Science.gov

Sample records for fnal collider experiment

  1. FNAL booster: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Panagiotis Spentzouris; James Amundson

    2003-06-02

    We present measurements of transverse and longitudinal beam phase space evolution during the first two hundred turns of the FNAL Booster cycle. We discuss the experimental technique, which allowed us to obtain turn-by-turn measurements of the beam profile. The experimental results are compared with the prediction of the Synergia 3D space charge simulation code.

  2. Status of FNAL SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro; /Kyoto U.

    2007-12-01

    SciBooNE is a new experiment at FNAL which will make precision neutrino-nucleus cross section measurements in the one GeV region. These measurements are essential for the future neutrino oscillation experiments. We started data taking in the antineutrino mode on June 8, 2007, and collected 5.19 x 10{sup 19} protons on target (POT) before the accelerator shutdown in August. The first data from SciBooNE are reported in this article.

  3. Data Plots from FNAL-E907: Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (FNAL E-907, MIPP), situated in the Meson Center beamline at Fermilab, took data during the first half of 2005. MIPP was designed primarily as an experiment to measure and study in detail the dynamics associated with non-perturbative strong interactions. The primary physics motivation behind MIPP was to restart the study of non-perturbative QCD interactions, which constitute over 99% of the strong interaction cross section. The available data of that time were of poor quality and old and were not in easily accessible form. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) [6] that was at the heart of the MIPP experiment represented the electronic equivalent of the bubble chamber with vastly superior data acquisition rates. It also digitized the charged tracks in three dimensions, obviating the need for track matching across stereo views. Coupled with the particle identification capability of MIPP, the data from MIPP was intended to add significantly to the knowledge base of non-perturbative QCD. One of the primary goals of MIPP was to verify a general scaling law of inclusive particle production that states that the ratio of a semi-inclusive cross section to an inclusive cross section involving the same particles is a function only of the missing mass squared (M2) of the system and not of the other two Mandelstam variables s and t, the center of mass energy squared and the momentum transfer squared, respectively. [Copied and edited from the following publication: The Main Injector Particle Production Experiment (MIPP) at Fermilab, Rajendran Raja, Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing, Journal of Physics: Conference Series 9 (2005) 303 û 308, doi:10.1088/1742-6596/9/1/058 at www.iop.org/EJ/article/1742-6596/9/1/058/jpconf5_9_058.pdf] There are approximately 40 data plots available to the public from E907. A proposal to upgrade the MIPP experiment (E-P-960) has been deferred. See the MIPP homepage at http://ppd.fnal.gov/experiments

  4. A Photon Collider Experiment based on SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J

    2003-11-01

    Technology for a photon collider experiment at a future TeV-scale linear collider has been under development for many years. The laser and optics technology has reached the point where a GeV-scale photon collider experiment is now feasible. We report on the photon-photon luminosities that would be achievable at a photon collider experiment based on a refurbished Stanford Linear Collider.

  5. COLLIDE: Collisions into Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1999-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) was completed and flew on STS-90 in April and May of 1998. After the experiment was returned to Earth, the data and experiment were analyzed. Some anomalies occurred during the flight which prevented a complete set of data from being obtained. However, the experiment did meet its criteria for scientific success and returned surprising results on the outcomes of very low energy collisions into powder. The attached publication, "Low Velocity Microgravity Impact Experiments into Simulated Regolith," describes in detail the scientific background, engineering, and scientific results of COLLIDE. Our scientific conclusions, along with a summary of the anomalies which occurred during flight, are contained in that publication. We offer it as our final report on this grant.

  6. Data acquisition for FNAL E665

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Green, M.C.; Kaufman, S.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Bartlett, J.F.; Melanson, H.L.; Petravick, D.; Michael, D.G.; McLeod, D.; Vidal, M.

    1989-01-01

    The data acquisition system for FNAL E665, an experiment to study deep inelastic muon scattering from nucleons and nuclei, is described. The system is built with the FNAL VAXONLINE and RSX DA building blocks. The structure, capabilities and limitations for data flow, control and monitoring are discussed. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Experiment and Radiation Safety at Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugatch, V.

    The emphasis is made on the novel radiation monitoring systems at colliders based on the Metal Foil Detector technology. The radiation monitoring systems for the HERA-B experiment (DESY, Hamburg) as well as for the Silicon Tracker of the LHCb experiment (CERN, Geneva) are described. The micro-strip Metal Foil Detector used for the beam profile monitoring is briefly presented.

  8. COLLIDE-2: Collisions Into Dust Experiment-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    2002-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experimental (COLLIDE-2) was the second flight of the COLLIDE payload. The payload performs six low-velocity impact experiments to study the collisions that are prevalent in planetary ring systems and in the early stages of planet formation. Each impact experiment is into a target of granular material, and the impacts occur at speeds between 1 and 100 cm/s in microgravity and in a vacuum. The experiments are recorded on digital videotape which is later analyzed. During the period of performance a plan was developed to address some of the technical issues that prevented the first flight of COLLIDE from being a complete success, and also to maximize the scientific return based on the science results from the first flight. The experiment was modified following a series of reviews of the design plan, and underwent extensive testing. The data from the experiment show that the primary goal of identifying transition regimes for low-velocity impacts based on cratering versus accretion was achieved. Following a brief period of storage, the experiment flew regimes for low-velocity impacts based on cratering versus accretion was achieved. as a Hitchhiker payload on the MACH-1 Hitchhiker bridge on STS-108 in December 2001. These data have been analyzed and submitted for publication. That manuscript is attached to this report. The experiment was retrieved in January 2002, and all six impact experiments functioned nominally. Preliminary results were reported at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

  9. The FNAL injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Bollinger, D.S.; Duel, K.L.; Lackey, J.R.; Pellico, W.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The present FNAL H{sup -} injector has been operational since the 1970s and consists of two magnetron H{sup -} sources and two 750 keV Cockcroft-Walton Accelerators. In the upgrade, both slit-type magnetron sources will be replaced with circular aperture sources, and the Cockcroft-Waltons with a 200 MHz RFQ (radio frequency quadrupole). Operational experience at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) has shown that the upgraded source and RFQ will be more reliable, improve beam quality and require less manpower than the present system. The present FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) injector has been operational since 1978 and has been a reliable source of H{sup -} beams for the Fermilab program. At present there are two Cockcroft-Walton injectors, each with a magnetron H{sup -} source with a slit aperture. With these two sources in operation, the injector has a reliability of better than 97%. However, issues with maintenance, equipment obsolescence, increased beam quality demands and retirement of critical personnel, have made it more difficult for the continued reliable running of the H{sup -} injector. The recent past has also seen an increase in both downtime and source output issues. With these problems coming to the forefront, a new 750 keV injector is being built to replace the present system. The new system will be similar to the one at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) that has a similar magnetron source with a round aperture and a 200MHz RFQ. This combination has been shown to operate extremely reliably.

  10. FNAL system patching design

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Romero, Andy; Dawson, Troy; Sieh, Connie; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01

    FNAL has over 5000 PCs running either Linux or Windows software. Protecting these systems efficiently against the latest vulnerabilities that arise has prompted FNAL to take a more central approach to patching systems. Due to different levels of existing support infrastructures, the patching solution for linux systems differs from that of windows systems. In either case, systems are checked for vulnerabilities by Computer Security using the Nessus tool.

  11. GLADE Global Liquid Argon Detector Experiment: a letter of intent to FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jennifer

    2012-05-13

    The recent measurements of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, which controls the observable size of any CP violation effects, open a window of opportunity to take advantage of the world's most powerful existing neutrino beam together with recent successes in development of the ultimate detector technology for the detection of electron neutrinos : a liquid argon (LAr) time projection chamber. During this proposed project a 5kt LAr detector (GLADE) will be developed by European groups to be put in a cryostat in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the US and will start taking data in 3-5 years time to address the neutrino mass ordering. The successful fruition of this project, along with nominal exposure at NO{nu}A and T2K, together with information from double beta decay experiments could ascertain that neutrinos are Dirac particles in the next decade.

  12. Recent experience in the fabrication and brazing of ceramic beam tubes for kicker magnets at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ader, C.R.; Jensen, C.; Reilly, R.; Snee, D.; Wilson, J.H.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Ceramic beam tubes are utilized in numerous kicker magnets in different accelerator rings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Kovar flanges are brazed onto each beam tube end, since kovar and high alumina ceramic have similar expansion curves. The tube, kovar flange, end piece, and braze foil (titanium/incusil) alloy brazing material are stacked in the furnace and then brazed in the furnace at 1000 C. The ceramic specified is 99.8% Alumina, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a strong recrystallized high-alumina fabricated by slip casting. Recent experience at Fermilab with the fabrication and brazing of these tubes has brought to light numerous problems including tube breakage and cracking and also the difficulty of brazing the tube to produce a leak-tight joint. These problems may be due to the ceramic quality, voids in the ceramic, thinness of the wall, and micro-cracks in the ends which make it difficult to braze because it cannot fill tiny surface cracks which are caused by grain pullout during the cutting process. Solutions which are being investigated include lapping the ends of the tubes before brazing to eliminate the micro-cracks and also metallization of the tubes.

  13. Cooling of electronics in collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Stanek et al.

    2003-11-07

    Proper cooling of detector electronics is critical to the successful operation of high-energy physics experiments. Collider experiments offer unique challenges based on their physical layouts and hermetic design. Cooling systems can be categorized by the type of detector with which they are associated, their primary mode of heat transfer, the choice of active cooling fluid, their heat removal capacity and the minimum temperature required. One of the more critical detector subsystems to require cooling is the silicon vertex detector, either pixel or strip sensors. A general design philosophy is presented along with a review of the important steps to include in the design process. Factors affecting the detector and cooling system design are categorized. A brief review of some existing and proposed cooling systems for silicon detectors is presented to help set the scale for the range of system designs. Fermilab operates two collider experiments, CDF & D0, both of which have silicon systems embedded in their detectors. A review of the existing silicon cooling system designs and operating experience is presented along with a list of lessons learned.

  14. FNAL central email systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Pasetes, Ray; Hill, Kevin; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The FNAL Email System is the primary point of entry for email destined for an employee or user at Fermilab. This centrally supported system is designed for reliability and availability. It uses multiple layers of protection to help ensure that: (1) SPAM messages are tagged properly; (2) All mail is inspected for viruses; and (3) Valid mail gets delivered. This system employs numerous redundant subsystems to accomplish these tasks.

  15. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is (96)Ru + (96)Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  16. Hunting electroweakinos at future hadron colliders and direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cortona, Giovanni Grilli

    2015-05-01

    We analyse the mass reach for electroweakinos at future hadron colliders and their interplay with direct detection experiments. Motivated by the LHC data, we focus on split supersymmetry models with different electroweakino spectra. We find for example that a 100 TeV collider may explore Winos up to ˜ 7 TeV in low scale gauge mediation models or thermal Wino dark matter around 3 TeV in models of anomaly mediation with long-lived Winos. We show moreover how collider searches and direct detection experiments have the potential to cover large part of the parameter space even in scenarios where the lightest neutralino does not contribute to the whole dark matter relic density.

  17. Test baryon antibaryon oscillation in collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Feng; Kang, Xian-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Searching for the New Physics (NP) phenomenon beyond Standard Model (SM) is still a main focus in particle physics. Here we propose to search for Λ — ⊼ oscillation in the decay J/ψ → Λ⊼ AA using BES detector. With one-year luminosity at BESIII, we can put a constraint that the Λ — ⊼ oscillation mass is smaller than 10-15 MeV at 90% confidence level, corresponding to the oscillation time of 10-6 second around, in case of non-observation of any signals. These measurements should provide very precious informations besides the neutron oscillation experiment. Also it would be the first-time access by experiment for Λ — ⊼ oscillation.

  18. Cross section measurements in the main injector particle production (FNAL-E907) experiment at 58 GeV energy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaydin, Yusuf Oguzhan

    2009-12-01

    Cross-sections are presented for 58 GeV π, K, and p on a wide range of nuclear targets. These cross-sections are essential for determining the neutrino flux in measurements of neutrino cross-sections and oscillations. The E907 Main Injector Particle Production (MIPP) experiment at Fermilab is a fixed target experiment for measuring hadronic particle production using primary 120 GeV/c protons and secondary π, K, and p beams. The particle identification is made by dE/dx in a time projection chamber, and by time-of-flight, differential Cherenkov and ring imaging Cherenkov detectors, which together cover a wide range of momentum from 0.1 GeV/c up to 120 GeV/c. MIPP targets span the periodic table, from hydrogen to uranium, including beryllium and carbon. The MIPP has collected ~ 0.26 x 106 events of 58 GeV/c secondary particles produced by protons from the main injector striking a carbon target.

  19. FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Bross, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-09-01

    The possibility to produce a scintillator that satisfies the demands of physicists from different science areas has emerged with the installation of an extrusion line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The extruder is the product of the fruitful collaboration between FNAL and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The results from the light output, light attenuation length and mechanical tolerance indicate that FNAL-NICADD scintillator is of high quality. Improvements in the extrusion die will yield better scintillator profiles and decrease the time needed for initial tuning. This paper will present the characteristics of the FNAL-NICADD scintillator based on the measurements performed. They include the response to MIPs from cosmic rays for individual extruded strips and irradiation studies where extruded samples were irradiated up to 1 Mrad. We will also discuss the results achieved with a new die design. The attractive perspective of using the extruded scintillator with MRS (Metal Resistive Semiconductor) photodetector readout will also be shown.

  20. SUSY Search in Future Collider and Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D. P.

    2007-10-03

    The lightest superparticle in the MSSM is expected to be a Bino, Higgsino or Wino. We consider the dark matter abundance constraint on these LSP scenarios in the minimal SUGRA and AMSB models. We discuss the resulting collider signals for the Bino LSP at LHC and the Higgsino and Wino LSP at CLIC. The Bino, Higgsino and Wino LSP signals in dark matter experiments are also discussed briefly. We conclude with a discussion of these LSP scenarios in nonminimal SUSY models.

  1. Ionization Cooling for Muon Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Prebys, E.

    2014-09-18

    Possible application for muon experiments such as mu2e is discussed of the initial part of the ionization cooling channel originally developed for muon collider. It is shown that with the FNAL Booster as the proton driver the mu2e sensitivity can be increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the presently considered experiment.

  2. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) and LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Experiments and detectors for high energy heavy ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, T.

    1984-01-01

    Problems and possibilities are discussed for experiments at the highest collision energies achievable in man-made accelerators; i.e., colliding beams of heavy nuclei at cm energies greater than or equal to 100 GeV/amu, well beyond the threshold of nuclear transparency. Here the final state consists of two hot, dense, baryon-rich fireballs flying away from each other at large rapidity (the fragmentation regions), and thermally-produced particles with near-zero net baryon number populating the central rapidity range. The matter produced at central rapidity (the lab frame for a collider) may reach extremely high temperatures and energy densities, and it is here that one expects to produce thermodynamic conditions similar to those which existed when the early universe condensed from a plasma of quarks and gluons to a gas of hadrons. The problem of tracking, lepton measurements, and calorimeters are discussed. (WHK)

  4. Physics of leptoquarks in precision experiments and at particle colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doršner, I.; Fajfer, S.; Greljo, A.; Kamenik, J. F.; Košnik, N.

    2016-06-01

    We present a comprehensive review of physics effects generated by leptoquarks (LQs), i.e., hypothetical particles that can turn quarks into leptons and vice versa, of either scalar or vector nature. These considerations include discussion of possible completions of the Standard Model that contain LQ fields. The main focus of the review is on those LQ scenarios that are not problematic with regard to proton stability. We accordingly concentrate on the phenomenology of light leptoquarks that is relevant for precision experiments and particle colliders. Important constraints on LQ interactions with matter are derived from precision low-energy observables such as electric dipole moments, (g - 2) of charged leptons, atomic parity violation, neutral meson mixing, Kaon, B, and D meson decays, etc. We provide a general analysis of indirect constraints on the strength of LQ interactions with the quarks and leptons to make statements that are as model independent as possible. We address complementary constraints that originate from electroweak precision measurements, top, and Higgs physics. The Higgs physics analysis we present covers not only the most recent but also expected results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We finally discuss direct LQ searches. Current experimental situation is summarized and self-consistency of assumptions that go into existing accelerator-based searches is discussed. A progress in making next-to-leading order predictions for both pair and single LQ productions at colliders is also outlined.

  5. The FNAL Injector Upgrade Status

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Bollinger, D.S.; Duel, K.L.; Karns, P.R.; Lackey, J.R.; Pellico, W.A; Scarpine, V.E.; Tomlin, R.E.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    The new FNAL H{sup -} injector upgrade is currently being tested before installation in the Spring 2012 shutdown of the accelerator complex. This line consists of an H{sup -} source, low energy beam transport (LEBT), 200 MHz RFQ and medium energy beam transport (MEBT). Beam measurements have been performed to validate the design before installation. The results of the beam measurements are presented in this paper.

  6. Fast timing and trigger Cherenkov detector for collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Karavicheva, T. L.; Konevskikh, A. S.; Kurepin, A. B.; Loginov, V. A.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Morozov, I. V.; Reshetin, A. I.; Serebryakov, D. V.; Shabanov, A. I.; Slupecki, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tykmanov, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of fast timing and trigger Cherenkov detector's design for its use in collider experiments is presented. Several specific requirements are taken into account - necessity of the radiator's placement as close to the beam pipe as possible along with the requirement of gapless (solid) radiator's design. Characteristics of the Cherenkov detector's laboratory prototype obtained using a pion beam at the CERN Proton Synchrotron are also presented, showing the possibility of obtaining sufficiently high geometrical efficiency along with good enough time resolution (50 ps sigma).

  7. Preliminary results investigating mix in colliding-shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, Dustin; Keiter, Paul; Loomis, Eric; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, Jim; Lanier, Nick

    2011-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at the Omega laser facility to investigate turbulence-driven mix from two colliding shocks, such as expected in ICF ignition capsules. Two shocks were generated at either end of a cylindrical, CH foam. The evolution of an Al tracer layer at one end of the foam was measured using point-projection radiography. Comparison of this data with simulations from the code, RAGE has been done to improve its predictive capability for ICF experiments. RAGE implements the Besnard-Harlow-Rauenzahn (BHR) model, which is intended for turbulent transport in fluids with large density variations. Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  8. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  9. The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B. A.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Achenbach, R.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Adamyan, F.; Addy, T. N.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, P. F.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, S. M.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alimonti, G.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, J.; Alves, R.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amaral, S. P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andricek, L.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Apsimon, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Athar, B.; Atkinson, T.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bailey, D. C.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Ballester, F.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbier, G.; Barclay, P.; Bardin, D. Y.; Bargassa, P.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barriuso Poy, A.; Barros, N.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Basiladze, S.; Bastos, J.; Batchelor, L. E.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Batraneanu, S.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Batusov, V.; Bauer, F.; Bauss, B.; Baynham, D. E.; Bazalova, M.; Bazan, A.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beaugiraud, B.; Beccherle, R. B.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger, G. A. N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellachia, F.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benes, J.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, S.; Bergsma, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernardet, K.; Berriaud, C.; Berry, T.; Bertelsen, H.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besson, N.; Beteille, A.; Bethke, S.; Bialas, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Binet, S.; Bingefors, N.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzell, J. P.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blaising, J. J.; Blanch, O.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehm, M.; Boek, J.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bonino, R.; Bonis, J.; Bonivento, W.; Bonneau, P.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P. S. L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J. R. 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N.; Sivoklokov, S.; Sjölin, J.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slattery, P.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Small, A.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D. S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, B.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Soares, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Söderberg, M.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Sole, D.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solov'yanov, O. V.; Soloviev, I.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Soret Medel, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Soukup, J.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spegel, M.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spogli, L.; Spousta, M.; Sprachmann, G.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Staley, R. J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Staroba, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavrianakou, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stefanidis, E.; Steffens, J. L.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T. D.; Stiller, W.; Stockmanns, T.; Stodulski, M.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strickland, V.; Striegel, D.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultanov, S.; Sun, Z.; Sundal, B.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutcliffe, P.; Sutton, M. R.; Sviridov, Yu M.; Sykora, I.; Szczygiel, R. R.; Szeless, B.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taboada Gameiro, S.; Tadel, M.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tarrant, J.; Tartarelli, G.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Tcherniatine, V.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Terada, S.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thion, J.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, A.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timm, S.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Titov, M.; Tobias, J.; Tocut, V. M.; Toczek, B.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres Pais, J. G.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Towndrow, E. F.; Trefzger, T.; Treichel, M.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tribanek, W.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trilling, G.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trka, Z.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; C-L Tseng, J.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzamarioudaki, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Ueda, I.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Ullán Comes, M.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urkovsky, E.; Usai, G.; Usov, Y.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Van Berg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Varanda, M.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vaz, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vedrine, P.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, S.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vertogardov, L.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Vigeolas, E.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villate, J.; Villella, I.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincent, P.; Vincke, H.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Vollmer, C. F.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von Boehn-Buchholz, R.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Vos, M.; Voss, K. C.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuaridel, B.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillemin, V.; Vuillermet, R.; Wänanen, A.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wallny, R. S.; Walsh, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, J. C.; Wappler, F.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warner, G. P.; Warren, M.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watts, G.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Webel, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weilhammer, P. M.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wellisch, H. P.; Wells, P. S.; Wemans, A.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werneke, P.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiesmann, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Wijnen, T.; Wildauer, A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilmut, I.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winton, L.; Witzeling, W.; Wlodek, T.; Woehrling, E.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wright, C.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Xiang, A.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, J. C.; Yang, S.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yarradoddi, K.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajac, J.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, A. Yu; Zalite, Yo K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhichao, L.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H. Z.; Zhuang, X. A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2008-08-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  10. SLC and SLD: Experimental experience with a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Breidenbach, M.; SLD and SLC Collaborations

    1993-08-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is the prototype e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider. This talk will consist of an introduction to SLC, a description of the strategy for luminosity, a description of the systems for the transport and measurement of the polarized electrons, and a description of the present performance of the SLC and planned upgrades. The detector, SLD, and the status of the polarization asymmetry measurement A{sub LR} will be described.

  11. Accelerator physics of the Stanford Linear Collider and SLC accelerator experiments towards the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1992-06-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was built to collide single bunches of electrons and positrons head-on at a single interaction point with single beam energies up to 55 GeV. The small beam sizes and high currents required for high luminosity operation have significantly pushed traditional beam quality limits. The Polarized Electron Source produces about 8 {times} 10{sup 10} electrons in each of two bunches with up to 28% polarization,. The Damping Rings provide coupled invariant emittances of 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m with 4.5 {times} 10{sup 10} particles per bunch. The 57 GeV Linac has successfully accelerated over 3 {times} 10{sup 10} particles with design invariant emittances of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m. Both longitudinal and transverse wakefields affect strongly the trajectory and emittance corrections used for operations. The Arc systems routinely transport decoupled and betatron matched beams. In the Final Focus, the beams are chromatically corrected and demagnified producing spot sizes of 2 to 3 {mu}m at the focal point. Spot sizes below 2 {mu}m have been made during special tests. Instrumentation and feedback systems are well advanced, providing continuous beam monitoring and pulse-by-pulse control. A luminosity of 1.6 {times} 10{sup 29} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1} has been produced. Several experimental tests for a Next Linear Collider (NLC) are being planned or constructed using the SLC accelerator as a test facility. The Final Focus Test Beam will demagnify a flat 50 GeV electron beam to dimensions near 60 nm vertically and 900 nm horizontally. A potential Emittance Dynamics Test Area has the capability to test the acceleration and transport of very low emittance beams, the compression of bunch lengths to 50 {mu}m, the acceleration and control of multiple bunches, and the properties of wakefields in the very short bunch length regime.

  12. The Multi-Purpose Detector (MPD) of the collider experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatyuk, V.; Kekelidze, V.; Kolesnikov, V.; Rogachevsky, O.; Sorin, A.

    2016-08-01

    The project NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) is aimed to study dense baryonic matter in heavy-ion collisions in the energy range up to √{s_{NN}} = 11 GeV with average luminosity of L = 1027 cm-2s-1 (for 197Au79). The experimental program at the NICA collider will be performed with the Multi-Purpose Detector (MPD). We report on the main physics objectives of the NICA heavy-ion program and present the main detector components.

  13. GARLIC: GAmma Reconstruction at a LInear Collider experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeans, D.; Brient, J.-C.; Reinhard, M.

    2012-06-01

    The precise measurement of hadronic jet energy is crucial to maximise the physics reach of a future Linear Collider. An important ingredient required to achieve this is the efficient identification of photons within hadronic showers. One configuration of the ILD detector concept employs a highly granular silicon-tungsten sampling calorimeter to identify and measure photons, and the GARLIC algorithm described in this paper has been developed to identify photons in such a calorimeter. We describe the algorithm and characterise its performance using events fully simulated in a model of the ILD detector.

  14. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH2 at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ṡ 1015 cm-3 for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ṡ 1016 cm-3 for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  15. Linear polarization of gluons and photons in unpolarized collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Cristian; Boer, Daniël; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Buffing, Maarten G. A.; Mulders, Piet J.

    2013-10-01

    We study azimuthal asymmetries in heavy quark pair production in unpolarized electron-proton and proton-proton collisions, where the asymmetries originate from the linear polarization of gluons inside unpolarized hadrons. We provide cross section expressions and study the maximal asymmetries allowed by positivity, for both charm and bottom quark pair production. The upper bounds on the asymmetries are shown to be very large depending on the transverse momentum of the heavy quarks, which is promising especially for their measurements at a possible future Electron-Ion Collider or a Large Hadron electron Collider. We also study the analogous processes and asymmetries in muon pair production as a means to probe linearly polarized photons inside unpolarized protons. For increasing invariant mass of the muon pair the asymmetries become very similar to the heavy quark pair ones. Finally, we discuss the process dependence of the results that arises due to differences in color flow and address the problem with factorization in case of proton-proton collisions.

  16. An overview of the new test stand for H⁻ ion sources at FNAL.

    PubMed

    Sosa, A; Bollinger, D S; Duel, K; Karns, P R; Pellico, W; Tan, C Y

    2016-02-01

    A new test stand at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is being constructed to carry out experiments to develop and upgrade the present magnetron-type sources of H(-) ions of up to 80 mA at 35 keV in the context of the Proton Improvement Plan. The aim of this plan is to provide high-power proton beams for the experiments at FNAL. The technical details of the construction and layout of this test stand are presented, along with a prospective set of diagnostics to monitor the sources. PMID:26931987

  17. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    SciTech Connect

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  18. Ion Source Development For The Proposed FNAL 750 keV Injector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S.

    2011-09-26

    Currently there is a Proposed FNAL 750 keV Injector Upgrade for the replacement of the 40 year old Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) Cockcroft-Walton accelerators with a new ion source and 200 MHz Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ). The slit type magnetron being used now will be replaced with a round aperture magnetron similar to the one used at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). Operational experience from BNL has shown that this type of source is more reliable with a longer lifetime due to better power efficiency. The current source development effort is to produce a reliable source with >60 mA of H{sup -} beam current, 15 Hz rep-rate, 100 {mu}s pulse width, and a duty factor of 0.15%. The source will be based on the BNL design along with development done at FNAL for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS).

  19. Ion source development for the proposed FNAL 750keV injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D.S.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Currently there is a Proposed FNAL 750keV Injector Upgrade for the replacement of the 40 year old Fermi National Laboratory (FNAL) Cockcroft-Walton accelerators with a new ion source and 200MHz Radio Frequency Quadruple (RFQ). The slit type magnetron being used now will be replaced with a round aperture magnetron similar to the one used at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). Operational experience from BNL has shown that this type of source is more reliable with a longer lifetime due to better power efficiency. The current source development effort is to produce a reliable source with >60mA of H- beam current, 15Hz rep-rate, 100s pulse width, and a duty factor of 0.15%. The source will be based on the BNL design along with development done at FNAL for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS).

  20. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  1. 2001 Report on the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gronnberg, J; Breidenbach; Burke, D; Corlett, J; Dombeck, T; Markiewicz, T

    2001-08-28

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider.

  2. Overview of results from the Fermilab fixed target and collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper we present a review of recent QCD related results from Fermilab fixed target and collider experiments. Topics covered range from structure functions through W/Z production, heavy quark production and jet angular distributions. We also include the current state of knowledge about leptoquark pair production in hadronic collisions.

  3. Fourth workshop on Experiments and Detectors for a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatyga, M. (Editor); Moskowitz, B. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    We present a description of an experiment which can be used to search for effects of strong electromagnetic fields on the production of e(sup +) e(sup -) pairs in the elastic scattering of two heavy ions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). A very brief discussion of other possible studies of electromagnetic phenomena at RHIC is also presented.

  4. SNiPER: an offline software framework for non-collider physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, J. H.; Huang, X. T.; Li, W. D.; Lin, T.; Li, T.; Zhang, K.; Deng, Z. Y.; Cao, G. F.

    2015-12-01

    SNiPER (Software for Non-collider Physics ExpeRiments) has been developed based on common requirements from both nuclear reactor neutrino and cosmic ray experiments. The design and implementation of SNiPER is described in this proceeding. Compared to the existing offline software frameworks in the high energy physics domain, the design of SNiPER is more focused on execution efficiency and flexibility. SNiPER has an open structure. User applications are executed as plug-ins based on it. The framework contains a compact kernel for software components management, event execution control, job configuration, common services, etc. Some specific features are attractive to non-collider physics experiments.

  5. Overview of the Large Hadron Collider and of the ATLAS and CMS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisati, Aleandro; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is the most powerful particle accelerator ever built. It has allowed the discovery of a Higgs boson with mass near 125 GeV in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. This chapter provides first an overview of the main characteristics of this collider, as well as a short description of the two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which discovered in 2012 a Higgs boson with mass close to 125 GeV. This is followed by a summary of the main aspects of particle identification and reconstruction by these two detectors, together with a short presentation of the main analysis tools used to extract the LHC results of the Higgs boson(s) searches and measurements.

  6. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  7. Technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider experiments (ATLAS and CMS).

    PubMed

    Ball, Austin

    2015-01-13

    This review article introduces the design of the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS, which independently discovered the Higgs boson, showing how generic features are motivated by the characteristics needed to explore the physics landscape made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider accelerator, whose high collision rate creates an extremely challenging operating environment for instrumentation. Examples of the very different component designs chosen by the two experiment collaborations are highlighted, as an introduction to briefly describing techniques used in the construction of some of these elements and, subsequently, in the assembly of both detection systems in their respective underground caverns. PMID:26949803

  8. Technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider experiments (ATLAS and CMS).

    PubMed

    Ball, Austin

    2015-01-13

    This review article introduces the design of the general purpose experiments ATLAS and CMS, which independently discovered the Higgs boson, showing how generic features are motivated by the characteristics needed to explore the physics landscape made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider accelerator, whose high collision rate creates an extremely challenging operating environment for instrumentation. Examples of the very different component designs chosen by the two experiment collaborations are highlighted, as an introduction to briefly describing techniques used in the construction of some of these elements and, subsequently, in the assembly of both detection systems in their respective underground caverns.

  9. Nucleon Decay and Neutrino Experiments, Experiments at High Energy Hadron Colliders, and String Theor

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Chang Kee; Douglas, Michaek; Hobbs, John; McGrew, Clark; Rijssenbeek, Michael

    2013-07-29

    This is the final report of the DOE grant DEFG0292ER40697 that supported the research activities of the Stony Brook High Energy Physics Group from November 15, 1991 to April 30, 2013. During the grant period, the grant supported the research of three Stony Brook particle physics research groups: The Nucleon Decay and Neutrino group, the Hadron Collider Group, and the Theory Group.

  10. A new micro-strip tracker for the new generation of experiments at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2005-12-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a prototype Silicon micro-strip detector that can be used in the forward (high rapidity) region of a hadron collider. These detectors must operate in a high radiation environment without any important degradation of their performance. The innovative feature of these detectors is the readout electronics, which, being completely data-driven, allows for the direct use of the detector information at the lowest level of the trigger. All the particle hits on the detector can be readout in real-time without any external trigger and any particular limitation due to dead-time. In this way, all the detector information is available to elaborate a very selective trigger decision based on a fast reconstruction of tracks and vertex topology. These detectors, together with the new approach to the trigger, have been developed in the context of the BTeV R&D program; our aim was to define the features and the design parameters of an optimal experiment for heavy flavour physics at hadron colliders. Application of these detectors goes well beyond the BTeV project and, in particular, involves the future upgrades of experiments at hadron colliders, such as Atlas, CMS and LHCb. These experiments, indeed, are already considering for their future high-intensity runs a new trigger strategy a la BTeV. Their aim is to select directly at trigger level events containing Bhadrons, which, on several cases, come from the decay of Higgs bosons, Zo's or W±'s; the track information can also help on improving the performance of the electron and muon selection at the trigger level. For this reason, they are going to develop new detectors with practically the same characteristics as those of BTeV. To this extent, the work accomplished in this thesis could serve as guide-line for those upgrades.

  11. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  12. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  13. DELPHES 3: a modular framework for fast simulation of a generic collider experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Favereau, J.; Delaere, C.; Demin, P.; Giammanco, A.; Lemaître, V.; Mertens, A.; Selvaggi, M.

    2014-02-01

    The version 3.0 of the Delphes fast-simulation is presented. The goal of Delphes is to allow the simulation of a multipurpose detector for phenomenological studies. The simulation includes a track propagation system embedded in a magnetic field, electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters, and a muon identification system. Physics objects that can be used for data analysis are then reconstructed from the simulated detector response. These include tracks and calorimeter deposits and high level objects such as isolated electrons, jets, taus, and missing energy. The new modular approach allows for greater flexibility in the design of the simulation and reconstruction sequence. New features such as the particle-flow reconstruction approach, crucial in the first years of the LHC, and pile-up simulation and mitigation, which is needed for the simulation of the LHC detectors in the near future, have also been implemented. The Delphes framework is not meant to be used for advanced detector studies, for which more accurate tools are needed. Although some aspects of Delphes are hadron collider specific, it is flexible enough to be adapted to the needs of electron-positron collider experiments. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometryfor controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans,Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler,D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-06-25

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma basedaccelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beamto push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase viaponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulseis discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beamof a_0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a_1 = 0.8 both focused on the middleof a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ~; 260 mu mlong gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the collidingpulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of thecolliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, whichsuggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV.

  15. Capture cavity II results at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Branlard, Julien; Chase, Brian; Cancelo, G.; Carcagno, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Hanna, B.; Harms, Elvan; Hocker, A.; Koeth, T.; Kucera, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    As part of the research and development towards the International Linear Collider (ILC), several test facilities have been developed at Fermilab. This paper presents the latest Low Level RF (LLRF) results obtained with Capture Cavity II (CCII) at the ILC Test Accelerator (ILCTA) test facility. The main focus will be on controls and RF operations using the SIMCON based LLRF system developed in DESY [1]. Details about hardware upgrades and future work will be discussed.

  16. Physics requirements for the design of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2012-02-28

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are discovery experiments. Thus, the aim was to make them sensitive to the widest possible range of new physics. New physics is likely to reveal itself in addressing questions such as: how do particles acquire mass; what is the particle responsible for dark matter; what is the path towards unification; do we live in a world with more space-time dimensions than the familiar four? The detection of the Higgs boson, conjectured to give mass to particles, was chosen as a benchmark to test the performance of the proposed experiment designs. Higgs production is one of the most demanding hypothesized processes in terms of required detector resolution and background discrimination. ATLAS and CMS feature full coverage, 4π-detectors to measure precisely the energies, directions and identity of all the particles produced in proton-proton collisions. Realizing this goal has required the collaborative efforts of enormous teams of people from around the world. PMID:22253241

  17. Journey in the search for the Higgs boson: the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Della Negra, M; Jenni, P; Virdee, T S

    2012-12-21

    The search for the standard model Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started more than two decades ago. Much innovation was required and diverse challenges had to be overcome during the conception and construction of the LHC and its experiments. The ATLAS and CMS Collaboration experiments at the LHC have discovered a heavy boson that could complete the standard model of particle physics. PMID:23258886

  18. Journey in the search for the Higgs boson: the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Della Negra, M; Jenni, P; Virdee, T S

    2012-12-21

    The search for the standard model Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started more than two decades ago. Much innovation was required and diverse challenges had to be overcome during the conception and construction of the LHC and its experiments. The ATLAS and CMS Collaboration experiments at the LHC have discovered a heavy boson that could complete the standard model of particle physics.

  19. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, M.

    2016-09-01

    During Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This included the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally, a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore, a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in the IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for mechanical support and a CO2 based cooling system. This paper describes the improvements achieved during the maintenance of the existing Pixel Detector as well as the performance of the IBL during the construction and commissioning phase. Additionally, first results obtained during the LHC Run 2 demonstrating the distinguished tracking performance of the new Four Layer ATLAS Pixel Detector are presented.

  20. Issues and experience with controlling beam loss at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Gerald; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Controlling beam loss in the Tevatron collider is of great importance because of the delicate nature of the cryogenic magnet system and the collider detectors. Maximizing the physics potential requires optimized performance as well as protection of all equipment. The operating history of the Tevatron has significantly influenced the way losses are managed. The development of beam loss management in the Tevatron will be presented.

  1. Experimental characterization of a coaxial plasma accelerator for a colliding plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wiechula, J.; Hock, C.; Iberler, M.; Manegold, T.; Schönlein, A.; Jacoby, J.

    2015-04-15

    We report experimental results of a single coaxial plasma accelerator in preparation for a colliding plasma experiment. The utilized device consisted of a coaxial pair of electrodes, accelerating the plasma due to J×B forces. A pulse forming network, composed of three capacitors connected in parallel, with a total capacitance of 27 μF was set up. A thyratron allowed to switch the maximum applied voltage of 9 kV. Under these conditions, the pulsed currents reached peak values of about 103 kA. The measurements were performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill at gas pressures between 10 Pa and 14 000 Pa. A gas mixture of ArH{sub 2} with 2.8% H{sub 2} served as the discharge medium. H{sub 2} was chosen in order to observe the broadening of the H{sub β} emission line and thus estimate the electron density. The electron density for a single plasma accelerator reached peak values on the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}. Electrical parameters, inter alia inductance and resistance, were determined for the LCR circuit during the plasma acceleration as well as in a short circuit case. Depending on the applied voltage, the inductance and resistance reached values ranging from 194 nH to 216 nH and 13 mΩ to 23 mΩ, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma velocity was measured using a fast CCD camera. Plasma velocities of 2 km/s up to 17 km/s were observed, the magnitude being highly correlated with gas pressure and applied voltage.

  2. Experimental characterization of a coaxial plasma accelerator for a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Hock, C.; Iberler, M.; Manegold, T.; Schönlein, A.; Jacoby, J.

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results of a single coaxial plasma accelerator in preparation for a colliding plasma experiment. The utilized device consisted of a coaxial pair of electrodes, accelerating the plasma due to J ×B forces. A pulse forming network, composed of three capacitors connected in parallel, with a total capacitance of 27 μF was set up. A thyratron allowed to switch the maximum applied voltage of 9 kV. Under these conditions, the pulsed currents reached peak values of about 103 kA. The measurements were performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill at gas pressures between 10 Pa and 14 000 Pa. A gas mixture of ArH2 with 2.8% H2 served as the discharge medium. H2 was chosen in order to observe the broadening of the Hβ emission line and thus estimate the electron density. The electron density for a single plasma accelerator reached peak values on the order of 1016 cm-3 . Electrical parameters, inter alia inductance and resistance, were determined for the LCR circuit during the plasma acceleration as well as in a short circuit case. Depending on the applied voltage, the inductance and resistance reached values ranging from 194 nH to 216 nH and 13 mΩ to 23 mΩ, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma velocity was measured using a fast CCD camera. Plasma velocities of 2 km/s up to 17 km/s were observed, the magnitude being highly correlated with gas pressure and applied voltage.

  3. OPERATIONS ELECTRONIC LOGBOOK EXPERIENCE AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMPBELL,I.; MARR,G.; SAMPSON,P.

    2002-06-02

    A web-based system for electronic logbooks, ''elog'', developed at Fermilab (FNAL), has been adopted for use by AGS and RHIC operations and physicists at BNL for the 2001-2 fixed target and collider runs. This paper describes the main functional and technical issues encountered in the first year of electronic logbook use, including security, search and indexing, sequencer integration, archival, and graphics management. We also comment on organizational experience and planned changes for the next facility run starting in September 2002.

  4. Control system for BCP processing facility at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Cristian Boffo et al.

    2003-09-11

    The surface processing is one of the key elements of superconducting RF cavity fabrication. Safety and reliability are the main requirements for the chemical surface treatment facility being developed at FNAL. Accepting the Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) as the baseline process, a ''gravity feed and open etching tank'' approach has been chosen at this stage. This choice resulted in the introduction of a control system with a strong automation since the number of elements to be controlled at different steps of the process is rather big. In order to allow for maximum flexibility, two operational modes were defined within the control system: semi-automatic, which requires an operator's decision to move from one stage to another, and manual. This paper describes the main features of the control system for the BCP facility that is under development at FNAL.

  5. Collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This past year our group participated in both the D0 experiment at Fermilab and the SDC experiment at the SSC. Most of our effort was concentrated on the D0 project, where we contributed as much manpower as possible to the commissioning of the detector in preparation for the coming collider run. Our SDC work consisted of the investigation of one of the candidate technologies for the forward calorimeter. On the D0 experiment, our primary responsibilities have been in the areas of electronics commissioning and in the establishment of triggers for the coming collider run. We have also actively participated in the physics studies and have contributed to the upgrade effort as much as time has permitted. Our group has also participated in the cosmic ray run and in the D0 test beam. In view of our contributions, James White was selected as a member of the D0 Trigger board, and Jay Wightman is being trained as one of the global experts'' who are responsible for keeping the detector operational during the run. In addition, Amber Boehnlein has played a major role in the Level-2 trigger commissioning. A more detailed description of these activities is given in this paper.

  6. The development of colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50`s and the 60`s colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible.

  7. Multiple Parton Interactions in ppbar Collisions in D0 Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanov, Georgy

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is devoted to the study of processes with multiple parton interactions (MPI) in a ppbar collision collected by D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. The study includes measurements of MPI event fraction and effective cross section, a process-independent parameter related to the effective interaction region inside the nucleon. The measurements are done using events with a photon and three hadronic jets in the final state. The measured effective cross section is used to estimate background from MPI for WH production at the Tevatron energy

  8. An AGS experiment to test bunching for the proton driver of the muon collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.

    1998-04-27

    The proton driver for the muon collider must produce short pulses of protons in order to facilitate muon cooling and operation with polarized beams. In order to test methods of producing these bunches they have operated the AGS near transition and studied procedures which involved moving the transition energy {gamma} to the beam energy. They were able to produce stable bunches with RMS widths of {sigma} = 2.2-2.7 ns for longitudinal bunch areas of {minus}1.5 V-s, in addition to making measurements of the lowest two orders of the momentum compaction factor.

  9. Exotic colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    The motivation, feasibility and potential for two unconventional collider concepts - the Gamma-Gamma Collider and the Muon Collider - are described. The importance of the development of associated technologies such as high average power, high repetition rate lasers and ultrafast phase-space techniques are outlined.

  10. Beam dynamics studies of the 8 GeV Linac at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Mustapha, B.; Carneiro, J.-P.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    The proposed 8-GeV proton driver (PD) linac at FNAL includes a front end up to {approx}420 MeV operating at 325 MHz and a high energy section at 1300 MHz. A normal conducting RFQ and short CH type resonators are being developed for the initial acceleration of the H-minus or proton beam up to 10 MeV. From 10 MeV to {approx}420 MeV, the voltage gain is provided by superconducting (SC) spoke-loaded cavities. In the high-energy section, the acceleration will be provided by the International Linear Collider (ILC)-style SC elliptical cell cavities. To employ existing, readily available klystrons, an RF power fan out from high-power klystrons to multiple cavities is being developed. The beam dynamics simulation code TRACK, available in both serial and parallel versions, has been updated to include all known H-minus stripping mechanisms to predict the exact location of beam losses. An iterative simulation procedure is being developed to interact with a transient beam loading model taking into account RF feedback and feedforward systems.

  11. International X-Band Linear Collider Accelerator Structure R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    For more than fifteen years before the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) decision in August, 2004, there were intensive R&D activities and broad international collaboration among the groups at SLAC, KEK, FNAL, LLNL and other labs for the room temperature X-Band accelerator structures. The goal was to provide an optimized design of the main linac structure for the NLC (Next Linear Collider) or GLC (Global Linear Collider). There have been two major challenges in developing X-band accelerator structures for the linear colliders. The first is to demonstrate stable, long-term operation at the high gradient (65 MV/m) that is required to optimize the machine cost. The second is to strongly suppress the beam induced long-range wakefields, which is required to achieve high luminosity. More than thirty X-band accelerator structures with various RF parameters, cavity shapes and coupler types have been fabricated and tested since 1989. A summary of the main achievements and experiences are presented in this talk including the structure design, manufacturing techniques, high power performance, and other structure related issues. Also, the new progress in collaborating with the CLIC, high gradient structures and X-Band structure applications for RF deflectors and others are briefly introduced.

  12. Solving the problem of anomalous J/ψ suppression by the MPD experiment on the NICA collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurepin, A. B.; Topilskaya, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    The meassurements of charmonium states production via their decay on lepton pairs by the MPD experiment on the NICA collider at the energies √{s_{NN}} = 4-11 GeV per nucleon could provide important data for solving the problem of anomalous J/ ψ suppression first observed in central Pb-Pb collisions by the NA50 Collaboration at 158 GeV/nucleon. The anomalous J/ ψ suppression could be due to the formation of the QGP in the central heavy-ion collisions. However, this effect could be also interpreted as the result of the comover interactions in nuclear matter. The recent experiments at the SPS, at the RHIC, and the LHC reviewed in this article indicate a more complicated picture of the J/ ψ production including the recombination, medium effects, parton shadowing, and the coherent energy loss mechanism. A more simple production mechanism could be expected at low colliding energies. However, no data were obtained at energies below √{s_{NN}}=17 GeV for heavy-ion collisions. After the short review of the whole set of the data of charmonium states observation the estimation of the production rate for the MPD/NICA is made.

  13. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  14. Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  15. A new solid state extractor pulser for the FNAL magnetron ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S.; Lackey, J.; Larson, J.; Triplett, K.

    2015-10-05

    A new solid state extractor pulser has been installed on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) magnetron ion source, replacing a vacuum tube style pulser that was used for over 40 years. The required ion source extraction voltage is 35 kV for injection into the radio frequency quadrupole. At this voltage, the old pulser had a rise time of over 150 μs due to the current limit of the vacuum tube. The new solid state pulsers are capable of 50 kV, 100 A peak current pulses and have a rise time of 9 μs when installed in the operational system. This paper will discuss the pulser design and operational experience to date.

  16. A New Chicane Experiment in PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M. T.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Arnett, D.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Lipari, J.J.; Munro, M.; Olszewski, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Spencer, C.M.; Wang, L.; Wittmer, W.; Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; Smith, B.

    2008-06-11

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine.

  17. A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Arnett, D.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Lipari, J.J.; Munro, M.; Olszewski, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Smith, B.; Spencer, C.M.; Wang, L.; Wittmer, W.; Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-03

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine.

  18. Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    An overview of linear collider programs is given. The history and technical challenges are described and the pioneering electron-positron linear collider, the SLC, is first introduced. For future energy frontier linear collider projects, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced and their technical features are discussed. The ILC is based on superconducting RF technology and the CLIC is based on two-beam acceleration technology. The ILC collaboration completed the Technical Design Report in 2013, and has come to the stage of "Design to Reality." The CLIC collaboration published the Conceptual Design Report in 2012, and the key technology demonstration is in progress. The prospects for further advanced acceleration technology are briefly discussed for possible long-term future linear colliders.

  19. Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    An overview of linear collider programs is given. The history and technical challenges are described and the pioneering electron-positron linear collider, the SLC, is first introduced. For future energy frontier linear collider projects, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced and their technical features are discussed. The ILC is based on superconducting RF technology and the CLIC is based on two-beam acceleration technology. The ILC collaboration completed the Technical Design Report in 2013, and has come to the stage of "Design to Reality." The CLIC collaboration published the Conceptual Design Report in 2012, and the key technology demonstration is in progress. The prospects for further advanced acceleration technology are briefly discussed for possible long-term future linear colliders.

  20. Muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  1. Incompatibility of FRC `Self--Colliding Beams' with Classical Large Orbit Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan

    2012-03-01

    Rosenbluth^1: ``One key physics issue is the behavior of very large gyro radius systems, for which the usual thermal physics is inadequate.''- Rostoker^2 posited (1) 0.42 KeV d^+ FRC can achieve confinement^ τ =30 s observed^3 in self-colliding orbits (SCO) of 725 KeV d^+,^ stabilized by magnet focusing^4 and electrons^5 ; (2) FRC result ^6τ=2 x10-3 s is ``record long lived plasma state for advanced, aneutronic fuels ''; (3) non-intersecting collision-less orbits produce nuclear reactions. (i) Bz(r) of FRC is defocusing, field index n>0. From single particle orbit theory^7,8 destructive instability must occur with τ^ <= 10-3 s. (ii) τ cannot be scaled up by ion energy increase. (iii) Luminosity in SCO^3: L˜10^31s-1 cm-2; in co-revolving FRC orbits: L=0 unless 2 species in same orbit, which requires v2/v1= z1m1/z2m2 and Nτ ˜ 10^17 by Lawson^ 9-11. See http://www.aneutronicfusion.org 1. NIM271, p.1 (88); 2. PRL 70, 1818 (93); 3.PRL 54, 796 (1985); 4.PRL 29, 1590 (72); 5.PRL 70, 299 (93); 6.PRL 105, 045003-1,(10); 7.Part. Acc.1, (70); 8. AIP CP 311, 292 (93); 9. J.App.Phys.46, 2915 (75); 10. NIM A346 322 (93); 11.NIM 144, 65 (77)

  2. High-performance DIRC detector for the future Electron Ion Collider experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalicy, G.; Allison, L.; Cao, T.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Horn, T.; Hyde, C.; Ilieva, Y.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Peters, K.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Stevens, J.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.

    2016-07-01

    A radially-compact subsystem providing particle identification (e/π, π/K, K/p) over a wide momentum range is an essential requirement for the central detector of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC). With a radial size of only a few cm, a detector based on Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) principle is a very attractive solution. The R&D undertaken by the EIC PID consortium achieved the goal of showing feasibility of a high-performance DIRC that would extend the momentum coverage well beyond state-of-the-art allowing 3σ separation of π/K up to 6 GeV/c, e/K up to 1.8 GeV/c and p/K up to 10 GeV/c. A key component to reach such a performance is a special 3-layer spherical compound lens. This article describes the status of the design and R&D for the DIRC at EIC detector, with a focus on the detailed Monte Carlo simulation results for the high-performance DIRC.

  3. Design Concept and Parameters of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ Dipole Demonstrator for a 100 TEV Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Novitski, I.

    2015-06-01

    FNAL has started the development of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale hadron collider. This paper describes the design concept and parameters of the 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator. The dipole magnetic, mechanical and quench protection concept and parameters are presented and discussed.

  4. Development of Large Area Gas Electron Multiplier Detector and Its Application to a Digital Hadron Calorimeter for Future Collider Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    The UTA High Energy Physics Group conducted generic detector development based on large area, very thin and high sensitivity gas detector using gas electron multiplier (GEM) technology. This is in preparation for a use as a sensitive medium for sampling calorimeters in future collider experiments at the Energy Frontier as well as part of the tracking detector in Intensity Frontier experiments. We also have been monitoring the long term behavior of one of the prototype detectors (30cmx30cm) read out by the SLAC-developed 13-bit KPiX analog chip over three years and have made presentations of results at various APS meetings. While the important next step was the development of large area (1m x 1m) GEM planes, we also have looked into opportunities of applying this technology to precision tracking detectors to significantly improve the performance of the Range Stack detector for CP violation experiments and to provide an amplification layer for the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in the LBNE experiment. We have jointly developed 33cmx100cm large GEM foils with the CERN gas detector development group to construct 33cm x100cm unit chambers. Three of these unit chambers will be put together to form a 1m x 1m detector plane. Following characterization of one 33cmx100cm unit chamber prototype, a total of five 1m x 1m planes will be constructed and inserted into an existing 1m3 RPC DHCAL stack to test the performance of the new GEM DHCAL in particle beams. The large area GEM detector we planned to develop in this proposal not only gives an important option to DHCAL for future collider experiments but also the potential to expand its use to Intensity Frontier and Cosmic Frontier experiments as high efficiency, high amplification anode planes for liquid Argon time projection chambers. Finally, thanks to its sensitivity to X-rays and other neutral radiations and its light-weight characteristics, the large area GEM has a great potential for the use in medical imaging and

  5. The E166 experiment: Development of an Undulator-Based Polarized Positron Source for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kovermann, J.; Stahl, A.; Mikhailichenko, A.A.; Scott, D.; Moortgat-Pick, G.A.; Gharibyan, V.; Pahl, P.; Poschl, R.; Schuler, K.P.; Laihem, K.; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Dollan, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Lohse, T.; Schweizer, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Batygin, Y.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Decker, F.J.; /SLAC /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U.

    2011-11-14

    A longitudinal polarized positron beam is foreseen for the international linear collider (ILC). A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed in the final focus test beam at SLAC to demonstrate the production of polarized positrons for implementation at the ILC. The E166 experiment uses a 1 m long helical undulator in a 46.6 GeV electron beam to produce a few MeV photons with a high degree of circular polarization. These photons are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized e{sup +} and e{sup -}. The positron polarization is measured using a Compton transmission polarimeter. The data analysis has shown asymmetries in the expected vicinity of 3.4% and {approx}1% for photons and positrons respectively and the expected positron longitudinal polarization is covering a range from 50% to 90%. The full exploitation of the physics potential of an international linear collider (ILC) will require the development of polarized positron beams. Having both e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams polarized will provide new insight into structures of couplings and thus give access to physics beyond the standard model [1]. The concept for a polarized positron source is based on circularly polarized photon sources. These photons are then converted to longitudinally polarized e{sup +} and e{sup -} pairs. While in an experiment at KEK [1a], Compton backscattering is used [2], the E166 experiment uses a helical undulator to produce polarized photons. An undulator-based positron source for the ILC has been proposed in [3,4]. The proposed scheme for an ILC positron source is illustrated in figure 1. In this scheme, a 150 GeV electron beam passes through a 120 m long helical undulator to produce an intense photon beam with a high degree of circular polarization. These photons are converted in a thin target to e{sup +} e{sup -} pairs. The polarized positrons are then collected, pre-accelerated to the damping ring and injected to the main linac. The E166 experiment is

  6. Hadron hadron collider group

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Peoples, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this group was to make a rough assessment of the characteristics of a hadron-hadron collider which could make it possible to study the 1 TeV mass scale. Since there is very little theoretical guidance for the type of experimental measurements which could illuminate this mass scale, we chose to extend the types of experiments which have been done at the ISR, and which are in progress at the SPS collider to these higher energies.

  7. When Rubrics Collide: One Undergraduate Writing Tutor's Experience Negotiating Faculty and Institutional Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kelli

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts one undergraduate writing tutor's experience helping a fellow peer navigate an institutional assessment rubric that seemed to contrast the assessment criteria provided by the student's instructor. This article presents a reflection on that experience, framed by Hutchings, Huber, and Ciccone's (2011) work on…

  8. A search for B$0\\atop{S}$ oscillations at the Tevatron collider experiment D0

    SciTech Connect

    Krop, Dan N.

    2007-04-01

    We present a search for B$0\\atop{S}$ oscillations using semileptonic BS → DsμX (Ds → K$0\\atop{S}$K). The data were collected using the D0 detector from events produced in √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Tevatron is currently the only place in the world that produces B$0\\atop{S}$ mesons and will be until early 2008 when the Large Hadron Collider begins operating at CERN. One of the vital ingredients for the search for B s oscillations is the determination of the flavor of the B$0\\atop{S}$ candidate (B$0\\atop{S}$ or $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{S}$ ) at the time of its production, called initial state flavor tagging. We develop an likelihood based initial state flavor tagger that uses objects on the side of the event opposite to the reconstructed B meson candidate. To improve the performance of this flavor tagger, we have made it multidimensional so that it takes correlations between discriminants into account. This tagging is then certified by applying it to sample of semimuonic B(0,+) decays and measuring the well-known oscillation frequency Δmd. We obtain Δmd = 0.486 ± 0.021 ps-1, consistent with the world average. The tagging performance is characterized by the effective efficiency, ϵD2 = (1.90 ± 0.41)%. We then turn to the search for B$0\\atop{S}$ oscillations in the above-named channel. A special two-dimensional mass fitting procedure is developed to separate kinematic reflections from signal events. Using this mass fitting procedure in an unbinned likelihood framework, we obtain a 95% C.L. of Δms > 1.10 ps-1 and a sensitivity of 1.92 ps-1. This result is combined with other analyzed B$0\\atop{S}$ decay channels at D0 to obtain a combined 95% C.L. of Δms > 14.9 ps-1 and a sensitivity of 16.5 ps-1. The corresponding log likelihood scan has a preferred value of

  9. When Worlds Collide: Identity, Culture and the Lived Experiences of Research When "Teaching-Led"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, John G.; Hemmings, Brian; Kay, Russell; Callinan, Carol

    2015-01-01

    This article presents detailed findings from the qualitative or interpretive phase of a mixed-methods case study focusing on the professional identities and lived experiences of research among six lecturers working in different capacities across the field of education in a "teaching-led" higher education institution. Building upon the…

  10. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  11. The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment for Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oide, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run 1 of the LHC. Taking advantage of the long shutdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface in order to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules, and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The IBL is the fourth layer of the Run 2 Pixel Detector, and it was installed at a radius of 3.3 cm in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and the new smaller-radius beam pipe. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. Furthermore, the physics performance is expected to improve through the reduction of pixel size. As well, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system were adopted. An overview of the IBL project as well as the experience in its construction is presented, focusing on adopted technologies, module and staves production, qualification of assembly procedure, integration of staves around the beam pipe, and commissioning of the detector.

  12. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: vector mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: m DM , M med , g DM and g q, the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establish an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (≲5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. Finally, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches.

  13. Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

  14. Results from colliding magnetized plasma jet experiments executed at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Rasmus, A. M.; Kurnaz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Davis, J. S.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Adams, C. S.; Pollock, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of high-velocity plasma flows in a background magnetic field has applications in pulsed-power and fusion schemes, as well as astrophysical environments, such as accretion systems and stellar mass ejections into the magnetosphere. Experiments recently executed at the Trident Laser Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory investigated the effects of an expanding aluminum plasma flow into a uniform 4.5-Tesla magnetic field created using a solenoid designed and manufactured at the University of Michigan. Opposing-target experiments demonstrate interesting collisional behavior between the two magnetized flows. Preliminary interferometry and Faraday rotation measurements will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the U.S Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  15. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: Vector mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-09

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: mDM, Mmed , gDM and gq, the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establish an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (≲5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. In conclusion, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches.

  16. Characterising dark matter searches at colliders and direct detection experiments: Vector mediators

    DOE PAGES

    Buchmueller, Oliver; Dolan, Matthew J.; Malik, Sarah A.; McCabe, Christopher

    2015-01-09

    We introduce a Minimal Simplified Dark Matter (MSDM) framework to quantitatively characterise dark matter (DM) searches at the LHC. We study two MSDM models where the DM is a Dirac fermion which interacts with a vector and axial-vector mediator. The models are characterised by four parameters: mDM, Mmed , gDM and gq, the DM and mediator masses, and the mediator couplings to DM and quarks respectively. The MSDM models accurately capture the full event kinematics, and the dependence on all masses and couplings can be systematically studied. The interpretation of mono-jet searches in this framework can be used to establishmore » an equal-footing comparison with direct detection experiments. For theories with a vector mediator, LHC mono-jet searches possess better sensitivity than direct detection searches for light DM masses (≲5 GeV). For axial-vector mediators, LHC and direct detection searches generally probe orthogonal directions in the parameter space. We explore the projected limits of these searches from the ultimate reach of the LHC and multi-ton xenon direct detection experiments, and find that the complementarity of the searches remains. In conclusion, we provide a comparison of limits in the MSDM and effective field theory (EFT) frameworks to highlight the deficiencies of the EFT framework, particularly when exploring the complementarity of mono-jet and direct detection searches.« less

  17. Event processing time prediction at the CMS experiment of the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cury, Samir; Gutsche, Oliver; Kcira, Dorian

    2014-06-01

    The physics event reconstruction is one of the biggest challenges for the computing of the LHC experiments. Among the different tasks that computing systems of the CMS experiment performs, the reconstruction takes most of the available CPU resources. The reconstruction time of single collisions varies according to event complexity. Measurements were done in order to determine this correlation quantitatively, creating means to predict it based on the data-taking conditions of the input samples. Currently the data processing system splits tasks in groups with the same number of collisions and does not account for variations in the processing time. These variations can be large and can lead to a considerable increase in the time it takes for CMS workflows to finish. The goal of this study was to use estimates on processing time to more efficiently split the workflow into jobs. By considering the CPU time needed for each job the spread of the job-length distribution in a workflow is reduced.

  18. Progress in the Next Linear Collider Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubenheimer, T. O.

    2001-07-01

    An electron/positron linear collider with a center-of-mass energy between 0.5 and 1 TeV would be an important complement to the physics program of the LHC. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is being designed by a US collaboration (FNAL, LBNL, LLNL, and SLAC) which is working closely with the Japanese collaboration that is designing the Japanese Linear Collider (JLC). The NLC main linacs are based on normal conducting 11 GHz rf. This paper will discuss the technical difficulties encountered as well as the many changes that have been made to the NLC design over the last year. These changes include improvements to the X-band rf system as well as modifications to the injector and the beam delivery system. They are based on new conceptual solutions as well as results from the R&D programs which have exceeded initial specifications. The net effect has been to reduce the length of the collider from about 32 km to 25 km and to reduce the number of klystrons and modulators by a factor of two. Together these lead to significant cost savings.

  19. Improvement of Digital Filter for the FNAL Booster Transverse Dampers

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkin, Timofey; Eddy, N.; Lebedev, V.

    2013-09-26

    Fermilab Booster has two transverse dampers which independently suppress beam instabilities in the horizontal and vertical planes. A suppression of the common mode signal is achieved by digital notch filter which is based on subtracting beam positions for two consecutive turns. Such system operates well if the orbit position changes sufficiently slow. Unfortunately it is not the case for FNAL Booster where the entire accelerating cycle consists of about 20000 turns, and successful transition crossing requires the orbit drifts up to about 10 μm/turn, resulting in excessive power, power amplifier saturation and loss of stability. To suppress this effect we suggest an improvement of the digital filter which can take into account fast orbit changes by using bunch positions of a few previous turns. To take into account the orbit change up toN-th order polynomial in time the system requires (N + 3) turns of “prehistory”. In the case of sufficiently small gain the damping rate and the optimal digital filter coefficients are obtained analytically. Numerical simulations verify analytical theory for the small gain and predict a system performance with gain increase.

  20. Galactic scale gas flows in colliding galaxies: 3-dimensional, N-body/hydrodynamics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Susan A.; Gerber, Richard A.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    1994-01-01

    We present some results from three dimensional computer simulations of collisions between models of equal mass galaxies, one of which is a rotating, disk galaxy containing both gas and stars and the other is an elliptical containing stars only. We use fully self consistent models in which the halo mass is 2.5 times that of the disk. In the experiments we have varied the impact parameter between zero (head on) and 0.9R (where R is the radius of the disk), for impacts perpendicular to the disk plane. The calculations were performed on a Cray 2 computer using a combined N-body/smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) program. The results show the development of complicated flows and shock structures in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the disk and the propagation outwards of a density wave in both the stars and the gas. The collisional nature of the gas results in a sharper ring than obtained for the star particles, and the development of high volume densities and shocks.

  1. Physics at hadron colliders: Experimental view

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    The physics of the hadron-hadron collider experiment is considered from an experimental point of view. The problems encountered in determination of how well the standard model describes collider results are discussed. 53 refs., 58 figs.

  2. Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.

    2009-10-19

    Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

  3. Search for the Production of Gluinos and Squarks with the CDF II Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    De Lorenzo, Gianluca

    2010-05-19

    sbottom decays exclusively as $\\tilde{b}$1 → b$\\tilde{x}$10. The expected signal for direct sbottom pair production is characterized by the presence of two jets of hadrons from the hadronization of the bottom quarks and E=T from the two LSPs in the final state. The events are selected with large ET and two energetic jets in the final state, and at least one jet is required to be associated with a b quark. The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% CL exclusion limits on production cross sections and sbottom and neutralino masses in the given MSSM scenario. Cross sections down to 0.1 pb are excluded for the sbottom mass range considered. Sbottom masses up to 230 GeV/c2 are excluded at 95% CL for neutralino masses below 70 GeV/c2. This analysis increases the previous CDF limit by more than 40 GeV/c2. The sensitivity of both the inclusive and the exclusive search is dominated by systematic effects and the results of the two analyses can be considered as conclusive for CDF Run II. With the new energy frontier of the newly commissioned Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, the experience from Tevatron will be of crucial importance in the developing of effective strategies to search for SUSY in the next era of particle physics experiments.

  4. The large hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, O.; Burkhardt, H.; Myers, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most energetic particle collider. It took many years to plan and build this large complex machine which promises exciting, new physics results for many years to come. We describe and review the machine design and parameters, with emphasis on subjects like luminosity and beam conditions which are relevant for the large community of physicists involved in the experiments at the LHC. First collisions in the LHC were achieved at the end of 2009 and followed by a period of a rapid performance increase. We discuss what has been learned so far and what can be expected for the future.

  5. Development of an optical transition radiation detector for profile monitoring of antiproton and proton beams at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, V.E.; Lindenmeyer, C.W.; Tassotto, G.R.; Lumpkin, A.H.; /Argonne

    2005-05-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) detectors are being developed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) as part of the collider Run II upgrade program and as part of the NuMI primary beam line. These detectors are designed to measure 150 GeV antiprotons as well as 120 GeV proton beams over a large range of intensities. Design and development of an OTR detector capable of measuring beam in both directions down to beam intensities of {approx}5e9 particles for nominal beam sizes are presented. Applications of these OTR detectors as an on-line emittance monitor for both antiproton transfers and reverse-injected protons, as a Tevatron injection profile monitor, and as a high-intensity beam profile monitor for NuMI are discussed. In addition, different types of OTR foils are being evaluated for operation over the intensity range of {approx}5e9 to 5e13 particles per pulse, and these are described.

  6. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  7. P{bar P} collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1992-04-01

    A brief introduction to {bar p}p collider physics is given. Selected results from the collider experiments at the CERN S{bar p}pS and the Tevatron collider are described. The emphasis is on experimental aspects of {bar p}p collisions. Minimum bias physics and the production of jets, Intermediate Vector Bosons and heavy flavors is reviewed. The outlook for physics at hadron colliders for the near future is briefly discussed.

  8. Progress with the JLC/NLC X-Band Linear Collider Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubenheimer, T. O.

    An electron/positron linear collider with a center-of-mass energy between 0.5 and 1 TeV would be an important complement to the physics program of the LHC in the next decade. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is being designed by a US collaboration (FNAL, LBNL, LLNL, and SLAC) which is working closely with the Japanese collaboration that is designing the Japanese Linear Collider (JLC). This paper will discuss the technical difficulties encountered as well as the changes that have been made to the NLC design over the last year. These changes include improvements to the X-band rf system as well as modifications to the beam delivery system. The net effect has been to reduce the length of the collider from about 32 km to 25 km and to reduce the number of klystrons and modulators by a factor of two. Together these lead to significant cost savings.

  9. Deducing the nature of dark matter from direct and indirect detection experiments in the absence of collider signatures of new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, Maria; Hooper, Dan; Kolb, Edward W.; Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2009-08-15

    Despite compelling arguments that significant discoveries of physics beyond the standard model are likely to be made at the Large Hadron Collider, it remains possible that this machine will make no such discoveries, or will make no discoveries directly relevant to the dark matter problem. In this article, we study the ability of astrophysical experiments to deduce the nature of dark matter in such a scenario. In most dark matter studies, the relic abundance and detection prospects are evaluated within the context of some specific particle physics model or models (e.g., supersymmetry). Here, assuming a single weakly interacting massive particle constitutes the Universe's dark matter, we attempt to develop a model-independent approach toward the phenomenology of such particles in the absence of any discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, we consider generic fermionic or scalar dark matter particles with a variety of interaction forms, and calculate the corresponding constraints from and sensitivity of direct and indirect detection experiments. The results may provide some guidance in disentangling information from future direct and indirect detection experiments.

  10. B physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  11. Effects of momentum conservation and flow on angular correlations observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Scott; Schlichting, Soeren; Gavin, Sean

    2011-08-15

    Correlations of azimuthal angles observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have gained great attention due to the prospect of identifying fluctuations of parity-odd regions in the field sector of QCD. Whereas the observable of interest related to parity fluctuations involves subtracting opposite-sign from same-sign correlations, the STAR collaboration reported the same-sign and opposite-sign correlations separately. It is shown here how momentum conservation combined with collective elliptic flow contributes significantly to this class of correlations, although not to the difference between the opposite- and same-sign observables. The effects are modeled with a crude simulation of a pion gas. Although the simulation reproduces the scale of the correlation, the centrality dependence is found to be sufficiently different in character to suggest additional considerations beyond those present in the pion gas simulation presented here.

  12. Results of a higgs boson searches in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the large hadron collider at energies 7 and 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A. A.; Epshteyn, V. S.; Gavrilov, V. B.; Gavrilyuk, A. A.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Jokin, A. S.; Lychkovskaya, N. V.; Popov, V. P.; Safronov, G. B.; Shamanov, V. V.; Shatalov, P. B.; Spiridonov, A. A.; Tsukerman, I. I.

    2016-05-01

    Recent achievements of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider searching for a Higgs boson are summarized. A new particle with the mass of 125 GeV and properties expected for the Standard Model Higgs boson was discovered three years ago in these experiments in proton-proton collisions when analyzing part of the data taken at the centre-of-mass energies 7 TeV and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012 year exposures. Today all the data are processed and fully analyzed. Experimental results of studies of individual Higgs boson decay channels as well as their combination to extract such properties as mass, signal strength, coupling constants, spin and parity are reviewed. All experimental results are found to be compatible with the Standard Model predictions.

  13. Collider Physics an Experimental Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvezio Pagliarone, Carmine

    2011-04-01

    This paper reviews shortly a small part of the contents of a set of lectures, presented at the XIV International School of Particles and Fields in Morelia, state of Michoacán, Mexico, during November 2010. The main goal of those lectures was to introduce students to some of the basic ideas and tools required for experimental and phenomenological analysis of collider data. In particular, after an introduction to the scientific motivations, that drives the construction of powerful accelerator complexes, and the need of reaching high center of mass energies and luminosities, some basic concept about collider particle detectors will be discussed. A status about the present running colliders and collider experiments as well as future plans and research and development is also given.

  14. Material Procurement Report for the FNAL pp Forward Detector's Toroids and Cos8 Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.; Morse, R.; Orosz, I.; Thomas, L.C.

    1980-10-27

    We outline the possibilities of starting construction of the {bar p}p forward detector toroids and cos{theta} dipole magnets described in CDP Note 64 as soon as possible using material that already exists on the FNAL site. Personal inspection of the steel supplies indicates that as much as 2000 tons of steel or over 50% of all the steel needed for the toroids is now available at the FNAL boneyard. Copper inventories indicate that there is enough copper on the FNAL site to construct both the toroid magnets and the cos{theta} dipole magnets. A construction schedule of one toroid in FY81, two toroids in FY82, and the final toroid in FY83 is shown to be feasible. Floor space and loading requirements for the IR Hall housing the forward detector are examined and finally, budgets for the initial FY8l phase and the completed project are given. The FY81 costs are $393K and to-completion costs are $1506K.

  15. High Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.

    INTRODUCTION PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS GENERAL REQUIRED LUMINOSITY FOR LEPTON COLLIDERS THE EFFECTIVE PHYSICS ENERGIES OF HADRON COLLIDERS HADRON-HADRON MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST CIRCULAR e^{+}e^- MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST e^{+}e^- LINEAR COLLIDERS LUMINOSITY CONVENTIONAL RF SUPERCONDUCTING RF AT HIGHER ENERGIES γ - γ COLLIDERS μ ^{+} μ^- COLLIDERS ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES DESIGN STUDIES STATUS AND REQUIRED R AND D COMPARISION OF MACHINES CONCLUSIONS DISCUSSION

  16. Update to Proposal for an Experiment to Measure Mixing, CP Violation and Rare Decays in Charm and Beauty Particle Decays at the Fermilac Collider - BTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Joel; Stone, Sheldon

    2002-03-01

    We have been requested to submit an update of the BTeV plan to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, where to save money the detector has only one arm and there is no new interaction region magnet construction planned. These are to come from a currently running collider experiment at the appropriate time. The "Physics Case" section is complete and updated with the section on the "New Physics" capabilites of BTeV greatly expanded. We show that precise measurements of rare flavor-changing neutral current processes and CP violation are and will be complementary to the Tevatron and LHC in unraveling the electroweak breaking puzzle. We include a revised summary of the physics sensitivities for the one-arm detector, which are not simply taking our proposal numbers and dividing by two, because of additional improvements. One important change resulted from an improved understanding of just how important the RJCH detector is to muon and electron identification, that we can indeed separate electrons from pions and muons from pions, especially at relatively large angles beyond the physical aperture of the EM calorimeter or the Muon Detector. This is documented in the "Physics Sensitivities" section. The section on the detector includes the motivation for doing band c physics at a hadron collider, and shows the changes in the detector since the proposal based on our ongoing R&D program. We do not here include a detailed description of the entire detector. That is available in the May, 2000 proposal. We include a summary of our R&D activities for the entire experiment. Finally, we also include a fully updated cost estimate for the one-arm system.

  17. Search for electroweak single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Svenja

    2007-11-02

    Understanding the world -- This aim drives humankind since the beginning of conscious thinking. Especially the nature of matter has been of major interest. Nowadays, we have a complex image of the constitution of matter. Atoms consist of electrons and nucleons. But even nucleons are not elementary. Their basic constituents are called quarks. Physicists developed a model describing the elementary components of matter as well as the forces between them: the standard model of elementary particle physics. The substructure of matter is only visible in scattering experiments. In high energy physics, these experiments are done at particle accelerators. The world's highest energetic collider, the Tevatron, is hosted by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), also called Fermilab, in the vicinity of Chicago. The proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are recorded by two multipurpose detectors, namely D0 and CDF II.

  18. Tau physics at p{bar p} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments.

  19. Experimental Study of W Z Intermediate Bosons Associated Production with the CDF Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzobon, Nicola; /Pisa U.

    2007-09-01

    Studying WZ associated production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is of great importance for two main reasons. On the one hand, this process would be sensitive to anomalies in the triple gauge couplings such that any deviation from the value predicted by the Standard Model would be indicative of new physics. In addition, by choosing to focus on the final state where the Z boson decays to b{bar b} pairs, the event topology would be the same as expected for associated production of a W and a Standard Model light Higgs boson (m{sub H} {approx}< 135 GeV) which decays into b{bar b} pairs most of times. The process WH {yields} W b{bar b} has an expected {sigma} {center_dot} B about five times lower than WZ {yields} Wb{bar b} for m{sub H} {approx_equal} 120 GeV. Therefore, observing this process would be a benchmark for an even more difficult search aiming at discovering the light Higgs in the WH {yields} Wb{bar b} process. After so many years of Tevatron operation only a weak WZ signal was recently observed in the full leptonic decay channel, which suffers from much less competition from background. Searching for the Z in the b{bar b} decay channel in this process is clearly a very challenging endeavour. In the work described in this thesis, WZ production is searched for in a final state where the W decays leptonically to an electron-neutrino pair or a muon-neutrino pair, with associated production of a jet pair consistent with Z decays. A set of candidate events is obtained by applying appropriate cuts to the parameters of events collected by wide acceptance leptonic triggers. To improve the signal fraction of the selected events, an algorithm was used to tag b-flavored jets by means of their content of long lived b-hadrons and corrections were developed to the jet algorithm to improve the b-jet energy resolution for a better reconstruction of the Z mass. In order to sense the presence of a signal one needs to estimate the amount of background. The relative content of

  20. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-03-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B.

  1. Observation of transverse instabilities in the FNAL 200 MeV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, E.; Lee, G.; Webber, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    Using newly installed Beam Position Monitors in the downstream half of the FNAL Linac, we have observed significant transverse beam instabilities within the 30 ..mu..s beam pulse. We can affect the instability so that the peak-to-peak amplitude is as small as 0.5 mm or as large as 8 mm. The effect is largely due to a beam-plasma instability in the ten-meter 750-keV transport line. Other causes are being investigated. Using these instabilities as an analysis tool, the betatron amplitude of the beam has been reduced. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Reduction of Beam Current Noise in the FNAL Magnetron Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S.; Karns, P. R.; Tan, C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    The new FNAL Injector Line with a circular dimple magnetron ion source has been operational since December of 2013. Since the new injector came on line there have been variations in the H- beam current flattop observed near the downstream end of the linac. Several different cathode geometries including a hollow cathode suggested by Dudnikov [1] were tried. We expanded on those studies by trying mixtures ranging from 0.25%N, 99.75%H to 3%N, 97%H. The results of these studies in our test stand will be presented in this paper.

  3. Status of LCLS - II QA Systems Collaboration for Cyromodule Construction at TJNAF and FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, E. A.; Leung, J.; Bookwalter, V.; Blowers, J.; Szal, J.

    2015-09-25

    At the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), we are supporting the LCLS-II Project at SLAC. The plan is to build thirty-five 1.3 GHz continuous wave cryomodules, production to be split between JLab and FNAL (Fermilab). This has required a close collaboration between the partner labs, including enhancing our existing quality systems to include this collaboration. This overview describes the current status of the Quality System development as of August 2015, when the partner labs start the assembly of the prototype cryomodules.

  4. Simulation of Multipacting in SC Low Beta Cavities at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Berrutti, Paolo; Khabiboulline, Timergali

    2015-06-01

    Proton Improvement Plan-II at Fermilab is a plan for improvements to the accelerator complex aimed at providing a beam power capability of at least 1 MW on target at the initiation of LBNE (Long Base Neutrino Experiment) operations. The central element of the PIP-II is a new 800 MeV superconducting linac, injecting into the existing Booster. Multipacting affects superconducting RF cavities in the entire range from high energy elliptical cavities to coaxial resonators for low-beta applications. This work is focused on multipacting study in the low-beta 325 MHz spoke cavities; namely SSR1 and SSR2, which are especially susceptible to the phenomena. The extensive simulations of multipacting in the cavities with updated material properties and comparison of the results with experimental data helped us to improve overall reliability and accuracy of these simulations. Our practical approach to the simulations is described in details. For SSR2, which has a high multipacting barrier right at the operating power level, some changes of the cavity shape to mitigate this harmful phenomenon are proposed.

  5. Photon collider Higgs factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  6. Gamma-gamma colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.

    1996-06-01

    Gamma-gamma colliders make intense beams of gamma rays and have them collide so as to make elementary particles. The authors show, in this article, that constructing a gamma-gamma collider as an add-on to an electron-positron linear collider is possible with present technology and that it does not require much additional cost. Furthermore, they show that the resulting capability is very interesting from a particle physics point of view. An overview of a linear collider, with a second interaction region devoted to {gamma}{gamma} collisions is shown.

  7. The Insertable B-Layer of the ATLAS experiment for the Run-2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guescini, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long shutdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new Service Quarter Panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors and has been installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam pipe at a radial distance of 3.3 cm from the beam axis. The realization of the IBL required the development of several new technologies and solutions in order to overcome the challenges introduced by the extreme environment and working conditions, such as the high radiation levels, the high pixel occupancy and the need of an exceptionally low material budget. Two silicon sensor technologies have been adopted for the IBL modules: planar and 3D. Both of these are connected via bump-bonding to the new FE-I4 front-end read-out chip. Furthermore, the physics performance will be improved through the reduction of pixel size while, targeting for a low material budget, a new mechanical support using lightweight staves and a CO2 based cooling system have been adopted. An overview of the IBL project as well as the experience in its construction is presented, focusing on adopted technologies, modules and staves production, qualification of assembly procedure, integration of staves around the beam pipe and commissioning of the detector.

  8. When hope and fear collide: Expectations and experiences of first-year doctoral students in the natural sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. Sean

    Although there is a significant body of research on the process of undergraduate education and retention, much less research exists as it relates to the doctoral experience, which is intended to be transformational in nature. At each stage of the process students are presented with a unique set of challenges and experiences that must be negotiated and mastered. However, we know very little about entering students' expectations, beliefs, goals, and identities, and how these may or may not change over time within a doctoral program. Utilizing a framework built upon socialization theory and cognitive-ecological theory, this dissertation examines the expectations that incoming doctoral students have about their programs as well as the actual experiences that these students have during their first year. Interviews were conducted with twelve students from the departments of Botany, Chemistry, and Physics prior to matriculation into their respective doctoral programs. These initial interviews provided information about students' expectations. Interviews were then conducted approximately every six to eight weeks to assess students' perceptions about their actual experiences throughout their first year. The findings of this study showed that new doctoral students tend to have uninformed and naive expectations about their programs. In addition, many of the specific policies or procedures necessary for navigation through a doctoral program were unknown to the students. While few differences existed in terms of students' expectations based on gender or discipline, there were significant differences in how international students described their expectations compared to American students. The two primary differences between American and international students revolved around the role of faculty members and the language barrier. It is clear that the first year of doctoral study is indeed a year of transition. The nature and clarity of the expectations associated with the role of

  9. Search for Neutral Heavy Leptons in Neutrino-Nucleon Interactions at the Fnal Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barbaro, Pawel

    The search for Neutral Heavy Leptons (NHL) in the Neutrino-Nucleon (nu-N) interactions has been conducted using the CCFR Detector and the Fermilab Quad Triplet Beam (FNAL-E744 and FNAL-E770). No evidence for NHL was found in the charged current decay channel, NHL to mu^- + X. NHL with masses between 0.5 and 3.0 GeV/c ^2 were excluded for coupling to muons below 1 to 10^{-4} of Fermi strength, depending on the NHL mass. An excess of 5.2 +/- 2.3 NHL candidates, in the neutral current decay channel, NHL to nu + X, was found for events with the separation between the production vertex and the decay vertex greater than 2.3 meters. No evidence for NHL was found in the neutral current decay channel, NHL to nu + X for events with the separation between the production vertex and the decay vertex between 0.6 meters and 2.3 meters. NHL with masses between 0.5 and 2.0 GeV/c^2 were excluded for coupling to muon neutrinos below 1 to 5 times 10^{ -4} of Fermi strength, depending on the NHL mass. ftn*Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  11. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  12. Muon Collider design status

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Muon Collider (MC) - proposed by G.I. Budker and A.N. Skrinsky a few decades ago - is now considered as the most exciting option for the energy frontier machine in the post-LHC era. A national Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) is being formed in the USA with the ultimate goal of building a MC at the Fermilab site with c.o.m. energy in the range 1.5-3 TeV and luminosity of {approx} 1.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. As the first step on the way to MC it envisages construction of a Neutrino Factory (NF) for high-precision neutrino experiments. The baseline scheme of the NF-MC complex is presented and possible options for its main components are discussed.

  13. PHENIX CDR update: An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory relativistic heavy ion collider. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report Update (CDR Update) is intended for use together with the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The CDR Update is a companion document to the CDR, and it describes the collaboration`s progress since the CDR was submitted in January 1993. Therefore, this document concentrates on changes, refinements, and decisions that have been made over the past year. These documents together define the baseline PHENIX detector that the collaboration intends to build for operation at RHIC startup. In this chapter the current status of the detector and its motivation are briefly described. In Chapters 2 and 3 the detector and the physics performance are more fully developed. In Chapters 4 through 13 the details of the present design status, the technology choices, and the construction costs and schedules are presented. The physics goals of PHENIX collaboration have remained exactly as they were described in the CDR. Primary among these is the detection of a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), and the measurement of its properties. The PHENIX experiment will measure many of the best potential QGP signatures to see if any or all of these physics variables show anomalies simultaneously due to the formation of the QGP.

  14. The Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Stephen

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was first suggested (in a documented way) in 1983 [1] as a possible future hadron collider to be installed in the 27 km "LEP" tunnel. More than thirty years later the collider has been operated successfully with beam for three years with spectacular performance and has discovered the long-sought-after Higgs boson. The LHC is the world's largest and most energetic particle collider. It took many years to plan and build this large complex machine which promises exciting, new physics results for many years to come...

  15. Feedback Systems for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-12

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an integral part of the design. Feedback requirements for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at high bandwidth and fast response. To correct for the motion of individual bunches within a train, both feedforward and feedback systems are planned. SLC experience has shown that feedback systems are an invaluable operational tool for decoupling systems, allowing precision tuning, and providing pulse-to-pulse diagnostics. Feedback systems for the NLC will incorporate the key SLC features and the benefits of advancing technologies.

  16. State of hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Grannis, P.D. |

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  17. Reduction of beam current noise in the FNAL magnetron ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, D. S. Karns, P. R. Tan, C. Y.

    2015-04-08

    The new FNAL Injector Line with a circular dimple magnetron ion source has been operational since December of 2012. Since the new injector came on line there have been variations in the H- beam current flattop observed near the downstream end of the Linac. Several different cathode geometries including a hollow cathode suggested by Dudnikov [1] were tried. Previous studies also showed that different mixtures of hydrogen and nitrogen had an effect on beam current noise [2]. We expanded on those studies by trying mixtures ranging from (0.25% nitrogen, 99.75% hydrogen) to (3% nitrogen, 97% hydrogen). The results of these studies in our test stand will be presented in this paper.

  18. Proposal for Drell-Yan Measurements of Nucleon and Nuclear Structure with the FNAL Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Isenhower, L.D.; Sadler, M.E.; Arrinton, J.; Geesamn, D.F.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Reimer, P.E.; Potterveld, D.H.; Brown, C.N.; Garvey, G.T.; Leitch, M.J.; /Los Alamos /Rutgers U. /Texas A-M /Valparaiso U.

    2001-04-01

    We propose measuring the fractional momentum (x) dependence of the ratio of the anti-down to anti-up quark distributions in the proton, {bar d}(x)/{bar u}(x), using proton induced Drell-Yan reactions at 120 GeV. Recent measurements by FNAL E866 unexpectedly show considerable x dependence in this ratio for x > 0.2. A lower energy primary proton beam from the Main Injector makes it possible to extend the E866 measurements to larger x with much higher precision. The apparatus will also be used with nuclear targets to measure parton energy loss and modifications to anti-quark distributions in nuclear targets at large x (x > 0.2).

  19. Electron-Cloud Build-up in the FNAL Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-06-04

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade [1] in a fieldfree region at the location of the RFA electron detector [2]. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding measurements obtained with the RFA we infer that the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} is {approx}> 1.4, and the average electron density is n{sub e} {approx}> 10{sup 10} m{sup -3} at transition energy for the specific fill pattern and beam intensities defined below. The sensitivity of our results to several variables remains to be explored in order to reach more definitive results. Effects from the electron cloud on the beam are being investigated separately [3].

  20. Design of 325 MHz single and triple spoke resonators at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, G.; Apollinari, G.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; McConologue, F.; Romanov, G.; Wagner, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The proposed 8-GeV driver at FNAL is based on approximately 400 independently phased SC resonators. In this paper the design of 325 MHz Spoke Resonators, two single spoke resonators ({beta}=0.22 and {beta}=0.4) and a triple spoke resonator ({beta}=0.62), for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front end is presented. We describe the optimization of the spoke resonators geometry, the goal being to minimize the E{sub peak}/E{sub acc} and B{sub peak}/E{sub acc} ratios. We report on the coupled ANSYS-MWS analysis on the resonators mechanical properties and power coupler RF design. The current status of mechanical design, slow tuning mechanism and cryostat are also presented.

  1. SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1985-12-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The status of the machine and the detectors are discussed and an overview is given of the physics which can be done at this new facility. Some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built are given.

  2. Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.

    1998-04-01

    We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ``tabletop`` scale is also discussed.

  3. Towards future circular colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  4. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  5. Test facilities for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    During the past several years there has been a tremendous amount of progress on Linear Collider technology world wide. This research has led to the construction of the test facilities described in this report. Some of the facilities will be complete as early as the end of 1996, while others will be finishing up around the end 1997. Even now there are extensive tests ongoing for the enabling technologies for all of the test facilities. At the same time the Linear Collider designs are quite mature now and the SLC is providing the key experience base that can only come from a working collider. All this taken together indicates that the technology and accelerator physics will be ready for a future Linear Collider project to begin in the last half of the 1990s.

  6. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  7. Linear collider: a preview

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  8. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  9. Commissioning and Operation of the FNAL Front end Injection Line and Ion Sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Karns, Patrick R.

    2015-09-01

    This thesis documents the efforts made in commissioning and operating the RFQ Injection Line (RIL) as a replacement for the Cockcroft Walton front end. The Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) was assembled and tested with multiwire position and emittance monitor measurements. The Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) commissioning was completed with the same measurements as well as output beam energy measurements that showed it initially accelerated beam only to 700 keV, which was 50 keV lower than the design energy. Working with the manufacturer solutions were found and instituted to continue testing. The Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) was then connected as the RIL was installed as the new front end of Linac. Testing gave way to operation when the new front end was used as the source of all High Energy Physics (HEP) beam for Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The magnetron ion source that provides the H- beam for the front end required several changes and eventual upgrades to operate well; such as new source operating points for vacuum pressure and cesium admixture, and new materials for critical source components. Further research was conducted on the cathode geometry and nitrogen doping of the hydrogen gas as well as using solid state switches for the extractor system high voltage.

  10. Commissioning and operation of the FNAL front end injection line and ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karns, Patrick R.

    This thesis documents the efforts made in commissioning and operating the RFQ Injection Line (RIL) as a replacement for the Cockcroft Walton front end. The Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) was assembled and tested with multiwire position and emittance monitor measurements. The Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) commissioning was completed with the same measurements as well as output beam energy measurements that showed it initially accelerated beam only to 700 keV, which was 50 keV lower than the design energy. Working with the manufacturer solutions were found and instituted to continue testing. The Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) was then connected as the RIL was installed as the new front end of Linac. Testing gave way to operation when the new front end was used as the source of all High Energy Physics (HEP) beam for Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The magnetron ion source that provides the H- beam for the front end required several changes and eventual upgrades to operate well; such as new source operating points for vacuum pressure and cesium admixture, and new materials for critical source components. Further research was conducted on the cathode geometry and nitrogen doping of the hydrogen gas as well as using solid state switches for the extractor system high voltage.

  11. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et al., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention [1]. A 1990 article by V.I. Telnov describes the situation at that time [2]. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held [3]. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons—the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  12. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  13. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  14. Tevatron collider operations and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Peter H. Garbincius

    2004-06-17

    Fermilab's Tevatron is a proton-antiproton collider with center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The antiprotons are produced by 125 GeV protons from the Main Injector striking a stainless steel target. The 8 GeV antiprotons are collected and cooled in the Debuncher and Accumulator rings of the Antiproton Source and, just recently, in the Recycler ring before acceleration by the Main Injector and the Tevatron. In addition to energy, a vital parameter for generating physics data is the Luminosity delivered to the experiments given by a formula that is listed in detail in the paper.

  15. The Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-02-28

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron-positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  16. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-05-17

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  17. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  18. Muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-03-01

    The possibility of muon colliders was introduced by Skrinsky et al., Neuffer, and others. More recently, several workshops and collaboration meetings have greatly increased the level of discussion. In this paper we present scenarios for 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV colliders based on an optimally designed proton source, and for a lower luminosity 0.5 TeV demonstration based on an upgraded version of the AGS. It is assumed that a demonstration version based on upgrades of the FERMILAB machines would also be possible. 53 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel .A.

    2008-08-25

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud (EC) buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade effort [1]. Most of the results presented here are for the field-free region at the location of the retarding field analyzer (RFA) electron detector [2-4]. The primary input variable we exercise is the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max}, which we let vary in the range 1.2 {le} {delta}{sub max} {le} 1.7. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding RFA measurements we infer that 1.25 {approx}< {delta}{sub max} {approx}< 1.35 at this location. From this piece of information we estimate features of the EC distribution for various fill patterns, including the average electron number density n{sub e}. We then compare the behavior of the EC for a hypothetical RF frequency f{sub RF} = 212 MHz with the current 53 MHz for a given total beam population N{sub tot}. The density n{sub e} goes through a clear threshold as a function of N{sub tot} in a field-free region. As expected, the higher frequency leads to a weaker EC effect: the threshold in N{sub tot} is a factor {approx} 2 higher for f{sub RF} = 212 MHz than for 53 MHz, and ne is correspondingly lower by a factor {approx} 2 when N{sub tot} is above threshold. We briefly describe further work that needs to be carried out, sensitivities in the calculation, and puzzles in the results that remain to be addressed.

  20. The Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, J.R.

    1989-10-01

    April, 1989, the first Z zero particle was observed at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The SLC collides high-energy beams of electrons and positrons into each other. In break with tradition the SLC aims two linear beams at each other. Strong motives impelled the Stanford team to choose the route of innovation. One reason being that linear colliders promise to be less expensive to build and operate than storage ring colliders. An equally powerful motive was the desire to build an Z zero factory, a facility at which the Z zero particle can be studied in detail. More than 200 Z zero particles have been detected at the SLC and more continue to be churned out regularly. It is in measuring the properties of the Z zero that the SLC has a seminal contribution to make. One of the primary goals of the SLC experimental program is to determine the mass of the Z zero as precisely as possible.In the end, the SLC's greatest significance will be in having proved a new accelerator technology. 7 figs.

  1. High energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p{anti p}), lepton (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed.

  2. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute, to design an energy frontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new 80-100 km tunnel with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV, an order of magnitude beyond the LHC's, as a long-term goal. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90-350 GeV high-luminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines will be assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics by the end of 2018. The presentation will summarize the status of machine designs and parameters and discuss the essential technical components to be developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets with a field of 16 T for the hadron collider and high-power, high-efficiency RF systems for the lepton collider. In addition the unprecedented beam power presents special challenges for the hadron collider for all aspects of beam handling and machine protection. First conclusions of geological investigations and implementation studies will be presented. The status of the FCC collaboration and the further planning for the study will be outlined.

  3. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Keisuke; Grojean, Christophe; Peskin, Michael E.; Barklow, Tim; Gao, Yuanning; Kanemura, Shinya; Kim, Hyungdo; List, Jenny; Nojiri, Mihoko; Perelstein, Maxim; Poeschl, Roman; Reuter, Juergen; Simon, Frank; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Yu, Jaehoon; Wells, James D.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; /Tohoku U.

    2015-06-23

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  4. High luminosity muon collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  5. Lattice of the NICA Collider Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly; Kozlov, Oleg; Meshkov, Igor; Mikhaylov, Vladimir; Trubnikov, Grigoriy; Lebedev, Valeri Nagaitsev, Sergei; Senichev, Yurij; /Julich, Forschungszentrum

    2010-05-01

    The Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) is a new accelerator complex being constructed at JINR. It is designed for collider experiments with ions and protons and has to provide ion-ion (Au{sup 79+}) and ion-proton collisions in the energy range 1 {divided_by} 4.5 GeV/n and collisions of polarized proton-proton and deuteron-deuteron beams. Collider conceptions with constant {gamma}{sub tr} and with possibility of its variation are considered. The ring has the racetrack shape with two arcs and two long straight sections. Its circumference is about 450m. The straight sections are optimized to have {beta}* {approx} 35cm in two IPs and a possibility of final betatron tune adjustment.

  6. [Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  7. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-20

    This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  8. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  9. Bouncing and Colliding Branes

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2007-11-20

    In a braneworld description of our universe, we must allow for the possibility of having dynamical branes around the time of the big bang. Some properties of such domain walls in motion are discussed here, for example the ability of negative-tension domain walls to bounce off spacetime singularities and the consequences for cosmological perturbations. In this context, we will also review a colliding branes solution of heterotic M-theory that has been proposed as a model for early universe cosmology.

  10. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  11. A new boson with a mass of 125 GeV observed with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    The Higgs boson was postulated nearly five decades ago within the framework of the standard model of particle physics and has been the subject of numerous searches at accelerators around the world. Its discovery would verify the existence of a complex scalar field thought to give mass to three of the carriers of the electroweak force-the W(+), W(-), and Z(0) bosons-as well as to the fundamental quarks and leptons. The CMS Collaboration has observed, with a statistical significance of five standard deviations, a new particle produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The evidence is strongest in the diphoton and four-lepton (electrons and/or muons) final states, which provide the best mass resolution in the CMS detector. The probability of the observed signal being due to a random fluctuation of the background is about 1 in 3 × 10(6). The new particle is a boson with spin not equal to 1 and has a mass of about 125 [corrected] giga-electron volts. Although its measured properties are, within the uncertainties of the present data, consistent with those expected of the Higgs boson, more data are needed to elucidate the precise nature of the new particle.

  12. A new boson with a mass of 125 GeV observed with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    The Higgs boson was postulated nearly five decades ago within the framework of the standard model of particle physics and has been the subject of numerous searches at accelerators around the world. Its discovery would verify the existence of a complex scalar field thought to give mass to three of the carriers of the electroweak force-the W(+), W(-), and Z(0) bosons-as well as to the fundamental quarks and leptons. The CMS Collaboration has observed, with a statistical significance of five standard deviations, a new particle produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The evidence is strongest in the diphoton and four-lepton (electrons and/or muons) final states, which provide the best mass resolution in the CMS detector. The probability of the observed signal being due to a random fluctuation of the background is about 1 in 3 × 10(6). The new particle is a boson with spin not equal to 1 and has a mass of about 125 [corrected] giga-electron volts. Although its measured properties are, within the uncertainties of the present data, consistent with those expected of the Higgs boson, more data are needed to elucidate the precise nature of the new particle. PMID:23258887

  13. Spin and Beam Dynamics in the Muon (g - 2) Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2016-09-01

    A number of recent advances in the Physics of the Muon (g - 2) experiments are described outlining the expectations of future improvements of the statistical and systematic errors of the technique. A comparison between the spin and beam dynamics of the two muon (g - 2) experiments under preparation at FNAL and at J-PARC shows that they are both well under control. It may be possible to use magnetic focusing for the FNAL experiment, especially if a decision is made to run with negative muons. Finally, a polarized proton beam could be used to measure the B-field in case of magnetic focusing.

  14. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kozanecki, W.

    1987-11-01

    In this paper we report on the status of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC), the prototype of a new generation of colliding beam accelerators. This novel type of machine holds the potential of extending electron-positron colliding beam studies to center-of-mass (c.m.) energies far in excess of what is economically achievable with colliding beam storage rings. If the technical challenges posed by linear colliders are solvable at a reasonable cost, this new approach would provide an attractive alternative to electron-positron rings, where, because of rapidly rising synchrotron radiation losses, the cost and size of the ring increases with the square of the c.m. energy. In addition to its role as a test vehicle for the linear collider principle, the SLC aims at providing an abundant source of Z/sup 0/ decays to high energy physics experiments. Accordingly, two major detectors, the upgraded Mark II, now installed on the SLC beam line, and the state-of-the-art SLD, currently under construction, are preparing to probe the Standard Model at the Z/sup 0/ pole. The SLC project was originally funded in 1983. Since the completion of construction, we have been commissioning the machine to bring it up to a performance level adequate for starting the high energy physics program. In the remainder of this paper, we will discuss the status, problems and performance of the major subsystems of the SLC. We will conclude with a brief outline of the physics program, and of the planned enhancements to the capabilities of the machine. 26 refs., 7 figs.

  15. XXth Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In 2009, the Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian (France), on the shore of the Geneva Lake, from 16-20 November. It was jointly organised by CERN and the French HEP community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). This year's symposium come at an important time for both the Tevatron and LHC communities. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sample, and it allowed an in-depth review of the readiness of the LHC and its detectors just before first collisions. The programme includes sessions on top-quark and electro-weak physics, QCD, B physics, new phenomena, electro-weak symmetry breaking, heavy ions, and the status and commissioning of the LHC machine and its experiments. Conference website : http://hcp2009.in2p3.fr/

  16. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  17. PERFORMANCE LIMITATIONS IN HIGH-ENERGY ION COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-05-16

    High-energy ion colliders (hadron colliders operating with ions other than protons) are premier research tools for nuclear physics. The collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operations considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species, including asymmetric collisions. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams limits are set by space charge, charge exchange, and intrabeam scattering effects. The latter leads to luminosity lifetimes of only a few hours for intense heavy ions beams. Currently, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL is the only operating high-energy ion collider. Later this decade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), under construction at CERN, will also run with heavy ions.

  18. Optimization of a closed-loop gas system for the operation of Resistive Plate Chambers at the Large Hadron Collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capeans, M.; Glushkov, I.; Guida, R.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), thanks to their fast time resolution (˜1 ns), suitable space resolution (˜1 cm) and low production cost (˜50 €/m2), are widely employed for the muon trigger systems at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Their large detector volume (they cover a surface of about 4000 m2 equivalent to 16 m3 of gas volume both in ATLAS and CMS) and the use of a relatively expensive Freon-based gas mixture make a closed-loop gas circulation unavoidable. It has been observed that the return gas of RPCs operated in conditions similar to the difficult experimental background foreseen at LHC contains a large amount of impurities potentially dangerous for long-term operation. Several gas-cleaning agents are currently in use in order to avoid accumulation of impurities in the closed-loop circuits. We present the results of a systematic study characterizing each of these cleaning agents. During the test, several RPCs were operated at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) in a high radiation environment in order to observe the production of typical impurities: mainly fluoride ions, molecules of the Freon group and hydrocarbons. The polluted return gas was sent to several cartridges, each containing a different cleaning agent. The effectiveness of each material was studied using gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry techniques. Results of this test have revealed an optimized configuration of filters that is now under long-term validation.Gas optimization studies are complemented with a finite element simulation of gas flow distribution in the RPCs, aiming at its eventual optimization in terms of distribution and flow rate.

  19. New DIS and collider results on PDFs

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, E.

    2015-05-15

    The HERA ep collider experiments have measured the proton structure functions over a wide kinematic range. New data from the H1 experiment now extend the range to higher 4-momentum transfer (√(Q{sup 2})) over which a precision of ∼ 2% is achieved in the neutral current channel. A factor of two reduction in the systematic uncertainties over previous measurement is attained. The charged current structure function measurements are also significantly improved in precision. These data, when used in QCD analyses of the parton density functions (PDFs) reduce the PDF uncertainties particularly at high momentum fractions x which is relevant to low energy neutrino scattering cross sections. New data from the LHC pp collider experiments may also offer significant high x PDF improvements as the experimental uncertainties improve.

  20. The super collider revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M.S.; Pato, M.P. )

    1992-05-20

    In this paper, the authors suggest a revised version of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) that employs the planned SSC first stage machine as an injector of 0.5 TeV protons into a power laser accelerator. The recently developed Non-linear Amplification of Inverse Bremsstrahlung Acceleration (NAIBA) concept dictates the scenario of the next stage of acceleration. Post Star Wars lasers, available at several laboratories, can be used for the purpose. The 40 TeV CM energy, a target of the SSC, can be obtained with a new machine which can be 20 times smaller than the planned SSC.

  1. Hadron-hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-06-21

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility.

  2. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, Steve

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate O(1021) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  3. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  4. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  5. Linear collider development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1993-08-01

    Linear collider R&D at SLAC comprises work on the present Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and work toward the next linear collider (NLC). Recent SLC developments are summarized. NLC studies are divided into hardware-based and theoretical. We report on the status of the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and the final focus test beam (FFTB), describe plans for ASSET, an installation to measure accelerator structure wakefields, and mention IR design developments. Finally we review recent NLC theoretical studies, ending with the author`s view of next linear collider parameter sets.

  6. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  7. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan , M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  8. Results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.G. )

    1990-12-14

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  10. Prospects for heavy flavor physics at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The role of hadron colliders in the observation and study of CP violation in B decays is discussed. We show that hadron collider experiments can play a significant role in the early studies of these phenomena and will play an increasingly dominant role as the effort turns towards difficult to measure decays, especially those of the B{sub s} meson, and sensitive searches for rare decays and subtle deviations from Standard Model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the relative merits of hadron collider detectors with `forward` vs `central` rapidity coverage.

  11. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  12. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Accelerator Test Facility for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. This article briefly reviews the needs and possibilities for a Muon Collider beam test facility to carry out the R&D program on the collider front-end and 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  14. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  15. ALPs at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimasu, Ken; Sanz, Verónica

    2015-06-01

    New pseudo-scalars, often called axion-like particles (ALPs), abound in model-building and are often associated with the breaking of a new symmetry. Traditional searches and indirect bounds are limited to light axions, typically in or below the KeV range for ALPs coupled to photons. We present collider bounds on ALPs from mono-γ, tri-γ and mono-jet searches in a model independent fashion, as well as the prospects for the LHC and future machines. We find that they are complementary to existing searches, as they are sensitive to heavier ALPs and have the capability to cover an otherwise inaccessible region of parameter space. We also show that, assuming certain model dependent correlations between the ALP coupling to photons and gluons as well as considering the validity of the effective description of ALP interactions, mono-jet searches are in fact more suitable and effective in indirectly constraining ALP scenarios.

  16. Where the Education System and Women's Bodies Collide: The Social and Health Impact of Girls' Experiences of Menstruation and Schooling in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Marni

    2010-01-01

    The global development community has focused in recent decades on closing the gender gap in education, but has given insufficient attention to the specific needs of pre- and post-pubescent girls as they transition to young womanhood within the educational institution. This study explored the social context of girls' experiences of menses and…

  17. A model for computing at the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, D. . Dept. of Physics); Grossman, R. . Lab. for Advanced Computing)

    1990-06-01

    High energy physics experiments at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will show a substantial increase in complexity and cost over existing forefront experiments, and computing needs may no longer be met via simple extrapolations from the previous experiments. We propose a model for computing at the SSC based on technologies common in private industry involving both hardware and software. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.; Armstrong, F.E.; von Przewoski, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  19. Quantum-beamsstrahlung laser collider

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Chattopadyay, S.; Xie, M.

    1997-11-01

    An e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider at energies beyond a TeV runs into a problem of severe beamsstrahlung, characterized by {Upsilon} on the order of unity (and beyond). In the regime of extremely high {Upsilon} the beamsstrahlung may be largely suppressed due to the quantum effect. In the design of an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider there are two ways to satisfy the collider physics constraints. One is to decrease the number of particles per bunch (and thus to increase the repetition rate) and the other is to decrease the longitudinal bunch length. The former approach can limit {Upsilon}, while the latter boosts it. (It may be useful to reevaluate the future collider parameters in view of this.) The laser wakefield driver for a collider in comparison with the microwave driver naturally offers a very short bunch length, which is appropriate for the latter collider option. The authors show that this choice of collider design with a short bunch length and high {Upsilon} has advantages and provide sample design parameters at 5 TeV. Such sample design parameters challenge them in a number of fronts, such as the preservation of high quality bunches, efficient high repetition rate lasers, etc. The collision point physics simulated by the CAIN code shows a surprisingly well preserved luminosity spectrum.

  20. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  1. Vanilla technicolor at linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Järvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    We analyze the reach of linear colliders for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that linear colliders can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, until the maximum energy in the center of mass of the colliding leptons. In particular we analyze the Drell-Yan processes involving spin-one intermediate heavy bosons decaying either leptonically or into two standard model gauge bosons. We also analyze the light Higgs production in association with a standard model gauge boson stemming also from an intermediate spin-one heavy vector.

  2. Colliding droplets: a short film presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-12-22

    A series of experiments were performed in which liquid droplets were caused to collide. Impact velocities to several meters per second and droplet diameters up to 600 micrometers were used. The impact parameters in the collisions vary from zero to greater than the sum of the droplet radii. Photographs of the collisions were taken with a high speed framing camera in order to study the impacts and subsequent behavior of the droplets. The experiments will be discussed and a short movie film presentation of some of the impacts will be shown.

  3. When Black Holes Collide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  4. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The 9th {anti p}p Workshop was held in Tsukuba, Japan in October, 1993. A number of important issues remained after that meeting: Does QCD adequately describe the large cross section observed by CDF for {gamma} production below 30 GeV? Do the CDF and D0 b-production cross sections agree? Will the Tevatron live up to its billing as a world-class b-physics facility? How small will the uncertainty in the W mass be? Is there anything beyond the Minimal Standard Model? And finally, where is the top quark? Presentations at this workshop addressed all of these issues. Most of them are now resolved, but new questions have arisen. This summary focuses on the experimental results presented at the meeting by CDF and D0 physicists. Reviews of LEP and HERA results, future plans for hadron colliders and their experiments, as well as important theoretical presentations are summarized elsewhere in this volume. Section 1 reviews physics beyond the Minimal Standard Model. Issues in b and c physics are addressed in section 3. Section 4 focuses on the top quark. Electroweak physics is reviewed in section 5, followed by QCD studies in section 6. Conclusions are drawn in section 7.

  5. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), shown in Fig. 1, was build to study the interactions of quarks and gluons at high energies [Harrison, Ludlam and Ozaki (2003)]. The theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes these interactions. One of the main goals for the RHIC experiments was the creation and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which was expected to be formed after the collision of heavy ions at a temperature of approximately 2 trillion kelvin (or equivalently an energy of 150 MeV). The QGP is the substance which existed only a few microseconds after the Big Bang. The QGP was anticipated to be weakly interacting like a gas but turned out to be strongly interacting and more like a liquid. Among its unusual properties is its extremely low viscosity [Auerbach and Schlomo (2009)], which makes the QGP the substance closest to a perfect liquid known to date. The QGP is opaque to moderate energy quarks and gluons leading to a phenomenon called jet quenching, where of a jet and its recoil jet only one is observable and the other suppressed after traversing and interacting with the QGP [Jacak and Müller (2012)]...

  6. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  7. Beam Rounders for Circular Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; Ya. Derbenev

    2001-07-01

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  8. Beam rounders for circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov and S. Nagaitsev

    2002-12-10

    By means of linear optics, an arbitrary uncoupled beam can be locally transformed into a round (rotation-invariant) state and then back. This provides an efficient way to round beams in the interaction region of circular colliders.

  9. Physicists dream of supersized collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Cindy

    2015-12-01

    Particle physicists in China are hopeful that the Chinese government will allocate 1 billion yuan (about £104m) to design what would be the world's largest particle accelerator - the Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC).

  10. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthoff, Moritz; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Stickland, David

    2013-12-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector efficiency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, because of the high number of low energy neutrons in these regions. The signal decrease was stronger than expected from the number of simulated defects. Here polarization from trapped charge carriers in the defects is a likely candidate for explaining the difference, as suggested by Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements. A single-crystalline (sCVD) diamond sensor shows a faster relative signal decrease than a pCVD sensor mounted at the same location. This is expected, since the relative increase in the number of defects is larger in sCVD than in pCVD sensors.

  11. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Garwin, E. L.; Kirby, R. E.; Luh, D.-A.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C. Y.; Sheppard, J. C.; Turner, J.; Prepost, R.

    2005-08-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting RF structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a DC-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  12. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.

    2004-11-19

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%.

  13. Physics at Future Circular Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh

    2016-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider has been a grand success with the discovery of the Higgs boson, with bright prospects for additional discoveries since the recent increase in collider energy and the anticipated large datasets. Big open questions such as the nature of dark matter, the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe, and the theoretical puzzle of the finely-tuned parameters in the Higgs sector, demand new physics principles that extend the established Standard Model paradigm. Future circular colliders in a substantially larger tunnel can house both a high luminosity electron-positron collider for precision measurements of Higgs and electroweak parameters, as well as a very high energy proton-proton collider which can directly manifest particles associated with these new physics principles. We discuss the physics goals of these future circular colliders, and the prospects for elucidating fundamental new laws of nature that will significantly extend our understanding of the Universe. Detailed studies of the discovery potential in specific benchmark models will be presented, with implications for detector design.

  14. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  15. Object based data access at the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fuess, S.; D0 Collaboration

    1995-11-01

    The D{O} Experiment at Fermilab is currently participating in the FNAL Computing Division`s ``Computing for Analysis Project`` (CAP) to investigate object based data storage and access. Following a short description of the CAP system architecture, the D{O} data model is explored. A brief discussion of the method of operation of the CAP system leads into a concluding section.

  16. Studies of E-Cloud Build up for the FNAL Main Injector and for theLHC

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2006-06-14

    We present a summary of recent simulation studies of the electron-cloud (EC) build-up for the FNAL MI and for the LHC. In the first case we pay particular attention to the dependence on bunch intensity N{sub b} at injection energy assuming the nominal bunch spacing t{sub b} = 19 ns, and we focus on the dipole magnets and field-free regions. The saturated value of the average EC density shows a clear threshold in N{sub b} beyond which the beam will be approximately neutralized on average. For the case of the LHC we limit our discussion to arc dipoles at collision energy, and bunch spacings t{sub b} = 25 ns or t{sub b} = 75 ns. The main variables exercised in this study are N{sub b} and the peak value of the secondary emission yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max}. For t{sub b} = 25 ns we conclude that the EC power deposition is comfortably below the available cooling capacity of the cryogenic system if {delta}{sub max} is below {approx} 1.2 at nominal N{sub b}. For t{sub b} = 75 ns, the EC power deposition is insignificant. As a byproduct of this exercise, we reach a detailed understanding of the significant role played by the backscattered secondary electrons. This article summarizes the results, an slightly extends the discussions, presented in Refs. 1 and 2.

  17. The Structure of Jets at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew James

    2012-08-01

    Particle physics seeks to understand the interactions and properties of the fundamental particles. To gain understanding, there is an interplay between theory and experiment. Models are proposed to explain how particles behave and interact. These models make precise predictions that can be tested. Experiments are built and executed to measure the properties of these particles, providing necessary tests for the theories that attempt to explain the realm of fundamental particles. However, there is also another level of interaction between theory and experiment; the development of new experiments demands the study of how particles will behave with respect to the measured observables toward the goal of understanding the details and idiosyncrasies of the measurements very well. Only once these are well-modeled and understood can one be con dent that the data that are measured is trustworthy. The modeling and interpretation of the physics of a proton collider, such as the LHC, is the main topic of this thesis.

  18. Collider study on the loop-induced dark matter mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-06-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For DM couplings involving light mediators, especially for the loop-mediated interactions, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory. In this note we discuss the study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, focusing on a model with anarchic dark flavor structure. By including the momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling - given by the Dark Penguin - in collider processes, we study bounds from monophoton, diphoton, and non-pointing photon searches at the LHC. We also compare our results to constraints from the direct detection experiments.

  19. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-03-20

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

  20. Challenges in future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Swapan Chattopadhyay; Kaoru Yokoya

    2002-09-02

    For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e-e+ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e-e+ linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the Future Linear Collider (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomic and political challenges, likely necessitating continued development of international collaboration among parties involved in accelerator-based physics.

  1. Rf-driver linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1987-05-01

    The next generation of linear collider after the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) will probably have an energy in the range 300 GeV-1 TeV per linac. A number of exotic accelerating schemes, such as laser and plasma acceleration, have been proposed for linear colliders of the far future. However, the technology which is most mature and which could lead to a collider in the above energy range in the relatively near future is the rf-driven linac, in which externally produced rf is fed into a more or less conventional metallic accelerating structure. Two basic technologies have been proposed for producing the required high peak rf power: discrete microwave power sources, and various two-beam acceleration schemes in which the rf is produced by a high current driving beam running parallel to the main accelerator. The current status of experimental and analytic work on both the discrete source and the two-beam methods for producing rf is discussed. The implications of beam-beam related effects (luminosity, disruption and beamstrahlung) for the design of rf-driven colliders are also considered.

  2. Relativistic klystron research for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1988-09-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our relativistic klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: OPAL experiment at LEP; D{phi} experiment at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon interactions at TEV II; CYGNUS experiment; final results from {nu}{sub e}{sup {minus}e} elastic scattering; physics with CLEO detector at CESR; results from JADE at PETRA; rare kaon-decay experiment at BNL; search for top quark; and super conducting super collider activities.

  4. Collider physics. Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This past year our group participated in both the D0 experiment at Fermilab and the SDC experiment at the SSC. Most of our effort was concentrated on the D0 project, where we contributed as much manpower as possible to the commissioning of the detector in preparation for the coming collider run. Our SDC work consisted of the investigation of one of the candidate technologies for the forward calorimeter. On the D0 experiment, our primary responsibilities have been in the areas of electronics commissioning and in the establishment of triggers for the coming collider run. We have also actively participated in the physics studies and have contributed to the upgrade effort as much as time has permitted. Our group has also participated in the cosmic ray run and in the D0 test beam. In view of our contributions, James White was selected as a member of the D0 Trigger board, and Jay Wightman is being trained as one of the ``global experts`` who are responsible for keeping the detector operational during the run. In addition, Amber Boehnlein has played a major role in the Level-2 trigger commissioning. A more detailed description of these activities is given in this paper.

  5. The dark penguin shines light at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primulando, Reinard; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2015-07-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling — given by the Dark Penguin — in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the 100 TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold for on-shell production of the mediators. We consider both minimal models and models where an additional state beyond the DM is accessible. In the latter case, under the assumption of anarchic flavor structure in the dark sector, the LHC monophoton and diphoton searches will be able to set much stronger bounds than in the minimal scenario. A determination of the mass of the heavier dark fermion might be feasible using the M T2 variable. In addition, if the Dark Penguin flavor structure is almost aligned with that of the DM mass, a displaced signal from the decay of the heavier dark fermion into the DM and photon can be observed. This allows us to set constraints on the mixings and couplings of the model from an existing search for non-pointing photons.

  6. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. The lead-liquid argon calorimeter for FNAL-E653

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, R.M.; Freyberger, A.P.; Lipton, R.J.; Nichols, W.R.; Potter, D.M.; Russ, J.S.; Zhang, Y.L.

    1987-02-01

    A lead-liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter has been constructed for Fermilab experiment E-653. The design, operation, energy and spatial resolution, and analysis are described. A description of a unique read-out geometry which gives the detector powerful pattern recognition capability is also given.

  8. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  9. Measurement of the radiation field surrounding the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    K. Kordas et al.

    2004-01-28

    We present here the first direct and detailed measurements of the spatial distribution of the ionizing radiation surrounding a hadron collider experiment. Using data from two different exposures we measure the effect of additional shielding on the radiation field around the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Employing a simple model we parameterize the ionizing radiation field surrounding the detector.

  10. The NuMI Beam at FNAL and its Use for Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Sacha E.

    2007-12-21

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab began operations in late 2004. NuMI will deliver an intense {nu}{sub {mu}} beam of variable energy (2-20 GeV). Several aspects of the design and results from runs of the MINOS experiment are reviewed. I also discuss technique to measure directly the neutrino flux using a muon flux system at the end of the NuMI line.

  11. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics - March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated. (WHK)

  12. Tevatron Collider Status and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald S.

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab continues operation as the world's highest energy particle accelerator by delivering luminosity at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. We review recent performance and plans for the remainder of Run 2.

  13. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2016-07-12

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  14. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Tourun, Yagmur

    2009-07-29

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be 'at least 20 years away' for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  15. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Tourun, Yagmur

    2009-07-29

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  16. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  17. Searches for new gauge bosons at future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    The search reaches for new gauge bosons at future hadron and lepton colliders are summarized for a variety of extended gauge models. Experiments at these energies will vastly improve over present limits and will easily discover a Z` and/or W` in the multi-TeV range.

  18. Large Hadron collider tests of the little Higgs model.

    PubMed

    Burdman, Gustavo; Perelstein, Maxim; Pierce, Aaron

    2003-06-20

    The little Higgs model provides an alternative to traditional candidates for new physics at the TeV scale. The new heavy gauge bosons predicted by this model should be observable at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We discuss how the LHC experiments could test the little Higgs model by studying the production and decay of these particles. PMID:12857187

  19. Searches for scalar and vector leptoquarks at future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    The search reaches for both scalar(S) and vector(V) leptoquarks at future hadron colliders are summarized. In particular the authors evaluate the production cross sections of both leptoquark types at TeV33 and LHC as well as the proposed 60 and 200 TeV colliders through both quark-antiquark annihilation and gluon-gluon fusion: q{anti q},gg {r_arrow} SS,VV. Experiments at these machines should easily discover such particles if their masses are not in excess of the few TeV range.

  20. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  1. Experimental demonstration of colliding beam lifetime improvement by electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Alexahin, Yuri; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos

    2007-10-01

    We report successful application of space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam for improvement of particle lifetime determined by beam-beam interaction in high-energy collider. In our experiments, an electron lens, a novel instrument developed for the beam-beam compensation, was set on a 980-GeV proton bunch in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The proton bunch losses due to its interaction with antiproton beam were reduced by a factor of 2 when the electron lens was operating. We describe the principle of electron lens operation and present experimental results.

  2. MIGHTY MURINES: NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT VERY HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    An overview is given of the potential for neutrino physics studies through parasitic use of the intense high energy neutrino beams that would be produced at future many-TeV muon colliders. Neutrino experiments clearly cannot compete with the collider physics. Except at the very highest energy muon colliders, the main thrust of the neutrino physics program would be to improve on the measurements from preceding neutrino experiments at lower energy muon colliders, particularly in the fields of B physics, quark mixing and CP violation. Muon colliders at the 10 TeV energy scale might already produce of order 10{sup 8} B hadrons per year in a favorable and unique enough experimental environment to have some analytical capabilities beyond any of the currently operating or proposed B factories. The most important of the quark mixing measurements at these energies might well be the improved measurements of the important CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and, possibly, the first measurements of {vert_bar}V{sub td}{vert_bar} in the process of flavor changing neutral current interactions involving a top quark loop. Muon colliders at the highest center-of-mass energies that have been conjectured, 100--1,000 TeV, would produce neutrino beams for neutrino-nucleon interaction experiments with maximum center-of-mass energies from 300--1,000 GeV. Such energies are close to, or beyond, the discovery reach of all colliders before the turn-on of the LHC. In particular, they are comparable to the 314 GeV center-of-mass energy for electron-proton scattering at the currently operating HERA collider and so HERA provides a convenient benchmark for the physics potential. It is shown that these ultimate terrestrial neutrino experiments, should they eventually come to pass, would have several orders of magnitude more luminosity than HERA. This would potentially open up the possibility for high statistics studies of any exotic particles, such as

  3. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  4. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  5. Superconducting super collider second generation dipole magnet cryostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.A.; Engler, N.H.; Gonczy, J.D.; Larson, E.T.; Nicol, T.H.; Ohmori, T.

    1989-03-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider, a planned colliding beam particle physics research facility, requires --10,000 superconducting devices for the control of high energy particle beams. The --7,500 collider ring superconducting dipole magnets require cryostats that are functional, cryogenically efficient, mass producible and cost effective. A second generation cryostat design has been developed utilizing the experiences gained during the construction, installation and operation of several full length first generation dipole magnet models. The nature of the cryostat improvements is presented. Considered are the connections between the magnet cold mass and its supports, cryogenic supports, cold mass axial anchor, thermal shields, insulation, vacuum vessel and interconnections. The details of the improvements are enumerated and the abstracted results of available component and system evaluations are presented.

  6. Superconducting super collider second generation dipole magnet cryostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.A.; Engler, N.H.; Gonczy, J.D.; Larson, E.T.; Nicol, T.H.; Ohmori, T.

    1988-12-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider, a planned colliding beam particle physics research facility, requires /approximately/10,000 superconducting devices for the control of high energy particle beams. The /approximately/7,500 collider ring superconducting dipole magnets require cryostats that are functional, cryogenically efficient, mass producible and cost effective. A second generation cryostat design has been developed utilizing the experiences gained during the construction, installation and operation of several full length first generation dipole magnet models. The nature of the cryostat improvements is presented. Considered are the connections between the magnet cold mass and its supports, cryogenic supports, cold mass axial anchor, thermal shields, insulation, vacuum vessel and interconnections. The details of the improvements are enumerated and the abstracted results of available component and system evaluations are presented. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Single event effects and their mitigation for the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, Richard J.; D'Auria, Saverio; Dong, Peter; Hocker, Andy; Kordas, Kostas; McGimpsey, Susan; Nicolas, Ludovic; Wallny, Rainer; Schmitt, Wayne; Worm, Steven; /Fermilab /Toronto U. /Glasgow U. /Rutherford /UCLA

    2005-11-01

    We present an overview of radiation induced failures and operational experiences from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). In our summary, we examine single event effects (SEE) in electronics located in and around the detector. We present results of experiments to identify the sources and composition of the radiation and steps to reduce the rate of SEEs in our electronics. Our studies have led to a better, more complete understanding of the radiation environment in a modern hadron collider experiment.

  8. COLLIDING DECIMETER DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Deckers, J.; Teiser, J.

    2013-06-01

    Collisional evolution is a key process in planetesimal formation and decimeter bodies play a key role in the different models. However, the outcome of collisions between two dusty decimeter bodies has never been studied experimentally. Therefore, we carried out microgravity collision experiments in the Bremen drop tower. The agglomerates consist of quartz with irregularly shaped micrometer-sized grains and the mean volume filling factor is 0.437 {+-} 0.004. The aggregates are cylindrical with 12 cm in height and 12 cm in diameter, and typical masses are 1.5 kg. These are the largest and most massive dust aggregates studied in collisions to date. We observed rebound and fragmentation but no sticking in the velocity range between 0.8 and 25.7 cm s{sup -1}. The critical fragmentation velocity for split up of an aggregate is 16.2 {+-} 0.4 cm s{sup -1}. At lower velocities the aggregates bounce off each other. In this velocity range, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing collision velocity from 0.8 to 0.3. While the aggregates are very weak, the critical specific kinetic energy for fragmentation Q{sub {mu}=1} is a factor of six larger than expected. Collisions of large bodies in protoplanetary disks are supposed to be much faster and the generation of smaller fragments is likely. In planetary rings, collision velocities are of the order of a few cm s{sup -1} and are thereby in the same range investigated in these experiments. The coefficient of restitution of dust agglomerates and regolith-covered ice particles, which are common in planetary rings, are similar.

  9. (Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders). [State Univ. of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  10. Study of requirements and performances of the electromagnetic calorimeter for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Soleti, S.

    2015-06-15

    In this thesis we discuss the simulation and tests carried out for the optimization and design of the electromagnetic calorimeter for the Mu2e (Muon to electron conversion) experiment, which is a proposed experiment part of the Muon Campus hosted at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, United States.

  11. Work at FNAL to achieve long electron drift lifetime in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.; Jaskierny, W.; Kendziora, C.; Krider, J.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This note records some of the work done between July 2005 and July 2006 to achieve long (many milliseconds) electron drift lifetimes in liquid argon at Fermilab. The work is part of a process to develop some experience at Fermilab with the technology required to construct a large liquid argon TPC. This technology has been largely developed by the ICARUS collaboration in Europe and this process can be seen as technology transfer. The capability to produce liquid argon in which electrons have drift lifetimes of several milliseconds is crucial to a successful device. Liquid argon calorimeters have been successfully operated at Fermilab; their electro-negative contaminants are at the level of 10{sup -7} while the TPC we are considering requires a contamination level at the level of 10{sup -11}, tens of parts per trillion (ppt). As well as demonstrating the ability to produce liquid argon at this level of purity, the work is part of a program to test the effect on the electron drift time of candidate materials for the construction of a TPC in liquid argon.

  12. Future Electron-Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.

    2010-05-23

    Outstanding research potential of electron-hadron colliders (EHC) was clearly demonstrated by first - and the only - electron-proton collider HERA (DESY, Germany). Physics data from HERA revealed new previously unknown facets of Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD). EHC is an ultimate microscope probing QCD in its natural environment, i.e. inside the hadrons. In contrast with hadrons, electrons are elementary particles with known initial state. Hence, scattering electrons from hadrons provides a clearest pass to their secrets. It turns EHC into an ultimate machine for high precision QCD studies and opens access to rich physics with a great discovery potential: solving proton spin puzzle, observing gluon saturation or physics beyond standard model. Access to this physics requires high-energy high-luminosity EHCs and a wide reach in the center-of-mass (CM) energies. This paper gives a brief overview of four proposed electron-hadron colliders: ENC at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), ELIC/MEIC at TJNAF (Newport News, VA, USA), eRHIC at BNL (Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). Future electron-hadron colliders promise to deliver very rich physics not only in the quantity but also in the precision. They are aiming at very high luminosity two-to-four orders of magnitude beyond the luminosity demonstrated by the very successful HERA. While ENC and LHeC are on opposite side of the energy spectrum, eRHIC and ELIC are competing for becoming an electron-ion collider (EIC) in the U.S. Administrations of BNL and Jlab, in concert with US DoE office of Nuclear Physics, work on the strategy for down-selecting between eRHIC and ELIC. The ENC, EIC and LHeC QCD physics programs to a large degree are complimentary to each other and to the LHC physics. In last decade, an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) collaboration held about 25 collaboration meetings to develop physics program for EIC with CM energy {approx}100 GeV. One of these meetings was held at GSI, where ENC topic was in the

  13. Dark Matter: Collider vs. direct searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, T.

    2016-07-01

    Effective Field Theories (EFTs) are a useful tool across a wide range of DM searches, including LHC searches and direct detection. Given the current lack of indications about the nature of the DM particle and its interactions, a model independent interpretation of the collider bounds appears mandatory, especially in complementarity with the reinterpretation of the exclusion limits within a choice of simplified models, which cannot exhaust the set of possible completions of an effective Lagrangian. However EFTs must be used with caution at LHC energies, where the energy scale of the interaction is at a scale where the EFT approximation can no longer be assumed to be valid. Here we introduce some tools that allow the validity of the EFT approximation to be quantified, and provide case studies for two operators. We also show a technique that allows EFT constraints from collider searches to be made substantially more robust, even at large center-of-mass energies. This allows EFT constraints from different classes of experiment to be compared in a much more robust manner.

  14. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  15. SLC: The first linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinney, Nan

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was built in the 1980s at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California. Like LEP, it was designed to study the properties of the Z boson at a center-of-mass energy of about 91 GeV. The SLC was also a prototype for an entirely new approach to electron-positron colliders. The development of a new technology was motivated by the fact that in an electron storage ring, the electrons radiate synchrotron radiation as they are bent around the ring. To avoid excessive energy loss from this radiation, the circumference of the ring has to increase as the square of the desired energy, making very high energy rings prohibitively large and expensive. With a linear accelerator, the electrons do not need to bend and the tunnel length only grows linearly with energy...

  16. Luminosity limitations for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri Lebedev

    2000-09-01

    The major limitations on reaching the maximum luminosity for an electron ion collider are discussed in application to the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders. It is shown that with intensive electron cooling the luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} is feasible for both schemes for the center-of-mass collider energy above approximately 15 GeV. Each scheme has its own pros and cons. The ring-ring collider is better supported by the current accelerator technology while the linac-ring collider suggests unique features for spin manipulations of the electron beam. The article addresses a general approach to a choice of collider scheme and parameters leaving details for other conference publications dedicated to particular aspects of the ring-ring and linac-ring colliders.

  17. Fermilab Collider: Performance and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Fermilab collider program has completed its first physics run with two major detectors, CDF and DO. Recent performance of the Fermilab accelerator complex during Run Ia is presented, along with plans to improve the luminosity of the collider. The beam-beam tune shift limitations of previous runs have been avoided by the successful implementation of electrostatic separators in the Tevatron. The simultaneous operation of two high luminosity sections is provided by two matched low beta inserts. The Antiproton Source has increased its performance over the previous run as measured by stack size and stacking rate. The Linac will be upgraded from 200 MeV to 400 MeV in order to lessen the space charge tune shift upon injection into the Booster and provide proton beams with increased intensity with the same emittance. Higher luminosity requires more bunches in the Tevatron to again avoid the limitation due to the beam-beam interaction. Until it is replaced with the Main Injector, the Main Ring will remain as the most significant bottleneck on the performance of the collider.

  18. Reviews Exhibitions: Collider: Step inside the World's Greatest Experiment Equipment: Hero Steam Turbine Classroom Video: Most of Our Universe is Missing Book: Serving the Reich Book: Breakthrough to CLIL for Physics Book: The Good Research Guide Apps: Popplet Web Watch Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Collider: step inside the world's greatest experiment A great exhibition at the Science Museum in London Hero Steam Turbine Superb engine model gets up to 2500 rpm Most of Our Universe is Missing BBC video explores the dark truth Serving the Reich Science and morality in Nazi Germany The Good Research Guide A non-specialist book for teachers starting out in education research WORTH A LOOK Breakthrough to CLIL for Physics A book based on a physics curriculum for non-English students WEB WATCH Electric cycles online: patterns of use APPS The virtual laboratory advances personal skills

  19. Collider searches for nonperturbative low-scale gravity states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, Douglas M.

    2015-12-01

    The possibility of producing nonperturbative low-scale gravity states in collider experiments was first discussed in about 1998. The ATLAS and CMS experiments have searched for nonperturbative low-scale gravity states using the Large Hadron Collider with a proton-proton center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. These experiments have now seriously confronted the possibility of producing nonperturbative low-scale gravity states which were proposed over 17 years ago. I will summarize the results of the searches, give a personal view of what they mean, and make some predictions for 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. I will also discuss early ATLAS 13 TeV center-of-mass energy results.

  20. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-03-04

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  1. Colliding-beam-accelerator lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Courant, E.D.; Parzen, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the lattice of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, a 400 x 400 GeV pp facility proposed for construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure adopted is very versatile, in part in consequence of its desirable behavior as function of momentum deviation and as function of the betatron tunes. Each of the six insertions can be arranged to meet specific requirements at the crossing points as illustrated by a discussion of the tuneable low-beta insertions. The luminosity in these low-beta insertions (2 x 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) would be an order of magnitude larger than the standard insertions.

  2. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  3. LHC: The Large Hadron Collider

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Large Hadron Collider (or LHC) is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. In 2012, scientists used data taken by it to discover the Higgs boson, before pausing operations for upgrades and improvements. In the spring of 2015, the LHC will return to operations with 163% the energy it had before and with three times as many collisions per second. It’s essentially a new and improved version of itself. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains both some of the absolutely amazing scientific and engineering properties of this modern scientific wonder.

  4. Colliders and brane vector phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T. E.; Love, S. T.; Xiong, C.; Nitta, Muneto; Veldhuis, T. ter

    2008-12-01

    Brane world oscillations manifest themselves as massive vector gauge fields. Their coupling to the standard model is deduced using the method of nonlinear realizations of the spontaneously broken higher dimensional space-time symmetries. Brane vectors are stable and weakly interacting and therefore escape particle detectors unnoticed. LEP and Tevatron data on the production of a single photon in conjunction with missing energy are used to delineate experimentally excluded regions of brane vector parameter space. The additional region of parameter space accessible to the LHC as well as a future lepton linear collider is also determined by means of this process.

  5. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  6. Estimates of Fermilab Tevatron collider performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a model which has been used to estimate the average luminosity performance of the Tevatron collider. In the model, the average luminosity is related quantitatively to various performance parameters of the Fermilab Tevatron collider complex. The model is useful in allowing estimates to be developed for the improvements in average collider luminosity to be expected from changes in the fundamental performance parameters as a result of upgrades to various parts of the accelerator complex.

  7. FUTURE LEPTON COLLIDERS AND LASER ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-05-30

    Future high energy colliders along with their physics potential, and relationship to new laser technology are discussed. Experimental approaches and requirements for New Physics exploration are also described.

  8. SLAC-Linac-Collider (SLC) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-02-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider Project (SLC) and its features are described in this paper. In times of ever increasing costs for energy the electron storage ring principle is about to reach its practical limit. A new class of colliding beam beam facilities, the Linear Colliders, are getting more and more attractive and affordable at very high center-of-mass energies. The SLC is designed to be a poineer of this new class of colliding beam facilities and at the same time will serve as a valuable tool to explore the high energy physics at the level of 100 GeV in the center-of-mass system.

  9. Development work for a superconducting linear collider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheisen, Axel

    1995-01-01

    For future linear e(+)e(-) colliders in the TeV range several alternatives are under discussion. The TESLA approach is based on the advantages of superconductivity. High Q values of the accelerator structures give high efficiency for converting RF power into beam power. A low resonance frequency for the RF structures can be chosen to obtain a large number of electrons (positrons) per bunch. For a given luminosity the beam dimensions can be chosen conservatively which leads to relaxed beam emittance and tolerances at the final focus. Each individual superconducting accelerator component (resonator cavity) of this linear collider has to deliver an energy gain of 25 MeV/m to the beam. Today s.c. resonators are in use at CEBAF/USA, at DESY/Germany, Darmstadt/Germany KEK/Japan and CERN/Geneva. They show acceleration gradients between 5 MV/m and 10 MV/m. Encouraging experiments at CEA Saclay and Cornell University showed acceleration gradients of 20 MV/m and 25 MV/m in single and multicell structures. In an activity centered at DESY in Hamburg/Germany the TESLA collaboration is constructing a 500 MeV superconducting accelerator test facility (TTF) to demonstrate that a linear collider based on this technique can be built in a cost effective manner and that the necessary acceleration gradients of more than 15 MeV/m can be reached reproducibly. The test facility built at DESY covers an area of 3.000 m2 and is divided into 3 major activity areas: (1) The testlinac, where the performance ofthe modular components with an electron beam passing the 40 m long acceleration section can be demonstrated. (2) The test area, where all individual resonators are tested before installation into a module. (3) The preparation and assembly area, where assembly of cavities and modules take place. We report here on the design work to reach a reduction of costs compared to actual existing superconducting accelerator structures and on the facility set up to reach high acceleration gradients in

  10. Next-Generation Linear Collider Final Focus System Stability Tolerances

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, G.; Irwin, J.; /SLAC

    2007-04-25

    The design of final focus systems for the next generation of linear colliders has evolved largely from the experience gained with the design and operation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) and with the design of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB). We will compare the tolerances for two typical designs for a next-generation linear collider final focus system. The chromaticity generated by strong focusing systems, like the final quadrupole doublet before the interaction point of a linear collider, can be canceled by the introduction of sextupoles in a dispersive region. These sextupoles must be inserted in pairs separated by a -I transformation (Chromatic Correction Section) in order to cancel the strong geometric aberrations generated by sextupoles. Designs proposed for both the JLC or NLC final focus systems have two separate chromatic correction sections, one for each transverse plane separated by a ''{beta}-exchanger'' to manipulate the {beta}-function between the two CCS. The introduction of sextupoles and bending magnets gives rise to higher order aberrations (long sextupole and chrome-geometries) and radiation induced aberrations (chromaticity unbalance and ''Oide effect'') and one must optimize the lattice accordingly.

  11. Hadron colliders (SSC/LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.; Palmer, R.B. |; Evans, L.; Gareyte, J.; Siemann, R.H.

    1992-12-31

    The nominal SSC and LHC designs should operate conservatively at luminosities up to 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This luminosity is dictated by the event rates that can be handled by the detectors. However, this limit is event dependent (e.g. it does not take much of a detector to detect the event pp {yields} elephant; all one needs is extremely high luminosity). As such, it is useful to explore the possibility of going beyond the 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} level. Such exploration will also improve the accelerator physics understanding of pp collider designs. If the detector limitations are removed, the first accelerator limits occur when the luminosity is at the level of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These accelerator limits will first be reviewed. The authors will then continue on to explore even higher luminosity as the ultimate limit of pp colliders. Accelerator technologies needed to achieve this ultimate luminosity as well as the R and D needed to reach it are discussed.

  12. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  13. RF sources for future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Robert M.

    1997-02-01

    As we push particle colliders to 1-TeV center-of-mass collision energy and beyond, we require much more from our RF energy sources, both in terms of the RF performance and the number required for a given machine. In order to conserve real estate, the operating frequency of future colliders is apt to be higher than the S-band used for the SLAC SLC. It is this inevitable trend toward higher frequencies which presents the source designer with the greatest challenge. This paper is about that challenge. For reasons which will become clear, as we go to frequencies substantially above X-band, we will require sources other than klystrons, probably of the type referred to as "fast-wave devices," such as FEL or gyro-based amplifiers, or two-beam accelerators. Because these are discussed elsewhere in this conference, I will stick to the klystron as my model in describing the challenges to be overcome, as well as the criteria which must be met by alternative sources for new accelerators.

  14. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, e{sup {minus}}{gamma}, and {gamma}{gamma} interactions; and precision tests of QCD.

  15. The possibility of discovering new boson in e-e-,μ-μ-,e-μ- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, J. C.; Pleitez, V.; Rodriguez, M. C.

    2000-08-01

    Several left-right asymmetries in Møller (electron-electron), muon-muon and electron-muon scattering are considered in the context of the electroweak standard model and in a model with SU(3)C⊗SU(3)L⊗U(1)Y gauge symmetry at tree level in collider experiments. We show that these asymmetries are very sensitive to a doubly charged vector bilepton in the case of ee and μμ colliders and to an extra Z' neutral vector boson contribution in e-μ- collider. .

  16. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures.

  17. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  18. Search for top quark at Fermilab Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, K.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    The status of a search for the top quark with Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), based on a data sample recorded during the 1988--1989 run is presented. The plans for the next Fermilab Collider run in 1992--1993 and the prospects of discovering the top quark are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-11-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC).

  20. Current Experiments in Particle Physics. 1996 Edition.

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, Hrvoje

    2003-06-27

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  1. Bilepton production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, B.; Grégoire, T.; London, D.; Marleau, L.; Nadeau, H.

    1999-04-01

    We examine, as model-independently as possible, the production of bileptons at hadron colliders. When a particular model is necessary or useful, we choose the 3-3-1 model. We consider a variety of processes: qq¯-->Y++Y--, ud¯-->Y++Y-, ūd-->Y+Y--, qq¯-->Y++e-e-, qq¯-->φ++φ--, ud¯-->φ++φ-, and ūd-->φ+φ--, where Y and φ are vector and scalar bileptons, respectively. Given the present low-energy constraints, we find that, at the Fermilab Tevatron, vector bileptons are unobservable, while light scalar bileptons (Mφ<~300 GeV) are just barely observable. At the CERN LHC, the reach is extended considerably: vector bileptons of mass MY<~1 TeV are observable, as are scalar bileptons of mass Mφ<~850 GeV.

  2. Disformal dark energy at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare; Englert, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Disformally coupled, light scalar fields arise in many of the theories of dark energy and modified gravity that attempt to explain the accelerated expansion of the Universe. They have proved difficult to constrain with precision tests of gravity because they do not give rise to fifth forces around static nonrelativistic sources. However, because the scalar field couples derivatively to standard model matter, measurements at high-energy particle colliders offer an effective way to constrain and potentially detect a disformally coupled scalar field. Here we derive new constraints on the strength of the disformal coupling from LHC run 1 data and provide a forecast for the improvement of these constraints from run 2. We additionally comment on the running of disformal and standard model couplings in this scenario under the renormalization group flow.

  3. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, H.B.

    1985-10-01

    A description of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is given. It is a calorimetric detector, which covers almost the complete solid angle around the interaction region with segmented calorimeter ''towers''. A 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid, 3m in diameter and 5m long, provides a uniform magnetic field in the central region for magnetic analysis of charged particles. The magnetic field volume is filled with a large cylindrical drift chamber and a set of Time Projection Chambers. Muon detection is accomplished with drift chambers outside the calorimeters in the central region and with large magnetized steel toroids and associated drift chambers in the forward-backward regions. The electronics has a large dynamic range to allow measurement of both high energy clusters and small energy depositions made by penetrating muons. Interesting events are identified by a trigger system which, together with the rest of the data acquisition system, is FASTBUS based.

  4. Mutual colliding impact fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2014-09-15

    It is proposed to apply the well established colliding beam technology of high energy physics to the fast hot spot ignition of a highly compressed DT (deuterium-tritium) target igniting a larger D (deuterium) burn, by accelerating a small amount of solid deuterium, and likewise a small amount of tritium, making a head-on collision in the center of the target, projecting them through conical ducts situated at the opposite side of the target and converging in its center. In their head-on collision, the relative collision velocity is 5/3 times larger compared to the collision velocity of a stationary target. The two pieces have for this reason to be accelerated to a smaller velocity than would otherwise be needed to reach upon impact the same temperature. Since the velocity distribution of the two head-on colliding projectiles is with its two velocity peaks non-Maxwellian, the maximum cross section velocity product turns out to be substantially larger than the maximum if averaged over a Maxwellian. The D and T projectiles would have to be accelerated with two sabots driven by powerful particle or laser beams, permitting a rather large acceleration length. With the substantially larger cross section-velocity product by virtue of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution, a further advantage is that the head-on collision produces a large magnetic field by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, enhancing propagating burn. With this concept, the ignition of the neutron-less hydrogen-boron (HB{sup 11}) reaction might even be possible in a heterogeneous assembly of the hydrogen and the boron to reduce the bremsstrahlung-losses, resembling the heterogeneous assembly in a graphite-natural uranium reactor, there to reduce the neutron losses.

  5. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  6. The technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Collier, Paul

    2015-01-13

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a 27km circumference hadron collider, built at CERN to explore the energy frontier of particle physics. Approved in 1994, it was commissioned and began operation for data taking in 2009. The design and construction of the LHC presented many design, engineering and logistical challenges which involved pushing a number of technologies well beyond their level at the time. Since the start-up of the machine, there has been a very successful 3-year run with an impressive amount of data delivered to the LHC experiments. With an increasingly large stored energy in the beam, the operation of the machine itself presented many challenges and some of these will be discussed. Finally, the planning for the next 20 years has been outlined with progressive upgrades of the machine, first to nominal energy, then to progressively higher collision rates. At each stage the technical challenges are illustrated with a few examples. PMID:26949802

  7. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-21

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  8. The technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Collier, Paul

    2015-01-13

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a 27km circumference hadron collider, built at CERN to explore the energy frontier of particle physics. Approved in 1994, it was commissioned and began operation for data taking in 2009. The design and construction of the LHC presented many design, engineering and logistical challenges which involved pushing a number of technologies well beyond their level at the time. Since the start-up of the machine, there has been a very successful 3-year run with an impressive amount of data delivered to the LHC experiments. With an increasingly large stored energy in the beam, the operation of the machine itself presented many challenges and some of these will be discussed. Finally, the planning for the next 20 years has been outlined with progressive upgrades of the machine, first to nominal energy, then to progressively higher collision rates. At each stage the technical challenges are illustrated with a few examples.

  9. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2009-04-29

    There is considerable interest in the use of muon beams to create either an intense source of decay neutrinos aimed at a detector located 3000-7500 km away (a Neutrino Factory), or a Muon Collider that produces high-luminosity collisions at the energy frontier. R&D aimed at producing these facilities has been under way for more than 10 years. This paper will review experimental results from MuCool, MERIT, and MICE and indicate the extent to which they will provide proof-of-principle demonstrations of the key technologies required for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. Progress in constructing components for the MICE experiment will also be described.

  10. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  11. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  12. The principles and construction of linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, J.

    1986-09-01

    The problems posed to the designers and builders of high-energy linear colliders are discussed. Scaling laws of linear colliders are considered. The problem of attainment of small interaction areas is addressed. The physics of damping rings, which are designed to condense beam bunches in phase space, is discussed. The effect of wake fields on a particle bunch in a linac, particularly the conventional disk-loaded microwave linac structures, are discussed, as well as ways of dealing with those effects. Finally, the SLAC Linear Collider is described. 18 refs., 17 figs. (LEW)

  13. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  14. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  15. Compensatable muon collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds

    DOEpatents

    Raja, Rajendran

    2015-02-17

    A method and system for reducing background noise in a particle collider, comprises identifying an interaction point among a plurality of particles within a particle collider associated with a detector element, defining a trigger start time for each of the pixels as the time taken for light to travel from the interaction point to the pixel and a trigger stop time as a selected time after the trigger start time, and collecting only detections that occur between the start trigger time and the stop trigger time in order to thereafter compensate the result from the particle collider to reduce unwanted background detection.

  16. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. ); Kozanecki, W. )

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  17. Proposal for Research and Development: Vertexing, Tracking, and Data Acquisition for the Bottom Collider Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, H.; Gomez, B.; Rivera, F.; Sanabria, J.-C.; Yager, P.; Barsotti, E.; Bowden, M.; Childress, S.; Lebrun, P.; Morfin, J.; Roberts, L.A.; /Fermilab /Florida U. /Houston U. /IIT /Iowa U. /Northeastern U. /Northern Illinois U. /Ohio State U. /Oklahoma U. /Pennsylvania U.

    1989-01-01

    The authors propose a program of research and development into the detector systems needed for a B-physics experiment at the Fermilab p-{bar p} Collider. The initial emphasis is on the critical issues of vertexting, tracking, and data acquisition in the high-multiplicity, high-rate collider environment. R and D for the particle-identification systems (RICH counters, TRD's, and EM calorimeter) will be covered in a subsequent proposal. To help focus their efforts in a timely manner, they propose the first phase of the R and D should culminate in a system test at the C0 collider intersect during the 1990-1991 run: a small fraction of the eventual vertex detector would be used to demonstrate that secondary-decay vertices can be found at a hadron collider. The proposed budget for the r and D program is $800k in 1989, $1.5M in 1990, and $1.6M in 1991.

  18. Flavourful production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian Francesco; Gripaios, Ben; Sundrum, Raman

    2011-08-01

    We ask what new states may lie at or below the TeV scale, with sizable flavour-dependent couplings to light quarks, putting them within reach of hadron colliders via resonant production, or in association with Standard Model states. In particular, we focus on the compatibility of such states with stringent flavour-changing neutral current and electric-dipole moment constraints. We argue that the broadest and most theoretically plausible flavour structure of the new couplings is that they are hierarchical, as are Standard Model Yukawa couplings, although the hierarchical pattern may well be different. We point out that, without the need for any more elaborate or restrictive structure, new scalars with "diquark" couplings to standard quarks are particularly immune to existing constraints, and that such scalars may arise within a variety of theoretical paradigms. In particular, there can be substantial couplings to a pair of light quarks or to one light and one heavy quark. For example, the latter possibility may provide a flavour-safe interpretation of the asymmetry in top quark production observed at the Tevatron. We thereby motivate searches for diquark scalars at the Tevatron and LHC, and argue that their discovery represents one of our best chances for new insight into the Flavour Puzzle of the Standard Model.

  19. Nonglobal correlations in collider physics

    DOE PAGES

    Moult, Ian; Larkoski, Andrew J.

    2016-01-13

    Despite their importance for precision QCD calculations, correlations between in- and out-of-jet regions of phase space have never directly been observed. These so-called non-global effects are present generically whenever a collider physics measurement is not explicitly dependent on radiation throughout the entire phase space. In this paper, we introduce a novel procedure based on mutual information, which allows us to isolate these non-global correlations between measurements made in different regions of phase space. We study this procedure both analytically and in Monte Carlo simulations in the context of observables measured on hadronic final states produced in e+e- collisions, though itmore » is more widely applicable.The procedure exploits the sensitivity of soft radiation at large angles to non-global correlations, and we calculate these correlations through next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The bulk of these non-global correlations are found to be described in Monte Carlo simulation. They increase by the inclusion of non-perturbative effects, which we show can be incorporated in our calculation through the use of a model shape function. As a result, this procedure illuminates the source of non-global correlations and has connections more broadly to fundamental quantities in quantum field theory.« less

  20. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua, Belen

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  1. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

    2001-05-03

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

  2. Governance of the International Linear Collider Project

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, B.; Barish, B.; Delahaye, J.P.; Dosselli, U.; Elsen, E.; Harrison, M.; Mnich, J.; Paterson, J.M.; Richard, F.; Stapnes, S.; Suzuki, A.; Wormser, G.; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-31

    Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency, clearly

  3. The Status of the International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The International Linear Collider is under consideration in Japan as the next major global high energy physics facility. In this talk we shall describe the site and accelerator footprint together with the latest technical information on the superconducting RF technology.

  4. Magnet R&D for future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbi, Gian Luca

    2001-06-14

    High-energy colliders complementing and expanding the physics reach of LHC are presently under study in the United States, Europe and Japan. The magnet system is a major cost driver for hadron colliders at the energy frontier, and critical to the successful operation of muon colliders. Under most scenarios, magnet design as well as vacuum and cryogenic systems are complicated by high radiation loads. Magnet R&D programs are underway worldwide to take advantage of new developments in superconducting materials, achieve higher efficiency and simplify fabrication while preserving accelerator-class field quality. A review of recent progress in magnet technology for future colliders is presented, with emphasis on the most innovative design concepts and fabrication techniques.

  5. Accelerator considerations of large circular colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alex

    2016-07-01

    As we consider the tremendous physics reaches of the big future circular electron-positron and proton-proton colliders, it might be advisable to keep a close track of what accelerator challenges they face. Good progresses are being made, and yet it is reported here that substantial investments in funding, manpower, as well as a long sustained time to the R&D efforts will be required in preparation to realize these dream colliders.

  6. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  7. World lays groundwork for future linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, Toni

    2010-07-15

    With the Large Hadron Collider at CERN finally working, the particle-physics community can now afford to divide its attention between achieving LHC results and preparing for the next machine on its wish list, an electron-positron linear collider. The preparations involve developing and deciding on the technology for such a machine, the mode of its governance, and how to balance regional and global particle- and accelerator-physics programs.

  8. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Perry B.

    1995-07-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0-1.5 TeV, 5 TeV, and 25 TeV. In order to keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0-1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150-200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30-40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-II system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternatively, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0-1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  9. Low-cost hadron colliders at Fermilab: A discussion paper

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, G.W.; Malamud, E.

    1996-06-21

    New more economic approaches are required to continue the dramatic exponential rise in collider energies as represented by the well known Livingston plot. The old idea of low cost, low field iron dominated magnets in a small diameter pipe may become feasible in the next decade with dramatic recent advances in technology: (1) advanced tunneling technologies for small diameter, non human accessible tunnels, (2) accurate remote guidance systems for tunnel survey and boring machine steering, (3) high T{sub c} superconductors operating at liquid N{sub 2} or liquid H{sub 2} temperatures, (4) industrial applications of remote manipulation and robotics, (5) digitally multiplexed electronics to minimize cables, (6) achievement of high luminosities in p-p and p-{anti P} colliders. The goal of this paper is to stimulate continuing discussions on approaches to this new collider and to identify critical areas needing calculations, construction of models, proof of principle experiments, and full scale prototypes in order to determine feasibility and arrive at cost estimates.

  10. Status of neutrino factory and muon collider R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    2001-06-17

    A significant worldwide R and D effort is presently directed toward solving the technical challenges of producing, cooling, accelerating, storing, and eventually colliding beams of muons. Its primary thrust is toward issues critical to a Neutrino Factory, for which R and D efforts are under way in the U.S., via the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC); in Europe, centered at CERN; and in Japan, at KEK. Under study and experimental development are production targets handling intense proton beams (1-4 MW), phase rotation systems to reduce beam energy spread, cooling channels to reduce transverse beam emittance for the acceleration system, and storage rings where muon decays in a long straight section provide a neutrino beam for a long-baseline (3000 km) experiment. Critical experimental activities include development of very high gradient normal conducting RF (NCRF) and superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities, high-power liquid-hydrogen absorbers, and high-field superconducting solenoids. Components and instrumentation that tolerate the intense decay products of the muon beam are being developed for testing. For a high-luminosity collider, muons must be cooled longitudinally as well as transversely, requiring an emittance exchange scheme. In addition to the experimental R and D effort, sophisticated theoretical and simulation tools are needed for the design. Here, the goals, present status, and future R and D plans in these areas will be described.

  11. Future proton and electron colliders: Dreams for the 1990's

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1988-10-01

    In this paper I have reviewed the possibilities for new colliders that might be available in the 1990's. One or more new proton should be available in the late-90s based on plans of Europe, the US and the USSR. The two very high energy machines, LHC and SSC, are quite expensive, and their construction will be more decided by the politicians' view on the availability of resources than by the physicists' view of the need for new machines. Certainly something will be built, but the question is when. New electron colliders beyond LEP II could be available in the late 1990's as well. Most of the people who have looked at this problem believe that at a minimum three years of RandD are required before a proposal can be made, two years will be required to convince the authorities to go ahead, and five years will be required to build such a machine. Thus the earliest time a new electron collider at high energy could be available is around 1988. A strong international RandD program will be required to meet that schedule. In the field of B factories, PSI's proposal is the first serious step beyond the capabilities of CESR. There are other promising techniques but these need more RandD. The least RandD would be required for the asymmetric storage ring systems, while the most would be required for high luminosity linear colliders. For the next decade, high energy physics will be doing its work at the high energy frontier with Tevatron I and II, UNK, SLC, LEP I and II, and HERA. The opportunities for science presented by experiments at these facilities are very great, and it is to be hoped that the pressure for funding to construct the next generation facilities will not badly affect the operating budgets of the ones we now have or which will soon be turning on. 9 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  13. Indirect probe of electroweak-interacting particles at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ichikawa, Koji; Kundu, Anirban; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Shirai, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Various types of electroweak-interacting particles, which have non-trivial charges under the SU(2) L × U(1) Y gauge symmetry, appear in various extensions of the Standard Model. These particles are good targets of future lepton colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the Future Circular Collider of electrons and positrons (FCC-ee). An advantage of the experiments is that, even if their beam energies are below the threshold of the production of the new particles, quantum effects of the particles can be detected through high precision measurements. We estimate the capability of future lepton colliders to probe electroweak-interacting particles through the quantum effects, with particular focus on the wino, the Higgsino and the so-called minimal dark matters, and found that a particle whose mass is greater than the beam energy by 100-1000 GeV is detectable by measuring di-fermion production cross sections with O(0.1)% accuracy. In addition, with the use of the same analysis, we also discuss the sensitivity of the future colliders to model independent higher dimensional operators, and found that the cutoff scales corresponding to the operators can be probed up to a few ten TeV.

  14. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  15. String resonances at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lüst, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes, with gauge bosons due to strings attached to stacks of D-branes and chiral matter due to strings stretching between intersecting D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale Ms is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (integrated luminosity =3000 fb-1) with a center-of-mass energy of √s =14 TeV and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at √s =33 and 100 TeV, respectively (with the same integrated luminosity). In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and γ +jet are completely independent of the details of compactification and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV) lowest massive Regge excitations are open to discovery at the ≥5σ in dijet (γ +jet) HL-LHC data. We also show that for n=1 the dijet discovery potential at HE-LHC and VLHC exceedingly improves: up to 15 TeV and 41 TeV, respectively. To compute the signal-to-noise ratio for n=2 resonances, we first carry out a complete calculation of all relevant decay widths of the second massive level string states (including decays into massless particles and a massive n=1 and a massless particle), where we rely on factorization and conformal field theory techniques. Helicity wave functions of arbitrary higher spin massive bosons are also constructed. We demonstrate that for string scales Ms≲10.5 TeV (Ms≲28 TeV) detection of n =2 Regge recurrences at HE-LHC (VLHC) would become the smoking gun for D

  16. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  17. Minimax: Multiparticle physics at the TeVatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The author and two dozen others are engaged in a small test/experiment in the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It is called Minimax, and its purpose is to explore large-cross-section physics in the forward direction. The primary goal of Minimax is search for events containing the residue of disoriented chiral condensate (dcc) produced in the primary collision. The theoretical ideas are very speculative. But if they are right, they could provide an interpretation of the Centauro/anti-Centauro anomalies claimed to have been seen in cosmic-ray events. In this paper, the history and status of Minimax is described.

  18. Approaches to Beam Stabilization in X-Band Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Raubenheimer, Tor; Seryi, Andrei; Burrow, Philip; Molloy, Stephen; White, Glen; /Queen Mary U. of London

    2006-09-05

    In order to stabilize the beams at the interaction point, the X-band linear collider proposes to use a combination of techniques: inter-train and intra-train beam-beam feedback, passive vibration isolation, and active vibration stabilization based on either accelerometers or laser interferometers. These systems operate in a technologically redundant fashion: simulations indicate that if one technique proves unusable in the final machine, the others will still support adequate luminosity. Experiments underway for all of these technologies have already demonstrated adequate performance.

  19. CLIC Project Overview (In Conjunction with the Muon Collider Workshop)

    ScienceCinema

    Latina, Andrea

    2016-07-12

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for physics. The current goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology by the year 2010. Recently, important progress has been made concerning the high-gradient accelerating structure tests and the experiments with beam in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. On the organizational side, the CLIC international collaborations have significantly gained momentum, boosting the CLIC study.

  20. SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole coil production tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Physics at the e⁺e⁻ linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Moortgat-Picka, G.; Kronfeld, A. S.

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e⁺e⁻ linear collider in the energy range of √s = 92 GeV–3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focuses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  2. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Kettle, P.R.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  3. Seismic studies for Fermilab future collider projects

    SciTech Connect

    Lauh, J.; Shiltsev, V.

    1997-11-01

    Ground motion can cause significant beam emittance growth and orbit oscillations in large hadron colliders due to a vibration of numerous focusing magnets. Larger accelerator ring circumference leads to smaller revolution frequency and, e.g. for the Fermilab Very Large Hadron Collider(VLHC) 50-150 Hz vibrations are of particular interest as they are resonant with the beam betatron frequency. Seismic measurements at an existing large accelerator under operation can help to estimate the vibrations generated by the technical systems in future machines. Comparison of noisy and quiet microseismic conditions might be useful for proper choice of technical solutions for future colliders. This article presents results of wide-band seismic measurements at the Fermilab site, namely, in the tunnel of the Tevatron and on the surface nearby, and in two deep tunnels in the Illinois dolomite which is though to be a possible geological environment of the future accelerators.

  4. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade.

  5. The Superconducting Super Collider: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwitters, R.F.

    1993-04-01

    The design of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is briefly reviewed, including its key machine parameters. The scientific objectives are twofold: (1) investigation of high-mass, low-rate, rare phenomena beyond the standard model; and (2) investigation of processes within the domain of the standard model. Machine luminosity, a key parameter, is a function of beam brightness and current, and it must be preserved through the injector chain. Features of the various injectors are discussed. The superconducting magnet system is reviewed in terms of model magnet performance, including the highly successful Accelerator System String Test Various magnet design modifications are noted, reflecting minor changes in the collider arcs and improved installation procedures. The paper concludes with construction scenarios and priority issues for ensuring the earliest collider commissioning.

  6. The Large Hadron Collider: Redefining High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, Sarah

    2007-06-19

    Particle physicists have a description of the forces of nature known as the Standard Model that has successfully withstood decades of testing at laboratories around the world. Though the Standard Model is powerful, it is not complete. Important details like the masses of particles are not explained well, and realities as fundamental as gravity, dark matter, and dark energy are left out altogether. I will discuss gaps in the model and why there is hope that some puzzles will be solved by probing high energies with the Large Hadron Collider. Beginning next year, this machine will accelerate protons to record energies, hurling them around a 27 kilometer ring before colliding them 40 million times per second. Detectors the size of five-story buildings will record the debris of these collisions. The new energy frontier made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider will allow thousands of physicists to explore nature's fundamental forces and particles from a fantastic vantage point.

  7. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    SciTech Connect

    I. L. Rakhno; N. V. Mokhov; A. I. Drozhdin

    2003-12-10

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  8. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration mechanisms with colliding magnetized laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.; Nilson, P.; Haberberger, D.; Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D.

    2015-11-01

    Significant particle energization is observed to occur in many astrophysical environments, and in the standard models this acceleration occurs as a part of the energy conversion processes associated with collisionless shocks or magnetic reconnection. A recent generation of laboratory experiments conducted using magnetized laser-produced plasmas has opened opportunities to study these particle acceleration processes in the laboratory. Ablated plasma plumes are externally magnetized using an externally-applied magnetic field in combination with a low-density background plasma. Colliding unmagnetized plasmas demonstrated ion-driven Weibel instability while colliding magnetized plasmas drive magnetic reconnection. Both magnetized and unmagnetized colliding plasma are modeled with electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations which provide an end-to-end model of the experiments. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we provide predictions of particle acceleration driven by reconnection, resulting from both direct x-line acceleration and Fermi-like acceleration at contracting magnetic fields lines near magnetic islands.

  9. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  10. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag {ital b} quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and D{null} collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  11. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  12. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M; Kirby, R.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-05-27

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a luminosity limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing SLAC and international R&D program to study potential remedies.

  13. FFAG Designs for Muon Collider Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. Scott

    2014-01-13

    I estimate FFAG parameters for a muon collider with a 70mm longitudinal emittance. I do not discuss the lower emittance beam for a Higgs factory. I produce some example designs, giving only parameters relevant to estimating cost and performance. The designs would not track well, but the parameters of a good design will be close to those described. I compare these cost estimates to those for a fast-ramping synchrotron and a recirculating linear accelerator. I conclude that FFAGs do not appear to be cost-effective for the large longitudinal emittance in a high-energy muon collider.

  14. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  15. Luminosity measurements at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we discuss luminosity measurements at Tevatron and HERA as well as plans for luminosity measurements at LHC. We discuss luminosity measurements using the luminosity detectors of the experiments as well as measurements by the machine. We address uncertainties of the measurements, challenges and lessons learned.

  16. Teaching Dangerously: When Feminisms Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitz, Rose

    2010-01-01

    A common (although not universal) goal of feminist teachers is to create a "safe environment" in the classroom. The meaning of that term, however, varies considerably--some hope students will feel they can share personal feelings and experiences without fear of judgment, some that students will feel they can state their opinions without fear of…

  17. Report of Snowmass 2001 working group E2: Electron - positron colliders from the phi to the Z

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen-guo Zhao et al.

    2002-12-23

    We report on the status and plans of experiments now running or proposed for electron-positron colliders at energies between the {phi} and the Z. The e{sup +}e{sup -}B and charm factories we considered were PEP-II/BABAR, KEKB/Belle, superKEK, SuperBABAR, and CESR-c/CLEO-c. We reviewed the programs at the {phi} factory at Frascati and the proposed PEP-N facility at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We studied the prospects for B physics with a dedicated linear collider Z factory, associated with the TESLA high energy linear collider. In all cases, we compared the physics reach of these facilities with that of alternative experiments at hadron colliders or fixed target facilities.

  18. Present optics options for TeV colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1986-05-01

    A practical approach for implementing TeV collider optics with high luminosities pounds approx. = 10/sup 33/ (cm/sup 2/ s)/sup -1/ but without large pinch effects is given using current alternatives. Characteristics are considered that constrain the optics and the types and orders of magnets required. A modified linac FoDo cell based on permanent magnet hybrid quadrupoles is discussed. Similarly, a demagnifying, permanent magnet telescopic system that allows variation of beta, eta and energy is suggested for the final focus. The basic cell for low emittance damping rings can also be constructed solely from permanent magnets. Small diameter, low permeability, high field permanent magnets have proven useful for injection and extraction lines and are also compatible with the large particle near the interaction regions as well as with exotic experiments for production and use of secondary beams or for multi-bunch coalescing schemes for control of longitudinal bunch distribution. An 8-10 GeV prototype cell and final focus experiment is proposed to verify and study such systems as well as do some interesting physics tests. One example, which could be used with the PEP storage ring, would convert an external electron beam into a photon beam to avoid beamstrahlung effects - a major problem for high energy e+- colliders.

  19. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  20. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-01-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film "Angels and Demons." In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society…

  1. From the LHC to future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, A.; Assamagan, K.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglien, G.; Well, J.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Schumacher, M.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; Chen, K.F.; De Curtis, S.; Desch, K.; Dittmar, M.; Dreiner, H.; Duhrssen, M.; Foster, B.; Frandsen, M.T.; Giammanco, A.; Godbole, R.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Govoni, P.; Gunion, J.; Hollik, W.; Hou, W.S.; Isidori, G.; Juste, A.; Kalinowski, J.; Korytov, A.; Kou, E.; Kraml, S.; Krawczyk, M.; Martin, A.; Milstead, D.; Morton-Thurtle, V.; Moenig, K.; Mele, B.; Ozcan, E.; Pieri, M.; Plehn, T.; Reina, L.; Richter-Was, E.; Rizzo, T.; Rolbiecki, K.; Sannino, F.; Schram, M.; Smillie, J.; Sultansoy, S.; Tattersall, J.; Uwer, P., Webber, B.; and Wienemann, P.

    2010-03-02

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, the Working Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  2. Recent results from proton-antiproton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S. . High Energy Physics Lab.)

    1990-03-01

    New results from the CERN and Fermilab proton-antiproton colliders are summarised. The areas covered are jet physics, direct photon production, W and Z production and decay, heavy flavor production, the search for the top quark, and the search for more exotic phenomena. 46 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. QCD parton model at collider energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.

    1984-09-01

    Using the example of vector boson production, the application of the QCD improved parton model at collider energies is reviewed. The reliability of the extrapolation to SSC energies is assessed. Predictions at ..sqrt..S = 0.54 TeV are compared with data. 21 references.

  4. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set.

  5. Linear Collider Accelerator Physics Issues Regarding Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require more stringent alignment tolerances than those for the SLC with regard to the accelerating structures, quadrupoles, and beam position monitors. New techniques must be developed to achieve these tolerances. A combination of mechanical-electrical and beam-based methods will likely be needed.

  6. From the LHC to Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.; Grojean, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Jakobs, K.; Weiglein, G.; Azuelos, G.; Dawson, S.; Gripaios, B.; Han, T.; Hewett, J.; Lancaster, M.; Mariotti, C.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Polesello, G.; Riemann, S.; Assamagan, K.; Bechtle, P.; Carena, M.; Chachamis, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Discoveries at the LHC will soon set the physics agenda for future colliders. This report of a CERN Theory Institute includes the summaries of Working Groups that reviewed the physics goals and prospects of LHC running with 10 to 300 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, of the proposed sLHC luminosity upgrade, of the ILC, of CLIC, of the LHeC and of a muon collider. The four Working Groups considered possible scenarios for the first 10 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC in which (i) a state with properties that are compatible with a Higgs boson is discovered, (ii) no such state is discovered either because the Higgs properties are such that it is difficult to detect or because no Higgs boson exists, (iii) a missing-energy signal beyond the Standard Model is discovered as in some supersymmetric models, and (iv) some other exotic signature of new physics is discovered. In the contexts of these scenarios, theWorking Groups reviewed the capabilities of the future colliders to study in more detail whatever new physics may be discovered by the LHC. Their reports provide the particle physics community with some tools for reviewing the scientific priorities for future colliders after the LHC produces its first harvest of new physics from multi-TeV collisions.

  7. Difficult Decisions: The Superconducting Super Collider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, David E.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles of the superconducting super collider are presented. Arguments for the construction of this apparatus and policy issues surrounding its construction are discussed. Charts of the fundamental atomic particles and forces and the history of particle accelerators are provided. An activity for discussing this controversial…

  8. Towards a Future Linear Collider and The Linear Collider Studies at CERN

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    During the week 18-22 October, more than 400 physicists will meet at CERN and in the CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva) to review the global progress towards a future linear collider. The 2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both the CLIC and ILC options. Among the topics presented and discussed will be the progress towards the CLIC Conceptual Design Report in 2011, the ILC Technical Design Report in 2012, physics and detector studies linked to these reports, and an increasing numbers of common working group activities. The seminar will give an overview of these topics and also CERN’s linear collider studies, focusing on current activities and initial plans for the period 2011-16. n.b: The Council Chamber is also reserved for this colloquium with a live transmission from the Main Auditorium.

  9. High-brightness injectors for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The counterrotating beams in collider rings consist of trains of beam bunches with N{sub B} particles per bunch, spaced a distance S{sub B} apart. When the bunches collide, the interaction rate is determined by the luminosity, which is defined as the interaction rate per unit cross section. For head-on collisions between cylindrical Gaussian beams moving at speed {beta}c, the luminosity is given by L = N{sub B}{sup 2}{beta}c/4{pi}{sigma}{sup 2}S{sub B}, where {sigma} is the rms beam size projected onto a transverse plane (the two transverse planes are assumed identical) at the interaction point. This beam size depends on the rms emittance of the beam and the focusing strength, which is a measure of the 2-D phase-space area in each transverse plane, and is defined in terms of the second moments of the beam distribution. Our convention is to use the rms normalized emittance, without factors of 4 or 6 that are sometimes used. The quantity {tilde {beta}} is the Courant-Synder betatron amplitude function at the interaction point, a characteristic of the focusing lattice and {gamma} is the relativistic Lorentz factor. Achieving high luminosity at a given energy, and at practical values of {tilde {beta}} and S{sub B}, requires a large value for the ratio N{sub B}{sup 2}/{var epsilon}{sub n}, which implies high intensity and small emittance. Thus, specification of the luminosity sets the requirements for beam intensity and emittance, and establishes the requirements on the performance of the injector to the collider ring. In general, for fixed N{sub B}, the luminosity can be increased if {var epsilon}{sub n} can be reduced. The minimum emittance of the collider is limited by the performance of the injector; consequently the design of the injector is of great importance for the ultimate performance of the collider.

  10. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle. (LSP)

  11. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the Top Group's Top Quark Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Top group studies the properties of the top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  12. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  13. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  14. An Afterburner at the ILC: The Collider Viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    2004-12-07

    The concept of a high-gradient plasma wakefield accelerator is considered as an upgrade path for the International Linear Collider, a future linear collider. Basic parameters are presented based on those developed for the SLC 'Afterburner'. Basic layout considerations are described and the primary concerns related to the collider operation are discussed.

  15. An Afterburner at the ILC: The Collider Viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T

    2004-09-01

    The concept of a high-gradient plasma wakefield accelerator is considered as an upgrade path for the International Linear Collider, a future linear collider. Basic parameters are presented based on those developed for the SLC ''Afterburner.'' Basic layout considerations are described and the primary concerns related to the collider operation are discussed.

  16. A proposal for femtosecond x-ray generation in the SLC collider arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, J.C.

    1999-12-15

    The high-energy electron beam from the SLAC linac, in conjunction with the bunch compression of the existing SLC collider arcs, provides the opportunity for an extremely short pulse spontaneous emission x-ray source with high brightness. Experiments at the SLC have already demonstrated peak currents of 10 kA at 46 GeV. The addition of a relatively simple undulator in the reverse-bend section of the north arc can generate x-ray radiation of wavelength < 1 {angstrom} with peak brightness higher than any existing source. This could be used for testing x-ray diagnostics and to gain experience with short pulse x-ray experiments as a precursor to high brightness experiments with the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). In addition, experiments with a short electron bunch, relevant to the LCLS and the Next Linear Collider (NLC) projects, might be carried out.

  17. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Talk: Collider Physics: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichten, Estia

    2011-04-01

    More than a quarter century ago, theoretical issues with the Standard Model scalar boson sector inspired theorists to develop alternative models of electroweak symmetry breaking. The goal of the EHLQ study of hadron collider physics was to help determine the basic parameters of a supercollider that could distinguish these alternatives. Now we await data from the CMS and ATLAS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider to solve this mystery. Does the Standard Model survive or, as theorists generally expect, does new physics appear (Strong Dynamics, SUSY, Extra Dimensions,...)? Even well into the LHC era it is likely that questions about the origin of fermion mass and mixings will remain and new physics will bring new puzzles. This time, the associated new scales are unknown. The opportunity to address new physics at a future multi-TeV lepton collider is briefly addressed.

  18. General-Purpose Detectors for the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froidevaux, Daniel; Sphicas, Paris

    2006-11-01

    This review describes the two general-purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, that have been designed to study proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV, the highest center-of-mass energy ever achieved, at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. These experiments have undergone a long research and development and construction period since 1989 and are now in the middle of a strenuous and exciting integration, installation, and commissioning period. After a brief introduction to the physics context and prospects as perceived today, this review presents an overview of both projects in terms of their global design characteristics. The main features and challenges related to the tracking systems, to the calorimetry, and to the muon spectrometers are described. The various aspects of the trigger and data acquisition systems and of the computing and software are also discussed broadly. Finally, we conclude with the lessons learned during the design and construction years.

  19. A photon-photon collider in a vacuum hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, O. J.; Mackenroth, F.; Hill, E. G.; Rose, S. J.

    2014-06-01

    The ability to create matter from light is amongst the most striking predictions of quantum electrodynamics. Experimental signatures of this have been reported in the scattering of ultra-relativistic electron beams with laser beams, intense laser-plasma interactions and laser-driven solid target scattering. However, all such routes involve massive particles. The simplest mechanism by which pure light can be transformed into matter, Breit-Wheeler pair production (γγ' --> e+e-), has never been observed in the laboratory. Here, we present the design of a new class of photon-photon collider in which a gamma-ray beam is fired into the high-temperature radiation field of a laser-heated hohlraum. Matching experimental parameters to current-generation facilities, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that this scheme is capable of producing of the order of 105 Breit-Wheeler pairs in a single shot. This would provide the first realization of a pure photon-photon collider, representing the advent of a new type of high-energy physics experiment.

  20. Initial operation of the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The Tevatron is now the highest energy proton synchrotron and the only accelerator made with superconducting magnets. Operating since 1983 as a fixed-target machine at energies up to 800 GeV, it has now been modified to operate as a 900 GeV antiproton-proton collider. This paper describes the initial operation of the machine in this mode. The new features of the Fermilab complex, including the antiproton source and the Main Ring injector with its two overpasses and new rf requirements, are discussed. Beam characteristics in the Tevatron (including lifetimes, emittances, luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, backgrounds, and low beta complications), the coordination of the steps in the accelerator chain, and the commissioning history are also discussed. Finally, some plans for the improvement of the collider are presented.

  1. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  2. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  3. COMMISSIONING OF THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P.; CARDONA,J.; CONNOLLY,R.; ET AL; TSOUPAS,N.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    This report describes in detail steps performed in bringing the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) from the commissioning into the operational stage when collisions between 60 bunches of fully striped gold ions, were routinely provided. Corrections of the few power supplies connections by the beam measurements are described. Beam lifetime improvements at injection, along the acceleration are shown. The beam diagnostic results; like Schottky detector, beam profile monitor, beam position monitors, tune meter and others, are shown [1].

  4. Electroweak results from the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dorage, T., Padova University and I.N.F.N.

    1998-08-01

    We present the latest results on electroweak physics obtained from the analysis of p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s=1.8 TeV. The large data samples collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron collider allow measurements of the top quark mass to a 3% accuracy and of the W boson to a 0.1% accuracy. Many precision measurements that test the Standard Model and probe its possible extensions are also described.

  5. Really large hadron collider working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.; Limon, P.; Syphers, M.

    1996-12-01

    A summary is presented of preliminary studies of three 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders made with magnets of different field strengths, 1.8T, 9.5T and 12.6T. Descriptions of the machines, and some of the major and most challenging subsystems, are presented, along with parameter lists and the major issues for future study.

  6. Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation.

    PubMed

    Myers, S

    2012-02-28

    A history of the commissioning and the very successful early operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The accident that interrupted the first commissioning, its repair and the enhanced protection system put in place are fully described. The LHC beam commissioning and operational performance are reviewed for the period from 2010 to mid-2011. Preliminary plans for operation and future upgrades for the LHC are given for the short and medium term.

  7. 1987 DOE review: First collider run operation

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, S.; Crawford, J.; Dugan, G.; Edwards, H.; Finley, D.A.; Fowler, W.B.; Harrison, M.; Holmes, S.; Makara, J.N.; Malamud, E.

    1987-05-01

    This review covers the operations of the first run of the 1.8 TeV superconducting super collider. The papers enclosed cover: PBAR source status, fixed target operation, Tevatron cryogenic reliability and capacity upgrade, Tevatron Energy upgrade progress and plans, status of the D0 low beta insertion, 1.8 K and 4.7 K refrigeration for low-..beta.. quadrupoles, progress and plans for the LINAC and booster, near term and long term and long term performance improvements.

  8. Progress report on the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, J.

    1986-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider project (SLC) is reported as being near completion. The performance specifications are tabulated both for the initial form and for eventual goals. Various parts of the SLC are described and the status of their construction is reported, including the front end electron gun and booster, the linac, damping ring, positron source, SLC arcs, and conventional facilities. 5 refs., 12 figs. (LEW)

  9. CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, H.B.

    1987-03-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a large detector built to study 2 TeV anti p p collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. The calorimetry, which has polar angle coverage from 2 to 178, and complete azimuthal coverage within this region, forms the subject of this paper. It consists of both electromagnetic shower counters (EM calorimeters) and hadron calorimeters, and is segmented into about 5000 ''towers'' or solid angle elements.

  10. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. K.; Ryutov, D. D.; Hu, S. X.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Betti, R.; Froula, D. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Young, R.; Koenig, M.

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generated by the well-known ∇Te×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number ReM˜5×104) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.

  12. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RACK) to be constructed in the existing 3.8 km tunnel at Brookhaven has been developed. The collider has been designed to provide collisions of gold ions at six intersection points with a luminosity of about 5 /times/ 10/sup 26/cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/ at an energy of 100 GeV/u in each beam. Collisions with different ion species, including protons, will be possible. The collider consists of two interlaced, but otherwise separate, superconducting magnet rings. The 9.7 m long dipoles will operate at 3.5 T. Their 8 cm aperture was determined by the dimensions of gold ion beams taking into account diffusion due to intrabeam scattering. Heavy ion beams will be available from the Tandem Van de Graaff/Booster/AGS complex. The salient design features and the reasons for major design choices of the proposed machine are discussed in this paper. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Petrasso, R.; Amendt, P.; Park, H.; Remington, B.; Wilks, S.; Betti, R.; Froula, D.; Knauer, J.; Meyerhofer, D.; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Young, R.; Koenig, M.

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generated by the well-known ∇Te ×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10⁴) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.

  15. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    DOE PAGES

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M.; et al

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generatedmore » by the well-known ∇Te ×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10⁴) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.« less

  16. Linear collider IR and final focus introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.; Burke, D.

    1991-09-01

    The Linear Collider subgroup of the Accelerator Physics working group concerned itself with all aspects of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) design from the end of the accelerating structure to and through the interaction region. Within this region are: (1) a collimation section, (2) muon protection (of the detector from the collimator), (3) final focus system, (4) interaction point physics, and (5) detector masking from synchrotron radiation and beam-beam pair production. These areas of study are indicated schematically in Fig. 1. The parameters for the Next Linear Collider are still in motion, but attention has settled on a handful of parameter sets. Energies under consideration vary from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV in the center of mass, and luminosities vary from 10{sup 33} to 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. To be concrete we chose as a guide for our studies the parameter sets labeled F and G, Table 1 from Palmer. These cover large and small crossing angle cases and 0.4 m to 1.8 m of free length at the interaction point.

  17. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Fellow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Gail G.; Snopak, Pavel; Bao, Yu

    2015-03-20

    Muons are fundamental particles like electrons but much more massive. Muon accelerators can provide physics opportunities similar to those of electron accelerators, but because of the larger mass muons lose less energy to radiation, allowing more compact facilities with lower operating costs. The way muon beams are produced makes them too large to fit into the vacuum chamber of a cost-effective accelerator, and the short muon lifetime means that the beams must be reduced in size rather quickly, without losing too many of the muons. This reduction in size is called "cooling." Ionization cooling is a new technique that can accomplish such cooling. Intense muon beams can then be accelerated and injected into a storage ring, where they can be used to produce neutrino beams through their decays or collided with muons of the opposite charge to produce a muon collider, similar to an electron-positron collider. We report on the research carried out at the University of California, Riverside, towards producing such muon accelerators, as part of the Muon Accelerator Program based at Fermilab. Since this research was carried out in a university environment, we were able to involve both undergraduate and graduate students.

  18. Advanced Concepts for Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev

    2002-08-01

    A superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) of 5 to 10 GeV was proposed earlier as an alternative to electron storage rings to deliver polarized electron beam for electron-ion collider (EIC). To enhance the utilization efficiency of electron beam from a polarized source, it is proposed to complement the ERL by circulator ring (CR) wherein the injected electrons undergo up to 100 revolutions colliding with the ion beam. In this way, electron injector and linac operate in pulsed current (beam energy recovery) regime of a relatively low average current, while the polarization is still easily delivered and preserved. To make it also easier delivering and manipulating the proton and light ion polarization, twisted (figure 8) synchrotrons are proposed for heavy particle booster and collider ring. Same type of beam orbit can be used then for electron circulator. Electron cooling (EC) of the ion beam is considered an inevitable component of high luminosity EIC (1033/s. cm2 or above). It is recognized that EC also gives a possibility to obtain very short ion bunches, that allows much stronger final focusing. At the same time, short bunches make feasible the crab crossing (and traveling focus for ion beam) at collision points, hence, allow maximizing the collision rate. As a result, one can anticipate the luminosity increase by one or two orders of magnitude.

  19. An Electron-Ion Collider at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager; Lia Merminga; Ya. Derbenev

    2002-10-01

    Electron-ion colliders with a center of mass energy between 15 and 100 GeV, a luminosity of at least 10{sup 33}cm{sup -1}s{sup -1}, and a polarization of both beams at or above 80% have been proposed for future studies of hadronic structure. The scheme proposed here would accelerate the electron beam using the CEBAF recirculating linac with energy recovery. If all accelerating structures presently installed in the CEBAF tunnel are replaced by ones with a {approx}20 MV/m gradient, then a single recirculation results in an electron beam energy of about 5 GeV. After colliding with protons/light ions circulating in a figure-of-eight storage ring (for flexibility of spin manipulation) at an energy of up to 100 GeV, the electrons are re-injected into the CEBAF accelerator for deceleration and energy recovery. In this report several lay-out options and their respective feasibilities will be presented and discussed, together with parameters which would provide a luminosity of up to 1 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The feasibility of combining such a collider at a center-of-mass energy [sq rt] s of up to 43 GeV with a fixed target facility of 25 GeV is also explored.

  20. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S. Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.; Costello, J. T.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Hirooka, Y.

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  1. Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)

    SciTech Connect

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

  2. Jet Reconstruction and Spectroscopy at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellettini, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Dear colleagues and friends, Major new particle discoveries were made in the past by exploring the mass spectrum of lepton pairs. These searches still have great potential. However, new particle searches are now being extended to masses larger than the W, Z mass. More and more decay channels open up and the branching ratios into lepton pairs are reduced. Also, physics may dictate that states with heavy bosons and quarks become dominant. Examples are the decay of top quarks, and the expected final states of the standard model Higgs boson. Supersymmetry in any of its wide spectrum of models predicts intrigued final states where jets are major observables. To reconstruct masses and to study the dynamics of these states one must exploit the energy-momentum four-vectors of jets. Past experiments at the CERN SPS collider, at HERA, at LEP and now at the Tevatron collider and at LHC, have studied how best to reconstruct hadron jets. However, originally the role of jets in searching for new physics was primarily to sense new parton contact interactions by means of increased large pt tails in inclusive jet spectra, or studying jet events with large missing Et, or measuring branching ratios into jets of different flavour. These studies did not require as accurate a measure of jet four-momenta as needed in new particle searches in multi-jets final states. Figure 1 Figure 1. W, Z associated production in CDF events with large Et, miss and 2 jets. Consider for example (figure 1) the mass spectrum of dijets in events with large missing Et recently measured by CDF [1]. Trigger and analysis cuts were chosen so as to favour production of heavy boson pairs, with decay of one Z boson into neutrinos tagging the event and another W or Z boson decaying into jets. Associated production of boson pairs is observed, but the dijet mass resolution does not allow the separation of W from Z. A broad agreement of the overall observed rate with expectation is found, but a comparative study of the

  3. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  4. Self-sustaining charging of identical colliding particles.

    PubMed

    Siu, Theo; Cotton, Jake; Mattson, Gregory; Shinbrot, Troy

    2014-05-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that identical material samples can charge one another after being brought into symmetric contact. The mechanism for this charging is not known. In this article, we use a simplified one-dimensional lattice model to analyze charging in the context of agitated particles. We find that the electric field from a single weakly polarized grain can feed back on itself by polarizing its neighbors, leading to an exponential growth in polarization. We show that, by incorporating partial neutralization between neighboring polarized particles, either uniform alignment of dipoles or complex charge and polarization waves can be produced. We reproduce a polarized state experimentally using identical colliding particles and raise several issues for future study. PMID:25353788

  5. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  6. 120 MW, 800 MHz Magnicon for a Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-15

    Development of a pulsed magnicon at 800 MHz was carried out for the muon collider application, based on experience with similar amplifiers in the frequency range between 915 MHz and 34.3 GHz. Numerical simulations using proven computer codes were employed for the conceptual design, while established design technologies were incorporated into the engineering design. A cohesive design for the 800 MHz magnicon amplifier was carried out, including design of a 200 MW diode electron gun, design of the magnet system, optimization of beam dynamics including space charge effects in the transient and steady-state regimes, design of the drive, gain, and output cavities including an rf choke in the beam exit aperture, analysis of parasitic oscillations and design means to eliminate them, and design of the beam collector capable of 20 kW average power operation.

  7. Indiana University High Energy Physics, Task A. Technical progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A.

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses research at Indians University on the following high energy physics experiments: A search for mesons with unusual quantum numbers; hadronic states produced in association with high-mass dimuons; FNAL E740 (D0); superconducting super collider; and OPAL experiment at CERN.

  8. Test of Relativistic Gravity for Propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated `antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

  9. Measurement of Boer-Mulders Function via Drell-Yan Process by SeaQuest Experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kenichi

    2016-02-01

    The SeaQuest experiment is being carried out at Fermi National Accelerator Lab (FNAL) to investigate the nucleon structure with the Drell-Yan process. It utilizes the 120-GeV proton beam extracted from the FNAL Main Injector and targets of liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium, carbon, iron and tungsten. The solid targets are used to measure the nuclear effects. This paper describes the flavor asymmetry of light anti-quark distributions in the proton (d¯/ū) and the angular distribution of Drell-Yan process. The Boer-Mulders function (h1⊥(x,k T)) can be derived from the size (ν) of cos 2ϕ modulation. SeaQuest finished the second data-taking period in August 2014. Preliminary results of d¯/ū and ν are reported.

  10. Electron Cloud Effect in the Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M

    2004-09-13

    Beam induced multipacting, driven by the electric field of successive positively charged bunches, may arise from a resonant motion of electrons, generated by secondary emission, bouncing back and forth between opposite walls of the vacuum chamber. The electron-cloud effect (ECE) has been observed or is expected at many storage rings [1]. In the beam pipe of the Damping Ring (DR) of a linear collider, an electron cloud is produced initially by ionization of the residual gas and photoelectrons from the synchrotron radiation. The cloud is then sustained by secondary electron emission. This electron cloud can reach equilibrium after the passage of only a few bunches. The electron-cloud effect may be responsible for collective effects as fast coupled-bunch and single-bunch instability, emittance blow-up or incoherent tune shift when the bunch current exceeds a certain threshold, accompanied by a large number of electrons in the vacuum chamber. The ECE was identified as one of the most important R&D topics in the International Linear Collider Report [2]. Systematic studies on the possible electron-cloud effect have been initiated at SLAC for the GLC/NLC and TESLA linear colliders, with particular attention to the effect in the positron main damping ring (MDR) and the positron Low Emittance Transport which includes the bunch compressor system (BCS), the main linac, and the beam delivery system (BDS). We present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud generation in both machine designs. Thus, single and coupled-bunch instability thresholds are estimated for the GLC/NLC design.

  11. Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

  12. Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2010-12-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e + e - linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

  13. Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

  14. Broader Impacts of the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, M.; Ruchti, R.

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale scientific endeavors such as the International Linear Collider Project can have a lasting impact on education and outreach to our society. The ILC will provide a discovery platform for frontier physical science and it will also provide a discovery platform for broader impacts and social science. The importance of Broader Impacts of Science in general and the ILC in particular are described. Additionally, a synopsis of education and outreach activities carried out as an integral part of the Snowmass ILC Workshop is provided.

  15. Depolarization in the SLC Collider Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, P.; Limberg, T.; Rossmanith, R.

    1994-06-01

    In the 1993 running cycle of the Stanford Linear Collider, electron spin polarization measurements with a Moller polarimeter at the end of the linac and a Compton polarimeter near the interaction point (IP) indicated a relative polarization loss of up to 20% across the arc. The authors present calculations of the depolarizing effects where variations in energy, energy spread and transverse emittance as well as changes in orbit and initial spin orientation are taken into account. They compare their results with measurements and conclude that, in standard operating conditions, the relative polarization loss is only 3{+-}2%.

  16. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  17. Nonlinear resonant collimation for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emma, P.; Helm, R.; Nosochkov, Y.; Pitthan, R.; Raubenheimer, T.; Thompson, K.; Zimmermann, F.

    1999-04-01

    We present a scheme for collimating large amplitude particles in the main linacs of a linear collider, by adding octupoles to the FODO lattice of the linac. With this scheme the requirements on downstream collimation can be greatly reduced or perhaps even eliminated. An analytic estimate of the amplitude at which particles are lost is made by calculating the separatrix of the fourth order resonance, and is in good agreement with the results of simulations. Simulations of particle distributions in the beam core and halo are presented, as well as alignment tolerances for the octupoles.

  18. Current Correlations from a Mesoscopic Anyon Collider.

    PubMed

    Rosenow, Bernd; Levkivskyi, Ivan P; Halperin, Bertrand I

    2016-04-15

    Fermions and bosons are fundamental realizations of exchange statistics, which governs the probability for two particles being close to each other spatially. Anyons in the fractional quantum Hall effect are an example for exchange statistics intermediate between bosons and fermions. We analyze a mesoscopic setup in which two dilute beams of anyons collide with each other, and relate the correlations of current fluctuations to the probability of particles excluding each other spatially. While current correlations for fermions vanish, negative correlations for anyons are a clear signature of a reduced spatial exclusion as compared to fermions.

  19. Drell-Yan production at collider energies

    SciTech Connect

    Neerven, W.L. Van

    1995-07-01

    We present some results of the Drell-Yan cross sections d{sigma}/dm and {sigma}{sub tot} which includes the O ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) contribution to the coefficient function. In particular we study the total cross section {sigma}{sub tot} for vector boson production and d{sigma}/dm for low invariant masses m of the lepton pairs at large hadron collider energies. This study includes a detailed discussion of the dependence of the cross sections on the chosen scheme ({bar M}S versus DIS) and the factorization scale.

  20. Black holes at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, S; Landsberg, G

    2001-10-15

    If the scale of quantum gravity is near TeV, the CERN Large Hadron Collider will be producing one black hole (BH) about every second. The decays of the BHs into the final states with prompt, hard photons, electrons, or muons provide a clean signature with low background. The correlation between the BH mass and its temperature, deduced from the energy spectrum of the decay products, can test Hawking's evaporation law and determine the number of large new dimensions and the scale of quantum gravity.

  1. Black Holes and the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arunava

    2011-12-01

    The European Center for Nuclear Research or CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has caught our attention partly due to the film ``Angels and Demons.'' In the movie, an antimatter bomb attack on the Vatican is foiled by the protagonist. Perhaps just as controversial is the formation of mini black holes (BHs). Recently, the American Physical Society1 website featured an article on BH formation at the LHC.2 This article examines some aspects of mini BHs and explores the possibility of their detection at the LHC.

  2. Rf power sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.M.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Nelson, E.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. ); Boyd, J.K.; Houk, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Live

    1990-06-01

    The next generation of linear colliders requires peak power sources of over 200 MW per meter at frequencies above 10 GHz at pulse widths of less than 100 nsec. Several power sources are under active development, including a conventional klystron with rf pulse compression, a relativistic klystron (RK) and a crossed-field amplifier. Power from one of these has energized a 0.5 meter two- section High Gradient Accelerator (HGA) and accelerated a beam at over 80 MeV meter. Results of tests with these experimental devices are presented here.

  3. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered in this research summary include: status of the OPAL collaboration at LEP, CERN; two-photon physics at PLUTO; search for new particles at JADE; neutrinoless double beta decay at DESY; Fermilab jet experiment; neutrino deuterium experiment in the 15 foot bubble chamber at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon experiment at Fermilab; new experiments at the proton-antiproton collider; neutrino-electron scattering at Los Alamos; parity violation in proton-proton scattering; an upgrade of laboratory and computer facilities; and a study of bismuth germanate as a durable scintillation crystal. (GHT)

  4. Far Future Colliders and Required R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the R&D toward near future colliders and make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.

  5. Numerical calculation of ion polarization in the NICA collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2016-02-01

    The NICA Collider with two solenoid Siberian snakes is “transparent” to the spin. The collider transparent to the spin provides a unique capability to control any polarization direction of protons and deuterons using additional weak solenoids without affecting orbital parameters of the beam. The spin tune induced by the control solenoids must significantly exceed the strength of the zero-integer spin resonance, which contains a coherent part associated with errors in the collider's magnetic structure and an incoherent part associated with the beam emittances. We present calculations of the coherent part of the resonance strength in the NICA collider for proton and deuteron beams.

  6. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  7. Linear collider approach to a B anti B factory

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1987-06-01

    In this paper we consider the basic design expression and principal design constraints for a linear collider suitable for a B anti-B factory: Energy approx. =10 GeV, luminosity 10/sup 33/-10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/, energy resolution approx. =10/sup -2/. The design of room temperature linear colliders for a B factory is discussed. In such colliders, the rf energy stored in the linac structure is thrown away after each linac pulse. Linear colliders using superconducting rf cavities are considered. Some brief conclusions are presented.

  8. Higgs boson production with heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher B.

    2005-11-01

    One of the remaining puzzles in particle physics is the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the Standard Model (SM), a single doublet of complex scalar fields is responsible for breaking the SU(2) L x U(1)Y gauge symmetry thus giving mass to the electroweak gauge bosons via the Higgs mechanism and to the fermions via Yukawa couplings. The remnant of the process is a vet to he discovered scalar particle, the Higgs boson (h). However, current and future experiments at hadron colliders hold great promise. Of particular interest at hadron colliders is the production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of heavy quarks, pp¯(pp) → QQ¯h, where Q can be either a top or a bottom quark. Indeed, the production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks provides a very distinctive signal in hadronic collisions where background processes are formidable, and it will be instrumental in the discovery of a Higgs boson below about 130 GeV at the LHC. On the other hand, the production of a Higgs boson with bottom quarks can be strongly enhanced in models of new physics beyond the SM, e.g. supersymmetric models. If this is the case, bb¯h production will play a crucial role at the Tevatron where it could provide the first signal of new physics. Given the prominent role that Higgs production with heavy quarks can play at hadron colliders, it becomes imperative to have precise theoretical predictions for total and differential cross sections. In this dissertation, we outline and present detailed results for the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of the Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) corrections to QQ¯h production at both the Tevatron and the LHC. This calculation involves several difficult issues due to the three massive particles in the final state, a situation which is at the frontier of radiative correction calculations in quantum field theory. We detail the novel techniques developed to deal with these challenges. The calculation of pp¯(pp) → bb¯h at NLO in

  9. ICOOL: A TOOL FOR MUON COLLIDER SIMULATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.

    2001-09-28

    Current ideas for designing neutrino factories [ 1,2] and muon colliders [3] require unique configurations of fields and materials to prepare the muon beam for acceleration. This so-called front end system must accomplish the goals of phase rotation, bunching and cooling. We have continued the development of a 3-D tracking code, ICOOL [4], for examining possible muon collider front end configurations. A system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of {approx}50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary codes can be used for pre-processing, post-processing and optimization.

  10. Light-gravitino production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Rangarajan, R.; Lopez, J.L.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Zichichi, A.

    1998-01-01

    We consider the production of gravitinos ({tilde G}) in association with gluinos ({tilde g}) or squarks ({tilde q}) at hadron colliders, including the three main subprocesses: q{bar q}{r_arrow}{tilde g}{tilde G}, and qg{r_arrow}{tilde q}{tilde G}, and gg{r_arrow}{tilde g}{tilde G}. These channels become enhanced to the point of being observable for sufficiently light gravitino masses (m{sub {tilde G}}{lt}10{sup {minus}4}eV), as motivated by some supersymmetric explanations of the Collider Detector at Fermilab ee{gamma}{gamma}+E{sub T,miss} event. The characteristic signal of such events would be monojets, as opposed to dijets obtained in the more traditional supersymmetric process p{bar p}{r_arrow}{tilde g}{tilde g}. Searches for such events at the Fermilab Tevatron can impose lower limits on the gravitino mass. In the appendixes, we provide a complete set of Feynman rules for the gravitino interactions used in our calculation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Frequency scaling of linear super-colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mondelli, A.; Chernin, D.; Drobot, A.; Reiser, M.; Granatstein, V.

    1986-06-01

    The development of electron-positron linear colliders in the TeV energy range will be facilitated by the development of high-power rf sources at frequencies above 2856 MHz. Present S-band technology, represented by the SLC, would require a length in excess of 50 km per linac to accelerate particles to energies above 1 TeV. By raising the rf driving frequency, the rf breakdown limit is increased, thereby allowing the length of the accelerators to be reduced. Currently available rf power sources set the realizable gradient limit in an rf linac at frequencies above S-band. This paper presents a model for the frequency scaling of linear colliders, with luminosity scaled in proportion to the square of the center-of-mass energy. Since wakefield effects are the dominant deleterious effect, a separate single-bunch simulation model is described which calculates the evolution of the beam bunch with specified wakefields, including the effects of using programmed phase positioning and Landau damping. The results presented here have been obtained for a SLAC structure, scaled in proportion to wavelength.

  12. Mass reach scaling for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2015-04-01

    The primary goal of any future hadron collider is to discover new physics (NP) associated with a high mass scale, , beyond the range of the LHC. In order to maintain the same relative mass reach for rate-limited NP, , as increases, Richter recently reminded us that the required integrated luminosity obtainable at future hadron colliders (FHC) must grow rapidly, , in the limit of naive scaling. This would imply, e.g., a 50-fold increase in the required integrated luminosity when going from the 14 TeV LHC to a FHC with TeV, an increase that would prove quite challenging on many different fronts. In this paper we point out, due to the scaling violations associated with the evolution of the parton density functions (PDFs) and the running of the strong coupling, , that the actual luminosity necessary in order to maintain any fixed value of the relative mass reach is somewhat greater than this scaling result indicates. However, the actual values of the required luminosity scaling are found to be dependent upon the detailed nature of the NP being considered. Here we elucidate this point explicitly by employing several specific benchmark examples of possible NP scenarios and briefly discuss the (relatively weak) search impact in each case if these luminosity goals are not met.

  13. Gamma rays from colliding winds of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; Pohl, Martin

    2007-06-01

    Colliding winds of massive binaries have long been considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated by the detection of non-thermal spectra in the radio band, as well as by correlation studies of yet unidentified EGRET γ-ray sources with source populations appearing in star formation regions. This work re-considers the basic radiative processes and its properties that lead to high energy photon production in long-period massive star systems. We show that Klein Nishina effects as well as the anisotropic nature of the inverse Compton scattering, the dominating leptonic emission process, likely yield spectral and variability signatures in the γ-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma ray instruments like GLAST-LAT. In addition to all relevant radiative losses, we include propagation (such as convection in the stellar wind) as well as photon absorption effects, which a priori can not be neglected. The calculations are applied to WR 140 and WR 147, and predictions for their detectability in the γ-ray regime are provided. Physically similar specimen of their kind like WR 146, WR 137, WR 138, WR 112 and WR 125 may be regarded as candidate sources at GeV energies for near-future γ-ray experiments. Finally, we discuss several aspects relevant for eventually identifying this source class as a γ-ray emitting population. Thereby we utilize our findings on the expected radiative behavior of typical colliding wind binaries in the γ-ray regime as well as its expected spatial distribution on the γ-ray sky.

  14. Obtaining slow beam spills at the SSC collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ritson, D.

    1993-08-01

    There is substantial interest in providing slow-spill external proton beams in parallel with ``interaction running`` at the 20 TeV SSC collider. The proposal is to cause a flux of particles to impinge on a target consisting of a bent crystal extraction channel. Additionally, a slow spill onto a conventional internal target could be used as a source of secondary beams for physics or test purposes and might also be used for B-physics as proposed for HERA. The ``natural`` beam loss rates from elastic and diffractive beam gas scattering and IP collisions are not sufficient to provide suitably intense external proton beams. To prevent loss of luminosity, the rf excitation is non-linear and preferentially blows up the halo of the beam. The ``target`` is to be located at a region of high dispersion forcing particles at the edge of the momentum space onto the target. T. Lohse in this workshop has described a proposed internal target to be used at HERA that will not employ rf excitation but will use the finite loss rates observed at the HERA machine. The Hera losses are caused by a variety of sources in addition to beam gas scattering or IP interactions. Initially, the beam lifetime at HERA was too short to obtain satisfactory integrated luminosities. Subsequently, through careful attention to detail, the beam lifetime was increased to > 20 hours. Even with these changes, present loss rates provide the required intensity onto an internal target. The Tevatron and SPS proton anti-proton colliders have had similar experiences with their investigations of loss rates and also find that beam lifetimes may be substantially shorter than expected solely from beam gas and IP interactions. This paper proposes deliberately introducing controlled errors li

  15. Muon colliders: New prospects for precision physics and the high energy frontier

    SciTech Connect

    King, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    An overview is given of muon collider technology and of the current status of the muon collider research program. The exciting potential of muon colliders for both neutrino physics and collider physics studies is then described and illustrated using self-consistent collider parameter sets at 0.1 TeV to 100 TeV center-of-mass energies.

  16. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi

    2015-03-10

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds.

  17. Neutralino dark matter in minimal supergravity: Direct detection versus collider searches

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.; Brhlik, M.

    1998-01-01

    We calculate expected event rates for direct detection of relic neutralinos as a function of parameter space of the minimal supergravity model. Numerical results are presented for the specific case of a {sup 73}Ge detector. We find significant detection rates (R{gt}0.01events/kg/day) in regions of parameter space most favored by constraints from B{r_arrow}X{sub s}{gamma} and the cosmological relic density of neutralinos. The detection rates are especially large in regions of large tan{beta}, where many conventional signals for supersymmetry at collider experiments are difficult to detect. If the parameter tan{beta} is large, then there is a significant probability that the first direct evidence for supersymmetry could come from direct detection experiments, rather than from collider searches for sparticles. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. SDA-based diagnostic and analysis tools for Collider Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshakov, T.B.; Lebrun, P.; Panacek, S.; Papadimitriou, V.; Slaughter, J.; Xiao, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Operating and improving the understanding of the Fermilab Accelerator Complex for the colliding beam experiments requires advanced software methods and tools. The Shot Data Analysis (SDA) has been developed to fulfill this need. Data from the Fermilab Accelerator Complex is stored in a relational database, and is served to programs and users via Web-based tools. Summary tables are systematically generated during and after a store. These tables (the Supertable, the Recomputed Emittances, the Recomputed Intensities and other tables) are discussed here.

  19. Probing neutral gauge boson self-interactions in ZZ production at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, U.; Rainwater, D.

    2000-12-01

    A detailed analysis of ZZ production at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider is presented for general ZZZ and ZZγ couplings. Deviations from the standard model gauge theory structure for each of these can be parametrized in terms of two form factors which are severely restricted by unitarity at high energy. Achievable limits on these couplings are shown to be a dramatic improvement over the limits currently obtained by e+e- experiments.

  20. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma-based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma-based collider is presented.

  1. The Threshold of Embedded M Collider Bias and Confounding Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelcey, Benjamin; Carlisle, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Of particular import to this study, is collider bias originating from stratification on retreatment variables forming an embedded M or bowtie structural design. That is, rather than assume an M structural design which suggests that "X" is a collider but not a confounder, the authors adopt what they consider to be a more reasonable position and…

  2. Physics prospects: Why do we want a linear collider?

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi |

    1995-12-01

    The need to understand physics of electroweak symmetry breaking is reviewed. An electron positron linear collider will play crucial roles in that respect. It is discussed how the LHC and a linear collider need each other to understand symmetry breaking mechanism unambiguously. Two popular scenarios, supersymmetry and technicolor- like models, are used to demonstrate this point.

  3. Ground motion data for International Collider models

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, J.T.; LeBrun, P.; Shiltsev, V.; Singatulin, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    The proposed location for the International Linear Collider (ILC) in the Americas region is Fermilab in Batavia Illinois. If built at this location the tunnels would be located in the Galena Platteville shale at a depth of 100 or more meters below the surface. Studies using hydro static water levels and seismometers have been conducted in the MINOS hall and the LaFrange Mine in North Aurora Illinois to determine the level of ground motion. Both these locations are in the Galena Platteville shale and indicate the typical ground motion to be expected for the ILC. The data contains both natural and cultural noise. Coefficients for the ALT law are determined. Seismic measurements at the surface and 100 meters below the surface are presented.

  4. QCD and jets at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapeta, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We review various aspects of jet physics in the context of hadron colliders. We start by discussing the definitions and properties of jets and recent development in this area. We then consider the question of factorization for processes with jets, in particular for cases in which jets are produced in special configurations, like for example in the region of forward rapidities. We review numerous perturbative methods for calculating predictions for jet processes, including the fixed-order calculations as well as various matching and merging techniques. We also discuss the questions related to non-perturbative effects and the role they play in precision jet studies. We describe the status of calculations for processes with jet vetoes and we also elaborate on production of jets in forward direction. Throughout the article, we present selected comparisons between state-of-the-art theoretical predictions and the data from the LHC.

  5. Galaxies Collide to Create Hot, Huge Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This image of a pair of colliding galaxies called NGC 6240 shows them in a rare, short-lived phase of their evolution just before they merge into a single, larger galaxy. The prolonged, violent collision has drastically altered the appearance of both galaxies and created huge amounts of heat turning NGC 6240 into an 'infrared luminous' active galaxy.

    A rich variety of active galaxies, with different shapes, luminosities and radiation profiles exist. These galaxies may be related astronomers have suspected that they may represent an evolutionary sequence. By catching different galaxies in different stages of merging, a story emerges as one type of active galaxy changes into another. NGC 6240 provides an important 'missing link' in this process.

    This image was created from combined data from the infrared array camera of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 8.0 microns (red) and visible light from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (green and blue).

  6. Small air showers and collider physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Gawin, J.; Grochalska, B.

    1985-01-01

    At energies lower than 2.5 X 10 to the 5 GeV (in Lab. system), more accurate information on nucleon-nucleon collision (p-p collider and on primary composition now exist. The behavior of those both basic elements in cosmic ray phenomenology from ISR energy suggests some tendencies for reasonable extrapolation in the next decade 2.0x10 to the 5 to 2.0x10 to the 6 GeV. Small showers in altitude, recorded in the decade 2 X 10 to the 4 to 2 X 10 to the 5 GeV offers a good tool to testify the validity of all the Monte-Carlo simulation analysis and appreciate how nucleon-air collision are different from nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  7. Illuminating new electroweak states at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel powerful strategy to perform searches for new electroweak states. Uncolored electroweak states appear in generic extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and yet are challenging to discover at hadron colliders. This problem is particularly acute when the lightest state in the electroweak multiplet is neutral and all multiplet components are approximately degenerate. In this scenario, production of the charged fields of the multiplet is followed by decay into nearly invisible states; if this decay occurs promptly, the only way to infer the presence of the reaction is through its missing energy signature. Our proposal relies on emission of photon radiation from the new charged states as a means of discriminating the signal from SM backgrounds. We demonstrate its broad applicability by studying two examples: a pure Higgsino doublet and an electroweak quintuplet field.

  8. Tracking study of hadron collider boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Huang, Y.; Mahale, N.

    1992-07-01

    A simulation code SIMPSONS (previously called 6D-TEASE T) of single- and multi-particle tracking has been developed for proton synchrotrons. The 6D phase space coordinates are calculated each time step including acceleration with an arbitrary ramping curve by integration of the rf phase. Space-charge effects are modelled by means of the Particle In Cell (PIC) method. We observed the transverse emittance growth around the injection energy of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) with and without second harmonic rf cavities which reduce peak line density. We also employed the code to see the possible transverse emittance deterioration around the transition energy in the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) and to estimate the emittance dilution due to an injection error of the MEB.

  9. The Superconducting Super Collider Low Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    York, R.C.; Funk, W.; Garren, A.; Machida, S.; Mahale, N.K.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Wu, X. ); Wienands, U. )

    1991-05-01

    In collider fill mode, the Low Energy Booster (LEB) will accelerate 10{sup 12} protons in 114 bunches from an injection momentum of 1.22 GeV/c to a final momentum of 12 Gev/c, cycling at a frequency of 10 Hz. The most significant extension of present fast-cycling synchrotron technology arises from the requirement that the normalized transverse emittance (rms) of the beam be {le}0.6 {pi} {mu}m. In an alternative mode, the LEB will accelerate five times this current with a normalized transverse emittance {le} 4 {pi} {mu}m. A general overview of the design is presented. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Beam Dynamics Considerations in Electron Ion Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear physics community is converging on the idea that the next large project after FRIB should be an electron-ion collider. Both Brookhaven National Lab and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have developed accelerator designs, both of which need novel solutions to accelerator physics problems. In this talk we discuss some of the problems that must be solved and their solutions. Examples in novel beam optics systems, beam cooling, and beam polarization control will be presented. Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  11. Big Science and the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Gian Francesco

    2012-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the particle accelerator operating at CERN, is probably the most complex and ambitious scientific project ever accomplished by humanity. The sheer size of the enterprise, in terms of financial and human resources, naturally raises the question whether society should support such costly basic-research programs. I address this question by first reviewing the process that led to the emergence of Big Science and the role of large projects in the development of science and technology. I then compare the methodologies of Small and Big Science, emphasizing their mutual linkage. Finally, after examining the cost of Big Science projects, I highlight several general aspects of their beneficial implications for society.

  12. Genesis of the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn

    2015-01-13

    This paper describes the scientific, technical and political genesis of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It begins with an outline of the early history of the LHC, from first thoughts and accelerator and detector developments that underwrote the project, through the first studies of the LHC and its scientific potential and the genesis of the experimental programme, to the presentation of the proposal to build the LHC to the CERN Council in December 1993. The events that led to the proposal to build the LHC in two stages, which was approved in December 1994, are then described. Next, the role of non-Member State contributions and of the agreement that CERN could take loans, which allowed single stage construction to be approved in December 1996, despite a cut in the Members' contributions, are explained. The paper concludes by identifying points of potential relevance for the approval of possible future large particle physics projects.

  13. Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, A.; Binderbauer, M.; Liu, F.; Qerushi, A.; Rostoker, N.; Wessel, F. J.

    2004-02-01

    The Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion System, CBFR-SPS, is an aneutronic, magnetic-field-reversed configuration, fueled by an energetic-ion mixture of hydrogen and boron11 (H-B11). Particle confinement and transport in the CBFR-SPS are classical, hence the system is scaleable. Fusion products are helium ions, α-particles, expelled axially out of the system. α-particles flowing in one direction are decelerated and their energy recovered to ``power'' the system; particles expelled in the opposite direction provide thrust. Since the fusion products are charged particles, the system does not require the use of a massive-radiation shield. This paper describes a 100 MW CBFR-SPS design, including estimates for the propulsion-system parameters and masses. Specific emphasis is placed on the design of a closed-cycle, Brayton-heat engine, consisting of heat-exchangers, turbo-alternator, compressor, and finned radiators.

  14. The future of the Large Hadron Collider and CERN.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2012-02-28

    This paper presents the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its current scientific programme and outlines options for high-energy colliders at the energy frontier for the years to come. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy, as well as upgrades to the LHC and its injectors. This may be followed by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider collaborations, or by a high-energy electron-proton machine. This contribution describes the past, present and future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  15. Time resolved diagnostics of ions in colliding carbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ravi Pratap; Gupta, Shyam L.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2014-11-14

    We report a comparative study of the dynamic behaviour of ions at different pressures in laser ablated colliding and single plasma plumes using 2D imaging, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and a retarding field analyser (RFA). 2D imaging shows the splitting of plasma plumes due to different velocities of various plasma species. OES shows enhancement in abundance of ionic species with their presence for a longer time in colliding plume. C{sub 2} molecular formation is seen at later time in colliding plume compared to single plume and is attributed to dominating collisional processes in the colliding region of the plumes. The time of flight distribution of ions traced by the RFA shows the variation with change in fluence as well as ambient pressure for both colliding and single plume. Time of flight analysis of ions also shows the appearance of a fast peak in ion signal due to acceleration of ions at larger fluence.

  16. Determination of strange sea quark distributions from fixed-target and collider data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Caminada, L.; Lipka, K.; Lohwasser, K.; Moch, S.; Petti, R.; PlačakytÄ--, R.

    2015-05-01

    We present an improved determination of the strange sea distribution in the nucleon with constraints coming from the recent charm production data in neutrino-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering by the NOMAD and CHORUS experiments and from charged current inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at HERA. We demonstrate that the results are consistent with the data from the ATLAS and the CMS experiments on the associated production of W± -bosons with c -quarks. We also discuss issues related to the recent strange sea determination by the ATLAS experiment using LHC collider data.

  17. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, T.S.; Barton, D.S.; Oerter, B.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider control system has been used in the commissioning of the AGS to RHIC transfer line and in the first RHIC sextant test. Much of the controls infrastructure for networks and links has been installed throughout the collider. All of the controls hardware modules needed to be built for early RHIC operations have been designed and tested. Many of these VME modules are already being used in normal AGS operations. Over 150 VME based front end computers and device controllers will be installed by the Summer of 1998 in order to be ready for Fall of 1998. A few features are being added to the front end computer core software. The bulk of the Accelerator Device Objects (ADOs) which are instantiated in the FECs, have been written and tested in the early commissioning. A configuration database has been designed. Generic control and display of ADO parameters via a spreadsheet like program on the console level computers was provided early on in the control system development. User interface tools that were developed for the AGS control system have been used in RHIC applications. Some of the basic operations programs, like alarm display and save/restore, that are used in the AGS operations have been or will be expanded to support RHIC operations. A model for application programs which involves a console level manager servicing ADOs have been verified with a few RHIC applications. More applications need to be written for the Fall of 1998 commissioning effort. A sequencer for automatic control of the fill is being written with the expectation that it will be useful in early commissioning.

  18. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  19. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-17

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D; efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  20. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}3{sup {minus}} linear colliders.

  1. Collider Phenomenology with Split-UED

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Park, Seong Chan; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the collider implications of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. The non-vanishing fermion mass in the bulk, which is consistent with the KK-parity, largely modifies the phenomenology of Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions. We scrutinize the behavior of couplings and study the discovery reach of the Tevatron and the LHC for level-2 Kaluza-Klein modes in the dilepton channel, which would indicates the presence of the extra dimensions. Observation of large event rates for dilepton resonances can result from a nontrivial fermion mass profile along the extra dimensions, which, in turn, may corroborate extra dimensional explanation for the observation of the positron excess in cosmic rays. The Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions scenario has received great attention. Recently non-vanishing bulk fermion masses have been introduced without spoiling the virtue of KK-parity. The fermion profiles are no longer simple sine/cosine functions and depend upon the specific values of bulk parameters. The profiles of fermions are split along the extra dimensions while the wave functions of the bosons remain the same as in UED. A simple introduction of a KK-parity conserving bulk fermion mass has significant influences on collider aspects as well as astrophysical implications of UED. For instance, the DM annihilation fraction into certain SM fermion pairs is either enhanced or reduced (compared to the MUED case) so that one can perhaps explain the PAMELA positron excess while suppressing the anti-proton flux. In this paper, we have concentrated on collider phenomenology of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. We have revisited the KK decomposition in detail and analyzed wave function overlaps to compute relevant couplings for collider studies. We have discussed general collider implication for level-1 KK modes and level-2 KK with non-zero bulk mass and have computed LHC reach for the EW level-2 KK bosons, {gamma}{sub 2} and Z{sub 2}, in the dilepton channel. The LHC should

  2. Beam tube vacuum in future superconducting proton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.

    1994-10-01

    The beam tube vacuum requirements in future superconducting proton colliders that have been proposed or discussed in the literature -- SSC, LHC, and ELN -- are reviewed. The main beam tube vacuum problem encountered in these machines is how to deal with the magnitude of gas desorption and power deposition by synchrotron radiation while satisfying resistivity, impedance, and space constraints in the cryogenic environment of superconducting magnets. A beam tube vacuum model is developed that treats photodesorption of tightly bound H, C, and 0, photodesorption of physisorbed molecules, and the isotherm vapor pressure of H{sub 2}. Experimental data on cold tube photodesorption experiments are reviewed and applied to model calculations of beam tube vacuum performance for simple cold beam tube and liner configurations. Particular emphasis is placed on the modeling and interpretation of beam tube photodesorpiion experiments at electron synchrotron light sources. The paper also includes discussion of the constraints imposed by beam image current heating, the growth rate of the resistive wall instability, and single-bunch instability impedance limits.

  3. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the QCD Group's Research into Properties of the Strong Interaction

    DOE Data Explorer

    ,

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The QCD group studies the properties of the strong interaction. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  4. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons Research of the Higgs Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Higgs group searches for Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs bosons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  5. Design and construction of vacuum systems for large colliders using superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Vacuum system requirements for proton accelerators and colliders with superconducting megnets are discussed. The vacuum systems for the colliding beam accelerator and the Tevatron are described. (WHK)

  6. Studies of Magnetic Reconnection in Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Novel images of magnetic fields and measurements of electron and ion temperatures have been obtained in the magnetic reconnection region of high- β, laser-produced plasmas. Experiments using laser-irradiated foils produce expanding, hemispherical plasma plumes carrying MG Biermann-battery magnetic fields, which can be driven to interact and reconnect. Thomson-scattering measurements of electron and ion temperatures in the interaction region of two colliding, magnetized plasmas show no thermal enhancement due to reconnection, as expected for β ~ 8 plasmas. Two different proton radiography techniques used to image the magnetic field structures show deformation, pileup, and annihilation of magnetic flux. High-resolution images reveal unambiguously reconnection-induced jets emerging from the interaction region and show instabilities in the expanding plasma plumes and supersonic, hydrodynamic jets due to the plasma collision. Quantitative magnetic flux data show that reconnection in experiments with asymmetry in the scale size, density, temperature, and plasma flow across the reconnection region occurs less efficiently than in similar, symmetric experiments. This result is attributed to disruption of the Hall mechanism mediating collisionless reconnection. The collision of plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields has also been probed, illustrating the deformation of magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas in the absence of reconnection. These experiments are particularly relevant to high- β reconnection environments, such as the magnetopause. This work was performed in collaboration with C. Li, F. Séguin, A. Zylstra, H. Rinderknecht, H. Sio, J. Frenje, and R. Petrasso (MIT), I. Igumenshchev, V. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, and D. Froula (LLE), J. Ross and R. Town (LLNL), W. Fox (UNH), and A. Nikroo (GA), and was supported in part by the NLUF, FSC/UR, U.S. DOE, LLNL, and LLE.

  7. Multianode Photomultiplier Tube Alignment for the MINERvA Experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    The MINERvA experiment (Main INjector ExpeRiment vA) at FNAL will study the neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-nucleus interaction. The light collection from the detector will be done via optic fibers using Hamamatsu H8804 64-channel photomultiplier tubes (PMT). Each PMT channel needs to be precisely aligned with the corresponding optic fiber. The MINERvA PMT optical boxes contain precision machined optic ``cookies'' which capture the 8x8 array of optic fibers. Each PMT-cookie pair needs to be aligned as precisely as possible. This contribution will describe the alignment setup and procedure implemented at James Madison University.

  8. Tevatron Collider Run II status and novel technologies for luminosity upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2004-07-20

    Over the past 2 years the Tevatron peak luminosity steadily progressed and reached the level of 92e30 cm-2s-1 which exceeds the original Run IIa goal. Over 0.57fb-1 have being delivered to each CDF and D0 experiments since the beginning of the Run II. In parallel to the Collider operation, we have started a project of the luminosity upgrade which should lead to peak luminosities of about 270e30 and total integrated luminosity of 4.4-8.5 fb-1 through FY2009. In this paper we describe the status of the Tevatron Collider complex, essence of the upgrades and novel accelerator technologies to be employed.

  9. Probing charged Higgs boson couplings at a future circular hadron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćakır, I. T.; Kuday, S.; Saygın, H.; Şenol, A.; ćakır, O.

    2016-07-01

    Many of the new physics models predict a light Higgs boson similar to the Higgs boson of the Standard Model (SM) and also extra scalar bosons. Beyond the search channels for a SM Higgs boson, the future collider experiments will explore additional channels that are specific to extended Higgs sectors. We study the charged Higgs boson production within the framework of two Higgs doublet models (THDM) in the proton-proton collisions at a future circular hadron collider (FCC-hh). With an integrated luminosity of Lint=500 fb-1 at very high energy frontier (√{s }=100 TeV ), we obtain a significant coverage of the parameter space and distinguish the charged Higgs-top-bottom interaction within the THDM or other new physics models with charged Higgs boson mass up to 1.5 TeV.

  10. Alighment and Vibration Issues in TeV Linear Collider Design

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of particle-beam-derived placement information are mentioned.

  11. Alignment and vibration issues in TeV linear collider design

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1989-07-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require alignment accuracies and stabilities of component placement at least one, perhaps two, orders of magnitude better than can be achieved by the conventional methods and procedures in practice today. The magnitudes of these component-placement tolerances for current designs of various linear collider subsystems are tabulated. In the micron range, long-term ground motion is sufficiently rapid that on-line reference and mechanical correction systems are called for. Some recent experiences with the upgraded SLAC laser alignment systems and examples of some conceivable solutions for the future are described. The so called ''girder'' problem is discussed in the light of ambient and vibratory disturbances. The importance of the quality of the underlying geology is stressed. The necessity and limitations of public-beam-derived placement information are mentioned. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Run scenarios for the linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    M. Battaglia et al.

    2002-12-23

    We have examined how a Linear Collider program of 1000 fb{sup -1} could be constructed in the case that a very rich program of new physics is accessible at {radical}s {le} 500 GeV. We have examined possible run plans that would allow the measurement of the parameters of a 120 GeV Higgs boson, the top quark, and could give information on the sparticle masses in SUSY scenarios in which many states are accessible. We find that the construction of the run plan (the specific energies for collider operation, the mix of initial state electron polarization states, and the use of special e{sup -}e{sup -} runs) will depend quite sensitively on the specifics of the supersymmetry model, as the decay channels open to particular sparticles vary drastically and discontinuously as the underlying SUSY model parameters are varied. We have explored this dependence somewhat by considering two rather closely related SUSY model points. We have called for operation at a high energy to study kinematic end points, followed by runs in the vicinity of several two body production thresholds once their location is determined by the end point studies. For our benchmarks, the end point runs are capable of disentangling most sparticle states through the use of specific final states and beam polarizations. The estimated sparticle mass precisions, combined from end point and scan data, are given in Table VIII and the corresponding estimates for the mSUGRA parameters are in Table IX. The precision for the Higgs boson mass, width, cross-sections, branching ratios and couplings are given in Table X. The errors on the top quark mass and width are expected to be dominated by the systematic limits imposed by QCD non-perturbative effects. The run plan devotes at least two thirds of the accumulated luminosity near the maximum LC energy, so that the program would be sensitive to unexpected new phenomena at high mass scales. We conclude that with a 1 ab{sup -1} program, expected to take the first 6-7 years

  13. Latest Results from the LSND Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tayloe, R.

    1999-02-14

    The LSND experiment at Los Alamos has searched for anti-{nu}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} anti-{nu}{sub e} oscillations using anti-{nu}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest and {nu}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {nu}{sub e} oscillations using {nu}{sub {mu}} from {pi}{sup +} decay in flight. An excess of events attributable to neutrino oscillations has been observed in both of these channels in data collected in 1993-1995. A recent preliminary analysis of the decay at rest anti-{nu}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} anti-{nu}{sub e} data collected in 1996-1998 with a different {nu} source configuration is consistent with the earlier data. The BooNE experiment that is planned to run at FNAL will further test these results.

  14. Laser cooling of electron beams for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Telnov, V.

    1996-10-01

    A novel method of electron beam cooling is considered which can be used for linear colliders. The electron beam is cooled during collision with focused powerful laser pulse. With reasonable laser parameters (laser flash energy about 10 J) one can decrease transverse beam emittances by a factor about 10 per one stage. The ultimate transverse emittances are much below that given by other methods. Depolarization of a beam during the cooling is about 5--15% for one stage. This method is especially useful for photon colliders and open new possibilities for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders and x-ray FEL based on high energy linacs.

  15. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P.; Kozanecki, W.

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  16. Heavy flavor production and top quark search at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    We review heavy flavor production at hadron colliders, with an eye towards the physics of the top quark. Motivation for existence of top, and current status of top search are reviewed. The physics of event simulation at hadron colliders is reviewed. We discuss characteristics of top quark events at p{bar p} colliders that may aid in distinguishing the top quark signal from Standard Model backgrounds, and illustrate various cuts which may be useful for top discovery. Top physics at hadron supercolliders is commented upon, as well as top quark mass measurement techniques. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  18. Secondary particle in background levels and effects on detectors at future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, T.

    1993-06-01

    The next generation of hadron colliders, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will operate at high center-of-mass energies and luminosities. Namely, for the SSC (LHC) the square root of s = 40 TeV (the square root of s = 16 TeV) and L = 10(exp 33) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) (L = 3 x 10(exp 34) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1)). These conditions will result in the production of large backgrounds as well as radiation environments. Ascertaining the backgrounds, in terms of the production of secondary charged and neutral particles, and the radiation environments are important considerations for the detectors proposed for these colliders. An initial investigation of the radiation levels in the SSC detectors was undertaken by D. Groom and colleagues, in the context of the 'task force on radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions.' The method consisted essentially of an analytic approach, using standard descriptions of average events in conjunction with simulations of secondary processes. Following Groom's work, extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed to address the issues of backgrounds and radiation environments for the GEM and SD C3 experiments proposed at the SSC and for the ATLAS and CMS experiments planned for the LHC. The purpose of the present article is to give a brief summary of some aspects of the methods, assumptions, and calculations performed to date (principally for the SSC detectors) and to stress the relevance of such calculations to the detectors proposed for the study of B-physics in particular.

  19. New Methods of Particle Collimation in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; /Fermilab

    2011-10-01

    The collimation system is an essential part of the design of any high-power accelerator. Its functions include protection of components from accidental and intentional energy deposition, reduction of backgrounds, and beam diagnostics. Conventional multi-stage systems based on scatterers and absorbers offer robust shielding and efficient collection of losses. Two complementary concepts have been proposed to address some of the limitations of conventional systems: channeling and volume reflection in bent crystals and collimation with hollow electron beams. The main focus of this paper is the hollow electron beam collimator, a novel concept based on the interaction of the circulating beam with a 5-keV, magnetically confined, pulsed hollow electron beam in a 2-m-long section of the ring. The electrons enclose the circulating beam, kicking halo particles transversely and leaving the beam core unperturbed. By acting as a tunable diffusion enhancer and not as a hard aperture limitation, the hollow electron beam collimator extends conventional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Results on the collimation of 980-GeV antiprotons are presented, together with prospects for the future.

  20. Collider tests of (composite) diphoton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinaro, Emiliano; Sannino, Francesco; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider sensitivity to new pseudoscalar resonances decaying into diphoton with masses up to scales of few TeVs. We focus on minimal scenarios where the production mechanisms involve either photon or top-mediated gluon fusion, partially motivated by the tantalizing excess around 750 GeV reported by ATLAS and CMS. The two scenarios lead respectively to a narrow and a wide resonance. We first provide a model-independent analysis via effective operators and then introduce minimal models of composite dynamics where the diphoton channel is characterized by their topological sector. The relevant state here is the pseudoscalar associated with the axial anomaly of the new composite dynamics. If the Standard Model top mass is generated via four-fermion operators the coupling of this state to the top remarkably explains the wide-width resonance reported by ATLAS. Beyond the excess, our analysis paves the way to test dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking via topological sectors.

  1. A feedback microprocessor for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Herrup, D.A.; Chapman, L.; Franck, A.; Groves, T.; Lublinsky, B. )

    1995-02-01

    A feedback microprocessor has been built for the Tevatron. It has been constructed to be applicable to hadron colliders in general. Its inputs are realtime accelerator measurements, data describing the state of the Tevatron, and ramp tables. The microprocessor software includes a finite-state machine. Each state corresponds to a specific Tevatron operation and has a state-specific Tevatron model. Transitions between states are initiated by the global Tevatron clock. Each state includes a cyclic routine, which is called periodically and where all calculations are performed. The output corrections are inserted onto a fast Tevatron-wide link from which the power supplies will read the real time corrections. We also store all of the input data and output corrections in a set of buffers that can easily be retrieved for diagnostic analysis. In this paper we describe this device and its use to control the Tevatron tunes as well as other possible applications. [copyright] 1995 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  2. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    DOE PAGES

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously withmore » the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.« less

  3. Multimegawatt rf power sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1991-04-01

    Conceptual designs for a future linear collider operating at 11.4 GHz call for peak rf power as high as 240 MW per meter, with an accelerator length of 14 km. This is an extremely high total power, which results in requirements for microwave sources that cannot be met with existing microwave tubes. While some new tube concepts are being considered, work is proceeding at several laboratories in the US and abroad on conventional 100 MW klystrons for this application. The electron beam necessary for this power to be generated, unless carefully controlled, can easily cause intrapulse melting at the klystron output circuit. This, coupled to the need for good efficiency, high production yield, and long life, poses some difficult problems to the klystron designer. Experimental klystrons at SLAC and other laboratories are approaching the goal of 100 MW in 800 nsec pulses, but much work remains to be done before a design is available which is suitable for manufacturing thousands of these tubes. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Cryostat design for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1990-09-01

    The cryostat of an SSC dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the cold mass assembly. It serves to support the cold mass accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation (MLI) system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course their 25 year expected life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC collider dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the thermal, structural, and dynamic considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  5. SSC 50 mm collider dipole cryostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1992-04-01

    The cryostat of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipole magnet consists of all magnet components except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be manufacturable at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shields, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course of their expected operating life. This paper describes the design of the current SSC dipole magnet cryostat and includes discussions on the structural and thermal considerations involved in the development of each of the major systems.

  6. The next linear collider damping ring complex

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett,J.; Atkinson,D.; De Santis,S.; Hartman, N.; Kennedy, K.; Li, D.; Marks, S.; Minamihara, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Pivi, M.; Reavill, D.; Rimmer, R.; Schlueter, R.; Wolski, A.; Anderson,S.; McKee,B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, J.C.

    2001-06-12

    We report progress on the design of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) Damping Rings complexes. The purpose of the damping rings is to provide low emittance electron and positron bunch trains to the NLC linacs, at a rate of 120 Hz. As an option to operate at the higher rate of 180 Hz, two 1.98 GeV main damping rings per beam are proposed, and one positron pre-damping ring. The main damping rings store up to 0.8 amp in 3 trains of 190 bunches each and have normalized extracted beam emittances {gamma}{var_epsilon}x = 3 mm-mrad and {gamma}{var_epsilon}y = 0.02 mm-mrad. The optical designs, based on a theoretical minimum emittance lattice (TME), are described, with an analysis of dynamic aperture and non-linear effects. Key subsystems and components are described, including the wiggler, the vacuum systems and photon stop design, and the higher-order-mode damped RF cavities. Impedance and instabilities are discussed.

  7. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  8. Bilinear parity violation at the ILC: neutrino physics at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vormwald, Benedikt; List, Jenny

    2014-02-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) with bilinearly broken parity (bRPV) offers an attractive possibility to explain the origin of neutrino masses and mixings. In such scenarios, the study of neutralino decays at colliders gives access to neutrino sector parameters. The ILC offers a very clean environment to study the neutralino properties as well as its subsequent decays, which typically involve a or boson and a lepton. This study is based on ILC beam parameters according to the Technical Design Report for a center of mass energy of . A full detector simulation of the International Large Detector (ILD) has been performed for all Standard Model backgrounds and for neutralino pair production within a simplified model. The bRPV parameters are fixed according to current neutrino data. In this scenario, the mass can be reconstructed with an uncertainty of for an integrated luminosity of from direct pair production, thus, to a large extent independently of the rest of the SUSY spectrum. The achievable precision on the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle from measuring the neutralino branching fractions BR() and BR() at the ILC is in the same range than current uncertainties from neutrino experiments. Thus, the ILC could have the opportunity to unveil the mechanism of neutrino mass generation.

  9. The SLC as a second generation linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    With enough luminosity, the SLC could contribute to most of the high energy physics of current interest such as new hadrons, quark molecules, gluebaus and studies of the Standard Model and Minimal Supersymmetric SM in the form of particle searches for the lowest mass Higgs or selectron or tests of the point-like predictions for the W, Z or {tilde e}{sub R}. Some experiments require alternative incident channels such as e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma} but only modest increases in energy. Just as the SLC was a prototype for the NLC, it could also be a prototype for a general or {gamma} linear collider -- a GLC. Because the main problem is luminosity, we give a scaling relation based on multiple bunches per R-F pulse. We then ask what is possible for the SLC in terms of bunch and train current, emittance and energy at the IP. The results suggest a phased development with the Higgs as a possible last step requiring a luminosity L{ge}10{sup 32}.

  10. Dynamic response of a collidant impacting a low pressure airbag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, Peter A.

    There are many uses of low pressure airbags, both military and commercial. Many of these applications have been hampered by inadequate and inaccurate modeling tools. This dissertation contains the derivation of a four degree-of-freedom system of differential equations from physical laws of mass and energy conservation, force equilibrium, and the Ideal Gas Law. Kinematic equations were derived to model a cylindrical airbag as a single control volume impacted by a parallelepiped collidant. An efficient numerical procedure was devised to solve the simplified system of equations in a manner amenable to discovering design trends. The largest public airbag experiment, both in scale and scope, was designed and built to collect data on low-pressure airbag responses, otherwise unavailable in the literature. The experimental results were compared to computational simulations to validate the simplified numerical model. Experimental response trends are presented that will aid airbag designers. The two objectives of using a low pressure airbag to demonstrate the feasibility to (1) accelerate a munition to 15 feet per second velocity from a bomb bay, and (2) decelerate humans hitting trucks below the human tolerance level of 50 G's, were both met.

  11. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  12. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-07-14

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  13. Higgs boson production at hadron colliders: Signal and background processes

    SciTech Connect

    David Rainwater; Michael Spira; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2004-01-12

    We review the theoretical status of signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. Particular emphasis is given to missing NLO results, which will play a crucial role for the Tevatron and the LHC.

  14. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Harwood, Leigh; Hutton, Andrew; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Yunhai; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli; Gerity, James; Mann, Thomas; McIntyre, Peter; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-09-01

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  15. Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Guidman, K.K.; Strait, J.B.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Optimization of pion and muon production/collection for neutrino factories and muon colliders is described along with recent developments of the MARS15 code event generators and effects influencing the choice of the optimal beam energy.

  16. Heaviest bound baryons production at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Su-Zhi; Li, You-Wei; Rashidin, Reyima

    2012-12-01

    We calculate the hadronic production of three heaviest bound baryons Ωbbb, Ωbbc*, and Ωbbc at hadron colliders at tree level. We present the integrated cross section and differential cross section distributions in this paper.

  17. Superconducting Super Collider: The presidential transition heightens uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1993-02-05

    Funding for the Superconducting Super Collider remains uncertain with the election of Bill Clinton. As a result, the Japanese are delaying their decision on whether or not to supply approximately $1 billion. The costs of delay or termination are discussed.

  18. Collider-independent tt forward-backward asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Juste, A

    2012-11-21

    We introduce the forward-backward asymmetries A(u), A(d) corresponding to uū, dd → tt production, respectively, at hadron colliders. These are collider and center-of-mass independent observables, directly related to the forward-backward and charge asymmetries measured at the Tevatron and the LHC, respectively. We discuss how to extract these asymmetries from data. Because these asymmetries are collider independent, their measurement at these two colliders could elucidate the nature of the anomalous forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron. Our framework also shows in a model independent fashion that a positive Tevatron asymmetry exceeding the standard model expectation is compatible with the small asymmetry measured at the LHC.

  19. Signatures of doubly-charged Higgsinos at colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Demir, D. A.; Frank, M.; Turan, I.; Huitu, K.; Rai, S. K.

    2008-11-23

    Several supersymmetric models with extended gauge structures predict light doubly-charged Higgsinos. Their distinctive signature at the large hadron collider is highlighted by studying its production and decay characteristics.

  20. Research and Development for an X-Band Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris

    1999-03-05

    At SLAC and KEK research is advancing toward a design for an electron-positron linear collider based on X-Band (11.4 GHz) rf accelerator technology. The nominal acceleration gradient in its main linacs will be about four times that in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The design targets a 1.0 TeV center-of-mass energy but envisions initial operation at 0.5 TeV and allows for expansion to 1.5 TeV. A 1034 cm-2s-1 luminosity level will be achieved by colliding multiple bunches per pulse with bunch emittances about two orders of magnitude smaller than those in the SLC. The key components needed to realize such a collider are under development at SLAC and KEK. In this paper we review recent progress in the development of the linac rf system and discuss future R&D.

  1. MADANALYSIS 5, a user-friendly framework for collider phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Eric; Fuks, Benjamin; Serret, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    flexible, efficient and straightforward fashion, starting from event files such as those produced by Monte Carlo event generators. The event files can have been matched or not to parton-showering and can have been processed or not by a (fast) simulation of a detector. According to the sophistication level of the event files (parton-level, hadron-level, reconstructed-level), one must note that several input formats are possible. Solution method: We implement an interface allowing the production of predefined as well as user-defined histograms for a large class of kinematical distributions after applying a set of event selection cuts specified by the user. This therefore allows us to devise robust and novel search strategies for collider experiments, such as those currently running at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, in a very efficient way. Restrictions: Unsupported event file format. Unusual features: The code is fully based on object representations for events, particles, reconstructed objects and cuts, which facilitates the implementation of an analysis. Running time: It depends on the purposes of the user and on the number of events to process. It varies from a few seconds to the order of the minute for several millions of events.

  2. Beam induced backgrounds: CDF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    We summarize the experiences of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment in the presence of backgrounds originating from the counter circulating beams in the Fermilab Tevatron. These backgrounds are measured and their sources identified. Finally, we outline the strategies employed to reduce the effects of these backgrounds on the experiment.

  3. Optical data transmission at the superconducting super collider

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1989-04-01

    Digital and analog data transmissions via fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider have been investigated. The state of the art of optical transmitters, low loss fiber waveguides, receivers and associated electronics components are reviewed and summarized. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the radiation environment on the performance of an optical data transmission system components. Also, the performance of candidate components of the wide band digital and analog transmission systems intended for deployment in the Superconducting Super Collider Detector is discussed.

  4. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron-positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  5. Heavy Meson Production at a Low-Energy Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S

    2004-04-15

    A low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider has been discussed in the context of a testbed for a {gamma}{gamma} interaction region at the Next Linear Collider(NLC). We consider the production of heavy mesons at such a testbed using Compton-backscattered photons and demonstrate that their production rivals or exceeds those by BELLE, BABAR or LEP where they are produced indirectly via virtual {gamma}{gamma} luminosities.

  6. Next linear collider test accelerator injector design and status

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) being built at SLAC will integrate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures and RF systems for the Next Linear Collider, demonstrate multibunch beam-loading energy compensation and suppression of higher-order deflecting modes, measure transverse components of the accelerating field, and measure the dark current generated by RF field emission in the accelerator Injector design and simulation results for the NLCTA injector are discussed.

  7. Ion polarization in the MEIC figure-8 ion collider ring

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, Y. Zhang, P. Chevtsov, A.M. Kondratenko, M.A. Kondratenko, Yu.N. Filatov

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear physics program envisaged at the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) currently being developed at the Jefferson Lab calls for collisions of 3-11 GeV/c longitudinally polarized electrons and 20-100 GeV/c, in equivalent proton momentum, longitudinally/ transversely polarized protons/ deuterons/ light ions. We present a scheme that provides the required ion polarization arrangement in the MEIC's ion collider ring.

  8. Scaling linear colliders to 5 TeV and above

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Detailed designs exist at present for linear colliders in the 0.5-1.0 TeV center-of-mass energy range. For linear colliders driven by discrete rf sources (klystrons), the rf operating frequencies range from 1.3 GHz to 14 GHz, and the unloaded accelerating gradients from 21 MV/m to 100 MV/m. Except for the collider design at 1.3 GHz (TESLA) which uses superconducting accelerating structures, the accelerating gradients vary roughly linearly with the rf frequency. This correlation between gradient and frequency follows from the necessity to keep the ac {open_quotes}wall plug{close_quotes} power within reasonable bounds. For linear colliders at energies of 5 TeV and above, even higher accelerating gradients and rf operating frequencies will be required if both the total machine length and ac power are to be kept within reasonable limits. An rf system for a 5 TeV collider operating at 34 GHz is outlined, and it is shown that there are reasonable candidates for microwave tube sources which, together with rf pulse compression, are capable of supplying the required rf power. Some possibilities for a 15 TeV collider at 91 GHz are briefly discussed.

  9. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-20

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on new kinds of positron sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.; Nixon, R.

    1997-06-01

    It has been very clear from the beginning of studies for future linear colliders that the conventional positron source approach, as exemplified by the SLC source, is pushing uncomfortably close to the material limits of the conversion target. Nonetheless, since this type of positron source is better understood and relatively inexpensive to build, it has been incorporated into the initial design studies for the JLC/NLC. New ideas for positron sources for linear colliders have been regularly reported in the literature and at accelerator conferences for at least a decade, and indeed the recirculation scheme associated with the VLEPP design is nearly two decades old. Nearly all the new types of positron sources discussed in this workshop come under the heading of crystals (or channeling), undulators, and Compton. Storage ring and nuclear reactor sources were not discussed. The positron source designs that were discussed have varying degrees of maturity, but except for the case of crystal sources, where proof of principle experiments have been undertaken, experimental results are missing. It is hoped that these presentations, and especially the recommendations of the working groups, will prove useful to the various linear collider groups in deciding if and when new experimental programs for positron sources should be undertaken.

  11. An Antiproton Ion Collider (AIC) for Measuring Neutron and Proton Distributions in Stable and Radioactive Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kienle, Paul

    2005-10-19

    An antiproton-ion collider is proposed to independently determine mean square radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton absorption at medium energies. The experiment makes use of the electron ion collider complex (ELISE) of the GSI FAIR project with appropriate modifications of the electron ring to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with 740A MeV energy ions.The total absorption cross-section of antiprotons by the stored ions will be measured by detecting their loss by means of the Schottky noise spectroscopy method. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be studied by detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by analysing them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. With a measurement of the A-1 fragment momentum distribution, one can test the momentum wave functions of the annihilated neutron and proton, respectively. Furthermore by changing the incident ion energy the tails of neutron and proton distribution can be measured.The absorption cross section is at asymptotic energies in leading order proportional to the mean square radius of the nucleus. Predicted cross sections and luminosities show that the method is applicable to nuclei with production rates of about 105 s-1 or lower, depending on the lifetime of the ions in the NESR, and for half-lives down to 1 second.

  12. THE ELECTRON ION COLLIDER. A HIGH LUMINOSITY PROBE OF THE PARTONIC SUBSTRUCTURE OF NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI.

    SciTech Connect

    EDITED BY M.S. DAVIS

    2002-02-01

    By the end of this decade, the advancement of current and planned research into the fundamental structure of matter will require a new facility, the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). The EIC will collide high-energy beams of polarized electrons from polarized protons and neutrons, and unpolarized beams of electrons off atomic nuclei with unprecedented intensity. Research at the EIC will lead to a detailed understanding of the structure of the proton, neutron, and atomic nuclei as described by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), the accepted theory of the strong interaction. The EIC will establish quantitative answers to important questions by delivering dramatically increased precision over existing and planned experiments and by providing completely new experimental capabilities. Indeed, the EIC will probe QCD in a manner not possible previously. This document presents the scientific case for the design, construction and operation of the EIC. While realization of the EIC requires a significant advance in the development of efficient means of producing powerful beams of energetic electrons, an important consideration for choosing the site of the EIC is the planned upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The upgrade planned for RHIC will fully meet the requirements for the ion beam for the EIC, providing a distinct advantage in terms of cost, schedule and the final operation.

  13. Hadron collider potential for excited bosons search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, M. V.; Boyko, I. R.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Budagov, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    The e + e - and μ+μ- dilepton final states are the most clear channels for a new heavy neutral resonance search. Their advantage is that usually in the region of expected heavy-mass resonance peak the main irreducible background, from the Standard Model Drell-Yan process, contributes two orders of magnitude smaller than the signal. In this paper we consider the future prospects for search for the excited neutral Z*-bosons. The bosons can be observed as a Breit-Wigner resonance peak in the dilepton invariant mass distributions in the same way as the well-known extra gauge Z' bosons. However, the Z* bosons have unique signatures in transverse momentum, angular and pseudorapidity distributions of the final leptons, which allow to distinguish them from the other heavy neutral resonances. At present only the ATLAS Collaboration has looked for such new excitations at the Large Hadron Collider and has published its results for 7 TeV collision energy. After successful comparison of our evaluation with these official results we present our estimations for the discovery potential and the exclusion limits on the Z*-boson search in pp collisions at higher centre-of-mass energies and different luminosities. In particular, LHC Run 2 can discover Z*-boson with its mass up to 5.3 TeV, while the High Luminosity LHC can extend that reach to 6.2 TeV. The High Energy LHC (with collision energy of 33 TeV) will be able to probe two times heavier resonance masses at the same integrated luminosities.

  14. Colliding pulse mode-locked VECSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marah, Declan; Laurain, Alexandre; Stolz, Wolfgang; Koch, Stephan; Ruiz Perez, Antje; McInerney, John; Moloney, Jerome

    2016-03-01

    Recent development of high power femtosecond pulse modelocked VECSEL with gigahertz pulse repetition rates sparked an increased interest from the scientific community due to the broad field of applications for such sources, such as frequency metrology, high-speed optical communication systems or high-resolution optical sampling. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time a colliding pulse modelocked VECSEL, where the VECSEL gain medium and a semiconductor saturable absorber (SESAM) are placed inside a ring cavity. This cavity geometry provides both a practical and an efficient way to get optimum performance from a modelocked laser system. The two counter propagating pulses in our ring cavity synchronize in the SESAM because the minimum energy is lost when they saturate the absorber together. This stronger saturation of the absorber increases the stability of the modelocking and reduces the overall losses of the laser for a given intra-cavity fluence, leading to a lower modelocking threshold. This also allows the generation of fundamental modelocking at a relatively low repetition rate (

  15. An FEL power source for a TeV linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D.B.; Hoyer, E.H.; Halbach, K.; Sessler, A.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Jong, R.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Yu, S.S.; Bayless, J.R.; Palmer, R.B.

    1988-10-01

    In this paper we consider the design of a power source of a linear collider. We take a conservative approach and hence extrapolate as little as possible from present experience. Thus we establish a ''straw man''; i.e., a design which serves as an ''existence proof'' of a power source for a TeV collider. We take as the parameters to which the power source is designed those presented earlier by R. Palmer; namely: f = 17 GHz, W = 634 MW/m, L = 1.44m, W/sub T/ = 3.87 TW, R = 180 Hz, L/sub c/ = 7.41 km, T/sub p/ = 50 ns, where the quantity f is the desired frequency, W is the power needed per meter (for a gradient of 186 MeV/m), L is the length between feeds, W/sub T/ is the total power required, R is the rep-rate, L/sub c/ is the total length of the collider, and T/sub p/ is the rf pulse width. With no emittance dilution, this collider would produce a luminosity of 7.7 /times/ 10/sup 32/ cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ for single bunch operation or 1.6 /times/ 10/sup 34/ cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ for multi-bunch operating (i.e., 21 bunches). With realistic dilution and R = 386 Hz these luminosity values would be 5.0 /times/ 10/sup 32/ and 1.0 /times/ 10/sup 34/ cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/, respectively. 5 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Physics Results from the Antiproton Experiment (APEX) at Fermilab

    DOE Data Explorer

    APEX Collaboration

    Is Antimatter stable? The APEX experiment searches for the decay of antiprotons at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. Observation of antiproton decay would indicate a violation of the CPT theorem, which is one of the most fundamental theorems of modern physics. The best laboratory limits on antiproton decay come from the APEX experiment which achieved a sensitivity to antiproton lifetimes up to of order 700,000 years for the most sensitive decay modes. Antiproton lifetimes in this range could arise from CPT violation at the Planck scale.[copied from http://www-apex.fnal.gov/] This website presents published results from the APEX Test Experiment (T861) and from the E868 Experiment. Limits were placed on six antiproton decay modes with a muon in the final state and on seven antiproton decay modes with an electron in the final state. See also the summary table and plot and the APEX picture gallery.

  17. The collider phenomenology of supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, David J.

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study is to investigate the phenomenology of various supersymmetric models. First, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is investigated. This model contains an extended Higgs sector that includes a charged boson. The effect that this charged Higgs boson has on the signatures for top quark pair production at the Tevatron is investigated. The rest of the work is devoted to the phenomenology of models with gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB). In GMSB models, the lighter stau can be the next to lightest supersymmetric particle. The signals at hadronic colliders for GMSB models with minimal visible sector content are explored for this case. A GMSB model with non-minimal visible sector content is also explored. This is the left-right symmetric GMSB model which contains doubly charged bosons and fermions that could be light enough in mass to be produced at Run II of the Tevatron. Findings and conclusions. The presence of a charged Higgs boson that is lighter than the top quark is found to have a significant impact on the expected signatures for top quark pair production at the Tevatron. This is marked by an overall decrease in high pT electrons and muons in the final states. In addition, for tan beta less than about one, the three-body decay H+→bbW leads to final states that are not present in the Standard Model. For GMSB models with the lighter stau as the next to lightest supersymmetric particle, the signature at the Tevatron typically involves two or three tau-jets plus large missing transverse energy. This tau-jet signature can be even more pronounced in left-right symmetric GMSB models due to the production of light doubly charged fermions that may couple preferentially to the third generation of leptons. The left-right models can be distinguished from GMSB models with minimal visible sector content by the distribution in angle between the highest ET tau-jets when they come from same sign tau

  18. Status of the MANX muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Hu, M.; Jansson, A.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Shiltsev, V.; Yarba, V.; Yu, M.; /Fermilab /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2008-06-01

    A demonstration experiment of six-dimensional (6D) phase space muon beam cooling is a key milestone on the roadmap toward to a real muon collider. In order to achieve this goal, they have designed the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory Experiment (MANX) channel, which consists of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC). They discuss the status of the simulation study of the MANX in this document.

  19. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T.

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  20. Prospects for very-high-gradient linac-colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1981-02-01

    The energy realistically attainable by an electron-positron storage ring is limited by the RF voltage and power requirements imposed by synchrotron radiation to about 100 GeV. To reach energies of 300 x 300 GeV and higher in a colliding beam machine of reasonable dimensions, we must look to the linac-collider operating at an energy gradient on the order of 100 MV/m. Proper choice of an RF structure or such a collider can minimize the total RF power requirement and the effects of longitudinal and transverse single-bunch beam loading. For an operating frequency in the range 4 to 6 GHz, the total RF power requirement for a 300 x 300 GeV collider with a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ accelerating 10/sup 11/ particles per bunch is on the order of 50 MW. To drive this collider, RF power sources are needed having a peak output power in the range 1-2 GW. Possibilities for attaining these peak power levels by direct generation and by energy storage and fast switching are discussed.