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Sample records for focal adhesion signaling

  1. Interactions of the Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase-α with the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase Are Involved in Interleukin-1 Signaling in Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Yongqiang; Fritz, Dominik; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling in fibroblasts is mediated through focal adhesions, organelles that are enriched with adaptor and cytoskeletal proteins that regulate signal transduction. We examined interactions of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) with protein-tyrosine phosphatase-α (PTP-α) in IL-1 signaling. In wild type and FAK knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, immunostaining, and gene silencing that FAK is required for IL-1-mediated sequestration of PTPα to focal adhesions. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays of purified proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between FAK and PTPα, which was dependent on the FAT domain of FAK and by an intact membrane-proximal phosphatase domain of PTPα. Recruitment of PTPα to focal adhesions, IL-1-induced Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, ERK activation, and IL-6, MMP-3, and MMP-9 expression were all blocked in FAK knock-out fibroblasts. These processes were restored in FAK knock-out cells transfected with wild type FAK, FAT domain, and FRNK. Our data indicate that IL-1-induced signaling through focal adhesions involves interactions between the FAT domain of FAK and PTPα. PMID:24821720

  2. Interactions of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase-α with the focal adhesion targeting domain of focal adhesion kinase are involved in interleukin-1 signaling in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Yongqiang; Fritz, Dominik; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2014-06-27

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling in fibroblasts is mediated through focal adhesions, organelles that are enriched with adaptor and cytoskeletal proteins that regulate signal transduction. We examined interactions of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) with protein-tyrosine phosphatase-α (PTP-α) in IL-1 signaling. In wild type and FAK knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, immunostaining, and gene silencing that FAK is required for IL-1-mediated sequestration of PTPα to focal adhesions. Immunoprecipitation and pulldown assays of purified proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between FAK and PTPα, which was dependent on the FAT domain of FAK and by an intact membrane-proximal phosphatase domain of PTPα. Recruitment of PTPα to focal adhesions, IL-1-induced Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum, ERK activation, and IL-6, MMP-3, and MMP-9 expression were all blocked in FAK knock-out fibroblasts. These processes were restored in FAK knock-out cells transfected with wild type FAK, FAT domain, and FRNK. Our data indicate that IL-1-induced signaling through focal adhesions involves interactions between the FAT domain of FAK and PTPα.

  3. Talin1 Promotes Tumor Invasion and Metastasis via Focal Adhesion Signaling and Anoikis Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shinichi; McCann, Richard O.; Dhir, Rajiv; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Talin1 is a focal adhesion complex protein that regulates integrin interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). This study investigated the significance of talin1 in prostate cancer progression to metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Talin1 overexpression enhanced prostate cancer cell adhesion, migration and invasion by activating survival signals and conferring resistance to anoikis. ShRNA-mediated talin1 loss led to a significant suppression of prostate cancer cell migration and transendothelial invasion in vitro and a significant inhibition of prostate cancer metastasis in vivo. Talin1 regulated cell survival signals via phosphorylation of focal adhesion complex proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src, and downstream activation of AKT. Targeting AKT activation led to a significant reduction of talin1-mediated prostate cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, talin1 immunoreactivity directly correlated with prostate tumor progression to metastasis in the TRAMP mouse model. Talin1 profiling in human prostate specimens revealed a significantly higher expression of cytoplasmic talin1 in metastatic tissue compared to primary prostate tumors (P<0.0001). These findings suggest: (a) a therapeutic significance of disrupting talin1 signaling/focal adhesion interactions in targeting metastatic prostate cancer and (b) a potential value for talin1 as a marker of tumor progression to metastasis. PMID:20160039

  4. Neuropilin-2 regulates α6β1 integrin in the formation of focal adhesions and signaling.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Pursell, Bryan; Standley, Clive; Fogarty, Kevin; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2012-01-15

    The neuropilins (NRPs) contribute to the function of cancer cells in their capacity as VEGF receptors. Given that NRP2 is induced in breast cancer and correlates with aggressive disease, we examined the role of NRP2 in regulating the interaction of breast cancer cells with the ECM. Using epithelial cells from breast tumors, we defined NRP2(high) and NRP2(low) populations that differed in integrin expression and adhesion to laminin. Specifically, the NRP2(high) population adhered more avidly to laminin and expressed high levels of the α6β1 integrin than the NRP2(low) population. The NRP2(high) population formed numerous focal adhesions on laminin that were not seen in the NRP2(low) population. These results were substantiated using breast carcinoma cell lines that express NRP2 and α6β1 integrin. Depletion experiments revealed that adhesive strength on laminin but not collagen is dependent on NRP2, and that VEGF is needed for adhesion on laminin. A specific interaction between NRP2 and α6β1 integrin was detected by co-immunoprecipitation. NRP2 is necessary for focal adhesion formation on laminin and for the association of α6β1 integrin with the cytoskeleton. NRP2 also facilitates α6β1-integrin-mediated activation of FAK and Src. Unexpectedly, we discovered that NRP2 is located in focal adhesions on laminin. The mechanism by which NRP2 regulates the interaction of α6β1 integrin with laminin to form focal adhesions involves PKC activation. Together, our data reveal a new VEGF-NRP2 signaling pathway that activates the α6β1 integrin and enables it to form focal adhesions and signal. This pathway is important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer.

  5. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  6. MUC16 contributes to the metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma through focal adhesion mediated signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Seema; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Gupta, Suprit; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Smith, Lynette M.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2016-01-01

    MUC16, a heavily glycosylated type-I transmembrane mucin is overexpressed in several cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Previously, we have shown that MUC16 is significantly overexpressed in human PDAC tissues. However, the functional consequences and its role in PDAC is poorly understood. Here, we show that MUC16 knockdown decreases PDAC cell proliferation, colony formation and migration in vitro. Also, MUC16 knockdown decreases the tumor formation and metastasis in orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Mechanistically, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analyses confirms MUC16 interaction with galectin-3 and mesothelin in PDAC cells. Adhesion assay displayed decreased cell attachment of MUC16 knockdown cells with recombinant galectin-1 and galectin-3 protein. Further, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated MUC16 knockout cells show decreased tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (T and Tn) in PDAC cells. Importantly, carbohydrate antigens were decreased in the region that corresponds to MUC16 and suggests for the decreased MUC16-galectin interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation also revealed a novel interaction between MUC16 and FAK in PDAC cells. Interestingly, we observed decreased expression of mesenchymal and increased expression of epithelial markers in MUC16-silenced cells. Additionally, MUC16 loss showed a decreased FAK-mediated Akt and ERK/MAPK activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that MUC16-focal adhesion signaling may play a critical role in facilitating PDAC growth and metastasis. PMID:27382435

  7. Focal adhesions are foci for tyrosine-based signal transduction via GIV/Girdin and G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Lo, I-Chung; Kabir, Firooz; Midde, Krishna K.; Wang, Honghui; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    GIV/Girdin is a multimodular signal transducer and a bona fide metastasis-related protein. As a guanidine exchange factor (GEF), GIV modulates signals initiated by growth factors (chemical signals) by activating the G protein Gαi. Here we report that mechanical signals triggered by the extracellular matrix (ECM) also converge on GIV-GEF via β1 integrins and that focal adhesions (FAs) serve as the major hubs for mechanochemical signaling via GIV. GIV interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ligand-activated β1 integrins. Phosphorylation of GIV by FAK enhances PI3K-Akt signaling, the integrity of FAs, increases cell–ECM adhesion, and triggers ECM-induced cell motility. Activation of Gαi by GIV-GEF further potentiates FAK-GIV-PI3K-Akt signaling at the FAs. Spatially restricted signaling via tyrosine phosphorylated GIV at the FAs is enhanced during cancer metastasis. Thus GIV-GEF serves as a unifying platform for integration and amplification of adhesion (mechanical) and growth factor (chemical) signals during cancer progression. PMID:26446841

  8. Focal adhesions are foci for tyrosine-based signal transduction via GIV/Girdin and G proteins.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Lo, I-Chung; Kabir, Firooz; Midde, Krishna K; Wang, Honghui; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-12-01

    GIV/Girdin is a multimodular signal transducer and a bona fide metastasis-related protein. As a guanidine exchange factor (GEF), GIV modulates signals initiated by growth factors (chemical signals) by activating the G protein Gαi. Here we report that mechanical signals triggered by the extracellular matrix (ECM) also converge on GIV-GEF via β1 integrins and that focal adhesions (FAs) serve as the major hubs for mechanochemical signaling via GIV. GIV interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ligand-activated β1 integrins. Phosphorylation of GIV by FAK enhances PI3K-Akt signaling, the integrity of FAs, increases cell-ECM adhesion, and triggers ECM-induced cell motility. Activation of Gαi by GIV-GEF further potentiates FAK-GIV-PI3K-Akt signaling at the FAs. Spatially restricted signaling via tyrosine phosphorylated GIV at the FAs is enhanced during cancer metastasis. Thus GIV-GEF serves as a unifying platform for integration and amplification of adhesion (mechanical) and growth factor (chemical) signals during cancer progression.

  9. Antitumour effects of Yangzheng Xiaoji in human osteosarcoma: the pivotal role of focal adhesion kinase signalling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen G; Ye, Lin; Ji, Ke; Ruge, Fiona; Wu, Yiling; Gao, Yong; Ji, Jiafu; Mason, Malcolm D

    2013-09-01

    The present study examined, in vitro and in vivo, the potential antitumour effects of Yangzheng Xiaoji (YZXJ), a traditional Chinese medical formula used in cancer treatment, on osteosarcoma, a tumour type recently found to be sensitive to YZXJ. The human osteosarcoma cell line MG63 was used in cell-matrix adhesion and cell growth assays. The same cell line was used in an in vivo tumour model by establishing subcutaneous osteosarcoma xenografts. Oral and intraperitoneal routes were used to deliver the YZXJ extract. The effect of YZXJ on the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin was evaluated by immunofluorescence methods. It was found that YZXJ exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on cell-matrix adhesion as demonstrated by a cell-based assay and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) analysis. The effect was observed together with a reduction in phospho-FAK and phospho-paxillin in the cells when treated with YZXJ. In the in vivo tumour model, YZXJ was found to significantly inhibit the growth of osteosarcoma with a sustained effect observed when YZXJ was delivered intraperitoneally. YZXJ sensitized cells to the effect of FAK inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. It is concluded that Yangzheng Xiaoji plays a significant role in cell-matrix adhesion and tumour growth, likely by inhibiting the activation of the FAK pathway. The therapeutic role of Yangzheng Xiaoji in osteosarcoma warrants further investigation. PMID:23828123

  10. Focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Rebecca L; Baggerly, Keith A; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Kang, Yu; Sanguino, Angela M; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Dalton, Heather J; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Zand, Behrouz; Akbani, Rehan; Diao, Lixia; Nick, Alpa M; DeGeest, Koen; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Coleman, Robert L; Lutgendorf, Susan; Sood, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    This investigation describes the clinical significance of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at the major activating tyrosine site (Y397) in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells. FAK gene amplification as a mechanism for FAK overexpression and the effects of FAK tyrosine kinase inhibitor VS-6062 on tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis were examined. FAK and phospho-FAKY397 were quantified in tumor (FAK-T; pFAK-T) and tumor-associated endothelial (FAK-endo; pFAK-endo) cell compartments of EOCs using immunostaining and qRT-PCR. Associations between expression levels and clinical variables were evaluated. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas were used to correlate FAK gene copy number and expression levels in EOC specimens. The in vitro and in vivo effects of VS-6062 were assayed in preclinical models. FAK-T and pFAK-T overexpression was significantly associated with advanced stage disease and increased microvessel density (MVD). High MVD was observed in tumors with elevated endothelial cell FAK (59%) and pFAK (44%). Survival was adversely affected by FAK-T overexpression (3.03 vs 2.06 y, P = 0.004), pFAK-T (2.83 vs 1.78 y, P < 0.001), and pFAK-endo (2.33 vs 2.17 y, P = 0.005). FAK gene copy number was increased in 34% of tumors and correlated with expression levels (P < 0.001). VS-6062 significantly blocked EOC and endothelial cell migration as well as endothelial cell tube formation in vitro. VS-6062 reduced mean tumor weight by 56% (P = 0.005), tumor MVD by 40% (P = 0.0001), and extraovarian metastasis (P < 0.01) in orthotopic EOC mouse models. FAK may be a unique therapeutic target in EOC given the dual anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic potential of FAK inhibitors. PMID:24755674

  11. Identification of methyl violet 2B as a novel blocker of focal adhesion kinase signaling pathway in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwan; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Jiyeon; Han, Gyoonhee; Sim, Taebo

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •FAK signaling cascade in cancer cells is profoundly inhibited by methyl violet 2B. •Methyl violet 2B identified by virtual screening is a novel allosteric FAK inhibitor. •Methyl violet 2B possesses extremely high kinase selectivity. •Methyl violet 2B suppresses strongly the proliferation of cancer cells. •Methyl violet 2B inhibits focal adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells. -- Abstract: The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling cascade in cancer cells was profoundly inhibited by methyl violet 2B identified with the structure-based virtual screening. Methyl violet 2B was shown to be a non-competitive inhibitor of full-length FAK enzyme vs. ATP. It turned out that methyl violet 2B possesses extremely high kinase selectivity in biochemical kinase profiling using a large panel of kinases. Anti-proliferative activity measurement against several different cancer cells and Western blot analysis showed that this substance is capable of suppressing significantly the proliferation of cancer cells and is able to strongly block FAK/AKT/MAPK signaling pathways in a dose dependent manner at low nanomolar concentration. Especially, phosphorylation of Tyr925-FAK that is required for full activation of FAK was nearly completely suppressed even with 1 nM of methyl violet 2B in A375P cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, it has never been reported that methyl violet possesses anti-cancer effects. Moreover, methyl violet 2B significantly inhibited FER kinase phosphorylation that activates FAK in cell. In addition, methyl violet 2B was found to induce cell apoptosis and to exhibit strong inhibitory effects on the focal adhesion, invasion, and migration of A375P cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Taken together, these results show that methyl violet 2B is a novel, potent and selective blocker of FAK signaling cascade, which displays strong anti-proliferative activities against a variety of human cancer cells and suppresses adhesion

  12. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin–focal adhesion kinase signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Lan; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Song, Xiao-meng; Jia, Jing; Wang, Song; Li, Jin-ping; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tyroservatide (YSV) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin–focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin β1 and integrin β3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer. PMID:27041993

  13. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin-focal adhesion kinase signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Lan; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Song, Xiao-meng; Jia, Jing; Wang, Song; Li, Jin-ping; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tyroservatide (YSV) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin-focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin β1 and integrin β3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer.

  14. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase-alpha and Src functionally link focal adhesions to the endoplasmic reticulum to mediate interleukin-1-induced Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Branch, Donald R; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Herrera Abreu, Maria Teresa; Downey, Gregory P; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2009-07-31

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) is dependent on focal adhesions, which contain diverse structural and signaling proteins including protein phosphatases. We examined here the role of protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) alpha in regulating IL-1-induced Ca2+ signaling in fibroblasts. IL-1 promoted recruitment of PTPalpha to focal adhesions and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fractions, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of the ER Ca2+ release channel IP3R. In response to IL-1, catalytically active PTPalpha was required for Ca2+ release from the ER, Src-dependent phosphorylation of IP3R1 and accumulation of IP3R1 in focal adhesions. In pulldown assays and immunoprecipitations PTPalpha was required for the association of PTPalpha with IP3R1 and c-Src, and this association was increased by IL-1. Collectively, these data indicate that PTPalpha acts as an adaptor to mediate functional links between focal adhesions and the ER that enable IL-1-induced Ca2+ signaling.

  15. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase-α and Src Functionally Link Focal Adhesions to the Endoplasmic Reticulum to Mediate Interleukin-1-induced Ca2+ Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Branch, Donald R.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Abreu, Maria Teresa Herrera; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) is dependent on focal adhesions, which contain diverse structural and signaling proteins including protein phosphatases. We examined here the role of protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) α in regulating IL-1-induced Ca2+ signaling in fibroblasts. IL-1 promoted recruitment of PTPα to focal adhesions and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fractions, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of the ER Ca2+ release channel IP3R. In response to IL-1, catalytically active PTPα was required for Ca2+ release from the ER, Src-dependent phosphorylation of IP3R1 and accumulation of IP3R1 in focal adhesions. In pulldown assays and immunoprecipitations PTPα was required for the association of PTPα with IP3R1 and c-Src, and this association was increased by IL-1. Collectively, these data indicate that PTPα acts as an adaptor to mediate functional links between focal adhesions and the ER that enable IL-1-induced Ca2+ signaling. PMID:19497848

  16. Mechanism of Focal Adhesion Kinase Mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Sebastian; Bullerjahn, Jakob Tómas; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensing at focal adhesions regulates vital cellular processes. Here, we present results from molecular dynamics (MD) and mechano-biochemical network simulations that suggest a direct role of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) as a mechano-sensor. Tensile forces, propagating from the membrane through the PIP2 binding site of the FERM domain and from the cytoskeleton-anchored FAT domain, activate FAK by unlocking its central phosphorylation site (Tyr576/577) from the autoinhibitory FERM domain. Varying loading rates, pulling directions, and membrane PIP2 concentrations corroborate the specific opening of the FERM-kinase domain interface, due to its remarkably lower mechanical stability compared to the individual alpha-helical domains and the PIP2-FERM link. Analyzing downstream signaling networks provides further evidence for an intrinsic mechano-signaling role of FAK in broadcasting force signals through Ras to the nucleus. This distinguishes FAK from hitherto identified focal adhesion mechano-responsive molecules, allowing a new interpretation of cell stretching experiments. PMID:26544178

  17. A kinetic model for RNA-interference of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal adhesions are integrin-based cell-matrix contacts that transduce and integrate mechanical and biochemical cues from the environment. They develop from smaller and more numerous focal complexes under the influence of mechanical force and are key elements for many physiological and disease-related processes, including wound healing and metastasis. More than 150 different proteins localize to focal adhesions and have been systematically classified in the adhesome project (http://www.adhesome.org). First RNAi-screens have been performed for focal adhesions and the effect of knockdown of many of these components on the number, size, shape and location of focal adhesions has been reported. Results We have developed a kinetic model for RNA interference of focal adhesions which represents some of its main elements: a spatially layered structure, signaling through the small GTPases Rac and Rho, and maturation from focal complexes to focal adhesions under force. The response to force is described by two complementary scenarios corresponding to slip and catch bond behavior, respectively. Using estimated and literature values for the model parameters, three time scales of the dynamics of RNAi-influenced focal adhesions are identified: a sub-minute time scale for the assembly of focal complexes, a sub-hour time scale for the maturation to focal adhesions, and a time scale of days that controls the siRNA-mediated knockdown. Our model shows bistability between states dominated by focal complexes and focal adhesions, respectively. Catch bonding strongly extends the range of stability of the state dominated by focal adhesions. A sensitivity analysis predicts that knockdown of focal adhesion components is more efficient for focal adhesions with slip bonds or if the system is in a state dominated by focal complexes. Knockdown of Rho leads to an increase of focal complexes. Conclusions The suggested model provides a kinetic description of the effect of RNA

  18. Inhibition of osteopontin reduce the cardiac myofibrosis in dilated cardiomyopathy via focal adhesion kinase mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Tuo; Fan, Guang-Pu; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Pei-De; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteopontin (OPN) is a pleiotropic cytokine, which has been shown to a close relationship with cardiac fibrosis. Overexpression of OPN in cardiomyocytes induces dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This research is to study whether inhibition of OPN could reduce myocardial remodelling in DCM, and if this process is focal adhesion kinase (FAK) dependent, which is recently found an important signal molecule in fibrosis. Method: Eight-week-old cTnTR141W transgenic mouse of DCM were injected with OPN-shRNA in left ventricular free wall, which could inhibit the OPN expression. Six weeks later, echocardiographic examinations were performed to test left ventricle function and heart tissues were harvested to test the quality of FAK by western blot and severity of fibrosis by masson staining. Human cardiac fibroblast was administrated with OPN, and FAK inhibition by PP2 was treated 2 h before OPN was given. Expression of α-SMA and collagen-I were tested by western blot and real-time PCR assay. Results: OPN-shRNA group has a relatively high ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening (FS), LV free wall thickness and a less sever cardiac fibrosis. In vitro, OPN could increase collagen-I and α-SMA expression, and this process can be inhibited by FAK inhibitor. Conclusion: Inhibition of OPN could reduce the LV remodeling and dysfunction in DCM mice, which may attribute to the suppression of collagen-I secretion in fibroblast through a FAK/Akt dependent pathway. PMID:27725847

  19. Intermediate filaments and the regulation of focal adhesion.

    PubMed

    Leube, Rudolf E; Moch, Marcin; Windoffer, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Focal adhesions are localized actin filament-anchoring signalling centres at the cell-extracellular matrix interface. The currently emerging view is that they fulfil an all-embracing coordinating function for the entire cytoskeleton. This review highlights the tight relationship between focal adhesions and the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. We summarize the accumulating evidence for direct binding of intermediate filaments to focal adhesion components and their mutual cross-talk through signalling molecules. Examples are presented to emphasize the high degree of complexity of these interactions equipping cells with a precisely controlled machinery for context-dependent adjustment of their biomechanical properties.

  20. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  1. Correlation between matrix metalloproteinase expression and activation of the focal adhesion kinase signaling pathway in herpes stromal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    CAO, TING; XING, YIQIAO; YANG, YANNING; MEI, HAIFENG

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression and activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway in herpes stromal keratitis (HSK). The cornea of 24 BALB/c mice was infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to construct a model of HSK. Six additional mice served as negative controls. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect FAK expression levels. Human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells cultured in vitro were infected with HSV-1 and the expression levels of MMP-2, FAK and phosphorylated-FAK (p-FAK) in HCE cells were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry at 2, 20 and 40 h following infection. In the HSK rat model, the corneal epithelial cells appeared deranged and the number of neutrophils and FAK-positive cells was significantly increased compared with that of the negative control group (P<0.05). Repeated measures analysis of variance of RT-PCR showed no significant differences in MMP-2 and FAK mRNA expression levels in the infected cells at various time points, and no significant differences between infected cells and the negative control group were observed. There was no interaction between groups and time points. Pairwise comparisons showed that MMP-2 and FAK mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in virus-infected cells compared with those of the control group. Over time, MMP-2 and FAK mRNA expression levels did not differ significantly in virus-infected cells or in control cells. Western blot analysis indicated no significant differences in p-FAK, FAK and MMP-2 expression levels between the infected and control cells at 2 h (P>0.05). Infected cells showed a significant increase in MMP-2 and p-FAK expression levels than that of the control cells at 20 and 40 h (P<0.05). p-FAK, FAK and MMP-2 expression levels in virus-infected cells at 2 h differed significantly from those at 20

  2. Quantitative relationship among integrin-ligand binding, adhesion, and signaling via focal adhesion kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Asthagiri, A R; Nelson, C M; Horwitz, A F; Lauffenburger, D A

    1999-09-17

    ERK2. These measures of FAK and ERK2 activity were found to correlate with short term cell-substratum adhesivity, indicating that signaling via FAK and ERK2 is proportional to the number of integrin-fibronectin bonds. PMID:10480927

  3. E-Cadherin-Dependent Stimulation of Traction Force at Focal Adhesions via the Src and PI3K Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Estevez, Maruxa; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Dufour, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between cadherin- and integrin-dependent signals controls cell behavior, but the precise mechanisms that regulate the strength of adhesion to the extracellular matrix remains poorly understood. We deposited cells expressing a defined repertoire of cadherins and integrins on fibronectin (FN)-coated polyacrylamide gels (FN-PAG) and on FN-coated pillars used as a micro-force sensor array (μFSA), and analyzed the functional relationship between these adhesion receptors to determine how it regulates cell traction force. We found that cadherin-mediated adhesion stimulated cell spreading on FN-PAG, and this was modulated by the substrate stiffness. We compared S180 cells with cells stably expressing different cadherins on μFSA and found that traction forces were stronger in cells expressing cadherins than in parental cells. E-cadherin-mediated contact and mechanical coupling between cells are required for this increase in cell-FN traction force, which was not observed in isolated cells, and required Src and PI3K activities. Traction forces were stronger in cells expressing type I cadherins than in cells expressing type II cadherins, which correlates with our previous observation of a higher intercellular adhesion strength developed by type I compared with type II cadherins. Our results reveal one of the mechanisms whereby molecular cross talk between cadherins and integrins upregulates traction forces at cell-FN adhesion sites, and thus provide additional insight into the molecular control of cell behavior. PMID:22853894

  4. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength. PMID:22208188

  5. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) activates integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and Akt signaling in ovarian cancer cells to attenuate TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to apoptosis is a major problem in ovarian cancer (OC) and correlates with poor prognosis. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble secreted factor that acts as a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). OPG has been reported to attenuate TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells, including OC cells. OPG-mediated protection against TRAIL has been attributed to its decoy receptor function. However, OPG activates integrin/focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling in endothelial cells. In OC cells, activation of integrin/FAK signaling inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that OPG could attenuate TRAIL-induced apoptosis in OC cells through integrin/FAK signaling. Methods In vitro experiments including immunoblots, colony formation assays, and apoptosis measurements were used to assess the effect of OPG on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Results Exogenous OPG protected from TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a TRAIL binding-independent manner and OPG protection was αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrin/FAK signaling-dependent. Moreover, OPG-mediated activation of integrin/FAK signaling resulted in the activation of Akt. Inhibition of both integrin/FAK and Akt signaling significantly inhibited OPG-mediated attenuation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Although OPG also stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling did not significantly altered OPG protection. Conclusions Our studies provide evidence, for the first time, that OPG can attenuate TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a TRAIL binding-independent manner through the activation of integrin/FAK/Akt signaling in OC cells. PMID:24267510

  6. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-11-26

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies.

  7. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  8. A novel orally available inhibitor of focal adhesion signaling increases survival in a xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Rosa; Moreno, María José; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Gallardo, Alberto; Trias, Manuel; Grañena, Albert; Sierra, Jorge; Casanova, Isolda; Mangues, Ramon

    2013-08-01

    Central nervous system dissemination is a relatively uncommon but almost always fatal complication in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Optimal therapy for central nervous involvement in this malignancy has not been established. In this paper, we aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of E7123, a celecoxib derivative that inhibits focal adhesion signaling, in a novel xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement. Cells obtained after disaggregation of HT subcutaneous tumors (HT-SC cells) were intravenously injected in NOD/SCID mice. These mice received oral vehicle or 75 mg/kg of E7123 daily until they were euthanized for weight loss or signs of sickness. The antitumor effect of E7123 was validated in an independent experiment using a bioluminescent mouse model. Intravenously injected HT-SC cells showed higher take rate and higher central nervous system tropism (associated with increased expression of β1-integrin and p130Cas proteins) than HT cells. The oral administration of E7123 significantly increased survival time in 2 independent experiments using mice injected with unmodified or bioluminescent HT-SC cells. We have developed a new xenograft model of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with central nervous system involvement that can be used in the pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs for this malignancy. E7123 is a new, well-tolerated and orally available therapeutic agent that merits further investigation since it may improve current management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with central nervous system involvement.

  9. Janus kinases and focal adhesion kinases play in the 4.1 band: a superfamily of band 4.1 domains important for cell structure and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Girault, J. A.; Labesse, G.; Mornon, J. P.; Callebaut, I.

    1998-01-01

    The band 4.1 domain was first identified in the red blood cell protein band 4.1, and subsequently in ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM proteins) and other proteins, including tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin, talin, unconventional myosins VIIa and X, and protein tyrosine phosphatases. Recently, the presence of a structurally related domain has been demonstrated in the N-terminal region of two groups of tyrosine kinases: the focal adhesion kinases (FAK) and the Janus kinases (JAK). Additional proteins containing the 4.1/JEF (JAK, ERM, FAK) domain include plant kinesin-like calmodulin-binding proteins (KCBP) and a number of uncharacterized open reading frames identified by systematic DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences suggests that band 4.1/JEF domains can be grouped in several families that have probably diverged early during evolution. Hydrophobic cluster analysis indicates that the band 4.1/JEF domains might consist of a duplicated module of approximately 140 residues and a central hinge region. A conserved property of the domain is its capacity to bind to the membrane-proximal region of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of proteins with a single transmembrane segment. Many proteins with band 4.1/JEF domains undergo regulated intra- or intermolecular homotypic interactions. Additional properties common to band 4.1/JEF domains of several proteins are binding of phosphoinositides and regulation by GTPases of the Rho family. Many proteins with band 4. 1/JEF domains are associated with the actin-based cytoskeleton and are enriched at points of contact with other cells or the extracellular matrix, from which they can exert control over cell growth. Thus, proteins with band 4.1/JEF domain are at the crossroads between cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction in multicellular organisms. Their importance is underlined by the variety of diseases that can result from their mutations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:9990861

  10. Integrin Molecular Tension within Motile Focal Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Sun, Jie; Xu, Qian; Chowdhury, Farhan; Roein-Peikar, Mehdi; Wang, Yingxiao; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-12-01

    Forces transmitted by integrins regulate many important cellular functions. Previously, we developed tension gauge tether (TGT) as a molecular force sensor and determined the threshold tension across a single integrin-ligand bond, termed integrin tension, required for initial cell adhesion. Here, we used fluorescently labeled TGTs to study the magnitude and spatial distribution of integrin tension on the cell-substratum interface. We observed two distinct levels of integrin tension. A >54 pN molecular tension is transmitted by clustered integrins in motile focal adhesions (FAs) and such force is generated by actomyosin, whereas the previously reported ∼40 pN integrin tension is transmitted by integrins before FA formation and is independent of actomyosin. We then studied FA motility using a TGT-coated surface as a fluorescent canvas, which records the history of integrin force activity. Our data suggest that the region of the strongest integrin force overlaps with the center of a motile FA within 0.2 μm resolution. We also found that FAs move in pairs and that the asymmetry in the motility of an FA pair is dependent on the initial FA locations on the cell-substratum interface.

  11. Mediation of the migration of endothelial cells and fibroblasts on polyurethane nanocomposites by the activation of integrin-focal adhesion kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Hung, Huey-Shan; Chu, Mei-Yun; Lin, Chien-Hsun; Wu, Chia-Ching; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2012-01-01

    Model surfaces of polyurethane-gold nanocomposites (PU-Au) were used to examine cell behavior on nanophase-segregated materials. Previously we showed that endothelial cell (EC) migration on these materials was modulated by the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway. The present study, investigated the expressions of alpha5/beta3 (α5β3) integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and other downstream signal molecules such as the Rho family and matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2) induced by the materials in two different cells, that is bovine arterial endothelial cells (BAEC) and human skin fibroblasts (HSF). Both cells proliferated better on the more phase-separated PU-Au 43.5 ppm than on the less phase-separated controls (PU and PU-Au 174 ppm). On PU-Au 43.5 ppm, BAEC compared to HSF had denser actin fibers and were more extended. BAEC became rounded with Y-27632 treatment and shrunk with LY294002 treatment. Treatment by inhibitors only caused slight changes in HSF. The migration distance of BAEC on PU-Au 43.5 ppm was greater than that of HSF, and was significantly reduced by LY294002 or Y-27632 but not SU-1498. The expressions of p-FAK, p-RhoA, p-Rac/Cdc42, MMP2, and α5β3 integrin induced by PU-Au 43.5 ppm were more pronounced in BAEC versus HSF. Further enhancement in MMP2 and α5β3 integrin expressions by FAK-GFP transfection was more remarkable for cells on PU-Au 43.5 ppm. Our findings suggested that the integrin α5β3/FAK pathway may be induced by nanophase-separated materials in both ECs and fibroblasts to promote their proliferation/migration, while the crosstalk between the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway and FAK/Rho-GTPase activation may account for the greater effect in ECs than in fibroblasts.

  12. Focal Adhesion Induction at the Tip of a Functionalized Nanoelectrode

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Daniela E.; Bae, Chilman; Butler, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Cells dynamically interact with their physical micro-environment through the assembly of nascent focal contacts and focal adhesions. The dynamics and mechanics of these contact points are controlled by transmembrane integrins and an array of intracellular adaptor proteins. In order to study the mechanics and dynamics of focal adhesion assembly, we have developed a technique for the timed induction of a nascent focal adhesion. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were approached at the apical surface by a nanoelectrode whose position was controlled with a resolution of 10s of nanometers using changes in electrode current to monitor distance from the cell surface. Since this probe was functionalized with fibronectin, a focal contact formed at the contact location. Nascent focal adhesion assembly was confirmed using time-lapse confocal fluorescent images of red fluorescent protein (RFP) – tagged talin, an adapter protein that binds to activated integrins. Binding to the cell was verified by noting a lack of change of electrode current upon retraction of the electrode. This study demonstrates that functionalized nanoelectrodes can enable precisely-timed induction and 3-D mechanical manipulation of focal adhesions and the assay of the detailed molecular kinetics of their assembly. PMID:22247742

  13. Focal adhesion kinase is required for actin polymerization and remodeling of the cytoskeleton during sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Roa-Espitia, Ana L.; Hernández-Rendón, Eva R.; Baltiérrez-Hoyos, Rafael; Muñoz-Gotera, Rafaela J.; Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Jiménez, Irma; González-Márquez, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several focal adhesion proteins are known to cooperate with integrins to link the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton; as a result, many intracellular signaling pathways are activated and several focal adhesion complexes are formed. However, how these proteins function in mammalian spermatozoa remains unknown. We confirm the presence of focal adhesion proteins in guinea pig spermatozoa, and we explore their role during capacitation and the acrosome reaction, and their relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest the presence of a focal adhesion complex formed by β1-integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, vinculin, talin, and α-actinin in the acrosomal region. Inhibition of FAK during capacitation affected the protein tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation that occurs within the first few minutes of capacitation, which caused the acrosome reaction to become increasingly Ca2+ dependent and inhibited the polymerization of actin. The integration of vinculin and talin into the complex, and the activation of FAK and paxillin during capacitation, suggests that the complex assembles at this time. We identify that vinculin and α-actinin increase their interaction with F-actin while it remodels during capacitation, and that during capacitation focal adhesion complexes are structured. FAK contributes to acrosome integrity, likely by regulating the polymerization and the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27402964

  14. Focal adhesion kinase is required for actin polymerization and remodeling of the cytoskeleton during sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Roa-Espitia, Ana L; Hernández-Rendón, Eva R; Baltiérrez-Hoyos, Rafael; Muñoz-Gotera, Rafaela J; Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Jiménez, Irma; González-Márquez, Humberto; Hernández-González, Enrique O

    2016-01-01

    Several focal adhesion proteins are known to cooperate with integrins to link the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton; as a result, many intracellular signaling pathways are activated and several focal adhesion complexes are formed. However, how these proteins function in mammalian spermatozoa remains unknown. We confirm the presence of focal adhesion proteins in guinea pig spermatozoa, and we explore their role during capacitation and the acrosome reaction, and their relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest the presence of a focal adhesion complex formed by β1-integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, vinculin, talin, and α-actinin in the acrosomal region. Inhibition of FAK during capacitation affected the protein tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation that occurs within the first few minutes of capacitation, which caused the acrosome reaction to become increasingly Ca(2+) dependent and inhibited the polymerization of actin. The integration of vinculin and talin into the complex, and the activation of FAK and paxillin during capacitation, suggests that the complex assembles at this time. We identify that vinculin and α-actinin increase their interaction with F-actin while it remodels during capacitation, and that during capacitation focal adhesion complexes are structured. FAK contributes to acrosome integrity, likely by regulating the polymerization and the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27402964

  15. Focal adhesion kinase is required for actin polymerization and remodeling of the cytoskeleton during sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Roa-Espitia, Ana L; Hernández-Rendón, Eva R; Baltiérrez-Hoyos, Rafael; Muñoz-Gotera, Rafaela J; Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Jiménez, Irma; González-Márquez, Humberto; Hernández-González, Enrique O

    2016-09-15

    Several focal adhesion proteins are known to cooperate with integrins to link the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton; as a result, many intracellular signaling pathways are activated and several focal adhesion complexes are formed. However, how these proteins function in mammalian spermatozoa remains unknown. We confirm the presence of focal adhesion proteins in guinea pig spermatozoa, and we explore their role during capacitation and the acrosome reaction, and their relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest the presence of a focal adhesion complex formed by β1-integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, vinculin, talin, and α-actinin in the acrosomal region. Inhibition of FAK during capacitation affected the protein tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation that occurs within the first few minutes of capacitation, which caused the acrosome reaction to become increasingly Ca(2+) dependent and inhibited the polymerization of actin. The integration of vinculin and talin into the complex, and the activation of FAK and paxillin during capacitation, suggests that the complex assembles at this time. We identify that vinculin and α-actinin increase their interaction with F-actin while it remodels during capacitation, and that during capacitation focal adhesion complexes are structured. FAK contributes to acrosome integrity, likely by regulating the polymerization and the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton.

  16. Tuning the material-cytoskeleton crosstalk via nanoconfinement of focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Natale, Carlo F; Ventre, Maurizio; Netti, Paolo A

    2014-03-01

    Material features proved to exert a potent influence on cell behaviour in terms of adhesion, migration and differentiation. In particular, biophysical and biochemical signals on material surfaces are able to affect focal adhesion distribution and cytoskeletal assemblies, which are known to regulate signalling pathways that ultimately influence cell fate and functions. However, a general, unifying model that correlates cytoskeletal-generated forces with genetic events has yet to be developed. Therefore, it is crucial to gain a better insight into the material-cytoskeleton crosstalk in order to design and fabricate biomaterials able to govern cell fate more accurately. In this work, we demonstrate that confining focal adhesion distribution and growth dramatically alters the cytoskeleton's structures and dynamics, which in turn dictate cellular and nuclear shape and polarization. MC3T3 preosteoblasts were cultivated on nanograted polydimethylsiloxane substrates and a thorough quantification - in static and dynamic modes - of the morphological and structural features of focal adhesions and cytoskeleton was performed. Nanoengineered surfaces provided well-defined zones for focal adhesions to form and grow. Unique cytoskeletal structures spontaneously assembled when focal adhesions were confined and, in fact, they proved to be very effective in deforming the nuclei. The results here presented provide elements to engineer surfaces apt to guide and control cell behaviour through the material-cytoskeleton-nucleus axis. PMID:24388800

  17. A Small Physiological Electric Field Mediated Responses of Extravillous Trophoblasts Derived from HTR8/SVneo Cells: Involvement of Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Ren, Rongmei; Luo, Xuefeng; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liang, Shanshan; Ma, Lei; Yu, Ping; Bai, Huai

    2014-01-01

    Moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into endometrium is essential for the placental development and normal pregnancy. Electric field (EF)-induced effects on cellular behaviors have been observed in many cell types. This study was to investigate the effect of physiological direct current EF (dc EF) on cellular responses such as elongation, orientation and motility of trophoblast cells. Immortalized first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells (HTR-8/SVneo) were exposed to the dc EF at physiological magnitude. Cell images were recorded and analyzed by image analyzer. Cell lysates were used to detect protein expression by Western blot. Cultured in the dc EFs the cells showed elongation, orientation and enhanced migration rate compared with non-EF stimulated cells at field strengths of 100 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. EF exposure increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and increased expression levels of MMP-2. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK impaired the EF-induced responses including motility and abrogated the elevation of MMP-2 expression. However, the expression levels of integrins like integrin α1, α5, αV and β1 were not affected by EF stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of FAK activation in migration/motility of trophobalst cells driven by EFs. In addition, it raises the feasibility of using applied EFs to promote placentation through effects on trophoblast cells. PMID:24643246

  18. Requirement of focal adhesion kinase in branching tubulogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Chun; Kopec, Anna K; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that alpha3beta1 integrins are essential to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-independent branching tubulogenesis in Mardin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells. However, the involvement of integrin downstream signaling molecules remains unclear. In the present study, we successfully isolated cell lines possessing different tubulogenic potentials from the MDCK cells; cyst clones (CA4, CA6) forming cystic structures when cultured in 0.3% type I collagen gel and mass clones (M610, M611, M612) forming aggregated masses. Cyst clones maintained cystic structure in 0.1% collagen gel, whereas mass clones spontaneously developed into tubules. Both clones exhibited various morphologies when cultured on a dish: cyst clones formed aggregated islands, while mass clones were more scattered and exhibited higher migration capacity. Among several focal adhesion machinery proteins examined, only the expression and phosphorylation level of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in mass clones was higher than in cyst clones, while other proteins showed no obvious differences. However, overexpression of wild type FAK in CA6 cells did not facilitate branching tubule formation in 0.1% collagen gel. Targeted decrease in the expression level of FAK in M610 cells with the application of antisense cDNA resulted in a marked reduction of branching tubule formation in 0.1% collagen gel and showed a down-regulation of fibronectin assembly, which is known to promote tubulogenesis. In contrast, overexpression of wild type FAK in CA6 cells had no effect on fibronectin assembly. Taken together, our data demonstrates that FAK is required, but not sufficient for HGF-independent branching tubulogenesis in MDCK cells. PMID:19272169

  19. Mulberry water extracts inhibit atherosclerosis through suppression of the integrin-β₃/focal adhesion kinase complex and downregulation of nuclear factor κB signaling in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuei-Chuan; Ho, Hsieh-Hsun; Lin, Ming-Cheng; Yen, Chi-Hua; Huang, Chien-Ning; Huang, Hui-Pei; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that mulberry water extracts (MWEs), which contain polyphenolic compounds, have an antiatherosclerotic effect in vivo and in vitro through stimulating apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Histological analysis was performed on atherosclerotic lesions from high-cholesterol diet (HCD)-fed rabbits after treatment with 0.5-1% MWEs for 10 weeks. Immunohistochemistry showed that the expressions of SMA, Ras, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in the VSMCs were dose-dependently inhibited after MWE treatment. The antimigratory effects of MWEs on A7r5 VSMCs were assessed by western blot analysis of migration-related proteins, visualization of F-actin cytoskeleton, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that MWEs inhibited VSMC migration through reducing interactions of the integrin-β3/focal adhesion kinase complex, alterations of the cytoskeleton, and downregulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β/nuclear factor κB signaling. Taken together, MWEs inhibited HCD-induced rabbit atherogenesis through blocking VSMC migration via reducing interactions of integrin-β3 and focal adhesion kinase and downregulating migration-related proteins.

  20. Substrate, focal adhesions, and actin filaments: a mechanical unit with a weak spot for mechanosensitive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchenbüchler, David; Born, Simone; Kirchgeßner, Norbert; Houben, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    Mechanosensing is a vital prerequisite for dynamic remodeling of focal adhesions and cytoskeletal structures upon substrate deformation. For example, tissue formation, directed cell orientation or cell differentiation are regulated by such mechanosensing processes. Focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton are believed to be involved in these processes, but where mechanosensing molecules are located and how elastic substrate, focal adhesions and the cytoskeleton couple with each other upon substrate deformation still remains obscure. To approach these questions we have developed a sensitive method to apply defined spatially decaying deformation fields to cells cultivated on ultrasoft elastic substrates and to accurately quantify the resulting displacements of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesions, as well as the substrate. Displacement fields were recorded in live cell microscopy by tracking either signals from fluorescent proteins or marker particles in the substrate. As model cell type we used myofibroblasts. These cells are characterized by highly stable adhesion and force generating structures but are still able to detect mechanical signals with high sensitivity. We found a rigid connection between substrate and focal adhesions. Furthermore, stress fibers were found to be barely extendable almost over their whole lengths. Plastic deformation took place only at the very ends of actin filaments close to focal adhesions. As a result, this area became elongated without extension of existing actin filaments by polymerization. Both ends of the stress fibers were mechanically coupled with detectable plastic deformations on either site. Interestingly, traction force dependent substrate deformation fields remained mostly unaffected even when stress fiber elongations were released. These data argue for a location of mechanosensing proteins at the ends of actin stress fibers and describe, except for these domains, the whole system to be relatively rigid for tensile

  1. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  2. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell-substrate adhesion.

    PubMed

    Langhe, Rahul P; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell-cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell-matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  3. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in mechanosensing during fibroblast migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Hanks, S. K.; Wang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase localized at focal adhesions and is believed to mediate adhesion-stimulated effects. Although ablation of FAK impairs cell movement, it is not clear whether FAK might be involved in the guidance of cell migration, a role consistent with its putative regulatory function. We have transfected FAK-null fibroblasts with FAK gene under the control of the tetracycline repression system. Cells were cultured on flexible polyacrylamide substrates for the detection of traction forces and the application of mechanical stimulation. Compared with control cells expressing wild-type FAK, FAK-null cells showed a decrease in migration speed and directional persistence. In addition, whereas FAK-expressing cells responded to exerted forces by reorienting their movements and forming prominent focal adhesions, FAK-null cells failed to show such responses. Furthermore, FAK-null cells showed impaired responses to decreases in substrate flexibility, which causes control cells to generate weaker traction forces and migrate away from soft substrates. Cells expressing Y397F FAK, which cannot be phosphorylated at a key tyrosine site, showed similar defects in migration pattern and force-induced reorientation as did FAK-null cells. However, other aspects of F397-FAK cells, including the responses to substrate flexibility and the amplification of focal adhesions upon mechanical stimulation, were similar to that of control cells. Our results suggest that FAK plays an important role in the response of migrating cells to mechanical input. In addition, phosphorylation at Tyr-397 is required for some, but not all, of the functions of FAK in cell migration.

  4. Focal Adhesion Assembly Induces Phenotypic Changes and Dedifferentiation in Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunjun; Lee, Mi Nam; Choung, Jin Seung; Kim, Sanghee; Choi, Byung Hyune; Noh, Minsoo; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate sufficient populations for cell-based therapies. However, during monolayer culture, chondrocytes lose inherent characteristics and shift to fibroblast-like cells as passage number increase. Here, we investigated passage-dependent changes in cellular physiology, including cellular morphology, motility, and gene and protein expression, as well as the role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal regulation in the dedifferentiation process. We found that the gene and protein expression levels of both the focal adhesion complex and small Rho GTPases are upregulated with increasing passage number and are closely linked to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. The inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but not small Rho GTPases induced the loss of fibroblastic traits and the recovery of collagen type II, aggrecan, and SOX9 expression levels in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Based on these findings, we propose a strategy to suppress chondrogenic dedifferentiation by inhibiting the identified FAK or Src pathways while maintaining the expansion capability of chondrocytes in a 2D environment. These results highlight a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of skeletal diseases and the generation of cartilage in tissue-engineering approaches. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1822-1831, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661891

  5. Neuronal polarity selection by topography-induced focal adhesion control.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Aldo; Cecchini, Marco; Serresi, Michela; Faraci, Paolo; Pisignano, Dario; Beltram, Fabio

    2010-06-01

    Interaction between differentiating neurons and the extracellular environment guides the establishment of cell polarity during nervous system development. Developing neurons read the physical properties of the local substrate in a contact-dependent manner and retrieve essential guidance cues. In previous works we demonstrated that PC12 cell interaction with nanogratings (alternating lines of ridges and grooves of submicron size) promotes bipolarity and alignment to the substrate topography. Here, we investigate the role of focal adhesions, cell contractility, and actin dynamics in this process. Exploiting nanoimprint lithography techniques and a cyclic olefin copolymer, we engineered biocompatible nanostructured substrates designed for high-resolution live-cell microscopy. Our results reveal that neuronal polarization and contact guidance are based on a geometrical constraint of focal adhesions resulting in an angular modulation of their maturation and persistence. We report on ROCK1/2-myosin-II pathway activity and demonstrate that ROCK-mediated contractility contributes to polarity selection during neuronal differentiation. Importantly, the selection process confined the generation of actin-supported membrane protrusions and the initiation of new neurites at the poles. Maintenance of the established polarity was independent from NGF stimulation. Altogether our results imply that focal adhesions and cell contractility stably link the topographical configuration of the extracellular environment to a corresponding neuronal polarity state. PMID:20304485

  6. Nanotopographical modification: a regulator of cellular function through focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Manus Jonathan Paul; Richards, R. Geoff; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of biomedical engineering advances, the role of cellular mechanisms, in particular adhesive interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device design has evolved from the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to topographical features or chemical stimuli, a process that has led to the development of next-generation biomaterials for a wide variety of clinical disorders. In vitro studies have identified nanoscale features as potent modulators of cellular behavior through the onset of focal adhesion formation. The focus of this review is on the recent developments concerning the role of nanoscale structures on integrin-mediated adhesion and cellular function with an emphasis on the generation of medical constructs with regenerative applications. PMID:20138244

  7. Focal adhesion molecule Kindlin-1 mediates activation of TGF-β signaling by interacting with TGF-βRI, SARA and Smad3 in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jinfeng; Du, Juan; Wang, Yunling; Yang, Mingzi; Gao, Jianchao; Wei, Xiaofan; Fang, Weigang; Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan

    2016-10-20

    Kindlin-1, an integrin-interacting protein, has been implicated in TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Kindlin-1 regulation of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling remains elusive. Here, we reported that Kindlin-1 is an important mediator of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling by showing that Kindlin-1 physically interacts with TGF-β receptor I (TβRI), Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA) and Smad3. Kindlin-1 is required for the interaction of Smad3 with TβRI, Smad3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and finally the activation of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathway. Functionally, Kindlin-1 promoted colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and was also required for CRC cell migration and invasion via an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Kindlin-1 was found to be increased with the CRC progression from stages I to IV. Importantly, raised expression level of Kindlin-1 correlates with poor outcome in CRC patients. Taken together, we demonstrated that Kindlin-1 promotes CRC progression by recruiting SARA and Smad3 to TβRI and thereby activates TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. Thus, Kindlin-1 is a novel regulator of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling and may also be a potential target for CRC therapeutics.

  8. Plakophilin 2 Affects Cell Migration by Modulating Focal Adhesion Dynamics and Integrin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Todorović, Viktor; Green, Kathleen J.; Godsel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilin 2 (PKP2), a desmosome component, modulates the activity and localization of the small GTPase RhoA at sites of cell–cell contact. PKP2 regulates cortical actin rearrangement during junction formation, and its loss is accompanied by an increase in actin stress fibers. We hypothesized that PKP2 may regulate focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Here we show that PKP2-deficient cells bind efficiently to the extracellular matrix, but upon spreading display total cell areas ~30% smaller than control cells. Focal adhesions in PKP2-deficient cells are ~2× larger and more stable than in control cells, and vinculin displays an increased time for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Furthermore, β4 and β1 integrin protein and mRNA expression is elevated in PKP2-silenced cells. Normal focal adhesion phenotypes can be restored in PKP2-null cells by dampening the RhoA pathway or silencing β1 integrin. However, integrin expression levels are not restored by RhoA signaling inhibition. These data uncover a potential role for PKP2 upstream of β1 integrin and RhoA in integrating cell–cell and cell–substrate contact signaling in basal keratinocytes necessary for the morphogenesis, homeostasis, and reepithelialization of the stratified epidermis. PMID:23884246

  9. Assembly and mechanosensory function of focal adhesions: experiments and models.

    PubMed

    Bershadsky, Alexander D; Ballestrem, Christoph; Carramusa, Letizia; Zilberman, Yuliya; Gilquin, Benoit; Khochbin, Saadi; Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Shemesh, Tom; Kozlov, Michael M

    2006-04-01

    Initial integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions (focal complexes) appear underneath the lamellipodia, in the regions of the "fast" centripetal flow driven by actin polymerization. Once formed, these adhesions convert the flow behind them into a "slow", myosin II-driven mode. Some focal complexes then turn into elongated focal adhesions (FAs) associated with contractile actomyosin bundles (stress fibers). Myosin II inhibition does not suppress formation of focal complexes but blocks their conversion into mature FAs and further FA growth. Application of external pulling force promotes FA growth even under conditions when myosin II activity is blocked. Thus, individual FAs behave as mechanosensors responding to the application of force by directional assembly. We proposed a thermodynamic model for the mechanosensitivity of FAs, taking into account that an elastic molecular aggregate subject to pulling forces tends to grow in the direction of force application by incorporating additional subunits. This simple model can explain a variety of processes typical of FA behavior. Assembly of FAs is triggered by the small G-protein Rho via activation of two major targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and the formin homology protein, Dia1. ROCK controls creation of myosin II-driven forces, while Dia1 is involved in the response of FAs to these forces. Expression of the active form of Dia1, allows the external force-induced assembly of mature FAs, even in conditions when Rho is inhibited. Conversely, downregulation of Dia1 by siRNA prevents FA maturation even if Rho is activated. Dia1 and other formins cap barbed (fast growing) ends of actin filaments, allowing insertion of the new actin monomers. We suggested a novel mechanism of such "leaky" capping based on an assumption of elasticity of the formin/barbed end complex. Our model predicts that formin-mediated actin polymerization should be greatly enhanced by application of external pulling force. Thus, the formin-actin complex

  10. Assembly and mechanosensory function of focal adhesions: experiments and models.

    PubMed

    Bershadsky, Alexander D; Ballestrem, Christoph; Carramusa, Letizia; Zilberman, Yuliya; Gilquin, Benoit; Khochbin, Saadi; Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Shemesh, Tom; Kozlov, Michael M

    2006-04-01

    Initial integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions (focal complexes) appear underneath the lamellipodia, in the regions of the "fast" centripetal flow driven by actin polymerization. Once formed, these adhesions convert the flow behind them into a "slow", myosin II-driven mode. Some focal complexes then turn into elongated focal adhesions (FAs) associated with contractile actomyosin bundles (stress fibers). Myosin II inhibition does not suppress formation of focal complexes but blocks their conversion into mature FAs and further FA growth. Application of external pulling force promotes FA growth even under conditions when myosin II activity is blocked. Thus, individual FAs behave as mechanosensors responding to the application of force by directional assembly. We proposed a thermodynamic model for the mechanosensitivity of FAs, taking into account that an elastic molecular aggregate subject to pulling forces tends to grow in the direction of force application by incorporating additional subunits. This simple model can explain a variety of processes typical of FA behavior. Assembly of FAs is triggered by the small G-protein Rho via activation of two major targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and the formin homology protein, Dia1. ROCK controls creation of myosin II-driven forces, while Dia1 is involved in the response of FAs to these forces. Expression of the active form of Dia1, allows the external force-induced assembly of mature FAs, even in conditions when Rho is inhibited. Conversely, downregulation of Dia1 by siRNA prevents FA maturation even if Rho is activated. Dia1 and other formins cap barbed (fast growing) ends of actin filaments, allowing insertion of the new actin monomers. We suggested a novel mechanism of such "leaky" capping based on an assumption of elasticity of the formin/barbed end complex. Our model predicts that formin-mediated actin polymerization should be greatly enhanced by application of external pulling force. Thus, the formin-actin complex

  11. The Focal Adhesion-Localized CdGAP Regulates Matrix Rigidity Sensing and Durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wormer, Duncan B.; Davis, Kevin A.; Henderson, James H.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Motile cells are capable of sensing the stiffness of the surrounding extracellular matrix through integrin-mediated focal adhesions and migrate towards regions of higher rigidity in a process known as durotaxis. Durotaxis plays an important role in normal development and disease progression, including tumor invasion and metastasis. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying focal adhesion-mediated rigidity sensing and durotaxis are poorly understood. Utilizing matrix-coated polydimethylsiloxane gels to manipulate substrate compliance, we show that cdGAP, an adhesion-localized Rac1 and Cdc42 specific GTPase activating protein, is necessary for U2OS osteosarcoma cells to coordinate cell shape changes and migration as a function of extracellular matrix stiffness. CdGAP regulated rigidity-dependent motility by controlling membrane protrusion and adhesion dynamics, as well as by modulating Rac1 activity. CdGAP was also found to be necessary for U2OS cell durotaxis. Taken together, these data identify cdGAP as an important component of an integrin-mediated signaling pathway that senses and responds to mechanical cues in the extracellular matrix in order to coordinate directed cell motility. PMID:24632816

  12. Induction of focal adhesions and motility in Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Susana A; D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Vale, Ronald D

    2014-12-01

    Focal adhesions are dynamic structures that interact with the extracellular matrix on the cell exterior and actin filaments on the cell interior, enabling cells to adhere and crawl along surfaces. We describe a system for inducing the formation of focal adhesions in normally non-ECM-adherent, nonmotile Drosophila S2 cells. These focal adhesions contain the expected molecular markers such as talin, vinculin, and p130Cas, and they require talin for their formation. The S2 cells with induced focal adhesions also display a nonpolarized form of motility on vitronectin-coated substrates. Consistent with findings in mammalian cells, the degree of motility can be tuned by changing the stiffness of the substrate and was increased after the depletion of PAK3, a p21-activated kinase. A subset of nonmotile, nonpolarized cells also exhibited focal adhesions that rapidly assembled and disassembled around the cell perimeter. Such cooperative and dynamic fluctuations of focal adhesions were decreased by RNA interference (RNAi) depletion of myosin II and focal adhesion kinase, suggesting that this behavior requires force and focal adhesion maturation. These results demonstrate that S2 cells, a cell line that is well studied for cytoskeletal dynamics and readily amenable to protein manipulation by RNAi, can be used to study the assembly and dynamics of focal adhesions and mechanosensitive cell motility.

  13. Essential role for focal adhesion kinase in regulating stress hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ramdas, Baskar; Hanneman, Philip; Martin, Joseph; Beggs, Hilary E.

    2010-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that has been extensively studied in fibroblasts; however its function in hematopoiesis remains an enigma. FAK is thought to be expressed in myeloid and erythroid progenitors, and its expression is enhanced in response to cytokines such as granu-locyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Furthermore, bone marrow cells cultured in granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor show active migration and chemoattractant-induced polarization, which correlates with FAK induction. While loss of FAK in mice results in embryonic lethality, we have deleted FAK in the adult bone marrow. We show an essential role for FAK in regulating hemolytic, myelotoxic, as well as acute inflammatory stress responses in vivo. In vitro, loss of FAK in erythroid and myeloid progenitor's results in impaired cytokine induced growth and survival, as well as defects in the activation and expression of antiapoptotic proteins caspase 3 and Bcl-xL. Additionally, reduced migration and adhesion of myeloid cells on extracellular matrix proteins, as well as impaired activation of Rac GTPase is also observed in the absence of FAK. Our studies reveal an essential role for FAK in integrating growth/survival and adhesion based functions in myeloid and erythroid cells predominantly under conditions of stress. PMID:20664055

  14. Osteogenic lineage restriction by osteoprogenitors cultured on nanometric grooved surfaces: the role of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, John W; Roberts, Jemma N; Smith, Carol-Anne; Robertson, Mary; White, Kate; Biggs, Manus J; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dalby, Matthew J

    2014-02-01

    The differentiation of progenitor cells is dependent on more than biochemical signalling. Topographical cues in natural bone extracellular matrix guide cellular differentiation through the formation of focal adhesions, contact guidance, cytoskeletal rearrangement and ultimately gene expression. Osteoarthritis and a number of bone disorders present as growing challenges for our society. Hence, there is a need for next generation implantable devices to substitute for, or guide, bone repair in vivo. Cellular responses to nanometric topographical cues need to be better understood in vitro in order to ensure the effective and efficient integration and performance of these orthopedic devices. In this study, the FDA-approved plastic polycaprolactone was embossed with nanometric grooves and the response of primary and immortalized osteoprogenitor cells observed. Nanometric groove dimensions were 240 nm or 540 nm deep and 12.5 μm wide. Cells cultured on test surfaces followed contact guidance along the length of groove edges, elongated along their major axis and showed nuclear distortion; they formed more focal complexes and lower proportions of mature adhesions relative to planar controls. Down-regulation of the osteoblast marker genes RUNX2 and BMPR2 in primary and immortalized cells was observed on grooved substrates. Down-regulation appeared to directly correlate with focal adhesion maturation, indicating the involvement of ERK 1/2 negative feedback pathways following integrin-mediated FAK activation. PMID:24252447

  15. Hyaluronan and the hyaluronan receptor RHAMM promote focal adhesion turnover and transient tyrosine kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms whereby hyaluronan (HA) stimulates cell motility was investigated in a C-H-ras transformed 10T 1/2 fibroblast cell line (C3). A significant (p < 0.001) stimulation of C3 cell motility with HA (10 ng/ml) was accompanied by an increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation as detected by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies using immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins was found to be both rapid and transient with phosphorylation occurring within 1 min of HA addition and dissipating below control levels 10-15 min later. These responses were also elicited by an antibody generated against a peptide sequence within the HA receptor RHAMM. Treatment of cells with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein, 10 micrograms/ml or herbimycin A, 0.5 micrograms/ml) or microinjection of anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies inhibited the transient protein tyrosine phosphorylation in response to HA as well as prevented HA stimulation of cell motility. To determine a link between HA-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation and the resulting cell locomotion, cytoskeletal reorganization was examined in C3 cells plated on fibronectin and treated with HA or anti-RHAMM antibody. These agents caused a rapid assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions as revealed by immunofluorescent localization of vinculin. The time course with which HA and antibody induced focal adhesion turnover exactly paralleled the induction of transient protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In addition, phosphotyrosine staining colocalized with vinculin within structures in the lamellapodia of these cells. Notably, the focal adhesion kinase, pp125FAK, was rapidly phosphorylated and dephosphorylated after HA stimulation. These results suggest that HA stimulates locomotion via a rapid and transient protein tyrosine kinase signaling event mediated by RHAMM. They also provide a possible molecular basis for focal adhesion turnover, a process that is

  16. Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin Regulates Cytoskeletal Tension, Cell Spreading, and Focal Adhesions by Stimulating RhoAD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Pirone, Dana M.; Tan, John L.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin–mediated cell-cell adhesion and integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion coordinate to affect the physical and mechanical rearrangements of the endothelium, although the mechanisms for such cross talk remain undefined. Herein, we describe the regulation of focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal tension by intercellular VE-cadherin engagement, and the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Increasing the density of endothelial cells to increase cell-cell contact decreased focal adhesions by decreasing cell spreading. This contact inhibition of cell spreading was blocked by disrupting VE-cadherin engagement with an adenovirus encoding dominant negative VE-cadherin. When changes in cell spreading were prevented by culturing cells on a micropatterned substrate, VE-cadherin–mediated cell-cell contact paradoxically increased focal adhesion formation. We show that VE-cadherin engagement mediates each of these effects by inducing both a transient and sustained activation of RhoA. Both the increase and decrease in cell-matrix adhesion were blocked by disrupting intracellular tension and signaling through the Rho-ROCK pathway. In all, these findings demonstrate that VE-cadherin signals through RhoA and the actin cytoskeleton to cross talk with cell-matrix adhesion and thereby define a novel pathway by which cell-cell contact alters the global mechanical and functional state of cells. PMID:15075376

  17. Focal-plane architectures and signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayadev, T. S.

    1991-11-01

    This paper discusses the relationship of focal plane architectures and signal processing functions currently used in infrared sensors. It then discusses the development of an algorithm derived from the models developed by biologists to explain the functions of insect eyes and the hardware realization of this algorithm using commercially available silicon chips. The conclusion of this study is that there are important lessons to be learned from the architecture of biological sensors, which may lead to new techniques in electro-optic sensor design.

  18. Talin determines the nanoscale architecture of focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jaron; Wang, Yilin; Goh, Wah Ing; Goh, Honzhen; Baird, Michelle A; Ruehland, Svenja; Teo, Shijia; Bate, Neil; Critchley, David R; Davidson, Michael W; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2015-09-01

    Insight into how molecular machines perform their biological functions depends on knowledge of the spatial organization of the components, their connectivity, geometry, and organizational hierarchy. However, these parameters are difficult to determine in multicomponent assemblies such as integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We have previously applied 3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy to probe the spatial organization of major FA components, observing a nanoscale stratification of proteins between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here we combine superresolution imaging techniques with a protein engineering approach to investigate how such nanoscale architecture arises. We demonstrate that talin plays a key structural role in regulating the nanoscale architecture of FAs, akin to a molecular ruler. Talin diagonally spans the FA core, with its N terminus at the membrane and C terminus demarcating the FA/stress fiber interface. In contrast, vinculin is found to be dispensable for specification of FA nanoscale architecture. Recombinant analogs of talin with modified lengths recapitulated its polarized orientation but altered the FA/stress fiber interface in a linear manner, consistent with its modular structure, and implicating the integrin-talin-actin complex as the primary mechanical linkage in FAs. Talin was found to be ∼97 nm in length and oriented at ∼15° relative to the plasma membrane. Our results identify talin as the primary determinant of FA nanoscale organization and suggest how multiple cellular forces may be integrated at adhesion sites. PMID:26283369

  19. Talin determines the nanoscale architecture of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jaron; Wang, Yilin; Goh, Wah Ing; Goh, Honzhen; Baird, Michelle A.; Ruehland, Svenja; Teo, Shijia; Bate, Neil; Critchley, David R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2015-01-01

    Insight into how molecular machines perform their biological functions depends on knowledge of the spatial organization of the components, their connectivity, geometry, and organizational hierarchy. However, these parameters are difficult to determine in multicomponent assemblies such as integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We have previously applied 3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy to probe the spatial organization of major FA components, observing a nanoscale stratification of proteins between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here we combine superresolution imaging techniques with a protein engineering approach to investigate how such nanoscale architecture arises. We demonstrate that talin plays a key structural role in regulating the nanoscale architecture of FAs, akin to a molecular ruler. Talin diagonally spans the FA core, with its N terminus at the membrane and C terminus demarcating the FA/stress fiber interface. In contrast, vinculin is found to be dispensable for specification of FA nanoscale architecture. Recombinant analogs of talin with modified lengths recapitulated its polarized orientation but altered the FA/stress fiber interface in a linear manner, consistent with its modular structure, and implicating the integrin–talin–actin complex as the primary mechanical linkage in FAs. Talin was found to be ∼97 nm in length and oriented at ∼15° relative to the plasma membrane. Our results identify talin as the primary determinant of FA nanoscale organization and suggest how multiple cellular forces may be integrated at adhesion sites. PMID:26283369

  20. ADAMTS-10 and -6 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Stuart A.; Mularczyk, Ewa J.; Singh, Mukti; Massam-Wu, Teresa; Kielty, Cay M.

    2016-01-01

    ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 are homologous metalloproteinases with ill-defined roles. ADAMTS10 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS), implicating it in fibrillin microfibril biology since some fibrillin-1 mutations also cause WMS. However little is known about ADAMTS6 function. ADAMTS10 is resistant to furin cleavage, however we show that ADAMTS6 is effectively processed and active. Using siRNA, over-expression and mutagenesis, it was found ADAMTS6 inhibits and ADAMTS10 is required for focal adhesions, epithelial cell-cell junction formation, and microfibril deposition. Either knockdown of ADAMTS6, or disruption of its furin processing or catalytic sites restores focal adhesions, implicating its enzyme activity acts on targets in the focal adhesion complex. In ADAMTS10-depleted cultures, expression of syndecan-4 rescues focal adhesions and cell-cell junctions. Recombinant C-termini of ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6, both of which induce focal adhesions, bind heparin and syndecan-4. However, cells overexpressing full-length ADAMTS6 lack heparan sulphate and focal adhesions, whilst depletion of ADAMTS6 induces a prominent glycocalyx. Thus ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 oppositely affect heparan sulphate-rich interfaces including focal adhesions. We previously showed that microfibril deposition requires fibronectin-induced focal adhesions, and cell-cell junctions in epithelial cultures. Here we reveal that ADAMTS6 causes a reduction in heparan sulphate-rich interfaces, and its expression is regulated by ADAMTS10. PMID:27779234

  1. Crosstalk between focal adhesions and material mechanical properties governs cell mechanics and functions.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Sabato; Panzetta, Valeria; Embrione, Valerio; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical properties of materials strongly influence cell fate and functions. Focal adhesions are involved in the extremely important processes of mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. To address the relationship between the mechanical properties of cell substrates, focal adhesion/cytoskeleton assembly and cell functions, we investigated the behavior of NIH/3T3 cells over a wide range of stiffness (3-1000kPa) using two of the most common synthetic polymers for cell cultures: polyacrylamide and polydimethylsiloxane. An overlapping stiffness region was created between them to compare focal adhesion characteristics and cell functions, taking into account their different time-dependent behavior. Indeed, from a rheological point of view, polyacrylamide behaves like a strong gel (elastically), whereas polydimethylsiloxane like a viscoelastic solid. First, focal adhesion characteristics and dynamics were addressed in terms of material stiffness, then cell spreading area, migration rate and cell mechanical properties were correlated with focal adhesion size and assembly. Focal adhesion size was found to increase in the whole range of stiffness and to be in agreement in the overlapping rigidity region for the investigated materials. Cell mechanics directly correlated with focal adhesion lengths, whereas migration rate followed an inverse correlation. Cell spreading correlated with the substrate stiffness on polyacrylamide hydrogel, while no specific trend was found on polydimethylsiloxane. Substrate mechanics can be considered as a key physical cue that regulates focal adhesion assembly, which in turn governs important cellular properties and functions. PMID:26004223

  2. The role of focal adhesion complexes in fibroblast mechanotransduction during scar formation.

    PubMed

    Rustad, Kristine C; Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-10-01

    Historically, great efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that direct the complex process of wound healing; however only recently has there been recognition of the importance that mechanical signals play in the process of tissue repair and scar formation. The body's physiologic response to injury involves a dynamic interplay between mechanical forces and biochemical cues which directs a cascade of signals leading ultimately to the formation of fibrotic scar. Fibroblasts are a highly mechanosensitive cell type and are also largely responsible for the generation of the fibrotic matrix during scar formation and are thus a critical player in the process of mechanotransduction during tissue repair. Mechanotransduction is initiated at the interface between the cell membrane and the extracellular matrix where mechanical signals are first translated into a biochemical response. Focal adhesions are dynamic multi-protein complexes through which the extracellular matrix links to the intracellular cytoskeleton. These focal adhesion complexes play an integral role in the propagation of this initial mechanical cue into an extensive network of biochemical signals leading to widespread downstream effects including the influx of inflammatory cells, stimulation of angiogenesis, keratinocyte migration, fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the importance of the biomechanical milieu in healing wounds and suggests that an integrated approach to the discovery of targets to decrease scar formation may prove more clinically efficacious than previous purely biochemical strategies.

  3. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  4. Microtubules Regulate Focal Adhesion Dynamics through MAP4K4

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jiping; Xie, Min; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Schneider, Michael D; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Disassembly of focal adhesions (FAs) allows cell retraction and integrin detachment from the ECM, processes critical for cell movement. Growth of MT (microtubule) can promote FA turnover by serving as tracks to deliver proteins essential for FA disassembly. The molecular nature of this FA “disassembly factor”, however, remains elusive. By quantitative proteomics, we identified MAP4K4 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4) as a FA regulator that associates with MTs. Conditional knockout (cKO) of MAP4K4 in skin stabilizes FAs and impairs epidermal migration. By exploring underlying mechanisms, we further show that MAP4K4 associates with EB2, a MT binding protein, and IQSEC1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) specific for Arf6, whose activation promotes integrin internalization. Together, our findings provide critical insights into FA disassembly, suggesting that MTs can deliver MAP4K4 toward FAs through EB2, where MAP4K4 can in turn activate Arf6 via IQSEC1 and enhance FA dissolution. PMID:25490267

  5. NBR1 enables autophagy-dependent focal adhesion turnover

    PubMed Central

    Kenific, Candia M.; Stehbens, Samantha J.; Goldsmith, Juliet; Leidal, Andrew M.; Faure, Nathalie; Ye, Jordan; Wittmann, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway involving the sequestration of cellular contents into a double-membrane vesicle, the autophagosome. Although recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy supports cell migration, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Using live-cell imaging, we uncover that autophagy promotes optimal migratory rate and facilitates the dynamic assembly and disassembly of cell-matrix focal adhesions (FAs), which is essential for efficient motility. Additionally, our studies reveal that autophagosomes associate with FAs primarily during disassembly, suggesting autophagy locally facilitates the destabilization of cell-matrix contact sites. Furthermore, we identify the selective autophagy cargo receptor neighbor of BRCA1 (NBR1) as a key mediator of autophagy-dependent FA remodeling. NBR1 depletion impairs FA turnover and decreases targeting of autophagosomes to FAs, whereas ectopic expression of autophagy-competent, but not autophagy-defective, NBR1 enhances FA disassembly and reduces FA lifetime during migration. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into how autophagy promotes migration by revealing a requirement for NBR1-mediated selective autophagy in enabling FA disassembly in motile cells. PMID:26903539

  6. Microtubules regulate focal adhesion dynamics through MAP4K4.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jiping; Xie, Min; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Schneider, Michael D; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-01

    Disassembly of focal adhesions (FAs) allows cell retraction and integrin detachment from the extracellular matrix, processes critical for cell movement. Growth of microtubules (MTs) can promote FA turnover by serving as tracks to deliver proteins essential for FA disassembly. The molecular nature of this FA "disassembly factor," however, remains elusive. By quantitative proteomics, we identified mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4) as an FA regulator that associates with MTs. Knockout of MAP4K4 stabilizes FAs and impairs cell migration. By exploring underlying mechanisms, we further show that MAP4K4 associates with ending binding 2 (EB2) and IQ motif and SEC7 domain-containing protein 1 (IQSEC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor specific for Arf6, whose activation promotes integrin internalization. Together, our findings provide critical insight into FA disassembly, suggesting that MTs can deliver MAP4K4 toward FAs through EB2, where MAP4K4 can, in turn, activate Arf6 via IQSEC1 and enhance FA dissolution. PMID:25490267

  7. Mechanosensing through focal adhesion-anchored intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Martin; Osmanagic-Myers, Selma; Burgstaller, Gerald; Wolfram, Michael; Fischer, Irmgard; Walko, Gernot; Resch, Guenter P; Jörgl, Almut; Herrmann, Harald; Wiche, Gerhard

    2014-02-01

    Integrin-based mechanotransduction involves a complex focal adhesion (FA)-associated machinery that is able to detect and respond to forces exerted either through components of the extracellular matrix or the intracellular contractile actomyosin network. Here, we show a hitherto unrecognized regulatory role of vimentin intermediate filaments (IFs) in this process. By studying fibroblasts in which vimentin IFs were decoupled from FAs, either because of vimentin deficiency (V0) or loss of vimentin network anchorage due to deficiency in the cytolinker protein plectin (P0), we demonstrate attenuated activation of the major mechanosensor molecule FAK and its downstream targets Src, ERK1/2, and p38, as well as an up-regulation of the compensatory feedback loop acting on RhoA and myosin light chain. In line with these findings, we show strongly reduced FA turnover rates in P0 fibroblasts combined with impaired directional migration, formation of protrusions, and up-regulation of "stretched" high-affinity integrin complexes. By exploiting tension-independent conditions, we were able to mechanistically link these defects to diminished cytoskeletal tension in both P0 and V0 cells. Our data provide important new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying cytoskeleton-regulated mechanosensing, a feature that is fundamental for controlled cell movement and tumor progression.

  8. Highly Multiplexed Imaging Uncovers Changes in Compositional Noise within Assembling Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Harizanova, Jana; Fermin, Yessica; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S.; Wieczorek, Jakob; Ickstadt, Katja; Grecco, Hernán E.; Zamir, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Integrin adhesome proteins bind each other in alternative manners, forming within the cell diverse cell-matrix adhesion sites with distinct properties. An intriguing question is how such modular assembly of adhesion sites is achieved correctly solely by self-organization of their components. Here we address this question using high-throughput multiplexed imaging of eight proteins and two phosphorylation sites in a large number of single focal adhesions. We found that during the assembly of focal adhesions the variances of protein densities decrease while the correlations between them increase, suggesting reduction in the noise levels within these structures. These changes correlate independently with the area and internal density of focal adhesions, but not with their age or shape. Artificial neural network analysis indicates that a joint consideration of multiple components improves the predictability of paxillin and zyxin levels in internally dense focal adhesions. This suggests that paxillin and zyxin densities in focal adhesions are fine-tuned by integrating the levels of multiple other components, thus averaging-out stochastic fluctuations. Based on these results we propose that increase in internal protein densities facilitates noise suppression in focal adhesions, while noise suppression enables their stable growth and further density increase—hence forming a feedback loop giving rise to a quality-controlled assembly. PMID:27519053

  9. Highly Multiplexed Imaging Uncovers Changes in Compositional Noise within Assembling Focal Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Harizanova, Jana; Fermin, Yessica; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S; Wieczorek, Jakob; Ickstadt, Katja; Grecco, Hernán E; Zamir, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Integrin adhesome proteins bind each other in alternative manners, forming within the cell diverse cell-matrix adhesion sites with distinct properties. An intriguing question is how such modular assembly of adhesion sites is achieved correctly solely by self-organization of their components. Here we address this question using high-throughput multiplexed imaging of eight proteins and two phosphorylation sites in a large number of single focal adhesions. We found that during the assembly of focal adhesions the variances of protein densities decrease while the correlations between them increase, suggesting reduction in the noise levels within these structures. These changes correlate independently with the area and internal density of focal adhesions, but not with their age or shape. Artificial neural network analysis indicates that a joint consideration of multiple components improves the predictability of paxillin and zyxin levels in internally dense focal adhesions. This suggests that paxillin and zyxin densities in focal adhesions are fine-tuned by integrating the levels of multiple other components, thus averaging-out stochastic fluctuations. Based on these results we propose that increase in internal protein densities facilitates noise suppression in focal adhesions, while noise suppression enables their stable growth and further density increase-hence forming a feedback loop giving rise to a quality-controlled assembly. PMID:27519053

  10. FAK phosphorylation at Tyr-925 regulates cross-talk between focal adhesion turnover and cell protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Deramaudt, Therese B.; Dujardin, Denis; Hamadi, Abdelkader; Noulet, Fanny; Kolli, Kaouther; De Mey, Jan; Takeda, Kenneth; Rondé, Philippe

    2011-01-01

     Cell migration is a highly complex process that requires the coordinated formation of membrane protrusion and focal adhesions (FAs). Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a major signaling component of FAs, is involved in the disassembly process of FAs through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of its tyrosine residues, but the role of such phosphorylations in nascent FA formation and turnover near the cell front and in cell protrusion is less well understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that, depending on the phosphorylation status of Tyr-925 residue, FAK modulates cell migration via two specific mechanisms. FAK−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) expressing nonphosphorylatable Y925F-FAK show increased interactions between FAK and unphosphorylated paxillin, which lead to FA stabilization and thus decreased FA turnover and reduced cell migration. Conversely, MEFs expressing phosphomimetic Y925E-FAK display unchanged FA disassembly rates, show increase in phosphorylated paxillin in FAs, and exhibit increased formation of nascent FAs at the cell leading edges. Moreover, Y925E-FAK cells present enhanced cell protrusion together with activation of the p130CAS/Dock180/Rac1 signaling pathway. Together, our results demonstrate that phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-925 is required for FAK-mediated cell migration and cell protrusion. PMID:21289086

  11. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase interacts with vinculin at focal adhesions during fatty acid-stimulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    George, Margaret D.; Wine, Robert N.; Lackford, Brad; Kissling, Grace E.; Akiyama, Steven K.; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid stimulates cell adhesion by activating α2β1 integrins in a process that depends on protein kinases, including p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. Here, we describe the interaction of cytoskeletal components with key signaling molecules that contribute to spreading of, and morphological changes in, arachidonic acid-treated MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells. Arachidonic acid-treated cells showed increased attachment and spreading on collagen type IV as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Fatty acid-treated cells displayed short cortical actin filaments associated with an increased number of β1 integrin-containing pseudopodia whereas untreated cells displayed elongated stress fibers and fewer clusters of β1 integrins. Confocal microscopy of arachidonic acid-treated cells showed that vinculin and phospho-p38 both appeared enriched in pseudopodia and at the tips of actin filaments, and fluorescence ratio imaging indicated the increase was specific for the phospho-(active) form of p38. Immunoprecipitates of phospho-p38 from extracts of arachidonic acid-treated cells contained vinculin, and GST-vinculin fusion proteins carrying the central region of vinculin bound phospho-p38, whereas fusion proteins expressing the terminal portions of vinculin did not. These data suggest that phospho-p38 associates with particular domains on critical focal adhesion proteins that are involved in tumor cell adhesion and spreading and that this association can be regulated by factors in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24219282

  12. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca2+-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca2+-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  13. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-06-15

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca(2+)-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca(2+)-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  14. Actin cap associated focal adhesions and their distinct role in cellular mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Khatau, Shyam B.; Feng, Yunfeng; Walcott, Sam; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.; Wirtz, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The ability for cells to sense and adapt to different physical microenvironments plays a critical role in development, immune responses, and cancer metastasis. Here we identify a small subset of focal adhesions that terminate fibers in the actin cap, a highly ordered filamentous actin structure that is anchored to the top of the nucleus by the LINC complexes; these differ from conventional focal adhesions in morphology, subcellular organization, movements, turnover dynamics, and response to biochemical stimuli. Actin cap associated focal adhesions (ACAFAs) dominate cell mechanosensing over a wide range of matrix stiffness, an ACAFA-specific function regulated by actomyosin contractility in the actin cap, while conventional focal adhesions are restrictively involved in mechanosensing for extremely soft substrates. These results establish the perinuclear actin cap and associated ACAFAs as major mediators of cellular mechanosensing and a critical element of the physical pathway that transduce mechanical cues all the way to the nucleus. PMID:22870384

  15. Fibronectin is not Present in the Focal Adhesions Formed between Normal Cultured Fibroblasts and Their Substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Tien; Singer, S. J.

    1980-12-01

    Fibronectin is an extracellular matrix protein that has been implicated in the spreading and adhesion of cultured fibroblasts to their substrata. In this paper, double immunoelectron microscopic labeling experiments for fibronectin and for concanavalin A-binding proteins on the cell surface were carried out on ultrathin frozen sections of cultures of embryonic chicken heart fibroblasts. On cross sections through the focal adhesions of the cell to the substratum there was substantial labeling for concanavalin A-binding proteins but no detectable labeling for fibronectin, whereas both the binding proteins and fibronectin were extensively labeled elsewhere on the cell surface and substratum. These results demonstrate that fibronectin is not present within the sites of focal adhesions. Therefore, the functions of fibronectin in cell spreading and adhesion are not directly mediated through its binding at focal adhesion sites. An alternative model is presented which can account for such fibronectin functions.

  16. Crystal Structures of Free and Ligand-Bound Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Pyk2

    SciTech Connect

    Lulo, J.; Yuzawa, S; Schlessinger, J

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domains target the non-receptor tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 to cellular focal adhesion areas, where the signaling molecule paxillin is also located. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pyk2 FAT domain alone or in complex with paxillin LD4 peptides. The overall structure of Pyk2-FAT is an antiparallel four-helix bundle with an up-down, up-down, right-handed topology. In the LD4-bound FAT complex, two paxillin LD4 peptides interact with two opposite sides of Pyk2-FAT, at the surfaces of the a1a4 and a2a3 helices of each FAT molecule. We also demonstrate that, while paxillin is phosphorylated by Pyk2, complex formation between Pyk2 and paxillin does not depend on Pyk2 tyrosine kinase activity. These experiments reveal the structural basis underlying the selectivity of paxillin LD4 binding to the Pyk2 FAT domain and provide insights about the molecular details which influence the different behavior of these two closely-related kinases.

  17. Novel Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Binding Sites on Focal Adhesion Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase that is ubiquitously expressed, recruited to focal adhesions, and engages in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. Diverse cellular responses, such as cell migration, proliferation, and survival, are regulated by FAK. Prior to activation, FAK adopts an autoinhibited conformation in which the FERM domain binds the kinase domain, blocking access to the activation loop and substrate binding site. Activation of FAK occurs through conformational change, and acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) are known to facilitate this process. PIP2 binding alters the autoinhibited conformation of the FERM and kinase domains and subsequently exposes the activation loop to phosphorylation. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of PIP2 binding and its role in FAK activation remain unclear. In this study, we conducted coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the binding of FAK to PIP2. Our simulations identified novel areas of basic residues in the kinase domain of FAK that potentially undergo transient binding to PIP2 through electrostatic attractions. Our investigation provides a molecular picture of PIP2-initiated FAK activation and introduces promising new pathways for future studies of FAK regulation. PMID:26186725

  18. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G.; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei -Jen; Chen, Shao -Yu; Yang, Feng; et al

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essentialmore » for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.« less

  19. Nuclear transport of paxillin depends on focal adhesion dynamics and FAT domains

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Aneesh R.; Shivashankar, G. V.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear transport of paxillin appears to be crucial for paxillin function but the mechanism of transport remains unclear. Here, we show that the nuclear transport of paxillin is regulated by focal adhesion turnover and the presence of FAT domains. Focal adhesion turnover was controlled using triangular or circular fibronectin islands. Circular islands caused higher focal adhesion turnover and increased the nuclear transport of paxillin relative to triangular islands. Mutating several residues of paxillin had no effect on its nuclear transport, suggesting that the process is controlled by multiple domains. Knocking out FAK (also known as PTK2) and vinculin caused an increase in nuclear paxillin. This could be reversed by rescue with wild-type FAK but not by FAK with a mutated FAT domain, which inhibits paxillin binding. Expressing just the FAT domain of FAK not only brought down nuclear levels of paxillin but also caused a large immobile fraction of paxillin to be present at focal adhesions, as demonstrated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies. Taken together, focal adhesion turnover and FAT domains regulate the nuclear localization of paxillin, suggesting a possible role for transcriptional control, through paxillin, by focal adhesions. PMID:27068537

  20. Bacillus cereus Certhrax ADP-ribosylates vinculin to disrupt focal adhesion complexes and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nathan C; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2014-04-11

    Bacillus cereus is often associated with mild to moderate gastroenteritis; however, some recent isolates cause inhalational anthrax-like diseases and death. These potential emerging human pathogens express multiple virulence factors. B. cereus strain G9241 expresses anthrax toxin, several polysaccharide capsules, and the novel ADP-ribosyltransferase, Certhrax. In this study, we show that Certhrax ADP-ribosylates Arg-433 of vinculin, a protein that coordinates actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix interactions. ADP-ribosylation of vinculin disrupted focal adhesion complexes and redistributed vinculin to the cytoplasm. Exogenous vinculin rescued these phenotypes. This provides a mechanism for strain G9241 to breach host barrier defenses and promote bacterial growth and spread. Certhrax is the first bacterial toxin to add a post-translational modification to vinculin to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Integrin binding and mechanical tension induce movement of mRNA and ribosomes to focal adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Singer, R. H.; Meyer, C. J.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) activates signalling pathways that control cell behaviour by binding to cell-surface integrin receptors and inducing the formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs). In addition to clustered integrins, FACs contain proteins that mechanically couple the integrins to the cytoskeleton and to immobilized signal-transducing molecules. Cell adhesion to the ECM also induces a rapid increase in the translation of preexisting messenger RNAs. Gene expression can be controlled locally by targeting mRNAs to specialized cytoskeletal domains. Here we investigate whether cell binding to the ECM promotes formation of a cytoskeletal microcompartment specialized for translational control at the site of integrin binding. High-resolution in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA and ribosomes rapidly and specifically localized to FACs that form when cells bind to ECM-coated microbeads. Relocation of these protein synthesis components to the FAC depended on the ability of integrins to mechanically couple the ECM to the contractile cytoskeleton and on associated tension-moulding of the actin lattice. Our results suggest a new type of gene regulation by integrins and by mechanical stress which may involve translation of mRNAs into proteins near the sites of signal reception.

  2. Distinct biophysical mechanisms of focal adhesion kinase mechanoactivation by different extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Seong, Jihye; Tajik, Arash; Sun, Jie; Guan, Jun-Lin; Humphries, Martin J; Craig, Susan E; Shekaran, Asha; García, Andrés J; Lu, Shaoying; Lin, Michael Z; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yingxiao

    2013-11-26

    Matrix mechanics controls cell fate by modulating the bonds between integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, it remains unclear how fibronectin (FN), type 1 collagen, and their receptor integrin subtypes distinctly control force transmission to regulate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, a crucial molecular signal governing cell adhesion/migration. Here we showed, using a genetically encoded FAK biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer, that FN-mediated FAK activation is dependent on the mechanical tension, which may expose its otherwise hidden FN synergy site to integrin α5. In sharp contrast, the ligation between the constitutively exposed binding motif of type 1 collagen and its receptor integrin α2 was surprisingly tension-independent to induce sufficient FAK activation. Although integrin α subunit determines mechanosensitivity, the ligation between α subunit and the ECM proteins converges at the integrin β1 activation to induce FAK activation. We further discovered that the interaction of the N-terminal protein 4.1/ezrin/redixin/moesin basic patch with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate is crucial during cell adhesion to maintain the FAK activation from the inhibitory effect of nearby protein 4.1/ezrin/redixin/moesin acidic sites. Therefore, different ECM proteins either can transmit or can shield from mechanical forces to regulate cellular functions, with the accessibility of ECM binding motifs by their specific integrin α subunits determining the biophysical mechanisms of FAK activation during mechanotransduction.

  3. Allosteric Regulation of Focal Adhesion Kinase by PIP2 and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Le Coq, Johanne; Lietha, Daniel; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell signaling, proliferation, migration, and development. A major mechanism of regulation of FAK activity is an intramolecular autoinhibitory interaction between two of its domains—the catalytic and FERM domains. Upon cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, FAK is being translocated toward focal adhesion sites and activated. Interactions of FAK with phosphoinositide phosphatidylinsositol-4,5-bis-phosphate (PIP2) are required to activate FAK. However, the molecular mechanism of the activation remains poorly understood. Recent fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments revealed a closure of the FERM-kinase interface upon ATP binding, which is reversed upon additional binding of PIP2. Here, we addressed the allosteric regulation of FAK by performing all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations of a FAK fragment containing the catalytic and FERM domains, and comparing the dynamics in the absence or presence of ATP and PIP2. As a major conformational change, we observe a closing and opening motion upon ATP and additional PIP2 binding, respectively, in good agreement with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. To reveal how the binding of the regulatory PIP2 to the FERM F2 lobe is transduced to the very distant F1/N-lobe interface, we employed force distribution analysis. We identified a network of mainly charged residue-residue interactions spanning from the PIP2 binding site to the distant interface between the kinase and FERM domains, comprising candidate residues for mutagenesis to validate the predicted mechanism of FAK activation. PMID:25650936

  4. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase prevents experimental lung fibrosis and myofibroblast formation

    PubMed Central

    Lagares, David; Busnadiego, Oscar; García-Fernández, Rosa Ana; Kapoor, Mohit; Liu, Shangxi; Carter, David E.; Abraham, David; Shi-Wen, Xu; Carreira, Patricia; Fontaine T, Benjamin A; Shea, Barry S; Tager, Andrew M; Leask, Andrew; Lamas, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enhanced adhesive signaling including activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a hallmark of fibroblasts from lung fibrosis patients, and FAK has been therefore hypothesized to be a key mediator of this disease. This study was undertaken to characterize the contribution of FAK to the development of pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro. Methods FAK expression and activity were analyzed in lung tissue samples from lung fibrosis patients by immunohistochemistry. Mice orally treated with the FAK inhibitor, PF-562,271, or with siRNA-mediated silencing of FAK, were exposed to intratracheally instilled bleomycin to induce lung fibrosis, and the lungs were harvested for histological and biochemical analysis. Using endothelin-1 (ET-1) as stimulus, cell adhesion and contraction, as well as profibrotic gene expression were studied in fibroblasts isolated from wild type and FAK-deficient mouse embryos. ET-1-mediated FAK activation and gene expression were studied in primary mouse lung fibroblasts, as well as in wild type and integrin β1-deficient fibroblasts. Results Increased FAK expression and activity are upregulated in fibroblast foci and remodeled vessels in lung fibrosis patients. Pharmacological or siRNA-mediated targeting of FAK resulted in marked abrogation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Loss of FAK impaired the acquisition of a profibrotic phenotype in response to ET-1. Profibrotic gene expression leading to myofibroblast differentiation required cell adhesion, and was driven by Jun N-terminal kinase activation through integrin β1/FAK signaling. Conclusion These results implicate FAK as a central mediator of fibrogenesis, and highlight this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases. PMID:22492165

  5. Targeting, Capture, and Stabilization of Microtubules at Early Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaverina, Irina; Rottner, Klemens; Small, J. Victor

    1998-01-01

    By co-injecting fluorescent tubulin and vinculin into fish fibroblasts we have revealed a “cross talk” between microtubules and early sites of substrate contact. This mutuality was first indicated by the targeting of vinculin-rich foci by microtubules during their growth towards the cell periphery. In addition to passing directly over contact sites, the ends of single microtubules could be observed to target several contacts in succession or the same contact repetitively, with intermittent withdrawals. Targeting sometimes involved side-stepping, or the major re-routing of a microtubule, indicative of a guided, rather than a random process. The paths that microtubules followed into contacts were unrelated to the orientation of stress fiber assemblies and targeting occurred also in mouse fibroblasts that lacked a system of intermediate filaments. Further experiments with microtubule inhibitors showed that adhesion foci can: (a) capture microtubules and stabilize them against disassembly by nocodazole; and (b), act as preferred sites of microtubule polymerization, during either early recovery from nocodazole, or brief treatment with taxol. From these and other findings we speculate that microtubules are guided into substrate contact sites and through the motor-dependent delivery of signaling molecules serve to modulate their development. It is further proposed this modulation provides the route whereby microtubules exert their influence on cell shape and polarity. PMID:9660872

  6. Rab'ing tumor cell migration and invasion: focal adhesion disassembly driven by Rab5.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente A

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 has been extensively studied in the context of endocytic trafficking because it is critical in the regulation of early endosome dynamics. In addition to this canonical role, evidence obtained in recent years implicates Rab5 in the regulation of cell migration. This novel role of Rab5 is based not only on an indirect relationship between cell migration and endosomal trafficking as separate processes, but also on the direct regulation of signaling proteins implicated in cell migration. However, the precise mechanisms underlying this connection have remained elusive. Recent studies have shown that the activation of Rab5 is a critical event for maintaining the dynamics of focal adhesions, which is fundamental in regulating not only cell migration but also tumor cell invasion.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Guillermina M.; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M. Teresa; Eck, Michael J.; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  8. Molecular mechanism of vinculin activation and nano-scale spatial organization in focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Baird, Michelle A.; Shtengel, Gleb; Campbell, Sharon L.; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) link the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the actin cytoskeleton to mediate cell adhesion, migration, mechanosensing and signaling. FAs have conserved nanoscale protein organization, suggesting that the position of proteins within FAs regulates their activity and function. Vinculin binds different FA proteins to mediate distinct cellular functions, but how vinculin’s interactions are spatiotemporally organized within FA is unknown. Using interferometric photo-activation localization (iPALM) super-resolution microscopy to assay vinculin nanoscale localization and a FRET biosensor to assay vinculin conformation, we found that upward repositioning within the FA during FA maturation facilitates vinculin activation and mechanical reinforcement of FA. Inactive vinculin localizes to the lower integrin signaling layer in FA by binding to phospho-paxillin. Talin binding activates vinculin and targets active vinculin higher in FA where vinculin can engage retrograde actin flow. Thus, specific protein interactions are spatially segregated within FA at the nano-scale to regulate vinculin activation and function. PMID:26053221

  9. Theory of the mechanical response of focal adhesions to shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biton, Y. Y.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The response of cells to shear flow is primarily determined by the asymmetry of the external forces and moments that are sensed by each member of a focal adhesion pair connected by a contractile stress fiber. In the theory presented here, we suggest a physical model in which each member of such a pair of focal adhesions is treated as an elastic body subject to both a myosin-activated contractile force and the shear stress induced by the external flow. The elastic response of a focal adhesion complex is much faster than the active cellular processes that determine the size of the associated focal adhesions and the direction of the complex relative to the imposed flow. Therefore, the complex attains its mechanical equilibrium configuration which may change because of the cellular activity. Our theory is based on the experimental observation that focal adhesions modulate their cross-sectional area in order to attain an optimal shear. Using this assumption, our elastic model shows that such a complex can passively change its orientation to align parallel to the direction of the flow.

  10. Multidimensional traction force microscopy reveals out-of-plane rotational moments about focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Legant, Wesley R; Choi, Colin K; Miller, Jordan S; Shao, Lin; Gao, Liang; Betzig, Eric; Chen, Christopher S

    2013-01-15

    Recent methods have revealed that cells on planar substrates exert both shear (in-plane) and normal (out-of-plane) tractions against the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the location and origin of the normal tractions with respect to the adhesive and cytoskeletal elements of cells have not been elucidated. We developed a high-spatiotemporal-resolution, multidimensional (2.5D) traction force microscopy to measure and model the full 3D nature of cellular forces on planar 2D surfaces. We show that shear tractions are centered under elongated focal adhesions whereas upward and downward normal tractions are detected on distal (toward the cell edge) and proximal (toward the cell body) ends of adhesions, respectively. Together, these forces produce significant rotational moments about focal adhesions in both protruding and retracting peripheral regions. Temporal 2.5D traction force microscopy analysis of migrating and spreading cells shows that these rotational moments are highly dynamic, propagating outward with the leading edge of the cell. Finally, we developed a finite element model to examine how rotational moments could be generated about focal adhesions in a thin lamella. Our model suggests that rotational moments can be generated largely via shear lag transfer to the underlying ECM from actomyosin contractility applied at the intracellular surface of a rigid adhesion of finite thickness. Together, these data demonstrate and probe the origin of a previously unappreciated multidimensional stress profile associated with adhesions and highlight the importance of new approaches to characterize cellular forces. PMID:23277584

  11. Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Benjamin P; Gough, Rosemarie E; Ammon, York-Christoph; van de Willige, Dieudonnée; Post, Harm; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Heck, Albert JR; Goult, Benjamin T; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cross-talk between dynamic microtubules and integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix plays a crucial role in cell polarity and migration. Microtubules regulate the turnover of adhesion sites, and, in turn, focal adhesions promote the cortical microtubule capture and stabilization in their vicinity, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that cortical microtubule stabilization sites containing CLASPs, KIF21A, LL5β and liprins are recruited to focal adhesions by the adaptor protein KANK1, which directly interacts with the major adhesion component, talin. Structural studies showed that the conserved KN domain in KANK1 binds to the talin rod domain R7. Perturbation of this interaction, including a single point mutation in talin, which disrupts KANK1 binding but not the talin function in adhesion, abrogates the association of microtubule-stabilizing complexes with focal adhesions. We propose that the talin-KANK1 interaction links the two macromolecular assemblies that control cortical attachment of actin fibers and microtubules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124.001 PMID:27410476

  12. Crystallization of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Targeting (FAT) Domain in a Primitive Orthorhombic Space Group

    SciTech Connect

    Magis,A.; Bailey, K.; Kurenova, E.; Hernandez Prada, J.; Cance, W.; Ostrov, D.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data from the targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were collected from a single crystal that diffracted to 1.99 Angstroms resolution and reduced to the primitive orthorhombic lattice. A single molecule was predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient. The data were phased using molecular-replacement methods using an existing model of the FAK FAT domain. All structures of human focal adhesion kinase FAT domains solved to date have been solved in a C-centered orthorhombic space group.

  13. Focal adhesion kinase protein regulates Wnt3a gene expression to control cell fate specification in the developing neural plate

    PubMed Central

    Fonar, Yuri; Gutkovich, Yoni E.; Root, Heather; Malyarova, Anastasia; Aamar, Emil; Golubovskaya, Vita M.; Elias, Sarah; Elkouby, Yaniv M.; Frank, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase protein localized to regions called focal adhesions, which are contact points between cells and the extracellular matrix. FAK protein acts as a scaffold to transfer adhesion-dependent and growth factor signals into the cell. Increased FAK expression is linked to aggressive metastatic and invasive tumors. However, little is known about its normal embryonic function. FAK protein knockdown during early Xenopus laevis development anteriorizes the embryo. Morphant embryos express increased levels of anterior neural markers, with reciprocally reduced posterior neural marker expression. Posterior neural plate folding and convergence-extension is also inhibited. This anteriorized phenotype resembles that of embryos knocked down zygotically for canonical Wnt signaling. FAK and Wnt3a genes are both expressed in the neural plate, and Wnt3a expression is FAK dependent. Ectopic Wnt expression rescues this FAK morphant anteriorized phenotype. Wnt3a thus acts downstream of FAK to balance anterior–posterior cell fate specification in the developing neural plate. Wnt3a gene expression is also FAK dependent in human breast cancer cells, suggesting that this FAK–Wnt linkage is highly conserved. This unique observation connects the FAK- and Wnt-signaling pathways, both of which act to promote cancer when aberrantly activated in mammalian cells. PMID:21551070

  14. Heat stress activates AKT via focal adhesion kinase-mediated pathway in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongguang; Vander Heide, Richard S

    2008-08-01

    Heat stress (HS)-induced cardioprotection is associated with increased paxillin localization to the membrane fraction of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). The purpose of this study was 1) to examine the subcellular signaling pathways activated by HS; 2) to determine whether myocardial stress organizes and activates an integrated survival pathway; and 3) to investigate potential downstream cytoprotective proteins activated by HS. After HS, NRVM were subjected to chemical inhibitors (CI) designed to simulate ischemia by inhibiting both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Protein kinase B (AKT) expression (wild type) was increased selectively with an adenoviral vector. Cell signaling was analyzed with Western blot analysis, while oncosis/apoptosis was assayed by measuring Trypan blue exclusion and/or terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, respectively. HS increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at tyrosine 397 but did not adversely affect the viability of NRVM before CI. HS increased association between FAK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase as well as causing a significant increase in AKT activity. Increased expression of wild-type AKT protected myocytes from both oncotic and apoptotic cell death. Increased expression of a FAK inhibitor, FRNK, reduced AKT phosphorylation in response to HS both at time 0 and after 10 min of CI compared with myocytes expressing empty virus. We conclude that myocardial stress activates cytoskeleton-based signaling pathways that are associated with protection from lethal cell injury.

  15. Inhibitory effects of Yangzheng Xiaoji on angiogenesis and the role of the focal adhesion kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen G; Ye, Lin; Ji, Ke; Frewer, Natasha; Ji, Jiafu; Mason, Malcolm D

    2012-11-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential event during the excessive growth and metastatic spread of solid tumours. Anti-angiogenic agents have become a new choice of therapy for patients with cancer. In the present study, we investigated the potential effect of Yangzheng Xiaoji, a traditional Chinese medicinal formula presently used in the treatment of several solid tumours including liver cancer and gastric cancer, on angiogenesis, in vitro. The human vascular endothelial cell line HECV was used. A Matrigel-based sandwich tubule formation assay was employed to assess in vitro angiogenesis, a colorimetric method for assessing in vitro cell growth. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) was used to evaluate the adhesion and migration of endothelial cells. The effects on activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were evaluated using western blotting and immunofluorescence methods. Yangzhen Xiaoji extract DME25 significantly inhibited tube formation (p=0.046 vs control). This was seen together with a concentration-dependent inhibition on cell-matrix adhesion and cellular migration. It was demonstrated that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor PF557328 had a significant synergistic effect on DME25-induced inhibition of cell adhesion, migration and tube formation. The study showed that DME25 inhibited the phosphorylation of FAK in endothelial cells. In conclusion, Yangzhen Xiaoji has a marked effect on angiogenesis, in vitro and that this effect is at least partly mediated by the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. PMID:22971748

  16. Simulated Microgravity Alters Actin Cytoskeleton and Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions of Cultured Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovic, J. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2008-06-01

    Cytoskeletal alterations occur in several cell types including lymphocytes, glial cells, and osteoblasts, during spaceflight and under simulated microgravity (SMG) (3, 4). One potential mechanism for cytoskeletal gravisensitivity is disruption of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrin interactions. Focal adhesions are specialized sites of cell-matrix interaction composed of integrins and the diversity of focal adhesion-associated cytoplasmic proteins including vinculin, talin, α-actinin, and actin filaments (4, 5). Integrins produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMG on F-actin cytoskeleton structure, vinculin focal adhesions, expression of some integrin subtypes and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow (hMSCs). Simulated microgravity was produced by 3D-clinostat (Dutch Space, Netherlands). Staining of actin fibers with TRITC-phalloidin showed reorganization even after 30 minutes of simulated microgravity. The increasing of cells number with abnormal F-actin was observed after subsequent terms of 3D-clinorotation (6, 24, 48, 120 hours). Randomization of gravity vector altered dimensional structure of stress fibers and resulted in remodeling of actin fibers inside the cells. In addition, we observed vinculin redistribution inside the cells after 6 hours and prolonged terms of clinorotation. Tubulin fibers in a contrast with F-actin and vinculin didn't show any reorganization even after long 3Dclinorotation (120 hours). The expression of integrin α2 increased 1,5-6-fold in clinorotated hMSCs. Also we observed decrease in number of VCAM-1-positive cells and changes in expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that SMG leads to microfilament and adhesion alterations of hMSCs most probably associated with involvement of some integrin subtypes.

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β dictates podocyte motility and focal adhesion turnover by modulating paxillin activity: implications for the protective effect of low-dose lithium in podocytopathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiwei; Ge, Yan; Liu, Zhihong; Gong, Rujun

    2014-10-01

    Aberrant focal adhesion turnover is centrally involved in podocyte actin cytoskeleton disorganization and foot process effacement. The structural and dynamic integrity of focal adhesions is orchestrated by multiple cell signaling molecules, including glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a multitasking kinase lately identified as a mediator of kidney injury. However, the role of GSK3β in podocytopathy remains obscure. In doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-injured podocytes, lithium, a GSK3β inhibitor and neuroprotective mood stabilizer, obliterated the accelerated focal adhesion turnover, rectified podocyte hypermotility, and restored actin cytoskeleton integrity. Mechanistically, lithium counteracted the doxorubicin-elicited GSK3β overactivity and the hyperphosphorylation and overactivation of paxillin, a focal adhesion-associated adaptor protein. Moreover, forced expression of a dominant negative kinase dead mutant of GSK3β highly mimicked, whereas ectopic expression of a constitutively active GSK3β mutant abolished, the effect of lithium in doxorubicin-injured podocytes, suggesting that the effect of lithium is mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of GSK3β. Furthermore, paxillin interacted with GSK3β and served as its substrate. In mice with doxorubicin nephropathy, a single low dose of lithium ameliorated proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Consistently, lithium therapy abrogated GSK3β overactivity, blunted paxillin hyperphosphorylation, and reinstated actin cytoskeleton integrity in glomeruli associated with an early attenuation of podocyte foot process effacement. Thus, GSK3β-modulated focal adhesion dynamics might serve as a novel therapeutic target for podocytopathy.

  18. Focal adhesion sites and the removal of substratum-bound fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Fibronectin was not removed from the substratum beneath focal adhesion sites when fibroblasts spread in serum-free medium on adsorbed fibronectin substrata, or when fibroblasts spread in serum-containing medium on covalently cross-linked fibronectin substrata. Under these conditions, there was colocalization between 140-kD fibronectin receptors and focal adhesion sites. It was concluded that removal of adsorbed fibronectin from beneath focal adhesion sites was a mechanical process that required serum. The effect of serum was nonspecific since serum could be replaced by equivalent concentrations of serum albumin, ovalbumin, or gamma globulins. Quantitative measurements indicated that the presence of proteins in the incubation medium weakens the interaction of fibronectin with the substratum, thereby allowing the adsorbed protein to be removed from the substratum at sites of high stress. After removing fibronectin from the substratum, cells reorganized this material into patches and fibrils beneath cells, and the reorganized fibronectin colocalized with fibronectin receptors. Some of the patches of fibronectin were phagocytosed. The fibronectin fibrils were observed to be in register with actin filament bundles and sometimes translocated to the upper cell surfaces. It is proposed that removal of fibronectin from beneath focal adhesion sites is an example of how cells can modify their extracellular matrices through contractile activity. PMID:2947902

  19. Occurrence and resolution of focal epithelial hyperplasia in two siblings with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mealey, B L; Hallmon, W W; Waldrop, T C

    1993-02-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is an uncommon disorder characterized by formation of multiple asymptomatic oral mucosal papular and/or nodular lesions. This article relates the occurrence and clinical course of FEH in 2 adolescent siblings with leukocyte adhesion deficiency. Histological findings are described and insights into potential causes are discussed.

  20. Mechanical force mobilizes zyxin from focal adhesions to actin filaments and regulates cytoskeletal reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Yoshigi, Masaaki; Hoffman, Laura M; Jensen, Christopher C; Yost, H Joseph; Beckerle, Mary C

    2005-10-24

    Organs and tissues adapt to acute or chronic mechanical stress by remodeling their actin cytoskeletons. Cells that are stimulated by cyclic stretch or shear stress in vitro undergo bimodal cytoskeletal responses that include rapid reinforcement and gradual reorientation of actin stress fibers; however, the mechanism by which cells respond to mechanical cues has been obscure. We report that the application of either unidirectional cyclic stretch or shear stress to cells results in robust mobilization of zyxin from focal adhesions to actin filaments, whereas many other focal adhesion proteins and zyxin family members remain at focal adhesions. Mechanical stress also induces the rapid zyxin-dependent mobilization of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein from focal adhesions to actin filaments. Thickening of actin stress fibers reflects a cellular adaptation to mechanical stress; this cytoskeletal reinforcement coincides with zyxin mobilization and is abrogated in zyxin-null cells. Our findings identify zyxin as a mechanosensitive protein and provide mechanistic insight into how cells respond to mechanical cues. PMID:16247023

  1. Comparing the mechanical influence of vinculin, focal adhesion kinase and p53 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, Anna H.; Diez, Gerold; Alonso, Jose-Luis

    2009-02-13

    Cytoskeletal reorganization is an ongoing process when cells adhere, move or invade extracellular substrates. The cellular force generation and transmission are determined by the intactness of the actomyosin-(focal adhesion complex)-integrin connection. We investigated the intracellular course of action in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the nuclear matrix protein p53 using magnetic tweezer and nanoparticle tracking techniques. Results show that the lack of these proteins decrease cellular stiffness and affect cell rheological behavior. The decrease in cellular binding strength was higher in FAK- to vinculin-deficient cells, whilst p53-deficient cells showed no effect compared to wildtype cells. The intracellular cytoskeletal activity was lowest in wildtype cells, but increased in the following order when cells lacked FAK+p53 > p53 > vinculin. In summary, cell mechanical processes are differently affected by the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and FAK than by the nuclear matrix protein, p53.

  2. Quantitative measurement of changes in adhesion force involving focal adhesion kinase during cell attachment, spread, and migration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Hsiao-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Tang, Ming-Jer; Su, Fong-Chin

    2005-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical protein for the regulation of integrin-mediated cellular functions and it can enhance cell motility in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induction. We utilized optical trapping and cytodetachment techniques to measure the adhesion force between pico-Newton and nano-Newton (nN) for quantitatively investigating the effects of FAK on adhesion force during initial binding (5 s), beginning of spreading (30 min), spreadout (12 h), and migration (induced by HGF) in MDCK cells with overexpressed FAK (FAK-WT), FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK), as well as normal control cells. Optical tweezers was used to measure the initial binding force between a trapped cell and glass coverslide or between a trapped bead and a seeded cell. In cytodetachment, the commercial atomic force microscope probe with an appropriate spring constant was used as a cyto-detacher to evaluate the change of adhesion force between different FAK expression levels of cells in spreading, spreadout, and migrating status. The results demonstrated that FAK-WT significantly increased the adhesion forces as compared to FRNK cells throughout all the different stages of cell adhesion. For cells in HGF-induced migration, the adhesion force decreased to almost the same level (approximately 600 nN) regardless of FAK levels indicating that FAK facilitates cells to undergo migration by reducing the adhesion force. Our results suggest FAK plays a role of enhancing cell adhesive ability in the binding and spreading, but an appropriate level of adhesion force is required for HGF-induced cell migration.

  3. Activity and Distribution of Paxillin, Focal Adhesion Kinase, and Cadherin Indicate Cooperative Roles during Zebrafish Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Bryan D.; Henry, Clarissa A.; Clason, Todd A.; Becker, Amanda L.; Hille, Merrill B.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the focal adhesion proteins paxillin and Fak, and the cell-cell adhesion protein cadherin in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Cadherins are expressed in presomitic mesoderm where they delineate cells. The initiation of somite formation coincides with an increase in the phosphorylation of Fak, and the accumulation of Fak, phosphorylated Fak, paxillin, and fibronectin at nascent somite boundaries. In the notochord, cadherins are expressed on cells during intercalation, and phosphorylated Fak accumulates in circumferential rings where the notochord cells contact laminin in the perichordal sheath. Subsequently, changes in the orientations of collagen fibers in the sheath suggest that Fak-mediated adhesion allows longitudinal expansion of the notochord, but not lateral expansion, resulting in notochord elongation. Novel observations showed that focal adhesion kinase and paxillin concentrate at sites of cell-cell adhesion in the epithelial enveloping layer and may associate with actin cytoskeleton at epithelial junctions containing cadherins. Fak is phosphorylated at these epithelial junctions but is not phosphorylated on Tyr397, implicating a noncanonical mechanism of regulation. These data suggest that Fak and paxillin may function in the integration of cadherin-based and integrin-based cell adhesion during the morphogenesis of the early zebrafish embryo. PMID:12925747

  4. mTOR signaling pathway genes in focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Baulac, S

    2016-01-01

    Focal epilepsies, where seizures initiate in spatially limited networks, are the most frequent epilepsy type, accounting for two-thirds of patients. Focal epilepsies have long been thought to be acquired disorders; several focal epilepsy syndromes are now proven to be (genetically heterogeneous) monogenic disorders. While earlier genetic studies have demonstrated a strong contribution of ion channel and neurotransmitter receptor genes, or synaptic secreted protein genes, later work has revealed a new class of genes encoding components of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal transduction pathway. The mTOR pathway controls a myriad of biological processes among which cell growth and protein synthesis in response to several extracellular and intracellular. Recently, germline mutations have been found in genes encoding the components of the GATOR1 complex (DEPDC5, NPRL2, NPRL3), a repressor of mTORC1. These mutations are increasingly recognized as causing a wide and yet evolving spectrum of focal epilepsy syndromes, with and without cortical structural abnormalities (usually focal cortical dysplasia). Brain somatic mutations in the gene encoding mTOR (MTOR) have recently been linked to focal cortical dysplasia and other associated brain pathologies including hemimegalencephaly. This chapter reviews the genetics and neurobiology of DEPDC5, NPRL2, and NPRL3, and summarizes the clinical and molecular spectrum of GATOR1-related epilepsies. PMID:27323939

  5. Structural Insight into the Role of Thrombospondin-1 Binding to Calreticulin in Calreticulin-Induced Focal Adhesion Disassembly†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qi; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Song, Yuhua

    2010-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) binding to calreticulin (CRT) on the cell surface stimulates association of CRT with LDL receptor-related protein (LRP1) to signal focal adhesion disassembly and engagement of cellular activities. The structural basis for this phenomenon is unknown. We studied the binding thermodynamics of the TSP1–CRT complex and the conformational changes in CRT induced by binding to TSP1 with combined binding free energy analysis, molecular dynamics simulation, and anisotropic network model restrained molecular dynamics simulation. Results showed that mutations of Lys 24 and Lys 32 in TSP1 to Ala and of amino acids 24–26 and 32–34 in CRT to Ala significantly weakened the binding of TSP1 and CRT, which is consistent with experimental results. Upon validation of the calculated binding affinity changes of the TSP1–CRT complex by mutations in key residues in TSP1 and CRT with the experimental results, we performed conformational analyses to understand the role of TSP1 binding to CRT in the induction of conformational changes in CRT. Conformational analyses showed that TSP1 binding to CRT resulted in a more “open” conformation and a significant rotational change for the CRT N-domain with respect to the CRT P-domain, which could expose the potential binding site(s) in CRT for binding to LRP1 to signal focal adhesion disassembly. Results offer structural insight into the role of TSP1 binding to CRT in CRT-induced focal adhesion disassembly. PMID:20337411

  6. Targeting Focal Adhesion Kinase Suppresses the Malignant Phenotype in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Waters, Alicia M; Stafman, Laura L; Garner, Evan F; Mruthyunjayappa, Smitha; Stewart, Jerry E; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    Despite the tremendous advances in the treatment of childhood solid tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) continues to provide a therapeutic challenge. Children with metastatic or relapsed disease have a disease-free survival rate under 30%. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that is important in many facets of tumorigenesis. Signaling pathways both upstream and downstream to FAK have been found to be important in sarcoma tumorigenesis, leading us to hypothesize that FAK would be present in RMS and would impact cellular survival. In the current study, we showed that FAK was present and phosphorylated in pediatric alveolar and embryonal RMS tumor specimens and cell lines. We also examined the effects of FAK inhibition upon two RMS cell lines utilizing parallel approaches including RNAi and small molecule inhibitors. FAK inhibition resulted in decreased cellular survival, invasion, and migration and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, small molecule inhibition of FAK led to decreased tumor growth in a nude mouse RMS xenograft model. The findings from this study will help to further our understanding of the regulation of tumorigenesis in RMS and may provide desperately needed novel therapeutic strategies for these difficult-to-treat tumors. PMID:27567948

  7. Focal adhesion kinase regulates expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Baotran; Huang, Grace; Golubovskaya, Vita M

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) down-regulated endogenous FAK and up-regulated TXNIP protein level, and treatment with 5-FU decreased FAK protein expression and up-regulated TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. Moreover, silencing of FAK with siRNA increased TXNIP protein expression, while overexpression of FAK inhibited TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. In addition, treatment of DBTRG glioblastoma cells with FAK inhibitor Y15 increased TXNIP mRNA, decreased cancer cell viability and increased apoptosis. These results for the first time demonstrate FAK-regulated TXNIP expression which is important for apoptotic, survival and oxidative stress signaling pathways in cancer cells. PMID:23387972

  8. High-Content Microscopy Analysis of Subcellular Structures: Assay Development and Application to Focal Adhesion Quantification.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Torsten; Schmidt, David; Schwanitz, Georg; Ahmad, Mubashir; Hamann, Jana; Schlosser, Corinne; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Böhm, Konrad J; Tuckermann, Jan; Ploubidou, Aspasia

    2016-01-01

    High-content analysis (HCA) converts raw light microscopy images to quantitative data through the automated extraction, multiparametric analysis, and classification of the relevant information content. Combined with automated high-throughput image acquisition, HCA applied to the screening of chemicals or RNAi-reagents is termed high-content screening (HCS). Its power in quantifying cell phenotypes makes HCA applicable also to routine microscopy. However, developing effective HCA and bioinformatic analysis pipelines for acquisition of biologically meaningful data in HCS is challenging. Here, the step-by-step development of an HCA assay protocol and an HCS bioinformatics analysis pipeline are described. The protocol's power is demonstrated by application to focal adhesion (FA) detection, quantitative analysis of multiple FA features, and functional annotation of signaling pathways regulating FA size, using primary data of a published RNAi screen. The assay and the underlying strategy are aimed at researchers performing microscopy-based quantitative analysis of subcellular features, on a small scale or in large HCS experiments. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367288

  9. Insights into the Utility of the Focal Adhesion Scaffolding Proteins in the Anaerobic Fungus Orpinomyces sp. C1A

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Shelby; Youssef, Noha H.

    2016-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are large eukaryotic multiprotein complexes that are present in all metazoan cells and function as stable sites of tight adhesion between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell’s cytoskeleton. FAs consist of anchor membrane protein (integrins), scaffolding proteins (e.g. α-actinin, talin, paxillin, and vinculin), signaling proteins of the IPP complex (e.g. integrin-linked kinase, α-parvin, and PINCH), and signaling kinases (e.g. focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src kinase). While genes encoding complete focal adhesion machineries are present in genomes of all multicellular Metazoa; incomplete machineries were identified in the genomes of multiple non-metazoan unicellular Holozoa, basal fungal lineages, and amoebozoan representatives. Since a complete FA machinery is required for functioning, the putative role, if any, of these incomplete FA machineries is currently unclear. We sought to examine the expression patterns of FA-associated genes in the anaerobic basal fungal isolate Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A under different growth conditions and at different developmental stages. Strain C1A lacks clear homologues of integrin, and the two signaling kinases FAK and Src, but encodes for all scaffolding proteins, and the IPP complex proteins. We developed a protocol for synchronizing growth of C1A cultures, allowing for the collection and mRNA extraction from flagellated spores, encysted germinating spores, active zoosporangia, and late inactive sporangia of strain C1A. We demonstrate that the genes encoding the FA scaffolding proteins α-actinin, talin, paxillin, and vinculin are indeed transcribed under all growth conditions, and at all developmental stages of growth. Further, analysis of the observed transcriptional patterns suggests the putative involvement of these components in alternative non-adhesion-specific functions, such as hyphal tip growth during germination and flagellar assembly during zoosporogenesis. Based on these results

  10. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour. PMID:27686622

  11. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-09-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour.

  12. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna W; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Arold, Stefan T

    2015-10-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein 'nanomachines' to become activated in a site-specific manner.

  13. Raver1 Interactions with Vinculin and RNA Suggest a Feed-Forward Pathway in Directing mRNA to Focal Adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Yogesha, S.D.; Izard, Tina; Scripps

    2009-09-11

    The translational machinery of the cell relocalizes to focal adhesions following the activation of integrin receptors. This response allows for rapid, local production of components needed for adhesion complex assembly and signaling. Vinculin links focal adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton following its activation by integrin signaling, which severs intramolecular interactions of vinculin's head and tail (Vt) domains. Our vinculin:raver1 crystal structures and binding studies show that activated Vt selectively interacts with one of the three RNA recognition motifs of raver1, that the vinculin:raver1 complex binds to F-actin, and that raver1 binds selectively to RNA, including a sequence found in vinculin mRNA. Further, mutation of residues that mediate interaction of raver1 with vinculin abolish their colocalization in cells. These findings suggest a feed-forward model where vinculin activation at focal adhesions provides a scaffold for recruitment of raver1 and its mRNA cargo to facilitate the production of components of adhesion complexes.

  14. KSHV-TK is a tyrosine kinase that disrupts focal adhesions and induces Rho-mediated cell contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michael B; Turner, Rachel; Stevenson, Philip G; Way, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paradoxically, the thymidine kinase (TK) encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an extremely inefficient nucleoside kinase, when compared to TKs from related herpesviruses. We now show that KSHV-TK, in contrast to HSV1-TK, associates with the actin cytoskeleton and induces extensive cell contraction followed by membrane blebbing. These dramatic changes in cell morphology depend on the auto-phosphorylation of tyrosines 65, 85 and 120 in the N-terminus of KSHV-TK. Phosphorylation of tyrosines 65/85 and 120 results in an interaction with Crk family proteins and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-Kinase, respectively. The interaction of Crk with KSHV-TK leads to tyrosine phoshorylation of this cellular adaptor. Auto-phosphorylation of KSHV-TK also induces a loss of FAK and paxillin from focal adhesions, resulting in activation of RhoA-ROCK signalling to myosin II and cell contraction. In the absence of FAK or paxillin, KSHV-TK has no effect on focal adhesion integrity or cell morphology. Our observations demonstrate that by acting as a tyrosine kinase, KSHV-TK modulates signalling and cell morphology. PMID:25471072

  15. Image Analysis for the Quantitative Comparison of Stress Fibers and Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Moreno-Arotzena, Oihana; Oregi, Amaia; Lasa, Marta; García-Aznar, José Manuel; De Juan-Pardo, Elena M.; Aldabe, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Actin stress fibers (SFs) detect and transmit forces to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and molecules in this pathway determine cellular behavior. Here, we designed two different computational tools to quantify actin SFs and the distribution of actin cytoskeletal proteins within a normalized cellular morphology. Moreover, a systematic cell response comparison between the control cells and those with impaired actin cytoskeleton polymerization was performed to demonstrate the reliability of the tools. Indeed, a variety of proteins that were present within the string beginning at the focal adhesions (vinculin) up to the actin SFs contraction (non-muscle myosin II (NMMII)) were analyzed. Finally, the software used allows for the quantification of the SFs based on the relative positions of FAs. Therefore, it provides a better insight into the cell mechanics and broadens the knowledge of the nature of SFs. PMID:25269086

  16. Protein Kinase D1 regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell adhesion through Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-l γ

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Nisha; Bastea, Ligia I.; Long, Jason; Döppler, Heike; Ling, Kun; Storz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are highly dynamic structures that are assembled and disassembled on a continuous basis. The balance between the two processes mediates various aspects of cell behavior, ranging from cell adhesion and spreading to directed cell migration. The turnover of FAs is regulated at multiple levels and involves a variety of signaling molecules and adaptor proteins. In the present study, we show that in response to integrin engagement, a subcellular pool of Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) localizes to the FAs. PKD1 affects FAs by decreasing turnover and promoting maturation, resulting in enhanced cell adhesion. The effects of PKD1 are mediated through direct phosphorylation of FA-localized phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-l γ (PIP5Klγ) at serine residue 448. This phosphorylation occurs in response to Fibronectin-RhoA signaling and leads to a decrease in PIP5Klγs’ lipid kinase activity and binding affinity for Talin. Our data reveal a novel function for PKD1 as a regulator of FA dynamics and by identifying PIP5Klγ as a novel PKD1 substrate provide mechanistic insight into this process. PMID:27775029

  17. Redistribution of microfilament-associated proteins during the formation of focal contacts and adhesions in chick fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Couchman, J R; Badley, R A; Rees, D A

    1983-12-01

    The roles of the microfilament-associated proteins vinculin, alpha-actinin, myosin and filamin have been studied by immunofluorescence and double fluorescence in conjunction with interference reflection microscopy (IRM), during the development of focal contacts and focal adhesions in a chick fibroblast system which initially has no such adhesion specializations but then develops them sequentially over a 48 h period. Without exception, all focal contacts and focal adhesions contain both vinculin and alpha-actinin at every stage that we can detect by IRM or by double staining to reveal the associated microfilament bundles. Indeed the appearance of small bodies containing alpha-actinin and vinculin is shown to precede focal contact formation in our model system and such structures (not visible by IRM) are proposed to be the precursors of focal contacts and adhesions. Myosin and filamin are distributed generally with some reticular patterning in the early motile cells which lack the focal specializations, but as focal contacts and adhesions form these proteins become progressively recruited into the associated microfilament bundles. Only then do we see the marked depletion that has been reported earlier of diffusely distributed myosin and filamin in the leading lamella. Although this is not initially associated with any change in the motile status of the cells, the recruitment of these microfilament-associated proteins into stress fibres is proposed to occur in preparation for anchorage and bracing of cells to the substratum when they later become stationary. PMID:6421873

  18. Focal adhesion kinase antagonizes doxorubicin cardiotoxicity via p21(Cip1.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhaokang; DiMichele, Laura A; Rojas, Mauricio; Vaziri, Cyrus; Mack, Christopher P; Taylor, Joan M

    2014-02-01

    Clinical application of potent anthracycline anticancer drugs, especially doxorubicin (DOX), is limited by a toxic cardiac side effect that is not fully understood and preventive strategies are yet to be established. Studies in genetically modified mice have demonstrated that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a key role in regulating adaptive responses of the adult myocardium to pathological stimuli through activation of intracellular signaling cascades that facilitate cardiomyocyte growth and survival. The objective of this study was to determine if targeted myocardial FAK activation could protect the heart from DOX-induced de-compensation and to characterize the underlying mechanisms. To this end, mice with myocyte-restricted FAK knock-out (MFKO) or myocyte-specific expression of an active FAK variant (termed SuperFAK) were subjected to DOX treatment. FAK depletion enhanced susceptibility to DOX-induced myocyte apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction, while elevated FAK activity provided remarkable cardioprotection. Our mec6hanistic studies reveal a heretofore unappreciated role for the protective cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in the repression of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim and the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and myocyte survival. DOX treatment induced proteasomal degradation of p21, which exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. FAK was both necessary and sufficient for maintaining p21 levels following DOX treatment and depletion of p21 compromised FAK-dependent protection from DOX. These findings identify p21 as a key determinant of DOX resistance downstream of FAK in cardiomyocytes and indicate that cardiac-restricted enhancement of the FAK/p21 signaling axis might be an effective strategy to preserve myocardial function in patients receiving anthracycline chemotherapy. PMID:24342076

  19. Nuclear Signaling from Cadherin Adhesion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, Pierre D.; Maher, Meghan T.; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2015-01-01

    The arrival of multicellularity in evolution facilitated cell–cell signaling in conjunction with adhesion. As the ectodomains of cadherins interact with each other directly in trans (as well as in cis), spanning the plasma membrane and associating with multiple other entities, cadherins enable the transduction of “outside-in” or “inside-out” signals. We focus this review on signals that originate from the larger family of cadherins that are inwardly directed to the nucleus, and thus have roles in gene control or nuclear structure–function. The nature of cadherin complexes varies considerably depending on the type of cadherin and its context, and we will address some of these variables for classical cadherins versus other family members. Substantial but still fragmentary progress has been made in understanding the signaling mediators used by varied cadherin complexes to coordinate the state of cell–cell adhesion with gene expression. Evidence that cadherin intracellular binding partners also localize to the nucleus is a major point of interest. In some models, catenins show reduced binding to cadherin cytoplasmic tails favoring their engagement in gene control. When bound, cadherins may serve as stoichiometric competitors of nuclear signals. Cadherins also directly or indirectly affect numerous signaling pathways (e.g., Wnt, receptor tyrosine kinase, Hippo, NFκB, and JAK/STAT), enabling cell–cell contacts to touch upon multiple biological outcomes in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25733140

  20. Focal adhesions control cleavage furrow shape and spindle tilt during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Nilay; Fenix, Aidan M.; Rathbun, Lindsay; Millis, Bryan A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Hehnly, Heidi; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    The geometry of the cleavage furrow during mitosis is often asymmetric in vivo and plays a critical role in stem cell differentiation and the relative positioning of daughter cells during development. Early observations of adhesive cell lines revealed asymmetry in the shape of the cleavage furrow, where the bottom (i.e., substrate attached side) of the cleavage furrow ingressed less than the top (i.e., unattached side). This data suggested substrate attachment could be regulating furrow ingression. Here we report a population of mitotic focal adhesions (FAs) controls the symmetry of the cleavage furrow. In single HeLa cells, stronger adhesion to the substrate directed less ingression from the bottom of the cell through a pathway including paxillin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin. Cell-cell contacts also direct ingression of the cleavage furrow in coordination with FAs in epithelial cells—MDCK—within monolayers and polarized cysts. In addition, mitotic FAs established 3D orientation of the mitotic spindle and the relative positioning of mother and daughter centrosomes. Therefore, our data reveals mitotic FAs as a key link between mitotic cell shape and spindle orientation, and may have important implications in our understanding stem cell homeostasis and tumorigenesis. PMID:27432211

  1. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  2. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  3. Micrometer scale spacings between fibronectin nanodots regulate cell morphology and focal adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horzum, Utku; Ozdil, Berrin; Pesen-Okvur, Devrim

    2014-04-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is an important process for both health and disease states. Surface protein patterns that are topographically flat, and do not introduce other chemical, topographical or rigidity related functionality and, more importantly, that mimic the organization of the in vivo extracellular matrix are desired. Previous work showed that vinculin and cytoskeletal organization are modulated by size and shape of surface nanopatterns. However, quantitative analysis on cell morphology and focal adhesions as a function of micrometer scale spacings of FN nanopatterns was absent. Here, electron beam lithography was used to pattern fibronectin nanodots with micrometer scale spacings on a K-casein background on indium tin oxide coated glass which, unlike silicon, is transparent and thus suitable for many light microscopy techniques. Exposure times were significantly reduced using the line exposure mode with micrometer scale step sizes. Micrometer scale spacings of 2, 4 and 8 μm between fibronectin nanodots proved to modulate cell adhesion through modification of cell area, focal adhesion number, size and circularity. Overall, cell behavior was shown to shift at the apparent threshold of 4 μm spacing. The findings presented here offer exciting new opportunities for cell biology research.

  4. Conditional Knockout of Myocyte Focal Adhesion Kinase Abrogates Ischemic Preconditioning in Adult Murine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Perricone, Adam J.; Bivona, Benjamin J.; Jackson, Fannie R.; Vander Heide, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the importance of a cytoskeletal‐based survival signaling pathway using in vitro models of ischemia/reperfusion (IR). However, the importance of this pathway in mediating stress‐elicited survival signaling in vivo is unknown. Methods and Results The essential cytoskeletal signaling pathway member focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was selectively deleted in adult cardiac myocytes using a tamoxifen‐inducible Cre‐Lox system (α‐MHC‐MerCreMer). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot were performed to confirm FAK knockout (KO). All mice were subjected to a 40‐minute coronary occlusion followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning (IP) was performed using a standard protocol. Control groups included wild‐type (WT) and tamoxifen‐treated α‐MHC‐MerCreMer+/−/FAKWT/WT (experimental control) mice. Infarct size was expressed as a percentage of the risk region. In WT mice IP significantly enhanced the expression of activated/phosphorylated FAK by 36.3% compared to WT mice subjected to a sham experimental protocol (P≤0.05; n=6 hearts [sham], n=4 hearts [IP]). IP significantly reduced infarct size in both WT and experimental control mice (43.7% versus 19.8%; P≤0.001; 44.7% versus 17.5%; P≤0.001, respectively). No difference in infarct size was observed between preconditioned FAK KO and nonpreconditioned controls (37.1% versus 43.7% versus 44.7%; FAK KO versus WT versus experimental control; P=NS). IP elicited a 67.2%/88.8% increase in activated phosphatidylinositol‐3‐kinase (PI3K) p85/activated Akt expression in WT mice, but failed to enhance the expression of either in preconditioned FAK KO mice. Conclusions Our results indicate that FAK is an essential mediator of IP‐elicited cardioprotection and provide further support for the hypothesis that cytoskeletal‐based signaling is an important component of stress‐elicited survival signaling. PMID:24080910

  5. Detection of focal adhesion kinase activation at membrane microdomains by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Seong, Jihye; Ouyang, Mingxing; Kim, Taejin; Sun, Jie; Wen, Po-Chao; Lu, Shaoying; Zhuo, Yue; Llewellyn, Nicholas M; Schlaepfer, David D; Guan, Jun-Lin; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2011-07-26

    Proper subcellular localization of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is crucial for many cellular processes. It remains, however, unclear how FAK activity is regulated at subcellular compartments. To visualize the FAK activity at different membrane microdomains, we develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based FAK biosensor, and target it into or outside of detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) regions at the plasma membrane. Here we show that, on cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins or stimulation by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), the FRET responses of DRM-targeting FAK biosensor are stronger than that at non-DRM regions, suggesting that FAK activation can occur at DRM microdomains. Further experiments reveal that the PDGF-induced FAK activation is mediated and maintained by Src activity, whereas FAK activation on cell adhesion is independent of, and in fact essential for the Src activation. Therefore, FAK is activated at membrane microdomains with distinct activation mechanisms in response to different physiological stimuli.

  6. Eyespot development on butterfly wings: the focal signal.

    PubMed

    French, V; Brakefield, P M

    1995-03-01

    The eyespot colour pattern on butterfly wings is specified in the early pupal epidermis by signals from a central "focus." In Bicyclus anynana we show that a small square of focal epidermis, grafted to a range of distal wing sites, induces eyespot formation in surrounding host tissue. Signaling is limited to the focus, and even an adjacent (parafocal) graft does not maintain its normal fate (of contributing to the eyespot) and does not influence its surroundings. Along the wing, there is an abrupt change in the epidermis, as a focus grafted to a proximal site provokes no host response. The results of several grafting experiments demonstrate that their different response properties are autonomous to small areas of the distal and proximal epidermis and that the nonresponding proximal tissue can nonetheless transmit the focal sign. The Bicyclus dorsal forewing has a small anterior and a large posterior eyespot, and we show that this results mainly from a difference in focal signals, not in the epidermal response. A grafted posterior focus induces a large eyespot, whereas an anterior focus induces a small eyespot. Furthermore, the anterior and posterior eyespots differ in proportions, and this difference also depends on the identity of the focus, not on the responding epidermis. Eyespots are specified over many cell diameters from the focus by a mechanism which could consist of one long-range signal, such as a morphogen gradient or of a cascade of short-range interactions initiated by the focus. Focal control of the difference in size and proportion between the anterior and posterior eyespot is more readily compatible with a gradient mechanism. Neither model, however, readily explains why the pattern induced by a grafted focus is smaller, but its peripheral gold annulus is broader than in the corresponding control eyespot. Also, there is no direct evidence for long-range gradients, in the butterfly wing or any other insect epithelium. PMID:7883067

  7. Eyespot development on butterfly wings: the focal signal.

    PubMed

    French, V; Brakefield, P M

    1995-03-01

    The eyespot colour pattern on butterfly wings is specified in the early pupal epidermis by signals from a central "focus." In Bicyclus anynana we show that a small square of focal epidermis, grafted to a range of distal wing sites, induces eyespot formation in surrounding host tissue. Signaling is limited to the focus, and even an adjacent (parafocal) graft does not maintain its normal fate (of contributing to the eyespot) and does not influence its surroundings. Along the wing, there is an abrupt change in the epidermis, as a focus grafted to a proximal site provokes no host response. The results of several grafting experiments demonstrate that their different response properties are autonomous to small areas of the distal and proximal epidermis and that the nonresponding proximal tissue can nonetheless transmit the focal sign. The Bicyclus dorsal forewing has a small anterior and a large posterior eyespot, and we show that this results mainly from a difference in focal signals, not in the epidermal response. A grafted posterior focus induces a large eyespot, whereas an anterior focus induces a small eyespot. Furthermore, the anterior and posterior eyespots differ in proportions, and this difference also depends on the identity of the focus, not on the responding epidermis. Eyespots are specified over many cell diameters from the focus by a mechanism which could consist of one long-range signal, such as a morphogen gradient or of a cascade of short-range interactions initiated by the focus. Focal control of the difference in size and proportion between the anterior and posterior eyespot is more readily compatible with a gradient mechanism. Neither model, however, readily explains why the pattern induced by a grafted focus is smaller, but its peripheral gold annulus is broader than in the corresponding control eyespot. Also, there is no direct evidence for long-range gradients, in the butterfly wing or any other insect epithelium.

  8. Phosphoproteomic profiling identifies focal adhesion kinase as a mediator of docetaxel resistance in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian Y; Hochgräfe, Falko; Lin, Hui-Ming; Castillo, Lesley; Wu, Jianmin; Raftery, Mark J; Martin Shreeve, S; Horvath, Lisa G; Daly, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Docetaxel remains the standard-of-care for men diagnosed with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, only approximately 50% of patients benefit from treatment and all develop docetaxel-resistant disease. Here, we characterize global perturbations in tyrosine kinase signaling associated with docetaxel resistance and thereby develop a potential therapeutic strategy to reverse this phenotype. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified that metastatic docetaxel-resistant prostate cancer cell lines (DU145-Rx and PC3-Rx) exhibit increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on Y397 and Y576, in comparison with parental controls (DU145 and PC3, respectively). Bioinformatic analyses identified perturbations in pathways regulating focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton and in protein-protein interaction networks related to these pathways in docetaxel-resistant cells. Treatment with the FAK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) PF-00562271 reduced FAK phosphorylation in the resistant cells, but did not affect cell viability or Akt phosphorylation. Docetaxel administration reduced FAK and Akt phosphorylation, whereas cotreatment with PF-00562271 and docetaxel resulted in an additive attenuation of FAK and Akt phosphorylation and overcame the chemoresistant phenotype. The enhanced efficacy of cotreatment was due to increased autophagic cell death, rather than apoptosis. These data strongly support that enhanced FAK activation mediates chemoresistance in CRPC, and identify a potential clinical niche for FAK TKIs, where coadministration with docetaxel may be used in patients with CRPC to overcome chemoresistance. PMID:24194567

  9. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Brandon D; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-03-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear.

  10. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  11. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility. PMID:26110647

  12. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Karin; Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew; Grawé, Jan; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Daley, George Q.; Welsh, Michael

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via increased

  13. Liprin-α1 and ERC1 control cell edge dynamics by promoting focal adhesion turnover

    PubMed Central

    Astro, Veronica; Tonoli, Diletta; Chiaretti, Sara; Badanai, Sabrina; Sala, Kristyna; Zerial, Marino; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Liprin-α1 and ERC1 are interacting scaffold proteins regulating the motility of normal and tumor cells. They act as part of plasma membrane-associated platforms at the edge of motile cells to promote protrusion by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we identify an amino-terminal region of the liprin-α1 protein (liprin-N) that is sufficient and necessary for the interaction with other liprin-α1 molecules. Similar to liprin-α1 or ERC1 silencing, expression of the liprin-N negatively affects tumor cell motility and extracellular matrix invasion, acting as a dominant negative by interacting with endogenous liprin-α1 and causing the displacement of the endogenous ERC1 protein from the cell edge. Interfering with the localization of ERC1 at the cell edge inhibits the disassembly of focal adhesions, impairing protrusion. Liprin-α1 and ERC1 proteins colocalize with active integrin β1 clusters distinct from those colocalizing with cytoplasmic focal adhesion proteins, and influence the localization of peripheral Rab7-positive endosomes. We propose that liprin-α1 and ERC1 promote protrusion by displacing cytoplasmic adhesion components to favour active integrin internalization into Rab7-positive endosomes. PMID:27659488

  14. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) regulates spermatid adhesion in the testis via dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the nectin-3 adhesion protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elissa W. P.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    Development of spermatozoa in adult mammalian testis during spermatogenesis involves extensive cell migration and differentiation. Spermatogonia that reside at the basal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium differentiate into more advanced germ cell types that migrate toward the apical compartment until elongated spermatids are released into the tubule lumen during spermiation. Apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES; a testis-specific anchoring junction) is the only cell junction that anchors and maintains the polarity of elongating/elongated spermatids (step 8–19 spermatids) in the epithelium. Little is known regarding the signaling pathways that trigger the disassembly of the apical ES at spermiation. Here, we show that secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1), a putative tumor suppressor gene that is frequently down-regulated in multiple carcinomas, is a crucial regulatory protein for spermiation. The expression of sFRP1 is tightly regulated in adult rat testis to control spermatid adhesion and sperm release at spermiation. Down-regulation of sFRP1 during testicular development was found to coincide with the onset of the first wave of spermiation at approximately age 45 d postpartum, implying that sFRP1 might be correlated with elongated spermatid adhesion conferred by the apical ES before spermiation. Indeed, administration of sFRP1 recombinant protein to the testis in vivo delayed spermiation, which was accompanied by down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-Tyr397 and retention of nectin-3 adhesion protein at the apical ES. To further investigate the functional relationship between p-FAK-Tyr397 and localization of nectin-3, we overexpressed sFRP1 using lentiviral vectors in the Sertoli-germ cell coculture system. Consistent with the in vivo findings, overexpression of sFRP1 induced down-regulation of p-FAK-Tyr397, leading to a decline in phosphorylation of nectin-3. In summary, this report highlights the critical role of s

  15. A Drosophila homolog of the Rac- and Cdc42-activated serine/threonine kinase PAK is a potential focal adhesion and focal complex protein that colocalizes with dynamic actin structures.

    PubMed Central

    Harden, N; Lee, J; Loh, H Y; Ong, Y M; Tan, I; Leung, T; Manser, E; Lim, L

    1996-01-01

    Changes in cell morphology are essential in the development of a multicellular organism. The regulation of the cytoskeleton by the Rho subfamily of small GTP-binding proteins is an important determinant of cell shape. The Rho subfamily has been shown to participate in a variety of morphogenetic processes during Drosophila melanogaster development. We describe here a Drosophila homolog, DPAK, of the serine/threonine kinase PAK, a protein which is a target of the Rho subfamily proteins Rac and Cdc42. Rac, Cdc42, and PAK have previously been implicated in signaling by c-Jun amino-terminal kinases. DPAK bound to activated (GTP-bound) Drosophila Rac (DRacA) and Drosophila Cdc42. Similarities in the distributions of DPAK, integrin, and phosphotyrosine suggested an association of DPAK with focal adhesions and Cdc42- and Rac-induced focal adhesion-like focal complexes. DPAK was elevated in the leading edge of epidermal cells, whose morphological changes drive dorsal closure of the embryo. We have previously shown that the accumulation of cytoskeletal elements initiating cell shape changes in these cells could be inhibited by expression of a dominant-negative DRacA transgene. We show that leading-edge epidermal cells flanking segment borders, which express particularly large amounts of DPAK, undergo transient losses of cytoskeletal structures during dorsal closure. We propose that DPAK may be regulating the cytoskeleton through its association with focal adhesions and focal complexes and may be participating with DRacA in a c-Jun amino-terminal kinase signaling pathway recently demonstrated to be required for dorsal closure. PMID:8628256

  16. A new link between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-11-01

    The retrograde actin flow, continuous centripetal movement of the cell peripheral actin networks, is widely observed in adherent cells. The retrograde flow is believed to facilitate cell migration when linked to cell adhesion molecules. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the functional relationship between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions (FAs). We also introduce our recent study in which single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy dissected the complex interactions between FAs and the local actin flow. FAs do not simply impede the actin flow, but actively attract and remodel the local actin network. Our findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms for protrusion and traction force generation at the cell leading edge. Furthermore, we discuss possible roles of the actin flow-FA interaction based on the accumulated knowledge and our SiMS study. PMID:25190817

  17. PEGylated human plasma fibronectin is proteolytically stable, supports cell adhesion, cell migration, focal adhesion assembly, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Hekmatfar, Sogol; Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy W

    2013-01-01

    Delayed wound healing in many chronic wounds has been linked to the degradation of fibronectin (FN) by abnormally high protease levels. We sought to develop a proteolytically stable and functionally active form of FN. For this purpose, we conjugated 3.35 kDa polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) to human plasma fibronectin (HPFN). Conjugation of PEGDA to HPFN or HPFN PEGylation was characterized by an increase of approximately 16 kDa in the average molecular weight of PEGylated HPFN compared to native HPFN in SDS-PAGE gels. PEGylated HPFN was more resistant to α chymotrypsin or neutrophil elastase digestion than native HPFN: after 30 min incubation with α chymotrypsin, 56 and 90% of native and PEGylated HPFN respectively remained intact. PEGylated HPFN and native HPFN supported NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast adhesion and spreading, migration and focal adhesion formation in a similar manner. Fluorescence microscopy showed that both native and PEGylated HPFN in the culture media were assembled into extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrils. Interestingly, when coated on surfaces, native but not PEGylated HPFN was assembled into the ECM of fibroblasts. The proteolytically stable PEGylated HPFN developed herein could be used to replenish FN levels in the chronic wound bed and promote tissue repair.

  18. Selected Contribution: Skeletal muscle focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, and serum response factor are loading dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. E.; Fluck, M.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation examined the effect of mechanical loading state on focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and serum response factor (SRF) in rat skeletal muscle. We found that FAK concentration and tyrosine phosphorylation, paxillin concentration, and SRF concentration are all lower in the lesser load-bearing fast-twitch plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles compared with the greater load-bearing slow-twitch soleus muscle. Of these three muscles, 7 days of mechanical unloading via tail suspension elicited a decrease in FAK tyrosine phosphorylation only in the soleus muscle and decreases in FAK and paxillin concentrations only in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. Unloading decreased SRF concentration in all three muscles. Mechanical overloading (via bilateral gastrocnemius ablation) for 1 or 8 days increased FAK and paxillin concentrations in the soleus and plantaris muscles. Additionally, whereas FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and SRF concentration were increased by < or =1 day of overloading in the soleus muscle, these increases did not occur until somewhere between 1 and 8 days of overloading in the plantaris muscle. These data indicate that, in the skeletal muscles of rats, the focal adhesion complex proteins FAK and paxillin and the transcription factor SRF are generally modulated in association with the mechanical loading state of the muscle. However, the somewhat different patterns of adaptation of these proteins to altered loading in slow- vs. fast-twitch skeletal muscles indicate that the mechanisms and time course of adaptation may partly depend on the prior loading state of the muscle.

  19. Septins promote stress fiber–mediated maturation of focal adhesions and renal epithelial motility

    PubMed Central

    Dolat, Lee; Hunyara, John L.; Bowen, Jonathan R.; Karasmanis, Eva Pauline; Elgawly, Maha; Galkin, Vitold E.

    2014-01-01

    Organogenesis and tumor metastasis involve the transformation of epithelia to highly motile mesenchymal-like cells. Septins are filamentous G proteins, which are overexpressed in metastatic carcinomas, but their functions in epithelial motility are unknown. Here, we show that a novel network of septin filaments underlies the organization of the transverse arc and radial (dorsal) stress fibers at the leading lamella of migrating renal epithelia. Surprisingly, septin depletion resulted in smaller and more transient and peripheral focal adhesions. This phenotype was accompanied by a highly disorganized lamellar actin network and rescued by the actin bundling protein α-actinin-1. We show that preassembled actin filaments are cross-linked directly by Septin 9 (SEPT9), whose expression is increased after induction of renal epithelial motility with the hepatocyte growth factor. Significantly, SEPT9 overexpression enhanced renal cell migration in 2D and 3D matrices, whereas SEPT9 knockdown decreased migration. These results suggest that septins promote epithelial motility by reinforcing the cross-linking of lamellar stress fibers and the stability of nascent focal adhesions. PMID:25349260

  20. Serine palmitoyltransferase subunit 1 is present in the endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and focal adhesions, and functions in cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia; Yerokun, Tokunbo; Leipelt, Martina; Haynes, Chris A; Radhakrishna, Harish; Momin, Amin; Kelly, Samuel; Park, Hyejung; Wang, Elaine; Carton, Jill M; Uhlinger, David J; Merrill, Alfred H

    2009-08-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) has been localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by subcellular fractionation and enzymatic assays, and fluorescence microscopy of epitope-tagged SPT; however, our studies have suggested that SPT subunit 1 might be present also in focal adhesions and the nucleus. These additional locations have been confirmed by confocal microscopy using HEK293 and HeLa cells, and for focal adhesions by the demonstration that SPT1 co-immunoprecipitates with vinculin, a focal adhesion marker protein. The focal adhesion localization of SPT1 is associated with cell morphology, and possibly cell migration, because it is seen in most cells before they reach confluence but disappears when they become confluent, and is restored by a standard scratch-wound healing assay. Conversely, elimination of SPT1 using SPTLC1 siRNA causes cell rounding. Thus, in addition to its "traditional" localization in the ER for de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis, SPT1 is present in other cellular compartments, including focal adhesions where it is associated with cell morphology. PMID:19362163

  1. Direct interaction of v-Src with the focal adhesion kinase mediated by the Src SH2 domain.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Z; Chen, H C; Nowlen, J K; Taylor, S J; Shalloway, D; Guan, J L

    1994-01-01

    The recently described focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been implicated in signal transduction pathways initiated by cell adhesion receptor integrins and by neuropeptide growth factors. To examine the mechanisms by which FAK relays signals from the membrane to the cell interior, we carried out a series of experiments to detect potential FAK interactions with proteins containing Src homology 2 (SH2) domains that are important intracellular signaling molecules. Using v-Src-transformed NIH3T3 cells, we showed that FAK was present in the immune-complex precipitated by anti-Src antibody, suggesting potential interaction of FAK with v-Src in vivo. We also showed potentially direct interaction of FAK with v-Src in vivo using the yeast two-hybrid system. Using recombinant FAK expressed in insect cells and bacterial fusion proteins containing Src SH2 domains, we showed direct binding of FAK to the Src SH2 domain but not to the SH3 domain in vitro. A kinase-defective mutant of FAK, which is not autophosphorylated, did not interact with the Src SH2 domain under the same conditions, suggesting the involvement of the FAK autophosphorylation sites. Treatment of FAK with a protein-tyrosine phosphatase decreased its binding to the Src SH2 domain, whereas autophosphorylation in vitro increased its binding. These results confirm the importance of FAK autophosphorylation sites in its interaction with SH2 domain-containing proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that FAK may mediate signal transduction events initiated on the cell surface by kinase activation and autophosphorylation that result in its binding to other key intracellular signaling molecules. Images PMID:8054685

  2. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  3. Different cytokeratin and neuronal cell adhesion molecule staining patterns in focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatic adenoma and their significance

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Anita; Robert, Marie E.; Bifulco, Carlo B.; Salem, Ronald R.; Jain, Dhanpat

    2013-01-01

    Summary Differentiating focal nodular hyperplasia from hepatic adenoma can be challenging. Cytokeratin 7, neuronal cell adhesion molecule, and cytokeratin 19 are differentially expressed in hepatocytes, biliary epithelium, and possibly hepatic progenitor/stem cells. CD34 is known to have altered expression patterns in the hepatic endothelium in conditions associated with abnormal perfusion and in hepatocellular carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression pattern of these markers in focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatic adenoma and assess their diagnostic use. Ten resection specimens each of hepatic adenoma and focal nodular hyperplasia (including a case of telangiectatic focal nodular hyperplasia) were selected for the study. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using antibodies against cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 19, neuronal cell adhesion molecule, and CD34 on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from each case. The staining patterns and intensity for each marker were analyzed. In hepatic adenoma, the cytokeratin 7 stain revealed strong positivity in hepatocytes in patches, with a gradual decrease in the staining intensity as the cells differentiated towards mature hepatocytes. Although bile ducts were typically absent in hepatic adenoma, occasional ductules could be identified with cytokeratin 7 stain. In focal nodular hyperplasia, cytokeratin 7 showed strong staining of the biliary epithelium within the fibrous septa and staining of the peripheral hepatocytes of most lobules that was focal and weaker than hepatic adenoma. Cytokeratin 19 and neuronal cell adhesion molecule showed patchy and moderate staining in the biliary epithelium of the ductules in focal nodular hyperplasia. While in the hepatic adenoma, cytokeratin 19 showed only rare positivity in occasional cells within ductules, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule marked occasional isolated cells in the lesion. CD34 showed staining of sinusoids in the inflow areas

  4. Sub-micron lateral topography affects endothelial migration by modulation of focal adhesion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Antonini, S; Meucci, S; Jacchetti, E; Klingauf, M; Beltram, F; Poulikakos, D; Cecchini, M; Ferrari, A

    2015-06-24

    Through the interaction with topographical features, endothelial cells tune their ability to populate target substrates, both in vivo and in vitro. Basal textures interfere with the establishment and maturation of focal adhesions (FAs) thus inducing specific cell-polarization patterns and regulating a plethora of cell activities that govern the overall endothelial function. In this study, we analyze the effect of topographical features on FAs in primary human endothelial cells. Reported data demonstrate a functional link between FA dynamics and cell polarization and spreading on structured substrates presenting variable lateral feature size. Our results reveal that gratings with 2 µm lateral periodicity maximize contact guidance. The effect is linked to the dynamical state of FAs. We argue that these results are readily applicable to the rational design of active surfaces at the interface with the blood stream.

  5. Haematopoietic focal adhesion kinase deficiency alters haematopoietic homeostasis to drive tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Batista, Silvia; Maniati, Eleni; Reynolds, Louise E; Tavora, Bernardo; Lees, Delphine M; Fernandez, Isabelle; Elia, George; Casanovas, Oriol; Lo Celso, Cristina; Hagemann, Thorsten; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of cancer-related death and thus understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this process is critical. Here, our data demonstrate, contrary to established dogma, that loss of haematopoietic-derived focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is sufficient to enhance tumour metastasis. Using both experimental and spontaneous metastasis models, we show that genetic ablation of haematopoietic FAK does not affect primary tumour growth but enhances the incidence of metastasis significantly. At a molecular level, haematopoietic FAK deletion results in an increase in PU-1 levels and decrease in GATA-1 levels causing a shift of hematopoietic homeostasis towards a myeloid commitment. The subsequent increase in circulating granulocyte number, with an increase in serum CXCL12 and granulocyte CXCR4 levels, was required for augmented metastasis in mice lacking haematopoietic FAK. Overall our findings provide a mechanism by which haematopoietic FAK controls cancer metastasis. PMID:25270220

  6. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Involved in Rabies Virus Infection through Its Interaction with Viral Phosphoprotein P

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Baptiste; Nikolic, Jovan; Larrous, Florence; Bourhy, Hervé; Wirblich, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rabies virus (RABV) phosphoprotein P is a multifunctional protein: it plays an essential role in viral transcription and replication, and in addition, RABV P has been identified as an interferon antagonist. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen revealed that RABV P interacts with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The binding involved the 106-to-131 domain, corresponding to the dimerization domain of P and the C-terminal domain of FAK containing the proline-rich domains PRR2 and PRR3. The P-FAK interaction was confirmed in infected cells by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of FAK with P in Negri bodies. By alanine scanning, we identified a single mutation in the P protein that abolishes this interaction. The mutant virus containing a substitution of Ala for Arg in position 109 in P (P.R109A), which did not interact with FAK, is affected at a posttranscriptional step involving protein synthesis and viral RNA replication. Furthermore, FAK depletion inhibited viral protein expression in infected cells. This provides the first evidence of an interaction of RABV with FAK that positively regulates infection. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus exhibits a small genome that encodes a limited number of viral proteins. To maintain efficient virus replication, some of them are multifunctional, such as the phosphoprotein P. We and others have shown that P establishes complex networks of interactions with host cell components. These interactions have revealed much about the role of P and about host-pathogen interactions in infected cells. Here, we identified another cellular partner of P, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Our data shed light on the implication of FAK in RABV infection and provide evidence that P-FAK interaction has a proviral function. PMID:25410852

  7. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  8. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y-S; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ₃, but not in those by integrin α₅β₁. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  9. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and Receptor
    Association of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
    Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  10. Label-free proteomics uncovers energy metabolism and focal adhesion regulations responsive for endometrium receptivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Zhang, Aijun; Yu, Feng; Gao, Jing; Liu, Yue; Yu, Chengli; Zhou, Hu; Xu, Chen

    2015-04-01

    The menstrual cycle of the female uterus leads to periodic changes of the endometrium. These changes are important for developing the endometrial receptivity and for achieving competency of embryo implantation. However, the molecular events underlying the endometrial receptivity process remain poorly understood. Here we applied an LC-MS-based label-free quantitative proteomic approach to compare the endometrial tissues in the midsecretory (receptive) phase with the endometrial tissues in the proliferative phase from age-matched woman (n = 6/group). The proteomes of endometrial tissues were extracted using an SDS-based detergent, digested by the filter-aided sample preparation procedures, and subsequently analyzed by nano-LC-MS/MS (Orbitrap XL) with a 4 h gradient. Reliable protein expression profiles were reproducibly obtained from the endometrial tissues in the receptive and proliferative phases. A total of 2138 protein groups were quantified under highly stringent criteria with a false discovery rate of <1% for peptide and protein groups. Among these proteins, 317 proteins had differences in expression that were statistically significant between the receptive and proliferative phases. Direct protein-protein interaction network analyses of these significantly changed proteins showed that the up-regulation of creatine kinase B-type (CKB) in the receptive phase may be related to endometrium receptivity. The interaction network also showed that proteins related to cell-cell adhesion were down-regulated. Moreover, the results from KEGG pathway analyses are consistent with the protein-protein interaction results. The proteins, including alpha-actinin (ACTN), extracellular matrix proteins, integrin alpha-V, and so on, that are involved in the focal adhesion pathway were down-regulated in the receptive phase compared with the proliferative phase, which may facilitate the implantation of the fertilized ovum. Selected proteins were validated by Western blot analysis and

  11. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-05-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(-) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl-amino)-phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes.

  12. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  13. Future directions in focal-plane signal processing for space-borne scientific imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1991-11-01

    The potential of focal-plane signal processing for space-borne scientific imagers is discussed. Significant improvement in image quality and consequent scientific return may be enabled through the utilization of focal-plane signal processing techniques. The possible application of focal-plane signal processing to readout noise reduction, cosmic ray circumvention, non-uniformity correction, and throughput enhancement is described. On-focal-plane analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion and micromotion stabilization are also discussed. It is the intention of this paper to stimulate further thought and efforts in this field.

  14. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells.

  15. Diagnostic use of cytokeratins, CD34, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule staining in focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Imran; Iyer, Anita; Marginean, Celia E; Yeh, Matthew M; Ferrell, Linda; Qin, Lihui; Bifulco, Carlo B; Jain, Dhanpat

    2009-05-01

    Cytokeratins 7 and 19 and neuronal cell adhesion molecule (CD56) are differentially expressed in the hepatocytes and biliary epithelium. CD34 is an endothelial marker that is expressed in hepatic sinusoids in conditions associated with altered vascular flow and neoplasms. Distinct staining patterns using these markers have been shown in resected specimens of focal nodular hyperplasia, telangiectatic focal nodular hyperplasia, and hepatic adenoma. The purpose of this study was to examine the diagnostic use of these markers in needle biopsies. Needle biopsies from focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 21), telangiectatic focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 2), and hepatic adenoma (n = 14) were included in the study. These cases represent typical examples of each entity that have been diagnosed on the basis of clinical, imaging, and histologic features. Corresponding resection specimens available in 9 cases were also included in the study for comparison. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 4-mum-thick formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections using antibodies against cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 19, neuronal cell adhesion molecule, and CD34. The staining patterns and intensity for each marker were analyzed in a blinded fashion, and the patterns were recorded as focal nodular hyperplasia-like, hepatic adenoma-like, or indeterminate for each case. Presence of normal tissue was also recorded in each case. The hepatic adenoma-like pattern is characterized by strong cytokeratin 7 positivity in hepatocytes in patches with a gradual decrease in the staining intensity as the cells differentiate toward mature hepatocytes. Hepatic adenomas lack bile ducts and ductules as highlighted by cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 19, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule stains. The focal nodular hyperplasia-like pattern is characterized by milder and focal cytokeratin 7 staining of hepatocytes. Cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 19, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule show a strong staining of bile

  16. Non-channel mechanosensors working at focal adhesion-stress fiber complex.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs) have long been the only established molecular class of cell mechanosensors; however, in the last decade, a variety of non-channel type mechanosensor molecules have been identified. Many of them are focal adhesion-associated proteins that include integrin, talin, and actin. Mechanosensors must be non-soluble molecules firmly interacting with relatively rigid cellular structures such as membranes (in terms of lateral stiffness), cytoskeletons, and adhesion structures. The partner of MSCs is the membrane in which MSC proteins efficiently transduce changes in the membrane tension into conformational changes that lead to channel opening. By contrast, the integrin, talin, and actin filament form a linear complex of which both ends are typically anchored to the extracellular matrices via integrins. Upon cell deformation by forces, this structure turns out to be a portion that efficiently transduces the generated stress into conformational changes of composite molecules, leading to the activation of integrin (catch bond with extracellular matrices) and talin (unfolding to induce vinculin bindings). Importantly, this structure also serves as an "active" mechanosensor to detect substrate rigidity by pulling the substrate with contraction of actin stress fibers (SFs), which may induce talin unfolding and an activation of MSCs in the vicinity of integrins. A recent study demonstrates that the actin filament acts as a mechanosensor with unique characteristics; the filament behaves as a negative tension sensor in which increased torsional fluctuations by tension decrease accelerate ADF/cofilin binding, leading to filament disruption. Here, we review the latest progress in the study of those non-channel mechanosensors and discuss their activation mechanisms and physiological roles. PMID:24965068

  17. The Regulation of RhoA at Focal Adhesions by StarD13 is Important for Astrocytoma Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Bassem D.; Hanna, Samer; Saykali, Bechara A.; El-Sitt, Sally; Nasrallah, Anita; Marston, Daniel; El-Sabban, Marwan; Hahn, Klaus M.; Symons, Marc; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2015-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are highly invasive into adjacent and distant regions of the normal brain. Rho GTPases are small monomeric G proteins that play important roles in cytoskeleton rearrangement, cell motility, and tumor invasion. In the present study, we show that the knock down of StarD13, a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RhoA and Cdc42, inhibits astrocytoma cell migration through modulating focal adhesion dynamics and cell adhesion. This effect is mediated by the resulting constitutive activation of RhoA and the subsequent indirect inhibition of Rac. Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF)-based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), we show that RhoA activity localizes with focal adhesions at the basal surface of astrocytoma cells. Moreover, the knock down of StarD13 inhibits the cycling of RhoA activation at the rear edge of cells, which makes them defective in retracting their tail. This study highlights the importance of the regulation of RhoA activity in focal adhesions of astrocytoma cells and establishes StarD13 as a GAP playing a major role in this process. PMID:24333506

  18. Role of c-Src and focal adhesion kinase in progression and metastasis of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Planas-Silva, Maricarmen D. . E-mail: mcplanas@psu.edu; Bruggeman, Richard D.; Grenko, Ronald T.; Stanley Smith, J.

    2006-03-03

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinases c-Src and focal adhesion kinase (Fak) mediate signal transduction pathways that regulate cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and metastasis. Here, we investigated whether c-Src and Fak are activated during progression of hormone-dependent breast cancer. Maximally active c-Src was overexpressed in a subset of tamoxifen-resistant variants and in metastases of recurrent hormone-treated breast cancer. Active Fak was also frequently observed in these tumors. We also show that estrogen receptor (ER) can bind to Fak and that estrogen can modulate Fak autophosphorylation supporting a cross-talk between these two pathways. Inhibition of c-Src activity blocked proliferation of all tamoxifen-resistant variants, suggesting that inhibitors of c-Src-Fak activity may delay or prevent progression and metastasis of ER-positive tumors. These studies also raise the possibility that fully active forms of c-Src and Fak in breast tumors may be biomarkers to predict tamoxifen resistance and/or risk of recurrence in ER-positive breast cancer.

  19. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  20. Manganese-induced integrin affinity maturation promotes recruitment of alpha V beta 3 integrin to focal adhesions in endothelial cells: evidence for a role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Src.

    PubMed

    Dormond, Olivier; Ponsonnet, Lionel; Hasmim, Meriem; Foletti, Alessandro; Rüegg, Curzio

    2004-07-01

    Integrin activity is controlled by changes in affinity (i.e. ligand binding) and avidity (i.e. receptor clustering). Little is known, however, about the effect of affinity maturation on integrin avidity and on the associated signaling pathways. To study the effect of affinity maturation on integrin avidity, we stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with MnCl(2) to increase integrin affinity and monitored clustering of beta 1 and beta 3 integrins. In unstimulated HUVEC, beta 1 integrins were present in fibrillar adhesions, while alpha V beta 3 was detected in peripheral focal adhesions. Clustered beta 1 and beta 3 integrins expressed high affinity/ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) epitopes. MnCl(2)-stimulation promoted focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation at the basal surface of the cells, and strongly enhanced mAb LM609 staining and expression of beta 3 high affinity/LIBS epitopes at focal adhesions. MnCl(2)-induced alpha V beta 3 clustering was blocked by a soluble RGD peptide, by wortmannin and LY294002, two pharmacological inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), and by over-expressing a dominant negative PI 3-K mutant protein. Conversely, over-expression of active PI 3-K and pharmacological inhibiton of Src with PP2 and CGP77675, enhanced basal and manganese-induced alpha V beta 3 clustering. Transient increased phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt, a direct target of PI 3K, occurred upon manganese stimulation. MnCl(2) did not alter beta 1 integrin distribution or beta1 high-affinity/LIBS epitope expression. Based on these results, we conclude that MnCl(2)-induced alpha V beta 3 integrin affinity maturation stimulates focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation, and promotes recruitment of high affinity alpha V beta 3 to focal adhesions. Affinity-modulated alpha V beta 3 clustering requires PI3-K signaling and is negatively regulate by Src.

  1. Photonic force microscopy of local tension at cell surface focal adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, François; Bessard, Judicaël; Marceau, Normand; Sheng, Yunlong

    2006-09-01

    The ability of cells to sustain mechanical stress is essential. It is however not very well understood how tension is expressed from the inside of the cell to the exterior. Here we show that these forces can be measured by photonic force microscopy (PFM), which is able to apply a force to cells and to probe their response to the physical stress. Our setup consists of an inverted microscope coupled with an optical trap from a 5W ND:YVO 4 fiber laser. Forces are applied to the cell by the trap through a 5μm polystyrene bead coated with fibronectin, pre-incubated with cells to allow bead attachment and creation of focal adhesions. The reaction of the cell is monitored by sensing the position of the bead relative to the trap center by a quadrant photodiode, when the bead is in an equilibrium state between the photonics forces and the membrane elasticity and cell stiffness. The detection system is calibrated using a piezo nano-positioner and thermal noise analysis. We observed increased deformation of H4 cells treated with cytocholasin D, which disrupts the actin microfilaments. This observation is correlated to an overall decrease in the force by the photonics force microscope. Our results suggest that cell stiffness can be assessed by the PFM, which allows quantification of a tension within cells with sufficient precision.

  2. Focal adhesion kinase as a mechanotransducer during rapid brain growth of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Mary E; Knepper, Janice E; DiBenedetto, Angela J; Malaugh, Elizabeth; Callejo, Sagrario; Carretero, Raquel; Alonso, Maria-Isabel; Gato, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of the hollow fluid-filled embryonic brain occurs by an increase in intraluminal pressure created by accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Experiments have shown a direct correlation between cavity pressure and cell proliferation within the neuroepithelium. These findings lead us to ask how mechanistically this might come about. Are there perhaps molecules on the luminal surface of the embryonic neuroepithelium, such as focal adhesion kinases (FAKs) known to respond to tension in other epithelial cells? Immunodetection using antibodies to total FAK and p-FAK was performed with subsequent confocal analysis of the pattern of their activation under normal intraluminal pressure and induced chronic pressure. Western analysis was also done to look at the amount of FAK expression, as well as its activation under these same conditions. Using immunolocalization, we have shown that FAK is present and activated on both apical and basolateral surfaces and within the cytoplasm of the neuroepithelial cells. This pattern changed profoundly when the neuroepithelium was under pressure. By Western blot, we have shown that FAK was upregulated and activated in the neuroepithelium of the embryos just after the neural tube becomes a closed pressurized system, with phosphorylation detected on the luminal instead of the basal surface, along with an increase in cell proliferation. Chronic hyper-pressure does not induce an increase in phosphorylation of FAK. In conclusion, here we show that neuroepithelial cells respond to intraluminal pressure via FAK phosphorylation on the luminal surface. PMID:24860993

  3. Diamagnetic levitation causes changes in the morphology, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion proteins expression in osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Qian, A R; Wang, L; Gao, X; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Han, J; Li, J B; Di, S M; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation technology is a novel simulated weightless technique and has recently been applied in life-science research. We have developed a superconducting magnet platform with large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels, namely, μg (diamagnetic levitation), 1g, and 2g for diamagnetic materials. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on the activity, morphology, and cytoskeleton (actin filament, microtubules, and vimentin intermediate filaments) in osteocyte - like cell line MLO-Y4 were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) methods, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), respectively. The changes induced by LG-HMF in distribution and expression of focal adhesion (FA) proteins, including vinculin, paxillin, and talin in MLO-Y4 were determined by LSCM and Western blotting. The results showed that LG-HMF produced by superconducting magnet had no lethal effects on MLO-Y4. Compared to control, diamagnetic levitation (μg) affected MLO-Y4 morphology, nucleus size, cytoskeleton architecture, and FA proteins distribution and expression. The study indicates that osteocytes are sensitive to altered gravity and FA proteins (vinculin, paxillin, and talin) may be involved in osteocyte mechanosensation. The diamagnetic levitation may be a novel ground-based space-gravity simulator and can be used for biological experiment at cellular level. PMID:21216704

  4. Phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase at Tyr397 in Gastric Carcinomas and its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Lai, I-Rue; Chu, Pei-Yu; Lin, Hsiao-Sheng; Liou, Jun-Yang; Jan, Yee-Jee; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Shen, Tang-Long

    2010-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been implicated in tumorigenesis in various cancers; however, it remains unclear how FAK participates in tumor malignancy in vivo. This study seeks to understand the role of FAK activation in gastric cancer progression. Using immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting, we found that pY397 FAK, an autophosphorylation site on FAK activation, was abundant in the cancerous tissues of 21 of 59 patients with gastric carcinomas. We attempted to correlate clinicopathological parameters, including histological types, TNM staging, and cancer recurrence, with the expression of FAK and pY397 FAK in cancerous tissues. Intriguingly, patients with higher levels of pY397 FAK displayed higher incidences of gastric cancer recurrence after surgery and poor 5-year recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that pY397 FAK was an independent predictor of gastric cancer recurrence. As a result, expression of pY397 FAK is a significant prognostic factor for the recurrence of gastric cancer. Additionally, in vitro studies showed that overexpression of Y397F, a dominant-negative mutant of FAK, in AGS human gastric carcinoma cells impaired cell migration, invasion, and proliferation compared with cells overexpressing wild-type FAK. Thus, activation of FAK through autophosphorylation at Tyr397 leads to the progression of gastric carcinomas by promoting cell migration, invasion, and proliferation. Collectively, our results have provided valuable insights for the development of novel diagnoses and therapeutic targets for gastric cancer treatments. PMID:20724588

  5. LRRK2 G2019S mutation attenuates microglial motility by inhibiting focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Insup; Kim, Beomsue; Byun, Ji-Won; Baik, Sung Hoon; Huh, Yun Hyun; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Song, Woo Keun; Shin, Joo-Ho; Seo, Hyemyung; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Park, Sang Myun; Kang, Ho Chul; Joe, Eun-Hye

    2015-01-01

    In response to brain injury, microglia rapidly extend processes that isolate lesion sites and protect the brain from further injury. Here we report that microglia carrying a pathogenic mutation in the Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated gene, G2019S-LRRK2 (GS-Tg microglia), show retarded ADP-induced motility and delayed isolation of injury, compared with non-Tg microglia. Conversely, LRRK2 knockdown microglia are highly motile compared with control cells. In our functional assays, LRRK2 binds to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phosphorylates its Thr–X–Arg/Lys (TXR/K) motif(s), eventually attenuating FAK activity marked by decreased pY397 phosphorylation (pY397). GS-LRRK2 decreases the levels of pY397 in the brain, microglia and HEK cells. In addition, treatment with an inhibitor of LRRK2 kinase restores pY397 levels, decreased pTXR levels and rescued motility of GS-Tg microglia. These results collectively suggest that G2019S mutation of LRRK2 may contribute to the development of PD by inhibiting microglial response to brain injury. PMID:26365310

  6. Probing mechanical principles of focal contacts in cell–matrix adhesion with a coupled stochastic–elastic modelling framework

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huajian; Qian, Jin; Chen, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Cell–matrix adhesion depends on the collective behaviours of clusters of receptor–ligand bonds called focal contacts between cell and extracellular matrix. While the behaviour of a single molecular bond is governed by statistical mechanics at the molecular scale, continuum mechanics should be valid at a larger scale. This paper presents an overview of a series of recent theoretical studies aimed at probing the basic mechanical principles of focal contacts in cell–matrix adhesion via stochastic–elastic models in which stochastic descriptions of molecular bonds and elastic descriptions of interfacial traction–separation are unified in a single modelling framework. The intention here is to illustrate these principles using simple analytical and numerical models. The aim of the discussions is to provide possible clues to the following questions: why does the size of focal adhesions (FAs) fall into a narrow range around the micrometre scale? How can cells sense and respond to substrates of varied stiffness via FAs? How do the magnitude and orientation of mechanical forces affect the binding dynamics of FAs? The effects of cluster size, cell–matrix elastic modulus, loading direction and cytoskeletal pretension on the lifetime of FA clusters have been investigated by theoretical arguments as well as Monte Carlo numerical simulations, with results showing that intermediate adhesion size, stiff substrate, cytoskeleton stiffening, low-angle pulling and moderate cytoskeletal pretension are factors that contribute to stable FAs. From a mechanistic point of view, these results provide possible explanations for a wide range of experimental observations and suggest multiple mechanisms by which cells can actively control adhesion and de-adhesion via cytoskeletal contractile machinery in response to mechanical properties of their surroundings. PMID:21632610

  7. Focal Adhesion Kinase Directly Interacts with TSC2 Through Its FAT Domain and Regulates Cell Proliferation in Cashmere Goat Fetal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xu; Bao, Wenlei; Yang, Jiaofu; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Dongsheng; Liang, Yan; Li, Shuyu; Wang, Yanfeng; Feng, Xue; Hao, Huifang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that senses a variety of extracellular signals, such as growth factors and integrins, to control the process of cell proliferation and metabolism. We cloned three goat FAK transcript variants (KM655805, KM658268, and KM658269) that encode 1052, 1006, and 962 amino-acid residue proteins. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the putative FAK protein contains an FERM domain, a PTK domain, two Proline-rich regions, and a focal adhesion-targeting (FAT) domain. All the three transcript variants of FAK were detected in seven different goat tissues, and variant 1 had the most accumulation whereas variant 2 and variant 3 had lower accumulation. Treatment of goat fetal fibroblasts (GFbs) with a specific FAK inhibitor, TAE226, inhibited cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and induced damage to the cell morphology in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further research demonstrated that FAK directly interacted with TSC2 (Tuberous sclerosis 2) tuberin domain through its C-terminus, which contains the complete FAT domain. In conclusion, our results indicated that FAK may be widely expressed in Cashmere goat tissues and its products participate in the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and cell proliferation through a direct interaction with TSC2 in GFBs. PMID:27380318

  8. Myxococcus xanthus Gliding Motors Are Elastically Coupled to the Substrate as Predicted by the Focal Adhesion Model of Gliding Motility

    PubMed Central

    Balagam, Rajesh; Litwin, Douglas B.; Czerwinski, Fabian; Sun, Mingzhai; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a model organism for studying bacterial social behaviors due to its ability to form complex multi-cellular structures. Knowledge of M. xanthus surface gliding motility and the mechanisms that coordinated it are critically important to our understanding of collective cell behaviors. Although the mechanism of gliding motility is still under investigation, recent experiments suggest that there are two possible mechanisms underlying force production for cell motility: the focal adhesion mechanism and the helical rotor mechanism, which differ in the biophysics of the cell–substrate interactions. Whereas the focal adhesion model predicts an elastic coupling, the helical rotor model predicts a viscous coupling. Using a combination of computational modeling, imaging, and force microscopy, we find evidence for elastic coupling in support of the focal adhesion model. Using a biophysical model of the M. xanthus cell, we investigated how the mechanical interactions between cells are affected by interactions with the substrate. Comparison of modeling results with experimental data for cell-cell collision events pointed to a strong, elastic attachment between the cell and substrate. These results are robust to variations in the mechanical and geometrical parameters of the model. We then directly measured the motor-substrate coupling by monitoring the motion of optically trapped beads and find that motor velocity decreases exponentially with opposing load. At high loads, motor velocity approaches zero velocity asymptotically and motors remain bound to beads indicating a strong, elastic attachment. PMID:24810164

  9. Molecular mechanisms underlying the force-dependent regulation of actin-to-ECM linkage at the focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Sokabe, Masahiro; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-01-01

    The linkage of the actin cytoskeleton to extracellular matrices (ECMs) at focal adhesions provides a physical path for cells to exert traction forces on substrates during cellular processes such as migration and morphogenesis. Mechanical strength of the actin-to-ECM linkage increases in response to forces loaded at this linkage. This is achieved by local accumulations of actin filaments, as well as linker proteins connecting actins to integrins, at force-bearing adhesion sites, which leads to an increase in the number of molecular bonds between the actin cytoskeleton- and ECM-bound integrins. Zyxin-dependent actin polymerization and filamin-mediated actin bundling are seemingly involved in the force-dependent actin accumulation. Each actin-integrin link is primarily mediated by the linker protein talin, which is strengthened by another linker protein vinculin connecting the actin filaments to talin in a force-dependent manner. This eliminates slippage between the actin cytoskeleton and talin (clutch mechanism), thus playing a crucial role in creating cell membrane protrusions mediated by actin polymerization. Finally, each integrin-ECM bond is also strengthened when a force is loaded on it, which ensures force transmission at focal adhesions, contributing to stable cell-substrate adhesion in cell migration. PMID:25081617

  10. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton via transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes by myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs/MAL/MKLs)

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Tsuyoshi; Mayanagi, Taira; Sobue, Kenji

    2007-10-01

    RhoA is a crucial regulator of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation through the activation of actin nucleation and polymerization. It also regulates the nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor-A and -B (MRTF-A/B, MAL or MKL 1/2), which are co-activators of serum response factor (SRF). In dominant-negative MRTF-A (DN-MRTF-A)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the expressions of several cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes were down-regulated, and the formation of stress fiber and focal adhesion was severely diminished. MRTF-A/B-knockdown cells also exhibited such cytoskeletal defects. In reporter assays, both RhoA and MRTF-A enhanced promoter activities of these genes in a CArG-box-dependent manner, and DN-MRTF-A inhibited the RhoA-mediated activation of these promoters. In dominant-negative RhoA (RhoA-N19)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the nuclear translocation of MRTF-A/B was predominantly prevented, resulting in the reduced expression of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins. Further, constitutive-active MRTF-A/B increased the expression of endogenous cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins, and thereby rescued the defective phenotype of stress fibers and focal adhesions in RhoA-N19 expressing cells. These results indicate that MRTF-A/B act as pivotal mediators of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation via the transcriptional regulation of a subset of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes.

  11. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection.

  12. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  13. Fenretinide Perturbs Focal Adhesion Kinase in Premalignant and Malignant Human Oral Keratinocytes. Fenretinide’s chemopreventive mechanisms include ECM interactions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Byungdo B.; Li, Suyang; Tong, Meng; Holpuch, Andrew S.; Spinney, Richard; Wang, Daren; Border, Michael B.; Liu, Zhongfa; Sarode, Sachin; Pei, Ping; Schwendeman, Steven; Mallery, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane-associated protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), modulates cell-extracellular matrix interactions and also conveys pro-survival and proliferative signals. Notably, increased intraepithelial FAK levels accompany transformation of premalignant oral intraepithelial neoplasia (OIN) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). OIN chemoprevention is a patient-centric, optimal strategy to prevent OSCC’s co-morbidities and mortality. The cancer chemopreventive and synthetic vitamin A derivative, fenretinide, has demonstrated protein-binding capacities e.g. mTOR and retinol binding protein interactions. These studies employed a continuum of human oral keratinocytes (normal-HPV E6/E7-transduced-OSCC) to assess potential fenretinide-FAK drug protein interactions and functional consequences on cellular growth regulation and motility. Molecular modeling studies demonstrated fenretinide has ~200-fold greater binding affinity relative to the natural ligand (ATP) at FAK’s kinase domain. Fenretinide also shows intermediate binding at FAK’s FERM domain and interacts at the ATP-binding site of the closest FAK analogue, Pyk2. Fenretinide significantly suppressed proliferation via induction of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle blockade. Fenretinide-treated cells also demonstrated F-actin disruption, significant inhibition of both directed migration and invasion of a synthetic basement membrane, and decreased phosphorylation of growth-promoting kinases. A commercially available FAK inhibitor did not suppress cell invasion. Notably, while FAK’s FERM domain directs cell invasion, FAK inhibitors target the kinase domain. In addition, FAK-specific siRNA treated cells showed an intermediate cell migration capacity; data which suggest co-contribution of the established migrating-enhancing Pyk2. Our data imply that fenretinide is uniquely capable of disrupting FAK’s and Pyk2’s pro-survival and mobility-enhancing effects and further extend fenretinide’s chemopreventive

  14. Progesterone promotes focal adhesion formation and migration in breast cancer cells through induction of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge; Aranda, Evelyn; Henriquez, Soledad; Quezada, Marisol; Espinoza, Estefanía; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Lange, Soledad; Villalon, Manuel; Jones, Marius; Brosens, Jan J; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Knutson, Todd P; Lange, Carol A; Leyton, Lisette; Owen, Gareth I

    2012-08-01

    Progesterone and progestins have been demonstrated to enhance breast cancer cell migration, although the mechanisms are still not fully understood. The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of membrane receptors that are activated by serine proteases in the blood coagulation cascade. PAR1 (F2R) has been reported to be involved in cancer cell migration and overexpressed in breast cancer. We herein demonstrate that PAR1 mRNA and protein are upregulated by progesterone treatment of the breast cancer cell lines ZR-75 and T47D. This regulation is dependent on the progesterone receptor (PR) but does not require PR phosphorylation at serine 294 or the PR proline-rich region mPRO. The increase in PAR1 mRNA was transient, being present at 3  h and returning to basal levels at 18  h. The addition of a PAR1-activating peptide (aPAR1) to cells treated with progesterone resulted in an increase in focal adhesion (FA) formation as measured by the cellular levels of phosphorylated FA kinase. The combined but not individual treatment of progesterone and aPAR1 also markedly increased stress fiber formation and the migratory capacity of breast cancer cells. In agreement with in vitro findings, data mining from the Oncomine platform revealed that PAR1 expression was significantly upregulated in PR-positive breast tumors. Our observation that PAR1 expression and signal transduction are modulated by progesterone provides new insight into how the progestin component in hormone therapies increases the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

  15. Prognostic Value of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Human Solid Carcinomas: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Li; Tseng, Yu-Jen; Zhao, Nai-Qing; Chen, Shi-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, the number of reports on focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as a vital therapeutic target in solid carcinomas has increased; however, the prognostic role of FAK status remains poorly understood. This study aims to evaluate the prognostic effect of FAK by means of a meta-analysis. Methods We performed a systematic literature search in order to examine the correlation between expression of FAK and overall survival(OS). The hazard ratio (HR) of OS was used to measure survival. A random-effects model was used to pool study statistics. Sensitivity and publication bias analyses were also conducted. Results Thirty eligible studies involving 4702 patients were included. The median expression rate of FAK was 54%. Meta-analysis of the HRs demonstrated that high FAK expression was associated with worse OS (average HR = 2.073, 95%confidence interval[CI]:1.712–2.510, p = 0.000). Regarding cancer type, FAK was associated with worse OS in gastric cancer (HR = 2.646,95% CI:1.743–4.017, p = 0.000), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR = 1.788,95% CI:1.228–2.602, p = 0.002), ovarian cancer (HR = 1.815, 95% CI: 1.193–2.762, p = 0.005), endometrial cancer (HR = 4.149, 95% CI:2.832–6.079, p = 0.000), gliomas (HR = 2.650, 95% CI: 1.205–5.829, p = 0.015), and squamous cell carcinoma (HR = 1,696, 95% CI: 1.030–2.793, p = 0.038). No association was found between HR and disease staging according to our meta-regression analysis. Conclusions Our study shows that high expression of FAK is associated with a worse OS in patients with carcinomas, but the association between FAK and prognosis varies according to cancer type. The value of FAK status in clinical prognosis in cancer needs further research. PMID:27637100

  16. Platelet adhesion signalling and the regulation of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2004-07-15

    Platelets perform a central role in haemostasis and thrombosis. They adhere to subendothelial collagens exposed at sites of blood vessel injury via the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-V-IX receptor complex, GPVI and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). These receptors perform distinct functions in the regulation of cell signalling involving non-receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. Src, Fyn, Lyn, Syk and Btk), adaptor proteins, phospholipase C and lipid kinases such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase. They are also coupled to an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and protein kinase C activation, leading to the secretion of paracrine/autocrine platelet factors and an increase in integrin receptor affinities. Through the binding of plasma fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor to integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), a platelet thrombus is formed. Although increasing evidence indicates that each of the adhesion receptors GPIb-V-IX and GPVI and integrins alpha(2)beta(1) and alpha(IIb)beta(3) contribute to the signalling that regulates this process, the individual roles of each are only beginning to be dissected. By contrast, adhesion receptor signalling through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is implicated in the inhibition of platelet function and thrombus formation in the healthy circulation. Recent studies indicate that understanding of platelet adhesion signalling mechanisms might enable the development of new strategies to treat and prevent thrombosis. PMID:15252124

  17. Fluorescence Fluctuation Approaches to the Study of Adhesion and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, Alexia I.; Kubow, Kristopher E.; Horwitz, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Cell–matrix adhesions are large, multimolecular complexes through which cells sense and respond to their environment. They also mediate migration by serving as traction points and signaling centers and allow the cell to modify the surroucnding tissue. Due to their fundamental role in cell behavior, adhesions are germane to nearly all major human health pathologies. However, adhesions are extremely complex and dynamic structures that include over 100 known interacting proteins and operate over multiple space (nm–µm) and time (ms–min) regimes. Fluorescence fluctuation techniques are well suited for studying adhesions. These methods are sensitive over a large spatiotemporal range and provide a wealth of information including molecular transport dynamics, interactions, and stoichiometry from a single time series. Earlier chapters in this volume have provided the theoretical background, instrumentation, and analysis algorithms for these techniques. In this chapter, we discuss their implementation in living cells to study adhesions in migrating cells. Although each technique and application has its own unique instrumentation and analysis requirements, we provide general guidelines for sample preparation, selection of imaging instrumentation, and optimization of data acquisition and analysis parameters. Finally, we review several recent studies that implement these techniques in the study of adhesions. PMID:23280111

  18. JUNCTIONAL COMPLEX AND FOCAL ADHESION REARRANGEMENT MEDIATES PULMONARY ENDOTHELIAL BARRIER ENHANCEMENT BY FTY720 S-PHOSPHONATE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lichun; Bittman, Robert; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Dudek, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Modulation of pulmonary vascular barrier function is an important clinical goal given the devastating effects of vascular leak in acute lung injury (ALI). We previously demonstrated that FTY720 S-phosphonate (Tys), an analog of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and FTY720, has more potent pulmonary barrier protective effects than these agents in vitro and in mouse models of ALI. Tys preserves expression of the barrier-promoting S1P1 receptor (S1PR1), whereas S1P and FTY720 induce its ubiquitination and degradation. Here we further characterize the novel barrier promoting effects of Tys in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells (EC). Methods/Results : In human lung EC, Tys significantly increased peripheral redistribution of adherens junction proteins VE-cadherin and β-catenin and tight junction protein ZO-1. Inhibition of VE-cadherin with blocking antibody significantly attenuated Tys-induced transendothelial resistance (TER) elevation, while ZO-1 siRNA partially inhibited this elevation. Tys significantly increased focal adhesion formation and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Pharmacologic inhibition of FAK significantly attenuated Tys-induced TER elevation. Tys significantly increased phosphorylation and peripheral redistribution of the actin-binding protein, cortactin, while cortactin siRNA partially attenuated Tys-induced TER elevation. Although Tys significantly increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β, neither PI3 kinase nor GSK3β inhibition altered Tys-induced TER elevation. Tys significantly increased Rac1 activity, while inhibition of Rac1 activity significantly attenuated Tys-induced VE-cadherin redistribution and TER elevation. Conclusion Junctional complex, focal adhesion rearrangement and Rac1 activation play critical roles in Tys-mediated barrier protection in pulmonary EC. These results provide mechanistic insights into the effects of this potential ALI therapy. PMID:25862132

  19. F-actin bundles direct the initiation and orientation of lamellipodia through adhesion-based signaling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Heath E.; King, Samantha J.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Rotty, Jeremy D.; Bear, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells such as fibroblasts are weakly polarized and reorient directionality by a lamellipodial branching mechanism that is stabilized by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. However, the mechanisms by which new lamellipodia are initiated and directed are unknown. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor cytoskeletal and signaling dynamics in migrating cells, we show that peripheral F-actin bundles/filopodia containing fascin-1 serve as templates for formation and orientation of lamellipodia. Accordingly, modulation of fascin-1 expression tunes cell shape, quantified as the number of morphological extensions. Ratiometric imaging reveals that F-actin bundles/filopodia play both structural and signaling roles, as they prime the activation of PI3K signaling mediated by integrins and focal adhesion kinase. Depletion of fascin-1 ablated fibroblast haptotaxis on fibronectin but not platelet-derived growth factor chemotaxis. Based on these findings, we conceptualize haptotactic sensing as an exploration, with F-actin bundles directing and lamellipodia propagating the process and with signaling mediated by adhesions playing the role of integrator. PMID:25666809

  20. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK signalling influence osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on titanium topographies.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Paul D H; Elliott, Christopher G; Hutter, Jeff; Hamilton, Douglas W

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK)). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated) and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched) topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications.

  1. Inhibition of Rac and ROCK Signalling Influence Osteoblast Adhesion, Differentiation and Mineralization on Titanium Topographies

    PubMed Central

    Prowse, Paul D. H.; Elliott, Christopher G.; Hutter, Jeff; Hamilton, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the time required for initial integration of bone-contacting implants with host tissues would be of great clinical significance. Changes in osteoblast adhesion formation and reorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton in response to altered topography are known to be upstream of osteoblast differentiation, and these processes are regulated by the Rho GTPases. Rac and RhoA (through Rho Kinase (ROCK)). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we tested how inhibition of Rac and ROCK influenced osteoblast adhesion, differentiation and mineralization on PT (Pre-treated) and SLA (sandblasted large grit, acid etched) topographies. Inhibition of ROCK, but not Rac, significantly reduced adhesion number and size on PT, with adhesion size consistent with focal complexes. After 1 day, ROCK, but not Rac inhibition increased osteocalcin mRNA levels on SLA and PT, with levels further increasing at 7 days post seeding. ROCK inhibition also significantly increased bone sialoprotein expression at 7 days, but not BMP-2 levels. Rac inhibition significantly reduced BMP-2 mRNA levels. ROCK inhibition increased nuclear translocation of Runx2 independent of surface roughness. Mineralization of osteoblast cultures was greater on SLA than on PT, but was increased by ROCK inhibition and attenuated by Rac inhibition on both topographies. In conclusion, inhibition of ROCK signalling significantly increases osteoblast differentiation and biomineralization in a topographic dependent manner, and its pharmacological inhibition could represent a new therapeutic to speed bone formation around implanted metals and in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23505566

  2. Direct observation of dynamic force propagation between focal adhesions of cells on microposts by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Akinori; Mizutani, Yusuke; Subagyo, Agus; Hosoi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Motonori; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Kawahara, Koichi; Okajima, Takaharu

    2011-12-01

    We investigated dynamic force propagation between focal adhesions of fibroblast cells cultured on polydimethylsiloxane micropost substrates, by atomic force microscopy. Live cells were mechanically modulated by the atomic force microscopy probe bound to cell apical surfaces at 0.01-0.5 Hz, while microposts served as a force sensor at basal surfaces. We observed that cells exhibited rheological behavior at the apical surface but had no apparent out-of-phase response at the basal surface, indicating that the dynamic force propagating through cytoskeletal filaments behaves in an elastic manner. Moreover, the direction of the propagated force was observed to be intimately associated with the prestress.

  3. Kinetic Mechanism and Rate-Limiting Steps of Focal Adhesion Kinase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, Jessica L.; Briand, Jacques; Chen, Stephanie; Lehr, Ruth; McDevitt, Patrick; Zhao, Baoguang; Smallwood, Angela; Concha, Nestor; Oza, Khyati; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Yan, Kang; Villa, James P.; Meek, Thomas D.; Thrall, Sara H.

    2010-12-07

    Steady-state kinetic analysis of focal adhesion kinase-1 (FAK1) was performed using radiometric measurement of phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide substrate (Ac-RRRRRRSETDDYAEIID-NH{sub 2}, FAK-tide) which corresponds to the sequence of an autophosphorylation site in FAK1. Initial velocity studies were consistent with a sequential kinetic mechanism, for which apparent kinetic values k{sub cat} (0.052 {+-} 0.001 s{sup -1}), K{sub MgATP} (1.2 {+-} 0.1 {micro}M), K{sub iMgATP} (1.3 {+-} 0.2 {micro}M), K{sub FAK-tide} (5.6 {+-} 0.4 {micro}M), and K{sub iFAK-tide} (6.1 {+-} 1.1 {micro}M) were obtained. Product and dead-end inhibition data indicated that enzymatic phosphorylation of FAK-tide by FAK1 was best described by a random bi bi kinetic mechanism, for which both E-MgADP-FAK-tide and E-MgATP-P-FAK-tide dead-end complexes form. FAK1 catalyzed the {beta}{gamma}-bridge:{beta}-nonbridge positional oxygen exchange of [{gamma}-{sup 18}O{sub 4}]ATP in the presence of 1 mM [{gamma}-{sup 18}O{sub 4}]ATP and 1.5 mM FAK-tide with a progressive time course which was commensurate with catalysis, resulting in a rate of exchange to catalysis of k{sub x}/k{sub cat} = 0.14 {+-} 0.01. These results indicate that phosphoryl transfer is reversible and that a slow kinetic step follows formation of the E-MgADP-P-FAK-tide complex. Further kinetic studies performed in the presence of the microscopic viscosogen sucrose revealed that solvent viscosity had no effect on k{sub cat}/K{sub FAK-tide}, while k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub MgATP} were both decreased linearly at increasing solvent viscosity. Crystallographic characterization of inactive versus AMP-PNP-liganded structures of FAK1 showed that a large conformational motion of the activation loop upon ATP binding may be an essential step during catalysis and would explain the viscosity effect observed on k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for MgATP but not on k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for FAK-tide. From the positional isotope exchange, viscosity, and

  4. The Chlamydia Effector TarP Mimics the Mammalian Leucine-Aspartic Acid Motif of Paxillin to Subvert the Focal Adhesion Kinase during Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, Tristan; Nogueira, Ana T.; Campeotto, Ivan; Silva, Ana P.; Grieshaber, Scott S.; Carabeo, Rey A.

    2014-01-01

    Host cell signal transduction pathways are often targets of bacterial pathogens, especially during the process of invasion when robust actin remodeling is required. We demonstrate that the host cell focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was necessary for the invasion by the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia caviae. Bacterial adhesion triggered the transient recruitment of FAK to the plasma membrane to mediate a Cdc42- and Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly. FAK recruitment was via binding to a domain within the virulence factor TarP that mimicked the LD2 motif of the FAK binding partner paxillin. Importantly, bacterial two-hybrid and quantitative imaging assays revealed a similar level of interaction between paxillin-LD2 and TarP-LD. The conserved leucine residues within the L(D/E)XLLXXL motif were essential to the recruitment of FAK, Cdc42, p34Arc, and actin to the plasma membrane. In the absence of FAK, TarP-LD-mediated F-actin assembly was reduced, highlighting the functional relevance of this interaction. Together, the data indicate that a prokaryotic version of the paxillin LD2 domain targets the FAK signaling pathway, with TarP representing the first example of an LD-containing Type III virulence effector. PMID:25193659

  5. Ezrin regulates focal adhesion and invadopodia dynamics by altering calpain activity to promote breast cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, Victoria; Szeto, Alvin; Ghaffari, Abdi; Greer, Peter A.; Côté, Graham P.; Elliott, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Up-regulation of the cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin frequently occurs in aggressive cancer types and is closely linked with metastatic progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms detailing how ezrin is involved in the invasive and metastatic phenotype remain unclear. Here we report a novel function of ezrin in regulating focal adhesion (FA) and invadopodia dynamics, two key processes required for efficient invasion to occur. We show that depletion of ezrin expression in invasive breast cancer cells impairs both FA and invadopodia turnover. We also demonstrate that ezrin-depleted cells display reduced calpain-mediated cleavage of the FA and invadopodia-associated proteins talin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and cortactin and reduced calpain-1–specific membrane localization, suggesting a requirement for ezrin in maintaining proper localization and activity of calpain-1. Furthermore, we show that ezrin is required for cell directionality, early lung seeding, and distant organ colonization but not primary tumor growth. Collectively our results unveil a novel mechanism by which ezrin regulates breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26246600

  6. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  7. Cell adhesion defines the topology of endocytosis and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grossier, Jean-Philippe; Xouri, Georgia; Goud, Bruno; Schauer, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Preferred sites of endocytosis have been observed in various cell types, but whether they occur randomly or are linked to cellular cues is debated. Here, we quantified the sites of endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells whose adhesion geometry was defined by micropatterns. 3D probabilistic density maps revealed that Tfn was enriched in adhesive sites during uptake, whereas EGF endocytosis was restricted to the dorsal cellular surface. This spatial separation was not due to distributions of corresponding receptors but was regulated by uptake mechanisms. Asymmetric uptake of Tfn resulted from the enrichment of clathrin and adaptor protein 2 at adhesive areas. Asymmetry in EGF uptake was strongly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and led to asymmetry in EGF receptor activation. Mild alteration of actin dynamics abolished asymmetry in EGF uptake and decreased EGF-induced downstream signaling, suggesting that cellular adhesion cues influence signal propagation. We propose that restriction of endocytosis at distinct sites allows cells to sense their environment in an “outside-in” mechanism. PMID:24366944

  8. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment.

  9. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment. PMID:20354780

  10. The mysterious nature of bacterial surface (gliding) motility: A focal adhesion-based mechanism in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Islam, Salim T; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-10-01

    Motility of bacterial cells promotes a range of important physiological phenomena such as nutrient detection, harm avoidance, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis. While much research has been devoted to the mechanism of bacterial swimming in liquid via rotation of flagellar filaments, the mechanisms of bacterial translocation across solid surfaces are poorly understood, particularly when cells lack external appendages such as rotary flagella and/or retractile type IV pili. Under such limitations, diverse bacteria at the single-cell level are still able to "glide" across solid surfaces, exhibiting smooth translocation of the cell along its long axis. Though multiple gliding mechanisms have evolved in different bacterial classes, most remain poorly characterized. One exception is the gliding motility mechanism used by the Gram-negative social predatory bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The available body of research suggests that M. xanthus gliding motility is mediated by trafficked multi-protein (Glt) cell envelope complexes, powered by proton-driven flagellar stator homologues (Agl). Through coupling to the substratum via polysaccharide slime, Agl-Glt assemblies can become fixed relative to the substratum, forming a focal adhesion site. Continued directional transport of slime-associated substratum-fixed Agl-Glt complexes would result in smooth forward movement of the cell. In this review, we have provided a comprehensive synthesis of the latest mechanistic and structural data for focal adhesion-mediated gliding motility in M. xanthus, with emphasis on the role of each Agl and Glt protein. Finally, we have also highlighted the possible connection between the motility complex and a new type of spore coat assembly system, suggesting that gliding and cell envelope synthetic complexes are evolutionarily linked. PMID:26520023

  11. Quantitative changes in focal adhesion kinase and its inhibitor, FRNK, drive load-dependent expression of costamere components.

    PubMed

    Klossner, Stephan; Li, Ruowei; Ruoss, Severin; Durieux, Anne-Cécile; Flück, Martin

    2013-09-15

    Costameres are mechanosensory sites of focal adhesion in the sarcolemma that reinforce the muscle-fiber composite and provide an anchor for myofibrillogenesis. We hypothesized that elevated content of the integrin-associated regulator of costamere turnover in culture, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), drives changes in costamere component content in antigravity muscle in a load-dependent way in correspondence with altered muscle weight. The content of FAK in soleus muscle being phosphorylated at autoregulatory tyrosine 397 (FAK-pY397) was increased after 20 s of stretch. FAK-pY397 content remained elevated after 24 h of stretch-overload due to upregulated FAK content. Overexpression of FAK in soleus muscle fibers by means of gene electrotransfer increased the β1-integrin (+56%) and meta-vinculin (+88%) content. α7-Integrin (P = 0.46) and γ-vinculin (P = 0.18) content was not altered after FAK overexpression. Co-overexpression of the FAK inhibitor FAK-related nonkinase (FRNK) reduced FAK-pY397 content by 33% and increased the percentage of fast-type fibers that arose in connection with hybrid fibers with gene transfer. Transplantation experiments confirmed the association of FRNK expression with slow-to-fast fiber transformation. Seven days of unloading blunted the elevation of FAK-pY397, β1-integrin, and meta-vinculin content with FAK overexpression, and this was reversed by 1 day of reloading. The results highlight that the expression of components for costameric attachment sites of myofibrils is under load- and fiber type-related control via FAK and its inhibitor FRNK.

  12. Identification of a new actin binding surface on vinculin that mediates mechanical cell and focal adhesion properties

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Peter M.; Tolbert, Caitlin E.; Shen, Kai; Kota, Pradeep; Palmer, Sean M.; Plevock, Karen M.; Orlova, Albina; Galkin, Vitold E.; Burridge, Keith; Egelman, Edward H.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Superfine, Richard; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Vinculin, a cytoskeletal scaffold protein essential for embryogenesis and cardiovascular function, localizes to focal adhesions and adherens junctions, connecting cell surface receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. While vinculin interacts with many adhesion proteins, its interaction with filamentous actin regulates cell morphology, motility, and mechanotransduction. Disruption of this interaction lowers cell traction forces and enhances actin flow rates. Although a model for the vinculin:actin complex exists, we recently identified actin-binding deficient mutants of vinculin outside sites predicted to bind actin, and developed an alternative model to better define this novel actin-binding surface, using negative-stain EM, discrete molecular dynamics, and mutagenesis. Actin-binding deficient vinculin variants expressed in vinculin knockout fibroblasts fail to rescue cell-spreading defects and reduce cellular response to external force. These findings highlight the importance of this new actin-binding surface and provide the molecular basis for elucidating additional roles of this interaction, including actin-induced conformational changes which promote actin bundling. PMID:24685146

  13. IGF-1 Receptor and Adhesion Signaling: An Important Axis in Determining Cancer Cell Phenotype and Therapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Orla T.; O’Shea, Sandra; Tresse, Emilie; Bustamante-Garrido, Milan; Kiran-Deevi, Ravi; O’Connor, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    IGF-1R expression and activation levels generally cannot be correlated in cancer cells, suggesting that cellular proteins may modulate IGF-1R activity. Strong candidates for such modulation are found in cell-matrix and cell–cell adhesion signaling complexes. Activated IGF-1R is present at focal adhesions, where it can stabilize β1 integrin and participate in signaling complexes that promote invasiveness associated with epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and resistance to therapy. Whether IGF-1R contributes to EMT or to non-invasive tumor growth may be strongly influenced by the degree of extracellular matrix engagement and the presence or absence of key proteins in IGF-1R-cell adhesion complexes. One such protein is PDLIM2, which promotes both cell polarization and EMT by regulating the stability of transcription factors including NFκB, STATs, and beta catenin. PDLIM2 exhibits tumor suppressor activity, but is also highly expressed in certain invasive cancers. It is likely that distinct adhesion complex proteins modulate IGF-1R signaling during cancer progression or adaptive responses to therapy. Thus, identifying the key modulators will be important for developing effective therapeutic strategies and predictive biomarkers. PMID:26191041

  14. Combination of heat shock protein 90 and focal adhesion kinase inhibitors synergistically inhibits the growth of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Webber, Philip J; Park, Chanhee; Qui, Min; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian; Du, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of effective drug combinations is a promising strategy to improve patient survival. This study explores the impact of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibition in combination with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor on the growth of non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC cells). Our data show that 17-N-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), a well-studied Hsp90 inhibitor, synergized with FAK inhibitor, PF-573228, on the growth inhibition of NSCLC cells. This combination effect was confirmed using additional chemically distinct Hsp90 inhibitor, STA-9090, which is currently undergoing phase 3 clinical evaluation. Co-treatment of NSCLC cells with Hsp90 and FAK inhibitors significantly enhanced the inhibition on long-term colony formation compared to that with single agent. Inhibition of FAK exacerbated the G2 cell cycle arrest and annexin-V apoptotic staining induced by 17-AAG. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the combination of Hsp90 and FAK inhibitors reduced the activity of canonical proliferative and survival Akt-mTOR signaling, and increased pro-apoptotic caspase activation. Interestingly, FAK inhibition alone induced feedback activation of pro-survival Erk signaling, which was abrogated by co-treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors. Both Hsp90 and FAK inhibitors are undergoing clinical evaluation. Our studies suggest the tandem of Hsp90 and FAK inhibitors may provide an effective treatment option for NSCLC patients.

  15. Matriptase is required for the active form of hepatocyte growth factor induced Met, focal adhesion kinase and protein kinase B activation on neural stem/progenitor cell motility.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jung-Da; Lee, Sheau-Ling

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a chemoattractant and inducer for neural stem/progenitor (NS/P) cell migration. Although the type II transmembrane serine protease, matriptase (MTP) is an activator of the latent HGF, MTP is indispensable on NS/P cell motility induced by the active form of HGF. This suggests that MTP's action on NS/P cell motility involves mechanisms other than proteolytic activation of HGF. In the present study, we investigate the role of MTP in HGF-stimulated signaling events. Using specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt) or focal adhesion kinase (FAK), we demonstrated that in NS/P cells HGF-activated c-Met induces PI3k-Akt signaling which then leads to FAK activation. This signaling pathway ultimately induces MMP2 expression and NS/P cell motility. Knocking down of MTP in NS/P cells with specific siRNA impaired HGF-stimulation of c-Met, Akt and FAK activation, blocked HGF-induced production of MMP2 and inhibited HGF-stimulated NS/P cell motility. MTP-knockdown NS/P cells cultured in the presence of recombinant protein of MTP protease domain or transfected with the full-length wild-type but not the protease-defected MTP restored HGF-responsive events in NS/P cells. In addition to functioning as HGF activator, our data revealed novel function of MTP on HGF-stimulated c-Met signaling activation.

  16. Correlation between Focal Nodular Low Signal Changes in Hoffa's Fat Pad Adjacent to Anterior Femoral Cartilage and Focal Cartilage Defect Underlying This Region and Its Possible Implication

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wuey Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigates the association between focal nodular mass with low signal in Hoffa's fat pad adjacent to anterior femoral cartilage of the knee (FNMHF) and focal cartilage abnormality in this region. Method. The magnetic resonance fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition sequence (MR FIESTA) sagittal and axial images of the B1 and C1 region (described later) of 148 patients were independently evaluated by two reviewers and categorized into four categories: normal, FNMHF with underlying focal cartilage abnormality, FNMHF with normal cartilage, and cartilage abnormality with no FNMHF. Results. There was a significant association (p = 0.00) between FNMHF and immediate adjacent focal cartilage abnormality with high interobserver agreement. The absence of focal nodular lesions next to the anterior femoral cartilage has a very high negative predictive value for chondral injury (97.8%). Synovial biopsy of focal nodular lesion done during arthroscopy revealed some fibrocollagenous tissue and no inflammatory cells. Conclusion. We postulate that the FNMHF adjacent to the cartilage defects is a form of normal healing response to the cartilage damage. One patient with FHMHF and underlying cartilage abnormality was rescanned six months later. In this patient, the FNMHF disappeared and normal cartilage was observed in the adjacent region which may support this theory. PMID:27213085

  17. Celecoxib exhibits an anti-gastric cancer effect by targeting focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guo-Hua; Xu, Wei; Shi, Yang; Wang, Li-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a prevalent cancer, which remains incurable, and therefore requires an alternative treatment method. Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that targets cyclooxygenase-2, and exhibits anticancer effects. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-GC mechanism of celecoxib using bioinformatics methods. Gene expression datasets GSE56807 (GC tissues and normal gastric tissues) and GSE54657 (celecoxib-treated and non-treated human GC epithelial AGS cells) were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Two groups of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using limma package in R language. The criterion for GSE56807 was a false discovery rate of <0.05, while that for GSE54657 was P<0.01. Overlapping DEGs from the two datasets were screened out. Subsequently, pathway enrichment analysis was performed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software (P<0.1; gene count ≥2). In addition, the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) among the overlapped DEGs were obtained based on IntAct, Database of Interacting Proteins, Biomolecular Interaction Network Database and Human Protein Reference Database. Finally, a PPI network was visualized using Cytoscape software. A total of 137 overlapped DEGs were obtained, and DEGs with opposite regulation directions in the two datasets were significantly enriched in focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration. Subsequently, a PPI network of overlapped DEGs was constructed. Comprehensively, a total of 8 key DEGs [cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), thrombospondin 1 (THBS1), myosin light chain 9 (MYL9), filamin A (FLNA), actinin alpha 1 (ACTN1), vinculin (VCL), laminin subunit gamma 2 (LAMC2) and claudin 1 (CLDN1)] were upregulated in GC tissues and downregulated in celecoxib-treated cells. In conclusion, celecoxib may exhibit anti-GC effects by suppressing the expression of CSRP1, THBS1, MYL9, FLNA, ACTN1, VCL, LAMC2 and CLDN1

  18. Celecoxib exhibits an anti-gastric cancer effect by targeting focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guo-Hua; Xu, Wei; Shi, Yang; Wang, Li-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a prevalent cancer, which remains incurable, and therefore requires an alternative treatment method. Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that targets cyclooxygenase-2, and exhibits anticancer effects. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-GC mechanism of celecoxib using bioinformatics methods. Gene expression datasets GSE56807 (GC tissues and normal gastric tissues) and GSE54657 (celecoxib-treated and non-treated human GC epithelial AGS cells) were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Two groups of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using limma package in R language. The criterion for GSE56807 was a false discovery rate of <0.05, while that for GSE54657 was P<0.01. Overlapping DEGs from the two datasets were screened out. Subsequently, pathway enrichment analysis was performed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software (P<0.1; gene count ≥2). In addition, the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) among the overlapped DEGs were obtained based on IntAct, Database of Interacting Proteins, Biomolecular Interaction Network Database and Human Protein Reference Database. Finally, a PPI network was visualized using Cytoscape software. A total of 137 overlapped DEGs were obtained, and DEGs with opposite regulation directions in the two datasets were significantly enriched in focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration. Subsequently, a PPI network of overlapped DEGs was constructed. Comprehensively, a total of 8 key DEGs [cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), thrombospondin 1 (THBS1), myosin light chain 9 (MYL9), filamin A (FLNA), actinin alpha 1 (ACTN1), vinculin (VCL), laminin subunit gamma 2 (LAMC2) and claudin 1 (CLDN1)] were upregulated in GC tissues and downregulated in celecoxib-treated cells. In conclusion, celecoxib may exhibit anti-GC effects by suppressing the expression of CSRP1, THBS1, MYL9, FLNA, ACTN1, VCL, LAMC2 and CLDN1

  19. Effect of bioactive extruded PLA/HA composite films on focal adhesion formation of preosteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Persson, Maria; Lorite, Gabriela S; Kokkonen, Hanna E; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lehenkari, Petri P; Skrifvars, Mikael; Tuukkanen, Juha

    2014-09-01

    The quality of the initial cell attachment to a biomaterial will influence any further cell function, including spreading, proliferation, differentiation and viability. Cell attachment is influenced by the material's ability to adsorb proteins, which is related to the surface chemistry and topography of the material. In this study, we incorporated hydroxyapatite (HA) particles into a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composite and evaluated the surface structure and the effects of HA density on the initial cell attachment in vitro of murine calvarial preosteoblasts (MC3T3-EI). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that the HA particles were successfully incorporated into the PLA matrix and located at the surface which is of importance in order to maintain the bioactive effect of the HA particles. SEM and AFM investigation revealed that the HA density (particles/area) as well as surface roughness increased with HA loading concentration (i.e. 5, 10, 15 and 20wt%), which promoted protein adsorption. Furthermore, the presence of HA on the surface enhanced cell spreading, increased the formation of actin stress fibers and significantly improved the expression of vinculin in MC3T3-E1 cells which is a key player in the regulation of cell adhesion. These results suggest the potential utility of PLA/HA composites as biomaterials for use as a bone substitute material and in tissue engineering applications. PMID:24986753

  20. NbN A/D Conversion of IR Focal Plane Sensor Signal at 10 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, L.; Durand, D.; Sandell, R.; Spargo, J.; Krabach, T.

    1994-01-01

    We are implementing a 12 bit SFQ counting ADC with parallel-to-serial readout using our established 10 K NbN capability. This circuit provides a key element of the analog signal processor (ASP) used in large infrared focal plane arrays. The circuit processes the signal data stream from a Si:As BIB detector array. A 10 mega samples per second (MSPS) pixel data stream flows from the chip at a 120 megabit bit rate in a format that is compatible with other superconductive time dependent processor (TDP) circuits being developed. We will discuss our planned ASP demonstration, the circuit design, and test results.

  1. Stimulation of human monocytes with macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces a Grb2-mediated association of the focal adhesion kinase pp125FAK and dynamin.

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, S; Saleem, A; Yuan, Z; Emoto, Y; Prasad, K V; Kufe, D

    1995-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is required for the growth and differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes. In the present studies using human monocytes, we show that M-CSF induces interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with the focal adhesion kinase pp125FAK. The results demonstrate that tyrosine-phosphorylated pp125FAK directly interacts with the SH2 domain of Grb2. The findings indicate that a pYENV site at Tyr-925 in pp125FAK is responsible for this interaction. We also demonstrate that the Grb2-FAK complex associates with the GTPase dynamin. Dynamin interacts with the SH3 domains of Grb2 and exhibits M-CSF-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation in association with pp125FAK. These findings suggest that M-CSF-induced signaling involves independent Grb2-mediated pathways, one leading to Ras activation and another involving pp125FAK and a GTPase implicated in receptor internalization. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7597091

  2. Vascular growth responses to chronic arterial occlusion are unaffected by myeloid specific focal adhesion kinase (FAK) deletion

    PubMed Central

    Heuslein, Joshua L.; Murrell, Kelsey P.; Leiphart, Ryan J.; Llewellyn, Ryan A.; Meisner, Joshua K.; Price, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Arteriogenesis, or the lumenal expansion of pre-existing arterioles in the presence of an upstream occlusion, is a fundamental vascular growth response. Though alterations in shear stress stimulate arteriogenesis, the migration of monocytes into the perivascular space surrounding collateral arteries and their differentiation into macrophages is critical for this vascular growth response to occur. Focal adhesion kinase’s (FAK) role in regulating cell migration has recently been expanded to primary macrophages. We therefore investigated the effect of the myeloid-specific conditional deletion of FAK on vascular remodeling in the mouse femoral arterial ligation (FAL) model. Using laser Doppler perfusion imaging, whole mount imaging of vascular casted gracilis muscles, and immunostaining for CD31 in gastrocnemius muscles cross-sections, we found that there were no statistical differences in perfusion recovery, arteriogenesis, or angiogenesis 28 days after FAL. We therefore sought to determine FAK expression in different myeloid cell populations. We found that FAK is expressed at equally low levels in Ly6Chi and Ly6Clo blood monocytes, however expression is increased over 2-fold in bone marrow derived macrophages. Ultimately, these results suggest that FAK is not required for monocyte migration to the perivascular space and that vascular remodeling following arterial occlusion occurs independently of myeloid specific FAK. PMID:27244251

  3. Proto-Oncogenic Src Phosphorylates EB1 to Regulate the Microtubule-Focal Adhesion Crosstalk and Stimulate Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Luo, Youguang; Lyu, Rui; Chen, Jie; Liu, Ruming; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration, a complex process critical for tumor progression and metastasis, requires a dynamic crosstalk between microtubules (MTs) and focal adhesions (FAs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this event remain elusive. Herein we identify the proto-oncogenic protein Src as an important player in the regulation of the MT-FA crosstalk. Src interacts with and phosphorylates end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs), both in cells and in vitro. Systematic mutagenesis reveals that tyrosine-247 (Y247) is the primary residue of EB1 phosphorylated by Src. Interestingly, both constitutively activated Src and Y247-phosphorylated EB1 localize to the centrosome and FAs. Src-mediated EB1 phosphorylation diminishes its interactions with other +TIPs, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and mitotic centromere associated kinesin (MCAK). In addition, EB1 phosphorylation at Y247 enhances the rate of MT catastrophe and significantly stimulates cell migration. These findings thus demonstrate that the Src-EB1 axis plays a crucial role in regulating the crosstalk between MTs and FAs to promote cell migration.

  4. Cell nanomechanics and focal adhesions are regulated by retinol and conjugated linoleic acid in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Yaron R; Yakubov, Gleb E; Horton, Michael A; Pelling, Andrew E

    2009-07-15

    Retinol and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) have previously been shown to have an important role in gene expression and various cellular processes, including differentiation, proliferation and cell death. In this study we have investigated the effect of retinol and CLA, both individually and in combination, on the intracellular cytoskeleton, focal adhesions (FAs) and the nanomechanical properties of 3T3 fibroblasts. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in the formation of FAs following treatment with either compound, which was directly correlated to an increase in cell height (>30%) and a decrease in the measured Young's modulus (approximately 28%). Furthermore, treatments with both compounds demonstrated an increased effect and led to a reduction of >70% in the average number of FAs per cell and a decrease of >50% in average cell stiffness. These data reveal that retinol and CLA disrupt FA formation, leading to an increase in cell height and a significant decrease in stiffness. These results may broaden our understanding of the interplay between cell nanomechanics and cellular contact with the external microenvironment, and help to shed light on the important role of retinoids and CLA in health and disease. PMID:19546491

  5. Exploring the interaction between human focal adhesion kinase and inhibitors: a molecular dynamic simulation and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiu-Yu; Zhang, Ji-Long; Wang, Yan; Li, Ye; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Zheng, Qing-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    Focal adhesion kinase is an important target for the treatment of many kinds of cancers. Inhibitors of FAK are proposed to be the anticancer agents for multiple tumors. The interaction characteristic between FAK and its inhibitors is crucial to develop new inhibitors. In the present article, we used Molecular Dynamic (MD) simulation method to explore the characteristic of interaction between FAK and three inhibitors (PHM16, TAE226, and ligand3). The MD simulation results together with MM-GB/SA calculations show that the combinations are enthalpy-driven process. Cys502 and Asp564 are both essential residues due to the hydrogen bond interactions with inhibitors, which was in good agreement with experimental data. Glu500 can form a non-classical hydrogen bond with each inhibitor. Arg426 can form electrostatic interactions with PHM16 and ligand3, while weaker with TAE226. The electronic static potential was employed, and we found that the ortho-position methoxy of TAE226 has a weaker negative charge than the meta-position one in PHM16 or ligand3. Ile428, Val436, Ala452, Val484, Leu501, Glu505, Glu506, Leu553, Gly563 Leu567, Ser568 are all crucial residues in hydrophobic interactions. The key residues in this work will be available for further inhibitor design of FAK and also give assistance to further research of cancer.

  6. Roles for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in blastomere abscission and vesicle trafficking during cleavage in the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    Schumpert, Brenda; García, María Guadalupe; Wessel, Gary M.; Wordeman, Linda; Hille, Merrill B.

    2014-01-01

    Is focal adhesion kinase (FAK) needed for embryonic cleavage? FAK is expressed during early cleavage divisions of sea urchin embryos as determined by polyclonal antibodies to the Lytechinus variegatus protein. FAK is absent in eggs and zygotes and then cycles in abundance during the first cleavages after fertilization, and is maximal at anaphase. Such cycling is consistent with the occurrence of a destruction box in the N-terminal sequence of L. variegatus FAK and the behavior of cyclins in sea urchin eggs. To investigate whether FAK is needed during early cleavage, we interfered with its function by microinjecting eggs with FAK antisense morpholino oligonucleotides or with anti-FAK antibodies. Both treatments led to regression of the cleavage furrow. FAK knockdown with morpholino oligonucleotides or antibodies also resulted in an over-accumulation of endocytic vesicles. Thus, FAK could be restricting endocytosis or increasing exocytosis in localized areas important for abscission. FAK appears to be necessary for successful cleavage. These results are the first to document a functional role for FAK during embryonic cleavage. PMID:23313141

  7. Vascular growth responses to chronic arterial occlusion are unaffected by myeloid specific focal adhesion kinase (FAK) deletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuslein, Joshua L.; Murrell, Kelsey P.; Leiphart, Ryan J.; Llewellyn, Ryan A.; Meisner, Joshua K.; Price, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    Arteriogenesis, or the lumenal expansion of pre-existing arterioles in the presence of an upstream occlusion, is a fundamental vascular growth response. Though alterations in shear stress stimulate arteriogenesis, the migration of monocytes into the perivascular space surrounding collateral arteries and their differentiation into macrophages is critical for this vascular growth response to occur. Focal adhesion kinase’s (FAK) role in regulating cell migration has recently been expanded to primary macrophages. We therefore investigated the effect of the myeloid-specific conditional deletion of FAK on vascular remodeling in the mouse femoral arterial ligation (FAL) model. Using laser Doppler perfusion imaging, whole mount imaging of vascular casted gracilis muscles, and immunostaining for CD31 in gastrocnemius muscles cross-sections, we found that there were no statistical differences in perfusion recovery, arteriogenesis, or angiogenesis 28 days after FAL. We therefore sought to determine FAK expression in different myeloid cell populations. We found that FAK is expressed at equally low levels in Ly6Chi and Ly6Clo blood monocytes, however expression is increased over 2-fold in bone marrow derived macrophages. Ultimately, these results suggest that FAK is not required for monocyte migration to the perivascular space and that vascular remodeling following arterial occlusion occurs independently of myeloid specific FAK.

  8. Conditional deletion of the focal adhesion kinase FAK alters remodeling of the blood-brain barrier in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jisook; Borboa, Alexandra; Chun, Hyun Bae; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas generally infiltrate the surrounding normal brain parenchyma, a process associated with increased vascular permeability (VP) and dysregulation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying glioma-induced VP in the brain remain poorly understood. Utilizing a conditional, endothelial-specific deletion of the focal adhesion kinase FAK in the mouse (FAK CKO), we show that FAK is critical for destabilization of the tumor endothelium in tumor-bearing mice, with mutant mice exhibiting a relatively stabilized vasculature to wild-type mice (FAK WT). Tumor vessels in the FAK CKO mice displayed reduced VP compared to FAK WT mice, resulting in reduced tumor growth. Additionally, FAK CKO mice displayed partial restoration of cell-cell junction proteins in the tumor vessels and astrocyte-endothelial interactions in tumors, revealing an additional role of astrocytes in mediating tumor-induced VP. Together, these results provide genetic evidence that FAK is a mediator of tumor-induced VP in the brain. Our findings may help understand how therapeutics might be used to regulate cell type-specific interactions to restore BBB structure/function in cancer and perhaps other pathological conditions. PMID:21159635

  9. Proto-Oncogenic Src Phosphorylates EB1 to Regulate the Microtubule-Focal Adhesion Crosstalk and Stimulate Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijun; Luo, Youguang; Lyu, Rui; Chen, Jie; Liu, Ruming; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration, a complex process critical for tumor progression and metastasis, requires a dynamic crosstalk between microtubules (MTs) and focal adhesions (FAs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this event remain elusive. Herein we identify the proto-oncogenic protein Src as an important player in the regulation of the MT-FA crosstalk. Src interacts with and phosphorylates end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs), both in cells and in vitro. Systematic mutagenesis reveals that tyrosine-247 (Y247) is the primary residue of EB1 phosphorylated by Src. Interestingly, both constitutively activated Src and Y247-phosphorylated EB1 localize to the centrosome and FAs. Src-mediated EB1 phosphorylation diminishes its interactions with other +TIPs, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and mitotic centromere associated kinesin (MCAK). In addition, EB1 phosphorylation at Y247 enhances the rate of MT catastrophe and significantly stimulates cell migration. These findings thus demonstrate that the Src-EB1 axis plays a crucial role in regulating the crosstalk between MTs and FAs to promote cell migration. PMID:27698945

  10. Focal adhesion kinase-promoted tumor glucose metabolism is associated with a shift of mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Gao, Q; Zhou, Y; Dier, U; Hempel, N; Hochwald, S N

    2016-04-14

    Cancer cells often gains a growth advantage by taking up glucose at a high rate and undergoing aerobic glycolysis through intrinsic cellular factors that reprogram glucose metabolism. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key transmitter of growth factor and anchorage stimulation, is aberrantly overexpressed or activated in most solid tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We determined whether FAK can act as an intrinsic driver to promote aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. FAK inhibition decreases and overexpression increases intracellular glucose levels during unfavorable conditions, including growth factor deficiency and cell detachment. Amplex glucose assay, fluorescence and carbon-13 tracing studies demonstrate that FAK promotes glucose consumption and glucose-to-lactate conversion. Extracellular flux analysis indicates that FAK enhances glycolysis and decreases mitochondrial respiration. FAK increases key glycolytic proteins, including enolase, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter. Furthermore, active/tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK directly binds to PKM2 and promotes PKM2-mediated glycolysis. On the other hand, FAK-decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I can result in reduced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Attenuation of FAK-enhanced glycolysis re-sensitizes cancer cells to growth factor withdrawal, decreases cell viability and reduces growth of tumor xenografts. These observations, for the first time, establish a vital role of FAK in cancer glucose metabolism through alterations in the OXPHOS-to-glycolysis balance. Broadly targeting the common phenotype of aerobic glycolysis and more specifically FAK-reprogrammed glucose metabolism will disrupt the bioenergetic and biosynthetic supply for uncontrolled growth of tumors, particularly glycolytic PDAC.

  11. Defining central themes in breast cancer biology by differential proteomics: conserved regulation of cell spreading and focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Sun, Mai; Hood, Brian L; Flint, Melanie S; Conrads, Thomas P

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease, an observation that underscores the importance of elucidating conserved molecular characteristics, such as gene and protein expression, across breast cancer cell types toward providing a greater understanding of context-specific features central to this disease. Motivated by the goal of defining central biological themes across breast cancer cell subtypes, we conducted a global proteomic analysis of three breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231, and compared these to a model of nontransformed mammary cells (MCF10A). Our results demonstrate modulation of proteins localized to the extracellular matrix, plasma membrane, and nucleus, along with coordinate decreases in proteins that regulate "cell spreading," a cellular event previously shown to be dysregulated in transformed cells. Protein interaction network analysis revealed the clustering of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a fundamental regulator of cell spreading, with several proteins identified as mutually, differentially abundant across breast cancer cell lines that impact expression and activity of FAK, such as neprilysin and keratin 19. These analyses provide insights into conservation of protein expression across breast cancer cell subtypes, a subset of which warrants further investigation for their roles in the regulation of cell spreading and FAK in breast cancer.

  12. Insulin-induced tyrosine dephosphorylation of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase requires active phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1D.

    PubMed Central

    Ouwens, D M; Mikkers, H M; van der Zon, G C; Stein-Gerlach, M; Ullrich, A; Maassen, J A

    1996-01-01

    Insulin stimulation of fibroblasts rapidly induces the tyrosine dephosphorylation of proteins of 68 kDa and 125 kDa, in addition to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor beta-chain, insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2, and Shc. Using specific antibodies, the 68 kDa and 125 kDa proteins were identified as paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) respectively. We have examined whether dephosphorylation of paxillin and pp125FAK requires interaction of the cells with the extracellular matrix. For this, cells were grown on poly(L-lysine) plates, and the tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin was increased by addition of lysophosphatidic acid. Under these conditions, insulin still induced the complete dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin, indicating that this process can occur independently of the interaction of integrins with extracellular matrix proteins. We also studied whether dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin results from the action of a phosphotyrosine phosphatase. It was found that phenylarsine oxide, a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, prevented the insulin-induced dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin. Furthermore, this insulin-induced dephosphorylation was also impaired in cells expressing a dominant-negative mutant of phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1D (PTP 1D). Thus we have identified paxillin as a target for dephosphorylation by insulin. In addition, we have obtained evidence that the insulin-mediated dephosphorylation of paxillin and pp125FAK requires active PTP 1D. PMID:8809054

  13. Annexin A6 contributes to the invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells by influencing the organization and localization of functional focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakwe, Amos M.; Koumangoye, Rainelli; Guillory, Bobby; Ochieng, Josiah

    2011-04-01

    The interaction of annexin A6 (AnxA6) with membrane phospholipids and either specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components or F-actin suggests that it may influence cellular processes associated with rapid plasma membrane reorganization such as cell adhesion and motility. Here, we examined the putative roles of AnxA6 in adhesion-related cellular processes that contribute to breast cancer progression. We show that breast cancer cells secrete annexins via the exosomal pathway and that the secreted annexins are predominantly cell surface-associated. Depletion of AnxA6 in the invasive BT-549 breast cancer cells is accompanied by enhanced anchorage-independent cell growth but cell-cell cohesion, cell adhesion/spreading onto collagen type IV or fetuin-A, cell motility and invasiveness were strongly inhibited. To explain the loss in adhesion/motility, we show that vinculin-based focal adhesions in the AnxA6-depleted BT-549 cells are elongated and randomly distributed. These focal contacts are also functionally defective because the activation of focal adhesion kinase and the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway were strongly inhibited while the MAP kinase pathway remained constitutively active. Compared with normal human breast tissues, reduced AnxA6 expression in breast carcinoma tissues correlates with enhanced cell proliferation. Together this suggests that reduced AnxA6 expression contributes to breast cancer progression by promoting the loss of functional cell-cell and/or cell-ECM contacts and anchorage-independent cell proliferation.

  14. Arp2/3 Inhibition Induces Amoeboid-Like Protrusions in MCF10A Epithelial Cells by Reduced Cytoskeletal-Membrane Coupling and Focal Adhesion Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Jonathan; Sayegh, Kareem; Campillo, Clement; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that Arp2/3 regulates a transition between mesenchymal and amoeboid protrusions in MCF10A epithelial cells. Using genetic and pharmacological means, we first show Arp2/3 inhibition impairs directed cell migration. Arp2/3 inhibition results in a dramatically impaired cell adhesion, causing deficient cell attachment and spreading to ECM as well as an 8-fold decrease in nascent adhesion assembly at the leading edge. While Arp2/3 does not play a significant role in myosin-dependent adhesion growth, mature focal adhesions undergo large scale movements against the ECM suggesting reduced coupling to the ECM. Cell edge protrusions occur at similar rates when Arp2/3 is inhibited but their morphology is dramatically altered. Persistent lamellipodia are abrogated and we observe a markedly increased incidence of blebbing and unstable pseuodopods. Micropipette-aspiration assays indicate that Arp2/3-inhibited cells have a weak coupling between the cell cortex and the plasma membrane, and suggest a potential mechanism for increased pseudopod and bleb formation. Pseudopods are not sensitive to reduced in formin or myosin II activity. Collectively, these results indicate that Arp2/3 is not necessary for rapid protrusion of the cell edge but plays a crucial role in assembling focal adhesions required for its stabilization. PMID:24967897

  15. Focal Adhesion-Chromatin Linkage Controls Tumor Cell Resistance to Radio- and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Katja; Cordes, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Cancer resistance to therapy presents an ongoing and unsolved obstacle, which has clear impact on patient's survival. In order to address this problem, novel in vitro models have been established and are currently developed that enable data generation in a more physiological context. For example, extracellular-matrix- (ECM-) based scaffolds lead to the identification of integrins and integrin-associated signaling molecules as key promoters of cancer cell resistance to radio- and chemotherapy as well as modern molecular agents. In this paper, we discuss the dynamic nature of the interplay between ECM, integrins, cytoskeleton, nuclear matrix, and chromatin organization and how this affects the response of tumor cells to various kinds of cytotoxic anticancer agents. PMID:22778951

  16. NMU signaling promotes endometrial cancer cell progression by modulating adhesion signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Wu, Fang-Ju; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) was originally named based on its strong uterine contractile activity, but little is known regarding its signaling/functions in utero. We identified that NMU and one of its receptors, NMUR2, are not only present in normal uterine endometrium but also co-expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, where the NMU level is correlated with the malignant grades and survival of patients. Cell-based assays further confirmed that NMU signaling can promote cell motility and proliferation of endometrial cancer cells derived from grade II tumors. Activation of NMU pathway in these endometrial cancer cells is required in order to sustain expression of various adhesion molecules, such as CD44 and integrin alpha1, as well as production of their corresponding extracellular matrix ligands, hyaluronan and collagen IV; it also increased the activity of SRC and its downstream proteins RHOA and RAC1. Thus, it is concluded that NMU pathway positively controls the adhesion signaling-SRC-Rho GTPase axis in the tested endometrial cancer cells and that changes in cell motility and proliferation can occur when there is manipulation of NMU signaling in these cells either in vitro or in vivo. Intriguingly, this novel mechanism also explains how NMU signaling promotes the EGFR-driven and TGFβ receptor-driven mesenchymal transitions. Through the above axis, NMU signaling not only can promote malignancy of the tested endometrial cancer cells directly, but also helps these cells to become more sensitive to niche growth factors in their microenvironment. PMID:26849234

  17. Accumulation of talin in nodes at the edge of the lamellipodium and separate incorporation into adhesion plaques at focal contacts in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The focal contact forms beneath F-actin-rich ribs, or cytoplasmic precursors, present in the lamellipodia of fibroblasts. The basal part of the precursor is retained at the contact as the initial adhesion plaque. We have examined the distribution of talin in the lamellipodia and adhesion plaques of chicken embryo fibroblasts relative to the process of focal contact formation. Motility of single cells was recorded with differential interference contrast or interference reflection microscopy before fixation and fluorescent staining for talin, F-actin, and vinculin. Talin is present along the extreme edge of the lamellipodium, where it is further concentrated into a series of nodes. The nodes of talin are present at the tips of both larger and finer F-actin-rich ribs and at small structural nodes at the edge of the lamellipodium. We suggest that the talin in the nodes functions, via a cross-linking activity, in the convergence of actin filaments at the membrane during development of the ribs. Talin accumulates de novo in the adhesion plaque, independent of that at the tip of the precursor, in response to contact with the substrate. This second accumulation of talin at the focal contact starts before vinculin, consistent with a sequential binding of talin at the membrane and of vinculin to talin. The results imply that talin functions independently at two steps during formation of the focal contact: the development of the F-actin-rich precursor of the contact; and development of the contact-associated adhesion plaque, both involving organization of F- actin at the membrane. PMID:1904445

  18. Reelin promotes the adhesion and drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells via integrin β1 signaling and STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Meng; Liang, Xiaodong; Dai, Hui; Qin, Xiaodan; Zhang, Yan; Hao, Jie; Sun, Xiuyuan; Yin, Yanhui; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that is essential for neuron migration and positioning. The expression of reelin in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its association with cell adhesion and survival were investigated. Overexpression, siRNA knockdown, and the addition of recombinant protein of reelin were used to examine the function of reelin in MM cells. Clinically, high expression of reelin was negatively associated with progression-free survival and overall survival. Functionally, reelin promoted the adhesion of MM cells to fibronectin via activation of α5β1 integrin. The resulting phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) led to the activation of Src/Syk/STAT3 and Akt, crucial signaling molecules involved in enhancing cell adhesion and protecting cells from drug-induced cell apoptosis. These findings indicate reelin's important role in the activation of integrin-β1 and STAT3/Akt pathways in multiple myeloma and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting reelin/integrin/FAK axis. PMID:26848618

  19. Divergent modulation of Rho‐kinase and Ca2+ influx pathways by Src family kinases and focal adhesion kinase in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shaifta, Yasin; Irechukwu, Nneka; Prieto‐Lloret, Jesus; MacKay, Charles E; Marchon, Keisha A; Ward, Jeremy P T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The importance of tyrosine kinases in airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Src‐family kinases (SrcFK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in GPCR‐mediated ASM contraction and associated signalling events. Experimental Approach Contraction was recorded in intact or α‐toxin permeabilized rat bronchioles. Phosphorylation of SrcFK, FAK, myosin light‐chain‐20 (MLC20) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit‐1 (MYPT‐1) was evaluated in cultured human ASM cells (hASMC). [Ca2+]i was evaluated in Fura‐2 loaded hASMC. Responses to carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and the contribution of SrcFK and FAK to these responses were determined. Key Results Contractile responses in intact bronchioles were inhibited by antagonists of SrcFK, FAK and Rho‐kinase, while after α‐toxin permeabilization, they were sensitive to inhibition of SrcFK and Rho‐kinase, but not FAK. CCh and BK increased phosphorylation of MYPT‐1 and MLC20 and auto‐phosphorylation of SrcFK and FAK. MYPT‐1 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibition of Rho‐kinase and SrcFK, but not FAK. Contraction induced by SR Ca2+ depletion and equivalent [Ca2+]i responses in hASMC were sensitive to inhibition of both SrcFK and FAK, while depolarization‐induced contraction was sensitive to FAK inhibition only. SrcFK auto‐phosphorylation was partially FAK‐dependent, while FAK auto‐phosphorylation was SrcFK‐independent. Conclusions and Implications SrcFK mediates Ca2+‐sensitization in ASM, while SrcFK and FAK together and individually influence multiple Ca2+ influx pathways. Tyrosine phosphorylation is therefore a key upstream signalling event in ASM contraction and may be a viable target for modulating ASM tone in respiratory disease. PMID:26294392

  20. Focal adhesion kinase regulates the activity of the osmosensitive transcription factor TonEBP/NFAT5 under hypertonic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Küper, Christoph; Lichtnekert, Julia; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Rupanagudi, Khader V.; Fraek, Maria-Luisa; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-Xaver

    2014-01-01

    TonEBP/NFAT5 is a major regulator of the urinary concentrating process and is essential for the osmoadaptation of renal medullary cells. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a mechanosensitive non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase expressed abundantly in the renal medulla. Since osmotic stress causes cell shrinkage, the present study investigated the contribution of FAK on TonEBP/NFAT5 activation. Osmotic stress induced time-dependent activation of FAK as evidenced by phosphorylation at Tyr-397, and furosemide reduces FAK Tyr-397 phosphorylation in the rat renal medulla. Both pharmacological inhibition of FAK and siRNA-mediated knockdown of FAK drastically reduced TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activity and target gene expression in HEK293 cells. This effect was not mediated by impaired nuclear translocation or by reduced transactivating activity of TonEBP/NFAT5. However, TonEBP/NFAT5 abundance under hypertonic conditions was diminished by 50% by FAK inhibition or siRNA knockdown of FAK. FAK inhibition only marginally reduced transcription of the TonEBP/NFAT5 gene. Rather, TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA stability was diminished significantly by FAK inhibition, which correlated with reduced reporter activity of the TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). In conclusion, FAK is a major regulator of TonEBP/NFAT5 activity by increasing its abundance via stabilization of the mRNA. This in turn, depends on the presence of the TonEBP/NFAT5 3′-UTR. PMID:24772088

  1. Focal adhesion kinase-promoted tumor glucose metabolism is associated with a shift of mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianliang; Gao, Qile; Zhou, Ying; Dier, Usawadee; Hempel, Nadine; Hochwald, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells often gains a growth advantage by taking up glucose at a high rate and undergoing aerobic glycolysis through intrinsic cellular factors that reprogram glucose metabolism. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key transmitter of growth factor and anchorage stimulation, is aberrantly overexpressed or activated in most solid tumors including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We determined whether FAK can act as an intrinsic driver to promote aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. FAK inhibition decreases and overexpression increases intracellular glucose levels during unfavorable conditions including growth factor deficiency and cell detachment. Amplex glucose assay, fluorescence and carbon-13 tracing studies demonstrate that FAK promotes glucose consumption and glucose-to-lactate conversion. Extracellular flux analysis indicates that FAK enhances glycolysis and decreases mitochondrial respiration. FAK increases key glycolytic proteins including enolase, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter. Furthermore, active/tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK directly binds to PKM2 and promotes PKM2-mediated glycolysis. On the other hand, FAK-decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I can result in reduced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Attenuation of FAK-enhanced glycolysis re-sensitizes cancer cells to growth factor withdrawal, decreases cell viability, and reduces growth of tumor xenografts. These observations, for the first time, establish a vital role of FAK in cancer glucose metabolism through alterations in the OXPHOS-to-glycolysis balance. Broadly targeting the common phenotype of aerobic glycolysis and more specifically FAK-reprogrammed glucose metabolism will disrupt the bioenergetic and biosynthetic supply for uncontrolled growth of tumors, particularly glycolytic PDAC. PMID:26119934

  2. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity prevents anchorage-independent ovarian carcinoma cell growth and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kristy K.; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lawson, Christine; Miller, Nichol L.G.; Jean, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Uryu, Sean; Kim, Josephine; Tarin, David; Stupack, Dwayne G.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence and spread of ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of death for women in the United States. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase located on chromosome 8q24.3 (gene is Ptk2), a site commonly amplified in serous ovarian cancer. Elevated FAK mRNA levels in serous ovarian carcinoma are associated with decreased (logrank P = 0.0007, hazard ratio 1.43) patient overall survival, but how FAK functions in tumor progression remains undefined. We have isolated aggressive ovarian carcinoma cells termed ID8-IP after intraperitoneal (IP) growth of murine ID8 cells in C57Bl6 mice. Upon orthotopic implantation within the periovarian bursa space, ID8-IP cells exhibit greater tumor growth, local and distant metastasis, and elevated numbers of ascites-associated cells compared to parental ID8 cells. ID8-IP cells exhibit enhanced growth under non-adherent conditions with elevated FAK and c-Src tyrosine kinase activation compared to parental ID8 cells. In vitro, the small molecule FAK inhibitor (Pfizer, PF562,271, PF-271) at 0.1 uM selectively prevented anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell growth with the inhibition of FAK tyrosine (Y)397 but not c-Src Y416 phosphorylation. Oral PF-271 administration (30 mg/kg, twice daily) blocked FAK but not c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation in ID8-IP tumors. This was associated with decreased tumor size, prevention of peritoneal metastasis, reduced tumor-associated endothelial cell number, and increased tumor cell-associated apoptosis. FAK knockdown and re-expression assays showed that FAK activity selectively promoted anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell survival. These results support the continued evaluation of FAK inhibitors as a promising clinical treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:23275034

  3. LKB1 kinase-dependent and -independent defects disrupt polarity and adhesion signaling to drive collagen remodeling during invasion

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Lee, Byoungkoo; Fu, Haian; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Marcus, Adam I.

    2016-01-01

    LKB1 is a serine/threonine kinase and a commonly mutated gene in lung adenocarcinoma. The majority of LKB1 mutations are truncations that disrupt its kinase activity and remove its C-terminal domain (CTD). Because LKB1 inactivation drives cancer metastasis in mice and leads to aberrant cell invasion in vitro, we sought to determine how compromised LKB1 function affects lung cancer cell polarity and invasion. Using three-dimensional models, we show that LKB1 kinase activity is essential for focal adhesion kinase–mediated cell adhesion and subsequent collagen remodeling but not cell polarity. Instead, cell polarity is overseen by the kinase-independent function of its CTD and more specifically its farnesylation. This occurs through a mesenchymal-amoeboid morphological switch that signals through the Rho-GTPase RhoA. These data suggest that a combination of kinase-dependent and -independent defects by LKB1 inactivation creates a uniquely invasive cell with aberrant polarity and adhesion signaling that drives invasion into the microenvironment. PMID:26864623

  4. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  5. Abl promotes cadherin-dependent adhesion and signaling in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Krauss, Robert S

    2010-07-15

    Cell-cell contact promotes myogenic differentiation but the mechanisms that regulate this phenomenon are not well understood. Cdo (also known as Cdon), an Ig superfamily member, functions as a component of cell surface complexes to promote myogenic differentiation through activation of p38alpha/beta MAP kinase. We recently showed that N-cadherin ligation activated p38alpha/beta in a Cdo-dependent manner, whereas N-cadherin ligation-dependent activation of ERK MAP kinase was not affected by loss of Cdo. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abl associates with Cdo during myoblast differentiation and is necessary for full activition of p38alpha/beta during this process. The Abl SH3 domain binds to a PxxP motif in the Cdo intracellular domain, and both these motifs are required for their promyogenic activity. Here we show that Abl is necessary for p38alpha/beta activation initiated by N-cadherin ligation, but in contrast to Cdo, Abl is also required for N-cadherin-dependent ERK activation. Moreover, Abl is required for efficient cadherin-mediated myoblast aggregation via modulation of RhoA-ROCK signaling. Therefore, Abl regulates N-cadherin-mediated p38alpha/beta activation by multiple mechanisms, more generally through regulation of cell-cell adhesion and specifically as a component of Cdo-containing complexes. The role of Cdo as a multifunctional coreceptor with roles in several pathways is also discussed.

  6. Coherent Optical Focal Plane Array Receiver for PPM Signals: Investigation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Michela Munoz

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a coherent optical focal plane array receiver for PPM signals under atmospheric turbulence is investigated and applications of this system are addressed. The experimental demonstration of this project has already been explained in previous publications [1]. This article shows a more exhaustive analysis of the expressions needed to obtain the Bit Error Rate (BER) for the real system under study in the laboratory. Selected experimental results of this system are described and compared with theoretical BER expressions, and array combining gains are presented. Receiver sensitivity in terms of photons per bit (PPB) is examined; BER results are shown as a function of signal to noise ratios, (SNR), as well as a function of photons per symbol, and photons per bit.

  7. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  8. Selective binding and lateral clustering of α5β1 and αvβ3 integrins: Unraveling the spatial requirements for cell spreading and focal adhesion assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schaufler, Viktoria; Czichos-Medda, Helmi; Hirschfeld-Warnecken, Vera; Neubauer, Stefanie; Rechenmacher, Florian; Medda, Rebecca; Kessler, Horst; Geiger, Benjamin; Spatz, Joachim P.; Cavalcanti-Adam, E. Ada

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coordination of the specific functions of α5β1 and αvβ3 integrins is crucial for the precise regulation of cell adhesion, spreading and migration, yet the contribution of differential integrin-specific crosstalk to these processes remains unclear. To determine the specific functions of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins, we used nanoarrays of gold particles presenting immobilized, integrin-selective peptidomimetic ligands. Integrin binding to the peptidomimetics is highly selective, and cells can spread on both ligands. However, spreading is faster and the projected cell area is greater on α5β1 ligand; both depend on ligand spacing. Quantitative analysis of adhesion plaques shows that focal adhesion size is increased in cells adhering to αvβ3 ligand at 30 and 60 nm spacings. Analysis of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrin clusters indicates that fibrillar adhesions are more prominent in cells adhering to α5β1 ligand, while clusters are mostly localized at the cell margins in cells adhering to αvβ3 ligand. αvβ3 integrin clusters are more pronounced on αvβ3 ligand, though they can also be detected in cells adhering to α5β1 ligand. Furthermore, α5β1 integrin clusters are present in cells adhering to α5β1 ligand, and often colocalize with αvβ3 clusters. Taken together, these findings indicate that the activation of αvβ3 integrin by ligand binding is dispensable for initial adhesion and spreading, but essential to formation of stable focal adhesions. PMID:27003228

  9. alpha2-Adrenoceptor stimulation promotes actin polymerization and focal adhesion in 3T3F442A and BFC-1beta preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Bétuing, S; Daviaud, D; Valet, P; Bouloumié, A; Lafontan, M; Saulnier-Blache, J S

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that in white fat cell precursors alpha2-adrenoceptor stimulation lead to the phosphorylation of p44 and p42 mitogen-activated protein kinases and an increase in cell number. Regulation of cell adhesion and cell cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in the control of cell growth by various growth factors. Here, we report that in mouse 3T3F442A preadipocytes expressing 2500 fmol/mg protein of the human alpha2C10-adrenoceptor (alpha2AF2 cells), alpha2-adrenergic stimulation rapidly restored the spreading of cells previously retracted by serum withdrawal. This effect was pertussis toxin sensitive and was blocked by pretreatment of the cells with dihydrocytochalasin B (a blocker of actin polymerization), genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor), or agents that increase cell cAMP content. Spreading was accompanied by cell membrane ruffling, formation of lamelipodia and filipodia, appearance of focal adhesion plaques, and induction of actin stress fibers. alpha2-Adrenergic stimulation also lead to a rapid Gi- and actin-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the pp125 focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as of the p42 and p44 mitogen-activated protein kinases. alpha2-Adrenergic-dependent spreading and FAK and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation were also observed in 3T3F442A preadipocytes permanently expressing 20 fmol/mg protein of the human alpha2C10-adrenoceptor (alpha2AF3 cells) as well as in BFC-1beta preadipocytes, which constitutively express 25 fmol/mg protein of mouse alpha2A-adrenoceptors. In BFC-1beta preadipocytes, alpha2-adrenergic-dependent spreading and pp125FAK phosphorylation were counteracted by beta-adrenergic stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha2-adrenergic control of actin polymerization and focal adhesion assembly could play a crucial role in the regulation of preadipocyte growth by the sympathetic nervous system.

  10. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2–59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction. PMID:26282580

  11. Desmosomes: Regulators of Cellular Signaling and Adhesion in Epidermal Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jodi L.; Najor, Nicole A.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that mediate cell–cell adhesion and anchor the intermediate filament network to the plasma membrane, providing mechanical resilience to tissues such as the epidermis and heart. In addition to their critical roles in adhesion, desmosomal proteins are emerging as mediators of cell signaling important for proper cell and tissue functions. In this review we highlight what is known about desmosomal proteins regulating adhesion and signaling in healthy skin—in morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis, wound healing, and protection against environmental damage. We also discuss how human diseases that target desmosome molecules directly or interfere indirectly with these mechanical and signaling functions to contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25368015

  12. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) interferes with endothelial cell migration by inhibition of both the Erk pathway and focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Provençal, Mathieu; Michaud, Marisol; Beaulieu, Edith; Ratel, David; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; Gingras, Denis; Béliveau, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a plasma Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor that is mainly known for its inhibition of tissue factor-mediated coagulation. In addition to its anticoagulant properties, emerging data show that TFPI may also regulate endothelial cell functions via a non-haemostatic pathway. In this work we demonstrate that at concentrations within the physiological range, TFPI inhibits both endothelial cell migration and their differentiation into capillary-like structures in vitro. These effects were specific to endothelial cells since no inhibitory effect was observed on the migration of tumor (glioblastoma) cells. Inhibition of endothelial cell migration was correlated with a concomitant loss in cell adhesion, suggesting an alteration of focal adhesion complex integrity. Accordingly, we observed that TFPI inhibited the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin, two key proteins involved in the scaffolding of these complexes, and that this effect was specific to endothelial cells. These results suggest that TFPI influences the angiogenic process via a non-haemostatic pathway, by downregulating the migratory mechanisms of endothelial cells. PMID:18327407

  13. Rgnef (p190RhoGEF) Knockout Inhibits RhoA Activity, Focal Adhesion Establishment, and Cell Motility Downstream of Integrins

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nichol L. G.; Lawson, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell migration is a highly regulated process that involves the formation and turnover of cell-matrix contact sites termed focal adhesions. Rho-family GTPases are molecular switches that regulate actin and focal adhesion dynamics in cells. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate Rho-family GTPases. Rgnef (p190RhoGEF) is a ubiquitous 190 kDa GEF implicated in the control of colon carcinoma and fibroblast cell motility. Principal Findings Rgnef exon 24 floxed mice (Rgnefflox) were created and crossed with cytomegalovirus (CMV)-driven Cre recombinase transgenic mice to inactivate Rgnef expression in all tissues during early development. Heterozygous RgnefWT/flox (Cre+) crosses yielded normal Mendelian ratios at embryonic day 13.5, but Rgnefflox/flox (Cre+) mice numbers at 3 weeks of age were significantly less than expected. Rgnefflox/flox (Cre+) (Rgnef−/−) embryos and primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) were isolated and verified to lack Rgnef protein expression. When compared to wildtype (WT) littermate MEFs, loss of Rgnef significantly inhibited haptotaxis migration, wound closure motility, focal adhesion number, and RhoA GTPase activation after fibronectin-integrin stimulation. In WT MEFs, Rgnef activation occurs within 60 minutes upon fibronectin plating of cells associated with RhoA activation. Rgnef−/− MEF phenotypes were rescued by epitope-tagged Rgnef re-expression. Conclusions Rgnef−/− MEF phenotypes were due to Rgnef loss and support an essential role for Rgnef in RhoA regulation downstream of integrins in control of cell migration. PMID:22649559

  14. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  15. Cell-cell signaling and adhesion in phagocytosis and early development of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Bracco, E; Pergolizzi, B; Peracino, B; Ponte, E; Balbo, A; Mai, A; Ceccarelli, A; Bozzaro, S

    2000-01-01

    Cell-cell signaling and adhesion regulate transition from the unicellular to the multicellular stage of development in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. Essential gene networks involved in these processes have been identified and their interplay dissected. Heterotrimeric G protein-linked signal transduction plays a key role in regulating expression of genes mediating chemotaxis or cell adhesion, as well as coordinating actin-based cell motility during phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Two classes of cell adhesion molecules, one cadherin-like and the second belonging to the IgG superfamily, contribute to the strength of adhesion in Dictyostelium aggregates. The developmental role of genes involved in motility and adhesion, and their degree of redundancy, have been re-assessed by using novel developmental assay conditions which are closer to development in nature. PMID:11061438

  16. T6BP and NDP52 are myosin VI binding partners with potential roles in cytokine signalling and cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Morriswood, Brooke; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Puri, Claudia; Arden, Susan D.; Roberts, Rhys; Dendrou, Calliope; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2009-01-01

    Summary Myosin VI has been implicated in many cellular processes including endocytosis, secretion, membrane ruffling and cell motility. We carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified TRAF6-binding protein (T6BP) and nuclear dot protein 52 (NDP52) as myosin VI binding partners. Myosin VI interaction with T6BP and NDP52 was confirmed in vitro and in vivo and the binding sites on each protein were accurately mapped. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy showed that T6BP, NDP52 and myosin VI are present at the trans side of the Golgi complex, and on vesicles in the perinuclear region. Although the SKICH domain in T6BP and NDP52 does not mediate recruitment into membrane ruffles, loss of T6BP and NDP52 in RNAi knockdown cells results in reduced membrane ruffling activity and increased stress fibre and focal adhesion formation. Furthermore, we observed in these knockdown cells an upregulation of constitutive secretion of alkaline phosphatase, implying that both proteins act as negative regulators of secretory traffic at the Golgi complex. T6BP was also found to inhibit NF-κB activation, implicating it in the regulation of TRAF6-mediated cytokine signalling. Thus myosin VI-T6BP interactions may link membrane trafficking pathways with cell adhesion and cytokine-dependent cell signalling. PMID:17635994

  17. Integrin-mediated adhesion complex: Cooption of signaling systems at the dawn of Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2010-09-01

    The integrin-mediated adhesion machinery is the primary cell-matrix adhesion mechanism in Metazoa. The integrin adhesion complex, which modulates important aspects of the cell physiology, is composed of integrins (alpha and beta subunits) and several scaffolding and signaling proteins. Integrins appeared to be absent in all non-metazoan eukaryotes so-far analyzed, including fungi, plants and choanoflagellates, the sister-group to Metazoa. Thus, integrins and, therefore, the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling mechanism was considered a metazoan innovation. Recently, a broad comparative genomic analysis including new genome data from several unicellular organisms closely related to fungi and metazoans shattered previous views. The integrin adhesion and signaling complex is not specific to Metazoa, but rather it is present in apusozoans and holozoan protists. Thus, this important signaling and adhesion system predated the origin of Fungi and Metazoa, and was subsequently lost in fungi and choanoflagellates. This finding suggests that cooption played a more important role in the origin of Metazoa than previously believed. Here, we hypothesize that the integrin adhesome was ancestrally involved in signaling.

  18. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  19. Identification, purification, and characterization of a zyxin-related protein that binds the focal adhesion and microfilament protein VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein).

    PubMed

    Reinhard, M; Jouvenal, K; Tripier, D; Walter, U

    1995-08-15

    VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein), an established substrate of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases in vitro and in living cells, is associated with focal adhesions, microfilaments, and membrane regions of high dynamic activity. Here, the identification of an 83-kDa protein (p83) that specifically binds VASP in blot overlays of different cell homogenates is reported. With VASP overlays as a detection tool, p83 was purified from porcine platelets and used to generate monospecific polyclonal antibodies. VASP binding to purified p83 in solid-phase binding assays and the closely matching subcellular localization in double-label immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that both proteins also directly interact as native proteins in vitro and possibly in living cells. The subcellular distribution, the biochemical properties, as well as microsequencing data revealed that porcine platelet p83 is related to chicken gizzard zyxin and most likely represents the mammalian equivalent of the chicken protein. The VASP-p83 interaction may contribute to the targeting of VASP to focal adhesions, microfilaments, and dynamic membrane regions. Together with our recent identification of VASP as a natural ligand of the profilin poly-(L-proline) binding site, our present results suggest that, by linking profilin to zyxin/p83, VASP may participate in spatially confined profilin-regulated F-actin formation.

  20. Identification, purification, and characterization of a zyxin-related protein that binds the focal adhesion and microfilament protein VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein).

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, M; Jouvenal, K; Tripier, D; Walter, U

    1995-01-01

    VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein), an established substrate of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases in vitro and in living cells, is associated with focal adhesions, microfilaments, and membrane regions of high dynamic activity. Here, the identification of an 83-kDa protein (p83) that specifically binds VASP in blot overlays of different cell homogenates is reported. With VASP overlays as a detection tool, p83 was purified from porcine platelets and used to generate monospecific polyclonal antibodies. VASP binding to purified p83 in solid-phase binding assays and the closely matching subcellular localization in double-label immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that both proteins also directly interact as native proteins in vitro and possibly in living cells. The subcellular distribution, the biochemical properties, as well as microsequencing data revealed that porcine platelet p83 is related to chicken gizzard zyxin and most likely represents the mammalian equivalent of the chicken protein. The VASP-p83 interaction may contribute to the targeting of VASP to focal adhesions, microfilaments, and dynamic membrane regions. Together with our recent identification of VASP as a natural ligand of the profilin poly-(L-proline) binding site, our present results suggest that, by linking profilin to zyxin/p83, VASP may participate in spatially confined profilin-regulated F-actin formation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7644520

  1. PGE2 inhibition of TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation is Smad-independent but involves cell shape and adhesion-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peedikayil E.; Peters-Golden, Marc; White, Eric S.; Thannickal, Victor J.; Moore, Bethany B.

    2010-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are pathogenic in pulmonary fibrotic disease due to their exuberant production of matrix rich in collagen that interferes with gas exchange and the ability of these cells to contract and distort the alveolar space. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well-known inducer of myofibroblast differentiation. TGF-β1-induced transformation of fibroblasts to apoptosis-resistant myofibroblasts is adhesion-dependent and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-mediated. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) inhibits this differentiation via E prostanoid receptor 2 (EP2) signaling and cAMP elevation, but whether PGE2 does so by interfering with TGF-β1 signaling is unknown. Thus we examined the effects of PGE2 in the presence and absence of TGF-β1 stimulation on candidate signaling pathways in human lung fibroblasts. We now demonstrate that PGE2 does not interfere with TGF-β1-induced Smad phosphorylation or its translocation to the nucleus. Rather, PGE2 has dramatic effects on cell shape and cytoskeletal architecture and disrupts the formation of appropriate focal adhesions. PGE2 treatment diminishes TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of paxillin, STAT-3, and FAK and, in turn, limits activation of the protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) pathway. These alterations do not, however, result in increased apoptosis within the first 24 h of treatment. Interestingly, the effects of PGE2 stimulation alone do not always mirror the effects of PGE2 in the presence of TGF-β1, indicating that the context for EP2 signaling is different in the presence of TGF-β1. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PGE2 has the potential to limit TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation via adhesion-dependent, but Smad-independent, pathways. PMID:17557799

  2. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  3. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour.

    PubMed

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E; Klip, Janna E; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J; Danen, Erik H J; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  4. Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibitors in Combination with Erlotinib Demonstrate Enhanced Anti-Tumor Activity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Grant A.; Xiao, Bin; Zhao, Huijun; Al-Zahrani, Khalid N.; Hasim, Mohamed S.; Villeneuve, James; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S.; Goss, Glenwood D.; Sabourin, Luc A.; Dimitroulakos, Jim; Addison, Christina L.

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity has been a primary therapeutic target for non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). As patients with wild-type EGFR have demonstrated only modest benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), there is a need for additional therapeutic approaches in patients with wild-type EGFR. As a key component of downstream integrin signalling and known receptor cross-talk with EGFR, we hypothesized that targeting focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, which has also been shown to correlate with aggressive stage in NSCLC, would lead to enhanced activity of EGFR TKIs. As such, EGFR TKI-resistant NSCLC cells (A549, H1299, H1975) were treated with the EGFR TKI erlotinib and FAK inhibitors (PF-573,228 or PF-562,271) both as single agents and in combination. We determined cell viability, apoptosis and 3-dimensional growth in vitro and assessed tumor growth in vivo. Treatment of EGFR TKI-resistant NSCLC cells with FAK inhibitor alone effectively inhibited cell viability in all cell lines tested; however, its use in combination with the EGFR TKI erlotinib was more effective at reducing cell viability than either treatment alone when tested in both 2- and 3-dimensional assays in vitro, with enhanced benefit seen in A549 cells. This increased efficacy may be due in part to the observed inhibition of Akt phosphorylation when the drugs were used in combination, where again A549 cells demonstrated the most inhibition following treatment with the drug combination. Combining erlotinib with FAK inhibitor was also potent in vivo as evidenced by reduced tumor growth in the A549 mouse xenograft model. We further ascertained that the enhanced sensitivity was irrespective of the LKB1 mutational status. In summary, we demonstrate the effectiveness of combining erlotinib and FAK inhibitors for use in known EGFR wild-type, EGFR TKI resistant cells, with the potential that a subset of cell types, which includes A549, could be particularly

  5. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  6. Vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, inhibits migration through inhibition of PDGF signaling and enhancement of cell adhesiveness in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Eng-Thaim; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Huang, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2011-10-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in normal vessel formation and in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Grape plants contain resveratrol monomer and oligomers and drinking of wine made from grape has been linked to 'French Paradox'. In this study we evaluated the effect of vitisin B, a resveratrol tetramer, on VSMC behaviors. Vitisin B inhibited basal and PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Strikingly, it did not inhibit VSMC proliferation but inversely enhanced cell cycle progression and proliferation. Among the tested resveratrol oligomers, vitisin B showed an excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity on PDGF signaling. The anti-migratory effect by vitisin B was due to direct inhibition on PDGF signaling but was independent of interference with PDGF binding to VSMCs. Moreover, the enhanced VSMC adhesiveness to matrix contributed to the anti-migratory effect by vitisin B. Fluorescence microscopy revealed an enhanced reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and redistribution of activated focal adhesion proteins from cytosol to the peripheral edge of the cell membrane. This was confirmed by the observation that enhanced adhesiveness was repressed by the Src inhibitor. Finally, among the effects elicited by vitisin B, only the inhibitory effect toward basal migration was partially through estrogen receptor activation. We have demonstrated here that a resveratrol tetramer exhibited dual but opposite actions on VSMCs, one is to inhibit VSMC migration and the other is to promote VSMC proliferation. The anti-migratory effect was through a potent inhibition on PDGF signaling and novel enhancement on cell adhesion. - Highlights: > Several resveratrol oligomers from grape plants are examined on VSMC behaviors. > Tetraoligomer vitisin B shows excellent inhibitory activity and selectivity. > It exerts dual but opposing actions: anti-migratory and pro-proliferative effects. > The anti-migratory effect results from anti-PDGF signaling

  7. Hyperintense cortical signal on MRI reflects focal leukocortical encephalitis and seizure risk in PML

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Michael N.; Alsop, David C.; Agnihotri, Shruti P.; Pfannl, Rolf; Wuthrich, Christian; Ho, Mai-Lan; Hackney, David; Ngo, Long; Anderson, Matthew P.; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency of hyperintense cortical signal (HCS) on T1-weighted pre-contrast MRI in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) patients, its association with seizure risk and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), and its pathologic correlate. Methods We reviewed clinical data including seizure history, presence of IRIS, and MRI scans from PML patients evaluated at our institution between 2003 and 2012. Cases that were diagnosed either by CSF JC Virus (JCV) PCR, brain biopsy or autopsy, and who had MRI images available were included in the analysis (n=49). We characterized pathologic findings in areas of the brain displaying HCS in two patients and compared them with isointense cortex in the same individuals. Results Of 49 patients, 17 (34.7%) had seizures and 30 (61.2%) had HCS adjacent to subcortical PML lesions on MRI. Of the 17 PML patients with seizures, 15 (88.2%) had HCS compared to 15/32 (46.9%) patients without seizures (p= 0.006). HCS was associated with seizure development with a relative risk (RR) of 4.75 (95% confidence interval of 1.2 to 18.5; p=0.006). Of the 20 patients with IRIS, 16 (80.0%) had HCS compared to 14/29 (49.3%) of those without IRIS (p=0.04). On histological examination, HCS areas were associated with striking JCV-associated demyelination of cortical and sub-cortical U-fibers, significant macrophage infiltration and a pronounced reactive gliosis in the deep cortical layers. Interpretation Seizures are a frequent complication in PML. HCS is associated with seizures as well as IRIS, and correlates histologically with JCV focal leukocortical encephalitis (JCV FLE). PMID:24752885

  8. C3G forms complexes with Bcr-Abl and p38α MAPK at the focal adhesions in chronic myeloid leukemia cells: implication in the regulation of leukemic cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies by our group and others have shown that C3G interacts with Bcr-Abl through its SH3-b domain. Results In this work we show that C3G and Bcr-Abl form complexes with the focal adhesion (FA) proteins CrkL, p130Cas, Cbl and Abi1 through SH3/SH3-b interactions. The association between C3G and Bcr-Abl decreased upon Abi1 or p130Cas knock-down in K562 cells, which suggests that Abi1 and p130Cas are essential partners in this interaction. On the other hand, C3G, Abi1 or Cbl knock-down impaired adhesion to fibronectin, while p130Cas silencing enhanced it. C3G, Cbl and p130Cas-SH3-b domains interact directly with common proteins involved in the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that C3G form complexes with the FA proteins paxillin and FAK and their phosphorylated forms. Additionally, C3G, Abi1, Cbl and p130Cas regulate the expression and phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK. p38α MAPK also participates in the regulation of adhesion in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. It interacts with C3G, CrkL, FAK and paxillin and regulates the expression of paxillin, CrkL and α5 integrin, as well as paxillin phosphorylation. Moreover, double knock-down of C3G/p38α decreased adhesion to fibronectin, similarly to the single silencing of one of these genes, either C3G or p38α. These suggest that C3G and p38α MAPK are acting through a common pathway to regulate cell adhesion in K562 cells, as previously described for the regulation of apoptosis. Conclusions Our results indicate that C3G-p38αMAPK pathway regulates K562 cell adhesion through the interaction with FA proteins and Bcr-Abl, modulating the formation of different protein complexes at FA. PMID:23343344

  9. Deregulation of focal adhesion pathway mediated by miR-659-3p is implicated in bone marrow infiltration of stage M neuroblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Stigliani, Sara; Scaruffi, Paola; Lagazio, Corrado; Persico, Luca; Carlini, Barbara; Varesio, Luigi; Morandi, Fabio; Morini, Martina; Gigliotti, Anna Rita; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Viscardi, Elisabetta; Cecinati, Valerio; Conte, Massimo; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2015-05-30

    To get insights on the metastatic process of human neuroblastoma (NB), the miRNA expression profile of bone marrow (BM)-infiltrating cells has been determined and compared to that of primary tumors.Twenty-two BM-infiltrating cells, 22 primary tumors, and 4 paired samples from patients with metastatic NB aged > 12 months were analyzed for the expression of 670 miRNAs by stem-loop RT-qPCR. The miRNAs whose expression was significantly different were subjected to selection criteria, and 20 selected miRNAs were tested in 10 additional BM-infiltrating cells and primary tumors. Among the miRNAs confirmed to be differentially expressed, miR-659-3p was further analyzed. Transfection of miR-659-3p mimic and inhibitor demonstrated the specific suppression and over-expression, respectively, of the miR-659-3p target gene CNOT1, a regulator of transcription of genes containing AU-rich element (ARE) sequence. Among the ARE-containing genes, miR-659-3p mimic and inhibitor specifically modified the expression of AKT3, BCL2, CYR61 and THSB2, belonging to the focal adhesion pathway. Most importantly, in BM-infiltrating cells CNOT1 expression was significantly higher, and that of AKT3, BCL2, THSB2 and CYR61 was significantly lower than in primary tumors. Thus, our study suggests a role of the focal adhesion pathway, regulated by miR-659-3p through CNOT1, in the human NB metastatic process. PMID:25980492

  10. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Robert S.

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre and Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed.

  11. Adhesive and Signaling Functions of Cadherins and Catenins in Vertebrate Development

    PubMed Central

    Stepniak, Ewa; Radice, Glenn L.; Vasioukhin, Valeri

    2009-01-01

    Properly regulated intercellular adhesion is critical for normal development of all metazoan organisms. Adherens junctions play an especially prominent role in development because they link the adhesive function of cadherin–catenin protein complexes to the dynamic forces of the actin cytoskeleton, which helps to orchestrate a spatially confined and very dynamic assembly of intercellular connections. Intriguingly, in addition to maintaining intercellular adhesion, cadherin–catenin proteins are linked to several major developmental signaling pathways crucial for normal morphogenesis. In this article we will highlight the key genetic studies that uncovered the role of cadherin–catenin proteins in vertebrate development and discuss the potential role of these proteins as molecular biosensors of external cellular microenvironment that may spatially confine signaling molecules and polarity cues to orchestrate cellular behavior throughout the complex process of normal morphogenesis. PMID:20066120

  12. Rac1 Controls the Subcellular Localization of the Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Net1A To Regulate Focal Adhesion Formation and Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Heather S.; Morris, Christopher A.; Menon, Sarita; Song, Eun Hyeon

    2013-01-01

    RhoA is overexpressed in human cancer and contributes to aberrant cell motility and metastatic progression; however, regulatory mechanisms controlling RhoA activity in cancer are poorly understood. Neuroepithelial transforming gene 1 (Net1) is a RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is overexpressed in human cancer. It encodes two isoforms, Net1 and Net1A, which cycle between the nucleus and plasma membrane. Net1 proteins must leave the nucleus to activate RhoA, but mechanisms controlling the extranuclear localization of Net1 isoforms have not been described. Here, we show that Rac1 activation causes relocalization of Net1 isoforms outside the nucleus and stimulates Net1A catalytic activity. These effects do not require Net1A catalytic activity, its pleckstrin homology domain, or its regulatory C terminus. We also show that Rac1 activation protects Net1A from proteasome-mediated degradation. Replating cells on collagen stimulates endogenous Rac1 to relocalize Net1A, and inhibition of proteasome activity extends the duration and magnitude of Net1A relocalization. Importantly, we demonstrate that Net1A, but not Net1, is required for cell spreading on collagen, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and focal adhesion maturation. These data identify the first physiological mechanism controlling the extranuclear localization of Net1 isoforms. They also demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for Net1A in regulating cell adhesion. PMID:23184663

  13. Feedback Regulation of Cell-Substratum Adhesion by Integrin-Mediated Intracellular Ca2+ Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjaastad, Michael D.; Angres, Brigitte; Lewis, Richard S.; Nelson, W. James

    1994-08-01

    Integrin binding to extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell migration and gene expression in embryogenesis, metastasis, wound healing, and the inflammatory response. In many cases, binding of integrins to ECM triggers intracellular signaling pathways. The regulatory roles of intracellular signaling mechanisms in these events are poorly understood. Using single-cell analysis, we demonstrate that beads coated with peptide containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), an integrin recognition motif found in many ECM proteins, elicit a rapid transient increase in intracellular calcium in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. Also, significantly more beads bind to responding cells than to nonresponders. Several independent methods that inhibit RGD-induced Ca2+ signaling decrease both the number of beads bound and the strength of adhesion to an RGD-coated substratum. These results indicate that intracellular Ca2+ signaling participates in a positive feedback loop that enhances integrin-mediated cell adhesion

  14. Ancient origin of the integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling machinery.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Roger, Andrew J; Lang, Franz B; King, Nicole; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2010-06-01

    The evolution of animals (metazoans) from their unicellular ancestors required the emergence of novel mechanisms for cell adhesion and cell-cell communication. One of the most important cell adhesion mechanisms for metazoan development is integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling. The integrin adhesion complex mediates critical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix, modulating several aspects of cell physiology. To date this machinery has been considered strictly metazoan specific. Here we report the results of a comparative genomic analysis of the integrin adhesion machinery, using genomic data from several unicellular relatives of Metazoa and Fungi. Unexpectedly, we found that core components of the integrin adhesion complex are encoded in the genome of the apusozoan protist Amastigomonas sp., and therefore their origins predate the divergence of Opisthokonta, the clade that includes metazoans and fungi. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that key components of this apparatus have been lost independently in fungi and choanoflagellates. Our data highlight the fact that many of the key genes that had formerly been cited as crucial for metazoan origins have a much earlier origin. This underscores the importance of gene cooption in the unicellular-to-multicellular transition that led to the emergence of the Metazoa.

  15. The interaction between uPAR and vitronectin triggers ligand-independent adhesion signalling by integrins

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Schulte, Carsten; Buttiglione, Valentina; De Lorenzi, Valentina; Piontini, Andrea; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Madsen, Chris D; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a non-integrin vitronectin (VN) cell adhesion receptor linked to the plasma membrane by a glycolipid anchor. Through structure–function analyses of uPAR, VN and integrins, we document that uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to VN triggers a novel type of integrin signalling that is independent of integrin–matrix engagement. The signalling is fully active on VN mutants deficient in integrin binding site and is also efficiently transduced by integrins deficient in ligand binding. Although integrin ligation is dispensable, signalling is crucially dependent upon an active conformation of the integrin and its association with intracellular adaptors such as talin. This non-canonical integrin signalling is not restricted to uPAR as it poses no structural constraints to the receptor mediating cell attachment. In contrast to canonical integrin signalling, where integrins form direct mechanical links between the ECM and the cytoskeleton, the molecular mechanism enabling the crosstalk between non-integrin adhesion receptors and integrins is dependent upon membrane tension. This suggests that for this type of signalling, the membrane represents a critical component of the molecular clutch. PMID:25168639

  16. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  17. Targeting Integrin-Dependent Adhesion and Signaling with 3-Arylquinoline and 3-Aryl-2-Quinolone Derivatives: A new Class of Integrin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, Sandrine; Lin, Xiaochen; Sadoul, Karin; Fournet, Guy; Bouvard, Daniel; Vinogradova, Olga; Joseph, Benoît; Block, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the anti-migratory function of 3-aryl-2-quinolone derivatives, chemically close to flavonoids (Joseph et al., 2002). Herein we show that 3-arylquinoline or 3-aryl-2-quinolone derivatives disrupt cell adhesion in a dose dependent and reversible manner yet antagonized by artificial integrin activation such as manganese. Relying on this anti-adhesive activity, a Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) study was established on 20 different compounds to throw the bases of future optimization strategies. Active drugs efficiently inhibit platelet spreading, aggregation, and clot retraction, processes that rely on αllbβ3 integrin activation and clustering. In vitro these derivatives interfere with β3 cytoplasmic tail interaction with kindlin-2 in pulldown assays albeit little effect was observed with pure proteins suggesting that the drugs may block an alternative integrin activation process that may not be directly related to kindlin recruitment. Ex vivo, these drugs blunt integrin signaling assayed using focal adhesion kinase auto-phosphorylation as a read-out. Hence, 3-arylquinoline and 3-aryl-2-quinolone series are a novel class of integrin activation and signaling antagonists. PMID:26509443

  18. Ling Zhi-8 reduces lung cancer mobility and metastasis through disruption of focal adhesion and induction of MDM2-mediated Slug degradation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that recombinant Ling Zhi-8 (rLZ-8), a medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum recombinant protein, effectively prevents lung cancer cells proliferation in vivo mice model. In our current study, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 suppressed tumor metastasis and increased the survival rate in Lewis lung carcinoma cell-bearing mice. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is regarded as the critical event in tumor metastasis. Herein, we showed that rLZ-8 effectively induced changes in EMT by interfering with cell adhesion and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions in lung cancer cells. Slug, a transcription factor, represses E-cadherin transcription and is regarded as a critical event in EMT and tumor metastasis. Functional studies revealed that downregulation of Slug as a result of rLZ-8-induced FAK inactivation enhanced E-cadherin expression and repressed cancer cell mobility. Moreover, we found that rLZ-8 enhanced the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of Slug in CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 promoted the interaction between MDM2 and Slug, resulting in Slug degradation; however, MDM2-shRNA abolished rLZ-8-enhanced Slug degradation. This study is the first to determine anti-metastatic activity of rLZ-8 and its potential mechanism, with how the regulation of EMT and cell mobility is via the negative modulation of FAK, and thereby leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of Slug. Our findings suggest that the targets of FAK play a key role in metastasis. Moreover, rLZ-8 may be useful as a chemotherapeutic agent for treating lung cancer. PMID:26992741

  19. Common and Diverging Integrin Signals Downstream of Adhesion and Mechanical Stimuli and Their Interplay with Reactive Oxygen Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Kathrin Stephanie; Johansson, Staffan

    The integrin family of adhesion receptors regulates basic functions of cells, and the signals they induce are altered in tumor cells. In this review we discuss how different integrindependent signals are generated during cell adhesion and by physical forces acting on cells. We also describe how reactive oxygen species are integral parts of integrin signaling and highlight a few important questions in the field. Answers to those may improve our understanding of integrins and their role in the development of cancer.

  20. A focal adhesion factor directly linking intracellularly motile Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii to the actin-based cytoskeleton of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, T; Ebel, F; Domann, E; Niebuhr, K; Gerstel, B; Pistor, S; Temm-Grove, C J; Jockusch, B M; Reinhard, M; Walter, U

    1995-04-01

    The surface-bound ActA polypeptide of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the sole listerial factor needed for recruitment of host actin filaments by intracellularly motile bacteria. Here we report that following Listeria infection the host vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a microfilament- and focal adhesion-associated substrate of both the cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, accumulates on the surface of intracytoplasmic bacteria prior to the detection of F-actin 'clouds'. VASP remains associated with the surface of highly motile bacteria, where it is polarly located, juxtaposed between one extremity of the bacterial surface and the front of the actin comet tail. Since actin filament polymerization occurs only at the very front of the tail, VASP exhibits properties of a host protein required to promote actin polymerization. Purified VASP binds directly to the ActA polypeptide in vitro. A ligand-overlay blot using purified radiolabelled VASP enabled us to identify the ActA homologue of the related intracellular motile pathogen, Listeria ivanovii, as a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. VASP also associates with actin filaments recruited by another intracellularly motile bacterial pathogen, Shigella flexneri. Hence, by the simple expedient of expressing surface-bound attractor molecules, bacterial pathogens effectively harness cytoskeletal components to achieve intracellular movement.

  1. PKCδ Influences p190 Phosphorylation and Activity: Events Independent of PKCδ-Mediated Regulation of Endothelial Cell Stress Fiber and Focal Adhesion Formation and Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Fordjour, Akua K.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2009-01-01

    Background We have shown that protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) inhibition results in increased endothelial cell (EC) permeability and decreased RhoA activity; which correlated with diminished stress fibers (SF) and focal adhesions (FA). We have also shown co-precipitation of p190RhoGAP (p190) with PKCδ. Here, we investigated if PKCδ regulates p190 and whether PKCδ-mediated changes in SF and FA or permeability were dependent upon p190. Methods Protein-protein interaction and activity analyses were performed using co-precipitation assays. Analysis of p190 phosphorylation was performed using in vitro kinase assays. SF and FA were analyzed by immunofluorescence analyses. EC monolayer permeability was measured using electrical cell impedance sensor (ECIS) technique. Results Inhibition of PKCδ increased p190 activity, while PKCδ overexpression diminished p190 activity. PKCδ bound to and phosphorylated both p190FF and p190GTPase domains. p190 protein overexpression diminished SF and FA formation and RhoA activity. Disruption of SF and FA or increased permeability induced upon PKCδ inhibition, were not attenuated in EC in which the p190 isoforms were suppressed individually or concurrently. Conclusion and General Significance Our findings suggest that while PKCδ can regulate p190 activity, possibly at the FF and/ or GTPase domains, the effect of PKCδ inhibition on SF and FA and barrier dysfunction occurs through a pathway independent of p190. PMID:19632305

  2. Application of Mathematical Modelling as a Tool to Analyze the EEG Signals in Rat Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Bhattacharya, P.; Pandey, A. K.; Patnaik, R.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper envisages the application of mathematical modelling with the autoregressive (AR) model method as a tool to analyze electroencephalogram data in rat subjects of transient focal cerebral ischemia. This modelling method was used to determine the frequencies and characteristic changes in brain waveforms which occur as a result of disorders or fluctuating physiological states. This method of analysis was utilized to ensure actual correlation of the different mathematical paradigms. The EEG data was obtained from different regions of the rat brain and was modelled by AR method in a MATLAB platform. AR modelling was utilized to study the long-term functional outcomes of a stroke and also is preferable for EEG signal analysis because the signals consist of discrete frequency intervals. Modern spectral analysis, namely AR spectrum analysis, was used to correlate the conditional and prevalent changes in brain function in response to a stroke.

  3. The direct effect of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), dominant-negative FAK, FAK-CD and FAK siRNA on gene expression and human MCF-7 breast cancer cell tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in survival signaling. FAK has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer tumors at early stages of tumorigenesis. Methods To study the direct effect of FAK on breast tumorigenesis, we developed Tet-ON (tetracycline-inducible) system of MCF-7 breast cancer cells stably transfected with FAK or dominant-negative, C-terminal domain of FAK (FAK-CD), and also FAKsiRNA with silenced FAK MCF-7 stable cell line. Increased expression of FAK in isogenic Tet-inducible MCF-7 cells caused increased cell growth, adhesion and soft agar colony formation in vitro, while expression of dominant-negative FAK inhibitor caused inhibition of these cellular processes. To study the role of induced FAK and FAK-CD in vivo, we inoculated these Tet-inducible cells in nude mice to generate tumors in the presence or absence of doxycycline in the drinking water. FAKsiRNA-MCF-7 cells were also injected into nude mice to generate xenograft tumors. Results Induction of FAK resulted in significant increased tumorigenesis, while induced FAK-CD resulted in decreased tumorigenesis. Taq Man Low Density Array assay demonstrated specific induction of FAKmRNA in MCF-7-Tet-ON-FAK cells. DMP1, encoding cyclin D binding myb-like protein 1 was one of the genes specifically affected by Tet-inducible FAK or FAK-CD in breast xenograft tumors. In addition, silencing of FAK in MCF-7 cells with FAK siRNA caused increased cell rounding, decreased cell viability in vitro and inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Importantly, Affymetrix microarray gene profiling analysis using Human Genome U133A GeneChips revealed >4300 genes, known to be involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, and adhesion that were significantly down- or up-regulated (p < 0.05) by FAKsiRNA. Conclusion Thus, these data for the first time demonstrate the direct effect of FAK expression and function on MCF-7 breast cancer tumorigenesis in vivo and reveal

  4. Yes-mediated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase at tyrosine 861 increases metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tanushree; Varkaris, Andreas S; Parikh, Nila U; Song, Jian H; Cheng, Chien-Jui; Schweppe, Rebecca E; Alexander, Stephanie; Davis, John W; Troncoso, Patricia; Friedl, Peter; Kuang, Jian; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Gallick, Gary E

    2015-04-30

    To study the role of FAK signaling complexes in promoting metastatic properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells, we selected stable, highly migratory variants, termed PC3 Mig-3 and DU145 Mig-3, from two well-characterized PCa cell lines, PC3 and DU145. These variants were not only increased migration and invasion in vitro, but were also more metastatic to lymph nodes following intraprostatic injection into nude mice. Both PC3 Mig-3 and DU145 Mig-3 were specifically increased in phosphorylation of FAK Y861. We therefore examined potential alterations in Src family kinases responsible for FAK phosphorylation and determined only Yes expression was increased. Overexpression of Yes in PC3 parental cells and src-/-fyn-/-yes-/- fibroblasts selectively increased FAK Y861 phosphorylation, and increased migration. Knockdown of Yes in PC3 Mig-3 cells decreased migration and decreased lymph node metastasis following orthotopic implantation of into nude mice. In human specimens, Yes expression was increased in lymph node metastases relative to paired primary tumors from the same patient, and increased pFAK Y861 expression in lymph node metastases correlated with poor prognosis. These results demonstrate a unique role for Yes in phosphorylation of FAK and in promoting PCa metastasis. Therefore, phosphorylated FAK Y861 and increased Yes expression may be predictive markers for PCa metastasis.

  5. Changes in focal adhesion kinase expression in rats with collagen-induced arthritis and efficacy of intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs alone or in combination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui-Ying; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lv, Qian; Wen, Hong-Yan; Song, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Zhao, Xiang-Cong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Si-Yu; Zhi, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is known to promote the proliferation, migration and survival of synovial cells and plays an important role in the occurrence, development and pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to observe FAK changes in synovial cells of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and after intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or in combination in a CIA female SD rat model induced by collagen type II. The rats were randomized to 8 groups: normal control group, CIA model control group, methotrexate (MTX, 0.9 mg/kg/w) group, cyclophosphamide (CTX, 24 mg/kg/3 w) group, leflunomide (LEF, 1.2 mg/kg/d) group, MTX + CTX group, LEF + CTX group, and MTX + LEF group. They were intervened with DMARDs alone or in combination for six weeks. The experiment lasted a total of 9 weeks in vivo. Articular inflammation was measured during the process of drug intervention in terms of the degree of swelling degree in the right hind foot using a venire caliper. All animals were sacrificed by breaking the neck after 9 weeks. Then, the ankle was fixed, decalcified, embedded, and HE stained, and prepared into slices to observe pathological changes in the synovial tissue. FAK expression in synovial cells was assayed by immunohistochemistry and the mean optical density (OD) value was measured using the HPIAS-2000 image analysis system. It was found that FAK expression was negative in normal control group, positive in CIA model control group, and decreased in the three DMARD combination treatment groups significantly as compared with that in the three single-drug groups (P < 0.05). FAK expression in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group decreased more significantly than that in MTX + LEF group (P < 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between LEF + CTX and MTX + CTX groups. The arthritis index and pathological change in the synovial tissue in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group

  6. Evaluation the development of focal cerebral ischemia in rats by optical imaging based on the spreading depression signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangbin; Feng, Zhe; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2007-02-01

    Spreading depression (SD) has been found involved in focal cerebral ischemia which may result in severe or lethal neurological deficits. Electrical recording of SD has been used for acute and long term monitoring of focal cerebral ischemia but with an inherently low resolution. Here, we presented optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI) to characterize the spontaneous SD waves following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats with high spatial resolution. During each SD episode, the measured optical reflectance varied regionally: decreased (-12.5+/-2.8%) in the area near the midline, remained flat (3.1+/-2.5%) in the lateral region, and increased (12.1+/-3.6%) in the intermediate cortex. The three types of changes yielded identifications for three biological relevant zones: nonischemic cortex, penumbra and infarct core. Accompanying recurrent SD waves, the suggested penumbral area reduced by about 6.4+/-2.5% of the whole imaged area per SD event, indicating a growth of the infracted area. Staining with 2% 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) 4 h post-occlusion proved the infarct cortex to be consistent with the lateral region where the final SD wave did not invade (r=0.86+/-0.10). The results suggest that OISI based on SD can effectively used to distinguish nonischemic cortex, penumbra and infarct core in the ischemic hemisphere and monitor the development of ischemia with high spatial resolution.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide activates focal adhesion kinase and c-Src by a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-dependent mechanism and promotes cell migration in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Basuroy, Shyamali; Dunagan, Mitzi; Sheth, Parimal; Seth, Ankur; Rao, R K

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies showed that c-Src and phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase mediate the oxidative stress-induced disruption of tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The present study evaluated the roles of PI3 kinase and Src kinase in the oxidative stress-induced activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and acceleration of cell migration. Oxidative stress, induced by xanthine and xanthine oxidase system, rapidly increased phosphorylation of FAK on Y397, Y925, and Y577 in the detergent-insoluble and soluble fractions and increased its tyrosine kinase activity. The PI3 kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002, and the Src kinase inhibitor, 4-amino-5[chlorophyll]-7-[t-butyl]pyrazolo[3-4-d]pyrimidine, attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. Oxidative stress induced phosphorylation of c-Src on Y418 by a PI3 kinase-dependent mechanism, whereas oxidative stress-induced activation of PI3 kinase was independent of Src kinase activity. Hydrogen peroxide accelerated Caco-2 cell migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Promotion of cell migration by hydrogen peroxide was attenuated by LY294002 and PP2. Reduced expression of FAK by siRNA attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced acceleration of cell migration. The expression of constitutively active c-Src(Y527F) enhanced cell migration, whereas the expression of dominant negative c-Src(K296R/Y528F) attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced stimulation of cell migration. Oxidative stress-induced activation of c-Src and FAK was associated with a rapid increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation and the levels of paxillin and p130(CAS) in actin-rich, detergent-insoluble fractions. This study shows that oxidative stress activates FAK and accelerates cell migration in an intestinal epithelium by a PI3 kinase- and Src kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:20378826

  8. Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Asthma Model Occurs Independently of Secretion of β1 Integrins in Airway Wall and Focal Adhesions Proteins Down Regulation.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Santos, Mayra; Carbajal, Verónica; Tellez-Jiménez, Olivia; Martínez-Cordero, Erasmo; Ruiz, Victor; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Lascurain, Ricardo; Santibañez-Salgado, Alfredo; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca

    2016-10-01

    The extracellular domains of some membrane proteins can be shed from the cell. A similar phenomenon occurs with β1 integrins (α1β1 and α2β1) in guinea pig. The putative role of β1 integrin subunit alterations due to shedding in airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an allergic asthma model was evaluated. Guinea pigs were sensitized and challenged with antigen. Antigenic challenges induced bronchoobstruction and hyperresponsiveness at the third antigenic challenge. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectronmicroscopy studies showed that the cytosolic and extracellular domains of the β1 integrin subunit shared the same distribution in airway structures in both groups. Various polypeptides with similar molecular weights were detected with both the cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit antibodies in isolated airway myocytes and the connective tissue that surrounds the ASM bundle. Flow cytometry and Western blot studies showed that the expression of cytosolic and extracellular β1 integrin subunit domains in ASM was similar between groups. An increment of ITGB1 mRNA in ASM was observed in the asthma model group. RACE-PCR of ITGB1 in ASM did not show splicing variants. The expression levels of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and paxillin diminished in the asthma model, but not talin. The levels of phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) at Thr(696) increased in asthma model. Our work suggests that β1 integrin is secreted in guinea pig airway wall. This secretion is not altered in asthma model; nevertheless, β1 integrin cytodomain assembly proteins in focal cell adhesions in which ILK and paxillin are involved are altered in asthma model. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2385-2396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effects of adhesive thickness on the Lamb wave pitch-catch signal using bonded piezoelectric wafer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. M.; Huang, H.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of adhesive layer on Lamb wave ultrasound pitch-catch signals that are excited and sensed by piezoelectric wafer transducers bonded on a slender structure. Analytical models were established to simulate the longitudinal and flexural vibrations of the structures separately and parametric studies of the bonding layer properties, i.e. the shear transfer parameter, adhesive thickness, and shear modulus, were performed. The parametric studies indicate that there exists an optimal adhesive layer thickness that generates maximum ultrasound pitch-catch signal for both wave modes. This prediction was subsequently validated by measurements. In addition, an improved match between the measured and simulated pitch-catch signals was achieved by adjusting the adhesive layer parameters.

  10. Adhesion rings surround invadopodia and promote maturation

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Kevin M.; Hoshino, Daisuke; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Invasion and metastasis are aggressive cancer phenotypes that are highly related to the ability of cancer cells to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM). At the cellular level, specialized actin-rich structures called invadopodia mediate focal matrix degradation by serving as exocytic sites for ECM-degrading proteinases. Adhesion signaling is likely to be a critical regulatory input to invadopodia, but the mechanism and location of such adhesion signaling events are poorly understood. Here, we report that adhesion rings surround invadopodia shortly after formation and correlate strongly with invadopodium activity on a cell-by-cell basis. By contrast, there was little correlation of focal adhesion number or size with cellular invadopodium activity. Prevention of adhesion ring formation by inhibition of RGD-binding integrins or knockdown (KD) of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) reduced the number of ECM-degrading invadopodia and reduced recruitment of IQGAP to invadopodium actin puncta. Furthermore, live cell imaging revealed that the rate of extracellular MT1-MMP accumulation at invadopodia was greatly reduced in both integrin-inhibited and ILK-KD cells. Conversely, KD of MT1-MMP reduced invadopodium activity and dynamics but not the number of adhesion-ringed invadopodia. These results suggest a model in which adhesion rings are recruited to invadopodia shortly after formation and promote invadopodium maturation by enhancing proteinase secretion. Since adhesion rings are a defining characteristic of podosomes, similar structures formed by normal cells, our data also suggest further similarities between invadopodia and podosomes. PMID:23213464

  11. ISOLATION OF INTEGRIN-BASED ADHESION COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew C.; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Byron, Adam; Millon-Frémillon, Angelique; Robertson, Joseph; Paul, Nikki R.; Ng, Daniel H. J.; Askari, Janet A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of cells with their extracellular environment is facilitated by cell surface adhesion receptors, such as integrins, which play important roles in both normal development and the onset of pathologies. Engagement of integrins with their ligands in the extracellular matrix, or counter receptors on other cells, initiates the intracellular assembly of a wide variety of proteins into adhesion complexes such as focal contacts, focal adhesions and fibrillar adhesions. The proteins recruited to these complexes mediate bidirectional signalling across the plasma membrane and as such help to coordinate and / or modulate the multitude of physical or chemical signals to which the cell is subjected. The protocols in this unit describe two approaches for the isolation or enrichment of proteins contained within integrin-associated adhesion complexes together with their local plasma membrane / cytosolic environments from cells in culture. In the first protocol integrin-associated adhesion structures are affinity isolated using microbeads coated with extracellular ligands or antibodies. The second protocol describes the isolation of ventral membrane preparations that are enriched for adhesion complex structures. The protocols permit the determination of adhesion complex components by subsequent downstream analysis by Western blotting or mass spectrometry. PMID:25727331

  12. The role of vascular-derived perlecan in modulating cell adhesion, proliferation and growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Megan S.; Chuang, Christine Y.; Melrose, James; Davies, Michael J.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Whitelock, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell proliferation can be inhibited by heparan sulfate proteoglycans whereas the removal or digestion of heparan sulfate from perlecan promotes their proliferation. In this study we characterized the glycosaminoglycan side chains of perlecan isolated from either primary human coronary artery smooth muscle or endothelial cells and determined their roles in mediating cell adhesion and proliferation, and in fibroblast growth factor (FGF) binding and signaling. Smooth muscle cell perlecan was decorated with both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, whereas endothelial perlecan contained exclusively heparan sulfate chains. Smooth muscle cells bound to the protein core of perlecan only when the glycosaminoglycans were removed, and this binding involved a novel site in domain III as well as domain V/endorepellin and the α2β1 integrin. In contrast, endothelial cells adhered to the protein core of perlecan in the presence of glycosaminoglycans. Smooth muscle cell perlecan bound both FGF1 and FGF2 via its heparan sulfate chains and promoted the signaling of FGF2 but not FGF1. Also endothelial cell perlecan bound both FGF1 and FGF2 via its heparan sulfate chains, but in contrast, promoted the signaling of both growth factors. Based on this differential bioactivity, we propose that perlecan synthesized by smooth muscle cells differs from that synthesized by endothelial cells by possessing different signaling capabilities, primarily, but not exclusively, due to a differential glycanation. The end result is a differential modulation of cell adhesion, proliferation and growth factor signaling in these two key cellular constituents of blood vessels. PMID:24509440

  13. Paxillin binding to the alpha 4 integrin subunit stimulates LFA-1 (integrin alpha L beta 2)-dependent T cell migration by augmenting the activation of focal adhesion kinase/proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2.

    PubMed

    Rose, David M; Liu, Shouchun; Woodside, Darren G; Han, Jaewon; Schlaepfer, David D; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2003-06-15

    Engagement of very late Ag-4 (integrin alpha(4)beta(1)) by ligands such as VCAM-1 markedly stimulates leukocyte migration mediated by LFA-1 (integrin alpha(L)beta(2)). This form of integrin trans-regulation in T cells requires the binding of paxillin to the alpha(4) integrin cytoplasmic domain. This conclusion is based on the abolition of trans-regulation in Jurkat T cells by an alpha(4) mutation (alpha(4)(Y991A)) that disrupts paxillin binding. Furthermore, cellular expression of an alpha(4)-binding fragment of paxillin that blocks the alpha(4)-paxillin interaction, selectively blocked VCAM-1 stimulation of alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent cell migration. The alpha(4)-paxillin association mediates trans-regulation by enhancing the activation of tyrosine kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and/or proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2), based on two lines of evidence. First, disruption of the paxillin-binding site in the alpha(4) tail resulted in much less alpha(4)beta(1)-mediated phosphorylation of Pyk2 and FAK. Second, transfection with cDNAs encoding C-terminal fragments of Pyk2 and FAK, which block the function of the intact kinases, blocked alpha(4)beta(1) stimulation of alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent migration. These results define a proximal protein-protein interaction of an integrin cytoplasmic domain required for trans-regulation between integrins, and establish that augmented activation of Pyk2 and/or FAK is an immediate signaling event required for the trans-regulation of integrin alpha(L)beta(2) by alpha(4)beta(1). PMID:12794117

  14. Neural cell adhesion molecule modulates mesenchymal stromal cell migration via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Xia, Yin-Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Khoo, King-Shung; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2012-10-15

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) represent promising tools for cellular therapy owing to their multipotentiality and ability to localize to injured, inflamed sites and tumor. Various approaches to manipulate expression of MSC surface markers, including adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, have been explored to enhance homing of MSCs. Recently, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) has been found to be expressed on MSCs yet its function remains largely elusive. Herein, we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs from NCAM deficient mice exhibit defective migratory ability and significantly impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. We further explore the mechanism governing NCAM mediated migration of MSCs by showing the interplay between NCAM and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) induces activation of MAPK/ERK signaling, thereby the migration of MSCs. In addition, re-expression of NCAM180, but not NCAM140, could restore the defective MAPK/ERK signaling thereby the migration of NCAM deficient MSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that NCAM180 expression level could be manipulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α treatment. Overall, our data reveal the vital function of NCAM in MSCs migration and differentiation thus raising the possibility of manipulating NCAM expression to enhance homing and therapeutic potential of MSCs in cellular therapy.

  15. Notch Signaling Mediates the Age-Associated Decrease in Adhesion of Germline Stem Cells to the Niche

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Wan, Chih-Ling; Cho, Yueh; Tung, Shu-Yun; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells have an innate ability to occupy their stem cell niche, which in turn, is optimized to house stem cells. Organ aging is associated with reduced stem cell occupancy in the niche, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here, we report that Notch signaling is increased with age in Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs), and this results in their removal from the niche. Clonal analysis revealed that GSCs with low levels of Notch signaling exhibit increased adhesiveness to the niche, thereby out-competing their neighbors with higher levels of Notch; adhesiveness is altered through regulation of E-cadherin expression. Experimental enhancement of Notch signaling in GSCs hastens their age-dependent loss from the niche, and such loss is at least partially mediated by Sex lethal. However, disruption of Notch signaling in GSCs does not delay GSC loss during aging, and nor does it affect BMP signaling, which promotes self-renewal of GSCs. Finally, we show that in contrast to GSCs, Notch activation in the niche (which maintains niche integrity, and thus mediates GSC retention) is reduced with age, indicating that Notch signaling regulates GSC niche occupancy both intrinsically and extrinsically. Our findings expose a novel role of Notch signaling in controlling GSC-niche adhesion in response to aging, and are also of relevance to metastatic cancer cells, in which Notch signaling suppresses cell adhesion. PMID:25521289

  16. Non-focal liver signal abnormalities on hepatobiliary phase of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MR imaging: a review and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Alessandro; Borhani, Amir A; Heller, Matthew T; Yu, Robinson K; Tublin, Mitchell E

    2016-07-01

    Gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a linear, non-ionic paramagnetic MR contrast agent with combined extracellular and hepatobiliary properties commonly used for several liver indications. Although gadoxetate disodium is commonly used for detection and characterization of focal lesions, a spectrum of diffuse disease processes can affect the hepatobiliary phase of imaging (i.e., when contrast accumulates within the hepatocytes). Non-focal signal abnormalities during the hepatobiliary phase can be seen with multiple disease processes such as deposition disorders, infiltrating tumors, vascular diseases, and post-treatment changes. The purpose of this paper is to review the different processes which result in non-focal signal alteration during the hepatobiliary phase and to describe imaging patterns that may order a differential diagnosis and facilitate patient management. PMID:26907715

  17. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development. PMID:26757815

  18. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development.

  19. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yan; Li, Zheng; He, Yan; Shang, Dandan; Pan, Jigang; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Huamei; Zhu, Zhuxia; Wang, Xudong

    2014-03-01

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI.

  20. The PSGL-1–L-selectin signaling complex regulates neutrophil adhesion under flow

    PubMed Central

    Stadtmann, Anika; Germena, Giulia; Block, Helena; Boras, Mark; Rossaint, Jan; Sundd, Prithu; Lefort, Craig; Fisher, Charles I.; Buscher, Konrad; Gelschefarth, Bernadette; Urzainqui, Ana; Gerke, Volker; Ley, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are recruited from the blood to sites of inflammation, where they contribute to immune defense but may also cause tissue damage. During inflammation, neutrophils roll along the microvascular endothelium before arresting and transmigrating. Arrest requires conformational activation of the integrin lymphocyte function–associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), which can be induced by selectin engagement. Here, we demonstrate that a subset of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) molecules is constitutively associated with L-selectin. Although this association does not require the known lectin-like interaction between L-selectin and PSGL-1, the signaling output is dependent on this interaction and the cytoplasmic tail of L-selectin. The PSGL-1–L-selectin complex signals through Src family kinases, ITAM domain–containing adaptor proteins, and other kinases to ultimately result in LFA-1 activation. The PSGL-1–L-selectin complex–induced signaling effects on neutrophil slow rolling and recruitment in vivo demonstrate the functional importance of this pathway. We conclude that this is a signaling complex specialized for sensing adhesion under flow. PMID:24127491

  1. Mutant p53 promotes ovarian cancer cell adhesion to mesothelial cells via integrin β4 and Akt signals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Jin Kim, Tae; Ho Lee, Jae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations in the TP53 gene resulting in the accumulation of mutant proteins are extremely common in advanced ovarian cancer, which is characterised by peritoneal metastasis. Attachment of cancer cells to the peritoneal mesothelium is regarded as an initial, key step for the metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of a p53 mutant in the mesothelial adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. We found that OVCAR-3 cells with the R248 TP53 mutation (p53R248) were more adhesive to mesothelial Met5A cells than were A2780 cells expressing wild-type p53. In addition, ectopic expression of p53R248 in p53-null SKOV-3 cells significantly increased adhesion to Met5A cells. Knockdown of mutant p53 significantly compromised p53R248-induced cell adhesion to Met5A cells. Microarray analysis revealed that several adhesion-related genes, including integrin β4, were markedly up-regulated, and certain signalling pathways, including PI3K/Akt, were activated in p53R248 transfectants of SKOV-3 cells. Inhibition of integrin β4 and Akt signalling using blocking antibody and the inhibitor LY294002, respectively, significantly attenuated p53R248-mediated ovarian cancer-mesothelial adhesion. These data suggest that the p53R248 mutant endows ovarian cancer cells with increased adhesiveness and that integrin β4 and Akt signalling are associated with the mutation-enhanced ovarian cancer-mesothelial cell adhesion. PMID:26223322

  2. Suppression of inflammatory response by flurbiprofen following focal cerebral ischemia involves the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-Zhu; Chen, Lin; Wu, Qi; Wang, Huan-Liang; Wei, Xin-Bing; Xiang, Yan-Xiao; Zhang, Xiu-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Some studies of animal models of middle cerebral artery occlusion indicate that inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia and secondary damage. Flurbiprofen has been suggested to alleviate cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in both focal and global cerebral ischemia models, but the mechanisms underlying the protective action are still incompletely understood. In this study we want to investigate the protective effect of flurbiprofen after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats and the role of the NF-κB signaling pathway on this neuroprotective effect. Male Wistar rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h, followed by 24 h reperfusion. Flurbiprofen was administrated via tail-vein injection at the onset of reperfusion. HE staining and Immunohistochemistry were carried out to detect the morphological changes in ischemic penumbra cortex. The expression of inflammatory cytokines genes (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) and the levels of p-NF-κB (p65) in ischemic penumbra cortex were measured by RT-PCR and western blot. Administration of flurbiprofen at the doses of 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg significantly attenuated cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, as shown by a reduction in the morphological changes and inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in ischemic penumbra cortex. Moreover, our findings further demonstrated that the inhibition of NF-κB activity was involved in the neuroprotective effect of flurbiprofen on inflammatory responses. Flurbiprofen protects against cerebral injury by reducing expression of inflammatory cytokines genes and this effect may be partly due to the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  3. Suppression of inflammatory response by flurbiprofen following focal cerebral ischemia involves the NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Zhu; Chen, Lin; Wu, Qi; Wang, Huan-Liang; Wei, Xin-Bing; Xiang, Yan-Xiao; Zhang, Xiu-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Some studies of animal models of middle cerebral artery occlusion indicate that inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia and secondary damage. Flurbiprofen has been suggested to alleviate cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in both focal and global cerebral ischemia models, but the mechanisms underlying the protective action are still incompletely understood. In this study we want to investigate the protective effect of flurbiprofen after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats and the role of the NF-κB signaling pathway on this neuroprotective effect. Male Wistar rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h, followed by 24 h reperfusion. Flurbiprofen was administrated via tail-vein injection at the onset of reperfusion. HE staining and Immunohistochemistry were carried out to detect the morphological changes in ischemic penumbra cortex. The expression of inflammatory cytokines genes (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) and the levels of p-NF-κB (p65) in ischemic penumbra cortex were measured by RT-PCR and western blot. Administration of flurbiprofen at the doses of 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg significantly attenuated cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, as shown by a reduction in the morphological changes and inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in ischemic penumbra cortex. Moreover, our findings further demonstrated that the inhibition of NF-κB activity was involved in the neuroprotective effect of flurbiprofen on inflammatory responses. Flurbiprofen protects against cerebral injury by reducing expression of inflammatory cytokines genes and this effect may be partly due to the inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25356186

  4. Green tea polyphenols alleviate early BBB damage during experimental focal cerebral ischemia through regulating tight junctions and PKCalpha signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been supposed that green tea polyphenols (GTPs) have neuroprotective effects on brain damage after brain ischemia in animal experiments. Little is known regarding GTPs’ protective effects against the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after ischemic stroke. We investigated the effects of GTPs on the expression of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1, and the corresponding cellular mechanisms involved in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Methods Male Wistar rats were subjected to a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 0, 30, 60, and 120 min. GTPs (400 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered by intragastric gavage twice a day for 30 days prior to MCAO. At different time points, the expression of claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1, and PKCα signaling pathway in microvessel fragments of cerebral ischemic tissue were evaluated. Results GTPs reduced BBB permeability at 60 min and 120 min after ischemia as compared with the vehicle group. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that GTPs could reverse the opening of tight junction (TJ) barrier at 60 min and 120 min after MACO. The decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 in microvessel fragments of cerebral ischemic tissue were significantly prevented by treatment with GTPs at the same time points after ischemia in rats. Furthermore, GTPs could attenuate the increase in the expression levels of PKCα mRNA and protein caused by cerebral ischemia. Conclusions These results demonstrate that GTPs may act as a potential neuroprotective agent against BBB damage at the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia through the regulation of TJ and PKCα signaling. PMID:23870286

  5. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm(2)) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins.

  6. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm2) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins.

  7. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm2) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins. PMID:26863924

  8. JNK and decapentaplegic signaling control adhesiveness and cytoskeleton dynamics during thorax closure in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Blanco, Enrique; Pastor-Pareja, José C.; García-Bellido, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    One of the fundamental events in metamorphosis in insects is the replacement of larval tissues by imaginal tissues. Shortly after pupariation the imaginal discs evaginate to assume their positions at the surface of the prepupal animal. This is a very precise process that is only beginning to be understood. In Drosophila, during embryonic dorsal closure, the epithelial cells push the amnioserosa cells, which contract and eventually invaginate in the body cavity. In contrast, we find that during pupariation the imaginal cells crawl over the passive larval tissue following a very accurate temporal and spatial pattern. Spreading is driven by filopodia and actin bridges that, protruding from the leading edge, mediate the stretching of the imaginal epithelia. Although interfering with JNK (Jun N-terminal kinase) and dpp (decapentaplegic) produces similar phenotypic effects suppressing closure, their effects at the cellular level are different. The loss of JNK activity alters the adhesion properties of larval cells and leads to the detachment of the imaginal and larval tissues. The absence of dpp signaling affects the actin cytoskeleton, blocks the emission of filopodia, and promotes the collapse of the leading edge of the imaginal tissues. Interestingly, these effects are very similar to those observed after interfering with JNK and dpp signaling during embryonic dorsal closure. PMID:10884420

  9. The calcium ATPase SERCA2 regulates desmoplakin dynamics and intercellular adhesive strength through modulation of PKCα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Ryan P.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Somasundaram, Agila; Simpson, Cory L.; Prakriya, Murali; Denning, Mitchell F.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2011-01-01

    Darier's disease (DD) is an inherited autosomal-dominant skin disorder characterized histologically by loss of adhesion between keratinocytes. DD is typically caused by mutations in sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), a major regulator of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in the skin. However, a defined role for SERCA2 in regulating intercellular adhesion remains poorly understood. We found that diminution of SERCA2 function by pharmacological inhibition or siRNA silencing in multiple human epidermal-derived cell lines was sufficient to disrupt desmosome assembly and weaken intercellular adhesive strength. Specifically, SERCA2-deficient cells exhibited up to a 60% reduction in border translocation of desmoplakin (DP), the desmosomal cytolinker protein necessary for intermediate filament (IF) anchorage to sites of robust cell-cell adhesion. In addition, loss of SERCA2 impaired the membrane translocation of protein kinase C α (PKCα), a known regulator of DP-IF association and desmosome assembly, to the plasma membrane by up to 70%. Exogenous activation of PKCα in SERCA2-deficient cells was sufficient to rescue the defective DP localization, desmosome assembly, and intercellular adhesive strength to levels comparable to controls. Our findings indicate that SERCA2-deficiency is sufficient to impede desmosome assembly and weaken intercellular adhesive strength via a PKCα-dependent mechanism, implicating SERCA2 as a novel regulator of PKCα signaling.—Hobbs, R. P., Amargo, E. V., Somasundaram, A., Simpson, C. L., Prakriya, M., Denning, M. F., Green, K. J. The calcium ATPase SERCA2 regulates desmoplakin dynamics and intercellular adhesive strength through modulation of PKCα signaling. PMID:21156808

  10. Tie2 Signaling Enhances Mast Cell Progenitor Adhesion to Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) through α4β1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaru, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Emiko; Tokunaga, Takahiro; Nagai, Kei; Hiroyama, Takashi; Nakamura, Yukio; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Shibuya, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation contributes considerably to immune responses, such as host protection and allergy. Cell surface immunoreceptors expressed on MCs play an important role in MC activation. Although various immunoreceptors on MCs have been identified, the regulatory mechanism of MC activation is not fully understood. To understand the regulatory mechanisms of MC activation, we used gene expression analyses of human and mouse MCs to identify a novel immunoreceptor expressed on MCs. We found that Tek, which encodes Tie2, was preferentially expressed in the MCs of both humans and mice. However, Tie2 was not detected on the cell surface of the mouse MCs of the peritoneal cavity, ear skin, or colon lamina propria. In contrast, it was expressed on mouse bone marrow–derived MCs and bone marrow MC progenitors (BM-MCps). Stimulation of Tie2 by its ligand angiopoietin-1 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 in MEDMC-BRC6, a mouse embryonic stem cell-derived mast cell line, and enhanced MEDMC-BRC6 and mouse BM-MCp adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) through α4β1 integrin. These results suggest that Tie2 signaling induces α4β1 integrin activation on BM-MCps for adhesion to VCAM-1. PMID:26659448

  11. A capacitive, biocompatible and adhesive electrode for long-term and cap-free monitoring of EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jeong Hun; Byeon, Hang Jin; Choi, Yoon Young; Park, Kwang Suk; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring broadens EEG applications to various areas, but it requires cap-free recording of EEG signals. Our objective here is to develop a capacitive, small-sized, adhesive and biocompatible electrode for the cap-free and long-term EEG monitoring. Approach. We have developed an electrode made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and adhesive PDMS for EEG monitoring. This electrode can be attached to a hairy scalp and be completely hidden by the hair. We tested its electrical and mechanical (adhesive) properties by measuring voltage gain to frequency and adhesive force using 30 repeat cycles of the attachment and detachment test. Electrode performance on EEG was evaluated by alpha rhythm detection and measuring steady state visually evoked potential and N100 auditory evoked potential. Main results. We observed the successful recording of alpha rhythm and evoked signals to diverse stimuli with high signal quality. The biocompatibility of the electrode was verified and a survey found that the electrode was comfortable and convenient to wear. Significance. These results indicate that the proposed EEG electrode is suitable and convenient for long term EEG monitoring.

  12. Role of dystrophins and utrophins in platelet adhesion process.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris; Mondragón, Ricardo; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Martínez-Pérez, Francisco; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Rendón, Alvaro

    2006-07-01

    Platelets are crucial at the site of vascular injury, adhering to the sub-endothelial matrix through receptors on their surface, leading to cell activation and aggregation to form a haemostatic plug. Platelets display focal adhesions as well as stress fibres to contract and facilitate expulsion of growth and pro-coagulant factors contained in the granules and to constrict the clot. The interaction of F-actin with different actin-binding proteins determines the properties and composition of the focal adhesions. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of dystrophin-associated protein complex corresponding to short dystrophin isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71) and the uthophin gene family (Up400 and Up71), which promote shape change, adhesion, aggregation, and granule centralisation. To elucidate participation of both complexes during the platelet adhesion process, their potential association with integrin beta-1 fraction and the focal adhesion system (alpha-actinin, vinculin and talin) was evaluated by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assays. It was shown that the short dystrophin-associated protein complex participated in stress fibre assembly and in centralisation of cytoplasmic granules, while the utrophin-associated protein complex assembled and regulated focal adhesions. The simultaneous presence of dystrophin and utrophin complexes indicates complementary structural and signalling mechanisms to the actin network, improving the platelet haemostatic role.

  13. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Integrin containing focal adhesions (FAs) transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane to modulate cell adhesion, signalling and survival. Although integrins are known to undergo continuous endo/exocytic traffic, potential impact of endocytic traffic on integrin-induced signals is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to cell-ECM adhesions and identify an endosomal signalling platform that supports integrin signalling away from the plasma membrane. We show that active focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an established marker of integrin-ECM downstream signalling, localises with active integrins on endosomes. Integrin endocytosis positively regulates adhesion-induced FAK activation, which is early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) and small GTPase Rab21 dependent. FAK binds directly to purified endosomes and becomes activated on them, suggesting a role for endocytosis in enhancing distinct integrin downstream signalling events. Finally, endosomal integrin signalling contributes to cancer-related processes such as anoikis resistance, anchorage-independence and metastasis. Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion receptors functioning as integrators of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) driven cues, the cellular cytoskeleton and the cellular signalling apparatus 1.Upon adhesion, integrins trigger the formation of plasma-membrane proximal large mechanosensing and signal-transmitting protein clusters depicted as “adhesomes” 2, 3. In addition, integrins undergo constant endocytic traffic to facilitate focal adhesion turnover, cell migration, invasion and cytokinesis 4. For other receptor systems it is well established that endocytic membrane traffic regulates bioavailability of cell-surface molecules and therefore the intensity and/or specificity of receptor-initiated signals 5, 6. Although active integrins and their ligands have been detected in endosomes 7–9 and increased integrin recycling to the plasma membrane contributes

  14. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery. PMID:27466027

  15. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery. PMID:27466027

  16. Reinforcement of integrin-mediated T-Lymphocyte adhesion by TNF-induced Inside-out Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Huth, Steven; Adam, Dieter; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is a crucial step in immunity against pathogens. Whereas the outside-in signaling pathway in response to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has already been studied in detail, little knowledge exists about a supposed TNF-mediated inside-out signaling pathway. In contrast to the outside-in signaling pathway, which relies on the TNF-induced upregulation of surface molecules on endothelium, inside-out signaling should also be present in an endothelium-free environment. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we show here that stimulating Jurkat cells with TNF significantly reinforces their adhesion to fibronectin in a biomimetic in vitro assay for cell-surface contact times of about 1.5 seconds, whereas for larger contact times the effect disappears. Analysis of single-molecule ruptures further demonstrates that TNF strengthens sub-cellular single rupture events at short cell-surface contact times. Hence, our results provide quantitative evidence for the significant impact of TNF-induced inside-out signaling in the T-lymphocyte initial adhesion machinery.

  17. Dosage-dependent regulation of cell proliferation and adhesion through dual β2-adrenergic receptor/cAMP signals.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, Ariana; Saulière, Aude; Finana, Frédéric; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Lüthy, Isabel; Galés, Céline

    2014-03-01

    The role of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) remains controversial in normal and tumor breast. Herein we explore the cAMP signaling involved in β-AR-dependent control of proliferation and adhesion of nontumor human breast cell line MCF-10A. Low concentrations of a β-agonist, isoproterenol (ISO), promote cell adhesion (87.5% cells remaining adherent to the plastic dishes following specific detachment vs. 35.0% in control, P<0.001), while increasing concentrations further engages an additional 36% inhibition of Erk1/2 phosphorylation (p-Erk1/2)-dependent cell proliferation (P<0.01). Isoproterenol dose response on cell adhesion was fitted to a 2-site curve (EC50(1): 16.5±11.5 fM, EC50(2): 4.08±3.09 nM), while ISO significantly inhibited p-Erk1/2 according to a 1-site model (EC50: 0.25±0.13 nM). Using β-AR-selective agonist/antagonists and cAMP analogs/inhibitors, we identified a dosage-dependent signaling in which low ISO concentrations target a β2-AR population localized in raft microdomains and stimulate a Gs/cAMP/Epac/adhesion-signaling module, while higher concentrations engage a concomitant activation of another β2-AR population outside rafts and inhibit the proliferation by a Gs/cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling module. Our data provide a new molecular basis for the dose-dependent switch of β-AR signaling. This study also sheds light on a new cAMP pathway core mechanism with a single receptor triggering dual cAMP signaling controlled by PKA or Epac but with different cellular outputs.

  18. L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE SIGNALING IS INHIBITED BY ETHANOL IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Littner, Yoav; Tang, Ningfeng; He, Min; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is an immense public health problem. In vitro studies support the hypothesis that L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) is a target for ethanol developmental neurotoxicity. L1 is critical for the development of the central nervous system. It functions through signal transduction leading to phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of tyrosines on its cytoplasmic domain. The function of L1 is also dependent on trafficking through lipid rafts. Our hypothesis is that L1 is a target for ethanol neurotoxicity in vivo. Our objective is to demonstrate changes in L1 phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and lipid raft association in vivo. Methods Rat pups on postnatal day 6 are administered 4.5, 5.25 and 6 g/kg of ethanol divided into 2 doses 2 hours apart, then sacrificed. Cerebella are rapidly frozen for assay. Blood is analyzed for blood ethanol concentration. L1 tyrosine phosphorylation is determined by immunoprecipitation and dephosphorylation of tyrosine 1176 determined by immunoblot. Lipid rafts are isolated by sucrose density gradient and the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts is determined. Results Ethanol at all doses reduced the relative amount of Y1176 dephosphorylation as well as the relative amount of L1 phosphorylated on other tyrosines. The proportion of L1 present in lipid rafts is significantly increased in pups who received 6 g/kg ethanol compared to intubated controls. Conclusions L1 is a target for ethanol developmental neurotoxicity in vivo. PMID:23050935

  19. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet; Ariestanti, Donna M.; Aust, Gabriela; Bae, Byoung-il; Bista, Bigyan R.; Bridges, James P.; Duman, Joseph G.; Engel, Felix B.; Giera, Stefanie; Goffinet, André M.; Hall, Randy A.; Hamann, Jörg; Hartmann, Nicole; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Liu, Mingyao; Luo, Rong; Mogha, Amit; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Prömel, Simone; Ressl, Susanne; Schiöth, Helgi B.; Sigoillot, Séverine M.; Song, Helen; Talbot, William S.; Tall, Gregory G.; White, James P.; Wolfrum, Uwe; Xu, Lei; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein–coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix—a structural feature of all GPCRs—the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region. In addition, all aGPCRs but one (GPR123) contain a GPCR autoproteolysis–inducing (GAIN) domain that mediates autoproteolytic cleavage at the GPCR autoproteolysis site (GPS) motif to generate N- and a C-terminal fragments (NTF and CTF, respectively) during protein maturation. Subsequently, the NTF and CTF are associated non-covalently as a heterodimer at the plasma membrane. While the biological function of the GAIN domain–mediated autocleavage is not fully understood, mounting evidence suggests that the NTF and CTF possess distinct biological activities in addition to their function as a receptor unit. We discuss recent advances in understanding the biological functions, signaling mechanisms, and disease associations of the aGPCRs. PMID:25424900

  20. Identification of Focal Epileptogenic Networks in Generalized Epilepsy Using Brain Functional Connectivity Analysis of Bilateral Intracranial EEG Signals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Ching; Castillo, Eduardo M; Baumgartner, James; Seo, Joo Hee; Korostenskaja, Milena; Lee, Ki Hyeong

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous bilateral onset and bi-synchrony epileptiform discharges in electroencephalogram (EEG) remain hallmarks for generalized seizures. However, the possibility of an epileptogenic focus triggering rapidly generalized epileptiform discharges has been documented in several studies. Previously, a new multi-stage surgical procedure using bilateral intracranial EEG (iEEG) prior to and post complete corpus callosotomy (CC) was developed to uncover seizure focus in non-lateralizing focal epilepsy. Five patients with drug-resistant generalized epilepsy who underwent this procedure were included in the study. Their bilateral iEEG findings prior to complete CC showed generalized epileptiform discharges with no clear lateralization. Nonetheless, the bilateral ictal iEEG findings post complete CC indicated lateralized or localized seizure onset. This study hypothesized that brain functional connectivity analysis, applied to the pre CC bilateral iEEG recordings, could help identify focal epileptogenic networks in generalized epilepsy. The results indicated that despite diffuse epileptiform discharges, focal features can still be observed in apparent generalized seizures through brain connectivity analysis. The seizure onset localization/lateralization from connectivity analysis demonstrated a good agreement with the bilateral iEEG findings post complete CC and final surgical outcomes. Our study supports the role of focal epileptic networks in generalized seizures. PMID:27142358

  1. Heterologous desensitization of T cell functions by CCR5 and CXCR4 ligands: inhibition of cellular signaling, adhesion and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Iris; Cahalon, Liora; Hershkoviz, Rami; Lahat, Adi; Franitza, Suzanne; Lider, Ofer

    2003-01-01

    T cells migrate into inflamed sites through the extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to chemotactic areas and are then simultaneously or sequentially exposed to multiple chemotactic ligands. We examined the responses of human peripheral blood T cells, present in an ECM-like context, to combinatorial signaling transduced by SDF-1alpha (CXCL12), and two CCR5 ligands, RANTES (CCL5) and MIP-1beta (CCL4). Separately, these chemokines, at G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-stimulating concentrations, induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) and T cell chemotaxis. However, the pro-adhesive and pro-migratory capacities of SDF-1alpha and RANTES or MIP-1beta were mutually suppressed by the simultaneous or sequential exposure of the cells to these CCR5 or CXCR4 ligands. This cross-talk did not involve the internalization of the SDF-1alpha receptor, CXCR4, but rather, a decrease in phosphorylation of ERK and Pyk-2, as well as inhibition of Ca(2+) mobilization. Strikingly, early CXCR4 signaling of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, detected by SDF-1alpha-induced AKT phosphorylation, was insensitive to RANTES-CCR5 signals. Accordingly, early chemotaxis to SDF-1alpha was not susceptible to CCR5 occupancy, whereas late stages of T cell chemotaxis were markedly down-regulated. This is an example of a specialized functional desensitization of heterologous chemokine receptors that induces GPCR interference with T cell adhesion to ECM ligands and chemotaxis within chemokine-rich extravascular contexts. PMID:12502723

  2. Radiation results in IL-8 mediated intercellular signaling that increases adhesion between monocytic cells and aortic endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Babitz, Stephen; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad

    cells (HAECs) in vitro under conditions that mimic the shear stress in the bloodstream. For both heavy ions and x-rays, these adhesiveness changes are independent of adhesion molecule expression levels, but are chemokine dependent. Here we identify the specific endothelial chemokine responsible for this radiation-induced adhesiveness. X-irradiation increased IL-8 secretion almost 5-fold, while having little or no effect on expression of 15 other chemokines. Adhesiveness was then assayed under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Radiation significantly increased endothelial adhesiveness. The radiation-induced adhesiveness was specifically blocked by anti-IL-8 antibody, with no effect on baseline, radiation-independent adhesion. Addition of recombinant human IL-8 to un-irradiated HAECs was sufficient to increase adhesion to the same level as x-rays. Therefore, radiation-induced IL-8 signaling is both necessary and sufficient for radiation effects on aortic endothelial adhesiveness. This IL-8 induced adhesiveness may explain, at least in part, the mechanism by which radiation accelerates development of atherosclerosis. A better understanding of this mechanism can provide the basis for future countermeasure development.

  3. Interactions with nanoscale topography: adhesion quantification and signal transduction in cells of osteogenic and multipotent lineage.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Manus J P; Richards, R Geoff; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; McMurray, Rebecca J; Affrossman, Stanley; Wilkinson, Chris D W; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dalby, Mathew J

    2009-10-01

    Polymeric medical devices widely used in orthopedic surgery play key roles in fracture fixation and orthopedic implant design. Topographical modification and surface micro-roughness of these devices regulate cellular adhesion, a process fundamental in the initiation of osteoinduction and osteogenesis. Advances in fabrication techniques have evolved the field of surface modification; in particular, nanotechnology has allowed the development of nanoscale substrates for the investigation into cell-nanofeature interactions. In this study human osteoblasts (HOBs) were cultured on ordered nanoscale pits and random nano "craters" and "islands". Adhesion subtypes were quantified by immunofluorescent microscopy and cell-substrate interactions investigated via immuno-scanning electron microscopy. To investigate the effects of these substrates on cellular function 1.7 k microarray analysis was used to establish gene profiles of enriched STRO-1+ progenitor cell populations cultured on these nanotopographies. Nanotopographies affected the formation of adhesions on experimental substrates. Adhesion formation was prominent on planar control substrates and reduced on nanocrater and nanoisland topographies; nanopits, however, were shown to inhibit directly the formation of large adhesions. STRO-1+ progenitor cells cultured on experimental substrates revealed significant changes in genetic expression. This study implicates nanotopographical modification as a significant modulator of osteoblast adhesion and cellular function in mesenchymal populations. PMID:18814275

  4. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  5. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  6. The de-adhesive activity of matricellular proteins: is intermediate cell adhesion an adaptive state?

    PubMed

    Murphy-Ullrich, J E

    2001-04-01

    The process of cellular de-adhesion is potentially important for the ability of a cell to participate in morphogenesis and to respond to injurious stimuli. Cellular de-adhesion is induced by the highly regulated matricellular proteins TSP1 and 2, tenascin-C, and SPARC. These proteins induce a rapid transition to an intermediate state of adhesiveness characterized by loss of actin-containing stress fibers and restructuring of the focal adhesion plaque that includes loss of vinculin and alpha-actinin, but not of talin or integrin. This process involves intracellular signaling mediators, which are engaged in response to matrix protein-receptor interactions. Each of these proteins employs different receptors and signaling pathways to achieve this common morphologic endpoint. What is the function of this intermediate adhesive state and what is the physiologic significance of this action of the matricellular proteins? Given that matricellular proteins are expressed in response to injury and during development, one can speculate that the intermediate adhesive state is an adaptive condition that facilitates expression of specific genes that are involved in repair and adaptation. Since cell shape is maintained in weakly adherent cells, this state might induce survival signals to prevent apoptosis due to loss of strong cell adhesion, but yet allow for cell locomotion. The three matricellular proteins considered here might each preferentially facilitate one or more aspects of this adaptive response rather than all of these equally. Currently, we have only preliminary data to support the specific ideas proposed in this article. It will be interesting in the next several years to continue to elucidate the biological roles of the intermediate adhesive state induced by these matricellular proteins. and focal adhesions in a cell that nevertheless maintains a spread, extended morphology and integrin clustering. TSP1, tenascin-C, and SPARC induce the intermediate adhesive state, as

  7. Control of Integrin αIIbβ3 Outside-In Signaling and Platelet Adhesion by Sensing the Physical Properties of Fibrin(ogen) Substrates†

    PubMed Central

    Podolnikova, Nataly P.; Yermolenko, Ivan S.; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Lishko, Valeryi K.; Magonov, Sergei; Bowen, Benjamin; Enderlein, Joerg; Podolnikov, Andriy V.; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of substrates are known to control cell adhesion via integrin-mediated signaling. Fibrin and fibrinogen, the principal components of hemostatic and pathological thrombi, may represent biologically relevant substrates whose variable physical properties control adhesion of leukocytes and platelets. In our previous work, we have shown that binding of fibrinogen to the surface of fibrin clot prevents cell adhesion by creating an antiadhesive fibrinogen layer. Furthermore, fibrinogen immobilized on various surfaces at high density supports weak cell adhesion whereas at low density it is highly adhesive. To explore the mechanism underlying differential cell adhesion, we examined the structural and physical properties of surfaces prepared by deposition of various concentrations of fibrinogen using atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. Fibrinogen deposition at high density resulted in an aggregated multilayered material characterized by low adhesion forces. In contrast, immobilization of fibrinogen at low density produced a single layer in which molecules were directly attached to the solid surface, resulting in higher adhesion forces. Consistent with their distinct physical properties, low- but not high-density fibrinogen induced strong αIIbβ3-mediated outside-in signaling in platelets, resulting in their spreading. Moreover, while intact fibrin gels induced strong signaling in platelets, deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of fibrin resulted in diminished cell signaling. The data suggest that deposition of a multilayered fibrinogen matrix prevents stable cell adhesion by modifying the physical properties of surfaces, which results in reduced force generation and insufficient signaling. The mechanism whereby circulating fibrinogen alters adhesive properties of fibrin clots may have important implications for control of thrombus formation and thrombogenicity of biomaterials. PMID:19929007

  8. Self-Adhesive and Capacitive Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrode to Record Electroencephalograph Signals From the Hairy Scalp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Jeong Hun; Park, Cheolsoo; Hwang, Ji-Young; Hong, Joung Sook; Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)/adhesive polydimethylsiloxane (aPDMS) composite-based dry electroencephalograph (EEG) electrode for capacitive measuring of EEG signals. As research related to brain-computer interface applications has advanced, the presence of hairs on a patient's scalp has continued to present an obstacle to recorder EEG signals using dry electrodes. The CNT/aPDMS electrode developed here is elastic, highly conductive, self-adhesive, and capable of making conformal contact with and attaching to a hairy scalp. Onto the conductive disk, hundreds of conductive pillars coated with Parylene C insulation layer were fabricated. A CNT/aPDMS layer was attached on the disk to transmit biosignals to the pillar. The top of disk was designed to be solderable, which enables the electrode to connect with a variety of commercial EEG acquisition systems. The mechanical and electrical characteristics of the electrode were tested, and the performances of the electrodes were evaluated by recording EEGs, including alpha rhythms, auditory-evoked potentials, and steady-state visually-evoked potentials. The results revealed that the electrode provided a high signal-to-noise ratio with good tolerance for motion. Almost no leakage current was observed. Although preamplifiers with ultrahigh input impedance have been essential for previous capacitive electrodes, the EEGs were recorded here by directly connecting a commercially available EEG acquisition system to the electrode to yield high-quality signals comparable to those obtained using conventional wet electrodes.

  9. Augmentation of RANTES-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediated signaling and T cell adhesion by elastase-treated fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Brill, A; Hershkoviz, R; Vaday, G G; Chowers, Y; Lider, O

    2001-06-15

    T cells migrating across extracellular matrix (ECM) barriers toward their target, the inflammatory site, should respond to chemoattractant cytokines and to the degradation of ECM by specific enzymes. In this study, we examined the effects of RANTES and ECM proteins treated with human leukocyte elastase on T cell activation and adhesion to the ECM. We found that human peripheral blood T cells briefly suspended with RANTES (0.1-100 ng/ml) had increased phosphorylation of their intracellular extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase involved in the activation of several intracellular downstream effector molecules implicated in cell adhesion and migration. Consequently, a small portion (12-20%) of the responding cells adhered to fibronectin (FN). However, when the T cells were exposed to RANTES in the presence of native immobilized FN, laminin, or collagen type I, ERK phosphorylation was partially inhibited, suggesting that this form of the ECM proteins can down-regulate RANTES-induced intracellular signaling. In contrast, when the T cells were exposed to RANTES in the presence of elastase-treated immobilized FN, but not to elastase-treated laminin, ERK phosphorylation was markedly increased. Furthermore, a large percentage (30%) of RANTES-activated T cells adhered to the enzymatically treated FN in a beta1 integrin-dependent fashion. Thus, while migrating along chemotactic gradients within the ECM, T cells can adapt their adhesive performance according to the level of cleavage induced by enzymes to the matrix. PMID:11390457

  10. Roles of lipid rafts in integrin-dependent adhesion and gp130 signalling pathway in mouse embryonic neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Kazuo; Taga, Tetsuya

    2004-09-01

    Neuronal and glial cells organizing the central nervous system are generated from common neural precursor cells present in the neuroepithelium during development. We tried to clarify functions of a cell surface microdomain, lipid raft, in neuroepithelial cells (NECs). NECs are suggested to adhere to fibronectin substratum dependently on integrin molecules. We found that beta1 integrin, a component of fibronectin receptors, was distributed in lipid rafts. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD), an inhibitor of lipid raft formation, inhibited the integrin-fibronectin interaction-dependent adhesion of NECs. However, inhibition of synthesis of glycosphingolipids (GSL), components of lipid rafts, did not affect NEC adhesion. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), an interleukin 6 type cytokine, induces astrocyte differentiation of NECs via activation of a transcription factor STAT3. We detected gp130, JAK1 and Ras but not STAT3 and ERK2 molecules in lipid rafts of NECs. Disruption of lipid rafts by MBCD inhibited LIF-induced ERK activation but not STAT3 activation. It is thus suggested that LIF-downstream molecules have differential lipid raft-dependency in terms of activation upon LIF-stimulation. In this study, we found functions of lipid rafts in cell adhesion and signal transduction in NECs. This is the first report that characterized functions of lipid rafts in embryonic neural precursor cells.

  11. Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol suppresses monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by attenuation of JNK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Kanamori, Yuta; Matsutomo, Toshiaki; Morihara, Naoaki

    2015-09-25

    Several clinical studies have shown that the intake of aged garlic extract improves endothelial dysfunction. Lignan compounds, (+)-(2S,3R)-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DDC) and (-)-(2R,3S)-dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DDDC), have been isolated as antioxidants in aged garlic extract. There is evidence showing the importance of oxidative stress in endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we examined whether DDC and DDDC enhance endothelial cell function in vitro. Cell adhesion assay was performed using THP-1 monocyte and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) which were activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-BSA. Cellular ELISA method was used for the evaluation of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression on HUVECs. DDC and DDDC suppressed the adhesion of THP-1 to HUVECs which was activated by LPS or AGEs-BSA. DDC and DDDC also inhibited VCAM-1 expression induced by LPS or AGEs-BSA, but DDDC was less effective than DDC. In addition, the inhibitory effect of DDC on VCAM-1 expression involved suppressing JNK/c-Jun pathway rather than NF-κB pathway. DDC has an inhibitory effect on VCAM-1 expression via JNK pathway in endothelial cells and therefore may serve as a novel pharmacological agent to improve endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26271597

  12. Membrane cholesterol plays an important role in enteropathogen adhesion and the activation of innate immunity via flagellin-TLR5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Duan, Qiangde; Li, Yinchau; Yang, Yang; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich ordered microdomains distributed in the plasma membrane that participates in mammalian signal transduction pathways. To determine the role of lipid rafts in mediating interactions between enteropathogens and intestinal epithelial cells, membrane cholesterol was depleted from Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells using methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Cholesterol depletion significantly reduced Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis adhesion and invasion into intestinal epithelial cells. Complementation with exogenous cholesterol restored bacterial adhesion to basal levels. We also evaluated the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Toll-like receptor 5 signaling by bacterial flagellin. Depleting membrane cholesterol reduced the ability of purified recombinant E. coli flagellin to activate TLR5 signaling in intestinal cells. These data suggest that both membrane cholesterol and lipid rafts play important roles in enteropathogen adhesion and contribute to the activation of innate immunity via flagellin-TLR5 signaling.

  13. Influence of the Laser Spot Size, Focal Beam Profile, and Tissue Type on the Lipid Signals Obtained by MALDI-MS Imaging in Oversampling Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Marcel; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Soltwisch, Jens

    2016-08-01

    To improve the lateral resolution in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) beyond the dimensions of the focal laser spot oversampling techniques are employed. However, few data are available on the effect of the laser spot size and its focal beam profile on the ion signals recorded in oversampling mode. To investigate these dependencies, we produced 2 times six spots with dimensions between ~30 and 200 μm. By optional use of a fundamental beam shaper, square flat-top and Gaussian beam profiles were compared. MALDI-MSI data were collected using a fixed pixel size of 20 μm and both pixel-by-pixel and continuous raster oversampling modes on a QSTAR mass spectrometer. Coronal mouse brain sections coated with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid matrix were used as primary test systems. Sizably higher phospholipid ion signals were produced with laser spots exceeding a dimension of ~100 μm, although the same amount of material was essentially ablated from the 20 μm-wide oversampling pixel at all spot size settings. Only on white matter areas of the brain these effects were less apparent to absent. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that these findings can presumably be attributed to different matrix morphologies depending on tissue type. We propose that a transition in the material ejection mechanisms from a molecular desorption at large to ablation at smaller spot sizes and a concomitant reduction in ion yields may be responsible for the observed spot size effects. The combined results indicate a complex interplay between tissue type, matrix crystallization, and laser-derived desorption/ablation and finally analyte ionization.

  14. Ligation of MHC class I and class II molecules can lead to heterologous desensitization of signal transduction pathways that regulate homotypic adhesion in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, N; Engel, P; Vega, M; Tedder, T F

    1994-06-01

    Engagement of lymphocyte MHC class I and class II Ags activates an array of intracellular signal transduction pathways that up-regulates the activity of cell-surface adhesion receptors, resulting in homotypic cell-cell aggregation. In this study, engagement of MHC class I and class II molecules with specific mAbs was shown to also inhibit lymphocyte homotypic adhesion. Two mAbs reactive with class II Ag, homotypic adhesion blocking mAb (HAB)-2, and HAB-3, and one mAb reactive with class I Ag, HAB-4, were generated that inhibited homotypic adhesion of activated lymphocytes and B and T cell lines at concentrations as low as 0.1 microgram/ml. Binding of these mAbs resulted in heterologous desensitization of other surface signal transduction molecules as homotypic adhesion induced through class I, class II, CD19, CD20, CD39, CD40, Leu-13, and PMA was also inhibited. The spontaneous adhesion exhibited by some cell lines was also abrogated by binding of these mAbs. Abs that either induced, blocked, or had no effect on adhesion bound to distinct epitopes on class I, whereas the anti-class II mAbs recognized either distinct or overlapping epitopes. Thus, engagement of distinct epitopes on MHC molecules can result in homologous or heterologous desensitization of cell-surface signaling molecules. The induction or inhibition of homotypic adhesion through class I molecules did not require the presence of the cytoplasmic domain, as deletion of this portion of the class I molecule had no effect. In contrast, the transmembrane region was essential for signal transduction as the mAbs binding to a chimeric molecule in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of class I were exchanged with those of the HB15 molecule did not induce or inhibit homotypic adhesion. Although this report is the first demonstration that homotypic adhesion can be influenced in a negative manner through MHC molecules, these findings demonstrate a considerable level of cross-talk between MHC molecules

  15. The adhesion GPCR latrophilin - a novel signaling cascade in oriented cell division and anterior-posterior polarity.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Jana; Prömel, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Although several signaling pathways in oriented cell division have been well characterized such as delta/notch inductions or wnt/frizzled-based anterior-posterior polarity, there is strong evidence for additional signal pathways controlling early anterior-posterior polarity decisions. The homolog of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor latrophilin, LAT-1 has been identified as a receptor essential for oriented cell division in an anterior-posterior direction of specific blastomeres in the early C. elegans embryo. We recently conducted a study aiming at clarifying the signals involved in LAT-1 function. We identified a Gs protein/adenylyl cyclase/cAMP pathway in vitro and demonstrated its physiological relevance in oriented cell division. By interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates cAMP levels. These data indicate that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. This commentary will discuss our findings in the context of the current knowledge of mechanisms controlling oriented cell division and anterior-posterior polarity. Further, we identify open questions which need to be addressed in the future.

  16. STAT3 signal that mediates the neural plasticity is involved in willed-movement training in focal ischemic rats*

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing-ping; Shen, Qin; Wu, Li-xiang; Feng, Xiang-ling; Liu, Hui; Wu, Bei; Huang, Xiao-song; Wang, Gai-qing; Li, Zhong-hao; Liu, Zun-jing

    2016-01-01

    Willed-movement training has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to increase motor performance and neural plasticity in ischemic rats. However, little is known regarding the molecular signals that are involved in neural plasticity following willed-movement training. To investigate the potential signals related to neural plasticity following willed-movement training, littermate rats were randomly assigned into three groups: middle cerebral artery occlusion, environmental modification, and willed-movement training. The infarct volume was measured 18 d after occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the changes in the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mRNA and protein, respectively. A chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to investigate whether STAT3 bound to plasticity-related genes, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synaptophysin, and protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1). In this study, we demonstrated that STAT3 mRNA and protein were markedly increased following 15-d willed-movement training in the ischemic hemispheres of the treated rats. STAT3 bound to BDNF, PICK1, and synaptophysin promoters in the neocortical cells of rats. These data suggest that the increased STAT3 levels after willed-movement training might play critical roles in the neural plasticity by directly regulating plasticity-related genes. PMID:27381726

  17. A direct interaction between fascin and microtubules contributes to adhesion dynamics and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Villari, Giulia; Jayo, Asier; Zanet, Jennifer; Fitch, Briana; Serrels, Bryan; Frame, Margaret; Stramer, Brian M.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Parsons, Maddy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fascin is an actin-binding and bundling protein that is highly upregulated in most epithelial cancers. Fascin promotes cell migration and adhesion dynamics in vitro and tumour cell metastasis in vivo. However, potential non-actin bundling roles for fascin remain unknown. Here, we show for the first time that fascin can directly interact with the microtubule cytoskeleton and that this does not depend upon fascin-actin bundling. Microtubule binding contributes to fascin-dependent control of focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration speed. We also show that fascin forms a complex with focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2) and Src, and that this signalling pathway lies downstream of fascin–microtubule association in the control of adhesion stability. These findings shed light on new non actin-dependent roles for fascin and might have implications for the design of therapies to target fascin in metastatic disease. PMID:26542021

  18. Modulation of adhesion-dependent cAMP signaling by echistatin and alendronate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, J. H.; Ingber, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We measured intracellular cAMP levels in cells during attachment and spreading on different extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Increases in cAMP were observed within minutes when cells attached to fibronectin, vitronectin, and a synthetic RGD-containing fibronectin peptide (Petite 2000), but not when they adhered to another integrin alpha nu beta 3 ligand, echistatin. Because echistatin also inhibits bone resorption, we measured the effects of adding another osteoporosis inhibitor, alendronate, in this system. Alendronate inhibited the cAMP increase induced by ligands that primarily utilize integrin alpha nu beta 3 (vitronectin, Peptite 2000), but not by fibronectin which can also use integrin alpha 5 beta 1. These results show that cell adhesion to ECM can increase intracellular cAPM levels and raise the possibility that inhibitors of osteoporosis may act, in part, by preventing activation of this pathway by integrins.

  19. Overexpressed GRP78 affects EMT and cell-matrix adhesion via autocrine TGF-β/Smad2/3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichao; Li, Zongwei; Fan, Yongsheng; Li, Hanqing; Li, Zhouyu; Li, Yaoping

    2015-07-01

    Glucose-regulated protein of 78kD (GRP78) is a multifunctional protein belonging to the heat shock protein 70 family. Overexpression of GRP78 triggered by environmental and physiological stresses is positively correlated with the occurrence and progression of various tumors, but the molecular mechanisms have not been well established. The present study indicated that overexpression of GRP78 in colon cancer cells could promote cell-matrix adhesion through the upregulation of fibronectin, integrin-β1 and phosphorylated FAK. Meanwhile, it resulted in a visible epithelial-mesenchymal transition in DLD1 cells, and the Snail-2 played the key role during the process. More importantly, the data indicated that GRP78 overexpression facilitated the expression and secretion of TGF-β1, which further activated the downstream Smad2/3 signaling module to effectuate the cell-matrix adhesion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Taken together, this study provides a novel molecular mechanism involving in the effects of GRP78 on colon cancer metastasis. PMID:25934251

  20. Activation of the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHR) in MA-10 cells leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by a pathway that involves Src family kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Koji; Welsh, Toni; Ascoli, Mario

    2006-01-01

    We show that activation of the endogenous or recombinant LHR in mouse Leydig tumor cells (MA-10 cells) leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and one of its substrates (paxillin). Using specific antibodies to the five tyrosine residues of FAK that become phosphorylated we show that activation of the LHR increases the phosphorylation of Tyr576 and Tyr577 but it does not affect the phosphorylation of Tyr397, Tyr861 or Tyr925. Because FAK is a prominent substrate for the Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs) we tested for their involvement in the LHR-mediated phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576. Src is not detectable in MA-10 cells, but two other prominent members of this family (Fyn and Yes) are present. The LHR-mediated phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576 is readily inhibited by PP2 (a pharmacological inhibitor of SFKs) and by dominant-negative mutants of SKFs. Moreover, activation of the LHR in MA-10 cells results in the stimulation of the activity of Fyn and Yes and overexpression of either of these two tyrosine kinases enhances the LHR-mediate phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576. Studies involving activation of other G protein-coupled receptors, overexpression of the different Gα subunits, and the use of second messenger analogs suggest that the LHR-induced phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576 in MA-10 cells is mediated by SFKs, and that this family of kinases is, in turn, independently or cooperatively activated by the LHR-induced stimulation of Gs and Gq/11-mediated pathways. PMID:16293639

  1. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury

    PubMed Central

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H.R.; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding “bystander” cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxide (NO) that diffuses to bystander cells, in which NO levels are further increased by a mechanism compatible with Ca2+-dependent enzymatic production. We detected similar signals in tumors grown in dorsal skinfold chambers applied to live mice. Pharmacological blockade of connexin channels significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis in bystander cells, consistent with a critical role played by intercellular communication, Ca2+ and NO in the bystander effects triggered by photodynamic therapy. PMID:25868859

  2. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury.

    PubMed

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo; Molon, Barbara; Mammano, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding "bystander" cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxide (NO) that diffuses to bystander cells, in which NO levels are further increased by a mechanism compatible with Ca(2+)-dependent enzymatic production. We detected similar signals in tumors grown in dorsal skinfold chambers applied to live mice. Pharmacological blockade of connexin channels significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis in bystander cells, consistent with a critical role played by intercellular communication, Ca2+ and NO in the bystander effects triggered by photodynamic therapy.

  3. Effects of memantine and melatonin on signal transduction pathways vascular leakage and brain injury after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Kilic, U; Yilmaz, B; Reiter, R J; Yüksel, A; Kilic, E

    2013-05-01

    Because of their favorable action profiles in humans, both memantine and melatonin are particularly interesting candidates as neuroprotectants in acute ischemic stroke. Until now, the signaling mechanisms mediating memantine's neuroprotective actions remained essentially uninvestigated. In addition, we have combined memantine with melatonin, which is a well-known neuroprotective molecule. Herein, we examined the effects of memantine (20mg/kg, i.p.) administered alone or in combination with melatonin (4 mg/kg, i.p.) on the activation of signaling transduction pathways, IgG extravasation and ischemic injury in mice submitted to 90 min of intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by 24h of reperfusion. In these studies, both agents reduced ischemic injury and the density of DNA-fragmentation. Notably, melatonin/memantine combination reduced ischemic injury further as compared with memantine treatment, which was associated with reduced IgG extravasation, indicating vascular leakage in the brain. Animals receiving memantine exhibited elevated ERK-1/2 and decreased p21 and p38/MAPK activations, while it had no significant effect on phosphorylated Akt and SAPK/JNK1/2 in the ischemic brain. However, melatonin increased the activation of Akt and reduced the activations of ERK-1/2, p21, p38/MAPK and SAPK/JNK1/2 significantly. Synergistic effects of memantine and melatonin were observed in the inactivation of p21, p38/MAPK and SAPK/JNK1/2 pathways. Moreover, memantine reversed the effects of melatonin on the activation of ERK-1/2 pathway. Here, we provide evidence that free radical scavenger melatonin potentiates the effects of memantine on ischemic brain injury via inactivations of p21 and stress kinases p38/MAPK and SAPK/JNK1/2 pathways.

  4. TNF-α enhances vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the NF-κB, ERK and JNK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    LU, ZI-YUAN; CHEN, WAN-CHENG; LI, YONG-HUA; LI, LI; ZHANG, HANG; PANG, YAN; XIAO, ZHI-FANG; XIAO, HAO-WEN; XIAO, YANG

    2016-01-01

    The migration of circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to injured tissue is an important step in tissue regeneration and requires adhesion to the microvascular endothelium. The current study investigated the underlying mechanism of MSC adhesion to endothelial cells during inflammation. In in vitro MSC culture, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased the level of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in a dose-dependent manner. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway inhibitors, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), U0126 and SP600125, respectively, suppressed VCAM-1 expression induced by TNF-α at the mRNA and protein levels (P<0.05). TNF-α augmented the activation of NF-κB, ERK and JNK, and promoted MSC adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells; however, the inhibitors of NF-κB, ERK and JNK did not affect this process in these cells. The results of the current study indicate that adhesion of circulating MSCs to the endothelium is regulated by TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression, which is potentially mediated by the NF-κB, ERK and JNK signaling pathways. PMID:27221006

  5. Platelet Adhesion to Podoplanin Under Flow is Mediated by the Receptor CLEC-2 and Stabilised by Src/Syk-Dependent Platelet Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Alice Y.; Lowe, Kate; Latif, Arusa; Nash, Gerard B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet-specific deletion of CLEC-2, which signals through Src and Syk kinases, or global deletion of its ligand podoplanin results in blood-filled lymphatics during mouse development. Platelet-specific Syk deficiency phenocopies this defect, indicating that platelet activation is required for lymphatic development. In the present study, we investigated whether CLEC-2-podoplanin interactions could support platelet arrest from blood flow and whether platelet signalling is required for stable platelet adhesion to lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and recombinant podoplanin under flow. Perfusion of human or mouse blood over human LEC monolayers led to platelet adhesion and aggregation. Following αIIbβ3 blockade, individual platelets still adhered. Platelet binding occurred at venous but not arterial shear rates. There was no adhesion using CLEC-2-deficient blood or to vascular endothelial cells (which lack podoplanin). Perfusion of human blood over human Fc-podoplanin (hFcPDPN) in the presence of monoclonal antibody IV.3 to block FcγRIIA receptors led to platelet arrest at similar shear rates to those used on LECs. Src and Syk inhibitors significantly reduced global adhesion of human or mouse platelets to LECs and hFcPDPN. A similar result was seen using Syk-deficient mouse platelets. Reduced platelet adhesion was due to a decrease in the stability of binding. In conclusion, our data reveal that CLEC-2 is an adhesive receptor that supports platelet arrest to podoplanin under venous shear. Src/Syk-dependent signalling stabilises platelet adhesion to podoplanin, providing a possible molecular mechanism contributing to the lymphatic defects of Syk-deficient mice. PMID:25694214

  6. Micro-adhesion rings surrounding TCR microclusters are essential for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Sakuma, Machie; Ike, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Kimura, Yayoi; Ohara, Osamu; Saito, Takashi

    2016-07-25

    The immunological synapse (IS) formed at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells represents a hallmark of initiation of acquired immunity. T cell activation is initiated at T cell receptor (TCR) microclusters (MCs), in which TCRs and signaling molecules assemble at the interface before IS formation. We found that each TCR-MC was transiently bordered by a ring structure made of integrin and focal adhesion molecules in the early phase of activation, which is similar in structure to the IS in microscale. The micro-adhesion ring is composed of LFA-1, focal adhesion molecules paxillin and Pyk2, and myosin II (MyoII) and is supported by F-actin core and MyoII activity through LFA-1 outside-in signals. The formation of the micro-adhesion ring was transient but especially sustained upon weak TCR stimulation to recruit linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and SLP76. Perturbation of the micro-adhesion ring induced impairment of TCR-MC development and resulted in impaired cellular signaling and cell functions. Thus, the synapse-like structure composed of the core TCR-MC and surrounding micro-adhesion ring is a critical structure for initial T cell activation through integrin outside-in signals.

  7. Adhesives in larynx repair.

    PubMed

    Lyons, M B; Lyons, G D; Webster, D; Wheeler, V R

    1989-04-01

    Guinea pig laryngeal fractures were used as a model to compare the ease of application and effectiveness of the fibrinogen-adhesive system with the ease of application and effectiveness of cyanoacrylate glue and control fractures stinted with contralateral gelatin film. Seven fibrin adhesive-treated and two cyanoacrylate glue-treated guinea pigs were perfused after 60 and 35 days, respectively. The larynges were serial sectioned, and the wound sites were compared. The fibrinogen adhesive system was easier to dispense than cyanoacrylate glue, did not require a completely dry surface, and stabilized within 3 minutes. Cartilage segment alignment with focal, complete fracture healing and symmetrical chondrocyte proliferation were seen in fibrogen adhesive-stinted larynges. In the cyanoacrylate glue-treated larynges, there was no alignment and minimal, asymmetrical chondrocyte proliferation. Gelatin film-stinted controls exhibited similar features. Thus, fibrogen adhesive was easier to apply and more effectively bound laryngeal fractures than cyanoacrylate glue or gelatin film.

  8. A novel role for neural cell adhesion molecule in modulating insulin signaling and adipocyte differentiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai Jie; Xia, Yin Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Goh, Kim Jee; Ju, Pei Jun; Feng, Zhi Wei

    2011-08-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has recently been found on adult stem cells, but its biological significance remains largely unknown. In this study, we used bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from wild-type and NCAM knockout mice to investigate the role of NCAM in adipocyte differentiation. It was demonstrated that NCAM isoforms 180 and 140 but not NCAM-120 are expressed on almost all wild-type MSCs. Upon adipogenic induction, Ncam(-/-) MSCs exhibited a marked decrease in adipocyte differentiation compared with wild-type cells. The role of NCAM in adipocyte differentiation was also confirmed in NCAM-silenced preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells, which also had a phenotype with reduced adipogenic potential. In addition, we found that Ncam(-/-) MSCs appeared to be insulin resistant, as shown by their impaired insulin signaling cascade, such as the activation of the insulin-IGF-1 receptor, PI3K-Akt and CREB pathways. The PI3K-Akt inhibitor, LY294002, completely blocked adipocyte differentiation of MSCs, unveiling that the reduced adipogenic potential of Ncam(-/-) MSCs is due to insulin resistance as a result of loss of NCAM function. Furthermore, insulin resistance of Ncam(-/-) MSCs was shown to be associated with induction of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), a key mediator of insulin resistance. Finally, we demonstrated that re-expression of NCAM-180, but not NCAM-140, inhibits induction of TNF-α and thereby improves insulin resistance and adipogenic potential of Ncam(-/-) MSCs. Our results suggest a novel role of NCAM in promoting insulin signaling and adipocyte differentiation of adult stem cells. These findings raise the possibility of using NCAM intervention to improve insulin resistance.

  9. NADPH oxidase and lipid raft-associated redox signaling are required for PCB153-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules in human brain endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Andras, Ibolya; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), can lead to chronic inflammation and the development of vascular diseases. Because cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the cerebrovascular endothelium regulate infiltration of inflammatory cells into the brain, we have explored the molecular mechanisms by which ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), such as PCB153, can upregulate CAMs in brain endothelial cells. Exposure to PCB153 increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as well as elevated adhesion of leukocytes to brain endothelial cells. These effects were impeded by inhibitors of EGFR, JAKs, or Src activity. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase or disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depleting agents blocked PCB153-induced phosphorylation of JAK and Src kinases and upregulation of CAMs. In contrast, silencing of caveolin-1 by siRNA interference did not affect upregulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in brain endothelial cells stimulated by PCB153. Results of the present study indicate that lipid raft-dependent NADPH oxidase/JAK/EGFR signaling mechanisms regulate the expression of CAMs in brain endothelial cells and adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial monolayers. Due to its role in leukocyte infiltration, induction of CAMs may contribute to PCB-induced cerebrovascular disorders and neurotoxic effects in the CNS.

  10. Soma influences GSC progeny differentiation via the cell adhesion-mediated steroid-let-7-Wingless signaling cascade that regulates chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    König, Annekatrin; Shcherbata, Halyna R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is known that signaling from the germline stem cell niche is required to maintain germline stem cell identity in Drosophila. However, it is not clear whether the germline stem-cell daughters differentiate by default (because they are physically distant from the niche) or whether additional signaling is necessary to initiate the differentiation program. Previously, we showed that ecdysteroid signaling cell non-autonomously regulates early germline differentiation via its soma-specific co-activator and co-repressor, Taiman and Abrupt. Now, we demonstrate that this regulation is modulated by the miRNA let-7, which acts in a positive feedback loop to confer ecdysone signaling robustness via targeting its repressor, the transcription factor Abrupt. This feedback loop adjusts ecdysteroid signaling in response to some stressful alterations in the external and internal conditions, which include temperature stress and aging, but not nutritional deprivation. Upon let-7 deficit, escort cells fail to properly differentiate: their shape, division, and cell adhesive characteristics are perturbed. These cells have confused cellular identity and form columnar-like rather than squamous epithelium and fail to send protrusions in between differentiating germline cysts, affecting soma-germline communication. Particularly, levels of the homophilic cell adhesion protein Cadherin, which recruits Wg signaling transducer β-catenin, are increased in mutant escort cells and, correspondingly, in the adjacent germline cells. Readjustment of heterotypic (soma-germline) cell adhesion modulates Wg signaling intensity in the germline, which in turn regulates histone modifications that promote expression of the genes necessary to trigger early germline differentiation. Thus, our data first show the intrinsic role for Wg signaling in the germline and support a model where the soma influences the tempo of germline differentiation in response to external conditions. PMID:25661868

  11. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester suppresses monocyte adhesion to the endothelium by inhibiting NF-κB/NOX2-derived ROS signaling.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Risa; Makino, Junya; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the major polyphenols, exhibits anti-oxidative, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer properties. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, the progression of which is closely related to the accumulated adhesion of inflammatory monocytes/macrophages to the endothelium. We herein determined whether CAPE and its derivatives suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Of the four polyphenols tested, CAPE significantly suppressed the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-elicited expression of cluster for differentiation (CD) 11b, 14, and 36, and this was accompanied by the inhibition of THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC. CAPE also suppressed the activation of TPA-elicited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and accumulation of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS), but did not affect extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that CAPE suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC through, at least in part, the NF-κB, NOX2, and ROS-derived signaling axis. PMID:27257341

  13. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester suppresses monocyte adhesion to the endothelium by inhibiting NF-κB/NOX2-derived ROS signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Risa; Makino, Junya; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the major polyphenols, exhibits anti-oxidative, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer properties. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, the progression of which is closely related to the accumulated adhesion of inflammatory monocytes/macrophages to the endothelium. We herein determined whether CAPE and its derivatives suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Of the four polyphenols tested, CAPE significantly suppressed the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-elicited expression of cluster for differentiation (CD) 11b, 14, and 36, and this was accompanied by the inhibition of THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC. CAPE also suppressed the activation of TPA-elicited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and accumulation of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS), but did not affect extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that CAPE suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC through, at least in part, the NF-κB, NOX2, and ROS-derived signaling axis. PMID:27257341

  14. PI3K{gamma} activation by CXCL12 regulates tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrubio, Maria; Mellado, Mario; Carrera, Ana C.

    2009-10-16

    Tumor dissemination is a complex process, in which certain steps resemble those in leukocyte homing. Specific chemokine/chemokine receptor pairs have important roles in both processes. CXCL12/CXCR4 is the most commonly expressed chemokine/chemokine receptor pair in human cancers, in which it regulates cell adhesion, extravasation, metastatic colonization, angiogenesis, and proliferation. All of these processes require activation of signaling pathways that include G proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), JAK kinases, Rho GTPases, and focal adhesion-associated proteins. We analyzed these pathways in a human melanoma cell line in response to CXCL12 stimulation, and found that PI3K{gamma} regulates tumor cell adhesion through mechanisms different from those involved in cell invasion. Our data indicate that, following CXCR4 activation after CXCL12 binding, the invasion and adhesion processes are regulated differently by distinct downstream events in these signaling cascades.

  15. The cell-adhesion and signaling molecule PECAM-1 is a molecular mediator of resistance to genotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergom, Carmen; Goel, Reema; Paddock, Cathy; Gao, Cunji; Newman, Debra K; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Newman, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Defects in the regulation of apoptotic pathways have been implicated in the emergence of cancers resistant to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Identification of novel signaling molecules that influence cell survival has the potential to facilitate the development of new cancer therapies. The cell adhesion and signaling molecule, PECAM-1, is expressed in many hematopoietic and endothelial cell malignancies, and has previously been shown to suppress mitochondrial-dependent, Bax-mediated apoptosis. The ability of PECAM-1 to influence tumor cell survival following exposure to chemotherapeutic agents, however, is not known. Here we show that, when overexpressed in HEK293 and REN mesothelioma cells, PECAM-1 confers resistance to apoptosis induced by the DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agent, etoposide. Surprisingly, PECAM-1-mediated cytoprotection was found to be largely independent of its ability to form a signaling complex with the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, as virtually no tyrosine phosphorylation of, or SHP-2 association with, PECAM-1 could be detected after etoposide treatment. Furthermore, PECAM-1 retained its ability to protect against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in cells with SHP-2 levels significantly reduced using SHP-2-specific siRNA, and in cells in which Erk1/2--a downstream effector of SHP-2--had been inhibited. Finally, to determine whether endogenous PECAM-1 confers resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in lymphoid malignancies and endothelial cells, we used a lentiviral vector to stably express PECAM-1-specific siRNA in the Jurkat leukemia cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). siRNA-expressing Jurkat cells with a 70% reduction of PECAM-1 expression were significantly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. HUVECs with PECAM-1 expression reduced 75% were also markedly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Taken together, these data demonstrate that endogenous PECAM-1 expression on lymphoid

  16. Dissecting the Impact of Matrix Anchorage and Elasticity in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Pompe, Tilo; Glorius, Stefan; Bischoff, Thomas; Uhlmann, Ina; Kaufmann, Martin; Brenner, Sebastian; Werner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Extracellular matrices determine cellular fate decisions through the regulation of intracellular force and stress. Previous studies suggest that matrix stiffness and ligand anchorage cause distinct signaling effects. We show herein how defined noncovalent anchorage of adhesion ligands to elastic substrates allows for dissection of intracellular adhesion signaling pathways related to matrix stiffness and receptor forces. Quantitative analysis of the mechanical balance in cell adhesion using traction force microscopy revealed distinct scalings of the strain energy imparted by the cells on the substrates dependent either on matrix stiffness or on receptor force. Those scalings suggested the applicability of a linear elastic theoretical framework for the description of cell adhesion in a certain parameter range, which is cell-type-dependent. Besides the deconvolution of biophysical adhesion signaling, site-specific phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, dependent either on matrix stiffness or on receptor force, also demonstrated the dissection of biochemical signaling events in our approach. Moreover, the net contractile moment of the adherent cells and their strain energy exerted on the elastic substrate was found to be a robust measure of cell adhesion with a unifying power-law scaling exponent of 1.5 independent of matrix stiffness. PMID:19843448

  17. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  18. The Cysteine-Rich Domain of Human Adam 12 Supports Cell Adhesion through Syndecans and Triggers Signaling Events That Lead to β1 Integrin–Dependent Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Iba, Kousuke; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Gilpin, Brent; Fröhlich, Camilla; Loechel, Frosty; Zolkiewska, Anna; Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Liu, Wei; Langford, J. Kevin; Sanderson, Ralph D.; Brakebusch, Cord; Fässler, Reinhard; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2000-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins is involved in a variety of cellular interactions, including cell adhesion and ecto- domain shedding. Here we show that ADAM 12 binds to cell surface syndecans. Three forms of recombinant ADAM 12 were used in these experiments: the cys-teine-rich domain made in Escherichia coli (rADAM 12-cys), the disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain made in insect cells (rADAM 12-DC), and full-length human ADAM 12-S tagged with green fluorescent protein made in mammalian cells (rADAM 12-GFP). Mesenchymal cells specifically and in a dose-dependent manner attach to ADAM 12 via members of the syndecan family. After binding to syndecans, mesenchymal cells spread and form focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. Integrin β1 was responsible for cell spreading because function-blocking monoclonal antibodies completely inhibited cell spreading, and chondroblasts lacking β1 integrin attached but did not spread. These data suggest that mesenchymal cells use syndecans as the initial receptor for the ADAM 12 cysteine-rich domain–mediated cell adhesion, and then the β1 integrin to induce cell spreading. Interestingly, carcinoma cells attached but did not spread on ADAM 12. However, spreading could be efficiently induced by the addition of either 1 mM Mn2+ or the β1 integrin–activating monoclonal antibody 12G10, suggesting that in these carcinoma cells, the ADAM 12–syndecan complex fails to modulate the function of β1 integrin. PMID:10831617

  19. A PKA-Csk-pp60Src signaling pathway regulates the switch between endothelial cell invasion and cell-cell adhesion during vascular sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hui; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Avraamides, Christie J.; Stoletov, Konstantin; Klemke, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is controlled by signals that stimulate motility in endothelial cells at the tips of vascular sprouts while maintaining cell-cell adhesion in the stalks of angiogenic sprouts. We show here that Gs-linked G protein–coupled receptor activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays an important role in regulating the switch between endothelial cell adhesion and migration by activating C-terminal Src kinase, leading to inhibition of pp60Src. Activated PKA blocks pp60Src-dependent vascular endot helial-cadherin phosphorylation, thereby stimulating cell-cell adhesion while suppressing endothelial cell polarization, motility, angiogenesis, and vascular permeability. Similar to the actions of Notch and Dll4, PKA activation blocks sprouting in newly forming embryonic blood vessels, while PKA inhibition promotes excessive sprouting in these vessels. These findings demonstrate that G protein–coupled receptors and PKA regulate vascular sprouting during angiogenesis by controlling endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion through their actions on pp60Src. PMID:20826718

  20. A PKA-Csk-pp60Src signaling pathway regulates the switch between endothelial cell invasion and cell-cell adhesion during vascular sprouting.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Avraamides, Christie J; Stoletov, Konstantin; Klemke, Richard L; Varner, Judith A

    2010-12-16

    Angiogenesis is controlled by signals that stimulate motility in endothelial cells at the tips of vascular sprouts while maintaining cell-cell adhesion in the stalks of angiogenic sprouts. We show here that Gs-linked G protein-coupled receptor activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays an important role in regulating the switch between endothelial cell adhesion and migration by activating C-terminal Src kinase, leading to inhibition of pp60Src. Activated PKA blocks pp60Src-dependent vascular endot helial-cadherin phosphorylation, thereby stimulating cell-cell adhesion while suppressing endothelial cell polarization, motility, angiogenesis, and vascular permeability. Similar to the actions of Notch and Dll4, PKA activation blocks sprouting in newly forming embryonic blood vessels, while PKA inhibition promotes excessive sprouting in these vessels. These findings demonstrate that G protein-coupled receptors and PKA regulate vascular sprouting during angiogenesis by controlling endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion through their actions on pp60Src. PMID:20826718

  1. Estrogen-Dependent Uterine Secretion of Osteopontin Activates Blastocyst Adhesion Competence

    PubMed Central

    Egashira, Mahiro; Bai, Rulan; Nomura, Nana; Nomura, Shintaro; Hirota, Yasushi; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a highly orchestrated process that involves blastocyst-uterine interactions. This process is confined to a defined interval during gestation referred to as the “window of embryo implantation receptivity”. In mice this receptive period is controlled by ovarian estrogen and involves a coordination of blastocyst adhesion competence and uterine receptivity. Mechanisms coordinating the acquisition of blastocyst adhesion competence and uterine receptivity are largely unknown. Here, we show that ovarian estrogen indirectly regulates blastocyst adhesion competence. Acquisition of blastocyst adhesion competence was attributed to integrin activation (e.g. formation of adhesion complexes) rather than de novo integrin synthesis. Osteopontin (OPN) was identified as an estrogen-dependent uterine endometrial gland secretory factor responsible for activating blastocyst adhesion competence. Increased adhesion complex assembly in OPN-treated blastocysts was mediated through focal adhesion kinase (FAK)- and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent signaling pathways. These findings define for the first time specific regulatory components of an estrogen-dependent pathway coordinating blastocyst adhesion competence and uterine receptivity. PMID:23152823

  2. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  3. Inhibition of the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway Restores Cultured Spinal Cord-Injured Neuronal Migration, Adhesion, and Dendritic Spine Development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongdong; Cao, Fujiang; Sun, Shiwei; Liu, Tao; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-08-01

    The Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway plays an important role in central and peripheral neurons in functions such as dendritic arborization, neuronal polarity, and axon assembly. However, emerging evidence also shows that up-regulation of this signaling pathway may lead to the development of spinal cord injury. The present study aimed to determine the effects of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway inhibition on properties of spinal cord-injured neurons. First, neurons from spinal cord-injured C57BL/6 J mouse pups and sham-operated C57BL/6 J mouse pups were harvested. Then, immunofluorescence, western blotting, cell adhesion and cell migration assays, and DiI labeling were employed to investigate the effect of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway inhibition on spinal cord-injured neurons. Immunofluorescence results of synapse formation indicated that the experimental spinal cord injury model was successfully established. Western blot results identified upregulated Erk phosphorylation in the spinal cord-injured neurons, and also showed that U0126 inhibited phosphorylation of Erk, which is a downstream kinase in the Ras/Raf signaling pathway. Additionally, cell migration and adhesion was significantly increased in the spinal cord-injured neurons. DiI labeling results also showed an increased formation of mature spines after inhibition of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling. Taken together, these results suggested that the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway could serve as an effective treatment target for spinal cord injury.

  4. Identification of a high-mannose ICAM-1 glycoform: effects of ICAM-1 hypoglycosylation on monocyte adhesion and outside in signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David W.; Dunn, Taylor S.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Litovsky, Silvio H.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial adhesion molecules are critical effectors of inflammation ensuring coordinated interactions that allow leukocytes to home to sites of injury. These adhesion molecules are often extensively modified posttranslationaly by the addition of N-glycans, but if, or how, these modifications contribute to the protein function remains poorly understood. Herein we show that activated endothelial cells express two distinct N-glycoforms of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) that comprise a complex N-glycoform with α-2,6 sialic acid present at relatively high levels and a second, less abundant and previously undescribed high-mannose glycoform (HM-ICAM-1). This novel HM-ICAM-1 glycoform was also detected in human coronary artery specimens and moreover appeared to be the dominant glycoform in vivo. Production of exclusively HM-ICAM-1 in cells by α-mannosidase inhibition increased monocyte rolling and adhesion compared with mature ICAM-1 consistent with high-mannose epitopes providing leukocyte ligands. Cross-linking of ICAM-1 transmits outside-in signals that affect endothelial permeability and survival. Interestingly, cell signaling (assessed using ERK, VE-cadherin, and Akt phosphorylation) was maintained after cross-linking of HM-ICAM-1 compared with mature ICAM-1; however, interactions with the actin cytoskeleton were lost with HM-ICAM-1. These findings suggest that specific ICAM-1 N-glycoforms modulate distinct aspects of the inflammatory response and identify HM-ICAM-1 as a new therapeutic target for controlling leukocyte trafficking and endothelial inflammation. PMID:23703526

  5. Altering FAK-Paxillin Interactions Reduces Adhesion, Migration and Invasion Processes

    PubMed Central

    Deramaudt, Thérèse B.; Dujardin, Denis; Noulet, Fanny; Martin, Sophie; Vauchelles, Romain; Takeda, Ken; Rondé, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays an important role in signal transduction pathways initiated at sites of integrin-mediated cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. Thus, FAK is involved in many aspects of the metastatic process including adhesion, migration and invasion. Recently, several small molecule inhibitors which target FAK catalytic activity have been developed by pharmaceutical companies. The current study was aimed at addressing whether inhibiting FAK targeting to focal adhesions (FA) represents an efficient alternative strategy to inhibit FAK downstream pathways. Using a mutagenesis approach to alter the targeting domain of FAK, we constructed a FAK mutant that fails to bind paxillin. Inhibiting FAK-paxillin interactions led to a complete loss of FAK localization at FAs together with reduced phosphorylation of FAK and FAK targets such as paxillin and p130Cas. This in turn resulted in altered FA dynamics and inhibition of cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Moreover, the migration properties of cells expressing the FAK mutant were reduced as compared to FAK-/- cells. This was correlated with a decrease in both phospho-Src and phospho-p130Cas levels at FAs. We conclude that targeting FAK-paxillin interactions is an efficient strategy to reduce FAK signalling and thus may represent a target for the development of new FAK inhibitors. PMID:24642576

  6. Synergistic regulation of cell function by matrix rigidity and adhesive pattern

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shinuo; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a critical role in regulating cellular behaviors. Recent studies of cell-ECM interactions have mainly focused on the actomyosin based and adhesion mediated mechanosensing pathways to understand how individual mechanical signals in the cell microenvironment, such as matrix rigidity and adhesive ECM pattern, are sensed by the cell and further trigger downstream intracellular signaling cascades and cellular responses. However, synergistic and collective regulation of cellular behaviors by matrix rigidity and adhesive ECM pattern are still elusive and largely uncharacterized. Here, we generated a library of microfabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropost arrays to study the synergistic and independent effects of matrix rigidity and adhesive ECM pattern on mechanoresponsive behaviors of both NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We showed that both cell types were mechanosensitive and their cell spreading, FA formation, cytoskeletal contractility, and proliferation were all strongly dependent on both substrate rigidity and adhesive ECM pattern. We further showed that under the same substrate rigidity condition, smaller and closer adhesive ECM islands would cause both cells to spread out more, form more adhesion structures, and have a higher proliferation rate. The influence of adhesive ECM pattern on rigidity-mediated cytoskeletal contractility was cell type specific and was only significant for NIH/3T3. Morphometric analysis of cell populations revealed a strong correlation between focal adhesion and cell spreading, regardless of substrate rigidity and adhesive ECM pattern. We also observed a strong correlation between cellular traction force and cell spreading, with a substantially smaller independent effect of substrate rigidity on traction force. Our study here had determined key aspects of the biomechanical responses of adherent cells to independent and collective changes of

  7. Xanthine Oxidase-Derived ROS Display a Biphasic Effect on Endothelial Cells Adhesion and FAK Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ben-Mahdi, Meriem H; Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; O'Dowd, Yvonne; El-Benna, Jamel; Pasquier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In pathological situations such as ischemia-reperfusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by different systems which are involved in endothelial cells injury, ultimately leading to severe organ dysfunctions. The aim of this work was to study the effect of ROS produced by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase (Hx-XO) on the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and on the signaling pathways involved. Results show that Hx-XO-derived ROS induced an increase in HUVEC adhesion in the early stages of the process (less than 30 min), followed by a decrease in adhesion in the later stages of the process. Interestingly, Hx-XO-derived ROS induced the same biphasic effect on the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase critical for cell adhesion, but not on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The biphasic effect was not seen with ERK1/2 where a decrease in phosphorylation only was observed. Wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, inhibited ROS-induced cell adhesion and FAK phosphorylation. Orthovanadate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and Resveratrol (Resv), an antioxidant agent, protected FAK and ERK1/2 from dephosphorylation and HUVEC from ROS-induced loss of adhesion. This study shows that ROS could have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on HUVEC adhesion and FAK phosphorylation and suggests that PI3-kinase and tyrosine phosphatase control these effects. PMID:27528888

  8. Xanthine Oxidase-Derived ROS Display a Biphasic Effect on Endothelial Cells Adhesion and FAK Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Pham My-Chan; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Pasquier, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In pathological situations such as ischemia-reperfusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by different systems which are involved in endothelial cells injury, ultimately leading to severe organ dysfunctions. The aim of this work was to study the effect of ROS produced by hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase (Hx-XO) on the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and on the signaling pathways involved. Results show that Hx-XO-derived ROS induced an increase in HUVEC adhesion in the early stages of the process (less than 30 min), followed by a decrease in adhesion in the later stages of the process. Interestingly, Hx-XO-derived ROS induced the same biphasic effect on the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase critical for cell adhesion, but not on ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The biphasic effect was not seen with ERK1/2 where a decrease in phosphorylation only was observed. Wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, inhibited ROS-induced cell adhesion and FAK phosphorylation. Orthovanadate, a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and Resveratrol (Resv), an antioxidant agent, protected FAK and ERK1/2 from dephosphorylation and HUVEC from ROS-induced loss of adhesion. This study shows that ROS could have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on HUVEC adhesion and FAK phosphorylation and suggests that PI3-kinase and tyrosine phosphatase control these effects. PMID:27528888

  9. Control cell adhesion with dynamic bilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourouklis, Andreas; Lerum, Ronald; Bermudez, Harry

    2012-02-01

    Interfacially-directed assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers was employed to create ultrathin films having the potential to correlate the dynamics of ECM cues with cell adhesion and cytoskeletally-generated forces. The mobility of the polymeric bilayer films were tuned by the incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer chains, which are thought to reduce interlayer friction. Labeling of the block copolymer chains with an adhesive peptide ligand (RGD) provided a specific means to study integrin-mediated cellular processes and the corresponding mechanotransduction. By seeding anchorage-dependent cells on ``dynamic'' (laterally mobile) and ``static'' films that display the same amount of RGD, we have found that cells recognize the difference in RGD diffusivity and develop distinct responses over time. We intend to examine changes in cell response by controlling the extent of cytoskeletally-generated forces and the assembly dynamics of focal adhesion complexes. Such films provide a unique platform to unveil the biomechanical signals related with ECM dynamics, and may ultimately facilitate a deeper understanding of cellular processes.

  10. Advanced approaches to focal plane integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. D.; Smith, E. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Both visible and infrared focal plane assemblies have common architectural driving parameters which guide their design approaches. The key drivers for advanced focal plane assemblies (FPA) are: the detector type and performance required; the number of detector chips; the packaging density; and the geometry. The impact of these drivers is seen to determine the engineering compromises necessary to establish FPA design approach. Several new designs are discussed which show a range of applications from single detector assemblies to monolithic detector chips with on-chip signal processing. The main objective of many advanced designs is to integrate the focal plane components in order to reduce power and reduce the number of interconnections.

  11. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  12. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and m

  13. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and m

  14. Alterations in ovarian cancer cell adhesion drive taxol resistance by increasing microtubule dynamics in a FAK-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Daniel J; Khambhati, Niti N; Qi, Mark X; Patel, Krishan S; Ravikumar, Nithin; Brandenburg, Chandler P; Dawson, Michelle R

    2015-04-17

    Chemorefractory ovarian cancer patients show extremely poor prognosis. Microtubule-stabilizing Taxol (paclitaxel) is a first-line treatment against ovarian cancer. Despite the close interplay between microtubules and cell adhesion, it remains unknown if chemoresistance alters the way cells adhere to their extracellular environment, a process critical for cancer metastasis. To investigate this, we isolated Taxol-resistant populations of OVCAR3 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines. Though Taxol-resistant cells neither effluxed more drug nor gained resistance to other chemotherapeutics, they did display increased microtubule dynamics. These changes in microtubule dynamics coincided with faster attachment rates and decreased adhesion strength, which correlated with increased surface β1-integrin expression and decreased focal adhesion formation, respectively. Adhesion strength correlated best with Taxol-sensitivity, and was found to be independent of microtubule polymerization but dependent on focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which was up-regulated in Taxol-resistant cells. FAK inhibition also decreased microtubule dynamics to equal levels in both populations, indicating alterations in adhesive signaling are up-stream of microtubule dynamics. Taken together, this work demonstrates that Taxol-resistance dramatically alters how ovarian cancer cells adhere to their extracellular environment causing down-stream increases in microtubule dynamics, providing a therapeutic target that may improve prognosis by not only recovering drug sensitivity, but also decreasing metastasis.

  15. Copper modulates zinc metalloproteinase-dependent ectodomain shedding of key signaling and adhesion proteins and promotes the invasion of prostate cancer epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Parr-Sturgess, Catherine A; Tinker, Claire L; Hart, Claire A; Brown, Michael D; Clarke, Noel W; Parkin, Edward T

    2012-10-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc metalloproteinases (ZMPs) that catalyze the "ectodomain shedding" of a range of cell surface proteins including signaling and adhesion molecules. These "sheddases" are associated with the invasion and metastasis of a range of cancers. Increased serum and tumor tissue levels of copper are also observed in several cancers, although little is known about how the metal might promote disease progression at the molecular level. In the current study, we investigated whether copper might regulate the ectodomain shedding of two key cell surface proteins implicated in the invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer, the Notch ligand Jagged1 and the adhesion molecule E-cadherin, and whether the metal was able to influence the invasion of the prostate cancer epithelial cell line PC3. Physiological copper concentrations stimulated the ZMP-mediated proteolysis of Jagged1 and E-cadherin in cell culture models, whereas other divalent metals had no effect. Copper-mediated Jagged1 proteolysis was also observed following the pretreatment of cells with cycloheximide and in a cell-free membrane system, indicating a posttranslational mechanism of sheddase activation. Finally, the concentrations of copper that stimulated ZMP-mediated protein shedding also enhanced PC3 invasion; an effect that could be negated using a sheddase inhibitor or copper chelators. Collectively, these data implicate copper as an important factor in promoting prostate cancer cell invasion and indicate that the selective posttranslational activation of ZMP-mediated protein shedding might play a role in this process.

  16. Control of density-dependent, cell state-specific signal transduction by the cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1, and its influence on cell cycle regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffrahn, Inka; Singer, Bernhard B.; Sigmundsson, Kristmundur; Lucka, Lothar; Oebrink, Bjoern . E-mail: bjorn.obrink@cmb.ki.se

    2005-07-15

    Growth factor receptors, extracellular matrix receptors, and cell-cell adhesion molecules co-operate in regulating the activities of intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1 co-regulates growth-factor-induced DNA synthesis in NBT-II epithelial cells in a cell-density-dependent manner. CEACAM1 exerted its effects by regulating the activity of the Erk 1/2 MAP kinase pathway and the expression levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Interestingly, both inhibitory and stimulatory effects were observed. Confluent cells continuously exposed to fetal calf serum showed little Erk activity and DNA synthesis compared with sparse cells. Under these conditions, anti-CEACAM1 antibodies strongly stimulated Erk activation, decreased p27 expression, and induced DNA synthesis. In serum-starved confluent cells, re-addition of 10% fetal calf serum activated the Erk pathway, decreased p27 expression, and stimulated DNA synthesis to the same levels as in sparse cells. Under these conditions anti-CEACAM1 antibodies de-activated Erk, restored the level of p27, and inhibited DNA synthesis. These data indicate that CEACAM1 mediates contact inhibition of proliferation in cells that are constantly exposed to growth factors, but co-activates growth-factor-induced proliferation in cells that have been starved for growth factors; exposure to extracellular CEACAM1 ligands reverts these responses.

  17. Mechanotransduction: all signals point to cytoskeleton, matrix, and integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alenghat, Francis J.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical stresses modulate cell function by either activating or tuning signal transduction pathways. Mechanotransduction, the process by which cells convert mechanical stimuli into a chemical response, occurs both in cells specialized for sensing mechanical cues and in parenchymal cells whose primary function is not mechanosensory. However, common among the various responses to mechanical stress is the importance of direct or indirect connections between the internal cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and traditional signal transducing molecules. In many instances, these elements converge at focal adhesions, sites of structural attachment between the cytoskeleton and ECM that are anchored by cell surface integrin receptors. Alenghat and Ingber discuss the accumulating evidence for the central role of cytoskeleton, ECM, and integrin-anchored focal adhesions in several mechanotransduction pathways.

  18. Focal dystonia in musicians.

    PubMed

    Lie-Nemeth, Theresa J

    2006-11-01

    In conclusion, musicians' focal dystonia is a significant and potentially career-ending neurological condition of which physiatrists and other performing arts medicine clinicians should be aware. Pathology has been identified in the somatosensory cortex, and in the motor cortex and basal ganglia. Although advances have been made in the elucidating some of the pathologic changes in focal dystonia, better understanding is needed. Current treatments such as retraining, splinting, oral medications, and botulinum toxin injections are limited. Therefore, the ultimate goal for focal dystonia is to prevent this disabling disorder of instrumental musicians.

  19. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  20. A c-di-GMP Effector System Controls Cell Adhesion by Inside-Out Signaling and Surface Protein Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Peter D.; Boyd, Chelsea D.; Sondermann, Holger; O'Toole, George A.

    2011-01-01

    In Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 the availability of inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an environmental signal that controls biofilm formation through a cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling pathway. In low Pi conditions, a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) RapA is expressed, depleting cellular c-di-GMP and causing the loss of a critical outer-membrane adhesin LapA from the cell surface. This response involves an inner membrane protein LapD, which binds c-di-GMP in the cytoplasm and exerts a periplasmic output promoting LapA maintenance on the cell surface. Here we report how LapD differentially controls maintenance and release of LapA: c-di-GMP binding to LapD promotes interaction with and inhibition of the periplasmic protease LapG, which targets the N-terminus of LapA. We identify conserved amino acids in LapA required for cleavage by LapG. Mutating these residues in chromosomal lapA inhibits LapG activity in vivo, leading to retention of the adhesin on the cell surface. Mutations with defined effects on LapD's ability to control LapA localization in vivo show concomitant effects on c-di-GMP-dependent LapG inhibition in vitro. To establish the physiological importance of the LapD-LapG effector system, we track cell attachment and LapA protein localization during Pi starvation. Under this condition, the LapA adhesin is released from the surface of cells and biofilms detach from the substratum. This response requires c-di-GMP depletion by RapA, signaling through LapD, and proteolytic cleavage of LapA by LapG. These data, in combination with the companion study by Navarro et al. presenting a structural analysis of LapD's signaling mechanism, give a detailed description of a complete c-di-GMP control circuit—from environmental signal to molecular output. They describe a novel paradigm in bacterial signal transduction: regulation of a periplasmic enzyme by an inner membrane signaling protein that binds a cytoplasmic second messenger. PMID:21304920

  1. Stalk-dependent and Stalk-independent Signaling by the Adhesion G Protein-coupled Receptors GPR56 (ADGRG1) and BAI1 (ADGRB1).

    PubMed

    Kishore, Ayush; Purcell, Ryan H; Nassiri-Toosi, Zahra; Hall, Randy A

    2016-02-12

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) are a large yet poorly understood family of seven-transmembrane proteins. A defining characteristic of the aGPCR family is the conserved GAIN domain, which has autoproteolytic activity and can cleave the receptors near the first transmembrane domain. Several aGPCRs, including ADGRB1 (BAI1 or B1) and ADGRG1 (GPR56 or G1), have been found to exhibit significantly increased constitutive activity when truncated to mimic GAIN domain cleavage (ΔNT). Recent reports have suggested that the new N-terminal stalk, which is revealed by GAIN domain cleavage, can directly activate aGPCRs as a tethered agonist. We tested this hypothesis in studies on two distinct aGPCRs, B1 and G1, by engineering mutant receptors lacking the entire NT including the stalk (B1- and G1-SL, with "SL" indicating "stalkless"). These receptors were evaluated in a battery of signaling assays and compared with full-length wild-type and cleavage-mimicking (ΔNT) forms of the two receptors. We found that B1-SL, in multiple assays, exhibited robust signaling activity, suggesting that the membrane-proximal stalk region is not necessary for its activation. For G1, however, the results were mixed, with the SL mutant exhibiting robust activity in several signaling assays (including TGFα shedding, activation of NFAT luciferase, and β-arrestin recruitment) but reduced activity relative to ΔNT in a distinct assay (activation of SRF luciferase). These data support a model in which the activation of certain pathways downstream of aGPCRs is stalk-dependent, whereas signaling to other pathways is stalk-independent.

  2. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) inhibits low density lipoprotein-induced signaling in platelets.

    PubMed

    Relou, Ingrid A M; Gorter, Gertie; Ferreira, Irlando Andrade; van Rijn, Herman J M; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N

    2003-08-29

    At physiological concentrations, low density lipoprotein (LDL) increases the sensitivity of platelets to aggregation- and secretion-inducing agents without acting as an independent activator of platelet functions. LDL sensitizes platelets by inducing a transient activation of p38MAPK, a Ser/Thr kinase that is activated by the simultaneous phosphorylation of Thr180 and Tyr182 and is an upstream regulator of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). A similar transient phosphorylation of p38MAPK is induced by a peptide mimicking amino acids 3359-3369 in apoB100 called the B-site. Here we report that the transient nature of p38MAPK activation is caused by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), a receptor with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif. PECAM-1 activation by cross-linking induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and a fall in phosphorylated p38MAPK and cPLA2. Interestingly, LDL and the B-site peptide also induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1, and studies with immunoprecipitates indicate the involvement of c-Src. Inhibition of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A (okadaic acid) makes the transient p38MAPK activation by LDL and the B-site peptide persistent. Inhibition of Tyr-phosphatases (vanadate) increases Tyr-phosphorylated PECAM-1 and blocks the activation of p38MAPK. Together, these findings suggest that, following a first phase in which LDL, through its B-site, phosphorylates and thereby activates p38MAPK, a second phase is initiated in which LDL activates PECAM-1 and induces dephosphorylation of p38MAPK via activation of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A. PMID:12775720

  3. LUTEOLIN PROTECTS AGAINST VASCULAR INFLAMMATION IN MICE AND TNF-ALPHA-INDUCED MONOCYTE ADHESION TO ENDOTHELIAL CELLS VIA SUPPRESSING IΚBα/NF-κB SIGNALING PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenquan; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Liu, Dongmin; Shah, Halley; Li, Jason Z.; Chitrakar, Rojin; Si, Hongwei; McCormick, John; Zhu, Hong; Zhen, Wei; Li, Yunbo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Luteolin, a naturally-occurring flavanoid, present in many medicinal plants as well as in some commonly consumed fruits and vegetables has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of luteolin at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that luteolin as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human EA.hy 926 endothelial cells, a key event in triggering vascular inflammation. Luteolin potently suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, key mediators involved in enhancing endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, luteolin inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation, expression of IκB kinase ß (IKKß), and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that luteolin can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing 0% or 0.6% luteolin for three weeks and luteolin supplementation greatly suppressed TNF-α-induced increases in circulating levels of MCP-1/JE, CXCL1/KC, and sICAM-1 in C57BL/6 mice. Consistently, dietary intake of luteolin significantly reduced TNF-α-stimulated adhesion of monocytes to aortic endothelial cells ex vivo. Histology shows that luteolin treatment prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers’ delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies further show that luteolin treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocyte-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, luteolin protects against TNF-α-induced vascular inflammation, in both in

  4. Terbium promotes adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via activation of the Smad-dependent TGF-β/BMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Ge, Kun; Jin, Yi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Shu-Xiang; Yang, Meng-Su; Zhang, Jin-Chao

    2014-08-01

    With its special physical and chemical properties, terbium has been widely used, which has inevitably increased the chance of human exposure to terbium-based compounds. It was reported that terbium mainly deposited in bone after introduction into the human body. Although some studies revealed the effects of terbium on bone cell lines, there have been few reports about the potential effect of terbium on adhesion and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we investigated the effects of terbium on the adhesion and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and the associated molecular mechanisms. Our data reveal that terbium promoted the osteogenic differentiation in a time-dependent manner and conversely inhibited the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the cell-cell or cell-matrix interaction was enhanced by activating adherent-related key factors, which were evaluated by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were also performed to further detect osteogenic and adipogenic biomarkers of MSCs. The regulation of terbium on differentiation of MSCs led to the interaction between the transforming growth factor β/bone morphogenetic protein and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) signaling pathways, resulting in upregulation of the osteogenic master transcription factors, such as Runt-related transcription factor 2, bone morphogenetic protein 2, collagen I, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin, and downregulation of the adipogenic master transcription factors, such as PPARγ2. The results provide novel evidence to elucidate the mechanisms of bone metabolism by terbium and may be helpful for more rational application of terbium-based compounds in the future.

  5. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 mediated endocytosis of β1-integrin influences cell adhesion and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Rabiej, Verena K; Pflanzner, Thorsten; Wagner, Timo; Goetze, Kristina; Storck, Steffen E; Eble, Johannes A; Weggen, Sascha; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) has been shown to interact with β1-integrin and regulate its surface expression. LRP1 knock-out cells exhibit altered cytoskeleton organization and decreased cell migration. Here we demonstrate coupled endocytosis of LRP1 and β1-integrin and the involvement of the intracellular NPxY2 motif of LRP1 in this process. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts harboring a knock in replacement of the NPxY2 motif of LRP1 by a multiple alanine cassette (AAxA) showed elevated surface expression of β1-integrin and decreased β1-integrin internalization rates. As a consequence, cell spreading was altered and adhesion rates were increased in our cell model. Cells formed more focal adhesion complexes, whereby in vitro cell migration rates were decreased. Similar results could be observed in a corresponding mouse model, the C57Bl6 LRP1 NPxYxxL knock in mice, therefore, the biochemistry of cellular adhesion was altered in primary cortical neurons. In vivo cell migration experiments demonstrated a disturbance of neuroblast cell migration along the rostral migratory stream. In summary, our results indicate that LRP1 interacts with β1-integrin mediating integrin internalization and thus correlates with downstream signaling of β1-integrin such as focal adhesion dynamics. Consequently, the disturbance of this interaction resulted in a dysfunction in in vivo and in vitro cell adhesion and cell migration.

  6. The Molecular Architecture of Cell Adhesion: Dynamic Remodeling Revealed by Videonanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sergé, Arnauld

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane delimits the cell, which is the basic unit of living organisms, and is also a privileged site for cell communication with the environment. Cell adhesion can occur through cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. Adhesion proteins such as integrins and cadherins also constitute receptors for inside-out and outside-in signaling within proteolipidic platforms. Adhesion molecule targeting and stabilization relies on specific features such as preferential segregation by the sub-membrane cytoskeleton meshwork and within membrane proteolipidic microdomains. This review presents an overview of the recent insights brought by the latest developments in microscopy, to unravel the molecular remodeling occurring at cell contacts. The dynamic aspect of cell adhesion was recently highlighted by super-resolution videomicroscopy, also named videonanoscopy. By circumventing the diffraction limit of light, nanoscopy has allowed the monitoring of molecular localization and behavior at the single-molecule level, on fixed and living cells. Accessing molecular-resolution details such as quantitatively monitoring components entering and leaving cell contacts by lateral diffusion and reversible association has revealed an unexpected plasticity. Adhesion structures can be highly specialized, such as focal adhesion in motile cells, as well as immune and neuronal synapses. Spatiotemporal reorganization of adhesion molecules, receptors, and adaptors directly relates to structure/function modulation. Assembly of these supramolecular complexes is continuously balanced by dynamic events, remodeling adhesions on various timescales, notably by molecular conformation switches, lateral diffusion within the membrane and endo/exocytosis. Pathological alterations in cell adhesion are involved in cancer evolution, through cancer stem cell interaction with stromal niches, growth, extravasation, and metastasis. PMID:27200348

  7. The Small Molecule Chloropyramine Hydrochloride (C4) Targets the Binding Site of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 3 and Suppresses Breast Cancer Growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kurenova, Elena V.; Hunt, Darell L.; He, Dihua; Magis, Andrew T.; Ostrov, David A.; Cance, William G.

    2009-01-01

    FAK is a tyrosine kinase that functions as a key orchestrator of signals leading to invasion and metastasis. Since FAK interacts directly with a number of critical proteins involved in survival signaling in tumor cells, we hypothesized that targeting a key protein-protein interface with drug-like small molecules was a feasible strategy for inhibiting tumor growth. In this study, we targeted the protein-protein interface between FAK and VEGFR-3 and identified compound C4 (chloropyramine hydrochloride) as a drug capable of 1) inhibiting the biochemical function of VEGFR-3 and FAK, 2) inhibiting proliferation of a diverse set of cancer cell types in vitro, and 3) reducing tumor growth in vivo. Chloropyramine hydrochloride reduced tumor growth as a single agent, while concomitant administration with doxorubicin had a pronounced synergistic effect. Our data demonstrate that the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction can be targeted by small drug-like molecules and this interaction can provide the basis for highly-specific novel cancer therapeutics. PMID:19610651

  8. Wnt/β-catenin coupled with HIF-1α/VEGF signaling pathways involved in galangin neurovascular unit protection from focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuanhong; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Chang; Wang, Wei; Wen, Limei; Gao, Kuo; Chen, Xiuping; Xiong, Sihuai; Zhao, Huihui; Li, Shaojing

    2015-01-01

    Microenvironmental regulation has become a promising strategy for complex disease treatment. The neurovascular unit (NVU), as the key structural basis to maintain an optimal brain microenvironment, has emerged as a new paradigm to understand the pathology of stroke. In this study, we investigated the effects of galangin, a natural flavonoid isolated from the rhizome of Alpina officinarum Hance, on NVU microenvironment improvement and associated signal pathways in rats impaired by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Galangin ameliorated neurological scores, cerebral infarct volume and cerebral edema and reduced the concentration of Evans blue (EB) in brain tissue. NVU ultrastructural changes were also improved by galangin. RT-PCR and western blot revealed that galangin protected NVUs through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway coupled with HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF and β-catenin could be the key nodes of these two coupled pathways. In conclusion, Galangin might function as an anti-ischemic stroke drug by improving the microenvironment of NVUs. PMID:26537366

  9. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  10. Innate Non-Specific Cell Substratum Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, William F.; Fuller, Danny; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of motile cells to solid surfaces is necessary to transmit forces required for propulsion. Unlike mammalian cells, Dictyostelium cells do not make integrin mediated focal adhesions. Nevertheless, they can move rapidly on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. We have found that adhesion to such surfaces can be inhibited by addition of sugars or amino acids to the buffer. Treating whole cells with αlpha-mannosidase to cleave surface oligosaccharides also reduces adhesion. The results indicate that adhesion of these cells is mediated by van der Waals attraction of their surface glycoproteins to the underlying substratum. Since glycoproteins are prevalent components of the surface of most cells, innate adhesion may be a common cellular property that has been overlooked. PMID:22952588

  11. A theoretical analysis for the effect of focal contact formation on cell-substrate attachment strength.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, M D; Hammer, D A

    1993-01-01

    For many cell types, growth, differentiation, and motility are dependent on receptor-mediated adhesion to ligand-coated surfaces. Focal contacts are strong, specialized, adhesive connections between cell and substrate in which receptors aggregate and connect extracellular ligand to intracellular cytoskeletal molecules. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to examine how focal contact formation affects cellular adhesive strength. To calculate adhesive strength with and without focal contacts, we use a one-dimensional tape peeling analysis to determine the critical tension necessary to peel the membrane. Receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as adhesive springs. In the absence of focal contacts, we derive analytic expressions for the critical tension at low and high ligand densities and show how membrane morphology affects adhesion. Then, focal contacts are modeled as cytoplasmic nucleation centers which bind adhesion receptors. The extent of adhesive strengthening upon focal contact formation depends on the elastic rigidity of the cytoskeletal connections, which determines the structural integrity of the focal contact itself. We consider two limits to this elasticity, very weak and rigid. Rigid cytoskeletal connections give much greater attachment strengths. The dependence of attachment strength on measurable model parameters is quite different in these two limits, which suggests focal contact structure might be deduced from properly performed adhesion experiments. Finally, we compare our model to the adhesive strengthening response reported for glioma cell adhesion to fibronectin (Lotz et al., 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:1795-1805). Our model successfully predicts the observed detachment forces at 4 degrees C and yields values for the number of fibronectin receptors per glioma cell and the density of cytoskeletal connection molecules (talin) involved in receptor clusters which are consistent with measurements for other cell types. Comparison of the model with

  12. Bile acid signaling through FXR induces intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in mouse liver and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pu; Borges-Marcucci, Lisa A; Evans, Mark J; Harnish, Douglas C

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a dramatic induction of inflammatory gene expression in livers from mice fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet containing cholate after 3-5 wk. To determine the contribution of cholate in mediating these inductions, C57BL/6 mice were fed a chow diet supplemented with increasing concentrations of cholic acid (CA) for 5 days. A dose-dependent induction in the hepatic levels of TNF-alpha, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and SAA-2 mRNA were observed. As positive controls, a dose-dependent repression of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase and a dose-dependent induction of small heterodimer partner (SHP) expression were also observed, suggesting that farnesoid X receptor (FXR) was activated. In addition, ICAM-1 and SHP mRNA levels were also induced in primary human hepatocytes when treated with chenodeoxycholic acid or GW4064, a FXR-selective agonist. The involvement of FXR in CA-induced inflammatory gene expression was further investigated in the human hepatic cell line HepG2. Both ICAM-1 and SHP expression were induced in a dose- and time-dependent manner by treatment with the FXR-selective agonist GW4064. Moreover, the induction of ICAM-1 by GW4064 was inhibited by the FXR antagonist guggulsterone or with transfection of FXR siRNA. Finally, the activity of FXR was mapped to a retinoic acid response element (RARE) site containing an imbedded farnesoid X response element (FXRE) on the human ICAM-1 promoter and FXR and retinoid X receptor were demonstrated to bind to this site. Finally, FXR-mediated activation of ICAM-1 could be further enhanced by TNF-alpha cotreatment in hepatocytes, suggesting a potential cooperation between cytokine and bile acid-signaling pathways during hepatic inflammatory events.

  13. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bassioukas, K; Danielides, V; Georgiou, I; Photos, E; Zagorianakou, P; Skevas, A

    2000-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by HPV 13 or HPV 32. In Caucasians there have been only a few cases reported. We present the first case in Greece in a young Caucasian girl in which HPV 13 was detected with PCR analysis. The patient was successfully treated with CO2 laser.

  14. [Focal infections in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    Pal'chun, V T

    2016-01-01

    This publication is focused on the mechanisms underlying the clinical course of acute focal infections concomitant with ENT pathology, factors responsible for their chronization and the development of complications. Also discussed are the methods for the early adequate conservative and surgical treatment of these conditions. Special emphasis is placed on the principles of management of chronic tonsillitis. PMID:26977559

  15. Focal Plane Instrumentation of VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, T.; McKay, R.; Sleege, G.; Petry, D.

    VERITAS is a new atmospheric Cherenkov imaging telescope array to detect very high energy gamma rays above 100 GeV. The array is located in southern Arizona, USA, at an altitude of 1270m above see level. The array currently consists of four 12 m telescopes, structurally resembling the Davis-Cotton design of the Whipple 10 m telescope. The VERITAS focal plane instruments are equipped with high-resolution (499 pixels) fast photo-multiplier-tube (PMT) cameras covering a 3.5 degree field of view with 0.148 degree pixel separation. Light concentrators reduce the dead-space between PMTs to 25% and shield the PMTs from ambient light. The PMTs are connected to high-speed pre-amplifiers improving the signal to noise ratio and allow single photoelectron measurements in situ at operating voltage. Current monitor circuits in the focus box provide real-time monitoring of the anode currents for each pixel and ambient conditions of the focus box. A charge injection system installed in the focus box allows daytime testing of the trigger and data acquisition system by injecting pulses of variable amplitude and length into pre-amplifier stage. A detailed description of the VERITAS focal plane instruments will be given in this presentation.

  16. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  17. Focal and generalized alopecia.

    PubMed

    O'Dair, H A; Foster, A P

    1995-07-01

    Focal or generalized alopecia is defined as hair loss affecting the ventral, lateral, perineal, and dorsal aspects of the trunk of the cat, usually in a symmetric pattern. This may be attributable to failure of hair coat production, excess loss of hair due to self trauma, or excess shedding of whole hairs. Self trauma is the most common cause of hair loss and is associated particularly with flea allergy dermatitis. Other causes of hair loss are reviewed.

  18. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, Pía; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Berdugo, Lucero

    2010-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign, asymptomatic disease. It appears as papules, principally on the lower lip, although it can also be found on the retro-commissural mucosa and tongue and, less frequently, on the upper lip, gingiva and palate. FEH is caused by human papillomavirus subtype 13 or 32. The condition occurs in many populations and ethnic groups. We present the clinical case of a 31-year-old male with lesions that clinically and histologically corresponded to FEH.

  19. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules

    PubMed Central

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2014-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  20. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  1. Surface wettability of plasma SiOx:H nanocoating-induced endothelial cells' migration and the associated FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Guixue; Huang, Xianliang; Zhang, Qin; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Chaojun; Yu, Qingsong; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration are essential processes in re-endothelialization of implanted biomaterials. There is no clear relationship and mechanism between EC adhesion and migration behaviour on surfaces with varying wettabilities. As model substrates, plasma SiOx:H nanocoatings with well-controlled surface wettability (with water contact angles in the range of 98.5 ± 2.3° to 26.3 ± 4.0°) were used in this study to investigate the effects of surface wettability on cell adhesion/migration and associated protein expressions in FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways. It was found that EC adhesion/migration showed opposite behaviour on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces promoted EC migration but were anti-adhesions). The number of adherent ECs showed a maximum on hydrophilic surfaces, while cells adhered to hydrophobic surfaces exhibited a tendency for cell migration. The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor targeting the Y-397 site of FAK could significantly inhibit cell adhesion/migration, suggesting that EC adhesion and migration on surfaces with different wettabilities involve (p)FAK and its downstream signalling pathways. Western blot results suggested that the FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways were correlative to EC migration on hydrophobic plasma SiOx:H surfaces, but uncertain to hydrophilic surfaces. This work demonstrated that surface wettability could induce cellular behaviours that were associated with different cellular signalling events. PMID:21715399

  2. Nucleophosmin Mutants Promote Adhesion, Migration and Invasion of Human Leukemia THP-1 Cells through MMPs Up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Jingrong; Shao, Huiyuan; Chen, Xianchun; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Quan, Jing; Zou, Qin; Jin, Hongjun; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1) has been defined as a unique subgroup in the new classification of myeloid neoplasm, and the AML patients with mutated NPM1 frequently present extramedullary infiltration, but how NPM1 mutants regulate this process remains elusive. In this study, we found that overexpression of type A NPM1 gene mutation (NPM1-mA) enhanced the adhesive, migratory and invasive potential in THP-1 AML cells lacking mutated NPM1. NPM1-mA had up-regulated expression and gelatinolytic matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 activity, as assessed by real-time PCR, western blotting and gelatin zymography. Following immunoprecipitation analysis to identify the interaction of NPM1-mA with K-Ras, we focused on the effect of NPM1-mA overexpression on the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling axis and showed that NPM1-mA increased the MEK and ERK phosphorylation levels, as evaluated by western blotting. Notably, a specific inhibitor of the ERK/MAPK pathway (PD98059), but not p38/MAPK, JNK/MAPK or PI3-K/AKT inhibitors, markedly decreased the cell invasion numbers in a transwell assay. Further experiments demonstrated that blocking the ERK/MAPK pathway by PD98059 resulted in reduced MMP-2/9 protein levels and MMP-9 activity. Additionally, NPM1-mA overexpression had down-regulated gene expression and protein production of tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2) in THP-1 cells. Furthermore, evaluation of gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset revealed that MMP-2 was overexpressed in AML patient samples with NPM1 mutated and high MMP-2 expression associated with leukemic skin infiltration. Taken together, our results reveal that NPM1 mutations contribute to the invasive potential of AML cells through MMPs up-regulation via Ras/ERK MAPK signaling pathway activation and offer novel insights into the potential role of NPM1 mutations in leukemogenesis. PMID:26884713

  3. Sargaquinoic Acid Inhibits TNF-α-Induced NF-κB Signaling, Thereby Contributing to Decreased Monocyte Adhesion to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs).

    PubMed

    Gwon, Wi-Gyeong; Lee, Bonggi; Joung, Eun-Ji; Choi, Min-Woo; Yoon, Nayoung; Shin, Taisun; Oh, Chul-Woong; Kim, Hyeung-Rak

    2015-10-21

    Sargaquinoic acid (SQA) has been known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated the effects of SQA isolated from Sargassum serratifolium on the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). SQA decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules such as intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as well as chemotactic cytokines such as interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in TNF-α-treated HUVECs. As a result, SQA prevented monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-induced adhesion. SQA also inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocation into the nucleus by preventing proteolytic degradation of inhibitor κB-α. Overall, SQA protects against TNF-α-induced vascular inflammation through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in HUVECs. These data suggest that SQA may be used as a therapeutic agent for vascular inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. PMID:26437568

  4. PKC signaling mediates global enhancement of excitatory synaptogenesis in neurons triggered by local contact with astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hama, Hiroshi; Hara, Chikako; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2004-02-01

    Here we provide evidence that astrocytes affect neuronal synaptogenesis by the process of adhesion. Local contact with astrocytes via integrin receptors elicited protein kinase C (PKC) activation in individual dissociated neurons cultured in astrocyte-conditioned medium. This activation, initially focal, soon spread throughout the entire neuron. We then demonstrated pharmacologically that the arachidonic acid cascade, triggered by the integrin reception, is responsible for the global activation of PKC. Local astrocytic contact also facilitated excitatory synaptogenesis throughout the neuron, a process which could be blocked by inhibitors of both integrins and PKC. Thus, propagation of PKC signaling represents an underlying mechanism for global neuronal maturation following local astrocyte adhesion.

  5. Simultaneous imaging of multiple focal planes using a two-photon scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, W.; Carriles, R.; Hoover, E. E.; Planchon, T. A.; Durfee, C. G.; Squier, J. A.

    2007-06-01

    Despite all the advances in nonlinear microscopy, all existing instruments are constrained to obtain images of one focal plane at a time. In this Letter we demonstrate a two-photon absorption fluorescence scanning microscope capable of imaging two focal planes simultaneously. This is accomplished by temporally demultiplexing the signal coming from two focal volumes at different sample depths. The scheme can be extended to three or more focal planes.

  6. Rsu1 contributes to regulation of cell adhesion and spreading by PINCH1-dependent and - independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Nieves, Reyda; Desantis, Akiko Iwahari; Cutler, Mary L

    2013-12-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are complex processes that require integrin activation, the formation and dissolution of focal adhesion (FAs), and linkage of actin cytoskeleton to the FAs. The IPP (ILK, PINCH, Parvin) complex regulates FA formation via binding of the adaptor protein ILK to β1 integrin, PINCH and parvin. The signaling protein Rsu1 is linked to the complex via binding PINCH1. The role of Rsu1 and PINCH1 in adhesion and migration was examined in non-transformed mammary epithelial cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that the depletion of either Rsu1 or PINCH1 by siRNA in MCF10A cells decreased the number of focal adhesions and altered the distribution and localization of β1 integrin, vinculin, talin and paxillin without affecting the levels of FA protein expression. This correlated with reduced adhesion, failure to spread or migrate in response to EGF and a loss of actin stress fibers and caveolae. In addition, constitutive phosphorylation of actin regulatory proteins occurred in the absence of PINCH1. The depletion of Rsu1 caused significant reduction in PINCH1 implying that Rsu1 may function by regulating levels of PINCH1. However, while both Rsu1- or PINCH1-depleted cells retained the ability to activate adhesion signaling in response to EGF stimulation, only Rsu1 was required for EGF-induced p38 Map Kinase phosphorylation and ATF2 activation, suggesting an Rsu1 function independent from the IPP complex. Reconstitution of Rsu1-depleted cells with an Rsu1 mutant that does not bind to PINCH1 failed to restore FAs or migration but did promote spreading and constitutive p38 activation. These data show that Rsu1-PINCH1 association with ILK and the IPP complex is required for regulation of adhesion and migration but that Rsu1 has a critical role in linking integrin-induced adhesion to activation of p38 Map kinase signaling and cell spreading. Moreover, it suggests that Rsu1 may regulate p38 signaling from the IPP complex affecting other functions including

  7. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Yolanda; Torrelo, Antonio; Colmenero, Isabel; Zambrano, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign proliferation of the oral mucosa with well defined clinical and histological characteristics. It has been associated with infection of the oral mucosa by types 13 and 32 of the human papillomavirus (HPV), and to a lesser extent, with other types. Its clinical course is variable, although it usually persists for months or years; cases with spontaneous resolution have been described, as have others with prolonged persistence. We present the case of an Ecuadorian boy whose visit was motivated by lesions in the oral mucosa consistent with a diagnosis of FEH, which were confirmed in the histological study, and in which HPV type 13 DNA was identified.

  8. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Carlino, P; Di Felice, R; Fiore-Donno, G; Samson, J

    1991-05-01

    Five cases of "focal epithelial hyperplasia" (FEH) of the oral mucosa observed in Switzerland are reported. The patients were of Turkish and North African extraction. The lesions of FEH were multiple, painless, located at various sites of the oral mucosa including the tongue in the form of either soft papules or hard nodules. Evidence of a human papilloma virus origin was ascertained. Among the 1067 cases reported in the literature and reviewed for this study, this condition has been described to occur among American Indians, Eskimos and North African, also in Israeli and European cases the disorder was often reported in individuals of Turkish or North African extraction.

  9. Glossogyne tenuifolia Extract Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via Blocking the NF-kB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Hsu, Hsia-Fen; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Lee, Thung-Lip; Wei, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Kwan-Lih; Wu, Chau-Chung; Houng, Jer-Yiing

    2015-09-17

    Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of atherosclerosis, where the pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and the recruitment of monocytes are the crucial events leading to its pathogenesis. Glossogyne tenuifolia ethanol extract (GTE) is shown to have potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. We evaluated the effects of GTE and its major components, luteolin (lut), luteolin-7-glucoside (lut-7-g), and oleanolic acid (OA) on TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results demonstrated that GTE, lut, and lut-7-g attenuated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-activated HUVECs, and inhibited the adhesion of monocytes to TNF-α-activated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced mRNA expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was also suppressed, revealing their inhibitory effects at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, GTE, lut, and lut-7-g blocked the TNF-α-induced degradation of nuclear factor-kB inhibitor (IkB), an indicator of the activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB). In summary, GTE and its bioactive components were effective in preventing the adhesion of monocytes to cytokine-activated endothelium by the inhibition of expression of adhesion molecules, which in turn is mediated through blocking the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-kB. The current results reveal the therapeutic potential of GTE in atherosclerosis.

  10. Glossogyne tenuifolia Extract Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via Blocking the NF-kB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Hsu, Hsia-Fen; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Lee, Thung-Lip; Wei, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Kwan-Lih; Wu, Chau-Chung; Houng, Jer-Yiing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of atherosclerosis, where the pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and the recruitment of monocytes are the crucial events leading to its pathogenesis. Glossogyne tenuifolia ethanol extract (GTE) is shown to have potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. We evaluated the effects of GTE and its major components, luteolin (lut), luteolin-7-glucoside (lut-7-g), and oleanolic acid (OA) on TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results demonstrated that GTE, lut, and lut-7-g attenuated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-activated HUVECs, and inhibited the adhesion of monocytes to TNF-α-activated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced mRNA expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was also suppressed, revealing their inhibitory effects at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, GTE, lut, and lut-7-g blocked the TNF-α-induced degradation of nuclear factor-kB inhibitor (IkB), an indicator of the activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB). In summary, GTE and its bioactive components were effective in preventing the adhesion of monocytes to cytokine-activated endothelium by the inhibition of expression of adhesion molecules, which in turn is mediated through blocking the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-kB. The current results reveal the therapeutic potential of GTE in atherosclerosis. PMID:26393541

  11. Mutations of DEPDC5 cause autosomal dominant focal epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Saeko; Picard, Fabienne; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Noé, Eric; Achaz, Guillaume; Thomas, Pierre; Genton, Pierre; Mundwiller, Emeline; Wolff, Markus; Marescaux, Christian; Miles, Richard; Baulac, Michel; Hirsch, Edouard; Leguern, Eric; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The main familial focal epilepsies of childhood are autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy, familial temporal lobe epilepsy and familial focal epilepsy with variable foci. A frameshift mutation in the DEPDC5 (DEP domain containing protein 5) gene was identified in a family with focal epilepsy with variable foci, by linkage analysis and exome sequencing. Subsequent pyrosequencing of DEPDC5 in a cohort of 15 additional families with focal epilepsies revealed four nonsense and one missense mutations. Our findings provided evidence for frequent (37%) loss-of-function mutations in DEPDC5 associated with a broad spectrum of focal epilepsies. The implication of a DEP domain (Dishevelled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin domain)-containing protein that may be involved in membrane trafficking and/or G-protein signaling, opens new avenues for research. PMID:23542701

  12. [The focal renal lesions].

    PubMed

    Tuma, Jan

    2013-06-01

    The focal renal lesions are altogether common. Most frequently are found Columna Bertini hypertrophies (so called pseudotumors) and simple renal cysts. The role of sonography in the practice is to distinguish pseudotumors from real renal tumors, and simple renal cysts from complex cysts. The differentiation of complex renal cysts is possible with the help of the CEUS (= contrast enhanced ultrasound) and other imaging modalities such as CT or MRI. In these cases, the CEUS imaging agent has clear advantages over CT and MRI, because it is composed of gas bubbles, which are only slightly smaller than red blood cells and remains exclusively intravascularly while the CT and MRI contrast agents diffuse into the interstitial space without any real perfusion. The real tumors can be differentiated from certain focal non-tumorous changes based on the ultrasound and clinic. The further differentiation of individual kidney tumors and metastases using ultrasound, MRI, CT and CEUS is only partly possible. In all uncertain or unclear cases, therefore, an open or ultrasound-guided biopsy is useful.

  13. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  14. Signaling switch of the urotensin II vasosactive peptide GPCR: prototypic chemotaxic mechanism in glioma.

    PubMed

    Lecointre, C; Desrues, L; Joubert, J E; Perzo, N; Guichet, P-O; Le Joncour, V; Brulé, C; Chabbert, M; Leduc, R; Prézeau, L; Laquerrière, A; Proust, F; Gandolfo, P; Morin, F; Castel, H

    2015-09-24

    Multiform glioblastomas (GBM) are the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumors in adults. The poor prognosis is due to neo-angiogenesis and cellular invasion, processes that require complex chemotaxic mechanisms involving motility, migration and adhesion. Understanding these different cellular events implies identifying receptors and transduction pathways that lead to and promote either migration or adhesion. Here we establish that glioma express the vasoactive peptide urotensin II (UII) and its receptor UT and that UT-mediated signaling cascades are involved in glioma cell migration and adhesion. Components of the urotensinergic systems, UII and UT, are widely expressed in patient-derived GBM tissue sections, glioma cell lines and fresh biopsy explants. Interestingly, gradient concentrations of UII produced chemoattracting migratory/motility effects in glioma as well as HEK293 cells expressing human UT. These effects mainly involved the G13/Rho/rho kinase pathway while partially requiring Gi/o/PI3K components. In contrast, we observed that homogeneous concentrations of UII drastically blocked cell motility and stimulated cell-matrix adhesions through a UT/Gi/o signaling cascade, partially involving phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase. Finally, we provide evidence that, in glioma cells, homogeneous concentration of UII allowed translocation of Gα13 to the UT receptor at the plasma membrane and increased actin stress fibers, lamellipodia formation and vinculin-stained focal adhesions. UII also provoked a re-localization of UT precoupled to Gαi in filipodia and initiated integrin-stained focal points. Altogether, these findings suggest that UT behaves as a chemotaxic receptor, relaying a signaling switch between directional migration and cell adhesion under gradient or homogeneous concentrations, thereby redefining sequential mechanisms affecting tumor cells during glioma invasion. Taken together, our results allow us to propose a model in order to improve the

  15. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  16. Signaling by the G12 class of G proteins.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, N; Dermott, J M

    1996-06-01

    The G12 class of G proteins are defined by the alpha-subunits of mammalian G12 and G13. Biochemical and mutational characterization of G alpha 12/13 have identified several novel signaling pathways regulated by these alpha-subunits. Studies with the constitutively activated mutants of G alpha 12 and G alpha 13 have indicated that they stimulate mitogenic signaling pathways leading to the oncogenic transformation of fibroblast cell lines. Recent analyses have indicated that G alpha 12 and G alpha 13 regulate cytoplasmic as well as nuclear signaling events such as activation of the Jun N-terminal kinase signaling module, Na+/H+ exchangers, focal adhesion assemblies, and transcriptional activation of specific primary response genes. The emerging view suggests that these signaling events represent an integrated response regulated by G12 and G13. This review discusses the diverse signaling responses regulated by G12 and G13, and the interrelationship of these responses. PMID:8842523

  17. Spironolactone promotes autophagy via inhibiting PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathway and reduce adhesive capacity damage in podocytes under mechanical stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Lu, Zhenyu; Xu, Zhongwei; Ji, Junya; Zheng, Zhenfeng; Lin, Shan; Yan, Tiekun

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stress which would cause deleterious adhesive effects on podocytes is considered a major contributor to the early progress of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Our previous study has shown that spironolactone could ameliorate podocytic adhesive capacity in diabetic rats. Autophagy has been reported to have a protective role against renal injury. The present study investigated the underlying mechanisms by which spironolactone reduced adhesive capacity damage in podocytes under mechanical stress, focusing on the involvement of autophagy. Human conditional immortalized podocytes exposed to mechanical stress were treated with spironolactone, LY294002 or rapamycin for 48 h. The accumulation of LC3 puncta was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Podocyte expression of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), integrin β1, LC3, Atg5, p85-PI3K, p-Akt, p-mTOR were detected by Western blotting. Podocyte adhesion to collagen type IV was also performed with spectrophotometry. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the normal level of autophagy was reduced in podocytes under mechanical stress. Decreased integrin β1, LC3, Atg5 and abnormal activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were also detected in podocytes under mechanical stress. Spironolactone up-regulated integrin β1, LC3, Atg5 expression, down-regulated p85-PI3K, p-Akt, p-mTOR expression and reduced podocytic adhesive capacity damage. Our data demonstrated that spironolactone inhibited mechanical-stress-induced podocytic adhesive capacity damage through blocking PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and restoring autophagy activity. PMID:27129295

  18. Asterixis in focal brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Degos, J D; Verroust, J; Bouchareine, A; Serdaru, M; Barbizet, J

    1979-11-01

    Asterixis was observed in 20 cases of focal brain lesions. Metabolic or toxic factors were excluded. An electromyogram study of asterixis was carried out in nine cases to establish the diagnosis. The site of the focal lesion was either parietal or mesencephalic and was always contralateral to the asterixis. "Focal asterixis" could result from a dysfunction of the sensorimotor integration in the parietal lobe and the midbrain.

  19. Adhesive plasters

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  20. Focal contacts as mechanosensors: externally applied local mechanical force induces growth of focal contacts by an mDia1-dependent and ROCK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Riveline, D; Zamir, E; Balaban, N Q; Schwarz, U S; Ishizaki, T; Narumiya, S; Kam, Z; Geiger, B; Bershadsky, A D

    2001-06-11

    The transition of cell-matrix adhesions from the initial punctate focal complexes into the mature elongated form, known as focal contacts, requires GTPase Rho activity. In particular, activation of myosin II-driven contractility by a Rho target known as Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) was shown to be essential for focal contact formation. To dissect the mechanism of Rho-dependent induction of focal contacts and to elucidate the role of cell contractility, we applied mechanical force to vinculin-containing dot-like adhesions at the cell edge using a micropipette. Local centripetal pulling led to local assembly and elongation of these structures and to their development into streak-like focal contacts, as revealed by the dynamics of green fluorescent protein-tagged vinculin or paxillin and interference reflection microscopy. Inhibition of Rho activity by C3 transferase suppressed this force-induced focal contact formation. However, constitutively active mutants of another Rho target, the formin homology protein mDia1 (Watanabe, N., T. Kato, A. Fujita, T. Ishizaki, and S. Narumiya. 1999. Nat. Cell Biol. 1:136-143), were sufficient to restore force-induced focal contact formation in C3 transferase-treated cells. Force-induced formation of the focal contacts still occurred in cells subjected to myosin II and ROCK inhibition. Thus, as long as mDia1 is active, external tension force bypasses the requirement for ROCK-mediated myosin II contractility in the induction of focal contacts. Our experiments show that integrin-containing focal complexes behave as individual mechanosensors exhibiting directional assembly in response to local force. PMID:11402062

  1. Hypergravity Stimulates the Extracellular Matrix/Integrin-Signaling Axis and Proliferation in Primary Osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, M.; Vercoutere, W.; Roden, C.; Banerjee, I.; Krauser, W.; Holton, E.; Searby, N.; Globus, R.; Almeida, E.

    2003-01-01

    We set out to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferative response of primary rat osteoblasts to mechanical stimulation using cell culture centrifugation as a model for hypergravity. We hypothesized that this proliferative response is mediated by specific integrin/Extracellular Matrix (ECM) interactions. To investigate this question we developed a cell culture centrifuge and an automated system that performs cell fixation during hypergravity loading. We generated expression vectors for various focal adhesion and cytoskeletal proteins fused to GFP or dsRed and visualized these structures in transfected (or infected) osteoblasts. The actin cytoskeleton was also visualized using rhodamine-phalloidin staining and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) levels were assessed biochemically. We observed that a 24 hour exposure to 50-g stimulated proliferation compared to the 1-g control when cells were plated on fibronectin, collagen Type I , and collagen Type IV, but not on uncoated tissue culture plastic surfaces. This proliferative response was greatest for osteoblasts grown on fibronectin (2-fold increase over 1-g control) and collagen Type I (1.4 fold increase over 1-g control), suggesting that specific matrices and integrins are involved in the signaling pathways required for proliferation. Exposing osteoblasts grown on different matrices to 10-g or 25-g showed that effects on proliferation depended on both matrix type and loading level. We found that osteoblasts exposed to a short pulse of hypergravity during adhesion spread further and had more GFP-FAK containing focal adhesions compared to their 1-g controls. While overall levels of FAK did not change, more FAK was in the active (phosphorylated) form under hypergravity than in the 1-g controls. Cytoskeletal F-actin organization into filaments was also more prominent after brief exposures to hypergravity during the first five minutes of adhesion. These results suggest that specific integrins sense

  2. Focal brain inflammation and autism.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Asadi, Shahrzad; Patel, Arti B

    2013-04-09

    Increasing evidence indicates that brain inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by social and learning disabilities that affect as many as 1/80 children in the USA. There is still no definitive pathogenesis or reliable biomarkers for ASD, thus significantly curtailing the development of effective therapies. Many children with ASD regress at about age 3 years, often after a specific event such as reaction to vaccination, infection, stress or trauma implying some epigenetic triggers, and may constitute a distinct phenotype. ASD children respond disproportionally to stress and are also affected by food and skin allergies. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and together with neurotensin (NT) stimulates mast cells and microglia resulting in focal brain inflammation and neurotoxicity. NT is significantly increased in serum of ASD children along with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). NT stimulates mast cell secretion of mtDNA that is misconstrued as an innate pathogen triggering an auto-inflammatory response. The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutation, associated with the higher risk of ASD, which leads to hyper-active mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling that is crucial for cellular homeostasis. CRH, NT and environmental triggers could hyperstimulate the already activated mTOR, as well as stimulate mast cell and microglia activation and proliferation. The natural flavonoid luteolin inhibits mTOR, mast cells and microglia and could have a significant benefit in ASD.

  3. FAK Forms a Complex with MEF2 to Couple Biomechanical Signaling to Transcription in Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Alisson Campos; Pereira, Ana Helena Macedo; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Consonni, Silvio Roberto; Rocha de Oliveira, Renata; Bajgelman, Marcio Chain; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes; Franchini, Kleber Gomes

    2016-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has emerged as a mediator of mechanotransduction in cardiomyocytes, regulating gene expression during hypertrophic remodeling. However, how FAK signaling is relayed onward to the nucleus is unclear. Here, we show that FAK interacts with and regulates myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), a master cardiac transcriptional regulator. In cardiomyocytes exposed to biomechanical stimulation, FAK accumulates in the nucleus, binds to and upregulates the transcriptional activity of MEF2 through an interaction with the FAK focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain. In the crystal structure (2.9 Å resolution), FAT binds to a stably folded groove in the MEF2 dimer, known to interact with regulatory cofactors. FAK cooperates with MEF2 to enhance the expression of Jun in cardiomyocytes, an important component of hypertrophic response to mechanical stress. These findings underscore a connection between the mechanotransduction involving FAK and transcriptional regulation by MEF2, with potential relevance to the pathogenesis of cardiac disease. PMID:27427476

  4. Endothelial cell adhesion in real time. Measurements in vitro by tandem scanning confocal image analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, P F; Robotewskyj, A; Griem, M L

    1993-01-01

    Real time measurements of cell-substratum adhesion in endothelial cells were obtained by tandem scanning confocal microscopy of sites of focal contact (focal adhesions) at the abluminal cell surface. Focal contact sites were sharply defined (low radiance levels) in the living cell such that the images could be enhanced, digitized, and isolated from other cellular detail. Sites of focal contact are the principal determinant of cell-substratum adhesion. Measurements of (a) the focal contact area and (b) the closeness of contact (inverse radiance) were used to nominally define the adhesion of a single cell or field of cells, and to record spontaneous and induced changes of cell adhesion in real time. The topography of focal contacts was estimated by calculating separation distances from radiance values using a calibration technique based on interference ring optics. While slightly closer contact was noted between the cell membrane and substratum at or near the center of each focal contact, separation distances throughout the adhesion regions were always < 50 nm. Subtraction of consecutive images revealed continuous spontaneous remodeling of individual focal adhesions in unperturbed cells during periods of < 1 min. Despite extensive remodeling of focal contact sites, however, cell adhesion calculated for an entire cell over extended periods varied by < 10%. When cytoskeletal stability was impaired by exposure to cytochalasin or when cells were exposed to proteolytic enzyme, endothelial adhesion declined rapidly. Such changes were recorded at the level of single cells, groups of cells, and at single focal adhesions. In both unperturbed and manipulated cells, the dynamics of remodeling and cell adhesion characteristics varied greatly between individual sites within the same cell; disappearance of existing sites and appearance of new ones often occurred within minutes while adjacent sites underwent minimal remodelling. Tandem scanning confocal microscopy image analysis of

  5. Cell Adhesion and Growth on the Anodized Aluminum Oxide Membrane.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Moon, Dalnim; Kim, Jin-Seok; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-03-01

    Nanotopological cues are popular tools for in vivo investigation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cellular microenvironments. The ECM is composed of multiple components and generates a complex microenvironment. The development of accurate in vivo methods for the investigation of ECM are important for disease diagnosis and therapy, as well as for studies on cell behavior. Here, we fabricated anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes using sulfuric and oxalic acid under controlled voltage and temperature. The membranes were designed to possess three different pore and interpore sizes, AAO-1, AAO-2, and AAO-3 membranes, respectively. These membranes were used as tools to investigate nanotopology-signal induced cell behavior. Cancerous cells, specifically, the OVCAR-8 cell-line, were cultured on porous AAO membranes and the effects of these membranes on cell shape, proliferation, and viability were studied. AAO-1 membranes bearing small sized pores were found to maintain the spreading shape of the cultured cells. Cells cultured on AAO-2 and AAO-3 membranes, bearing large pore-sized AAO membranes, changed shape from spreading to rounding. Furthermore, cellular area decreased when cells were cultured on all three AAO membranes that confirmed decreased levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Additionally, OVCAR-8 cells exhibited increased proliferation on AAO membranes possessing various pore sizes, indicating the importance of the nanosurface structure in regulating cell behaviors, such as cell proliferation. Our results suggest that porous-AAO membranes induced nanosurface regulated cell behavior as focal adhesion altered the intracellular organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results may find potential applications as tools in in vivo cancer research studies. PMID:27280255

  6. Cell Adhesion and Growth on the Anodized Aluminum Oxide Membrane.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Moon, Dalnim; Kim, Jin-Seok; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-03-01

    Nanotopological cues are popular tools for in vivo investigation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cellular microenvironments. The ECM is composed of multiple components and generates a complex microenvironment. The development of accurate in vivo methods for the investigation of ECM are important for disease diagnosis and therapy, as well as for studies on cell behavior. Here, we fabricated anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes using sulfuric and oxalic acid under controlled voltage and temperature. The membranes were designed to possess three different pore and interpore sizes, AAO-1, AAO-2, and AAO-3 membranes, respectively. These membranes were used as tools to investigate nanotopology-signal induced cell behavior. Cancerous cells, specifically, the OVCAR-8 cell-line, were cultured on porous AAO membranes and the effects of these membranes on cell shape, proliferation, and viability were studied. AAO-1 membranes bearing small sized pores were found to maintain the spreading shape of the cultured cells. Cells cultured on AAO-2 and AAO-3 membranes, bearing large pore-sized AAO membranes, changed shape from spreading to rounding. Furthermore, cellular area decreased when cells were cultured on all three AAO membranes that confirmed decreased levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Additionally, OVCAR-8 cells exhibited increased proliferation on AAO membranes possessing various pore sizes, indicating the importance of the nanosurface structure in regulating cell behaviors, such as cell proliferation. Our results suggest that porous-AAO membranes induced nanosurface regulated cell behavior as focal adhesion altered the intracellular organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results may find potential applications as tools in in vivo cancer research studies.

  7. A plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area defines adhesion size and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Berge, Ulrich; Lock, John G.; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-06-01

    Cell-matrix adhesions are central mediators of mechanotransduction, yet the interplay between force and adhesion regulation remains unclear. Here we use live cell imaging to map time-dependent cross-correlations between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area, revealing a plastic, context-dependent relationship. Interestingly, while an expected positive cross-correlation dominated in mid-sized adhesions, small and large adhesions display negative cross-correlation. Furthermore, although large changes in adhesion complex area follow vinculin-mediated tension alterations, small increases in area precede vinculin-mediated tension dynamics. Modelling based on this mapping of the vinculin-mediated tension-adhesion complex area relationship confirms its biological validity, and indicates that this relationship explains adhesion size and lifetime limits, keeping adhesions focal and transient. We also identify a subpopulation of steady-state adhesions whose size and vinculin-mediated tension become stabilized, and whose disassembly may be selectively microtubule-mediated. In conclusion, we define a plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area that controls fundamental cell-matrix adhesion properties.

  8. The enhanced characteristics of osteoblast adhesion to porous Zinc-TiO2 coating prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenxiang; Gu, Beibei; Zhang, Wenjie; Kan, Guangyu; Sun, Junying

    2012-06-01

    Zinc-incorporated TiO2 coating (Zn-TiO2) was prepared on titanium (Ti) plate by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique in the Ca, P, Zn-containing electrolyte. The surface topography, phase and element composition of the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometer, respectively. Osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion on Ti, TiO2 and Zn-TiO2 surfaces was evaluated and its possible signal transduction pathway involved was confirmed by the sequential gene expressions of integrin β1, α1, α3 and α5, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and extracellular regulated kinases (ERK, including ERK1 and ERK2). The obtained results showed that Zn was successfully incorporated into the porous TiO2 coating, which did not alter apparently its surface topography and phase composition. The adhesion of MC3T3-E1 cells on Zn-incorporated TiO2 coating was significantly enhanced compared with that on the Zn-free TiO2 coating and pure Ti plate. In addition, the enhanced cell adhesion on Zn-TiO2 coating may be mediated by integrin (subunits β1 and α5) binding and subsequent signal transduction pathway (involving FAK and ERK1). The present work suggests that the Zn-incorporated porous TiO2 coating produced by PEO technique is promising as a candidate for orthopedic implant applications.

  9. A NPxY-independent {beta}5 integrin activation signal regulates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sukhwinder; D'mello, Veera; Henegouwen, Paul van Bergen en; Birge, Raymond B.

    2007-12-21

    Integrin receptors are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors with critical functions in cell adhesion and migration, cell cycle progression, differentiation, apoptosis, and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Integrins are activated by intracellular signaling that alter the binding affinity for extracellular ligands, so-called inside to outside signaling. A common element for integrin activation involves binding of the cytoskeletal protein talin, via its FERM domain, to a highly conserved NPxY motif in the {beta} chain cytoplasmic tails, which is involved in long-range conformation changes to the extracellular domain that impinges on ligand affinity. When the human beta-5 ({beta}5) integrin cDNA was expressed in {alpha}v positive, {beta}5 and {beta}3 negative hamster CS-1 cells, it promoted NPxY-dependent adhesion to VTN-coated surfaces, phosphorylation of FAK, and concomitantly, {beta}5 integrin-EGFP protein was recruited into talin and paxillin-containing focal adhesions. Expression of a NPxY destabilizing {beta}5 mutant (Y750A) abrogated adhesion and {beta}5-Y750A-EGFP was excluded from focal adhesions at the tips of stress fibers. Surprisingly, expression of {beta}5 Y750A integrin had a potent gain-of-function effect on apoptotic cell phagocytosis, and further, a {beta}5-Y750A-EGFP fusion integrin readily bound MFG-E8-coated 10 {mu}m diameter microspheres developed as apoptotic cell mimetics. The critical sequences in {beta}5 integrin were mapped to a YEMAS motif just proximal to the NPxY motif. Our studies suggest that the phagocytic function of {beta}5 integrin is regulated by an unconventional NPxY-talin-independent activation signal and argue for the existence of molecular switches in the {beta}5 cytoplasmic tail for adhesion and phagocytosis.

  10. Alpha2,6-sialic acid on platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) regulates its homophilic interactions and downstream antiapoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Kitazume, Shinobu; Imamaki, Rie; Ogawa, Kazuko; Komi, Yusuke; Futakawa, Satoshi; Kojima, Soichi; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Marth, Jamey D; Paulson, James C; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2010-02-26

    Antiangiogenesis therapies are now part of the standard repertoire of cancer therapies, but the mechanisms for the proliferation and survival of endothelial cells are not fully understood. Although endothelial cells are covered with a glycocalyx, little is known about how endothelial glycosylation regulates endothelial functions. Here, we show that alpha2,6-sialic acid is necessary for the cell-surface residency of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that plays multiple roles in cell adhesion, mechanical stress sensing, antiapoptosis, and angiogenesis. As a possible underlying mechanism, we found that the homophilic interactions of PECAM in endothelial cells were dependent on alpha2,6-sialic acid. We also found that the absence of alpha2,6-sialic acid down-regulated the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM and recruitment of Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase 2 and rendered the cells more prone to mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis, as evaluated using PECAM- deficient endothelial cells. The present findings open up a new possibility that modulation of glycosylation could be one of the promising strategies for regulating angiogenesis. PMID:20048157

  11. CD99 inhibits CD98-mediated β1 integrin signaling through SHP2-mediated FAK dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Yoo, Yeon Ho; Kim, Min Seo; Yadav, Birendra Kumar; Kim, Yuri; Lim, Dongyoung; Hwangbo, Cheol; Moon, Ki Won; Kim, Daejoong; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Jeong-Hyung; Hahn, Jang-Hee

    2015-08-15

    The human CD99 protein is a 32-kDa type I transmembrane glycoprotein, while CD98 is a disulfide-linked 125-kDa heterodimeric type II transmembrane glycoprotein. It has been previously shown that CD99 and CD98 oppositely regulate β1 integrin signaling, though the mechanisms by which this regulation occurs are not known. Our results revealed that antibody-mediated crosslinking of CD98 induced FAK phosphorylation at Y397 and facilitated the formation of the protein kinase Cα (PKCα)-syntenin-focal adhesion kinase (FAK), focal adhesions (FAs), and IPP-Akt1-syntenin complex, which mediates β1 integrin signaling. In contrast, crosslinking of CD99 disrupted the formation of the PKCα-syntenin-FAK complex as well as FA via FAK dephosphorylation. The CD99-induced dephosphorylation of FAK was apparently mediated by the recruitment of Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-2 (SHP2) to the plasma membrane and subsequent activation of its phosphatase activity. Further consequences of the activation of SHP2 included the disruption of FAK-talin and talin-β1 integrin interactions and attenuation in the formation of the IPP-Akt1-syntenin complex at the plasma membrane, which resulted in reduced cell-ECM adhesion. This report uncovers the molecular mechanisms underlying the inverse regulation of β1 integrin signaling by CD99 and CD98 and may provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat inflammation and cancer.

  12. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  13. Small GTPase Rho signaling is involved in {beta}1 integrin-mediated up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand on osteoblasts and osteoclast maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Fumihiko; Nakayamada, Shingo; Okada, Yosuke; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Kurose, Hitoshi; Mogami, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshiya . E-mail: tanaka@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-27

    We assessed the characteristics of human osteoblasts, focusing on small GTPase Rho signaling. {beta}1 Integrin were highly expressed on osteoblasts. Engagement of {beta}1 integrins by type I collagen augmented expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) on osteoblasts. Rho was activated by {beta}1 stimulation in osteoblasts. {beta}1 Integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL was inhibited by transfection with adenoviruses encoding C3 transferase or pretreated with Y-27632, specific Rho and Rho-kinase inhibitors. Engagement of {beta}1 integrin on osteoblasts induced formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells (MNC) in a coculture system of osteoblasts and peripheral monocytes, but this action was completely abrogated by transfection of C3 transferase. Our results indicate the direct involvement of Rho-mediated signaling in {beta}1 integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL and RANKL-dependent osteoclast maturation. Thus, Rho-mediated signaling in osteoblasts seems to introduce major biases to bone resorption.

  14. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Franziska; Sastradihardja, Tania; Binder, Claudia; Schnabel, Ralf; Kungel, Jana; Rothemund, Sven; Hennig, Christian; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of anterior-posterior spindle orientation during the fourth round of embryonic cell division. We show that the receptor mediates a G protein-signaling pathway revealing that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. Genetic analyses showed that through the interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the C. elegans embryo. Stimulation of this G-protein cascade in lat-1 null mutant nematodes is sufficient to orient spindles and cell division planes in the embryo in the correct direction. Finally, we demonstrate that LAT-1 is activated by an intramolecular agonist to trigger this cascade. Our data support a model in which a novel, GPCR-dependent G protein-signaling cascade mediated by LAT-1 controls alignment of cell division planes in an anterior-posterior direction via a metabotropic Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase pathway by regulating intracellular cAMP levels. PMID:26505631

  15. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1.

    PubMed

    Müller, Antje; Winkler, Jana; Fiedler, Franziska; Sastradihardja, Tania; Binder, Claudia; Schnabel, Ralf; Kungel, Jana; Rothemund, Sven; Hennig, Christian; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of anterior-posterior spindle orientation during the fourth round of embryonic cell division. We show that the receptor mediates a G protein-signaling pathway revealing that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. Genetic analyses showed that through the interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the C. elegans embryo. Stimulation of this G-protein cascade in lat-1 null mutant nematodes is sufficient to orient spindles and cell division planes in the embryo in the correct direction. Finally, we demonstrate that LAT-1 is activated by an intramolecular agonist to trigger this cascade. Our data support a model in which a novel, GPCR-dependent G protein-signaling cascade mediated by LAT-1 controls alignment of cell division planes in an anterior-posterior direction via a metabotropic Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase pathway by regulating intracellular cAMP levels.

  16. Thermal Characterization of Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spomer, Ken A.

    1999-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle adhesive bond system is being replaced due to obsolescence. Down-selection and performance testing of the structural adhesives resulted in the selection of two candidate replacement adhesives, Resin Technology Group's Tiga 321 and 3M's EC2615XLW. This paper describes rocket motor testing of these two adhesives. Four forty-pound charge motors were fabricated in configurations that would allow side by side comparison testing of the candidate replacement adhesives and the current RSRM adhesives. The motors provided an environment where the thermal performance of adhesives in flame surface bondlines was compared. Results of the FPC testing show that: 1) The phenolic char depths on radial bond lines is approximately the same and vary depending on the position in the blast tube regardless of which adhesive was used; 2) The adhesive char depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the char depth of the current adhesives; 3) The heat-affected depth of the candidate replacement adhesives is less than the heat-affected depth of the current adhesives; and 4) The ablation rates for both replacement adhesives are slower than that of the current adhesives.

  17. Hedgehog inhibitors selectively target cell migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma in bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Zheng; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Romaguera, Jorge; McCarty, Nami

    2016-01-01

    The clinical benefits of a Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitor, LDE225 (NPV-LDE-225, Erismodegib), have been unclear in hematological cancers. Here, we report that LDE225 selectively inhibited migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to bone marrows via very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. LDE225 treatment not only affected MCL cells, but also modulated stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment by decreasing their production of SDF-1, IL-6 and VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4. Surprisingly, LDE225 treatment alone did not suppress cell proliferation due to increased CXCR4 expression mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS/CXCR4 further stimulated autophagy formation. The combination of LDE225 with the autophagy inhibitors further enhanced MCL cell death. Our data, for the first time, revealed LDE225 selectively targets MCL cells migration and adhesion to bone marrows. The ineffectiveness of LDE225 in MCL is due to autophagy formation, which in turn increases cell viability. Inhibiting autophagy will be an effective adjuvant therapy for LDE225 in MCL, especially for advanced MCL patients with bone marrow involvement. PMID:26885608

  18. Hedgehog inhibitors selectively target cell migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma in bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Zheng; Neelapu, Sattva S; Romaguera, Jorge; McCarty, Nami

    2016-03-22

    The clinical benefits of a Hedgehog (Hh) inhibitor, LDE225 (NPV-LDE-225, Erismodegib), have been unclear in hematological cancers. Here, we report that LDE225 selectively inhibited migration and adhesion of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to bone marrows via very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. LDE225 treatment not only affected MCL cells, but also modulated stromal cells within the bone marrow microenvironment by decreasing their production of SDF-1, IL-6 and VCAM-1, the ligand for VLA-4. Surprisingly, LDE225 treatment alone did not suppress cell proliferation due to increased CXCR4 expression mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increased ROS/CXCR4 further stimulated autophagy formation. The combination of LDE225 with the autophagy inhibitors further enhanced MCL cell death. Our data, for the first time, revealed LDE225 selectively targets MCL cells migration and adhesion to bone marrows. The ineffectiveness of LDE225 in MCL is due to autophagy formation, which in turn increases cell viability. Inhibiting autophagy will be an effective adjuvant therapy for LDE225 in MCL, especially for advanced MCL patients with bone marrow involvement. PMID:26885608

  19. A FAK-Cas-Rac-Lamellipodin Signaling Module Transduces Extracellular Matrix Stiffness into Mechanosensitive Cell Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yong Ho; Mui, Keeley L.; Hsu, Bernadette Y.; Liu, Shu-Lin; Cretu, Alexandra; Razinia, Ziba; Xu, Tina; Puré, Ellen; Assoian, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness is transduced into intracellular stiffness, signaling, and changes in cellular behavior. Integrins and several of their associated focal adhesion proteins have been implicated in sensing ECM stiffness. We investigated how an initial sensing event is translated into intracellular stiffness and a biologically interpretable signal. We found that a pathway consisting of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), the adaptor protein p130Cas (Cas), and the guanosine triphosphatase Rac selectively transduced ECM stiffness into stable intracellular stiffness, increased abundance of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1, and promoted S phase entry. Rac-dependent intracellular stiffening involved its binding partner lamellipodin, a protein that transmits Rac signals to the cytoskeleton during cell migration. Our findings establish that mechanotransduction by a FAK-Cas-Rac-lamellipodin signaling module converts the external information encoded by ECM stiffness into stable intracellular stiffness and mechanosensitive cell cycling. Thus, lamellipodin is not only important in controlling cellular migration, but also for regulating the cell cycle in response to mechanical signals. PMID:24939893

  20. A FAK-Cas-Rac-lamellipodin signaling module transduces extracellular matrix stiffness into mechanosensitive cell cycling.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yong Ho; Mui, Keeley L; Hsu, Bernadette Y; Liu, Shu-Lin; Cretu, Alexandra; Razinia, Ziba; Xu, Tina; Puré, Ellen; Assoian, Richard K

    2014-06-17

    Tissue and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness is transduced into intracellular stiffness, signaling, and changes in cellular behavior. Integrins and several of their associated focal adhesion proteins have been implicated in sensing ECM stiffness. We investigated how an initial sensing event is translated into intracellular stiffness and a biologically interpretable signal. We found that a pathway consisting of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), the adaptor protein p130Cas (Cas), and the guanosine triphosphatase Rac selectively transduced ECM stiffness into stable intracellular stiffness, increased the abundance of the cell cycle protein cyclin D1, and promoted S-phase entry. Rac-dependent intracellular stiffening involved its binding partner lamellipodin, a protein that transmits Rac signals to the cytoskeleton during cell migration. Our findings establish that mechanotransduction by a FAK-Cas-Rac-lamellipodin signaling module converts the external information encoded by ECM stiffness into stable intracellular stiffness and mechanosensitive cell cycling. Thus, lamellipodin is important not only in controlling cellular migration but also for regulating the cell cycle in response to mechanical signals.

  1. Nanoparticle-functionalized polymer platform for controlling metastatic cancer cell adhesion, shape, and motility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojin; Jang, Yeongseon; Seo, Jinhwa; Nam, Jwa-Min; Char, Kookheon

    2011-07-26

    Controlling and understanding the changes in metastatic cancer cell adhesion, shape, and motility are of paramount importance in cancer research, diagnosis, and treatment. Here, we used gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as nanotopological structures and protein nanocluster forming substrates. Cell adhesion controlling proteins [in this case, fibronection (Fn) and ephrinB3] were modified to AuNPs, and these particles were then modified to the layer-by-layer (LbL) polymer surface that offers a handle for tuning surface charge and mechanical property of a cell-interfacing substrate. We found that metastatic cancer cell adhesion is affected by nanoparticle density on a surface, and ∼140 particles per 400 μm(2) (∼1.7 μm spacing between AuNPs) is optimal for effective metastatic cell adhesion. It was also shown that the AuNP surface density and protein nanoclustering on a spherical AuNP are controlling factors for the efficient interfacing and signaling of metastatic cancer cells. Importantly, the existence of nanotopological features (AuNPs in this case) is much more critical in inducing more dramatic changes in metastatic cell adhesion, protrusion, polarity, and motility than the presence of a cell adhesion protein, Fn, on the surface. Moreover, cell focal adhesion and motility-related paxillin clusters were heavily formed in cell lamellipodia and filopodia and high expression of phospho-paxillins were observed when the cells were cultured on either an AuNP or Fn-modified AuNP polymer surface. The ephrin signaling that results in the decreased expression of paxillin was found to be more effective when ephrins were modified to the AuNP surface than when ephrinB3 was directly attached to the polymer film. The overall trend for cell motility change is such that a nanoparticle-modified LbL surface induces higher cell motility and the AuNP modification to the LbL surface results in more pronounced change in cell motility than Fn or ephrin modification to the LbL surface.

  2. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Reeba S; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K

    2016-03-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  3. Simvastatin disrupts cytoskeleton and decreases cardiac fibroblast adhesion, migration and viability.

    PubMed

    Copaja, Miguel; Venegas, Daniel; Aranguiz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Vivar, Raul; Avalos, Yennifer; Garcia, Lorena; Chiong, Mario; Olmedo, Ivonne; Catalán, Mabel; Leyton, Lisette; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2012-03-29

    Statins reduce the isoprenoids farnesyl and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, essential intermediates, which control a diversity of cellular events such as cytoskeleton integrity, adhesion, migration and viability. Cardiac fibroblasts are the major non-myocyte cell constituent in the normal heart, and play a key role in the maintenance of extracellular matrix. The effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibroblast processes previously mentioned remain unknown. Our aims were to investigate the effects of simvastatin on cytoskeleton structure and focal adhesion complex assembly and their relationships with cell adhesion, migration and viability in cultured cardiac fibroblasts. To this end, cells were treated with simvastatin for 24 h and changes in actin cytoskeleton, levels of vimentin and paxillin as well as their subcellular localization were analyzed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Cell adhesion to plastic or collagen coated dishes, migration in Transwell chambers, and cell viability were analyzed after simvastatin treatment. Our results show that simvastatin disrupts actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion complex evaluated by phalloidin stain and immunocytochemistry for paxillin and vinculin. All these effects occurred by a cholesterol synthesis-independent mechanism. Simvastatin decreased cell adhesion, migration and viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, simvastatin decreased angiotensin II-induced phospho-paxillin levels and cell adhesion. We concluded that simvastatin disrupts cytoskeleton integrity and focal adhesion complex assembly in cultured cardiac fibroblasts by a cholesterol-independent mechanism and consequently decreases cell migration, adhesion and viability. PMID:22306966

  4. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Francisco F.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are water-impervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion. PMID:17990038

  5. Understanding Marine Mussel Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    H. G. Silverman; F. F. Roberto

    2007-12-01

    In addition to identifying the proteins that have a role in underwater adhesion by marine mussels, research efforts have focused on identifying the genes responsible for the adhesive proteins, environmental factors that may influence protein production, and strategies for producing natural adhesives similar to the native mussel adhesive proteins. The production-scale availability of recombinant mussel adhesive proteins will enable researchers to formulate adhesives that are waterimpervious and ecologically safe and can bind materials ranging from glass, plastics, metals, and wood to materials, such as bone or teeth, biological organisms, and other chemicals or molecules. Unfortunately, as of yet scientists have been unable to duplicate the processes that marine mussels use to create adhesive structures. This study provides a background on adhesive proteins identified in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and introduces our research interests and discusses the future for continued research related to mussel adhesion.

  6. Statistical earthquake focal mechanism forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.; Jackson, David D.

    2014-04-01

    Forecasts of the focal mechanisms of future shallow (depth 0-70 km) earthquakes are important for seismic hazard estimates and Coulomb stress, and other models of earthquake occurrence. Here we report on a high-resolution global forecast of earthquake rate density as a function of location, magnitude and focal mechanism. In previous publications we reported forecasts of 0.5° spatial resolution, covering the latitude range from -75° to +75°, based on the Global Central Moment Tensor earthquake catalogue. In the new forecasts we have improved the spatial resolution to 0.1° and the latitude range from pole to pole. Our focal mechanism estimates require distance-weighted combinations of observed focal mechanisms within 1000 km of each gridpoint. Simultaneously, we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms, using the method of Kagan & Jackson proposed in 1994. This average angle reveals the level of tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The procedure becomes problematical where longitude lines are not approximately parallel, and where shallow earthquakes are so sparse that an adequate sample spans very large distances. North or south of 75°, the azimuths of points 1000 km away may vary by about 35°. We solved this problem by calculating focal mechanisms on a plane tangent to the Earth's surface at each forecast point, correcting for the rotation of the longitude lines at the locations of earthquakes included in the averaging. The corrections are negligible between -30° and +30° latitude, but outside that band uncorrected rotations can be significantly off. Improved forecasts at 0.5° and 0.1° resolution are posted at http://eq.ess.ucla.edu/kagan/glob_gcmt_index.html.

  7. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells respond to interaction with Entamoeba histolytica by changes in morphology, integrin signalling and cell death.

    PubMed

    Faust, Daniela M; Marquay Markiewicz, Jacques; Danckaert, Anne; Soubigou, Guillaume; Guillen, Nancy

    2011-07-01

    Invasive infection with Entamoeba histolytica causes intestinal and hepatic amoebiasis. In liver, parasites cross the endothelial barrier before abscess formation in the parenchyma. We focussed on amoebae interactions with human hepatic endothelial cells, the latter potentially playing a dual role in the infection process: as a barrier and as modulators of host defence responses. We characterized early responses of a human liver sinusoidal endothelial cell line to virulent and virulence-attenuated E. histolytica. Within the first minutes human cells start to retract, enter into apoptosis and die. In the presence of virulent amoebae, expression of genes related to cell cycle, cell death and integrin-mediated adhesion signalling was modulated, and actin fibre, focal adhesion kinase and paxillin localizations changed. Effects of inhibitors and amoeba strains not expressing pathogenic factors amoebapore A and cysteine protease A5 indicated that cell death and cytoskeleton disorganization depend upon parasite adhesion and amoebic cysteine proteinase activities. The data establish a relation between cytotoxic effects of E. histolytica and altered human target cell adhesion and suggest that interference with adhesion signalling triggers endothelial cell retraction and death. Understanding the roles of integrin signalling in endothelial cells will provide clues to unravel host-pathogen interactions during amoebic liver infection. PMID:21624031

  8. Small pixel oversampled IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon; Lewis, Jay; Dhar, Nibir

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new high definition high charge capacity 2.1 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Array. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which is below the Nyquist limit imposed by the optical systems Point Spread Function (PSF). These smaller sub diffraction limited pixels allow spatial oversampling of the image. We show that oversampling IRFPAs enables improved fidelity in imaging including resolution improvements, advanced pixel correlation processing to reduce false alarm rates, improved detection ranges, and an improved ability to track closely spaced objects. Small pixel HD arrays are viewed as the key component enabling lower size, power and weight of the IR Sensor System. Small pixels enables a reduction in the size of the systems components from the smaller detector and ROIC array, the reduced optics focal length and overall lens size, resulting in an overall compactness in the sensor package, cooling and associated electronics. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  9. LiteBIRD: Mission Overview and Focal Plane Layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, T.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Borrill, J.; Chendra, R.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Dominjon, A.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fujino, T.; Fuke, H.; Goeckner-wald, N.; Halverson, N.; Harvey, P.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hattori, M.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Hilton, G.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Hubmayr, J.; Ichiki, K.; Inatani, J.; Inoue, M.; Inoue, Y.; Irie, F.; Irwin, K.; Ishino, H.; Ishitsuka, H.; Jeong, O.; Karatsu, K.; Kashima, S.; Katayama, N.; Kawano, I.; Keating, B.; Kibayashi, A.; Kibe, Y.; Kida, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kimura, N.; Kohri, K.; Komatsu, E.; Kuo, C. L.; Kuromiya, S.; Kusaka, A.; Lee, A.; Linder, E.; Matsuhara, H.; Matsuoka, S.; Matsuura, S.; Mima, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Mizukami, K.; Morii, H.; Morishima, T.; Nagai, M.; Nagasaki, T.; Nagata, R.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, S.; Namikawa, T.; Naruse, M.; Natsume, K.; Nishibori, T.; Nishijo, K.; Nishino, H.; Nitta, T.; Noda, A.; Noguchi, T.; Ogawa, H.; Oguri, S.; Ohta, I. S.; Otani, C.; Okada, N.; Okamoto, A.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, T.; Rebeiz, G.; Richards, P.; Sakai, S.; Sato, N.; Sato, Y.; Segawa, Y.; Sekiguchi, S.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sekine, M.; Seljak, U.; Sherwin, B.; Shinozaki, K.; Shu, S.; Stompor, R.; Sugai, H.; Sugita, H.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takakura, S.; Takano, K.; Takei, Y.; Tomaru, T.; Tomita, N.; Turin, P.; Utsunomiya, S.; Uzawa, Y.; Wada, T.; Watanabe, H.; Westbrook, B.; Whitehorn, N.; Yamada, Y.; Yamasaki, N.; Yamashita, T.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yotsumoto, Y.

    2016-08-01

    LiteBIRD is a proposed CMB polarization satellite project to probe the inflationary B-mode signal. The satellite is designed to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio with a 68 % confidence level uncertainty of σ _r<10^{-3}, including statistical, instrumental systematic, and foreground uncertainties. LiteBIRD will observe the full sky from the second Lagrange point for 3 years. We have a focal plane layout for observing frequency coverage that spans 40-402 GHz to characterize the galactic foregrounds. We have two detector candidates, transition-edge sensor bolometers and microwave kinetic inductance detectors. In both cases, a telecentric focal plane consists of approximately 2× 10^3 superconducting detectors. We will present the mission overview of LiteBIRD, the project status, and the TES focal plane layout.

  10. Mutations in DEPDC5 cause familial focal epilepsy with variable foci.

    PubMed

    Dibbens, Leanne M; de Vries, Boukje; Donatello, Simona; Heron, Sarah E; Hodgson, Bree L; Chintawar, Satyan; Crompton, Douglas E; Hughes, James N; Bellows, Susannah T; Klein, Karl Martin; Callenbach, Petra M C; Corbett, Mark A; Gardner, Alison E; Kivity, Sara; Iona, Xenia; Regan, Brigid M; Weller, Claudia M; Crimmins, Denis; O'Brien, Terence J; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Mulley, John C; Dubeau, Francois; Licchetta, Laura; Bisulli, Francesca; Cossette, Patrick; Thomas, Paul Q; Gecz, Jozef; Serratosa, Jose; Brouwer, Oebele F; Andermann, Frederick; Andermann, Eva; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pandolfo, Massimo; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-05-01

    The majority of epilepsies are focal in origin, with seizures emanating from one brain region. Although focal epilepsies often arise from structural brain lesions, many affected individuals have normal brain imaging. The etiology is unknown in the majority of individuals, although genetic factors are increasingly recognized. Autosomal dominant familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF) is notable because family members have seizures originating from different cortical regions. Using exome sequencing, we detected DEPDC5 mutations in two affected families. We subsequently identified mutations in five of six additional published large families with FFEVF. Study of families with focal epilepsy that were too small for conventional clinical diagnosis with FFEVF identified DEPDC5 mutations in approximately 12% of families (10/82). This high frequency establishes DEPDC5 mutations as a common cause of familial focal epilepsies. Shared homology with G protein signaling molecules and localization in human neurons suggest a role of DEPDC5 in neuronal signal transduction.

  11. Systematic Pathway Enrichment Analysis of a Genome-Wide Association Study on Breast Cancer Survival Reveals an Influence of Genes Involved in Cell Adhesion and Calcium Signaling on the Patients’ Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Woltmann, Andrea; Chen, Bowang; Lascorz, Jesús; Johansson, Robert; Eyfjörd, Jorunn E.; Hamann, Ute; Manjer, Jonas; Enquist-Olsson, Kerstin; Henriksson, Roger; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Hemminki, Kari; Lenner, Per; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) may help to understand the effects of genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer (BC) progression and survival. However, they give only a focused view, which cannot capture the tremendous complexity of this disease. Therefore, we investigated data from a previously conducted GWAS on BC survival for enriched pathways by different enrichment analysis tools using the two main annotation databases Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). The goal was to identify the functional categories (GO terms and KEGG pathways) that are consistently overrepresented in a statistically significant way in the list of genes generated from the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. The SNPs with allelic p-value cut-offs 0.005 and 0.01 were annotated to the genes by excluding or including a 20 kb up-and down-stream sequence of the genes and analyzed by six different tools. We identified eleven consistently enriched categories, the most significant ones relating to cell adhesion and calcium ion binding. Moreover, we investigated the similarity between our GWAS and the enrichment analyses of twelve published gene expression signatures for breast cancer prognosis. Five of them were commonly used and commercially available, five were based on different aspects of metastasis formation and two were developed from meta-analyses of published prognostic signatures. This comparison revealed similarities between our GWAS data and the general and the specific brain metastasis gene signatures as well as the Oncotype DX signature. As metastasis formation is a strong indicator of a patient’s prognosis, this result reflects the survival aspect of the conducted GWAS and supports cell adhesion and calcium signaling as important pathways in cancer progression. PMID:24886783

  12. Ultrastructural localization of plasma membrane-associated urokinase- type plasminogen activator at focal contacts

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have recently shown that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 are both found extracellularly beneath cultured human skin fibroblasts and HT-1080 sarcoma cells, but in distinct localizations. Here, the ultrastructural distribution of u-PA was studied using immunoferritin electron microscopy. In HT-1080 cells, u-PA on the extracellular aspect of the plasma membrane was detected at sites of direct contact of the cell with the growth substratum beneath all parts of the ventral cell surface. The ferritin-labeled adhesion plaques, which were enriched in submembraneous microfilaments, were frequently seen at the leading lamellae of the cells as well as in lamellipodia and microspikes. Besides the cell-substratum adhesion plaques, ferritin label was detected at cell-cell contact sites. Double-label immunofluorescence showed a striking colocalization of u-PA and vinculin in both HT-1080 cells and WI-38 lung fibroblasts, which is consistent with u-PA being a focal contact component. The u-PA-containing focal contacts of WI-38 cells had no direct codistribution with fibronectin fibrils. In WI-38 cells made stationary by cultivation in a medium containing 0.5% FCS, vinculin plaques became highly elongated and more centrally located, whereas u-PA immunolabel disappeared from such focal adhesions. These findings show that plasma membrane-associated u-PA is an intrinsic component of focal contacts, where, we propose, it enables directional proteolysis for cell migration and invasion. PMID:3123496

  13. Tissue Mechanics and Adhesion during Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Shawky, Joseph H.; Davidson, Lance A.

    2014-01-01

    During development cells interact mechanically with their microenvironment through cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions. Many proteins involved in these adhesions serve both mechanical and signaling roles. In this review we will focus on the mechanical roles of these proteins and their complexes in transmitting force or stress from cell to cell or from cell to the extracellular matrix. As forces operate against tissues they establish tissue architecture, extracellular matrix assembly, and pattern cell shapes. As tissues become more established, adhesions play a major role integrating cells with the mechanics of their local environment. Adhesions may serve as both a molecular-specific glue, holding defined populations of cells together, and as a lubricant, allowing tissues to slide past one another. We review the biophysical principles and experimental tools used to study adhesion so that we may aid efforts to understand how adhesions guide these movements and integrate their signaling functions with mechanical function. As we conclude we review efforts to develop predictive models of adhesion that can be used to interpret experiments and guide future efforts to control and direct the process of tissue self-assembly during development. PMID:25512299

  14. Molecular Architecture and Function of Matrix Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Benjamin; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesions mediate important bidirectional interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix. They provide an interactive interface between the extracellular chemical and physical environment and the cellular scaffolding and signaling machinery. This dynamic, reciprocal regulation of intracellular processes and the matrix is mediated by membrane receptors such as the integrins, as well as many other components that comprise the adhesome. Adhesome constituents assemble themselves into different types of cell adhesion structures that vary in molecular complexity and change over time. These cell adhesions play crucial roles in cell migration, proliferation, and determination of cell fate. PMID:21441590

  15. Focal hyperhidrosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Haider, Aamir; Solish, Nowell

    2005-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis, a condition characterized by excessive sweating, can be generalized or focal. Generalized hyperhidrosis involves the entire body and is usually part of an underlying condition, most often an infectious, endocrine or neurologic disorder. Focal hyperhidrosis is idiopathic, occurring in otherwise healthy people. It affects 1 or more body areas, most often the palms, armpits, soles or face. Almost 3% of the general population, largely people aged between 25 and 64 years, experience hyperhidrosis. The condition carries a substantial psychological and social burden, since it interferes with daily activities. However, patients rarely seek a physician's help because many are unaware that they have a treatable medical disorder. Early detection and management of hyperhidrosis can significantly improve a patient's quality of life. There are various topical, systemic, surgical and nonsurgical treatments available with efficacy rates greater than 90%-95%.

  16. Focal hyperhidrosis: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Aamir; Solish, Nowell

    2005-01-01

    HYPERHIDROSIS, A CONDITION CHARACTERIZED by excessive sweating, can be generalized or focal. Generalized hyperhidrosis involves the entire body and is usually part of an underlying condition, most often an infectious, endocrine or neurologic disorder. Focal hyperhidrosis is idiopathic, occurring in otherwise healthy people. It affects 1 or more body areas, most often the palms, armpits, soles or face. Almost 3% of the general population, largely people aged between 25 and 64 years, experience hyperhidrosis. The condition carries a substantial psychological and social burden, since it interferes with daily activities. However, patients rarely seek a physician's help because many are unaware that they have a treatable medical disorder. Early detection and management of hyperhidrosis can significantly improve a patient's quality of life. There are various topical, systemic, surgical and nonsurgical treatments available with efficacy rates greater than 90%–95%. PMID:15632408

  17. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  18. Reversible Holographic Patterns on Azopolymers for Guiding Cell Adhesion and Orientation.

    PubMed

    Rianna, Carmela; Calabuig, Alejandro; Ventre, Maurizio; Cavalli, Silvia; Pagliarulo, Vito; Grilli, Simonetta; Ferraro, Pietro; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-08-12

    Topography of material surfaces is known to influence cell behavior at different levels: from adhesion up to differentiation. Different micro- and nanopatterning techniques have been employed to create patterned surfaces to investigate various aspects of cell behavior, most notably cellular mechanotransduction. Nevertheless, conventional techniques, once implemented on a specific substrate, fail in allowing dynamic changes of the topographic features. Here we investigated the response of NIH-3T3 cells to reversible topographic signals encoded on light-responsive azopolymer films. Switchable patterns were fabricated by means of a well-established holographic setup. Surface relief gratings were realized with Lloyd's mirror system and erased with circularly polarized or incoherent light. Cell cytoskeleton organization and focal adhesion assembly proved to be very sensitive to the underlying topographic signal. Thereafter, pattern reversibility was tested in air and wet environment by using temperature or light as a trigger. Additionally, pattern modification was dynamically performed on substrates with living cells. This study paves the way toward an in situ and real-time investigation of the material-cytoskeleton crosstalk caused by the intrinsic properties of azopolymers. PMID:25876082

  19. [Asterixis in focal brain lesions].

    PubMed

    Velasco, F; Gomez, J C; Zarranz, J J; Lambarri, I; Ugalde, J

    2004-05-01

    Asterixis is a motor control disorder characterized by the presence of abnormal movements of the lower limbs in the vertical plane during posture maintenance. Asterixis is usually bilateral and associated with toxic-metabolic metabolic encephalopathies. Unilateral asterixis is less frequent and it normally indicates focal brain damage. We report the cases of four patients (two males/two females), aged 57 to 83 years, suffering from uni or bilateral asterixis associated with focal brain damage. All patients underwent CT brain scan and a neurophysiological study (parietal EMG and/or PES). In addition, any toxic-metabolic cause that could be produced by this clinical phenomenon was ruled out with the appropriate testing. Unilateral asterixis is a clinical symptom that may indicate the presence of focal brain damage. Often, it is ignored or overlooked during routine neurological examinations. On the other hand, the presence of a bilateral asterixis is not always indicative of a toxic-metabolic encephalopathy.Rarely, such as in one of the cases herein presented, bilateral asterixis can also appear associated with structural brain lesions. Although asterixis diagnosis is fundamentally clinical, the neurophysiological study contributes to verify the diagnosis.

  20. MIPAS focal-plane optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, Henk; Smorenburg, C.; Visser, H.

    1993-11-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) has been selected by ESA for the ENVISAT-Mission, scheduled for launch in 1998. The instrument will measure the concentration of a number of atmospheric trace gases in the earth atmosphere in a spectral region from 4.15 - 14.6 micrometers . Within this region measurements are performed with high spectral resolution. The MIPAS optical system consists of scan mirrors, a telescope, a Michelson interferometer, an afocal reducer and a focal plane assembly. TNO Institute of Applied Physics is involved in the design and development of the afocal reducer and the focal plane assembly. The beam reducing optics of the afocal reducer consist of 2 concave and one convex mirror. Both the housing and the mirrors are made of aluminum to ensure temperature invariance. The optics of the focal plane assembly consist of aluminum mirrors, dichroic beamsplitters and Ge lenses in front of the detectors. The optical/mechanical design is developed to the level that phase C2/D activities can start.

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for…

  3. Evidence for an actin-containing cytoplasmic precursor of the focal contact and the timing of incorporation of vinculin at the focal contact

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of F-actin and vinculin in chicken embryo fibroblasts has been examined by nitrobenzoxadiazol (NBD)-phallacidin and indirect immunofluorescent staining, respectively, and related to the process of focal contact formation by recording the motility of the cell with differential interference contrast (DIC) or interference reflection microscopy (IRM) before fixation for staining. Linear cytoplasmic precursors of the focal contact, present within unattached lamellipodia, stained intensely with NBD-phallacidin. Without exception new focal contacts, 8 s and older at fixation, were associated with either a longer F-actin rib in the lamellipodium or, in older contacts, an F-actin structure of similar dimensions to the contact. This change in distribution of F-actin over the new contacts was accounted for by the segregation of the structural precursor into an attached part over the focal contact and a separate motile part. These results show that F- actin accumulates in the precursor adjacent to areas of the membrane competent to form the focal contact, and are consistent with the interpretation that this F-actin contributes to the initial adhesion plaque associated with the new contact. Vinculin was essentially absent from motile lamellipodia, showed no preferential association with F- actin rich precursors or very young focal contacts, but accumulated over new contacts during a 90-s period. Therefore, the association of F- actin with the membrane that precedes and persists in the initial focal contact is independent of vinculin, and the role of vinculin in development of the focal contact remains unclear. PMID:3121637

  4. Mini-review: barnacle adhesives and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Barnacles are intriguing, not only with respect to their importance as fouling organisms, but also in terms of the mechanism of underwater adhesion, which provides a platform for biomimetic and bioinspired research. These aspects have prompted questions regarding how adult barnacles attach to surfaces under water. The multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the studies makes an overview covering all aspects challenging. This mini-review, therefore, attempts to bring together aspects of the adhesion of adult barnacles by looking at the achievements of research focused on both fouling and adhesion. Biological and biochemical studies, which have been motivated mainly by understanding the nature of the adhesion, indicate that the molecular characteristics of barnacle adhesive are unique. However, it is apparent from recent advances in molecular techniques that much remains undiscovered regarding the complex event of underwater attachment. Barnacles attached to silicone-based elastomeric coatings have been studied widely, particularly with respect to fouling-release technology. The fact that barnacles fail to attach tenaciously to silicone coatings, combined with the fact that the mode of attachment to these substrata is different to that for most other materials, indicates that knowledge about the natural mechanism of barnacle attachment is still incomplete. Further research on barnacles will enable a more comprehensive understanding of both the process of attachment and the adhesives used. Results from such studies will have a strong impact on technology aimed at fouling prevention as well as adhesion science and engineering.

  5. The structure of cell-matrix adhesions: the new frontier

    PubMed Central

    Hanein, Dorit; Horwitz, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Adhesions between the cell and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are mechanosensitive multi-protein assemblies that transmit force across the cell membrane and regulate biochemical signals in response to the chemical and mechanical environment. These combined functions in force transduction, signaling and mechanosensing contribute to cellular phenotypes that span development, homeostasis and disease. These adhesions form, mature and disassemble in response to actin organization and physical forces that originate from endogenous myosin activity or external forces by the extracellular matrix. Despite advances in our understanding of the protein composition, interactions and regulation, our understanding of matrix adhesion structure and organization, how forces affect this organization, and how these changes dictate specific signaling events is limited. Insights across multiple structural levels are acutely needed to elucidate adhesion structure and ultimately the molecular basis of signaling and mechanotransduction. Here we describe the challenges and recent advances and prospects for unraveling the structure of cell-matrix adhesions and their response to force. PMID:22196929

  6. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E; McClatchey, P Mason; Thomas, Susan N

    2015-10-15

    Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell-cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner.

  7. Integrin adhesions suppress syncytium formation in the Drosophila larval epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Antunes, Marco; Anderson, Aimee E.; Kadrmas, Julie L.; Jacinto, Antonio; Galko, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Integrins are critical for barrier epithelial architecture. Integrin loss in vertebrate skin leads to blistering and wound healing defects. However, how Integrins and associated proteins maintain the regular morphology of epithelia is not well understood. We found that targeted knockdown of the integrin focal adhesion (FA) complex components βIntegrin, PINCH, and Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), caused formation of multinucleate epidermal cells within the Drosophila larval epidermis. This phenotype was specific to the Integrin FA complex and not due to secondary effects on polarity or junctional structures. The multinucleate cells resembled the syncytia caused by physical wounding. Live imaging of wound-induced syncytium formation in the pupal epidermis suggested direct membrane breakdown leading to cell-cell fusion and consequent mixing of cytoplasmic contents. Activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which occurs upon wounding, also correlated with syncytium formation induced by PINCH knockdown. Further, ectopic JNK activation directly caused epidermal syncytium formation. No mode of syncytium formation including that induced by wounding, genetic loss-of FA-proteins, or local JNK hyperactivation, involved misregulation of mitosis or apoptosis. Finally, the mechanism of epidermal syncytium formation following JNK hyperactivation and wounding appeared to be direct disassembly of FA complexes. In conclusion, the loss of function phenotype of Integrin FA components in the larval epidermis resembles a wound. Integrin FA loss in mouse and human skin also causes a wound-like appearance. Our results reveal a novel and unexpected role for proper Integrin-based adhesion in suppressing larval epidermal cell-cell fusion– a role that may be conserved in other epithelia. PMID:26255846

  8. Integrin Adhesions Suppress Syncytium Formation in the Drosophila Larval Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Antunes, Marco; Anderson, Aimee E; Kadrmas, Julie L; Jacinto, Antonio; Galko, Michael J

    2015-08-31

    Integrins are critical for barrier epithelial architecture. Integrin loss in vertebrate skin leads to blistering and wound healing defects. However, how integrins and associated proteins maintain the regular morphology of epithelia is not well understood. We found that targeted knockdown of the integrin focal adhesion (FA) complex components β-integrin, PINCH, and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) caused formation of multinucleate epidermal cells within the Drosophila larval epidermis. This phenotype was specific to the integrin FA complex and not due to secondary effects on polarity or junctional structures. The multinucleate cells resembled the syncytia caused by physical wounding. Live imaging of wound-induced syncytium formation in the pupal epidermis suggested direct membrane breakdown leading to cell-cell fusion and consequent mixing of cytoplasmic contents. Activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which occurs upon wounding, also correlated with syncytium formation induced by PINCH knockdown. Further, ectopic JNK activation directly caused epidermal syncytium formation. No mode of syncytium formation, including that induced by wounding, genetic loss of FA proteins, or local JNK hyperactivation, involved misregulation of mitosis or apoptosis. Finally, the mechanism of epidermal syncytium formation following JNK hyperactivation and wounding appeared to be direct disassembly of FA complexes. In conclusion, the loss-of-function phenotype of integrin FA components in the larval epidermis resembles a wound. Integrin FA loss in mouse and human skin also causes a wound-like appearance. Our results reveal a novel and unexpected role for proper integrin-based adhesion in suppressing larval epidermal cell-cell fusion--a role that may be conserved in other epithelia.

  9. α5-Integrin-mediated cellular signaling contributes to the myogenic response of cerebral resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Colinas, Olaia; Moreno-Domínguez, Alejandro; Zhu, Hai-Lei; Walsh, Emma J; Pérez-García, M Teresa; Walsh, Michael P; Cole, William C

    2015-10-01

    The myogenic response of resistance arterioles and small arteries involving constriction in response to intraluminal pressure elevation and dilation on pressure reduction is fundamental to local blood flow regulation in the microcirculation. Integrins have garnered considerable attention in the context of initiating the myogenic response, but evidence indicative of mechanotransduction by integrin adhesions, for example established changes in tyrosine phosphorylation of key adhesion proteins, has not been obtained to substantiate this interpretation. Here, we evaluated the role of integrin adhesions and associated cellular signaling in the rat cerebral arterial myogenic response using function-blocking antibodies against α5β1-integrins, pharmacological inhibitors of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src family kinase (SFK), an ultra-high-sensitivity western blotting technique, site-specific phosphoprotein antibodies to quantify adhesion and contractile filament protein phosphorylation, and differential centrifugation to determine G-actin levels in rat cerebral arteries at varied intraluminal pressures. Pressure-dependent increases in the levels of phosphorylation of FAK (FAK-Y397, Y576/Y577), SFK (SFK-Y416; Y527 phosphorylation was reduced), vinculin-Y1065, paxillin-Y118 and phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-γ1 (PLCγ1)-Y783 were detected. Treatment with α5-integrin function-blocking antibodies, FAK inhibitor FI-14 or SFK inhibitor SU6656 suppressed the changes in adhesion protein phosphorylation, and prevented pressure-dependent phosphorylation of the myosin targeting subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase (MYPT1) at T855 and 20kDa myosin regulatory light chains (LC20) at S19, as well as actin polymerization that are necessary for myogenic constriction. We conclude that mechanotransduction by integrin adhesions and subsequent cellular signaling play a fundamental role in the cerebral arterial myogenic response.

  10. Compliance of bio-adhesive substrates controls the kinetics of membrane-substrate association.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2010-10-21

    Mechanical stiffness of bio-adhesive substrates is one of the major regulators of the cell adhesion and migration. In this study, we propose a theoretical model for the spontaneous growth of focal adhesion (FA) sites, on compliant elastic substrates, at the early stages of cellular adhesion. Using a purely thermodynamic approach, we demonstrate that the rate of membrane-substrate association decreases with increasing the compli