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Sample records for focal hippocampal seizures

  1. Seizure prediction in patients with focal hippocampal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Ardalan; He, Bin

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the performance of our previously developed seizure prediction approach on thirty eight seizures from ten patients with focal hippocampal epilepsy. The seizure prediction system was developed based on the extraction of correlation dimension, correlation entropy, noise level, Lempel-Ziv complexity, largest Lyapunov exponent, and nonlinear interdependence from segments of intracranial EEG. Our results showed an average sensitivity of 86.7% and 92.9%, an average false prediction rate of 0.126 and 0.096/h, and an average minimum prediction time of 14.3 and 33.3min, respectively, using seizure occurrence periods of 30 and 50min and a seizure prediction horizon of 10s. Two-third of the analyzed seizures showed significantly increased complexity in periods prior to the seizures in comparison with baseline. In four patients, strong bidirectional connectivities between epileptic contacts and the surrounding areas were observed. However, in five patients, unidirectional functional connectivities in preictal periods were observed from remote areas to epileptogenic zones. Overall, preictal periods in patients with focal hippocampal epilepsy were characterized with patient-specific changes in univariate and bivariate nonlinear measures. The spatio-temporal characterization of preictal periods may help to better understand the mechanism underlying seizure generation in patients with focal hippocampal epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  2. Remote effects of focal hippocampal seizures on the rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Englot, Dario J; Mishra, Asht M; Mansuripur, Peter K; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2008-09-03

    Seizures have both local and remote effects on nervous system function. Whereas propagated seizures are known to disrupt cerebral activity, little work has been done on remote network effects of seizures that do not propagate. Human focal temporal lobe seizures demonstrate remote changes including slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the neocortex. Ictal neocortical slow waves have been interpreted as seizure propagation; however, we hypothesize that they reflect a depressed cortical state resembling sleep or coma. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed multimodal studies of partial and secondarily generalized limbic seizures in rats. Video/EEG monitoring of spontaneous seizures revealed slow waves in the frontal cortex during behaviorally mild partial seizures, contrasted with fast polyspike activity during convulsive generalized seizures. Seizures induced by hippocampal stimulation produced a similar pattern, and were used to perform functional magnetic resonance imaging weighted for blood oxygenation and blood volume, demonstrating increased signals in hippocampus, thalamus and septum, but decreases in orbitofrontal, cingulate, and retrosplenial cortex during partial seizures, and increases in all of these regions during propagated seizures. Combining these results with neuronal recordings and CBF measurements, we related neocortical slow waves to reduced neuronal activity and cerebral metabolism during partial seizures, but found increased neuronal activity and metabolism during propagated seizures. These findings suggest that ictal neocortical slow waves represent an altered cortical state of depressed function, not propagated seizure activity. This remote effect of partial seizures may cause impaired cerebral functions, including loss of consciousness.

  3. Remote effects of focal hippocampal seizures on the rat neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Englot, Dario J.; Mishra, Asht M.; Mansuripur, Peter K.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2008-01-01

    Seizures have both local and remote effects on nervous system function. While propagated seizures are known to disrupt cerebral activity, little work has been done on remote network effects of seizures that do not propagate. Human focal temporal lobe seizures demonstrate remote changes including slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the neocortex. Ictal neocortical slow waves have been interpreted as seizure propagation, however we hypothesize that they reflect a depressed cortical state resembling sleep or coma. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed multi-modal studies of partial and secondarily-generalized limbic seizures in rats. Video/EEG monitoring of spontaneous seizures revealed slow waves in the frontal cortex during behaviorally mild partial seizures, contrasted with fast poly-spike activity during convulsive generalized seizures. Seizures induced by hippocampal stimulation produced a similar pattern, and were used to perform functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) weighted for blood oxygenation (BOLD) and blood volume (CBV), demonstrating increased signals in hippocampus, thalamus and septum, but decreases in orbitofrontal, cingulate, and retrosplenial cortex during partial seizures; and increases in all these regions during propagated seizures. Combining these results with neuronal recordings and CBF measurements, we related neocortical slow waves to reduced neuronal activity and cerebral metabolism during partial seizures, but found increased neuronal activity and metabolism during propagated seizures. These findings suggest that ictal neocortical slow waves represent an altered cortical state of depressed function, not propagated seizure activity. This remote effect of partial seizures may cause impaired cerebral functions, including loss of consciousness. PMID:18768701

  4. Mortality with brainstem seizures from focal 4-aminopyridine-induced recurrent hippocampal seizures.

    PubMed

    Salam, Muhammad Tariqus; Montandon, Gaspard; Genov, Roman; Devinsky, Orrin; Del Campo, Martin; Carlen, Peter L

    2017-09-01

    Sudden unexplained death in epilepsy is the leading cause of death in young adult epilepsy patients, typically occurring during the early postictal period, presumably resulting from brainstem and cardiorespiratory dysfunction. We hypothesized that ictal discharges in the brainstem disrupt the cardiorespiratory network, causing mortality. To study this hypothesis, we chose an animal model comprising focal unilateral hippocampal injection of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which produced focal recurrent hippocampal seizures with secondary generalization in awake, behaving rats. We studied ictal and interictal intracranial electrographic activity (iEEG) in 23 rats implanted with a custom electrode array into the hippocampus, the contralateral cortex, and brainstem. The hippocampal electrodes contained a cannula to administer the potassium channel blocker and convulsant (4-AP). iEEG was recorded continuously before, during, and after seizures induced by 4-AP infusion into the hippocampus. The control group (n = 5) was monitored for 2-3 months, and the weekly baseline iEEG recordings showed long-term stability. The low-dose group (1 μL 4-AP, 40 mm, n = 5) exhibited local electrographic seizures without spread to the contralateral cerebral cortex or brainstem. The high-dose group (5 μL 4-AP, 40 mm, n = 3) had several hippocampal electrographic seizures, which spread contralaterally and triggered brainstem discharges within 40 min, and were associated with violent motor seizures followed by dyspnea and respiratory arrest, with cortical and hippocampal iEEG flattening. The group that received high-dose 4-AP without brainstem implantation (n = 5) had similar seizure-related respiratory difficulties. Finally, five rats that received high-dose 4-AP without EEG recording also developed violent motor seizures with postictal respiratory arrest. Following visualized respiratory arrest in groups III, IV, and V, manual respiratory resuscitation was successful in five of 13 animals. These

  5. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  6. Febrile seizures - semiology in humans and animal models: evidence of focality and heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Neville, Brian G R; Gindner, Diane

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between febrile seizures and hippocampal sclerosis has been the subject of longstanding discussion. Animal models for prolonged seizures have shown a clear causal relationship with focal limbic features at low dose and hippocampal damage at high dose. Careful history taking of febrile seizure semiology has shown focal early features often with clear temporal lobe elements. This would suggest that many febrile seizures are secondarily generalised hippocampal seizures. There is evidence of varying levels of epileptogenicity in specific infective causes of febrile seizures. Seizure semiology also suggests that a proportion of such seizures may be non-epileptic reflex asystolic attacks. Seizure semiology in febrile seizures deserves closer scrutiny. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. GABAergic networks jump-start focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Abnormally enhanced glutamatergic excitation is commonly believed to mark the onset of a focal seizure. This notion, however, is not supported by firm evidence, and it will be challenged here. A general reduction of unit firing has been indeed observed in association with low-voltage fast activity at the onset of seizures recorded during presurgical intracranial monitoring in patients with focal, drug-resistant epilepsies. Moreover, focal seizures in animal models start with increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneuronal activity that silences principal cells. In vitro studies have shown that synchronous activation of GABAA receptors occurs at seizure onset and causes sizeable elevations in extracellular potassium, thus facilitating neuronal recruitment and seizure progression. A paradoxical involvement of GABAergic networks is required for the initiation of focal seizures characterized by low-voltage fast activity, which represents the most common seizure-onset pattern in focal epilepsies. PMID:27061793

  8. Seizure ending signs in patients with dyscognitive focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Gavvala, Jay R; Gerard, Elizabeth E; Macken, Mícheál; Schuele, Stephan U

    2015-09-01

    Signs indicating the end of a focal seizure with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness but without progression to focal or generalized motor symptoms are poorly defined and can be difficult to determine. Not recognizing the transition from ictal to postictal behaviour can affect seizure reporting accuracy by family members and may lead to delayed or a lack of examination during EEG monitoring, erroneous seizure localization and inadequate medical intervention for prolonged seizure duration. Our epilepsy monitoring unit database was searched for focal seizures without secondary generalization for the period from 2007 to 2011. The first focal seizure in a patient with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness and/or behavioural arrest, with or without automatisms, was included. Seizures without objective symptoms or inadequate video-EEG quality were excluded. A total of 67 patients were included, with an average age of 41.7 years. Thirty-six of the patients had seizures from the left hemisphere and 29 from the right. All patients showed an abrupt change in motor activity and resumed contact with the environment as a sign of clinical seizure ending. Specific ending signs (nose wiping, coughing, sighing, throat clearing, or laughter) were seen in 23 of 47 of temporal lobe seizures and 7 of 20 extra-temporal seizures. Seizure ending signs are often subtle and the most common finding is a sudden change in motor activity and resumption of contact with the environment. More distinct signs, such as nose wiping, coughing or throat clearing, are not specific to temporal lobe onset. A higher proportion of seizures during sleep went unexamined, compared to those during wakefulness. This demonstrates that seizure semiology can be very subtle and arousals from sleep during monitoring should alert staff. Patient accounts of seizure frequency appear to be unreliable and witness reports need to be taken into account. [Published with video sequences].

  9. TONIC INFLUENCE OF NEOCORTEX ON HIPPOCAMPAL SEIZURES.

    PubMed

    Saralidze, E; Khuchua, L; Kobaidze, I

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between different brain structures could be crucial to predicting seizure occurrence, threshold and spread. Moreover, the sleep-wake cycle and electrical activity of brain structures in different phases of sleep could significantly affect the pattern and extent of seizure spread, and therefore the characteristics of epileptic activity. In this animal model using 15 Wistar rats, we show that the duration of hippocampal seizures, induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus, is significantly increased during slow sleep. Moreover, decreasing the electrical activity of the neocortex by cooling of the cortical surface or induction of cortical spreading depression also caused an increase in hippocampal seizure duration. Conversely, warming the cortical surface triggered a remission in spreading depression, in turn restoring the duration of epileptic episodes. Our data suggest that the neocortex probably exerts a tonic inhibitory influence on hippocampal seizures. Thus, cortico-hippocampal interaction could be an important component in the manifestation and generalization of limbic seizures.

  10. Intracerebral temperature alterations associated with focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Feng; Chang, Jong Hee; Rothman, Steven M

    2002-12-01

    Because focal seizures produce an increase in local cerebral metabolism and blood flow, we wanted to determine whether they might lead to changes in brain temperature. We induced focal neocortical seizures by microinjection of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) into the rat motor cortex. The temperature on the dura immediately over the injection site, or 8 mm away, was measured with a thermocouple and in some experiments relative blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. In animals that did not receive 4-AP, brain and rectal temperature remained fairly constant at 33.5 and 37.2 degrees C, respectively, over a 2 h monitoring period. In animals treated with 4-AP, brain temperature over the seizure focus rose an average of 0.3 degrees C, within a few seconds of seizure onset, while rectal temperature remained constant. The seizure-induced temperature rise was preceded by an increase in cortical blood flow. The temperature, but not blood flow, was also elevated 8 mm away from the seizure focus. When blood flow was increased independently of neuronal activity, by elevating pCO(2), brain temperature also rose by about 0.3 degrees C. Focal seizures in anesthetized rats produce a small, but statistically significant increase in local brain temperature, as a result of increased blood flow that brings brain temperature closer to body temperature. In humans, seizures could actually cause a reduction in brain temperature, because brain temperature is normally higher than body temperature.

  11. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment.

  12. Decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal in focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Motelow, Joshua E.; Li, Wei; Zhan, Qiong; Mishra, Asht M.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Liu, Geoffrey; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Zayyad, Zaina; Lee, Hyun Seung; Chu, Victoria; Andrews, John P.; Englot, Dario J.; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures has a major negative impact on quality of life. The prevailing view holds that this disorder impairs consciousness by seizure spread to the bilateral temporal lobes. We propose instead that seizures invade subcortical regions and depress arousal, causing impairment through decreases rather than through increases in activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a rodent model, we found increased activity in regions known to depress cortical function including lateral septum and anterior hypothalamus. Importantly, we found suppression of intralaminar thalamic and brainstem arousal systems and suppression of the cortex. At a cellular level, we found reduced firing of identified cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal forebrain. Finally, we used enzyme-based amperometry to demonstrate reduced cholinergic neurotransmission in both cortex and thalamus. Decreased subcortical arousal is a novel mechanism for loss of consciousness in focal temporal lobe seizures. PMID:25654258

  13. Focal seizure symptoms in idiopathic generalized epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Udaya; Woo, Jia J; Boston, Ray C; Cook, Mark; D'Souza, Wendyl

    2015-08-18

    We sought to study the frequency and prognostic value of focal seizure symptoms (FSS) in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGE) using a validated tool: Epilepsy Diagnostic Interview Questionnaire and Partial Seizure Symptom Definitions. Participants with IGE were recruited from epilepsy clinics at 2 tertiary hospitals. The diagnosis was validated and classified into syndromes according to the International League Against Epilepsy criteria by 2 epileptologists independently with discordance resolved by consensus. The Epilepsy Diagnostic Interview Questionnaire utilizes both open- and closed-ended questions to elicit FSS in association with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonus, and absences. The elicited FSS were classified according to the Partial Seizure Symptom Definitions. Regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between the duration of seizure freedom and FSS. A total of 135 patients were studied, of whom 70 (51.9%) reported FSS. Those symptoms occurred in association with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (53.1%) as well as myoclonus and absences (58%). FSS were reported with similar frequency in juvenile absence epilepsy (62.5%) and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (60%), and with a lesser frequency in generalized epilepsy with tonic-clonic seizures only (39.5%) and childhood absence epilepsy (33.3%). A strong relationship between FSS and duration of seizure freedom was found (regression coefficient -0.665, p = 0.037). FSS are frequently reported by patients with IGE. A shorter duration of seizure freedom is associated with FSS. Recognition of the presence of FSS in IGE is important to avoid misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis as well as to choose appropriate antiepileptic drug therapy. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Seizure Freedom After Limited Hippocampal Radiofrequency Thermocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Han-Tao; Lee, Ching-Yi; Lim, Siew-Na; Chang, Chun-Wei; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Tony

    2016-12-01

    Surgical interventions are often used for freedom from seizure in patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. A patient with seizure foci in the left mesiotemporal region underwent limited-size stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RF-TC) over the left hippocampus. A 37-year-old woman with febrile convulsion in her childhood was admitted to our neurologic department with complex partial seizure with secondary generalization. Electroencephalography showed epileptogenic focus mainly from the left mesiotemporal region, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a left hippocampal atrophy. Because of failure to control seizure after use of several antiepileptic drugs, drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy was diagnosed. RF-TC was done in the left hippocampus. Unique features of our technique include intraoperative electroencephalography recordings directly from electrodes on the left hippocampus, an aura sensation provoked during the low-temperature test thermocoagulation, and therapeutic thermocoagulation performed via a Radionics radiofrequency lead. In the 16-week period following the surgery, the patient experienced no seizure attacks and no significant postoperative adverse effects or memory impairments. Compared with other reports using RF-TC, our case demonstrates a 1-step minimally invasive surgery that reduces hippocampal volume loss, shortens the length of hospital stay, decreases the occurrence of postoperative infection, and achieves good outcomes for epilepsy control. Favorable seizure control was achieved with minimally invasive RF-TC. Further use of this technique is warranted in cases of drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hippocampal sclerosis and associated focal cortical dysplasia-related epilepsy in neurofibromatosis type I.

    PubMed

    Gales, Jordan; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is a relatively common disorder associated with a range of neurologic sequelae. Refractory epilepsy occurs in 4-13% of NF1 patients. Hippocampal sclerosis and focal cortical dysplasia, both well-defined epilepsy-related entities, have been described in a subset of cases. To our knowledge, there has been only one other series describing coexistent focal cortical dysplasia and hippocampal sclerosis in the setting of NF1. We report two such patients who presented with intractable seizures requiring epilepsy surgery. Histologically, the hippocampal sclerosis specimen met criteria for the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) hippocampal sclerosis subtypes Ia and II respectively. The associated focal cortical dysplasia observed within the resected temporal lobe were both consistent with ILAE focal cortical dysplasia type IIIa (e.g. associated with a secondary lesion). Post-operatively, both patients had recurrence of habitual seizures, with one case continuing to have intractable seizures following two subsequent temporal lobectomies. Although hippocampal sclerosis association with focal cortical dysplasia is well document in epilepsy, it has been rarely described in the setting of neurofibromatosis type I. Although prior surgical series have shown good epilepsy surgery outcomes within neurofibromatosis type I, these two cases did not.

  16. Termination of seizure clusters is related to the duration of focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Ferastraoaru, Victor; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Lipton, Richard B; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Legatt, Alan D; Blumberg, Julie; Haut, Sheryl R

    2016-06-01

    Clustered seizures are characterized by shorter than usual interseizure intervals and pose increased morbidity risk. This study examines the characteristics of seizures that cluster, with special attention to the final seizure in a cluster. This is a retrospective analysis of long-term inpatient monitoring data from the EPILEPSIAE project. Patients underwent presurgical evaluation from 2002 to 2009. Seizure clusters were defined by the occurrence of at least two consecutive seizures with interseizure intervals of <4 h. Other definitions of seizure clustering were examined in a sensitivity analysis. Seizures were classified into three contextually defined groups: isolated seizures (not meeting clustering criteria), terminal seizure (last seizure in a cluster), and intracluster seizures (any other seizures within a cluster). Seizure characteristics were compared among the three groups in terms of duration, type (focal seizures remaining restricted to one hemisphere vs. evolving bilaterally), seizure origin, and localization concordance among pairs of consecutive seizures. Among 92 subjects, 77 (83%) had at least one seizure cluster. The intracluster seizures were significantly shorter than the last seizure in a cluster (p = 0.011), whereas the last seizure in a cluster resembled the isolated seizures in terms of duration. Although focal only (unilateral), seizures were shorter than seizures that evolved bilaterally and there was no correlation between the seizure type and the seizure position in relation to a cluster (p = 0.762). Frontal and temporal lobe seizures were more likely to cluster compared with other localizations (p = 0.009). Seizure pairs that are part of a cluster were more likely to have a concordant origin than were isolated seizures. Results were similar for the 2 h definition of clustering, but not for the 8 h definition of clustering. We demonstrated that intracluster seizures are short relative to isolated seizures and terminal seizures. Frontal

  17. Initiation, Propagation, and Termination of Partial (Focal) Seizures

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The neurophysiological patterns that correlate with partial (focal) seizures are well defined in humans by standard electroencephalogram (EEG) and presurgical depth electrode recordings. Seizure patterns with similar features are reproduced in animal models of partial seizures and epilepsy. However, the network determinants that support interictal spikes, as well as the initiation, progression, and termination of seizures, are still elusive. Recent findings show that inhibitory networks are prominently involved at the onset of these seizures, and that extracellular changes in potassium contribute to initiate and sustain seizure progression. The end of a partial seizure correlates with an increase in network synchronization, which possibly involves both excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:26134843

  18. Focal nonconvulsive seizures during detoxification for benzodiazepine abuse.

    PubMed

    Albiero, Anna; Brigo, Francesco; Faccini, Marco; Casari, Rebecca; Quaglio, Gianluca; Storti, Monica; Fiaschi, Antonio; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Lugoboni, Fabio

    2012-02-01

    Chronic benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse is currently treated with detoxification using a low-dose flumazenil infusion, a relatively recently developed and promising procedure. Given the possibility reported in the literature of the occurrence of generalized seizures during therapeutic BDZ detoxification, we usually administer preventive antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy. We describe two patients with no previous history of seizures or evidence of intracerebral lesions who, during detoxification for benzodiazepine abuse, developed repetitive focal nonconvulsive seizures instead of generalized seizures, even with appropriate doses of preventive AED therapy. There are no previous reported cases of focal nonconvulsive seizures occurring during this procedure or, more generally, during abrupt BDZ discontinuation. The cases we describe suggest that during detoxification for BDZ abuse, not only generalized, but also focal nonconvulsive seizures may occur. In this context, the focal seizures probably result from a diffuse decrease in the seizure threshold (caused by a generalized excitatory rebound), which may trigger focal seizures arising from cortical regions with higher intrinsic epileptogenicity. Detoxification for benzodiazepine abuse, even if performed with adequate-dosage AED treatment, may not be as safe a procedure as previously considered, because not only convulsive, but also nonconvulsive seizures may occur and go unnoticed. It is therefore strongly advisable to perform this detoxification under close medical supervision and to maintain a low threshold for EEG monitoring in the event of sudden onset of behavioral changes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tract-specific atrophy in focal epilepsy: Disease, genetics, or seizures?

    PubMed

    Vaughan, David N; Raffelt, David; Curwood, Evan; Tsai, Meng-Han; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Connelly, Alan; Jackson, Graeme D

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether genetics, underlying pathology, or repeated seizures contribute to atrophy in specific white matter tracts. Medically refractory unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS-TLE, n = 26) was studied as an archetype of focal epilepsy, using fixel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging. A genetic effect was assessed in first-degree relatives of HS-TLE subjects who did not have epilepsy themselves (HS-1°Rel; n = 26). The role of disease process was uncovered by comparing HS-TLE to unilateral TLE with normal clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-neg TLE; n = 26, matched for seizure severity). The effect of focal seizures was inferred from lateralized atrophy common to both HS-TLE and MRI-neg TLE, in comparison to healthy controls (n = 76). HS-1 °Rel had bilaterally small hippocampi, but no focal white matter atrophy was detected, indicating a limited effect of genetics. HS-TLE subjects had lateralized atrophy of most temporal lobe tracts, and hippocampal volumes in HS-TLE correlated with parahippocampal cingulum and anterior commissure atrophy, indicating an effect of the underlying pathology. Ipsilateral atrophy of the tapetum, uncinate, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus was found in both HS-TLE and MRI-neg TLE, suggesting a common lateralized effect of focal seizures. Both epilepsy groups had bilateral atrophy of the dorsal cingulum and corpus callosum fibers, which we interpret as a consequence of bilateral insults (potentially generalized seizures and/or medications). Underlying pathology, repeated focal seizures, and global insults each contribute to atrophy in specific tracts. Genetic factors make less of a contribution in this cohort. A multifactorial model of white matter atrophy in focal epilepsy is proposed. Ann Neurol 2017;81:240-250. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  20. The semiology of febrile seizures: Focal features are frequent.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Michihiko; Kubota, Tetsuo; Tsuji, Takeshi; Kurahashi, Hirokazu; Numoto, Shingo; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Akihisa

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the semiology of febrile seizures (FS) and to determine the frequency of FS with symptoms suggestive of focal onset. FS symptoms in children were reported within 24h of seizure onset by the parents using a structured questionnaire consisting principally of closed-ended questions. We focused on events at seizure commencement, including changes in behavior and facial expression, and ocular and oral symptoms. We also investigated the autonomic and motor symptoms developing during seizures. The presence or absence of focal and limbic features was determined for each patient. The associations of certain focal and limbic features with patient characteristics were assessed. Information was obtained on FS in 106 children. Various events were recorded at seizure commencement. Behavioral changes were observed in 35 children, changes in facial expression in 53, ocular symptoms in 78, and oral symptoms in 90. In terms of events during seizures, autonomic symptoms were recognized in 78, and convulsive motor symptoms were recognized in 68 children. Focal features were evident in 81 children; 38 children had two or more such features. Limbic features were observed in 44 children, 9 of whom had two or more such features. There was no significant relationship between any patient characteristic and the numbers of focal or limbic features. The semiology of FS varied widely among children, and symptoms suggestive of focal onset were frequent. FS of focal onset may be more common than is generally thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effective suppression of hippocampal seizures in rats by direct hippocampal cooling with a Peltier chip.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Fujii, Masami; Imoto, Hirochika; Uchiyama, Joji; Nakano, Kimihiko; Nomura, Sadahiro; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Saito, Takashi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2008-04-01

    The use of focal brain cooling to eliminate epileptic discharges (EDs) has attracted increasing attention in the scientific community. In this study, the inhibitory effect of selective hippocampal cooling on experimental hippocampal seizures was investigated using a newly devised cooling system with a thermoelectric (Peltier) chip. A copper needle coated with silicone and attached to the Peltier chip was used for the cooling device. The experiments were performed first in a phantom model with thermography and second in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in a state of halothane anesthesia. The cooling needle, a thermocouple, and a needle electrode for electroencephalography recording were inserted into the right hippocampus. Kainic acid (KA) was injected into the right hippocampus to provoke the EDs. The animals were divided into hippocampal cooling (10 rats) and noncooling (control, 10 rats) groups. In the phantom study, the cooling effects (9 degrees C) occurred in the spherical areas around the needle tip. In the rats the temperature of the cooled hippocampus decreased below 20 degrees C within a 1.6-mm radius and below 25 degrees C within a 2.4-mm radius from the cooling center. The temperature at the needle tip decreased below 20 degrees C within 1 minute and was maintained at the same level until the end of the cooling process. The amplitude of the EDs was suppressed to 68.1 +/- 4.8% of the precooling value and remained low thereafter. No histological damage due to cooling was observed in the rat hippocampus. Selective hippocampal cooling effectively suppresses the KA-induced hippocampal EDs. Direct hippocampal cooling with a permanently implantable system is potentially useful as a minimally invasive therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy and therefore could be an alternative to the temporal lobectomy.

  2. Patient considerations in the management of focal seizures in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Daniel; Wirrell, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Focal epilepsy accounts for approximately one-half to two-thirds of new-onset epilepsy in children. Etiologies are diverse, and range from benign epilepsy syndromes with normal neuroimaging and almost certain remission to focal malformations of cortical development or hippocampal sclerosis with intractable seizures persisting lifelong. Other important etiologies in children include pre-, peri-, or postnatal brain injury, low-grade neoplasms, vascular lesions, and neuroimmunological disorders. Cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric comorbidities are commonly seen and must be addressed in addition to seizure control. Given the diverse nature of focal epilepsies in children and adolescents, investigations and treatments must be individualized. First-line therapy consists of prophylactic antiepileptic drugs; however, prognosis is poor after failure of two to three drugs for lack of efficacy. Refractory cases should be referred for an epilepsy surgery workup. Dietary treatments and neurostimulation may be considered in refractory cases who are not good candidates for surgery. PMID:24808722

  3. Patient considerations in the management of focal seizures in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Daniel; Wirrell, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Focal epilepsy accounts for approximately one-half to two-thirds of new-onset epilepsy in children. Etiologies are diverse, and range from benign epilepsy syndromes with normal neuroimaging and almost certain remission to focal malformations of cortical development or hippocampal sclerosis with intractable seizures persisting lifelong. Other important etiologies in children include pre-, peri-, or postnatal brain injury, low-grade neoplasms, vascular lesions, and neuroimmunological disorders. Cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric comorbidities are commonly seen and must be addressed in addition to seizure control. Given the diverse nature of focal epilepsies in children and adolescents, investigations and treatments must be individualized. First-line therapy consists of prophylactic antiepileptic drugs; however, prognosis is poor after failure of two to three drugs for lack of efficacy. Refractory cases should be referred for an epilepsy surgery workup. Dietary treatments and neurostimulation may be considered in refractory cases who are not good candidates for surgery.

  4. Focal Seizures Induced by Intracranial Electroencephalogram Grids

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mesha-Gay; Litt, Brian; Davis, Kathryn; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a unique, but important seizure variant directly related to placement of subdural grids. Two distinct epileptogenic zones were identified, one which correlated with the patient’s baseline seizures and a separate zone associated with atypical semiology and localization. Inspection of this zone at surgery revealed cortical deformation from the grid itself. The patient underwent successful surgical resection of the primary epileptogenic zone, but not that of the atypical zone. She remains seizure free at two years following surgery. Recognition of grid-induced seizures is important as they may confound the interpretation of intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG) and mislead resective surgery. PMID:27896038

  5. Olanzapine-related repetitive focal seizures with lingual dystonia.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Capasso, Margherita; Frazzini, Valerio; Onofrj, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Olanzapine-related seizures have rarely been reported despite associated proconvulsant risk factors described in the literature: myoclonic status, increased frequency of seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, as well as fatal status epilepticus. We present a psychiatric patient who developed repetitive focal motor seizures and lingual dystonia when olanzapine was added for psychomotor agitation and aggressiveness. Olanzapine was immediately suspended and the seizures progressively disappeared. A control EEG showed no paroxysmal discharges. Olanzapine shares some pharmacological similarities with clozapine, a neuroleptic with a high risk of dose-dependent seizures. This adverse effect should be taken into account, and olanzapine should be used with caution if concomitant circumstances decrease the seizure threshold. [Published with video sequence online].

  6. [Neurophysiological markers of generalized and focal epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Kravtsova, E Yu; Shulakova, K V

    To identify neurophysiological markers of focal and generalized epileptic seizures in the inter-epileptic period. Sixty-four patients, including 36 with isolated generalized tonic-clonic seizures and 28 with focal seizures, were examined. The control group consisted of 27 healthy people. EEG-video monitoring and bioelectric activity analysis of the brain during wakefulness and day sleep, spectral EEG analysis, quantitative and quality indicators of sleep were used. In generalized epileptic seizures, alpha rhythm is predominantly recorded in the left hemisphere. In wakefulness, the focal epileptiform activity develops during the first two stages of day sleep. In focal epileptic seizures, delta and beta-2 rhythms were recorded in the left hemisphere, regional epileptiform changes are aggravated during the 1st and 2nd stages of slow sleep initiated in the frontal regions. A focal component of the epileptiform activity in the inter-epileptic period in patients with different types of seizures should be taken into account in examination and treatment planning of patients who had difficulties with the diagnosis of epilepsy type.

  7. Neuronal Ensemble Synchrony during Human Focal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Harrison, Matthew T.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Madsen, Joseph R.; Blum, Andrew S.; Potter, N. Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Cash, Sydney S.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are classically characterized as the expression of hypersynchronous neural activity, yet the true degree of synchrony in neuronal spiking (action potentials) during human seizures remains a fundamental question. We quantified the temporal precision of spike synchrony in ensembles of neocortical neurons during seizures in people with pharmacologically intractable epilepsy. Two seizure types were analyzed: those characterized by sustained gamma (∼40–60 Hz) local field potential (LFP) oscillations or by spike-wave complexes (SWCs; ∼3 Hz). Fine (<10 ms) temporal synchrony was rarely present during gamma-band seizures, where neuronal spiking remained highly irregular and asynchronous. In SWC seizures, phase locking of neuronal spiking to the SWC spike phase induced synchrony at a coarse 50–100 ms level. In addition, transient fine synchrony occurred primarily during the initial ∼20 ms period of the SWC spike phase and varied across subjects and seizures. Sporadic coherence events between neuronal population spike counts and LFPs were observed during SWC seizures in high (∼80 Hz) gamma-band and during high-frequency oscillations (∼130 Hz). Maximum entropy models of the joint neuronal spiking probability, constrained only on single neurons' nonstationary coarse spiking rates and local network activation, explained most of the fine synchrony in both seizure types. Our findings indicate that fine neuronal ensemble synchrony occurs mostly during SWC, not gamma-band, seizures, and primarily during the initial phase of SWC spikes. Furthermore, these fine synchrony events result mostly from transient increases in overall neuronal network spiking rates, rather than changes in precise spiking correlations between specific pairs of neurons. PMID:25057195

  8. Stress and Seizures: Space, Time and Hippocampal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Gunn, B G; Baram, T Z

    2017-09-12

    Stress is a major trigger of seizures in people with epilepsy. Exposure to stress results in the release of several stress mediators throughout the brain, including the hippocampus, a region sensitive to stress and prone to seizures. Stress mediators interact with their respective receptors to produce distinct effects on the excitability of hippocampal neurons and networks. Crucially, these stress mediators and their actions exhibit unique spatiotemporal profiles, generating a complex combinatorial output with time- and space-dependent effects on hippocampal network excitability and seizure generation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Role of Resting State Networks in Focal Neocortical Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bandt, S. Kathleen; Bundy, David T.; Hawasli, Ammar H.; Ayoub, Kareem W.; Sharma, Mohit; Hacker, Carl D.; Pahwa, Mrinal; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The role of resting state functional networks in epilepsy is incompletely understood. While some pathologic diagnoses have been shown to have maintained but altered resting state connectivity, others have implicated resting state connectivity in disease progression. However little is known about how these resting state networks influence the behavior of a focal neocortical seizure. Methods Using data taken from invasively monitored patients with intractable focal neocortical epilepsy, we evaluated network connectivity (as determined by oscillatory covariance of the slow cortical potential (<0.5 Hz)) as it relates to neocortical seizure foci both in the interictal and ictal states. Results Similar to what has been shown in the past for sleep and anesthesia, electophysiologic resting state networks that are defined by this slow cortical potential covariance maintain their topographic correlation structure throughout an ictal event. Moreover, in the context of focal epilepsy in which the seizure has a specific site of onset, seizure propagation is not chaotic or random. Rather, the seizure (reflected by an elevation of high frequency power) preferentially propagates along the network that contains the seizure onset zone. Significance Taken together, these findings further undergird the fundamental role of resting state networks, provide novel insights into the network-influenced behavior of seizures, and potentially identify additional targets for surgical disconnection including informing the location for the completion of multiple subpial transections (MSPTs). PMID:25247680

  10. Mechanisms underlying different onset patterns of focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Trevelyan, Andrew J; Valentin, Antonio; Alarcon, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    Focal seizures are episodes of pathological brain activity that appear to arise from a localised area of the brain. The onset patterns of focal seizure activity have been studied intensively, and they have largely been distinguished into two types—low amplitude fast oscillations (LAF), or high amplitude spikes (HAS). Here we explore whether these two patterns arise from fundamentally different mechanisms. Here, we use a previously established computational model of neocortical tissue, and validate it as an adequate model using clinical recordings of focal seizures. We then reproduce the two onset patterns in their most defining properties and investigate the possible mechanisms underlying the different focal seizure onset patterns in the model. We show that the two patterns are associated with different mechanisms at the spatial scale of a single ECoG electrode. The LAF onset is initiated by independent patches of localised activity, which slowly invade the surrounding tissue and coalesce over time. In contrast, the HAS onset is a global, systemic transition to a coexisting seizure state triggered by a local event. We find that such a global transition is enabled by an increase in the excitability of the “healthy” surrounding tissue, which by itself does not generate seizures, but can support seizure activity when incited. In our simulations, the difference in surrounding tissue excitability also offers a simple explanation of the clinically reported difference in surgical outcomes. Finally, we demonstrate in the model how changes in tissue excitability could be elucidated, in principle, using active stimulation. Taken together, our modelling results suggest that the excitability of the tissue surrounding the seizure core may play a determining role in the seizure onset pattern, as well as in the surgical outcome. PMID:28472032

  11. Hippocampal internal architecture and postoperative seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Elkommos, Samia; Weber, Bernd; Niehusmann, Pitt; Volmering, Elisa; Richardson, Mark P; Goh, Yen Y; Marson, Anthony G; Elger, Christian; Keller, Simon S

    2016-02-01

    Semi-quantitative analysis of hippocampal internal architecture (HIA) on MRI has been shown to be a reliable predictor of the side of seizure onset in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postoperative seizure outcome and preoperative semi-quantitative measures of HIA. We determined HIA on high in-plane resolution preoperative T2 short tau inversion recovery MR images in 79 patients with presumed unilateral mesial TLE (mTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS) who underwent amygdalohippocampectomy and postoperative follow up. HIA was investigated with respect to postoperative seizure freedom, neuronal density determined from resected hippocampal specimens, and conventionally acquired hippocampal volume. HIA ratings were significantly related to some neuropathological features of the resected hippocampus (e.g. neuronal density of selective CA regions, Wyler grades), and bilaterally with preoperative hippocampal volume. However, there were no significant differences in HIA ratings of the to-be-resected or contralateral hippocampus between patients rendered seizure free (ILAE 1) compared to those continuing to experience seizures (ILAE 2-5). This work indicates that semi-quantitative assessment of HIA on high-resolution MRI provides a surrogate marker of underlying histopathology, but cannot prospectively distinguish between patients who will continue to experience postoperative seizures and those who will be rendered seizure free. The predictive power of HIA for postoperative seizure outcome in non-lesional patients with TLE should be explored. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Adjunctive pregabalin vs gabapentin for focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Glue, Paul; Friedman, Daniel; Almas, Mary; Yardi, Nandan; Knapp, Lloyd; Pitman, Verne; Posner, Holly B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the comparative safety and adjunctive efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency in patients with partial-onset seizures based on prestudy modeling showing superior efficacy for pregabalin. Methods: The design of this comparative efficacy and safety study of pregabalin and gabapentin as adjunctive treatment in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures was randomized, flexible dose, double blind, and parallel group. The study included a 6-week baseline and a 21-week treatment phase. The primary endpoint was the percentage change from baseline in 28-day seizure rate to the treatment phase. Results: A total of 484 patients were randomized to pregabalin (n = 242) or gabapentin (n = 242). Of these, 359 patients (187 pregabalin, 172 gabapentin) completed the treatment phase. The observed median and mean in percentage change from baseline was −58.65 and −47.7 (SD 48.3) for pregabalin and −57.43 and −45.28 (SD 60.6) for gabapentin. For the primary endpoint, there was no significant difference between treatments. The Hodges-Lehman estimated median difference was 0.0 (95% confidence interval −6.0 to 7.0). Safety profiles were comparable and consistent with prior trials. Conclusions: The absence of the anticipated efficacy difference based on modeling of prior, nearly identical trials and the larger-than-expected response rates of the 2 antiepileptic drugs were unexpected. These findings raise questions that are potentially important to consider in future comparative efficacy trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00537940. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with partial seizures enrolled in this study, pregabalin is not superior to gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency. Because of the atypical response rates, the results of this study are poorly generalizable to other epilepsy populations. PMID:27521437

  13. Chemical-genetic attenuation of focal neocortical seizures.

    PubMed

    Kätzel, Dennis; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Schorge, Stephanie; Walker, Matthew C; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2014-05-27

    Focal epilepsy is commonly pharmacoresistant, and resective surgery is often contraindicated by proximity to eloquent cortex. Many patients have no effective treatment options. Gene therapy allows cell-type specific inhibition of neuronal excitability, but on-demand seizure suppression has only been achieved with optogenetics, which requires invasive light delivery. Here we test a combined chemical-genetic approach to achieve localized suppression of neuronal excitability in a seizure focus, using viral expression of the modified muscarinic receptor hM4Di. hM4Di has no effect in the absence of its selective, normally inactive and orally bioavailable agonist clozapine-N-oxide (CNO). Systemic administration of CNO suppresses focal seizures evoked by two different chemoconvulsants, pilocarpine and picrotoxin. CNO also has a robust anti-seizure effect in a chronic model of focal neocortical epilepsy. Chemical-genetic seizure attenuation holds promise as a novel approach to treat intractable focal epilepsy while minimizing disruption of normal circuit function in untransduced brain regions or in the absence of the specific ligand.

  14. Painful focal sensory seizure arising from the primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Shogo; Ikeda, Akio; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Terada, Kiyohito; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Tanaka, Mayako; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2003-09-01

    A 31-year-old, right-handed woman had frequent focal painful seizures involving the right hand without any movement. EEG demonstrated an ictal activity arising from the left centroparietal region. No cerebral structural abnormality was seen on MRI. Ictal single photon emission CT showed markedly increased activity in the left perirolandic cortex, which remained active following the ictal symptoms when the EEG seizure pattern had completely disappeared. It is concluded that the painful seizures in the present patient originated from the primary somatosensory cortex. The prolonged increase of regional blood flow in the perirolandic area may reflect the possibility of persistent subclinical epileptogenicity.

  15. Sustained Focal Cortical Compression Reduces Electrically-Induced Seizure Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ming-Chieh; Lo, Eng H.; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2008-01-01

    Brain injury can often result in the subsequent appearance of seizures, suggesting an alteration in neural excitability associated with the balance between neuronal excitation and inhibition. The process by which this occurs has yet to be fully elucidated. The specific nature of the changes in excitation and inhibition is still unclear, as is the process by which the seizures appear following injury. In this study, we investigated the effects of focal cortical compression on electrically-induced localized seizure threshold in rats. Male Long Evans rats were implanted with stimulating screw electrodes in their motor cortices above the regions controlling forelimb movement. Initial seizure threshold was determined in the animals using a ramped electrical stimulation procedure prior to any compression. Following initial threshold determination, animals underwent sustained cortical compression and then following a 24 hour recovery period had their seizure thresholds tested again with electrical stimulation. Reliability of threshold measurements was confirmed through repeated measurements of seizure threshold. Localized seizure threshold was significantly lowered following sustained cortical compression as compared to control cases. Taken together, the results here suggest a change in global brain excitability following localized, focal compression. PMID:18495350

  16. Lacosamide: A Review in Focal Seizures in Patients with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2015-12-01

    Lacosamide (Vimpat(®)) is a functionalized amino acid available orally (as a solution or tablets) and as an intravenous infusion for use as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ≥17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy. As adjunctive therapy to other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), lacosamide provided effective seizure control and was generally well tolerated in adults and adolescents (aged ≥16 years) in randomized clinical trials and in the real-world setting. In clinical trials, adjunctive lacosamide provided significantly greater reductions in 28-day seizure rates than adjunctive placebo, with these benefits maintained after up to 8 years of therapy in open-label extension studies. Moreover, patients were effectively switched from oral to short-term intravenous adjunctive therapy at the same dosage, which may be particularly beneficial in situations where oral therapy is not suitable. Conversion to lacosamide monotherapy was superior to a historical-control cohort in patients with focal seizures converting from previous AED therapy. In the absence of head-to-head comparisons with other AEDs, the exact position of lacosamide relative to other AEDs remains to be fully determined. In the meantime, oral and intravenous lacosamide provides a useful option as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ≥17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy.

  17. Microscale spatiotemporal dynamics during neocortical propagation of human focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Fabien B; Eskandar, Emad N; Cosgrove, G Rees; Madsen, Joseph R; Blum, Andrew S; Potter, N Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R; Cash, Sydney S; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-11-15

    Some of the most clinically consequential aspects of focal epilepsy, e.g. loss of consciousness, arise from the generalization or propagation of seizures through local and large-scale neocortical networks. Yet, the dynamics of such neocortical propagation remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the microdynamics of focal seizure propagation in neocortical patches (4×4 mm) recorded via high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in people with pharmacologically resistant epilepsy. Our main findings are threefold: (1) a newly developed stage segmentation method, applied to local field potentials (LFPs) and multiunit activity (MUA), revealed a succession of discrete seizure stages, each lasting several seconds. These different stages showed characteristic evolutions in overall activity and spatial patterns, which were relatively consistent across seizures within each of the 5 patients studied. Interestingly, segmented seizure stages based on LFPs or MUA showed a dissociation of their spatiotemporal dynamics, likely reflecting different contributions of non-local synaptic inputs and local network activity. (2) As previously reported, some of the seizures showed a peak in MUA that happened several seconds after local seizure onset and slowly propagated across the MEA. However, other seizures had a more complex structure characterized by, for example, several MUA peaks, more consistent with the succession of discrete stages than the slow propagation of a simple wavefront of increased MUA. In both cases, nevertheless, seizures characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWDs, ~2-3 Hz) eventually evolved into patterns of phase-locked MUA and LFPs. (3) Individual SWDs or gamma oscillation cycles (25-60 Hz), characteristic of two different types of recorded seizures, tended to propagate with varying degrees of directionality, directions of propagation and speeds, depending on the identified seizure stage. However, no clear relationship was observed between the MUA

  18. Microscale Spatiotemporal Dynamics during Neocortical Propagation of Human Focal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Fabien B.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Madsen, Joseph R.; Blum, Andrew S.; Potter, N. Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Cash, Sydney S.; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most clinically consequential aspects of focal epilepsy, e.g. loss of consciousness, arise from the generalization or propagation of seizures through local and large-scale neocortical networks. Yet, the dynamics of such neocortical propagation remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the microdynamics of focal seizure propagation in neocortical patches (4 × 4 mm) recorded via high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in people with pharmacologically resistant epilepsy. Our main findings are threefold: (1) A newly developed stage segmentation method, applied to local field potentials (LFPs) and multi-unit activity (MUA), revealed a succession of discrete seizure stages, each lasting several seconds. These different stages showed characteristic evolutions in overall activity and spatial patterns, which were relatively consistent across seizures within each of the 5 patients studied. Interestingly, segmented seizure stages based on LFPs or MUA showed a dissociation of their spatiotemporal dynamics, likely reflecting different contributions of non-local synaptic inputs and local network activity. (2) As previously reported, some of the seizures showed a peak in MUA that happened several seconds after local seizure onset and slowly propagated across the MEA. However, other seizures had a more complex structure characterized by, for example, several MUA peaks, more consistent with the succession of discrete stages than the slow propagation of a simple wavefront of increased MUA. In both cases, nevertheless, seizures characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWDs, ~ 2–3Hz) eventually evolved into patterns of phase-locked MUA and LFPs. (3) Individual SWDs or gamma oscillation cycles (25–60 Hz), characteristic of two different types of recorded seizures, tended to propagate with varying degrees of directionality, directions of propagation and speeds, depending on the identified seizure stage. However, no clear relationship was observed between the

  19. Focal epileptic seizures mimicking sleep paralysis.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Ossola, Maria; Colnaghi, Silvia; Arbasino, Carla

    2009-03-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a common parasomnia. The diagnostic criteria for SP, as reported in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, are essentially clinical, as electroencephalography (EEG)-polysomnography (PSG) is not mandatory. We describe a subject whose sleep-related events fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SP, even though her visual hallucinations were elementary, repetitive and stereotyped, thus differing from those usually reported by patients with SP. Video/EEG-PSG documented the focal epileptic nature of the SP-like episodes.

  20. Detection of recurrent activation patterns across focal seizures: Application to seizure onset zone identification.

    PubMed

    Vila-Vidal, Manel; Principe, Alessandro; Ley, Miguel; Deco, Gustavo; Tauste Campo, Adrià; Rocamora, Rodrigo

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a method that quantifies the consistent involvement of intracranially monitored regions in recurrent focal seizures. We evaluated the consistency of two ictal spectral activation patterns (mean power change and power change onset time) in intracranial recordings across focal seizures from seven patients with clinically marked seizure onset zone (SOZ). We examined SOZ discrimination using both patterns in different frequency bands and periods of interest. Activation patterns were proved to be consistent across more than 80% of recurrent ictal epochs. In all patients, whole-seizure mean activations were significantly higher for SOZ than non-SOZ regions (P<0.05) while activation onset times were significantly lower for SOZ than for non-SOZ regions (P<0.001) in six patients. Alpha-beta bands (8-20Hz) achieved the highest patient-average effect size on the whole-seizure period while gamma band (20-70Hz) achieved the highest discrimination values between SOZ and non-SOZ sites near seizure onset (0-5s). Consistent spectral activation patterns in focal epilepsies discriminate the SOZ with high effect sizes upon appropriate selection of frequency bands and activation periods. The present method may be used to improve epileptogenic identification as well as pinpoint additional regions that are functionally altered during ictal events. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 24-hour rhythmicity of seizures in refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Menezes Cordeiro, Inês; Santos, Ana Catarina; Peralta, Rita; Paiva, Teresa; Bentes, Carla

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of seizures in specific types of epilepsies can follow a 24-hour nonuniform or nonrandom pattern. We described the 24-hour pattern of clinical seizures in patients with focal refractory epilepsy who underwent video-electroencephalography monitoring. Only patients who were candidates for epilepsy surgery with an unequivocal seizure focus were included in the study. A total of 544 seizures from 123 consecutive patients were analyzed. Specific time of seizures were distributed along 3- or 4-hour time blocks or bins throughout the 24-hour period. The mean age of the subjects was 37.7 years, with standard deviation of 11.5 years, median of 37. The majority were females (70/56%). The majority of patients had a seizure focus located in the mesial temporal lobe (102/83%) and in the neocortical temporal lobe (13/11%). The remaining patients had a seizure focus located in the extratemporal lobe (8/6%). The most common etiology was mesial temporal sclerosis (86/69.9%). Nonuniform seizure distribution was observed in seizures arising from the temporal lobe (mesial temporal lobe and neocortical temporal lobe), with two peaks found in both 3- and 4-hour bins: 10:00-13:00/16:00-19:00 and 08:00-12:00/16:00-20:00 respectively (p=0.004). No specific 24-hour pattern was identified in seizures from extratemporal location. The 24-hour rhythmicity of seizure distribution is recognized in certain types of epilepsy, but studies on the topic are scarce. Their replication and validation is therefore needed. Our study confirms the bimodal pattern of temporal lobe epilepsy independently of the nature of the lesion. However, peak times differ between different studies, suggesting that the ambient, rhythmic exogenous factors or environmental/social zeitgebers, may modulate the 24-hour rhythmicity of seizures. Characterization of these 24-hour patterns of seizure occurrence can influence diagnosis and treatment in selected types of epilepsy, such as the case of temporal lobe

  2. What is a seizure network? Long-range network consequences of focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    What defines the spatial and temporal boundaries of seizure activity in brain networks? To fully answer this question a precise and quantitative definition of seizures is needed, which unfortunately remains elusive. Nevertheless, it is possible to ask under conditions where clearly divergent patterns of activity occur in large-scale brain networks whether certain activity patterns are part of the seizure while others are not. Here we examine brain network activity during focal limbic seizures, including diverse regions such as the hippocampus, subcortical arousal systems and fronto-parietal association cortex. Based on work from patients and from animal models we describe a characteristic pattern of intense increases in neuronal firing, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) signals and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in the hippocampus during focal limbic seizures. Similar increases are seen in certain closely linked subcortical structures such as the lateral septal nuclei and anterior hypothalamus, which contain inhibitory neurons. In marked contrast, decreases in all of these parameters are seen in the subcortical arousal systems of the upper brainstem and intralaminar thalamus, as well as in the fronto-parietal association cortex. We propose that the seizure proper can be defined as regions showing intense increases, while those areas showing opposite changes are inhibited by the seizure network and constitute long-range network consequences beyond the seizure itself. Importantly, the fronto-parietal cortex shows sleep-like slow wave activity and depressed metabolism under these conditions, associated with impaired consciousness. Understanding which brain networks are directly involved in seizures versus which sustain secondary consequences can provide new insights into the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in epilepsy, hopefully leading to innovative treatment

  3. Synchronous inhibitory potentials precede seizure-like events in acute models of focal limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Uva, Laura; Breschi, Gian Luca; Gnatkovsky, Vadym; Taverna, Stefano; de Curtis, Marco

    2015-02-18

    Interictal spikes in models of focal seizures and epilepsies are sustained by the synchronous activation of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks. The nature of population spikes associated with seizure initiation (pre-ictal spikes; PSs) is still undetermined. We analyzed the networks involved in the generation of both interictal and PSs in acute models of limbic cortex ictogenesis induced by pharmacological manipulations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings from both principal cells and interneurons were performed in the medial entorhinal cortex of the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain during focal interictal and ictal discharges induced in the limbic network by intracortical and brief arterial infusions of either bicuculline methiodide (BMI) or 4-aminopyridine (4AP). Local application of BMI in the entorhinal cortex did not induce seizure-like events (SLEs), but did generate periodic interictal spikes sensitive to the glutamatergic non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX. Unlike local applications, arterial perfusion of either BMI or 4AP induced focal limbic SLEs. PSs just ahead of SLE were associated with hyperpolarizing potentials coupled with a complete blockade of firing in principal cells and burst discharges in putative interneurons. Interictal population spikes recorded from principal neurons between two SLEs correlated with a depolarizing potential. We demonstrate in two models of acute limbic SLE that PS events are different from interictal spikes and are sustained by synchronous activation of inhibitory networks. Our findings support a prominent role of synchronous network inhibition in the initiation of a focal seizure. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353048-08$15.00/0.

  4. Hippocampal atrophy, epilepsy duration, and febrile seizures in patients with partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Theodore, W H; Bhatia, S; Hatta, J; Fazilat, S; DeCarli, C; Bookheimer, S Y; Gaillard, W D

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a variety of factors that may be associated with the presence of hippocampal formation (HF) atrophy in patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), including a history of complex or prolonged febrile seizures (FS), age at seizure onset, and epilepsy duration. To determine whether epilepsy duration is related to HF atrophy. We performed MRIs on 35 patients with uncontrolled CPS who had temporal lobe ictal onset on video-EEG. None had evidence for an alien tissue lesion or extra-hippocampal seizure onset. All had a history of secondary generalization. Brain structures were drawn on consecutive images and pixel points summed from successive pictures to calculate volumes. Nine patients with a history of complex or prolonged FS had smaller ipsilateral HF volume and ipsilateral/contralateral ratio than did patients without a history of FS. Epilepsy duration had a significant relation to ipsilateral HF volume and ipsilateral/contralateral ratio. In a multivariate analysis, the effect of duration, but not age at onset or scan, was significant. Patients with a history of FS did not have earlier age at epilepsy onset or longer duration. A history of FS predicted the severity of HF atrophy in our patients. Age at onset or study was not a significant factor. Epilepsy duration, however, did have a significant effect, suggesting that, after an initial insult, progressive HF damage may occur in patients with persistent seizures.

  5. Generalized onset seizures with focal evolution (GOFE) - A unique seizure type in the setting of generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Linane, Avriel; Lagrange, Andre H; Fu, Cary; Abou-Khalil, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    We report clinical and electrographic features of generalized onset seizures with focal evolution (GOFE) and present arguments for the inclusion of this seizure type in the seizure classification. The adult and pediatric Epilepsy Monitoring Unit databases at Vanderbilt Medical Center and Children's Hospital were screened to identify generalized onset seizures with focal evolution. We reviewed medical records for epilepsy characteristics, epilepsy risk factors, MRI abnormalities, neurologic examination, antiepileptic medications before and after diagnosis, and response to medications. We also reviewed ictal and interictal EEG tracings, as well as video-recorded semiology. Ten patients were identified, 7 males and 3 females. All of the patients developed generalized epilepsy in childhood or adolescence (ages 3-15years). Generalized onset seizures with focal evolution developed years after onset in 9 patients, with a semiology concerning for focal seizures or nonepileptic events. Ictal discharges had a generalized onset on EEG, described as either generalized spike-and-wave and/or polyspike-and-wave discharges, or generalized fast activity. This electrographic activity then evolved to focal rhythmic activity most commonly localized to one temporal or frontal region; five patients had multiple seizures evolving to focal activity in different regions of both hemispheres. The predominant interictal epileptiform activity included generalized spike-and-wave and/or polyspike-and-wave discharges in all patients. Taking into consideration all clinical and EEG data, six patients were classified with genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy, and four were classified with structural/metabolic (symptomatic) generalized epilepsy. All of the patients had modifications to their medications following discharge, with three becoming seizure-free and five responding with >50% reduction in seizure frequency. Generalized onset seizures may occasionally have focal evolution with semiology

  6. Optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic brainstem neurons during focal limbic seizures: Effects on cortical physiology.

    PubMed

    Furman, Moran; Zhan, Qiong; McCafferty, Cian; Lerner, Benjamin A; Motelow, Joshua E; Meng, Jin; Ma, Chanthia; Buchanan, Gordon F; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Cardin, Jessica A; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-12-01

    Focal temporal lobe seizures often cause impaired cortical function and loss of consciousness. Recent work suggests that the mechanism for depressed cortical function during focal seizures may depend on decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal, which leads to a sleep-like state of cortical slow-wave activity. To test this hypothesis, we sought to directly activate subcortical cholinergic neurons during focal limbic seizures to determine the effects on cortical function. Here we used an optogenetic approach to selectively stimulate cholinergic brainstem neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus during focal limbic seizures induced in a lightly anesthetized rat model. We found an increase in cortical gamma activity and a decrease in delta activity in response to cholinergic stimulation. These findings support the mechanistic role of reduced subcortical cholinergic arousal in causing cortical dysfunction during seizures. Through further work, electrical or optogenetic stimulation of subcortical arousal networks may ultimately lead to new treatments aimed at preventing cortical dysfunction during seizures.

  7. Acute postoperative seizures and long-term seizure outcome after surgery for hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Casciato, Sara; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Mascia, Addolorata; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Grammaldo, Liliana G; De Risi, Marco; Meldolesi, Giulio N; Romigi, Andrea; Esposito, Vincenzo; Picardi, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence and the prognostic value of acute postoperative seizures (APOS) in patients surgically treated for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS). We studied 139 consecutive patients with TLE-HS who underwent epilepsy surgery and were followed up for at least 5 years (mean duration of follow-up 9.1 years, range 5-15). Medical charts were reviewed to identify APOS, defined as ictal events with the exception of auras occurring within the first 7 days after surgery. Seizure outcome was determined at annual intervals. Patients who were in Engel Class Ia at the last contact were classified as having a favorable outcome. Seizure outcome was favorable in 99 patients (71%). Six patients (4%) experienced APOS and in all cases their clinical manifestations were similar to the habitual preoperative seizures. All patients with APOS had unfavorable long-term outcome, as compared with 35 (26%) of 133 in whom APOS did not occur (p<0.001). Our study suggests that APOS, despite being relatively uncommon in patients undergoing resective surgery for TLE-HS, are associated with a worse long-term seizure outcome. Given some study limitations, our findings should be regarded as preliminary and need confirmation from future larger, prospective, multicenter studies. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuronal injury and cytogenesis after simple febrile seizures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of juvenile rat.

    PubMed

    Nazem, Amir; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Gorji, Ali; Kheradmand, Hamed; Radmard, Mahla; Haghir, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    Although simple febrile seizures are frequently described as harmless, there is evidence which suggests that hippocampal damage may occur after simple febrile seizures. This study aimed to investigate possible neuronal damages as well as alterations in cytogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following simple febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizure was modeled by hyperthermia-induced seizures in 22-day-old male rats. The brains were removed 2 or 15 days after hyperthermia in all rats with (n=20) and without (n=10) occurrence of seizures as well as in control animals (n=10). The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to estimate the surface numerical density of dark neurons. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate changes of cytogenesis following simple febrile seizures. Hyperthermia induced behavioral seizure activities in 67 % of the rats. The numerical densities of dark neurons as well as the mean Ki-67 index (the fraction of Ki-67-positive cells) were significantly increased in dentate gyrus after induction of seizures by hyperthermia compared to both controls and rats without seizure after hyperthermia. Both the seizure duration and intensity were correlated significantly with numerical densities of dark neurons (but not with Ki-67 index). The data indicate that simple febrile seizures can cause neuronal damages and enhancement of cytogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, which were still visible for at least 2 weeks. These findings also suggest the correlation of febrile seizure intensity and duration with neuronal damage.

  9. Ictal electrographic pattern of focal subcortical seizures induced by sound in rats.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Lyudmila V; Grinenko, Olesya A

    2016-03-15

    It is now recognized that both generalized and focal seizures may originate in subcortical structures. The well-known types of focal subcortically-driven seizures are gelastic seizures in patients with the hypothalamic hamartoma and sound-induced seizures in rodents with audiogenic epilepsy. The seizures are generated by subcortical intrinsically epileptogenic focus, the hamartoma in humans and the inferior colliculus (IC) in rodents. In patients with gelastic epilepsy additional seizure types may develop with time that are supposed to result from secondary epileptogenesis and spreading of epileptic discharges to the cortex. Repeated audiogenic seizures can also lead to development of additional seizure behavior and secondary epileptic activation of the cortex. This process, named audiogenic kindling, may be useful for studying secondary subcortico-cortical epileptogenesis. Using intracollicular and intracortical recordings, we studied an ictal electrographic pattern of focal subcortical seizures induced by repeated sound stimulation in Wistar audiogenic-susceptible rats. The audiogenic seizures, representing brief attacks of paroxysmal unidirectional running, were accompanied by epileptiform abnormalities in the IC, mostly on the side ipsilateral to run direction, and enhanced rhythmic 8-9Hz activity in the cortex. With repetition of the subcortical seizures and kindling development, a secondary cortical discharge began to follow the IC seizure. The secondary discharge initially involved the cortex homolateral to the side of dominant subcortical epileptiform abnormalities and behaviorally expressed as limbic (partial) clonus. Kindling progression was associated with bilateralization of the secondary cortical discharge, an increase in its amplitude and duration, intensification of associated behavioral seizures (from partial clonus to generalized tonic-clonic convulsions). Thus, ictal recordings during brief audiogenic running seizures showed their focal

  10. Hippocampal Malrotation Is Associated With Prolonged Febrile Seizures: Results of the FEBSTAT Study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephen; Bello, Jacqueline A; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Lewis, Darrell V; MacFall, James; Shinnar, Ruth C; Gomes, William; Litherland, Claire; Xu, Yuan; Nordli, Douglas R; Pellock, John M; Frank, L Matthew; Moshé, Solomon L; Sun, Shumei

    2015-11-01

    Hippocampal malrotation is characterized by incomplete hippocampal inversion with a rounded shape and blurred internal architecture. There is still debate about whether hippocampal malrotation has pathologic significance. We present findings from the Consequences of Prolonged Febrile Seizures in Childhood (FEBSTAT) study on the frequency of and risk factors for hippocampal malrotation. FEBSTAT is a prospective multicenter study investigating the consequences of febrile status epilepticus in childhood. MRI studies of 226 patients with febrile status epilepticus were analyzed visually by two board-certified neuroradiologists blinded to clinical details and were compared with MRI studies of 96 subjects with first simple febrile seizure. Quantitative analysis of hippocampal volume was performed by two independent observers. Hippocampal malrotation was present in 20 of 226 (8.8%) patients with febrile status epilepticus compared with two of 96 (2.1%) control subjects (odds ratio [OR], 4.56; 95% CI, 1.05-19.92). Hippocampal malrotation was exclusively left-sided in 18 of 22 (81.8%) patients and bilateral in the remaining four patients (18.2%). There was no case of exclusively right-sided hippocampal malrotation. Hippocampal malrotation was more common in boys than in girls (OR, 6.1; 95% CI, 1.7-21.5). On quantitative volumetric MRI analysis, the left hippocampal volume was smaller in patients with hippocampal malrotation than in control subjects with simple febrile seizure (p = 0.004), and the right-to-left hippocampal volume ratio was higher in the hippocampal malrotation group than in the simple febrile seizure group (p < 0.001). Hippocampal malrotation is a developmental malformation that predominantly affects the left hippocampus in male patients and is more frequently found in children with prolonged febrile status epilepticus than in control subjects. These data provide further evidence that hippocampal malrotation represents a pathologic error in brain development

  11. Seizure Freedom in Children With Pathology-Confirmed Focal Cortical Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Witte, Robert J; Wirrell, Elaine C; Nickels, Katherine C; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the temporal course of seizure outcome in children with pathology-confirmed focal cortical dysplasia and explored predictors of sustained seizure freedom. We performed a single-center retrospective study of children ≤ 18 years who underwent resective surgery from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2012 and had pathology-proven focal cortical dysplasia. Surgical outcome was classified as seizure freedom (Engel class I) or seizure recurrence (Engel classes II-IV). Fisher exact and nonparametric Wilcoxon ranksum tests were used, as appropriate. Survival analysis was based on seizure-free outcome. Patients were censored at the time of seizure recurrence or seizure freedom at last follow-up. Thirty-eight patients were identified (median age at surgery, 6.5 years; median duration of epilepsy, 3.3 years). Median time to last follow-up was 13.5 months (interquartile range, 7-41 months). Twenty patients (53%) were seizure free and 26 patients (68%) attained seizure freedom for a minimum of 3 months. Median time to seizure recurrence was 38 months (95% confidence interval, 6-109 months), and the cumulative seizure-free rate was 60% at 12 months (95% confidence interval, 43%-77%). Clinical features associated with seizure freedom at last follow-up included older age at seizure onset (P = .02), older age at surgery (P = .04), absent to mild intellectual disability before surgery (P = .05), and seizure freedom for a minimum of 3 months (P < .001). Favorable clinical features associated with sustained seizure freedom included older age at seizure onset, older age at surgery, absent or mild intellectual disability at baseline, and seizure freedom for a minimum of 3 months. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A 16-year-old girl with focal seizures and impaired awareness: divergent non-invasive data related to a diffuse epileptogenic network.

    PubMed

    Russo, Angelo; Jayakar, Prasanna; Miller, Ian; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Duchowny, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We describe a patient with medically refractory focal epilepsy who presented with divergent non-invasive data, with MRI revealing hippocampal sclerosis and EEG indicating involvement of the occipital lobe. A localized corticectomy over the occipital convexity was performed based on intracranial EEG recording. The patient was seizure-free after four years of follow-up. Electroclinical hypotheses and challenges of defining the epileptogenic network are discussed.

  13. Silent hippocampal seizures and spikes identified by foramen ovale electrodes in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alice D; Deck, Gina; Goldman, Alica; Eskandar, Emad N; Noebels, Jeffrey; Cole, Andrew J

    2017-06-01

    We directly assessed mesial temporal activity using intracranial foramen ovale electrodes in two patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) without a history or EEG evidence of seizures. We detected clinically silent hippocampal seizures and epileptiform spikes during sleep, a period when these abnormalities were most likely to interfere with memory consolidation. The findings in these index cases support a model in which early development of occult hippocampal hyperexcitability may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  14. Praxis-induced reflex seizures mainly precipitated by writing due to a parietal focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Racicot, Frédéric; Obaid, Sami; Bouthillier, Alain; Guillon-Létourneau, Laurent; Clément, Jean-François; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old left-handed woman with medically intractable praxis-induced reflex seizures mainly precipitated by writing. Selective resection of subtle end-of-sulcus cortical dysplasia in the right inferior parietal lobule resulted in freedom from seizures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of praxis-induced reflex seizures mainly precipitated by writing in which a focal lesion was found and treated successfully by surgery.

  15. Nonconvulsive seizures after traumatic brain injury are associated with hippocampal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vespa, P M; McArthur, D L; Xu, Y; Eliseo, M; Etchepare, M; Dinov, I; Alger, J; Glenn, T P; Hovda, D

    2010-08-31

    To determine if posttraumatic nonconvulsive electrographic seizures result in long-term brain atrophy. Prospective continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring was done in 140 patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and in-depth study of 16 selected patients was done using serial volumetric MRI acutely and at 6 months after TBI. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET was done in the acute stage in 14/16 patients. These data were retrospectively analyzed after collection of data for 7 years. cEEG detected seizures in 32/140 (23%) of the entire cohort. In the selected imaging subgroup, 6 patients with seizures were compared with a cohort of 10 age- and GCS-matched patients with TBI without seizures. In this subgroup, the seizures were repetitive and constituted status epilepticus in 4/6 patients. Patients with seizures had greater hippocampal atrophy as compared to those without seizures (21 +/- 9 vs 12 +/- 6%, p = 0.017). Hippocampi ipsilateral to the electrographic seizure focus demonstrated a greater degree of volumetric atrophy as compared with nonseizure hippocampi (28 +/- 5 vs 13 +/- 9%, p = 0.007). A single patient had an ictal PET scan which demonstrated increased hippocampal glucose uptake. Acute posttraumatic nonconvulsive seizures occur frequently after TBI and, in a selected subgroup, appear to be associated with disproportionate long-term hippocampal atrophy. These data suggest anatomic damage is potentially elicited by nonconvulsive seizures in the acute postinjury setting.

  16. Convulsive seizures from experimental focal cortical dysplasia occur independently of cell misplacement

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Lawrence S.; Wen, John H.; Claycomb, Kumiko; Huang, Yuegao; Harrsch, Felicia A.; Naegele, Janice R.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Bordey, Angelique

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a local malformation of cortical development, is the most common cause of pharmacoresistant epilepsy associated with life-long neurocognitive impairments. It remains unclear whether neuronal misplacement is required for seizure activity. Here we show that dyslamination and white matter heterotopia are not necessary for seizure generation in a murine model of type II FCDs. These experimental FCDs generated by increasing mTOR activity in layer 2/3 neurons of the medial prefrontal cortex are associated with tonic-clonic seizures and a normal survival rate. Preventing all FCD-related defects, including neuronal misplacement and dysmorphogenesis, with rapamycin treatments from birth eliminates seizures, but seizures recur after rapamycin withdrawal. In addition, bypassing neuronal misplacement and heterotopia using inducible vectors do not prevent seizure occurrence. Collectively, data obtained using our new experimental FCD-associated epilepsy suggest that life-long treatment to reduce neuronal dysmorphogenesis is required to suppress seizures in individuals with FCD. PMID:27249187

  17. Selective Silencing of Hippocampal Parvalbumin Interneurons Induces Development of Recurrent Spontaneous Limbic Seizures in Mice.

    PubMed

    Drexel, Meinrad; Romanov, Roman A; Wood, James; Weger, Stefan; Heilbronn, Regine; Wulff, Peer; Tasan, Ramon O; Harkany, Tibor; Sperk, Günther

    2017-08-23

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most frequent form of focal epilepsies and is generally associated with malfunctioning of the hippocampal formation. Recently, a preferential loss of parvalbumin (PV) neurons has been observed in the subiculum of TLE patients and in animal models of TLE. To demonstrate a possible causative role of defunct PV neurons in the generation of TLE, we permanently inhibited GABA release selectively from PV neurons of the ventral subiculum by injecting a viral vector expressing tetanus toxin light chain in male mice. Subsequently, mice were subjected to telemetric EEG recording and video monitoring. Eighty-eight percent of the mice presented clusters of spike-wave discharges (C-SWDs; 40.0 ± 9.07/month), and 64% showed spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs; 5.3 ± 0.83/month). Mice injected with a control vector presented with neither C-SWDs nor SRSs. No neurodegeneration was observed due to vector injection or SRS. Interestingly, mice that presented with only C-SWDs but no SRSs, developed SRSs upon injection of a subconvulsive dose of pentylenetetrazole after 6 weeks. The initial frequency of SRSs declined by ∼30% after 5 weeks. In contrast to permanent silencing of PV neurons, transient inhibition of GABA release from PV neurons through the designer receptor hM4Di selectively expressed in PV-containing neurons transiently reduced the seizure threshold of the mice but induced neither acute nor recurrent seizures. Our data demonstrate a critical role for perisomatic inhibition mediated by PV-containing interneurons, suggesting that their sustained silencing could be causally involved in the development of TLE.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) generally takes years after an initial insult during which maladaptation of hippocampal circuitries takes place. In human TLE and in animal models of TLE, parvalbumin neurons are selectively lost in the subiculum, the major output area of the hippocampus. The present

  18. Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures: three patients treated with the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Roberto; Noli, Daniel; Cachia, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    We present three patients with epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures treated with the ketogenic diet. Between February 1, 2012 and January 31, 2014, three patients who met the diagnostic criteria for migrating focal seizures in infancy at our department were placed on the ketogenic diet and followed for a minimum of seven months. Two of the three children responded well to the ketogenic diet. One of these patients became seizure-free and his neuropsychological performance also significantly improved. The other child had a seizure reduction of 75% to 99% with only weekly seizures and moderate psychomotor improvement. For these two patients who responded well to the ketogenic diet, hospital admission was not required. The remaining patient had a seizure reduction of less than 50%. Tolerability of the diet was good in all three patients. Early treatment with the ketogenic diet should be considered for epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures to control seizures and status epilepticus, and avoid progressive cognitive impairment.

  19. Glutamate receptor 1 phosphorylation at Serine 831 and 845 modulates seizure susceptibility and hippocampal hyperexcitability following early life seizures

    PubMed Central

    Rakhade, S.N.; Fitzgerald, E.F.; Klein, P.M.; Zhou, C.; Sun, H; Huganir, R.L.; Jensen, F.E.

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal seizures can lead to later life epilepsy and neurobehavioral deficits, and there are no treatments to prevent these sequelae. We previously showed that hypoxia-induced seizures in a neonatal rat model induce rapid phosphorylation of S831 and S845 sites of the AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit and later neuronal hyperexcitability and epilepsy, suggesting that seizure-induced post-translational modifications may represent a novel therapeutic target. To unambiguously assess the contribution of these sites, we examined seizure susceptibility in wild type mice versus transgenic knock-in mice with deficits in GluR1 S831 and S845 phosphorylation (GluR1 double phosphomutant (GluR1DPM) mice). Phosphorylation of the GluR1 S831 and S845 sites was significantly increased in the hippocampus and cortex following a single episode of pentyleneterazol (PTZ) induced seizures in postnatal day 9 (P9) wild type mouse pups, and that transgenic knock-in mice have a higher threshold and longer latencies to seizures. Like the rat, hypoxic seizures in P9 C57BL/6N wild type mice resulted in transient increases in GluR1 S831 and GluR1 S845 phosphorylation in cortex, and were associated with enhanced seizure susceptibility to later-life kainic acid induced seizures. In contrast, later-life seizure susceptibility following hypoxia-induced seizures was attenuated in GluR1 DPM mice, supporting a role for post-translational modifications in seizure-induced network excitability. Finally, human hippocampal samples from neonatal seizure autopsy cases also showed an increase in GluR1 S831 and S845, supporting the validation of this potential therapeutic target in human tissue. PMID:23223299

  20. Glutamate receptor 1 phosphorylation at serine 831 and 845 modulates seizure susceptibility and hippocampal hyperexcitability after early life seizures.

    PubMed

    Rakhade, Sanjay N; Fitzgerald, Erin F; Klein, Peter M; Zhou, Chengwen; Sun, Hongyu; Huganir, Richard L; Hunganir, Richard L; Jensen, Frances E

    2012-12-05

    Neonatal seizures can lead to later life epilepsy and neurobehavioral deficits, and there are no treatments to prevent these sequelae. We showed previously that hypoxia-induced seizures in a neonatal rat model induce rapid phosphorylation of serine-831 (S831) and Serine 845 (S845) sites of the AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit and later neuronal hyperexcitability and epilepsy, suggesting that seizure-induced posttranslational modifications may represent a novel therapeutic target. To unambiguously assess the contribution of these sites, we examined seizure susceptibility in wild-type mice versus transgenic knock-in mice with deficits in GluR1 S831 and S845 phosphorylation [GluR1 double-phosphomutant (GluR1 DPM) mice]. Phosphorylation of the GluR1 S831 and S845 sites was significantly increased in the hippocampus and cortex after a single episode of pentyleneterazol-induced seizures in postnatal day 7 (P7) wild-type mouse pups and that transgenic knock-in mice have a higher threshold and longer latencies to seizures. Like the rat, hypoxic seizures in P9 C57BL/6N wild-type mice resulted in transient increases in GluR1 S831 and GluR1 S845 phosphorylation in cortex and were associated with enhanced seizure susceptibility to later-life kainic-acid-induced seizures. In contrast, later-life seizure susceptibility after hypoxia-induced seizures was attenuated in GluR1 DPM mice, supporting a role for posttranslational modifications in seizure-induced network excitability. Finally, human hippocampal samples from neonatal seizure autopsy cases also showed an increase in GluR1 S831 and S845, supporting the validation of this potential therapeutic target in human tissue.

  1. Rufinamide for refractory focal seizures: an open-label, multicenter European study.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Zamponi, Nelia; Kluger, Gerhard; Mueller, Arndt; Anna Rita, Mazzotta; Parisi, Pasquale; Isone, Claudia; Santoro, Elena; Curatolo, Paolo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the efficacy and tolerability of rufinamide as adjunctive drug for the treatment of a large series of children, adolescents and adults with refractory cryptogenic or symptomatic focal epilepsy. Patients were recruited in a prospective, add-on, open-label treatment study from six Italian and one German centers for pediatric and adolescent epilepsy care. Inclusion criteria were: (1) age 3 years or more; (2) diagnosis of cryptogenic or symptomatic focal epilepsy refractory to at least three previous antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), alone or in combination; (3) more than one seizure per month in the last 6 months; (4) use of at least one other AED, but no more than three, at baseline; (5) informed consent from parents and/or caregivers. Sixty-eight patients (40 males, 28 females), aged between 3 and 63 years (mean 19.9 years, median 16.0)±SD 12.58, with cryptogenic (28 pts, 41.2%) or symptomatic focal epilepsy (40 pts, 58.8%), were recruited in the study. After a mean follow-up period of 10.4±10.29 months, twenty-two patients (32.3%) had a 50-99% seizure reduction, and none became seizure-free. Twelve patients (17.6%) had a 25-49% seizure decrease, while in 30 (44.1%) seizure frequency was unchanged. A seizure worsening was reported in 5 patients (7.3%). A better response to rufinamide occurred in frontal lobe seizures (51.6%) and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (50%). Rufinamide was effective against focal-onset seizures, particularly in the treatment of secondary generalized frontal lobe seizures. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis and febrile seizures linked by common genetic variation around SCN1A

    PubMed Central

    Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B.; Matarin, Mar; Leu, Costin; Novy, Jan; Tostevin, Anna; Leal, Bárbara; Hessel, Ellen V. S.; Hallmann, Kerstin; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Alhusaini, Saud; Doherty, Colin P.; Dorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jörg; Krämer, Günter; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.; Zumsteg, Dominik; Duncan, Susan; Kälviäinen, Reetta K.; Eriksson, Kai J.; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Pandolfo, Massimo; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Schlachter, Kurt; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Zimprich, Fritz; Théâtre, Emilie; Smith, Colin; O’Brien, Terence J.; Meng Tan, K.; Petrovski, Slave; Robbiano, Angela; Paravidino, Roberta; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Sperling, Michael R.; Buono, Russell J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chaves, João; Costa, Paulo P.; Silva, Berta M.; da Silva, António M.; de Graan, Pierre N. E.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Becker, Albert; Schoch, Susanne; von Lehe, Marec; Reif, Philipp S.; Rosenow, Felix; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Rössler, Karl; Buchfelder, Michael; Hamer, Hajo M.; Kobow, Katja; Coras, Roland; Blumcke, Ingmar; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Weale, Michael E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Kunz, Wolfram S.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy comprises several syndromes, amongst the most common being mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis are typically drug-resistant, and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is frequently associated with important co-morbidities, mandating the search for better understanding and treatment. The cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is unknown, but there is an association with childhood febrile seizures. Several rarer epilepsies featuring febrile seizures are caused by mutations in SCN1A, which encodes a brain-expressed sodium channel subunit targeted by many anti-epileptic drugs. We undertook a genome-wide association study in 1018 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 7552 control subjects, with validation in an independent sample set comprising 959 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 3591 control subjects. To dissect out variants related to a history of febrile seizures, we tested cases with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with (overall n = 757) and without (overall n = 803) a history of febrile seizures. Meta-analysis revealed a genome-wide significant association for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures at the sodium channel gene cluster on chromosome 2q24.3 [rs7587026, within an intron of the SCN1A gene, P = 3.36 × 10−9, odds ratio (A) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.26–1.59]. In a cohort of 172 individuals with febrile seizures, who did not develop epilepsy during prospective follow-up to age 13 years, and 6456 controls, no association was found for rs7587026 and febrile seizures. These findings suggest SCN1A involvement in a common epilepsy syndrome, give new direction to biological understanding of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures

  3. Synchronization analysis of voltage-sensitive dye imaging during focal seizures in the rat neocortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Daisuke; Bahar, Sonya

    2011-12-01

    Seizures are often assumed to result from an excess of synchronized neural activity. However, various recent studies have suggested that this is not necessarily the case. We investigate synchronization during focal neocortical seizures induced by injection of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) in the rat neocortex in vivo. Neocortical activity is monitored by field potential recording and by the fluorescence of the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. After removal of artifacts, the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) signal is analyzed using the nonlinear dynamics-based technique of stochastic phase synchronization in order to determine the degree of synchronization within the neocortex during the development and spread of each seizure event. Results show a large, statistically significant increase in synchronization during seizure activity. Synchrony is typically greater between closer pixel pairs during a seizure event; the entire seizure region is synchronized almost exactly in phase. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first application of synchronization analysis methods to mammalian VSD imaging in vivo. Our observations indicate a clear increase in synchronization in this model of focal neocortical seizures across a large area of the neocortex; a sharp increase in synchronization during seizure events was observed in all 37 seizures imaged. The results are consistent with a recent computational study which simulates the effect of 4AP in a neocortical neuron model.

  4. Effects of undernourishment, recurrent seizures and enriched environment during early life in hippocampal morphology.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Paula Steffen; Simão, Fabrício; Hemb, Marta; Xavier, Léder Leal; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2014-04-01

    It has been recently shown that enriched environment led to a significant benefit in learning and retention of visual-spatial memory, being able to reverse the cognitive impairment generated by undernourishment and recurrent seizures. We investigated the hippocampal morphological effects of recurrent seizures and undernourishment early in life in Wistar rats and the possible benefits produced by the enriched environment in these conditions. The morphological parameters stereologically evaluated were hippocampal volume, thickness of pyramidal stratum of the CA1 subfield and neuronal and glial densities in the same subfield. Male Wistar rats were divided into eight groups including nourished, nourished+enriched environment, nourished+recurrent seizures, nourished+recurrent seizures+enriched environment, undernourished, undernourished+enriched environment, undernourished+recurrent seizures and undernourished+recurrent seizures+enriched environment. Undernourishment model consisted in nutritional deprivation regimen from post-natal day 2 (P2) to P15. From P8 to P10, recurrent seizures group were induced by flurothyl three times per day. Enriched environment groups were exposed between P21 and P51. Our main findings were: (1) animals submitted to the enriched environment showed an increased hippocampal volume; (2) enriched environment promotes increases in the thickness of the pyramidal layer in hippocampal CA1 subfield in animals nourished and undernourished with recurrent seizures; (3) undernourishment during early development decreased neuronal density in CA1 and CA3 subfields. Our findings show that these three conditions induces important changes in hippocampal morphology, the most deleterious changes are induced by undernourishment and recurrent seizures, while more beneficial morphological changes are produced by enriched environment. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Familial aggregation of focal seizure semiology in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project.

    PubMed

    Tobochnik, Steven; Fahlstrom, Robyn; Shain, Catherine; Winawer, Melodie R

    2017-07-04

    To improve phenotype definition in genetic studies of epilepsy, we assessed the familial aggregation of focal seizure types and of specific seizure symptoms within the focal epilepsies in families from the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project. We studied 302 individuals with nonacquired focal epilepsy from 149 families. Familial aggregation was assessed by logistic regression analysis of relatives' traits (dependent variable) by probands' traits (independent variable), estimating the odds ratio for each symptom in a relative given presence vs absence of the symptom in the proband. In families containing multiple individuals with nonacquired focal epilepsy, we found significant evidence for familial aggregation of ictal motor, autonomic, psychic, and aphasic symptoms. Within these categories, ictal whole body posturing, diaphoresis, dyspnea, fear/anxiety, and déjà vu/jamais vu showed significant familial aggregation. Focal seizure type aggregated as well, including complex partial, simple partial, and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Our results provide insight into genotype-phenotype correlation in the nonacquired focal epilepsies and a framework for identifying subgroups of patients likely to share susceptibility genes. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Restoring Conscious Arousal During Focal Limbic Seizures with Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kundishora, Adam J; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Ma, Chanthia; Liu, Mengran; McCafferty, Cian; Schiff, Nicholas D; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Gerrard, Jason; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2016-03-03

    Impaired consciousness occurs suddenly and unpredictably in people with epilepsy, markedly worsening quality of life and increasing risk of mortality. Focal seizures with impaired consciousness are the most common form of epilepsy and are refractory to all current medical and surgical therapies in about one-sixth of cases. Restoring consciousness during and following seizures would be potentially transformative for these individuals. Here, we investigate deep brain stimulation to improve level of conscious arousal in a rat model of focal limbic seizures. We found that dual-site stimulation of the central lateral nucleus of the intralaminar thalamus (CL) and the pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) bilaterally during focal limbic seizures restored normal-appearing cortical electrophysiology and markedly improved behavioral arousal. In contrast, single-site bilateral stimulation of CL or PnO alone was insufficient to achieve the same result. These findings support the "network inhibition hypothesis" that focal limbic seizures impair consciousness through widespread inhibition of subcortical arousal. Driving subcortical arousal function would be a novel therapeutic approach to some forms of refractory epilepsy and may be compatible with devices already in use for responsive neurostimulation. Multisite deep brain stimulation of subcortical arousal structures may benefit not only patients with epilepsy but also those with other disorders of consciousness.

  7. Classic hippocampal sclerosis and hippocampal-onset epilepsy produced by a single “cryptic” episode of focal hippocampal excitation in awake rats

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, Braxton A.; Bumanglag, Argyle V.; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina; Nicolato, Elena; Fabene, Paolo F.; Sloviter, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    In refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures often arise from a shrunken hippocampus exhibiting a pattern of selective neuron loss called “classic hippocampal sclerosis.” No single experimental injury has reproduced this specific pathology, suggesting that hippocampal atrophy might be a progressive “endstage” pathology resulting from years of spontaneous seizures. We posed the alternate hypothesis that classic hippocampal sclerosis results from a single excitatory event that has never been successfully modeled experimentally because convulsive status epilepticus, the insult most commonly used to produce epileptogenic brain injury, is too severe and necessarily terminated before the hippocampus receives the needed duration of excitation. We tested this hypothesis by producing prolonged hippocampal excitation in awake rats without causing convulsive status epilepticus. Two daily 30-minute episodes of perforant pathway stimulation in Sprague-Dawley rats increased granule cell paired-pulse inhibition, decreased epileptiform afterdischarge durations during 8 hours of subsequent stimulation, and prevented convulsive status epilepticus. Similarly, one 8-hour episode of reduced-intensity stimulation in Long-Evans rats, which are relatively resistant to developing status epilepticus, produced hippocampal discharges without causing status epilepticus. Both paradigms immediately produced the extensive neuronal injury that defines classic hippocampal sclerosis, without giving any clinical indication during the insult that an injury was being inflicted. Spontaneous hippocampal-onset seizures began 16–25 days post-injury, before hippocampal atrophy developed, as demonstrated by sequential magnetic resonance imaging. These results indicate that classic hippocampal sclerosis is uniquely produced by a single episode of clinically “cryptic” excitation. Epileptogenic insults may often involve prolonged excitation that goes undetected at the time of injury. PMID

  8. Cerebral regional oxygen fluctuations and decline during clinically silent focal electroencephalographic seizures in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Shuhaiber, Hans; Bolton, Scott; Alfonso, Israel; Dunoyer, Catalina; Yaylali, Ilker

    2004-07-01

    We describe a neonate with tuberous sclerosis complex and right frontal cortical dysplasia who underwent simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy and electroencephalography (EEG) during repetitive clinically silent right frontal EEG seizures. The seizures produced a progressive decline in regional oxygen saturation index and wider regional oxygen saturation index fluctuations in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. We conclude that recurrent clinically silent focal EEG seizures in this neonate were associated with lateralizing near-infrared spectroscopy changes suggestive of relative cerebral hypoxia.

  9. Evolution of genuine cross-correlation strength of focal onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus F; Baier, Gerold; Jiménez, Yurytzy López; Marín García, Arlex O; Rummel, Christian; Schindler, Kaspar

    2011-10-01

    To quantify the evolution of genuine zero-lag cross-correlations of focal onset seizures, we apply a recently introduced multivariate measure to broad band and to narrow-band EEG data. For frequency components below 12.5 Hz, the strength of genuine cross-correlations decreases significantly during the seizure and the immediate postseizure period, while higher frequency bands show a tendency of elevated cross-correlations during the same period. We conclude that in terms of genuine zero-lag cross-correlations, the electrical brain activity as assessed by scalp electrodes shows a significant spatial fragmentation, which might promote seizure offset.

  10. Nonconvulsive seizures after traumatic brain injury are associated with hippocampal atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Vespa, P.M.; McArthur, D.L.; Xu, Y.; Eliseo, M.; Etchepare, M.; Dinov, I.; Alger, J.; Glenn, T.P.; Hovda, D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine if posttraumatic nonconvulsive electrographic seizures result in long-term brain atrophy. Methods: Prospective continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring was done in 140 patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and in-depth study of 16 selected patients was done using serial volumetric MRI acutely and at 6 months after TBI. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET was done in the acute stage in 14/16 patients. These data were retrospectively analyzed after collection of data for 7 years. Results: cEEG detected seizures in 32/140 (23%) of the entire cohort. In the selected imaging subgroup, 6 patients with seizures were compared with a cohort of 10 age- and GCS-matched patients with TBI without seizures. In this subgroup, the seizures were repetitive and constituted status epilepticus in 4/6 patients. Patients with seizures had greater hippocampal atrophy as compared to those without seizures (21 ± 9 vs 12 ± 6%, p = 0.017). Hippocampi ipsilateral to the electrographic seizure focus demonstrated a greater degree of volumetric atrophy as compared with nonseizure hippocampi (28 ± 5 vs 13 ± 9%, p = 0.007). A single patient had an ictal PET scan which demonstrated increased hippocampal glucose uptake. Conclusion: Acute posttraumatic nonconvulsive seizures occur frequently after TBI and, in a selected subgroup, appear to be associated with disproportionate long-term hippocampal atrophy. These data suggest anatomic damage is potentially elicited by nonconvulsive seizures in the acute postinjury setting. GLOSSARY cEEG = continuous EEG; FLAIR = fluid-attenuated inversion recovery; GCS = Glasgow Coma Scale score; GRE = gradient recalled echo; ICU = intensive care unit; TBI = traumatic brain injury. PMID:20805525

  11. Exposure to prenatal stress has deleterious effects on hippocampal function in a febrile seizure rat model.

    PubMed

    Qulu, Lihle; Daniels, W M U; Mabandla, Musa V

    2015-10-22

    Prenatal stress has been shown to result in the development of a number of neurological disorders in the offspring. Most of these disorders are a result of an altered HPA axis resulting in higher than normal glucocorticoid levels in the affected neonate. This leaves the offspring prone to immune challenges. Therefore the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of prenatal stress and febrile seizures on behavior and hippocampal function. Pregnant dams were exposed to restraint stress during the third trimester. Following birth, febrile seizures were induced in two week old pups using lipopolysaccharide and kainic acid. A week later, anxiety-like behavior and navigational ability was assessed. Trunk blood was used to measure basal corticosterone concentration and hippocampal tissue was collected and analyzed. Our results show that exposure to prenatal stress increased basal corticosterone concentration. Exposure to prenatal stress exacerbated anxiety-like behavior and impaired the rat's navigational ability. Exposure to prenatal stress resulted in reduced hippocampal mass that was exacerbated by febrile seizures. However, exposure to febrile seizures did not affect hippocampal mass in the absence of prenatal stress. This suggests that febrile seizures are exacerbated by exposure to early life stressors and this may lead to the development of neurological symptoms associated with a malfunctioning hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Control of Seizure-Like Activity in the Rat Hippocampal Slice

    PubMed Central

    Khosravani, Houman; Carlen, Peter L.; Velazquez, Jose L. Perez

    2003-01-01

    The sudden and transient hypersynchrony of neuronal firing that characterizes epileptic seizures can be considered as the transitory stabilization of metastable states present within the dynamical repertoire of a neuronal network. Using an in vitro model of recurrent spontaneous seizures in the rat horizontal hippocampal slice preparation, we present an approach to characterize the dynamics of the transition to seizure, and to use this information to control the activity and avoid the occurrence of seizure-like events. The transition from the interictal activity (between seizures) to the seizure-like event is aborted by brief (20–50 s) low-frequency (0.5 Hz) periodic forcing perturbations, applied via an extracellular stimulating electrode to the mossy fibers, the axons of the dentate neurons that synapse onto the CA3 pyramidal cells. This perturbation results in the stabilization of an interictal-like low-frequency firing pattern in the hippocampal slice. The results derived from this work shed light on the dynamics of the transition to seizure and will further the development of algorithms that can be used in automated devices to stop seizure occurrence. PMID:12524321

  13. Occurrence of nonconvulsive seizures, periodic epileptiform discharges, and intermittent rhythmic delta activity in rat focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hartings, Jed A; Williams, Anthony J; Tortella, Frank C

    2003-02-01

    A significant proportion of neurologic patients suffer electroencephalographic (EEG) seizures in the acute phase following traumatic or ischemic brain injury, including many without overt behavioral manifestations. Although such nonconvulsive seizures may exacerbate neuropathological processes, they have received limited attention clinically and experimentally. Here we characterize seizure episodes following focal cerebral ischemia in the rat as a model for brain injury-induced seizures. Cortical EEG activity was recorded continuously from both hemispheres up to 72 h following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Seizure discharges appeared in EEG recordings within 1 h of MCAo in 13/16 (81%) animals and consisted predominantly of generalized 1-3 Hz rhythmic spiking. During seizures animals engaged in quiet awake or normal motor behaviors, but exhibited no motor convulsant activity. Animals had a mean of 10.6 seizure episodes within 2 h, with a mean duration of 60 s per episode. On average, seizures ceased at 1 h 59 min post-MCAo in permanently occluded animals and did not occur following reperfusion at 2 h in transiently occluded animals. In addition to seizures, periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) appeared over penumbral regions in the injured hemisphere while intermittent rhythmic delta activity (IRDA) recurred in the contralateral hemisphere with frontoparietal dominance. PLEDs and IRDA persisted up to 72 h in permanent MCAo animals, and early onset of the former was predictive of prolonged seizure activity. The presentation of these EEG waveforms, each with characteristic features replicating those in clinical neurologic populations, validates rat MCAo for study of acutely induced brain seizures and other neurophysiological aspects of brain injury.

  14. Seizures in early life suppress hippocampal dendrite growth while impairing spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masataka; Gu, Xue; Swann, John W

    2011-11-01

    Impaired learning and memory are common in epilepsy syndromes of childhood. Clinical investigations suggest that the developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of intractable seizure disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have demonstrated reduced volumes in brain regions involved in learning and memory. The earlier the onset of an epilepsy the larger the effects seem to be on both brain anatomy and cognition. Thus, childhood epilepsy has been proposed to interfere in some unknown way with brain development. Experiments reported here explore these ideas by examining the effects of seizures in infant mice on learning and memory and on the growth of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. Fifteen brief seizures were induced by flurothyl between postnatal days 7 and 11 in mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in hippocampal pyramidal cells. One to 44days later, dendritic arbors were reconstructed to measure growth. Spatial learning and memory were also assessed in a water maze. Our results show that recurrent seizures produced marked deficits in learning and memory. Seizures also dramatically slowed the growth of basilar dendrites while neurons in littermate control mice continued to add new dendritic branches and lengthen existing branches. When experiments were performed in older mice, seizures had no measureable effects on either dendrite arbor complexity or spatial learning and memory. Our results suggest that the recurring seizures of intractable childhood epilepsy contribute to associated learning and memory deficits by suppressing dendrite growth.

  15. Nonprogressive familial leukoencephalopathy with porencephalic cyst and focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Blumkin, Lubov; Watemberg, Nathan; Lev, Dorit; Malinger, Gustavo; Luckman, Yehudit; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Lerman-Sagie, Tally

    2006-02-01

    Two siblings with a similar white-matter disease but different clinical symptoms are described. The first sibling suffers from nonprogressive spastic hemiparesis secondary to a congenital periventricular porencephalic cyst. Her brother has focal epilepsy. On magnetic resonance imaging, both patients show diffuse white-matter involvement predominantly of the posterior periventricular area. We suggest that this is a familial white-matter disorder with minimal symptoms and no progression in early childhood.

  16. Mossy Fiber Plasticity and Enhanced Hippocampal Excitability, Without Hippocampal Cell Loss or Altered Neurogenesis, in an Animal Model of Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Roland A.; Dubé, Celine; Gonzalez-Vega, Rebeca; Mina, Erene W.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2010-01-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most frequent seizures affecting infants and children; however, their impact on the developing hippocampal formation is not completely understood. Such understanding is highly important because of the potential relationship of prolonged febrile seizures to temporal lobe epilepsy. Using an immature rat model, we have previously demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures render the hippocampus hyperexcitable throughout life. Here we examined whether (1) neuronal loss, (2) altered neurogenesis, or (3) mossy fiber sprouting, all implicated in epileptogenesis in both animal models and humans, were involved in the generation of a pro-epileptic, hyperexcitable hippocampus by these seizures. The results demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures did not result in appreciable loss of any vulnerable hippocampal cell population, though causing strikingly enhanced sensitivity to hippocampal excitants later in life. In addition, experimental febrile seizures on postnatal day 10 did not enhance proliferation of granule cells, whereas seizures generated by kainic acid during the same developmental age increased neurogenesis in the immature hippocampus. However, prolonged febrile seizures resulted in long-term axonal reorganization in the immature hippocampal formation: Mossy fiber densities in granule cell- and molecular layers were significantly increased by 3 months (but not 10 days) after the seizures. Thus, the data indicate that prolonged febrile seizures influence connectivity of the immature hippocampus long-term, and this process requires neither significant neuronal loss nor altered neurogenesis. In addition, the temporal course of the augmented mossy fiber invasion of the granule cell and molecular layers suggests that it is a consequence, rather than the cause, of the hyperexcitable hippocampal network resulting from these seizures. PMID:12722980

  17. Repetitive Convulsant-Induced Seizures Reduce the Number But Not Precision of Hippocampal Place Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hangya, Balázs; Fox, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive one-per-day seizures induced in otherwise normal rats by the volatile convulsant flurothyl decrease the accuracy of locating a hidden goal without changing the mean location of goal selection. We now show that an 8-d series of such seizures degrades the spatial signal carried by the firing of hippocampal pyramidal cells and specifically reduces the information conveyed by the place cell subset of pyramidal cells. This degradation and a concomitant slowing of the hippocampal theta rhythm occur over time courses parallel to the development of the behavioral deficit and plausibly account for the impairment. The details of how pyramidal cell discharge weakens are, however, unexpected. Rather than a reduction in the precision of location-specific firing distributed evenly over all place cells, the number of place cells decreases with seizure number, although the remaining place cells remain quite intact. Thus, with serial seizures there is a cell-specific conversion of robust place cells to sporadically firing (<0.1 spike/s) “low-rate” cells as opposed to gradual loss of place cell resolution. This transformation occurs in the absence of significant changes in the discharge rate of hippocampal interneurons, suggesting that the decline in the number of place cells is not a simple matter of increased inhibitory tone. The cumulative transformation of place cells to low-rate cells by repetitive seizures may reflect a homeostatic, negative-feedback process. PMID:22442080

  18. Environmental enrichment restores CA1 hippocampal LTP and reduces severity of seizures in epileptic mice.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Emanuela; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Pendolino, Valentina; Bagetta, Vincenza; Pignataro, Annabella; Fejtova, Anna; Costa, Cinzia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Picconi, Barbara; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed the effects of environmental enrichment (EE) in a seizure-prone mouse model in which the genetic disruption of the presynaptic protein Bassoon leads to structural and functional alterations in the hippocampus and causes early spontaneous seizures mimicking human neurodevelopmental disorders. One-month EE starting at P21 reduced seizure severity, preserved long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse synaptic responses in the hippocampal CA1 neuronal population and prevented the reduction of spine density and dendrite branching of pyramidal neurons. These data demonstrate that EE exerts its therapeutic effect by normalizing multiple aspects of hippocampal function and provide experimental support for its use in the optimization of existent treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hippocampal sst(1) receptors are autoreceptors and do not affect seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    De Bundel, Dimitri; Aourz, Najat; Kiagiadaki, Foteini; Clinckers, Ralph; Hoyer, Daniel; Kastellakis, Andreas; Michotte, Yvette; Thermos, Kyriaki; Smolders, Ilse

    2010-03-10

    Somatostatin-14 (SRIF-14) exerts anticonvulsive effects in several rat seizure models, generally attributed to sst(2) receptor activation. Whereas sst(1) immunoreactivity has been localized to both polymorphic interneurons and principal cells in the rat hippocampus, its potential role as an inhibitory autoreceptor or as a receptor involved in mediating anticonvulsive actions remains unknown. We showed that intrahippocampal administration of the sst(1) antagonist SRA880 (1 microM) induced a robust increase in hippocampal SST-14 levels without affecting gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in conscious rats, indicating that the sst(1) receptor acts as an inhibitory autoreceptor. SRA880 did not affect seizure severity and did not reverse the anticonvulsive action of SRIF-14 (1 microM) against pilocarpine-induced seizures, suggesting that hippocampal sst(1) receptors are not involved in the anticonvulsive effects of SRIF-14.

  20. FOCAL GENERATION OF PAROXYSMAL FAST RUNS DURING ELECTROGRAPHIC SEIZURES

    PubMed Central

    Boucetta, Sofiane; Chauvette, Sylvain; Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose A cortically generated Lennox-Gastaut type seizure is associated with spike-wave/polyspike-wave discharges at 1.0–2.5 Hz and fast runs at 7–16 Hz. Here we studied the patterns of synchronization during runs of paroxysmal fast spikes. Methods Electrographic activities were recorded using multisite intracellular and field potential recordings in vivo from cats anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine. In different experiments, the recording electrodes were located either at short distances (<1 mm) or at longer distances (up to 12 mm). The main experimental findings were tested in computational models. Results In the majority of cases, the onset and the offset of fast runs occurred almost simultaneously in different recording sites. The amplitude and duration of fast runs could vary by orders of magnitude. Within the fast runs, the patterns of synchronization recorded in different electrodes were as following: (i) synchronous, in phase, (ii) synchronous, with phase shift, (iii) patchy, repeated in phase/phase shift transitions and (iv) non-synchronous, slightly different frequencies in different recording sites or absence of oscillatory activity in one of the recording sites; the synchronous patterns (in phase or with phase shifts) were most common. All these patterns could be recorded in the same pair of electrodes during different seizures and they were reproduced in a computational network model. Intrinsically-bursting (IB) neurons fired more spikes per cycle than any other neurons suggesting their leading role in the fast run generation. Conclusions Once started, the fast runs are generated locally with variable correlations between neighboring cortical foci. PMID:18616553

  1. X-linked focal epilepsy with reflex bathing seizures: Characterization of a distinct epileptic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Rouleau, Isabelle; Sénéchal, Geneviève; Ansaldo, Ana Inés; Gravel, Micheline; Benfenati, Fabio; Cossette, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    We recently reported a Q555X mutation of synapsin 1 (SYN1) on chromosome Xp11-q21 in a family segregating partial epilepsy and autistic spectrum disorder. Herein, we provide a detailed description of the epileptic syndrome in the original family. A total of 34 members from a large French-Canadian family were evaluated. Family members with seizures or epilepsy underwent (when possible) clinical, neuropsychological, electrophysiologic, and neuroimaging assessments. Epilepsy was diagnosed in 10 family members (4 deceased, 6 living). In addition to occasional spontaneous complex partial seizures, seven family members clearly had reflex seizures triggered by bathing or showering. Hippocampal atrophy was found in two of five epileptic family members family members who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of three triggered seizures in two affected members showed rhythmic theta activity over temporal head regions. Ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed temporoinsular perfusion changes. Detailed neuropsychological assessments revealed that SYN1 Q555X male mutation carriers showed specific language impairment and mild autistic spectrum disorder. Female carriers also exhibited reading impairments and febrile seizures but no chronic epilepsy. Available evidence suggests that impaired SYN1 function is associated with hyperexcitability of the temporoinsular network and disturbance of high mental functions such as language and social interaction. The presence of reflex bathing seizures, a most peculiar clinical feature, could be helpful in identifying other patients with this syndrome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of high-dose phenobarbital in children with focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihisa; Nakahara, Eri; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Nakazawa, Mika; Takasu, Michihiko; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of children with focal epilepsy treated with oral high-dose phenobarbital. We reviewed data on children (aged<15 years) with focal seizures treated with high-dose phenobarbital (>5 mg/kg/day to maintain a target serum level >40 μg/mL) for at least 6 months. Seizure frequency was evaluated after phenobarbital titration, and 1 and 2 years after high-dose phenobarbital treatment commenced. Treatment was judged effective when seizure frequencies fell by ⩾75%. Seven boys and eight girls were treated. The median age at commencement of high-dose phenobarbital therapy was 30 months. The maximal serum phenobarbital level ranged from 36.5 to 62.9 μg/mL. High-dose PB was effective in seven. In two patients, treatment was transiently effective, but seizure frequency later returned to the baseline. High-dose PB was ineffective in six. No significant association between effectiveness and any clinical variable was evident. Drowsiness was recorded in nine patients, but no patient developed a behavioral problem or hypersensitivity. Oral high-dose phenobarbital was effective in 7 of 15 patients with focal epilepsy and well tolerated. High-dose PB may be useful when surgical treatment is difficult. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Seizures induce proliferation and dispersion of doublecortin-positive hippocampal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Jessberger, Sebastian; Römer, Benedikt; Babu, Harish; Kempermann, Gerd

    2005-12-01

    One neuropathological hallmark of temporal lobe epilepsy is granule cell dispersion, a widening of the hippocampal granule cell layer (GCL) with abnormally positioned excitatory neurons. The finding that seizure activity also induces adult hippocampal neurogenesis was taken largely as indicative of a regenerative attempt, not as part of the pathology. The aim of our study was to characterize a potential relationship between granule cell dispersion and seizure-induced neurogenesis. Kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures in mice led to increased cell proliferation and new neurons persisted for months after the seizures. We show that the proliferative stimulus did not affect nestin-expressing early precursor cells that primarily respond to physiologic mitogenic stimuli, but stimulated the division of late type-3 progenitor cells, which express doublecortin (DCX), a protein associated with cell migration. This delayed proliferation presumably interfered with migration, leading to a significant dispersion of DCX-positive progenitors and early postmitotic neurons within the dentate gyrus granule cell layer. We propose that initial seizures induce ectopic precursor cell proliferation resulting in the dispersion of immature neurons within the adult granule cell layer. Thus, seizure-generated neurons might contribute to the disease process of epilepsy.

  4. Review of therapeutic options for adjuvant treatment of focal seizures in epilepsy: focus on lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Juan Luis; Ojeda, Joaquín; Corredera, Enrique; Ruiz Giménez, Jesús

    2011-12-05

    Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions worldwide, with an age-adjusted incidence of approximately 50 per 100,000 persons per year in developed countries. Antiepileptic therapy can result in long-term remission in 60-70% of patients, but many patients will require combination treatment to achieve optimal seizure control, as monotherapy is ineffective at controlling seizures in 30-53% of patients. Despite the increase in available treatment options, patient outcomes have not improved significantly and there is still a need for more effective therapies. Drugs used in the treatment of focal-onset seizures are a diverse range of compounds, and in most cases their mechanism of action is unknown or poorly defined. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of the newer adjuvant antiepileptic therapies that may improve outcomes in patients unresponsive to monotherapy, including clobazam, vigabatrin, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, tiagabine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, zonisamide and eslicarbazepine, with focus on lacosamide. Lacosamide has been shown to exert its anticonvulsant effects predominantly by enhancement of the slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Lacosamide is indicated for use as adjuvant treatment of focal-onset seizures in patients with epilepsy, and there is some evidence that it may also be of use in patients with status epilepticus and cancer patients with epilepsy. The efficacy of lacosamide has been assessed in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, all of which have shown lacosamide to be effective at reducing seizure frequency and increasing 50% responder rates in patients with focal-onset seizures. Long-term lacosamide treatment is generally well tolerated and is not associated with significant drug interactions; the availability of an intravenous form of the drug also makes it particularly useful for a broad range of patients.

  5. Critical evaluation of four different seizure detection systems tested on one patient with focal and generalized tonic and clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Van de Vel, Anouk; Verhaert, Kristien; Ceulemans, Berten

    2014-08-01

    For long-term home monitoring of epileptic seizures, the measurement of extracerebral body signals such as abnormal movement is often easier and less obtrusive than monitoring intracerebral brain waves with electroencephalography (EEG). Non-EEG devices are commercially available but with little scientifically valid information and no consensus on which system works for which seizure type or patient. We evaluated four systems based on efficiency, comfort, and user-friendliness and compared them in one patient suffering from focal epilepsy with secondary generalization. The Emfit mat, Epi-Care device, and Epi-Care Free bracelet are commercially available alarm systems, while the VARIA (Video, Accelerometry, and Radar-Induced Activity recording) device is being developed by our team and requires offline analysis for seizure detection and does so by presenting the 5% or 10% (patient-specific) most abnormal movement events, irrespective of the number of seizures per night. As we chose to mimic the home situation, we did not record EEG and compared our results to the seizures reported by experienced staff that were monitoring the patient on a semicontinuous basis. This resulted in a sensitivity (sens) of 78% and false detection rate (FDR) of 0.55 per night for Emfit, sens 40% and FDR 0.41 for Epi-Care, sens 41% and FDR 0.05 for Epi-Care Free, and sens 56% and FDR 20.33 for VARIA. Good results were obtained by some of the devices, even though, as expected, nongeneralized and nonrhythmic motor seizures (involving the head only, having a tonic phase, or manifesting mainly as sound) were often missed. The Emfit mat was chosen for our patient, also based on user-friendliness (few setup steps), comfort (contactless), and possibility to adjust patient-specific settings. When in need of a seizure detection system for a patient, a thorough individual search is still required, which suggests the need for a database or overview including results of clinical trials describing the

  6. [Clinical features and gene mutations in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures].

    PubMed

    Shang, K W; Zhang, Y H; Yang, X L; Liu, A J; Yang, Z X; Liu, X Y; Jiang, Y W; Wu, X R

    2016-10-02

    Objective: To summarize the clinical features and gene mutations of epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS). Method: Clinical features and electroencephalograms(EEG)of 9 patients with EIMFS of Peking University First Hospital from May 2015 to January 2016 were analyzed. Candidate gene mutations were screened by next generation sequencing. Result: Among the 9 patients, 3 were males and 6 were females. Two patients had family history. Seizure onset age was 2 days to 3 months after birth (median age 35 days). Migrating focal seizure was presented. Seizures manifested as eyes and(or)head deviation, involuntary blinking, swallowing, trembling or stiffness of limbs, hand clenching, flushing and cyanosis of lips, etc. Four patients had a history of status epilepticus. All 9 patients had psychomotor delay. EEG of all patients presented relatively slow background; during interictal phase, there were multi-focal epileptic discharges, which dominated one hemisphere or brain region; seizures were recorded in all 9 cases, which manifested eyes or(and)head deviation, stiffening or trembling of limbs, lip smacking, etc. Corresponding EEG showed low-medium-amplitude fast waves that originated from some brain regions and migrated to other regions. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was abnormal in 4 cases, which predominantly showed white matter dysplasia and enlargement of subarachnoid spaces. Two cases carried heterozygous missense mutations of SCN1A gene, while 3 cases carried heterozygous missense mutations of KCNT1 gene, all of which were de novo. One case carried compound heterozygous mutation of TBC1D24 gene(p.Gln207*, p. Ala289Va). Gene mutation was not found in 3 cases. All patients used multiple antiepileptic drugs (AED) and their seizures were not controlled. Follow-up ranged from 2 months to 5 years and 8 months, during which 4 were found dead. Two were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: EIMFS is clinically characterized by early onset, which is

  7. Long-term seizure outcome in 211 patients with focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Fauser, Susanne; Essang, Charles; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias; Staack, Anke Maren; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Strobl, Karl; Bast, Thomas; Schubert-Bast, Susanne; Stephani, Ulrich; Wiegand, Gert; Prinz, Marco; Brandt, Armin; Zentner, Josef; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is currently recognized as the most common cause of neocortical pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Epilepsy surgery has become an increasingly successful treatment option. Herein, the largest patient cohort reported to date is analyzed regarding long-term outcome and factors relevant for long-term seizure control. Two hundred eleven children and adults undergoing epilepsy surgery for histologically proven FCD and a follow-up period of 2-12 years were analyzed regarding the longitudinal course of seizure control, effects of FCD type, localization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), timing of surgery, and postoperative antiepileptic treatment. After 1 year, Engel class I outcome was achieved in 65% of patients and the percentage of seizure-free patients remained stable over the following (up to 12) years. Complete resection of the assumed epileptogenic area, lower age at surgery, and unilobar localization were positive prognostic indicators of long-term seizure freedom. Seizure recurrence was 12% after the first year, whereas 8% achieved late seizure freedom either following additional introduction of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (4%), a reoperation (2%), or a running down phenomenon (2%). Thirty-nine percent of patients had a reduction of AED from polytherapy to monotherapy or a complete cessation of AED treatment. Late seizure relapse was seen in nine patients during reduction of AEDs (i.e., in 12% of all patients with AED tapering); in four of them seizures persisted after reestablishment of antiepileptic medication. Postoperative long-term seizure outcome was favorable in patients with FCD and remained stable in 80% of patients after the first postoperative year. Several preoperative factors revealed to be predictive for the postoperative outcome and may help in the preoperative counseling of patients with FCD and in the selection of ideal candidates for epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Developmental Febrile Seizures Modulate Hippocampal Gene Expression of Hyperpolarization-Activated Channels in an Isoform- and Cell-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Amy; Bender, Roland A.; Chen, Yuncai; Dube, Celine; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2012-01-01

    Febrile seizures, in addition to being the most common seizure type of the developing human, may contribute to the generation of subsequent limbic epilepsy. Our previous work has demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures in the immature rat model increased hippocampal excitability long term, enhancing susceptibility to future seizures. The mechanisms for these profound proepileptogenic changes did not require cell death and were associated with long-term slowed kinetics of the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (IH). Here we show that these seizures modulate the expression of genes encoding this current, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs): In CA1 neurons expressing multiple HCN isoforms, the seizures induced a coordinated reduction of HCN1 mRNA and enhancement of HCN2 expression, thus altering the neuronal HCN phenotype. The seizure-induced augmentation of HCN2 expression involved CA3 in addition to CA1, whereas for HCN4, mRNA expression was not changed by the seizures in either hippocampal region. This isoform- and region-specific transcriptional regulation of the HCNs required neuronal activity rather than hyperthermia alone, correlated with seizure duration, and favored the formation of slow-kinetics HCN2-encoded channels. In summary, these data demonstrate a novel, activity-dependent transcriptional regulation of HCN molecules by developmental seizures. These changes result in long-lasting alteration of the HCN phenotype of specific hippocampal neuronal populations, with profound consequences on the excitability of the hippocampal network. PMID:12040066

  9. Developmental febrile seizures modulate hippocampal gene expression of hyperpolarization-activated channels in an isoform- and cell-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Amy; Bender, Roland A; Chen, Yuncai; Dube, Celine; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Baram, Tallie Z

    2002-06-01

    Febrile seizures, in addition to being the most common seizure type of the developing human, may contribute to the generation of subsequent limbic epilepsy. Our previous work has demonstrated that prolonged experimental febrile seizures in the immature rat model increased hippocampal excitability long term, enhancing susceptibility to future seizures. The mechanisms for these profound proepileptogenic changes did not require cell death and were associated with long-term slowed kinetics of the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (I(H)). Here we show that these seizures modulate the expression of genes encoding this current, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs): In CA1 neurons expressing multiple HCN isoforms, the seizures induced a coordinated reduction of HCN1 mRNA and enhancement of HCN2 expression, thus altering the neuronal HCN phenotype. The seizure-induced augmentation of HCN2 expression involved CA3 in addition to CA1, whereas for HCN4, mRNA expression was not changed by the seizures in either hippocampal region. This isoform- and region-specific transcriptional regulation of the HCNs required neuronal activity rather than hyperthermia alone, correlated with seizure duration, and favored the formation of slow-kinetics HCN2-encoded channels. In summary, these data demonstrate a novel, activity-dependent transcriptional regulation of HCN molecules by developmental seizures. These changes result in long-lasting alteration of the HCN phenotype of specific hippocampal neuronal populations, with profound consequences on the excitability of the hippocampal network.

  10. A rule-based seizure prediction method for focal neocortical epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Aarabi, Ardalan; He, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Objective In the present study, we have developed a novel patient-specific rule-based seizure prediction system for focal neocortical epilepsy. Methods Five univariate measures including correlation dimension, correlation entropy, noise level, Lempel-Ziv complexity, and largest Lyapunov exponent as well as one bivariate measure, nonlinear interdependence, were extracted from non-overlapping 10-second segments of intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) data recorded using electrodes implanted deep in the brain and/or placed on the cortical surface. The spatio-temporal information was then integrated by using rules established based on patient-specific changes observed in the period prior to a seizure sample for each patient. The system was tested on 316 h of iEEG data containing 49 seizures recorded in eleven patients with medically intractable focal neocortical epilepsy. Results For seizure occurrence periods of 30 and 50 min our method showed an average sensitivity of 79.9% and 90.2% with an average false prediction rate of 0.17 and 0.11/h, respectively. In terms of sensitivity and false prediction rate, the system showed superiority to random and periodical predictors. Conclusions The nonlinear analysis of iEEG in the period prior to seizures revealed patient-specific spatio-temporal changes that were significantly different from those observed within baselines in the majority of the seizures analyzed in this study. Significance The present results suggest that the patient specific rule-based approach may become a potentially useful approach for predicting seizures prior to onset. PMID:22361267

  11. Synchrony in Normal and Focal Epileptic Brain: The Seizure Onset Zone is Functionally Disconnected

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Christopher P.; Hu, Sanqing; Stead, Matt; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Bower, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Synchronization of local and distributed neuronal assemblies is thought to underlie fundamental brain processes such as perception, learning, and cognition. In neurological disease, neuronal synchrony can be altered and in epilepsy may play an important role in the generation of seizures. Linear cross-correlation and mean phase coherence of local field potentials (LFPs) are commonly used measures of neuronal synchrony and have been studied extensively in epileptic brain. Multiple studies have reported that epileptic brain is characterized by increased neuronal synchrony except possibly prior to seizure onset when synchrony may decrease. Previous studies using intracranial electroencephalography (EEG), however, have been limited to patients with epilepsy. Here we investigate neuronal synchrony in epileptic and control brain using intracranial EEG recordings from patients with medically resistant partial epilepsy and control subjects with intractable facial pain. For both epilepsy and control patients, average LFP synchrony decreases with increasing interelectrode distance. Results in epilepsy patients show lower LFP synchrony between seizure-generating brain and other brain regions. This relative isolation of seizure-generating brain underlies the paradoxical finding that control patients without epilepsy have greater average LFP synchrony than patients with epilepsy. In conclusion, we show that in patients with focal epilepsy, the region of epileptic brain generating seizures is functionally isolated from surrounding brain regions. We further speculate that this functional isolation may contribute to spontaneous seizure generation and may represent a clinically useful electrophysiological signature for mapping epileptic brain. PMID:20926610

  12. Brain State Is a Major Factor in Preseizure Hippocampal Network Activity and Influences Success of Seizure Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ewell, Laura A.; Liang, Liang; Armstrong, Caren; Soltész, Ivan; Leutgeb, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Neural dynamics preceding seizures are of interest because they may shed light on mechanisms of seizure generation and could be predictive. In healthy animals, hippocampal network activity is shaped by behavioral brain state and, in epilepsy, seizures selectively emerge during specific brain states. To determine the degree to which changes in network dynamics before seizure are pathological or reflect ongoing fluctuations in brain state, dorsal hippocampal neurons were recorded during spontaneous seizures in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizures emerged from all brain states, but with a greater likelihood after REM sleep, potentially due to an observed increase in baseline excitability during periods of REM compared with other brains states also characterized by sustained theta oscillations. When comparing the firing patterns of the same neurons across brain states associated with and without seizures, activity dynamics before seizures followed patterns typical of the ongoing brain state, or brain state transitions, and did not differ until the onset of the electrographic seizure. Next, we tested whether disparate activity patterns during distinct brain states would influence the effectiveness of optogenetic curtailment of hippocampal seizures in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Optogenetic curtailment was significantly more effective for seizures preceded by non-theta states compared with seizures that emerged from theta states. Our results indicate that consideration of behavioral brain state preceding a seizure is important for the appropriate interpretation of network dynamics leading up to a seizure and for designing effective seizure intervention. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hippocampal single-unit activity is strongly shaped by behavioral brain state, yet this relationship has been largely ignored when studying activity dynamics before spontaneous seizures in medial temporal lobe epilepsy. In light of the increased attention on using single

  13. Long-term seizure outcome for international consensus classification of hippocampal sclerosis: a survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Na, Meng; Ge, Haitao; Shi, Chen; Shen, Hong; Wang, Yu; Pu, Song; Liu, Li; Wang, Haiyang; Xie, Chuncheng; Zhu, Minwei; Wang, Jiabin; Shi, Changbin; Lin, Zhiguo

    2015-02-01

    Surgery is regarded as a common treatment option for patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) as a result of hippocampal sclerosis (HS). However, approximately one-third of patients with intractable epilepsy did not become seizure-free after tailored resection strategies. It would be compelling to identify predictive factors of postoperative seizure outcomes. Our aim was to assess the correlation between HS classification and long-term postoperative seizure outcome in patients with MTLE due to HS. To investigate HS classification, semi-quantitative analysis and immunohistochemical staining of neuronal nuclei (NeuN) were performed on 100 postoperative hippocampal specimens. All patients had a 1-7 year postoperative follow-up. The postoperative seizure outcome was evaluated using International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) outcome classification. Three types of HS were recognized. The highest incidence of initial precipitating injury (IPI) was noted in the HS ILAE type 1 group (53.1%). The most favorable long-term seizure outcome was also noted in the HS ILAE type 1 group. The shortest epilepsy duration was recorded in the HS ILAE type 2 group (mean epilepsy duration=6.64 ± 5.83 years). The completely seizure free rate of patients in all groups declined with an increase in time. Our study for the first time demonstrated a significant correlation between HS ILAE types and long-term postoperative seizure outcome in patients with MTLE due to HS. Therefore, HS ILAE types have predictive value in long-term seizure outcome following epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hyperintense cortical signal on MRI reflects focal leukocortical encephalitis and seizure risk in PML

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Michael N.; Alsop, David C.; Agnihotri, Shruti P.; Pfannl, Rolf; Wuthrich, Christian; Ho, Mai-Lan; Hackney, David; Ngo, Long; Anderson, Matthew P.; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency of hyperintense cortical signal (HCS) on T1-weighted pre-contrast MRI in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) patients, its association with seizure risk and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), and its pathologic correlate. Methods We reviewed clinical data including seizure history, presence of IRIS, and MRI scans from PML patients evaluated at our institution between 2003 and 2012. Cases that were diagnosed either by CSF JC Virus (JCV) PCR, brain biopsy or autopsy, and who had MRI images available were included in the analysis (n=49). We characterized pathologic findings in areas of the brain displaying HCS in two patients and compared them with isointense cortex in the same individuals. Results Of 49 patients, 17 (34.7%) had seizures and 30 (61.2%) had HCS adjacent to subcortical PML lesions on MRI. Of the 17 PML patients with seizures, 15 (88.2%) had HCS compared to 15/32 (46.9%) patients without seizures (p= 0.006). HCS was associated with seizure development with a relative risk (RR) of 4.75 (95% confidence interval of 1.2 to 18.5; p=0.006). Of the 20 patients with IRIS, 16 (80.0%) had HCS compared to 14/29 (49.3%) of those without IRIS (p=0.04). On histological examination, HCS areas were associated with striking JCV-associated demyelination of cortical and sub-cortical U-fibers, significant macrophage infiltration and a pronounced reactive gliosis in the deep cortical layers. Interpretation Seizures are a frequent complication in PML. HCS is associated with seizures as well as IRIS, and correlates histologically with JCV focal leukocortical encephalitis (JCV FLE). PMID:24752885

  15. Repeated restraint stress increases seizure susceptibility by activation of hippocampal endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Xia, Zhengrong; Zhang, Aifeng; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2017-09-05

    A growing body of evidence suggests that stress triggers a variety of pathophysiological responses. Recent studies show that stress produces enduring effects on structure and function of hippocampus, which is one of the most important structures involved in epilepsy. In the present study, we determined the effect of repeated restraint stress exposure on the susceptibility of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and the possible mechanisms involved using a rodent model. Our results show that mice subjected to repeated restraint stress exhibited shorter latency to PTZ-induced tonic-clonic seizures and higher seizure severity, suggesting chronic restraint stress increases seizure susceptibility. Following repeated restraint stress, we observed an increased level of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as well as oxidative stress in the hippocampus. Moreover, our results show that chronic restraint stress exposure causes neuron loss in the hippocampus. Inhibition of ER stress with chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), however, protects against chronic restraint stress-induced neuron loss, suggesting repeated restraint stress-induced neuronal degeneration is dependent on ER stress activation. On the other hand, inhibition of ER stress with TUDCA suppresses restraint stress-induced seizure susceptibility. Taken together, these results indicate that repeated restraint stress increases seizure susceptibility by activation of hippocampal ER stress and ER stress mediated oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. Thus, attenuating ER stress may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy targeted to block stress-induced seizure activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MILD PASSIVE FOCAL COOLING PREVENTS EPILEPTIC SEIZURES AFTER HEAD INJURY IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosio, Raimondo; Eastman, Clifford L.; Darvas, Felix; Fender, Jason S.; Verley, Derek R.; Farin, Federico M.; Wilkerson, Hui-Wen; Temkin, Nancy R.; Miller, John W.; Ojemann, Jeffrey; Rothman, Steven M.; Smyth, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Posttraumatic epilepsy is prevalent, often difficult to manage, and currently cannot be prevented. While cooling is broadly neuroprotective, cooling-induced prevention of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures has never been demonstrated. We examined the effect of mild passive focal cooling of the perilesional neocortex on the development of neocortical epileptic seizures after head injury in the rat. Methods Rostral parasagittal fluid percussion injury in rats reliably induces a perilesional, neocortical epileptic focus within weeks after injury. Epileptic seizures were assessed by 5-electrode video-electrocorticography (ECoG) 2–16 weeks post-injury. Focal cooling was induced with ECoG headsets engineered for calibrated passive heat dissipation. Pathophysiology was assessed by GFAP immunostaining, cortical sclerosis, gene expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β, and ECoG spectral analysis. All animals were formally randomized to treatment groups and data were analyzed blind. Results Cooling by 0.5–2°C inhibited the onset of epileptic seizures in a dose dependent fashion. The treatment induced no additional pathology or inflammation, and normalized the power spectrum of stage N2 sleep. Cooling by 2°C for 5.5 weeks beginning 3 days after injury virtually abolished ictal activity. This effect persisted through the end of the study, over ten weeks after cessation of cooling. Rare remaining seizures were shorter than in controls. Interpretation These findings demonstrate potent and persistent prevention and modification of epileptic seizures after head injury with a cooling protocol that is neuroprotective, compatible with the care of head-injury patients, and conveniently implemented. The required cooling can be delivered passively without Peltier cells or electrical power. PMID:23225633

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation decreases the number of seizures in patients with focal neocortical epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodríguez, Efraín; Cárdenas-Morales, Lizbeth; Harmony, Thalía; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio; Porras-Kattz, Eneida; Hernández, Adriana

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the number of seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) in patients with focal neocortical epilepsy before, during and after rTMS. Twelve patients (seven men and five women, mean age 29.3+/-15.8 years) were studied. An open-label study with baseline (4 weeks), intervention (2 weeks) and follow-up (8 weeks) periods was carried out. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with 900 pulses, intensity of 120% motor resting threshold and 0.5Hz frequency was used. A 120 channel EEG was recorded; an electrical source analysis of IEDs with Variable Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (VARETA) was performed. The number of seizures per week and IEDs per minute were measured and compared in the three periods. During the basal period the mean seizure frequency was 2.25 per week; in the intervention period it decreased to 0.66 per week (F=2.825; p=0.0036) which corresponds to a 71% reduction. In the follow-up period the mean frequency was 1.14 seizures per week, that is, a 50% reduction in the number of seizures. In the visual EEG analysis, the baseline IED frequency was 11.9+/-8.3events/min; it decreased to 9.3+/-7.9 during 2 weeks of rTMS with a further reduction to 8.2+/-6.6 in the follow-up period. These differences however were not significant (p=0.190). We conclude that 2 weeks of rTMS at 0.5Hz with a figure-of-eight coil placed over the epileptic focus, determined with VARETA, decreases the number of seizures in patients with focal epilepsy, without reduction in IEDs.

  18. Unit Activity of Hippocampal Interneurons before Spontaneous Seizures in an Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Izumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2015-04-22

    Mechanisms of seizure initiation are unclear. To evaluate the possible roles of inhibitory neurons, unit recordings were obtained in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum of epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Most interneurons in the dentate gyrus, CA1, and subiculum increased their firing rate before seizures, and did so with significant consistency from seizure to seizure. Identification of CA1 interneuron subtypes based on firing characteristics during theta and sharp waves suggested that a parvalbumin-positive basket cell and putative bistratified cells, but not oriens lacunosum moleculare cells, were activated preictally. Preictal changes occurred much earlier than those described by most previous in vitro studies. Preictal activation of interneurons began earliest (>4 min before seizure onset), increased most, was most prevalent in the subiculum, and was minimal in CA3. Preictal inactivation of interneurons was most common in CA1 (27% of interneurons) and included a putative ivy cell and parvalbumin-positive basket cell. Increased or decreased preictal activity correlated with whether interneurons fired faster or slower, respectively, during theta activity. Theta waves were more likely to occur before seizure onset, and increased preictal firing of subicular interneurons correlated with theta activity. Preictal changes by other hippocampal interneurons were largely independent of theta waves. Within seconds of seizure onset, many interneurons displayed a brief pause in firing and a later, longer drop that was associated with reduced action potential amplitude. These findings suggest that many interneurons inactivate during seizures, most increase their activity preictally, but some fail to do so at the critical time before seizure onset.

  19. Unit Activity of Hippocampal Interneurons before Spontaneous Seizures in an Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Izumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of seizure initiation are unclear. To evaluate the possible roles of inhibitory neurons, unit recordings were obtained in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum of epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Most interneurons in the dentate gyrus, CA1, and subiculum increased their firing rate before seizures, and did so with significant consistency from seizure to seizure. Identification of CA1 interneuron subtypes based on firing characteristics during theta and sharp waves suggested that a parvalbumin-positive basket cell and putative bistratified cells, but not oriens lacunosum moleculare cells, were activated preictally. Preictal changes occurred much earlier than those described by most previous in vitro studies. Preictal activation of interneurons began earliest (>4 min before seizure onset), increased most, was most prevalent in the subiculum, and was minimal in CA3. Preictal inactivation of interneurons was most common in CA1 (27% of interneurons) and included a putative ivy cell and parvalbumin-positive basket cell. Increased or decreased preictal activity correlated with whether interneurons fired faster or slower, respectively, during theta activity. Theta waves were more likely to occur before seizure onset, and increased preictal firing of subicular interneurons correlated with theta activity. Preictal changes by other hippocampal interneurons were largely independent of theta waves. Within seconds of seizure onset, many interneurons displayed a brief pause in firing and a later, longer drop that was associated with reduced action potential amplitude. These findings suggest that many interneurons inactivate during seizures, most increase their activity preictally, but some fail to do so at the critical time before seizure onset. PMID:25904809

  20. Various ketogenic diets can differently support brain resistance against experimentally evoked seizures and seizure-induced elemental anomalies of hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Chwiej, J; Patulska, A; Skoczen, A; Matusiak, K; Janeczko, K; Ciarach, M; Simon, R; Setkowicz, Z

    2017-07-01

    In this paper the influence of two different ketogenic diets (KDs) on the seizure-evoked elemental anomalies of hippocampal formation was examined. To achieve this purpose normal and pilocarpine treated rats previously fed with one of the two high fat and carbohydrate restricted diets were compared with animals on standard laboratory diet. The ketogenic ratios of the examined KDs were equal to 5:1 (KD1) and 9:1 (KD2). KD1 and standard diet fed animals presented similar patterns of seizure-evoked elemental changes in hippocampal formation. Also the analysis of behavioral data recorded after pilocarpine injection did not show any significant differences in intensity and duration of seizures between KD1 and standard diet fed animals. Higher ketogenic ratio KD2 introduced in the normal hippocampal formation prolonged changes in the accumulation of P, K, Zn and Ca. Despite this, both the intensity and duration of seizures were significantly reduced in rats fed with KD2 which suggests that its saving action on the nerve tissue may protect brain from seizure propagation. Also seizure-evoked elemental anomalies in KD2 animals were different than those observed for rats both on KD1 and standard diets. The comparison of seizure experiencing and normal rats on KD2, did not show any statistically significant differences in elemental composition of CA1 and H hippocampal areas whilst in CA3 area only Zn level changed as a result of seizures. DG was the area mostly affected by seizures in KD2 fed rats but areal densities of all examined elements increased in this hippocampal region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel KCNT1 mutation in a Japanese patient with epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shino; Hirano, Yoshiko; Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Nagata, Satoru; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIFMS) is a rare, early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by polymorphous focal seizures. De novo mutations of KCNT1 have been identified in cases of this disorder. We encountered a sporadic patient with EIFMS, who suffered tonic convulsions at the age of 9 days. Using Sanger sequencing, we identified a de novo missense mutation of the same amino acid affected by a previously identified mutation, c.1420C>T (p.Arg474Cys).

  2. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES AFTER SEIZURE PRECONDITIONING IN THE THREE MAJOR HIPPOCAMPAL CELL LAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Karin; Shaw, Renee; Dingledine, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Rodents experience hippocampal damage after status epilepticus (SE) mainly in pyramidal cells while sparing the dentate granule cell layer (DGCL). Hippocampal damage was prevented in rats that had been preconditioned by brief seizures on two consecutive days before SE. To identify neuroprotective genes and biochemical pathways changed after preconditioning we compared the effect of preconditioning on gene expression in the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and DGCLs, harvested by laser capture microscopy. In the DGCL the expression of 632 genes was altered, compared to only 151 and 58 genes in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers. Most of the differentially expressed genes regulate tissue structure and intra- and extracellular signaling, including neurotransmission. A selective upregulation of energy metabolism transcripts occurred in CA1 pyramidal cells relative to the DGCL. These results reveal a broad transcriptional response of the DGCL to preconditioning, and suggest several mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of preconditioning seizures. PMID:17239605

  3. The delta between postoperative seizure freedom and persistence: Automatically detected focal slow waves after epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Schönherr, Margit; Stefan, Hermann; Hamer, Hajo M; Rössler, Karl; Buchfelder, Michael; Rampp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we use a novel automated method for localization and quantitative comparison of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) delta activity in patients with and without recurrent seizures after epilepsy surgery as well as healthy controls. We identified the generators of delta activity by source location in frequency domain between 1 and 4 Hz in spontaneous MEG data. Comparison with healthy control subjects by z-transform emphasized relative changes of activation in patients. The individual results were compared to spike localizations and statistical group analysis was performed. Additionally, MEG results were compared to 1-4 Hz activity in invasive EEG (iEEG) in two patients, in whom this data was available. Patients with recurrent seizures exhibited significantly increased focal MEG delta activity both in comparison to healthy controls and seizure free patients. This slow activity showed a correlation to interictal epileptic activity and was not explained by consequences of the resection alone. In two patients with iEEG, iEEG analysis was concordant with the MEG findings. The quantity of delta activity could be used as a diagnostic marker for recurrent seizures. The close relation to epileptic spike localizations and the resection volume of patients with successful second surgery imply involvement in seizure recurrence. This initial evidence suggests a potential application in the planning of second epilepsy surgery.

  4. Focal inhibitory seizure with prolonged deficit in adult Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aupy, Jerome; Bonnet, Charlotte; Arnould, Jean-Simon; Fernandez, Philippe; Marchal, Cecile; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a sporadic congenital neurocutaneous disorder often related to varying degrees of motor impairment. The phenomenon of prolonged ictal paresis is a rare seizure sign that can be due to lesions affecting the centro-parietal lobe. Focal inhibitory motor seizures can be difficult to differentiate from other clinical entities such as stroke, migraine or postictal paresis. We describe the case of a 40-year-old patient suffering from Sturge-Weber syndrome, admitted due to prolonged right-sided hemiparesis following a usual seizure. Repeated EEGs during the prolonged deficit showed only intermittent left fronto-parietal sharp waves. (99m)Tc HMPAO-brain SPECT performed seven days after the last seizure showed a vast area of parieto-occipital hyperperfusion in the left hemisphere. Aggressive antiepileptic therapy dramatically improved the clinical symptoms and scintigraphic images, which corroborated the diagnosis of ictal paresis. This case highlights the role of SPECT in the evaluation of Sturge-Weber syndrome, not only to investigate progressive neurological deterioration, but also exacerbation of seizures or prolonged neurological deficits. In fact, it may be possible to document ongoing epileptic activity using SPECT, despite a non-contributory EEG, which may be of help in adapting a therapeutic strategy.

  5. Pediatric first time non-febrile seizure with focal manifestations: is emergent imaging indicated?

    PubMed

    Aprahamian, N; Harper, M B; Prabhu, S P; Monuteaux, M C; Sadiq, Z; Torres, A; Kimia, A A

    2014-10-01

    To assess the prevalence of clinically urgent intra-cranial pathology among children who had imaging for a first episode of non-febrile seizure with focal manifestations. We performed a cross sectional study of all children age 1 month to 18 years evaluated for first episode of non-febrile seizure with focal manifestations and having neuroimaging performed within 24h of presentation at a single pediatric ED between 1995 and 2012. We excluded intubated patients, those with known structural brain abnormality and trauma. A single neuro-radiologist reviewed all cranial computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging performed. We defined clinically urgent intracranial pathology as any finding resulting in a change of initial patient management. We performed univariate analysis using χ(2) analysis for categorical data and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous data. We identified 319 patients having a median age of 4.6 years [IQR 1.8-9.4] of which 45% were female. Two hundred sixty-two children had a CT scan, 15 had an MR and 42 had both. Clinically urgent intra-cranial pathology was identified on imaging of 13 patients (4.1%; 95% CI: 2.2, 7.0). Infarction, hemorrhage and thrombosis were most common (9/13). Twelve of 13 were evident on CT scan. Persistent Todd's paresis and age ≤ 18 months were predictors of clinically urgent intracranial pathology. Absence of secondary generalization and multiple seizures on presentation were not predictive. Four percent of children imaged with first time, afebrile focal seizures have findings important to initial management. Children younger than ≤ 18 months are at increased risk. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid eye movement sleep and hippocampal theta oscillations precede seizure onset in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Thuku, Godfrey I; Sunderam, Sridhar; Parkar, Anjum; Weinstein, Steven L; Schiff, Steven J; Gluckman, Bruce J

    2014-01-22

    Improved understanding of the interaction between state of vigilance (SOV) and seizure onset has therapeutic potential. Six rats received injections of tetanus toxin (TeTX) in the ventral hippocampus that resulted in chronic spontaneous seizures. The distribution of SOV before 486 seizures was analyzed for a total of 19 d of recording. Rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and exploratory wake, both of which express prominent hippocampal theta rhythm, preceded 47 and 34%, for a total of 81%, of all seizures. Nonrapid eye movement sleep (NREM) and nonexploratory wake, neither of which expresses prominent theta, preceded 6.8 and 13% of seizures. We demonstrate that identification of SOV yields significant differentiation of seizure susceptibilities, with the instantaneous seizure rate during REM nearly 10 times higher than baseline and the rate for NREM less than half of baseline. Survival analysis indicated a shorter duration of preseizure REM bouts, with a maximum transition to seizure at ∼90 s after the onset of REM. This study provides the first analysis of a correlation between SOV and seizure onset in the TeTX model of temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as the first demonstration that hippocampal theta rhythms associated with natural behavioral states can serve a seizure-promoting role. Our findings are in contrast with previous studies suggesting that the correlations between SOV and seizures are primarily governed by circadian oscillations and the notion that hippocampal theta rhythms inhibit seizures. The documentation of significant SOV-dependent seizure susceptibilities indicates the potential utility of SOV and its time course in seizure prediction and control.

  7. Local disruption of glial adenosine homeostasis in mice associates with focal electrographic seizures: a first step in epileptogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianfu; Lytle, Nikki; Lan, Jing-Quan; Sandau, Ursula S.; Boison, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    Astrogliosis and associated dysfunction of adenosine-homeostasis are pathological hallmarks of the epileptic brain and thought to contribute to seizure generation in epilepsy. We hypothesized that astrogliosis – an early component of the epileptogenic cascade – might be linked to focal seizure onset. To isolate the contribution of astrogliosis to ictogenesis from other pathological events involved in epilepsy, we used a minimalistic model of epileptogenesis in mice, based on a focal onset status epilepticus triggered by intraamygdaloid injection of kainic acid. We demonstrate acute neuronal cell loss restricted to the injected amygdala and ipsilateral CA3, followed three weeks later by focal astrogliosis and overexpression of the adenosine-metabolizing enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Using synchronous electroencephalographic recordings from multiple depth electrodes, we identify the KA-injected amygdala and ipsilateral CA3 as two independent foci for the initiation of non-synchronized electrographic subclinical seizures. Importantly, seizures remained focal and restricted to areas of ADK-overexpression. However, after systemic application of a non-convulsive dose of an adenosine A1-receptor antagonist, seizures in amygdala and CA3 immediately synchronized and spread throughout the cortex, leading to convulsive seizures. This focal seizure phenotype remained stable over at least several weeks. We conclude that astrogliosis via disruption of adenosine homeostasis per se and in the absence of any other overt pathology, is associated with the emergence of spontaneous recurrent subclinical seizures, which remain stable over space and time. A secondary event, here mimicked by brain-wide disruption of adenosine signaling, is likely required to turn pre-existing subclinical seizures into a clinical seizure phenotype. PMID:21964979

  8. Profile of SB-204269, a mechanistically novel anticonvulsant drug, in rat models of focal and generalized epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Upton, Neil; Blackburn, Tom P; Campbell, Colin A; Cooper, Duncan; Evans, Martyn L; Herdon, Hugh J; King, Penny D; Ray, Alison M; Stean, Tania O; Chan, Wai N; Evans, John M; Thompson, Mervyn

    1997-01-01

    Earlier optimization of structure-activity relationships in a novel series of 4-(benzoylamino)-benzopyrans, led to the discovery of SB-204269 (trans-(+)-6-acetyl-4S-(4-fluorobenzoylamino)-3,4-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-2H-benzo[b]pyran-3R-ol, hemihydrate), a potent orally-active anticonvulsant in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test. Studies have now been undertaken to determine the effects of SB-204269 in a range of seizure models and tests of neurological deficits in rats. In addition, the compound has been evaluated in a series of in vitro mechanistic assays. SB-204269 proved to be an orally-effective anticonvulsant agent, at doses (0.1–30 mg kg−1) devoid of overt behavioural depressant properties, in models of both electrically (MEST and maximal electroshock (MES)) and chemically (i.v. pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) infusion)-evoked tonic extension seizures. However, the compound did not inhibit PTZ-induced myoclonic seizures at doses up to 30 mg kg−1, p.o. SB-204269 also selectively reduced focal electrographic seizure activity in an in vitro elevated K+ rat hippocampal slice model at concentrations (0.1–10 μM) that had no effect on normal synaptic activity and neuronal excitability. In all of these seizure models, SB-204269 was equivalent or better than the clinically established antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine and lamotrigine, in terms of anticonvulsant potency and efficacy. Unlike SB-204269, the corresponding trans 3S,4R enantiomer, SB-204268, did not produce marked anticonvulsant effects, an observation in accord with previous findings for other related pairs of trans enantiomers in the benzopyran series. In the rat accelerating rotarod test, a sensitive paradigm for the detection of neurological deficits such as sedation and motor incoordination, SB-204269 was inactive even at doses as high as 200 mg kg−1, p.o. This was reflected in the excellent therapeutic index (minimum significantly effective dose in the rotarod

  9. Low Frequency Stimulation of Hippocampal Commissures Reduces Seizures in Chronic Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Saifur; Pho, Gerald; Czigler, Michael; Werz, Mary Ann; Durand, Dominique M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose To investigate the effects of low frequency stimulation (LFS) of a fiber track for the suppression of spontaneous seizures described by Nissinen in a rat model of human temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods Stimulation electrodes were implanted into the ventral hippocampal commissure (VHC) in a rat post-status epilepticus (SE) model of human temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 7). Two recordings electrodes were placed in the CA3 regions bilaterally and neural data was recorded for a minimum of six weeks. LFS (60 minute train of 1Hz biphasic square wave pulses, each 0.1ms in duration and 200μA in amplitude, followed by 15 minutes of rest) was applied to the VHC for, two weeks, 24 hours a day. Key Findings The baseline mean seizure frequency of the study animals was 3.7 seizures per day. The seizures were significantly reduced by the application of LFS in every animal (n=7). By the end of the two-week period of stimulation, there was a significant 90% (<1 seizure/day) reduction of seizure frequencies (p < 0.05) and a 57% reduction during the period following LFS (p < 0.05) when compared to baseline. LFS also resulted in a significant reduction of hippocampal interictal spike frequency (71%, p < 0.05), during two weeks LFS session. The hippocampal histological analysis showed no significant difference between rats that received LFS and SE-induction and those that had only received SE-induction. None of the animals showed any symptomatic hemorrhage, infection or complication. Significance LFS applied at a frequency of 1Hz significantly reduced both the excitability of the neural tissue as well as the seizure frequency in a rat model of human temporal lobe epilepsy. The results support the hypothesis that LFS of fiber tracts can be an effective method for the suppression of spontaneous seizures in a temporal lobe model of epilepsy in rats and could be lead to the development of the new therapeutic modality for human patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22150779

  10. Seizure outcome after AED failure in pediatric focal epilepsy: impact of underlying etiology.

    PubMed

    Wirrell, Elaine C; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C; Nickels, Katherine C

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to identify long-term seizure outcome in pediatric nonsyndromic focal epilepsy after failure of serial antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) due to lack of efficacy. Children (1 month-17 years) with new-onset focal epilepsy not meeting the criteria for a defined electroclinical syndrome diagnosed between 1980 and 2009 while residing in Olmsted County, MN, were retrospectively identified. Medical records of those followed for ≥2 years were reviewed to assess etiology, the number of AEDs that failed due to lack of efficacy, and seizure outcome at final follow-up. Etiology was classified into structural/metabolic, genetic, or unknown. Favorable outcome was defined as seizure freedom ≥1 year, on or off AEDs, without prior epilepsy surgery. Poor outcome was defined as ongoing seizures in the preceding year or having undergone prior epilepsy surgery. Nonsyndromic focal epilepsy accounted for 275/468 (59%) of all patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy--of these, 256 (93%) were followed for a minimum of two years and were included in the study. Median duration of follow-up was 10.0 years. At least one AED had failed due to lack of efficacy in 100 (39.1%) children. Favorable outcomes occurred in 149/156 (95.5%) children with no AED failure, 16/30 (53.3%) with one AED failure, 8/25 (32%) with two AED failures, and only 2/45 (4.4%) with three AED failures. After two AED failures, the seizures of nearly one-quarter of children who had epilepsy with an unknown cause responded favorably to the third AED compared with only 7.8% of the cohort that had epilepsy with a structural/metabolic cause. Children with a remote brain insult had a significantly higher likelihood of favorable outcome with serial AEDs than those with other structural abnormalities. Etiology is an important determinant of pharmacoresistance in nonsyndromic focal epilepsy. Surgical evaluation should be considered after failure of 1-2 AEDs in those who have epilepsy with structural causes, excluding

  11. Seizure outcome following primary motor cortex-sparing resective surgery for perirolandic focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Siby; Roy, Arun Grace; Vinayan, Kollencheri Puthenveetil; Kumar, Anand; Sarma, Manjit; Rajeshkannan, Ramiah; Pillai, Ashok

    2016-12-01

    We present a case series of patients who underwent perirolandic resection for medically refractory focal epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Our aim was to specifically evaluate the outcome of a surgical strategy intended for seizure freedom while preserving primary motor cortex function. Thirteen patients undergoing perirolandic resection for pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy between 2010 and 2015 who demonstrated histological evidence of FCD were selected from a prospectively maintained database. Presurgical evaluation included video EEG telemetry and 3T MRI brain for all patients. Eight patients underwent interictal FDG PET scan. Intracranial EEG monitoring was done for 8 patients - six by conventional subdural grid and depth electrodes and two by Stereo EEG. Additional techniques included extraoperative cortical stimulation mapping, intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG), intraoperative motor cortex mapping and awake surgery in various combinations. In all cases (lesional and nonlesional), resection was intentionally limited for anatomic preservation of the primary motor cortex. Amongst the thirteen patients with age ranging 14-44 years (mean 26.8 ± 9.2) 62% of them had daily seizures. MRI abnormalities were identified in 8 patients (62%), PET showed concordant findings in 7 patients (88%). When utilized, the mean duration of intracranial EEG recordings was 8.0 ± 7.2 days (range 2-23 days). All patients underwent a primary motor cortex-sparing resection of the suspected epileptogenic cortex. The mean postoperative follow up period was 23 months (range 7.5-62 months). Twelve out of 13 (92%) were seizure free (Engel 1) outcome at the last follow-up assessment; one patient had Engel 2a outcome at 28 months. Six patients (46%) had immediate new focal neurological deficits, however all six patients had recovered completely within three months. The surgical strategy of a primary motor cortex-sparing resective surgery for perirolandic FCD is

  12. Epidural focal brain cooling abolishes neocortical seizures in cats and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takao; Fujii, Masami; Kida, Hiroyuki; Yamakawa, Toshitaka; Maruta, Yuichi; Tokiwa, Tatsuji; He, Yeting; Nomura, Sadahiro; Owada, Yuji; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2017-09-01

    Focal brain cooling (FBC) is under investigation in preclinical trials of intractable epilepsy (IE), including status epilepticus (SE). This method has been studied in rodents as a possible treatment for epileptic disorders, but more evidence from large animal studies is required. To provide evidence that FBC is a safe and effective therapy for IE, we investigated if FBC using a titanium cooling plate can reduce or terminate focal neocortical seizures without having a significant impact on brain tissue. Two cats and two macaque monkeys were chronically implanted with an epidural FBC device over the somatosensory and motor cortex. Penicillin G was delivered via the intracranial cannula for induction of local seizures. Repetitive FBC was performed using a cooling device implanted for a medium-term period (FBC for 30min at least twice every week; 3 months total) in three of the four animals. The animals exhibited seizures with repetitive epileptiform discharges (EDs) after administration of penicillin G, and these discharges decreased at less than 20°C cooling with no adverse histological effects. The results of this study suggest that epidural FBC is a safe and effective potential treatment for IE and SE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduced inhibition within primary motor cortex in patients with poststroke focal motor seizures.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Kirn R; Schnitzler, Alfons; Classen, Joseph; Benecke, Reiner

    2002-10-08

    Following an ischemic brain lesion, the affected cortex undergoes structural and functional changes that may lead to increased cortical excitability or decreased inhibitory neuronal activity, resulting in the occurrence of poststroke epileptic seizures in 6 to 10% of patients with stroke. To assess motor cortical excitability, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to determine the silent period (SP) duration in 84 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke. In a subpopulation of six patients (38 to 72 years old) a significant decrease of the SP duration (mean 116 +/- 14 msec) was detected in either the arm or the leg on the affected side as compared to the corresponding unaffected limb (mean 231 +/- 32 msec). This electrophysiologic abnormality was clinically associated with focal motor seizures in five of the six patients, whereas none of the other 76 patients with normal or prolonged SP durations developed seizures or epilepsy. Silent period shortening in this group reflects decreased inhibitory activity that may partly be related to functional or structural impairment of GABAergic interneurons. TMS may be of value for determining patients with stroke at risk for developing poststroke seizures.

  14. Hyperventilation revisited: physiological effects and efficacy on focal seizure activation in the era of video-EEG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Guaranha, Mirian S B; Garzon, Eliana; Buchpiguel, Carlos A; Tazima, Sérgio; Yacubian, Elza M T; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2005-01-01

    Hyperventilation is an activation method that provokes physiological slowing of brain rhythms, interictal discharges, and seizures, especially in generalized idiopathic epilepsies. In this study we assessed its effectiveness in inducing focal seizures during video-EEG monitoring. We analyzed the effects of hyperventilation (HV) during video-EEG monitoring (video-EEG) of patients with medically intractable focal epilepsies. We excluded children younger than 10 years, mentally retarded patients, and individuals with frequent seizures. We analyzed 97 patients; 24 had positive seizure activation (PSA), and 73 had negative seizure activation (NSA). No differences were found between groups regarding sex, age, age at epilepsy onset, duration of epilepsy, frequency of seizures, and etiology. Temporal lobe epilepsies were significantly more activated than frontal lobe epilepsies. Spontaneous and activated seizures did not differ in terms of their clinical characteristics, and the activation did not affect the performance of ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). HV is a safe and effective method of seizure activation during monitoring. It does not modify any of the characteristics of the seizures and allows the obtaining of valuable ictal SPECTs. This observation is clinically relevant and suggests the effectiveness and the potential of HV in shortening the presurgical evaluation, especially of temporal lobe epilepsy patients, consequently reducing its costs and increasing the number of candidates for epilepsy surgery.

  15. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on seizure frequency of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tekturk, Pinar; Erdogan, Ezgi Tuna; Kurt, Adnan; Vanli-Yavuz, Ebru Nur; Ekizoglu, Esme; Kocagoncu, Ece; Kucuk, Zeynep; Aksu, Serkan; Bebek, Nerses; Yapici, Zuhal; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen; Baykan, Betul; Karamursel, Sacit

    2016-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive and safe method tried in drug-resistant epilepsies, in recent years. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of tDCS in patients diagnosed with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) which is a well-known drug-resistant focal epilepsy syndrome. Twelve MTLE-HS patients diagnosed with their typical clinical, EEG and MRI findings fulfilling the criteria for drug-resistance as suggested by the ILAE commission were included after Ethics Committee approval and their signed consent. All patients received modulated cathodal stimulation; 2mA for 30min on 3 consecutive days. All patients also received sham stimulation with the same electrode positions; designed as 60s stimulation gradually decreasing in 15s with placement of the electrodes for 30min over the stimulation side. They were followed up by standard seizure diaries and their medical treatment was not changed during the study period. Their seizure frequencies both before and after cathodal tDCS and sham stimulation were compared statistically. Adverse effects were also questioned. Mean age of our study group was 35.42±6.96 (6 males; median: 35.50). The mean seizure frequency was 10.58±9.91 (median=8; min-max=2-30) at the baseline and significantly decreased to 1.67±2.50 (median=0.5; min-max=0-8) after cathodal tDCS application (p=0.003). Ten patients (83.33%) had more than 50% decrease in their seizure frequencies after cathodal tDCS. Two patients (16.67%) also showed positive sham effect. Six patients (50%) were seizure-free in the post-cathodal tDCS period of one month. No adverse effect has been reported except tingling sensation during cathodal stimulation. Our small series suggested that cathodal tDCS may be used as an additional treatment option in MTLE-HS. It may be tried in TLE-HS patients waiting for or rejecting epilepsy surgery or even with ineffective surgery results. More studies are needed with large series of

  16. Focal BOLD-fMRI changes in bicuculline-induced tonic-clonic seizures in the rat

    PubMed Central

    DeSalvo, Matthew N.; Schridde, Ulrich; Mishra, Asht M.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Purcaro, Michael J.; Danielson, Nathan; Bai, Xiaoxiao; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2010-01-01

    Generalized tonic-clonic seizures cause widespread physiological changes throughout the cerebral cortex and subcortical structures in the brain. Using combined blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 9.4 T and electroencephalography (EEG) these changes can be characterized with high spatiotemporal resolution. We studied BOLD changes in anesthetized Wistar rats during bicuculline-induced tonic-clonic seizures. Bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, was injected systemically and seizure activity was observed on EEG as high amplitude, high-frequency polyspike discharges followed by clonic paroxysmal activity of lower frequency, with mean electrographic seizure duration of 349 s. Our aim was to characterize the spatial localization, direction, and timing of BOLD signal changes during the pre-ictal, ictal and post-ictal periods. Group analysis was performed across seizures using paired t-maps of BOLD signal superimposed on high resolution anatomical images. Regional analysis was then performed using volumes of interest to quantify BOLD timecourses. In the pre-ictal period we found focal BOLD increases in specific areas of somatosensory cortex (S1, S2) and thalamus several seconds before seizure onset. During seizures we observed BOLD increases in cortex, brainstem and thalamus and BOLD decreases in the hippocampus. The largest ictal BOLD increases remained in the focal regions of somatosensory cortex showing pre-ictal increases. During the post-ictal period we observed widespread BOLD decreases. These findings support a model in which “generalized” tonic-clonic seizures begin with focal changes before electrographic seizure onset, which progress to non-uniform changes during seizures, possibly shedding light on the etiology and pathophysiology of similar seizures in humans. PMID:20079442

  17. Somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 4 affect seizure susceptibility and hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Moneta, D; Richichi, C; Aliprandi, M; Dournaud, P; Dutar, P; Billard, J M; Carlo, A S; Viollet, C; Hannon, J P; Fehlmann, D; Nunn, C; Hoyer, D; Epelbaum, J; Vezzani, A

    2002-09-01

    We have investigated the role of somatostatin receptor subtypes sst2 and sst4 in limbic seizures and glutamate-mediated neurotransmission in mouse hippocampus. As compared to wild-type littermates, homozygous mice lacking sst2 receptors showed a 52% reduction in EEG ictal activity induced by intrahippocampal injection of 30 ng kainic acid (P < 0.05). The number of behavioural tonic-clonic seizures was reduced by 50% (P < 0.01) and the time to onset of seizures was doubled on average (P < 0.05). Seizure-associated neurodegeneration was found in the injected hippocampus (CA1, CA3 and hilar interneurons) and sporadically in the ipsilateral latero-dorsal thalamus. This occurred to a similar extent in wild-type and sst2 knock-out mice. Intrahippocampal injection of three selective sst2 receptor agonists in wild-type mice (Octreotide, BIM 23120 and L-779976, 1.5-6.0 nmol) did not affect kainate seizures while the same compounds significantly reduced seizures in rats. L-803087 (5 nmol), a selective sst4 receptor agonist, doubled seizure activity in wild-type mice on average. Interestingly, this effect was blocked by 3 nmol octreotide. It was determined, in both radioligand binding and cAMP accumulation, that octreotide had no direct agonist or antagonist action at mouse sst4 receptors expressed in CCl39 cells, up to micromolar concentrations. In hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, octreotide (2 micro m) did not modify AMPA-mediated synaptic responses while facilitation occurred with L-803087 (2 micro m). Similarly to what was observed in seizures, the effect of L-803087 was reduced by octreotide. In hippocampal slices from sst2 knock-out mice, both octreotide and L-803087 were ineffective on synaptic responses. Our findings show that, unlike in rats, sst2 receptors in mice do not mediate anticonvulsant effects. Moreover, stimulation of sst4 receptors in the hippocampus of wild-type mice induced excitatory effects which appeared to depend on the presence of sst2

  18. Topiramate reduces non-convulsive seizures after focal brain ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anthony J; Tortella, Frank C; Gryder, Divina; Hartings, Jed A

    2008-01-03

    Acute "silent" seizures after brain injury are associated with a worsening of patient outcome and are often refractory to anti-epileptic drug (AED) therapy. In the present study we evaluated topiramate (TPM, 1-30 mg/kg, i.v.) in a rodent model of spontaneous non-convulsive seizure (NCS) activity induced by focal cerebral ischemia. For seizure detection, electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was continuously recorded for 24h in male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Infarct volume, neurological deficit, and NCS were evaluated by an experimenter blinded to the treatment group. All vehicle treated rats (7/7) exhibited NCS following MCAo. TPM treatment, delivered at 20 min post-occlusion and prior to onset of NCS activity, dose-dependently reduced the incidence of NCS (ED(50)=21.1mg/kg). The highest dose of TPM tested (30 mg/kg) exhibited maximal reductions of 76% in the number of NCS/rat (vehicle=22.1+/-5.3, TPM=4.4+/-3.2, P<0.05), 80% in the total time of NCS (vehicle=1259+/-337 s, TPM=253+/-220 s, P<0.05), 20% in core brain infarction (vehicle=45+/-1%, TPM=36+/-4%, percent of ipsilateral volume corrected for swelling, P<0.05), and 38% in neurological deficit score (vehicle=7.4+/-1.2, TPM=4.6+/-1.5, P<0.05). Despite efficacy as a pre-seizure treatment, TPM was not effective when delivered immediately following onset of the first NCS event (36+/-5 min post-MCAo). In conclusion, TPM exhibited significant efficacy for the prophylactic treatment of brain-injury induced NCS and represents a novel class of AED for treatment of this type of silent brain seizure.

  19. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome manifesting as focal seizures without a thunderclap headache: A pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Shuji; Goto, Hironori; Okanari, Kazuo; Maeda, Tomoki; Ihara, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    We report a pediatric case of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with focal seizures without a thunderclap headache. A 7-year-old girl had a mild acute headache with nausea after swimming. She subsequently developed hemi-convulsions followed by right hemiplegia. Brain magnetic resonance angiography revealed generalized vasoconstriction of the main cerebral peripheral arteries. Her hemiplegia was spontaneously resolved within 6h. Over the next 24h she suffered from recurrent and transient headaches, which recurred on days 3 and 5. Follow-up magnetic resonance angiography on day 3 documented the multifocal narrowing of the main cerebral arteries, which was observed to have diminished at 12weeks after her initial presentation. She did not have any headaches or neurological deficits after day 5. This case indicates that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome should be considered in children with focal seizures even when they do not present with thunderclap headaches. The timely and appropriate evaluation by magnetic resonance angiography and imaging is essential for diagnosing reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome.

  20. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L; Kay, Steven M; Besio, Walter G

    2012-07-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study, we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback.

  1. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L.; Kay, Steven M.; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback. PMID:22772373

  2. Encapsulated galanin-producing cells attenuate focal epileptic seizures in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nikitidou, Litsa; Torp, Malene; Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Kusk, Philip; Wahlberg, Lars U; Kokaia, Mérab

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated cell biodelivery (ECB) is a relatively safe approach, since the devices can be removed in the event of adverse effects. The main objectives of the present study were to evaluate whether ECB could be a viable alternative of cell therapy for epilepsy. We therefore developed a human cell line producing galanin, a neuropeptide that has been shown to exert inhibitory effects on seizures, most likely acting via decreasing glutamate release from excitatory synapses. To explore whether ECB of genetically modified galanin-producing human cell line could provide seizure-suppressant effects, and test possible translational prospect for clinical application, we implanted ECB devices bilaterally into the hippocampus of rats subjected to rapid kindling, a model for recurrent temporal lobe seizures. Two clones from a genetically modified human cell line secreting different levels of galanin were tested. Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings and stimulations were performed by electrodes implanted into the hippocampus at the same surgical session as ECB devices. One week after the surgery, rapid kindling stimulations were initiated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurements prior to device implantation showed a release of galanin on average of 8.3 ng/mL/24 h per device for the low-releasing clone and 12.6 ng/mL/24 h per device for the high-releasing clone. High-releasing galanin-producing ECB devices moderately decreased stimulation-induced focal afterdischarge duration, whereas low-releasing ECB devices had no significant effect. Our study shows that galanin-releasing ECB devices moderately suppress focal stimulation-induced recurrent seizures. Despite this moderate effect, the study provides conceptual proof that ECB could be a viable alternative approach to cell therapy in humans, with the advantage that the treatment could be terminated by removing these devices from the brain. Thereby, this strategy provides a higher level of safety for future

  3. A novel KCNT1 mutation in a Japanese patient with epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Shino; Hirano, Yoshiko; Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Nagata, Satoru; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIFMS) is a rare, early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by polymorphous focal seizures. De novo mutations of KCNT1 have been identified in cases of this disorder. We encountered a sporadic patient with EIFMS, who suffered tonic convulsions at the age of 9 days. Using Sanger sequencing, we identified a de novo missense mutation of the same amino acid affected by a previously identified mutation, c.1420C>T (p.Arg474Cys). PMID:27081515

  4. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Seizures KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Seizures Print A A A en español Folleto de instructiones: Convulsiones (Seizures) Although seizures can be frightening, many last only ...

  5. Nearly Automatic Segmentation of Hippocampal Subfields in In Vivo Focal T2-Weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.; Wang, Hongzhi; Pluta, John; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Craige, Caryne; Avants, Brian B.; Weiner, Michael W.; Mueller, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    We present and evaluate a new method for automatically labeling the subfields of the hippocampal formation in focal 0.4×0.5×2.0mm3 resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance images that can be acquired in the routine clinical setting with under 5 min scan time. The method combines multi-atlas segmentation, similarity-weighted voting, and a novel learning-based bias correction technique to achieve excellent agreement with manual segmentation. Initial partitioning of MRI slices into hippocampal ‘head’, ‘body’ and ‘tail’ slices is the only input required from the user, necessitated by the nature of the underlying segmentation protocol. Dice overlap between manual and automatic segmentation is above 0.87 for the larger subfields, CA1 and dentate gyrus, and is competitive with the best results for whole-hippocampus segmentation in the literature. Intraclass correlation of volume measurements in CA1 and dentate gyrus is above 0.89. Overlap in smaller hippocampal subfields is lower in magnitude (0.54 for CA2, 0.62 for CA3, 0.77 for subiculum and 0.79 for entorhinal cortex) but comparable to overlap between manual segmentations by trained human raters. These results support the feasibility of subfield-specific hippocampal morphometry in clinical studies of memory and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:20600984

  6. The subcortical hidden side of focal motor seizures: evidence from micro-recordings and local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Devergnas, Annaelle; Piallat, Brigitte; Prabhu, Shivadatta; Torres, Napoleon; Louis Benabid, Alim; David, Olivier; Chabardès, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    Focal motor seizures are characterized by transient motor behaviour that occurs simultaneously with paroxystic activity in the controlateral motor cortex. The implication of the basal ganglia has already been shown for generalized seizure but the propagation pathways from the motor cortex towards the basal ganglia during focal motor seizures are largely unknown. With a better knowledge of those pathways, a therapeutic modulation for reducing drug resistant motor epilepsy could be considered. Here, we recorded single-unit activities and local field potentials in the basal ganglia of two Macaca fascicularis in which acute focal motor seizures were induced by the injection of penicillin over the arm motor cortex territory. Each neuron was characterized using its mean firing rate and its type of firing pattern during interictal periods and seizures. Time-frequency analyses of local field potentials and electroencephalographic signals were used to assess dynamic changes occurring during seizure at a larger spatial level. The firing rate of neurons of input stages of basal ganglia (subthalamic nucleus and putamen) and those from the external part of the globus pallidus were significantly higher during seizures as compared to interictal periods. During seizures, the proportion of oscillatory neurons in subthalamic nucleus (71%), external globus pallidus (45%) and putamen (53%) significantly increased in comparison to interictal periods. Rhythmic activity was synchronized with ictal cortical spikes in external globus pallidus and subthalamic nucleus, but not in the putamen which oscillated faster than motor cortex. In contrast, no significant modification of the firing rate of the output stages of basal ganglia (internal part of the globus pallidus, substantia nigra pars reticulata) could be found during seizures. The local field potentials of subthalamic nucleus and external globus pallidus changed abruptly at the onset of the seizure, showing synchronization with the

  7. Mutations in SLC12A5 in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Stödberg, Tommy; McTague, Amy; Ruiz, Arnaud J.; Hirata, Hiromi; Zhen, Juan; Long, Philip; Farabella, Irene; Meyer, Esther; Kawahara, Atsuo; Vassallo, Grace; Stivaros, Stavros M.; Bjursell, Magnus K.; Stranneheim, Henrik; Tigerschiöld, Stephanie; Persson, Bengt; Bangash, Iftikhar; Das, Krishna; Hughes, Deborah; Lesko, Nicole; Lundeberg, Joakim; Scott, Rod C.; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Smith, Holly; Gissen, Paul; Schorge, Stephanie; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Topf, Maya; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Harvey, Robert J.; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A.

    2015-01-01

    The potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2, encoded by SLC12A5, plays a fundamental role in fast synaptic inhibition by maintaining a hyperpolarizing gradient for chloride ions. KCC2 dysfunction has been implicated in human epilepsy, but to date, no monogenic KCC2-related epilepsy disorders have been described. Here we show recessive loss-of-function SLC12A5 mutations in patients with a severe infantile-onset pharmacoresistant epilepsy syndrome, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS). Decreased KCC2 surface expression, reduced protein glycosylation and impaired chloride extrusion contribute to loss of KCC2 activity, thereby impairing normal synaptic inhibition and promoting neuronal excitability in this early-onset epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:26333769

  8. Hippocampal Closed-Loop Modeling and Implications for Seizure Stimulation Design

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Roman A.; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.; Berger, Theodore W.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Traditional hippocampal modeling has focused on the series of feedforward synapses known as the trisynaptic pathway. However, feedback connections from CA1 back to the hippocampus through the Entorhinal Cortex (EC) actually make the hippocampus a closed-loop system. By constructing a functional closed-loop model of the hippocampus, one may learn how both physiological and epileptic oscillations emerge and design efficient neurostimulation patterns to abate such oscillations. Approach Point process input-output models where estimated from recorded rodent hippocampal data to describe the nonlinear dynamical transformation from CA3→CA1, via the Schaffer-Collateral synapse, and CA1→CA3 via the EC. Each Volterra-like subsystem was composed of linear dynamics (Principal Dynamic Modes) followed by static nonlinearities. The two subsystems were then wired together to produce the full closed-loop model of the hippocampus. Main Results Closed-loop connectivity was found to be necessary for the emergence of theta resonances as seen in recorded data, thus validating the model. The model was then used to identify frequency parameters for the design of neurostimulation patterns to abate seizures. Significance DBS is a new and promising therapy for intractable seizures. Currently, there is no efficient way to determine optimal frequency parameters for DBS, or even whether periodic or broadband stimuli are optimal. Data-based computational models have the potential to be used as a testbed for designing optimal DBS patterns for individual patients. However, in order for these models to be successful they must incorporate the complex closed-loop structure of the seizure focus. This study serves as a proof-of-concept of using such models to design efficient personalized DBS patterns for epilepsy. PMID:26355815

  9. Hippocampal closed-loop modeling and implications for seizure stimulation design.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Roman A; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E; Deadwyler, Sam A; Berger, Theodore W; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z

    2015-10-01

    Traditional hippocampal modeling has focused on the series of feedforward synapses known as the trisynaptic pathway. However, feedback connections from CA1 back to the hippocampus through the entorhinal cortex (EC) actually make the hippocampus a closed-loop system. By constructing a functional closed-loop model of the hippocampus, one may learn how both physiological and epileptic oscillations emerge and design efficient neurostimulation patterns to abate such oscillations. Point process input-output models where estimated from recorded rodent hippocampal data to describe the nonlinear dynamical transformation from CA3 → CA1, via the schaffer-collateral synapse, and CA1 → CA3 via the EC. Each Volterra-like subsystem was composed of linear dynamics (principal dynamic modes) followed by static nonlinearities. The two subsystems were then wired together to produce the full closed-loop model of the hippocampus. Closed-loop connectivity was found to be necessary for the emergence of theta resonances as seen in recorded data, thus validating the model. The model was then used to identify frequency parameters for the design of neurostimulation patterns to abate seizures. Deep-brain stimulation (DBS) is a new and promising therapy for intractable seizures. Currently, there is no efficient way to determine optimal frequency parameters for DBS, or even whether periodic or broadband stimuli are optimal. Data-based computational models have the potential to be used as a testbed for designing optimal DBS patterns for individual patients. However, in order for these models to be successful they must incorporate the complex closed-loop structure of the seizure focus. This study serves as a proof-of-concept of using such models to design efficient personalized DBS patterns for epilepsy.

  10. Hippocampal closed-loop modeling and implications for seizure stimulation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandler, Roman A.; Song, Dong; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.; Berger, Theodore W.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Traditional hippocampal modeling has focused on the series of feedforward synapses known as the trisynaptic pathway. However, feedback connections from CA1 back to the hippocampus through the entorhinal cortex (EC) actually make the hippocampus a closed-loop system. By constructing a functional closed-loop model of the hippocampus, one may learn how both physiological and epileptic oscillations emerge and design efficient neurostimulation patterns to abate such oscillations. Approach. Point process input-output models where estimated from recorded rodent hippocampal data to describe the nonlinear dynamical transformation from CA3 → CA1, via the schaffer-collateral synapse, and CA1 → CA3 via the EC. Each Volterra-like subsystem was composed of linear dynamics (principal dynamic modes) followed by static nonlinearities. The two subsystems were then wired together to produce the full closed-loop model of the hippocampus. Main results. Closed-loop connectivity was found to be necessary for the emergence of theta resonances as seen in recorded data, thus validating the model. The model was then used to identify frequency parameters for the design of neurostimulation patterns to abate seizures. Significance. Deep-brain stimulation (DBS) is a new and promising therapy for intractable seizures. Currently, there is no efficient way to determine optimal frequency parameters for DBS, or even whether periodic or broadband stimuli are optimal. Data-based computational models have the potential to be used as a testbed for designing optimal DBS patterns for individual patients. However, in order for these models to be successful they must incorporate the complex closed-loop structure of the seizure focus. This study serves as a proof-of-concept of using such models to design efficient personalized DBS patterns for epilepsy.

  11. Duration of focal complex, secondarily generalized tonic-clonic, and primarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures--A video-EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Dobesberger, Judith; Ristić, Aleksandar J; Walser, Gerald; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Unterberger, Iris; Höfler, Julia; Amann, Edda; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-08-01

    Identifying seizures with prolonged duration during video-electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring is of importance to inform clinicians when to start emergency treatment of seizures to prevent status epilepticus. The aims of this study were to assess the clinical and EEG seizure duration (SD) in consecutive patients with epilepsy who underwent prolonged video-EEG monitoring and to identify a seizure type-dependent time point to start emergency treatment based on the likelihood that seizures will not stop spontaneously. Furthermore, we sought to determine predictors of SD and explored the relationship between antiepileptic drug (AED) serum levels and SD. We retrospectively analyzed 1796 seizures in 200 patients undergoing video-EEG monitoring between January 2006 and March 2008. Focal simple seizures lasted significantly shorter (clinical SD: 28s, EEG SD: 42 s) compared with focal complex seizures (clinical SD: 64 s, EEG SD: 62 s), and both seizure types lasted significantly shorter compared with secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs; clinical SD: 90 s, EEG SD: 96 s). There was no difference between the duration of the convulsive phase of primary GTCSs (defined as nonfocal) and that of secondarily GTCSs (each 65 s). Cumulative clinical SD (99%) was 7 min in focal complex seizures and 11 min in focal simple seizures. Mixed linear regression model demonstrated that history of status epilepticus (P = 0.034), temporal lobe seizure onset (P = 0.040), and MRI lesions (P = 0.013) were significantly associated with logarithmic EEG SD in focal epilepsies recorded with scalp electrodes. We found significant negative correlations between the AED serum level and the EEG SD in patients treated with monotherapy: carbamazepine (P < 0.001), levetiracetam (P = 0.001), oxcarbazepine (P = 0.001), and valproic acid (P = 0.038) but not with lamotrigine monotherapy and EEG SD. Based on the results of this study, we propose 2 min of convulsive seizure activity

  12. Alumina cream-induced focal motor seizures in cats: bilateral lesions of the mesencephalic reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Velasco, M; Velasco, F; Cepeda, C; Márquez, I; Estrada-Villanueva, F

    1986-06-01

    The effect of bilateral lesions of the mesencephalic reticular formation on the EEG-EMG patterns of types B and C alumina cream-induced focal motor seizures was studied in cats with chronically implanted electrode and cannula lesion systems. EEG patterns included number, amplitude, and contralateral propagation of type B spikes and occurrence and duration of type C tonic-clonic discharges. EMG patterns included changes in muscular multiple-unit activity time locked to the onset of type B spikes and to the onset and end of type C tonic-clonic EEG paroxysmal discharges. The lesions persistently blocked the orienting response to visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli to both sides in all cats and produced other neurologic symptoms partially or totally recovered in some cats. The lesions significantly increased the number, amplitude, and contralateral propagation of type B EEG spikes and the occurrence, but not the duration, of type C EEG tonic-clonic discharges. Ipsi- and contralateral adversion of the tonic phase were completely blocked and the muscular contractions of the clonic phase were reduced and delayed. These facts suggest that in intact epileptic cats, the mesencephalic reticular formation has an ascending suppressive influence on the mechanism related to EEG spike generation and precipitation of seizures but also a descending facilitatory control on the corticospinal epileptic impulses mediated through pyramidal and extrapyramidal pathways.

  13. Focal seizures and epileptic spasms in a child with Down syndrome from a family with a PRRT2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ayuko; Okumura, Akihisa; Shimojima, Keiko; Abe, Shinpei; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    We describe a girl with Down syndrome who experienced focal seizures and epileptic spasms during infancy. The patient was diagnosed as having trisomy 21 during the neonatal period. She had focal seizures at five months of age, which were controlled with phenobarbital. However, epileptic spasms appeared at seven months of age in association with hypsarrhythmia. Upon treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone, her epileptic spasms disappeared. Her younger brother also had focal seizures at five months of age. His development and interictal electroencephalogram were normal. The patient's father had had infantile epilepsy and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. We performed a mutation analysis of the PRRT2 gene and found a c.841T>C mutation in the present patient, her father, and in her younger brother. We hypothesized that the focal seizures in our patient were caused by the PRRT2 mutation, whereas the epileptic spasms were attributable to trisomy 21. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Early clinical experience with lacosamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory focal epilepsy and nocturnal seizures.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Irene; Delgado, Rafael Toledano; Falip, Mercé; Campos, Dulce; García, María Eugenia; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    This retrospective study reports the early experience with lacosamide (LCM) as adjunctive therapy in Spanish patients with refractory focal epilepsy. Sixty patients (mean age 38.3 years, 54% women, mean epilepsy duration 27.2 years, mean seizure rate 9.7/month, and 28% with mainly nocturnal seizures) taking ≥2 antiepileptic drugs (mean 2.2) were included. LCM maintenance doses were 200, 300, 400, and 500mg/day in 31, 16, 10, and 3 patients, respectively. Patients were followed up for 13-24 months. Twenty-eight patients (47%) reported a ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency. A ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency was reported by 65% and 40% of patients in the nocturnal seizure and diurnal seizure subgroups, respectively (p>0.05). Of the 28 responders, 2 achieved stable periods of seizure freedom of 6 and 11 months after starting LCM. Twenty patients (33%) reported drug-related adverse events (AEs); the most common was dizziness (16 patients). LCM was withdrawn in 8 patients (13%). There were no serious AEs. These results support the efficacy and safety of adjunctive LCM in patients with partial-onset seizures. 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation Protects Against Seizures, Cognitive Impairments, Hippocampal Apoptosis, and Inflammatory Responses in Epileptic Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Zhu, Li-Jun; Wang, Xian-Hong; Zuo, Jian; He, Hui-Yan; Tian, Miao-Miao; Wang, Lei; Liang, Gui-Ling; Wang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) has recently been demonstrated effective in the treatment of epilepsy and mood disorders. Here, we aim to determine the effects of TNS on epileptogenesis, cognitive function, and the associated hippocampal apoptosis and inflammatory responses. Rats were injected with pilocarpine to produce status epilepticus (SE) and the following chronic epilepsy. After SE induction, TNS treatment was conducted for 4 consecutive weeks. A pilocarpine re-injection was then used to induce a seizure in the epileptic rats. The hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by seizure was assessed by TUNEL staining and inflammatory responses by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The spontaneous recurrent seizure (SRS) number was counted through video monitoring, and the cognitive function assessed through Morris Water Maze (MWM) test. TNS treatment attenuated the SRS attacks and improved the cognitive impairment in epileptic rats. A pilocarpine re-injection resulted in less hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and reduced level of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and microglial activation in epileptic rats with TNS treatment in comparison to the epileptic rats without TNS treatment. It is concluded that TNS treatment shortly after SE not only protected against the chronic spontaneous seizures but also improved cognitive impairments. These antiepileptic properties of TNS may be related to its attenuating effects on hippocampal apoptosis and pro-inflammatory responses.

  16. Secondary generalization of focal-onset seizures: examining the relationship between seizure propagation and epilepsy surgery outcome.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Samuel B; Venkataraman, Arun

    2017-04-01

    Surgical intervention often fails to achieve seizure-free results in patients with intractable epilepsy. Identifying features of the epileptic brain that dispose certain patients to unfavorable outcomes is critical for improving surgical candidacy assessments. Recent research by Martinet, Ahmad, Lepage, Cash, and Kramer (J Neurosci 35: 9477-9490, 2015) suggests that pathways of secondary seizure generalization distinguish patients with favorable (i.e., seizure free) vs. unfavorable (i.e., seizure persistent) surgical outcomes, lending insights into the network mechanisms of epilepsy surgery failure. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Effects of genistein on cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment in an ovariectomized rat kainic acid model of seizure.

    PubMed

    Khodamoradi, Mehdi; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-09-05

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the probable effects of genistein (one of the most important soy phytoestrogens-SPEs) on seizure-induced cognitive dysfunction, hippocampal early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) impairment and morphological damage to CA1 neurons in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three weeks after ovariectomy, cannulae were implanted over the left lateral ventricle. After a 7-day recovery period, animals were injected by genistein (0.5 or 5mg/kg) or vehicle during four consecutive days, each 24h. One h after the last treatment, kainic acid (KA) or vehicle was perfused into the left lateral ventricle to induce generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Finally, 7 days later, spatial learning and memory of animals were examined using the Morris water maze (MWM) task, hippocampal E-LTP was assessed using in-vivo field potential recordings and the morphology of hippocampal CA1 area was examined using Fluoro-Jade C staining. KA-induced generalized seizures resulted in spatial learning and memory impairment, E-LTP deficit and CA1 cell injury. Seizure-induced abnormalities improved partially only by the lower dose of genistein (0.5mg/kg). However, genistein at the higher dose (5mg/kg) did not have any beneficial effects. Also, genistein did not affect seizure activity. It is concluded that genistein may have partially preventive effects against seizure-induced cognitive impairment in OVX rats. Also, it seems that such effects of genistein are correlated with its beneficial effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and morphology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Local Functional Connectivity as a Pre-Surgical Tool for Seizure Focus Identification in Non-Lesion, Focal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, K. E.; Chaovalitwongse, W. A.; Novotny, E. J.; Poliakov, A.; Grabowski, T. G.; Ojemann, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Successful resection of cortical tissue engendering seizure activity is efficacious for the treatment of refractory, focal epilepsy. The pre-operative localization of the seizure focus is therefore critical to yielding positive, post-operative outcomes. In a small proportion of focal epilepsy patients presenting with normal MRI, identification of the seizure focus is significantly more challenging. We examined the capacity of resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) to identify the seizure focus in a group of four non-lesion, focal (NLF) epilepsy individuals. We predicted that computing patterns of local functional connectivity in and around the epileptogenic zone combined with a specific reference to the corresponding region within the contralateral hemisphere would reliably predict the location of the seizure focus. We first averaged voxel-wise regional homogeneity (ReHo) across regions of interest (ROIs) from a standardized, probabilistic atlas for each NLF subject as well as 16 age- and gender-matched controls. To examine contralateral effects, we computed a ratio of the mean pair-wise correlations of all voxels within a ROI with the corresponding contralateral region (IntraRegional Connectivity – IRC). For each subject, ROIs were ranked (from lowest to highest) on ReHo, IRC, and the mean of the two values. At the group level, we observed a significant decrease in the rank for ROI harboring the seizure focus for the ReHo rankings as well as for the mean rank. At the individual level, the seizure focus ReHo rank was within bottom 10% lowest ranked ROIs for all four NLF epilepsy patients and three out of the four for the IRC rankings. However, when the two ranks were combined (averaging across ReHo and IRC ranks and scalars), the seizure focus ROI was either the lowest or second lowest ranked ROI for three out of the four epilepsy subjects. This suggests that rsfMRI may serve as an adjunct pre-surgical tool, facilitating the identification of the seizure focus in

  19. Bursts of seizures in long-term recordings of human focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karoly, Philippa J; Nurse, Ewan S; Freestone, Dean R; Ung, Hoameng; Cook, Mark J; Boston, Ray

    2017-03-01

    We report on temporally clustered seizures detected from continuous long-term ambulatory human electroencephalographic data. The objective was to investigate short-term seizure clustering, which we have termed bursting, and consider implications for patient care, seizure prediction, and evaluating therapies. Chronic ambulatory intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) data collected for the purpose of seizure prediction were annotated to identify seizure events. A detection algorithm was used to identify bursts of events. Burst events were compared to nonburst events to evaluate event dispersion, duration and dynamics. Bursts of seizures were present in 6 of 15 subjects, and detections were consistent over long-term monitoring (>2 years). Subjects with bursts of seizures had highly overdispersed seizure rates, compared to other subjects. There was a complicated relationship between bursts and clinical seizures, although bursts were associated with multimodal distributions of seizure duration, and poorer predictive outcomes. For three subjects, bursts demonstrated distinctive preictal dynamics compared to clinical seizures. We have previously hypothesized that there are distinct physiologic pathways underlying short- and long-duration seizures. Herein we show that burst seizures fall almost exclusively within the short population of seizure durations; however, a short duration event was not sufficient to induce or imply bursting. We can therefore conclude that in addition to distinct mechanisms underlying seizure duration, there are separate factors regulating bursts of seizures. We show that bursts were a robust phenomenon in our patient cohort, which were consistent with overdispersed seizure rates, suggesting long-memory dynamics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. The medial septum mediates impairment of prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle induced by a hippocampal seizure or phencyclidine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyi; Shen, Bixia; Rajakumar, N; Leung, L Stan

    2004-11-05

    The involvement of the septohippocampal system on the impaired sensorimotor gating induced by phencyclidine (PCP) or by an electrically induced hippocampal seizure was examined in behaving rats. An impaired sensorimotor gating, measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response, was observed following a hippocampal afterdischarge (AD) or systemic injection of PCP and was accompanied with an increase in hippocampal gamma waves (30-70 Hz). The medial septum infusion with muscimol (0.25 microg), a GABA(A) receptor agonist, 15 min prior to PCP or a hippocampal AD, prevented the impairment of sensorimotor gating and the increase in gamma waves. By itself, muscimol (0.25 microg) injection into the medial septum did not affect PPI, although it significantly suppressed spontaneous gamma waves. In order to identify subpopulations of neurons mediating the sensorimotor gating deficit and the hippocampal gamma wave increase, 0.14-0.21 microg of p75 antibody conjugated to saporin (192 IgG-saporin) was injected into the medial septum to selectively lesion the septohippocampal cholinergic neurons. Neither the PPI deficit nor the gamma wave increase induced by PCP or a hippocampal AD was affected by 192 IgG-saporin lesion of the medial septum. It is concluded that increase in neural activity in the medial septum participates in the impairment of sensorimotor gating and the increase in hippocampal gamma waves induced by PCP or a hippocampal AD. It is suggested that the GABAergic but not the cholinergic septohippocampal neurons mediate the sensorimotor gating deficit.

  1. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antiepileptic drug treatment of nonconvulsive seizures induced by experimental focal brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Williams, A J; Tortella, F C; Lu, X M; Moreton, J E; Hartings, J A

    2004-10-01

    Nonconvulsive seizures (NCSs) after traumatic and ischemic brain injury are often refractory to antiepileptic drug therapy and are associated with a decline in patient outcome. We recently characterized an in vivo rat model of focal brain ischemia-induced NCS and here sought to evaluate potential pharmacological treatments. Electroencephalographic activity was recorded continuously for 24 h in freely behaving rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Rats were treated with an antiepileptic drug from one of seven different drug classes at ED(50) and 2x ED(50) doses (as reported in other rat seizure models), delivered as a single i.v. injection 20 min post-MCAo. Vehicle-treated rats (n = 9) had an 89% incidence of NCS with an average number of NCS of 8.6 +/- 1.9. The latency to onset of NCS was 32.5 +/- 3.4 min post-MCAo with an average duration of 49.1 +/- 8.2 s/event. The high doses of ethosuximide, gabapentin, fos-phenytoin, and valproate significantly reduced the incidence of NCS (11, 14, 14, and 38%, respectively), whereas midazolam, phenobarbital, and dextromethorphan had no significant effect at either dose. Across treatment groups, there was a low but significant correlation between the number of NCS events per animal and volume of brain infarction (r = 0.352). Antiepileptic drug therapy that prevented the occurrence of NCS also reduced mortality from 26 to 7%. Based on combined effects on NCS, infarction, neurological recovery, and mortality, ethosuximide and gabapentin were identified as having the best therapeutic profile.

  3. Frequent Seizures Are Associated with a Network of Gray Matter Atrophy in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with or without Hippocampal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Coan, Ana C.; Campos, Brunno M.; Yasuda, Clarissa L.; Kubota, Bruno Y.; Bergo, Felipe PG.; Guerreiro, Carlos AM.; Cendes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) have diffuse subtle gray matter (GM) atrophy detectable by MRI quantification analyses. However, it is not clear whether the etiology and seizure frequency are associated with this atrophy. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence of GM atrophy and the influence of seizure frequency in patients with TLE and either normal MRI (TLE-NL) or MRI signs of HS (TLE-HS). Methods We evaluated a group of 172 consecutive patients with unilateral TLE-HS or TLE-NL as defined by hippocampal volumetry and signal quantification (122 TLE-HS and 50 TLE-NL) plus a group of 82 healthy individuals. Voxel-based morphometry was performed with VBM8/SPM8 in 3T MRIs. Patients with up to three complex partial seizures and no generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the previous year were considered to have infrequent seizures. Those who did not fulfill these criteria were considered to have frequent seizures. Results Patients with TLE-HS had more pronounced GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral mesial temporal structures, temporal lobe, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Patients with TLE-NL had more subtle GM atrophy, including the ipsilateral orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral thalami and pre/post-central gyri. Both TLE-HS and TLE-NL showed increased GM volume in the contralateral pons. TLE-HS patients with frequent seizures had more pronounced GM atrophy in extra-temporal regions than TLE-HS with infrequent seizures. Patients with TLE-NL and infrequent seizures had no detectable GM atrophy. In both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, the duration of epilepsy correlated with GM atrophy in extra-hippocampal regions. Conclusion Although a diffuse network GM atrophy occurs in both TLE-HS and TLE-NL, this is strikingly more evident in TLE-HS and in patients with frequent seizures. These findings suggest that neocortical atrophy in TLE is related to the ongoing seizures and epilepsy duration, while thalamic atrophy is more

  4. Inhibition of neuronal (type 1) nitric oxide synthase prevents hyperaemia and hippocampal lesions resulting from kainate-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Montécot, C; Rondi-Reig, L; Springhetti, V; Seylaz, J; Pinard, E

    1998-06-01

    The possible roles for nitric oxide produced by neurons in epileptic conditions have been investigated from two different aspects: microcirculation and delayed damage. Our aim was to determine whether the selective inhibition of neuronal (type 1) nitric oxide synthase by 7-nitroindazole, during seizures induced by systemic kainate, modifies hippocampal blood flow and oxygen supply and influences the subsequent hippocampal damage. Experiments were performed in conscious Wistar rats whose electroencephalogram was recorded. 7-Nitroindazole (25 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle was injected 30 min before kainate administration (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and then twice at 1-h intervals. Kainate triggered typical limbic seizures evolving into status epilepticus, identified by uninterrupted electroencephalographic spike activity. The seizures were stopped by diazepam (5 mg/kg, i.p.) after 1 h of status epilepticus. Three types of experiments were performed in vehicle- and 7-nitroindazole-treated rats. (1) Hippocampal nitric oxide synthase activity was measured under basal conditions, at 1 h after the onset of the status epilepticus and at 24 h after its termination (n = 4-6 per group). (2) Hippocampal blood flow and tissue partial pressure of oxygen were measured simultaneously by mass spectrometry for the whole duration of the experiment, while systemic variables and body temperature were monitored (n = 6 per group). (3) Hippocampal damage was revealed by Cresyl Violet staining and evaluated with a lesion score seven days after status epilepticus (n = 12 per group). Hippocampal nitric oxide synthase activity was not significantly modified during status epilepticus or the following day in vehicle-treated rats. In contrast, it was inhibited by 57% in 7-nitroindazole-treated rats, both in basal conditions and after 1 h of status epilepticus, but was not different from its basal level 24 h later. 7-Nitroindazole significantly decreased basal hippocampal blood flow and tissue partial

  5. A meta-analysis of predictors of seizure freedom in the surgical management of focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Nathan C; Englot, Dario J; Cage, Tene A; Sughrue, Michael E; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chang, Edward F

    2012-05-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of the most common causes of medically refractory epilepsy leading to surgery. However, seizure control outcomes reported in isolated surgical series are highly variable. As a result, it is not clear which variables are most crucial in predicting seizure freedom following surgery for FCD. The authors' aim was to determine the prognostic factors for seizure control in FCD by performing a meta-analysis of the published literature. A MEDLINE search of the published literature yielded 37 studies that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Seven potential prognostic variables were determined from these studies and were dichotomized for analysis. For each variable, individual studies were weighted by inverse variance and combined to generate an odds ratio favoring seizure freedom. The methods complied with a standardized meta-analysis reporting protocol. Two thousand fourteen patients were included in the analysis. The overall rate of seizure freedom (Engel Class I) among patients undergoing surgery for FCD in the cohort of studies was 55.8% ± 16.2%. Partial seizures, a temporal location, detection with MRI, and a Type II Palmini histological classification were associated with higher rates of postoperative seizure control. As a treatment-related factor, complete resection of the anatomical or electrographic abnormality was the most important predictor overall of seizure freedom. Neither age nor electroencephalographic localization of the ictal onset significantly affected seizure freedom after surgery. Using a large population cohort pooled from the published literature, an analysis identified important factors that are prognostic in patients with epilepsy due to FCD. The most important of these factors-diagnostic imaging and resection-provide modalities through which improvements in the impact of FCD can be effected.

  6. Consecutive 15 min is necessary for focal low frequency stimulation to inhibit amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yi; Xu, Zhenghao; Xu, Cenglin; Ying, Xiaoying; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Shihong; Xiao, Bo; Chen, Zhong

    2013-09-01

    Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is emerging as a new option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. The stimulation duration may influence the anti-epileptic effect of LFS but is poorly studied. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-epileptic effect of focal LFS with different stimulation duration on amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats. We found 15 and 30 min but not 1 or 5 min LFS delivered immediately after the kindling stimulation slowed the progression of behavioral seizure stages and reduced mean afterdischarge duration (ADD) during kindling acquisition. In fully kindled animals, 15 and 30min rather than 1 and 5 min LFS decreased the incidence of generalized seizures and the average seizure stage as well as shortened the cumulative generalized seizure duration (GSD). Meanwhile, EEG analysis showed 15 and 30 min LFS specifically lowered the power in delta band. However, if 15min LFS delivered intermittently by 5 min interval, it had no suppressing effect on kindling rat. Thus, it is likely that consecutive 15 min is necessary for LFS to inhibit amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats, indicating the stimulation duration may be a key fact affecting the clinical effect of LFS on epilepsy.

  7. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: A finite element simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced maximum electric field in the brain of 2.1–2.5 V/cm and 1.1–2.2 V/cm, corresponding to 6.2–7.2 times and 1.2–2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much higher with ECT (up to 100%) than MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double cone coil was the most focal and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800–900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects. PMID:21248385

  8. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  9. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... often with a loss of or change in consciousness. Seizures can be frightening, but most last only ... unusual sensations, uncontrollable muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. Some seizures may be due to another medical ...

  10. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures ... part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity ...

  11. Aging-induced Seizure-related Changes to the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway in Forebrain Specific BDNF Overexpressing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Kate L.; Goodman, Jeffrey H.; Chadman, Kathryn K.; McCloskey, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Aging confers an increased risk for developing seizure activity, especially within brain regions that mediate learning and synaptic plasticity. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family that has an important role in regulating growth and development of the nervous system. BDNF is upregulated after pharmacological seizure induction and this upregulation contributes to enhanced excitability of the hippocampal mossy fiber–CA3 pathway, which is accompanied by neuropeptide Y (NPY) upregulation. Mice overexpressing a BDNF transgene in forebrain neurons provide an avenue for understanding the role of neurotrophic support in the aged hippocampus. In this study BDNF transgenic (TG) mice were utilized to determine whether increased BDNF expression through genetic manipulation resulted in age-related changes in hippocampal excitability and NPY expression. Spontaneous behavioral seizures were observed in TG mice, but not WT mice, past 5 months of age and the severity of behavioral seizures increased with age. Electrophysiological investigation of hippocampal CA3 activity indicated that slices from aged TG mice (86%), but not age-matched WT mice, or young TG mice, showed epileptiform activity in response to either repeated paired pulse or high frequency (tetanic) stimulation. Electrophysiological results were supported by the observation of robust ectopic NPY immunoreactivity in hippocampal mossy fibers of most aged TG mice (57%), which was absent in age-matched WT mice and young TG mice. The results from this study indicate that forebrain restricted BDNF overexpression produces age-related changes in hyperexcitability and NPY immunoreactivity in mossy fiber–CA3 pathway. Together, these data suggest that the capability for BDNF to promote epileptogenesis is maintained, and may be enhanced, in the aging hippocampus. PMID:22396883

  12. Aging-induced Seizure-related Changes to the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway in Forebrain Specific BDNF Overexpressing Mice.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Kate L; Goodman, Jeffrey H; Chadman, Kathryn K; McCloskey, Daniel P

    2011-08-01

    Aging confers an increased risk for developing seizure activity, especially within brain regions that mediate learning and synaptic plasticity. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family that has an important role in regulating growth and development of the nervous system. BDNF is upregulated after pharmacological seizure induction and this upregulation contributes to enhanced excitability of the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 pathway, which is accompanied by neuropeptide Y (NPY) upregulation. Mice overexpressing a BDNF transgene in forebrain neurons provide an avenue for understanding the role of neurotrophic support in the aged hippocampus. In this study BDNF transgenic (TG) mice were utilized to determine whether increased BDNF expression through genetic manipulation resulted in age-related changes in hippocampal excitability and NPY expression. Spontaneous behavioral seizures were observed in TG mice, but not WT mice, past 5 months of age and the severity of behavioral seizures increased with age. Electrophysiological investigation of hippocampal CA3 activity indicated that slices from aged TG mice (86%), but not age-matched WT mice, or young TG mice, showed epileptiform activity in response to either repeated paired pulse or high frequency (tetanic) stimulation. Electrophysiological results were supported by the observation of robust ectopic NPY immunoreactivity in hippocampal mossy fibers of most aged TG mice (57%), which was absent in age-matched WT mice and young TG mice. The results from this study indicate that forebrain restricted BDNF overexpression produces age-related changes in hyperexcitability and NPY immunoreactivity in mossy fiber-CA3 pathway. Together, these data suggest that the capability for BDNF to promote epileptogenesis is maintained, and may be enhanced, in the aging hippocampus.

  13. Hippocampal TNFα Signaling Contributes to Seizure Generation in an Infection-Induced Mouse Model of Limbic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipan C; Wallis, Glenna; Dahle, E Jill; McElroy, Pallavi B; Thomson, Kyle E; Tesi, Raymond J; Szymkowski, David E; West, Peter J; Smeal, Roy M; Patel, Manisha; Fujinami, Robert S; White, H Steve; Wilcox, Karen S

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system infection can induce epilepsy that is often refractory to established antiseizure drugs. Previous studies in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced mouse model of limbic epilepsy have demonstrated the importance of inflammation, especially that mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), in the development of acute seizures. TNFα modulates glutamate receptor trafficking via TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) to cause increased excitatory synaptic transmission. Therefore, we hypothesized that an increase in TNFα signaling after TMEV infection might contribute to acute seizures. We found a significant increase in both mRNA and protein levels of TNFα and the protein expression ratio of TNF receptors (TNFR1:TNFR2) in the hippocampus, a brain region most likely involved in seizure initiation, after TMEV infection, which suggests that TNFα signaling, predominantly through TNFR1, may contribute to limbic hyperexcitability. An increase in hippocampal cell-surface glutamate receptor expression was also observed during acute seizures. Although pharmacological inhibition of TNFR1-mediated signaling had no effect on acute seizures, several lines of genetically modified animals deficient in either TNFα or TNFRs had robust changes in seizure incidence and severity after TMEV infection. TNFR2(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to developing acute seizures, suggesting that TNFR2-mediated signaling may provide beneficial effects during the acute seizure period. Taken together, the present results suggest that inflammation in the hippocampus, caused predominantly by TNFα signaling, contributes to hyperexcitability and acute seizures after TMEV infection. Pharmacotherapies designed to suppress TNFR1-mediated or augment TNFR2-mediated effects of TNFα may provide antiseizure and disease-modifying effects after central nervous system infection.

  14. Hippocampal TNFα Signaling Contributes to Seizure Generation in an Infection-Induced Mouse Model of Limbic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dipan C.; Wallis, Glenna; Dahle, E. Jill; McElroy, Pallavi B.; Thomson, Kyle E.; West, Peter J.; Smeal, Roy M.; Patel, Manisha; Fujinami, Robert S.; White, H. Steve

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Central nervous system infection can induce epilepsy that is often refractory to established antiseizure drugs. Previous studies in the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced mouse model of limbic epilepsy have demonstrated the importance of inflammation, especially that mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), in the development of acute seizures. TNFα modulates glutamate receptor trafficking via TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) to cause increased excitatory synaptic transmission. Therefore, we hypothesized that an increase in TNFα signaling after TMEV infection might contribute to acute seizures. We found a significant increase in both mRNA and protein levels of TNFα and the protein expression ratio of TNF receptors (TNFR1:TNFR2) in the hippocampus, a brain region most likely involved in seizure initiation, after TMEV infection, which suggests that TNFα signaling, predominantly through TNFR1, may contribute to limbic hyperexcitability. An increase in hippocampal cell-surface glutamate receptor expression was also observed during acute seizures. Although pharmacological inhibition of TNFR1-mediated signaling had no effect on acute seizures, several lines of genetically modified animals deficient in either TNFα or TNFRs had robust changes in seizure incidence and severity after TMEV infection. TNFR2–/– mice were highly susceptible to developing acute seizures, suggesting that TNFR2-mediated signaling may provide beneficial effects during the acute seizure period. Taken together, the present results suggest that inflammation in the hippocampus, caused predominantly by TNFα signaling, contributes to hyperexcitability and acute seizures after TMEV infection. Pharmacotherapies designed to suppress TNFR1-mediated or augment TNFR2-mediated effects of TNFα may provide antiseizure and disease-modifying effects after central nervous system infection. PMID:28497109

  15. Suppression of acute seizures by theta burst electrical stimulation of the hippocampal commissure using a closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Siah, Boon Hong; Chiang, Chia-Chu; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2014-12-17

    This study investigated the effects of electrical stimulation with theta burst stimulation (eTBS) on seizure suppression. Optimal parameters of eTBS were determined through open-loop stimulation experiments and then implemented in a close-loop seizure control system. For the experiments, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) was injected into the right hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats to induce an acute seizure. eTBS was applied on the ventral hippocampal commissure and the effects of eTBS with different combinations of burst frequency and number of pulses per burst were analyzed in terms of seizure suppression. A closed-loop seizure control system was then implemented based on optimal eTBS parameters. The efficiency of the closed-loop eTBS was evaluated and compared to that of high frequency stimulation. The results show that eTBS induced global suppression in the hippocampus and this was sustained even after the application of eTBS. The optimal parameter of eTBS in the open-loop stimulation experiments was a burst frequency at 100Hz with nine pulses in a burst. The eTBS integrated with the on-off control law yielded less actions and cumulative delivered charge, but induced longer after-effects of seizure suppression compared to continuous high frequency stimulation (cHFS). To conclude, eTBS has suppressive effects on 4-AP induced seizure. A closed-loop eTBS system provides a more effective way of suppressing seizure and requires less effort compared to cHFS. eTBS may be a novel stimulation protocol for effective seizure control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Focal Electrically Administered Seizure Therapy (FEAST): A novel form of ECT illustrates the roles of current directionality, polarity, and electrode configuration in seizure induction

    PubMed Central

    Spellman, Timothy; Peterchev, Angel V.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a mainstay in the treatment of severe, medication resistant depression. The antidepressant efficacy and cognitive side effects of ECT are influenced by the position of the electrodes on the head and by the degree to which the electrical stimulus exceeds the threshold for seizure induction. However, surprisingly little is known about the effects of other key electrical parameters such as current directionality, polarity, and electrode configuration. Understanding these relationships may inform the optimization of therapeutic interventions to improve their risk/benefit ratio. To elucidate these relationships, we evaluated a novel form of ECT (focal electrically administered seizure therapy, FEAST) that combines unidirectional stimulation, control of polarity, and an asymmetrical electrode configuration, and contrasted it with conventional ECT in a nonhuman primate model. Rhesus monkeys had their seizure thresholds determined on separate days with ECT conditions that crossed the factors of current directionality (unidirectional or bidirectional), electrode configuration (standard bilateral or FEAST (small anterior and large posterior electrode)), and polarity (assignment of anode and cathode in unidirectional stimulation). Ictal expression and post-ictal suppression were quantified via scalp EEG. Findings were replicated and extended in a second experiment with the same subjects. Seizures were induced in each of 75 trials, including 42 FEAST procedures. Seizure thresholds were lower with unidirectional than with bidirectional stimulation (p<0.0001), and lower in FEAST than in bilateral ECS (p=0.0294). Ictal power was greatest in posterior-anode unidirectional FEAST, and post-ictal suppression was strongest in anterior-anode FEAST (p=0.0008 and p=0.0024, respectively). EEG power was higher in the stimulated hemisphere in posterior-anode FEAST (p=0.0246), consistent with the anode being the site of strongest activation. These findings

  17. Synchrotron FTIR micro-spectroscopy study of the rat hippocampal formation after pilocarpine-evoked seizures.

    PubMed

    Chwiej, J; Dulinska, J; Janeczko, K; Dumas, P; Eichert, D; Dudala, J; Setkowicz, Z

    2010-10-01

    In the present work, synchrotron radiation Fourier transform infrared (SRFTIR) micro-spectroscopy and imaging were used for topographic and semi-quantitative biochemical analysis of rat brain tissue in cases of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. The tissue samples were analyzed with a beam defined by small apertures and spatial resolution steps of 10 microm which allowed us to probe the selected cellular layers of hippocampal formation. Raster scanning of the samples has generated 2D chemical cartographies revealing the distribution of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Spectral analysis has shown changes in the saturation level of phospholipids and relative secondary structure of proteins. Special interest was put in the analysis of two areas of the hippocampal formation (sector 3 of the Ammon's horn, CA3 and dentate gyrus, DG) in which elemental abnormalities were observed during our previous studies. Statistically significant increase in the saturation level of phospholipids (increased ratio of the absorption intensities at around 2921 and 2958 cm(-1)) as well as conformational changes of proteins (beta-type structure discrepancies as shown by the increased ratio of the absorbance intensities at around 1631 and 1657 cm(-1) as well as the ratio of the absorbance at 1548 and 1657 cm(-1)) were detected in pyramidal cells of CA3 area as well as in the multiform and molecular layers of DG. The findings presented here suggest that abnormalities in the protein secondary structure and increases in the level of phospholipid saturation could be involved in mechanisms of neurodegenerative changes following the oxidative stress evoked in brain areas affected by pilocarpine-induced seizures. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cerebellar Directed Optogenetic Intervention Inhibits Spontaneous Hippocampal Seizures in a Mouse Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy1 2

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Gergely G.; Armstrong, Caren; Oijala, Mikko; Soltesz, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cover Figure Krook-Magnuson et al. report a bidirectional functional connectivity between the hippocampus and the cerebellum in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and demonstrate that cerebellar directed on-demand optogenetic intervention can stop seizures recorded from the hippocampus. Temporal lobe epilepsy is often medically refractory and new targets for intervention are needed. We used a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy, on-line seizure detection, and responsive optogenetic intervention to investigate the potential for cerebellar control of spontaneous temporal lobe seizures. Cerebellar targeted intervention inhibited spontaneous temporal lobe seizures during the chronic phase of the disorder. We further report that the direction of modulation as well as the location of intervention within the cerebellum can affect the outcome of intervention. Specifically, on-demand optogenetic excitation or inhibition of parvalbumin-expressing neurons, including Purkinje cells, in the lateral or midline cerebellum results in a decrease in seizure duration. In contrast, a consistent reduction in spontaneous seizure frequency occurs uniquely with on-demand optogenetic excitation of the midline cerebellum, and was not seen with intervention directly targeting the hippocampal formation. These findings demonstrate that the cerebellum is a powerful modulator of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that intervention targeting the cerebellum as a potential therapy for epilepsy should be revisited. PMID:25599088

  19. Hypoxia-Induced neonatal seizures diminish silent synapses and long-term potentiation in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengwen; Bell, Jocelyn J. Lippman; Sun, Hongyu; Jensen, Frances E.

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal seizures can lead to epilepsy and long-term cognitive deficits in adulthood. Using a rodent model of the most common form of human neonatal seizures, hypoxia-induced seizures (HS), we aimed to determine whether these seizures modify long-term potentiation (LTP) and “silent” N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-only synapses in hippocampal CA1. At 48-72 hours (hrs) post-HS, electrophysiology and immunofluorescent confocal microscopy revealed a significant decrease in the incidence of silent synapses, and an increase in amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) at the synapses. Coincident with this decrease in silent synapses, there was an attenuation of LTP elicited by either tetanic stimulation of Schaffer collaterals or a pairing protocol, and persistent attenuation of LTP in slices removed in later adulthood after P10 HS. Furthermore, post-seizure treatment in vivo with the AMPAR antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfonyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline (NBQX) protected against the HS-induced depletion of silent synapses and preserved LTP. Thus, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which early-life seizures could impair synaptic plasticity, suggesting a potential target for therapeutic strategies to prevent long-term cognitive deficits. PMID:22171027

  20. Quantitative visualization of ictal subdural EEG changes in children with neocortical focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Eishi; Muzik, Otto; Shah, Aashit; Juhász, Csaba; Chugani, Diane C.; Kagawa, Kenji; Benedek, Krisztina; Sood, Sandeep; Gotman, Jean; Chugani, Harry T.

    2005-01-01

    Objective To quantify the ictal subdural electroencephalogram (EEG) changes using spectral analysis, and to delineate the quantitatively defined ictal onset zones on high-resolution 3D MR images in children with intractable neocortical epilepsy. Methods Fourteen children with intractable neocortical epilepsy (age: 1–16 years) who had subsequent resective surgery were retrospectively studied. The subjects underwent a high-resolution MRI and prolonged subdural EEG recording. Spectral analysis was applied to 3 habitual focal seizures. After fast Fourier transformation of the EEG epoch at ictal onset, an amplitude spectral curve (square root of the power spectral curve) was created for each electrode. The EEG magnitude of ictal rhythmic discharges was defined as the area under the amplitude spectral curve within a preset frequency band including the ictal discharge frequency, and calculated for each electrode. The topography mapping of ictal EEG magnitude was subsequently displayed on a surface-rendered MRI. Finally, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate the consistency between quantitatively and visually defined ictal onset zones. Results The electrode showing the maximum of the averaged ictal EEG magnitude was part of the visually defined ictal onset zone in all cases. ROC analyses demonstrated that electrodes showing >30% of the maximum of the averaged ictal EEG magnitude had a specificity of 0.90 and a sensitivity of 0.74 for the concordance with visually defined ictal onset zones. Significance Quantitative ictal subdural EEG analysis using spectral analysis may supplement conventional visual inspection in children with neocortical epilepsy by providing an objective definition of the onset zone and its simple visualization on the patient’s MRI. PMID:15546780

  1. Quantitative visualization of ictal subdural EEG changes in children with neocortical focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Asano, Eishi; Muzik, Otto; Shah, Aashit; Juhász, Csaba; Chugani, Diane C; Kagawa, Kenji; Benedek, Krisztina; Sood, Sandeep; Gotman, Jean; Chugani, Harry T

    2004-12-01

    To quantify the ictal subdural electroencephalogram (EEG) changes using spectral analysis, and to delineate the quantitatively defined ictal onset zones on high-resolution 3D MR images in children with intractable neocortical epilepsy. Fourteen children with intractable neocortical epilepsy (age: 1-16 years) who had subsequent resective surgery were retrospectively studied. The subjects underwent a high-resolution MRI and prolonged subdural EEG recording. Spectral analysis was applied to 3 habitual focal seizures. After fast Fourier transformation of the EEG epoch at ictal onset, an amplitude spectral curve (square root of the power spectral curve) was created for each electrode. The EEG magnitude of ictal rhythmic discharges was defined as the area under the amplitude spectral curve within a preset frequency band including the ictal discharge frequency, and calculated for each electrode. The topography mapping of ictal EEG magnitude was subsequently displayed on a surface-rendered MRI. Finally, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate the consistency between quantitatively and visually defined ictal onset zones. The electrode showing the maximum of the averaged ictal EEG magnitude was part of the visually defined ictal onset zone in all cases. ROC analyses demonstrated that electrodes showing >30% of the maximum of the averaged ictal EEG magnitude had a specificity of 0.90 and a sensitivity of 0.74 for the concordance with visually defined ictal onset zones. Quantitative ictal subdural EEG analysis using spectral analysis may supplement conventional visual inspection in children with neocortical epilepsy by providing an objective definition of the onset zone and its simple visualization on the patient's MRI.

  2. Low frequency stimulation of ventral hippocampal commissures reduces seizures in a rat model of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Saifur; Pho, Gerald; Czigler, Michael; Werz, Mary A; Durand, Dominique M

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low frequency stimulation (LFS) of a fiber tract for the suppression of spontaneous seizures in a rat model of human temporal lobe epilepsy. Stimulation electrodes were implanted into the ventral hippocampal commissure (VHC) in a rat post-status epilepticus (SE) model of human temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 7). Two recording electrodes were placed in the CA3 regions bilaterally and neural data were recorded for a minimum of 6 weeks. LFS (60 min train of 1 Hz biphasic square wave pulses, each 0.1 ms in duration and 200 μA in amplitude, followed by 15 min of rest) was applied to the VHC for 2 weeks, 24 h a day. The baseline mean seizure frequency of the study animals was 3.7 seizures per day. The seizures were significantly reduced by the application of LFS in every animal (n = 7). By the end of the 2-week period of stimulation, there was a significant, 90% (<1 seizure/day) reduction of seizure frequencies (p < 0.05) and a 57% reduction during the period following LFS (p < 0.05) when compared to baseline. LFS also resulted in a significant reduction of hippocampal interictal spike frequency (71%, p < 0.05), during 2 weeks of LFS session. The hippocampal histologic analysis showed no significant difference between rats that received LFS and SE induction and those that had received only SE-induction. None of the animals showed any symptomatic hemorrhage, infection, or complication. Low frequency stimulation applied at a frequency of 1 Hz significantly reduced both the excitability of the neural tissue as well as the seizure frequency in a rat model of human temporal lobe epilepsy. The results support the hypothesis that LFS of fiber tracts can be an effective method for the suppression of spontaneous seizures in a temporal lobe model of epilepsy in rats and could lead to the development of a new therapeutic modality for human patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Loss of hippocampal serine protease BSP1/neuropsin predisposes to global seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Davies, B; Kearns, I R; Ure, J; Davies, C H; Lathe, R

    2001-09-15

    Serine proteases in the adult CNS contribute both to activity-dependent structural changes accompanying learning and to the regulation of excitotoxic cell death. Brain serine protease 1 (BSP1)/neuropsin is a trypsin-like serine protease exclusively expressed, within the CNS, in the hippocampus and associated limbic structures. To explore the role of this enzyme, we have used gene targeting to disrupt this gene in mice. Mutant mice were viable and overtly normal; they displayed normal hippocampal long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) and exhibited no deficits in spatial navigation (water maze). Nevertheless, electrophysiological studies revealed that the hippocampus of mice lacking this specifically expressed protease possessed an increased susceptibility for hyperexcitability (polyspiking) in response to repetitive afferent stimulation. Furthermore, seizure activity on kainic acid administration was markedly increased in mutant mice and was accompanied by heightened immediate early gene (c-fos) expression throughout the brain. In view of the regional selectivity of BSP1/neuropsin brain expression, the observed phenotype may selectively reflect limbic function, further implicating the hippocampus and amygdala in controlling cortical activation. Within the hippocampus, our data suggest that BSP1/neuropsin, unlike other serine proteases, has little effect on physiological synaptic remodeling and instead plays a role in limiting neuronal hyperexcitability induced by epileptogenic insult.

  4. The effects of early-life seizures on hippocampal dendrite development and later-life learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J R; Nishimura, Masataka; Swann, John W

    2014-04-01

    Severe childhood epilepsy is commonly associated with intellectual developmental disabilities. The reasons for these cognitive deficits are likely multifactorial and will vary between epilepsy syndromes and even among children with the same syndrome. However, one factor these children have in common is the recurring seizures they experience - sometimes on a daily basis. Supporting the idea that the seizures themselves can contribute to intellectual disabilities are laboratory results demonstrating spatial learning and memory deficits in normal mice and rats that have experienced recurrent seizures in infancy. Studies reviewed here have shown that seizures in vivo and electrographic seizure activity in vitro both suppress the growth of hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. A simplification of dendritic arborization and a resulting decrease in the number and/or properties of the excitatory synapses on them could help explain the observed cognitive disabilities. There are a wide variety of candidate mechanisms that could be involved in seizure-induced growth suppression. The challenge is designing experiments that will help focus research on a limited number of potential molecular events. Thus far, results suggest that growth suppression is NMDA receptor-dependent and associated with a decrease in activation of the transcription factor CREB. The latter result is intriguing since CREB is known to play an important role in dendrite growth. Seizure-induced dendrite growth suppression may not occur as a single process in which pyramidal cells dendrites simply stop growing or grow slower compared to normal neurons. Instead, recent results suggest that after only a few hours of synchronized epileptiform activity in vitro dendrites appear to partially retract. This acute response is also NMDA receptor dependent and appears to be mediated by the Ca(+2)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. An understanding of the staging of seizure-induced growth suppression and the

  5. [Effects of prenatal maternal seizure on hippocampal damage and cognitive deficits in offspring rats].

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Wang, W P; Wang, X X; Feng, J J; Guo, Z P; Liu, L M; Xie, T; Zhao, R R; Cai, Y L

    2016-10-02

    Objective: To observe hippocampal damage and cognitive impairment of offspring exposed to prenatal maternal seizure induced by amygdala kindling, and to explore the underlying mechanism by the detection of pathological changes of placenta. Method: Adult female SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: control group(8 rats), kindling group(12 rats) and sham group(8 rats). All the rats were allowed to mate after one week's fully kindling. The pregnant rats in kindling group received electric stimulation every 48 h. Dams were allowed to deliver naturally. Effects of maternal seizure on the number of offspring, the survival rate and body weight of pups were observed. HE staining was used to visualize histopathological changes of placenta. Morris water maze test was used to assess the cognitive function and Nissal's staining to detect hippocampal morphology of the offspring. One-way ANOVA analysis and χ(2) test were used. Result: Compared with the sham group (95%(78/82)) and the control group (95%(82/86)), the survival rate of pups in kindling group(81%(66/82))was much lower (χ(2)=13.817, P=0.001). There were no significant differences in the number of pups per litter and pups birth-weight between kindling group and sham group or control group(F=0.312 and 0.257, P=0.736 and 0.776). HE staining showed that placental tissues from control and sham groups were normal whereas the histologic abnormalities of placentas from kindling group were characterized by thickening of the villus vascular walls, luminal stenosis, trophoblasts hyperplasia, abnormalities of trophoblasts with nuclear pyknosis and karyorrhexis and accumulation of inflammatory lymphocytes in labyrinthine zone. Nissl staining showed that neurons in hippocampus of P0(0 d after birth) and P84(84 d after birth) offspring from control and sham groups were normal, but neuronal damages were obvious in hippocampus of P0 and P84 offspring from kindling groups, and the damages in P0 pups were severe with a

  6. Hidden focal EEG seizures during prolonged suppressions and high-amplitude bursts in early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Al-Futaisi, Amna; Banwell, Brenda; Ochi, Ayako; Hew, Justine; Chu, Bill; Oishi, Makoto; Otsubo, Hiroshi

    2005-05-01

    We report on a 27-month-old female with atypical early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), who developed tonic spasms, partial seizures and myoclonic jerks along with episodic bradycardia at 5 days. We recorded digital electroencephalography (EEG) using either an 11-channel neonatal montage or 19 channel scalp electrodes, at 200 Hz sampling rate, and a single reference for a minimum of 30 min. At 18 days EEG showed suppression-burst (SB) patterns during wakefulness and sleep. Tonic spasms concomitant with bursts recorded as brief, low-amplitude fast waves. EEG at 8 months showed increased amplitude of bursts to 1 mV and extension of suppression periods to 65 s. By increasing recording sensitivity, we detected focal epileptiform discharges of slow rhythmic sharp and slow waves building to 30 microV during suppression periods. Status epilepticus occurred at 16 months. EEG at 27 months returned to the previous SB pattern with rare partial seizures. This report is the first to demonstrate clinically silent focal EEG seizures during prolonged suppression periods in atypical EIEE by off-line digital EEG. Digital EEG sensitivity can reveal covert electrical activity during suppression periods in epileptic neonates and infants.

  7. Altered glutamate metabolism contributes to antiepileptogenic effects in the progression from focal seizure to generalized seizure by low-frequency stimulation in the ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Liu; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Rong; Pan, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Jun-Ru; Chen, Xiang-Ming; Liu, Yu-Xia; Li, Shu-Cui; Wang, Qiao-Yun; Deng, Da-Ping

    2017-03-01

    As a promising method for treating intractable epilepsy, the inhibitory effect of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is well known, although its mechanisms remain unclear. Excessive levels of cerebral glutamate are considered a crucial factor for epilepsy. Therefore, we designed experiments to investigate the crucial parts of the glutamate cycle. We evaluated glutamine synthetase (GS, metabolizes glutamate), glutaminase (synthesizes glutamate), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD, a γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA] synthetase) in different regions of the brain, including the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 subregions of the hippocampus, and the cortex, using western blots, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme activity assays. Additionally, the concentrations of glutamate, GABA, and glutamine (a product of GS) were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in the same subregions. The results indicated that a transiently promoted glutamate cycle was closely involved in the progression from focal to generalized seizure. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) delivered to the ventral hippocampus had an antiepileptogenic effect in rats exposed to amygdaloid-kindling stimulation. Simultaneously, LFS could partly reverse the effects of the promoted glutamate cycle, including increased GS function, accelerated glutamate-glutamine cycling, and an unbalanced glutamate/GABA ratio, all of which were induced by amygdaloid kindling in the DG when seizures progressed to stage 4. Moreover, glutamine treatment reversed the antiepileptic effect of LFS with regard to both epileptic severity and susceptibility. Our results suggest that the effects of LFS on the glutamate cycle may contribute to the antiepileptogenic role of LFS in the progression from focal to generalized seizure.

  8. Volume of focal brain lesions and hippocampal formation in relation to memory function after closed head injury in children.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, G; Bachevalier, J; Levin, H S; Song, J X; Scheibel, R S; Fletcher, J M

    2000-08-01

    (1) A study of verbal learning and memory in children who had sustained a closed head injury (CHI) at least 3 months earlier. (2) To relate memory function to focal brain lesion and hippocampal formation volumes using morphometric analysis of MRI. A group of 245 children who had been admitted to hospital for CHI graded by the Glasgow coma scale (GCS), including 161 patients with severe and 84 with mild CHI completed the California verbal learning test (CVLT) and underwent MRI which was analysed for focal brain lesion volume independently of memory test data. Brain MRI with 1.5 mm coronal slices obtained in subsets of 25 patients with severe and 25 patients with mild CHI were analysed for hippocampal formation volume. Interoperator reliability in morphometry was satisfactory. Severity of CHI and age at study significantly affected memory performance. Regression analysis showed that bifrontal, left frontal, and right frontal lesion volumes incremented prediction of various learning and memory indices after entering the GCS score and age into the model. Extrafrontal lesion volume did not contribute to predicting memory performance. Prefrontal lesions contribute to residual impairment of learning and memory after severe CHI in children. Although effects of CHI on hippocampal formation volume might be difficult to demonstrate in non-fatal paediatric CHI, further investigation using functional brain imaging could potentially demonstrate hippocampal dysfunction.

  9. Hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures diminish silent synapses and long-term potentiation in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chengwen; Lippman, Jocelyn J Bell; Sun, Hongyu; Jensen, Frances E

    2011-12-14

    Neonatal seizures can lead to epilepsy and long-term cognitive deficits into adulthood. Using a rodent model of the most common form of human neonatal seizures, hypoxia-induced seizures (HS), we aimed to determine whether these seizures modify long-term potentiation (LTP) and silent NMDAR-only synapses in hippocampal CA1. At 48-72 h after HS, electrophysiology and immunofluorescent confocal microscopy revealed a significant decrease in the incidence of silent synapses, and an increase in AMPARs at the synapses. Coincident with this decrease in silent synapses, there was an attenuation of LTP elicited by either tetanic stimulation of Schaffer collaterals or a pairing protocol, and persistent attenuation of LTP in slices removed in later adulthood after P10 HS. Furthermore, postseizure treatment in vivo with the AMPAR antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfonyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline (NBQX) protected against the HS-induced depletion of silent synapses and preserved LTP. Thus, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which early life seizures could impair synaptic plasticity, suggesting a potential target for therapeutic strategies to prevent long-term cognitive deficits.

  10. [THE PROPAGATION AND SEMIOLOGY OF FOCAL EPILEPTIC SEIZURES. CASES CONNECTED TO THE INSULA. THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Attila; Balogh, Attila

    2016-01-30

    The developing of diagnostical examinations in epileptology provides new challenges in seizure semiology. On the analysis of seizures it is important to examine the mechanisms of their propagation. The brain connectivity (based on the neuroimaging), the shadowing of the movement of excessive neuronal activity (based on computerized EEG and MEG methods), the cognition of the physiological and pathological brain networks are the footstone of the epileptic seizure propagation. The investigators prove, by means of case demonstrations of the role of the network nodes and the role of the epileptic hubs in the seizure symptomatology. The preoperative, intra and postoperative data are analised of three insular and one parietal epileptic patients in point of view of their seizure symptomes. Complex neuroimaging, noninvasive and invasive electrophysiology, intensive long-term video-EEG monitoring, computerized EEG analysis, fuctional mapping, intraoperative corticography were used. The etiology were confirmed with hystology. It is observed that on seizure semiology our patients plays the insula a double role. In some cases, it is the focus of insular seizures with their symptoms difficult to identify. However, in the majority of cases and as a consequence of its rich neural connections, the insula has a peculiar property in the evolution of the symptomatogenic features of seizures. This observations are developing new relationships between the mechanism of seizure propagation and its semiological consequences. On epileptological point of view there are brain structures which has peculiar role in the "designe" of propagation of the epileptic excitement. The numerous new methods in neuroimaging and neurophysiology allowed the connectomical examination of the epileptic networks. The role of the epileptic diathesis is approachable with the metholdology of the brain connectivity. Theoretically the node of the epileptic network consist of the potential pathes where the localised

  11. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Shi-Bing; Cheng, Sin-Jhong; Hung, Wei-Chen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Min, Ming-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC) analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE. PMID:26659605

  12. Hippocampal sclerosis and chronic epilepsy following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kapina, Viktoria; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Wohlrab, Gabriele; Vulliemoz, Serge; Fluss, Joel; Seeck, Margitta

    2013-12-01

    Chronic epilepsy has rarely been reported after posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and the association with hippocampal sclerosis has been suggested only once before. We report the case of a girl admitted at the age of 8 years with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. On the second day of admission, she presented with focal complex seizures and cerebral MRI showed posterior encephalopathy and no hippocampal sclerosis. MRI after one month confirmed the diagnosis of PRES. The seizures recurred and the girl developed pharmacoresistant epilepsy and was admitted to our hospital for further investigation. Cerebral MRI three years after the diagnosis of PRES showed hippocampal sclerosis which was not present on the initial MRI. We conclude that there is a triggering role of PRES in the development of hippocampal sclerosis. Hippocampal sclerosis may have resulted from seizure-associated damage, alternatively, hypertensive encephalopathy may have led to hippocampal damage via a vascular mechanism.

  13. Surgical pathology of epilepsy-associated non-neoplastic cerebral lesions: a brief introduction with special reference to hippocampal sclerosis and focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Hajime; Hori, Tomokatsu; Vinters, Harry V.

    2014-01-01

    Among epilepsy-associated non-neoplastic lesions, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (mTLE-HS) and malformation of cortical development (MCD) including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), are the two most frequent causes of drug-resistant focal epilepsies constituting about 50% of all surgical pathology of epilepsy. Several distinct histological patterns have been historically recognized in both HS and FCD, and several studies have tried to perform clinicopathological correlation; results, however, have been controversial, particularly in terms of postsurgical seizure outcome. Recently, the International League Against Epilepsy constituted a Task Forces of Neuropathology and FCD within the Commission on Diagnostic Methods, to establish an international consensus of histological classification of HS and FCD, respectively, based on agreement with the recognition of the importance of defining a histopathological classification system that reliably has some clinicopathological correlation. Such consensus classifications are likely to facilitate future clinicopathological study. Meanwhile, we reviewed neuropathology of 41 surgical cases of mTLE, and confirmed three type/patterns of HS along with no HS, based on the qualitative evaluation of the distribution and severity of neuronal loss and gliosis within hippocampal formation; i.e., HS type 1 (61%) equivalent to ‘classical’ Ammon’s horn sclerosis, HS type 2 (2%) representing CA1 sclerosis, HS type 3 (17%) equivalent to end folium sclerosis, and no HS (19%). Furthermore we performed a neuropathological comparative study on mTLE-HS and dementia associated HS (d-HS) in elderly, and confirmed that neuropathological features differ between mTLE-HS and d-HS in the distribution of hippocampal neuronal loss and gliosis, morphology of reactive astrocytes and their protein expression, and presence of concomitant neurodegenerative changes particularly Alzheimer type and TDP-43 pathologies. These

  14. Recruitment of the Sonic hedgehog signalling cascade in electroconvulsive seizure-mediated regulation of adult rat hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sunayana B.; Rajendran, Rajeev; Dias, Brian G.; Ladiwala, Uma; Tole, Shubha; Vaidya, Vidita A.

    2007-01-01

    Electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) induces structural remodelling in the adult mammalian brain, including an increase in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this increase in the proliferation of adult hippocampal progenitors are at present not well understood. We hypothesized that ECS may recruit the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway to mediate its effects on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as Shh is known to enhance the proliferation of neuronal progenitors and is expressed in the adult basal forebrain, a region that sends robust projections to the hippocampus. Here we demonstrate that the ECS-induced increase in proliferation of adult hippocampal progenitors was completely blocked in animals treated with cyclopamine, a pharmacological inhibitor of Shh signalling. Our results suggest that both acute and chronic ECS enhance Shh signalling in the adult hippocampus, as we observed a robust upregulation of Patched (Ptc) mRNA, a component of the Shh receptor complex and a downstream transcriptional target of Shh signalling. This increase was rapid and restricted to the dentate gyrus, where the adult hippocampal progenitors reside. In addition, both acute and chronic ECS decreased Smoothened (Smo) mRNA, the other component of the Shh receptor complex, selectively within the dentate gyrus. However, ECS did not appear to influence Shh expression within the basal forebrain, the site from which it has been suggested to be anterogradely transported to the hippocampus. Together, our findings demonstrate that ECS regulates the Shh signalling cascade and indicate that the Shh pathway may be an important mechanism through which ECS enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:16197497

  15. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... entire body Sudden falling Tasting a bitter or metallic flavor Teeth clenching Temporary stop in breathing Uncontrollable ... Causes of seizures can include: Abnormal levels of sodium or glucose in the blood Brain infection, including ...

  16. Effects of intra-uterine and early extra-uterine malnutrition on seizure threshold and hippocampal morphometry of pup rats.

    PubMed

    Florian, Mariana Lorenzet; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2010-12-01

    We evaluate the influence of different malnutrition paradigms (intra-uterine × extra-uterine) in body and brain weight, in seizure threshold and in hippocampus morphometry, in developing rats. Intra-uterine malnutrition model consisted in reduction by half of the ration offered to pregnant female; extra-uterine malnutrition consisted of progressive limitation of lactation, from P2 to P15. Seizure induction was accomplished by exposure to flurothyl, at P15. At the same day animals were sacrificed. Morphometric analysis was based on hippocampal pyramidal and granular cells estimate number, through volume calculation and cellular density. Extra-uterine malnutrition significantly reduced pups body and brain weight, seizure threshold and neuronal number in CA4 region only. Intra-uterine malnutrition reduced neuronal number in CA2, CA4 and DG regions regarding well-nourished and extra-uterine malnourished animals. In CA3, CA4 and dentate gyrus, a significant cell increase was observed in groups exposed to seizures, regarding similar control groups.

  17. Effects of intra-uterine and early extra-uterine malnutrition on seizure threshold and hippocampal morphometry of pup rats.

    PubMed

    Florian, Mariana Lorenzet; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2011-07-01

    We evaluate the influence of different malnutrition paradigms (intra-uterine x extra-uterine) in body and brain weight, in seizure threshold and in hippocampus morphometry, in developing rats. Intra-uterine malnutrition model consisted in reduction by half of the ration offered to pregnant female; extrauterine malnutrition consisted of progressive limitation of lactation, from P2 to P15. Seizure induction was accomplished by exposure to flurothyl, at P15. At the same day animals were sacrificed. Morphometric analysis was based on hippocampal pyramidal and granular cells estimate number, through volume calculation and cellular density. Extra-uterine malnutrition significantly reduced pups body and brain weight, seizure threshold and neuronal number in CA4 region only. Intra-uterine malnutrition reduced neuronal number in CA2, CA4 and DG regions regarding well-nourished and extra-uterine malnourished animals. In CA3, CA4 and dentate gyrus, a significant cell increase was observed in groups exposed to seizures, regarding similar control groups.

  18. Lamotrigine Decreased Hippocampal Damage and Improved Vascular Risk Markers in a Rat Model of Pentylenetetrazole Induced Kindling Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Haggag, Basma S; Raafat, Mona H; Abdel Kawy, Hala S

    2014-01-01

    Various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) especially enzyme-inducing AEDs might be associated with increased vascular risk, through impairment of the endogenous antioxidative ability which may trigger oxygen-dependent tissue injury. Lamotrigine (LTG) a non-enzyme-inducing AED has scarce information regarding its effects on oxidative stress. The present study aimed to study the possible modulation of vascular risk factors of epileptogenesis by LTG, in a rat model of kindling seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Four groups of male Wister rats were used; vehicle control group, PTZ group (alternate day PTZ, 30 mg/kg, i.p), LTG/PTZ group (LTG 20 mg/kg/day p.o and alternate day PTZ) and LTG group. The study period was 5 weeks. Lipoproteins and total homocysteine (tHcy), malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured. Aortic endothelial function study and histopathological examination of the rats' brains, aortas and coronaries were conducted. Serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), tHcy, MDA, GSH levels were significantly higher in epileptic rats than normal controls rats. A decrease in HDL-cholesterol with high atherosclerotic index was also demonstrated. The administration of LTG improved the PTZ-kindled seizures. It produced a significant decrease in TC, TG and LDL-cholesterol, MDA, aortic GSH and increase in HDL-cholesterol with no significant effect on serum GSH and tHcy levels. LTG improved endothelium-dependent relaxation, decreased hippocampal neurodegenerative changes and atherosclerotic changes of aortas and coronaries. LTG decreased seizures severity, hippocampal damage and improved vascular risk markers in this rat model of kindling seizures. PMID:24976768

  19. Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) adversely effects on pilocarpine seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Dong Won; Choi, Bo Young; Sohn, Min; Lee, Song Hee; Choi, Hui Chul; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-21

    Citicoline (CDP-choline; cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine) is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids. Citicoline serves as a choline donor in the biosynthetic pathways of acetylcholine and neuronal membrane phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylcholine. The ability of citicoline to reverse neuronal injury has been tested in animal models of cerebral ischemia and clinical trials have been performed in stroke patients. However, no studies have examined the effect of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death. To clarify the potential therapeutic effects of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death, we used an animal model of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was induced by intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine (25mg/kg) in adult male rats. Citicoline (100 or 300 mg/kg) was injected into the intraperitoneal space two hours after seizure onset and a second injection was performed 24h after the seizure. Citicoline was injected once per day for one week after pilocarpine- or kainate-induced seizure. Neuronal injury and microglial activation were evaluated at 1 week post-seizure. Surprisingly, rather than offering protection, citicoline treatment actually enhanced seizure-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated controls. Citicoline administration after seizure-induction increased immunoglobulin leakage via BBB disruption in the hippocampus compared with the vehicle-only group. To clarify if this adverse effect of citicoline is generalizable across alternative seizure models, we induced seizure by kainate injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) and then injected citicoline as in pilocarpine-induced seizure. We found that citicoline did not modulate kainate seizure-induced neuronal death, BBB disruption or microglial activation. These results suggest that citicoline may not have neuroprotective effects after seizure and that clinical application of citicoline after

  20. Impaired neuronal KCC2 function by biallelic SLC12A5 mutations in migrating focal seizures and severe developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Watanabe, Miho; Akita, Tenpei; Ohba, Chihiro; Sugai, Kenji; Ong, Winnie Peitee; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Yuasa, Shota; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Beng, Khoo Teik; Saitoh, Shinji; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Fukuda, Atsuo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) is one of the early-onset epileptic syndromes characterized by migrating polymorphous focal seizures. Whole exome sequencing (WES) in ten sporadic and one familial case of EIMFS revealed compound heterozygous SLC12A5 (encoding the neuronal K+-Cl− co-transporter KCC2) mutations in two families: c.279 + 1G > C causing skipping of exon 3 in the transcript (p.E50_Q93del) and c.572 C >T (p.A191V) in individuals 1 and 2, and c.967T > C (p.S323P) and c.1243 A > G (p.M415V) in individual 3. Another patient (individual 4) with migrating multifocal seizures and compound heterozygous mutations [c.953G > C (p.W318S) and c.2242_2244del (p.S748del)] was identified by searching WES data from 526 patients and SLC12A5-targeted resequencing data from 141 patients with infantile epilepsy. Gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp analysis demonstrated strongly suppressed Cl− extrusion function of E50_Q93del and M415V mutants, with mildly impaired function of A191V and S323P mutants. Cell surface expression levels of these KCC2 mutants were similar to wildtype KCC2. Heterologous expression of two KCC2 mutants, mimicking the patient status, produced a significantly greater intracellular Cl− level than with wildtype KCC2, but less than without KCC2. These data clearly demonstrated that partially disrupted neuronal Cl− extrusion, mediated by two types of differentially impaired KCC2 mutant in an individual, causes EIMFS. PMID:27436767

  1. Exogenous antenatal glucocorticoid treatment reduces susceptibility for hippocampal kindled and maximal electroconvulsive seizures in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Young, Nicole A; Teskey, G Campbell; Henry, Luke C; Edwards, Heather E

    2006-04-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) and betamethasone (BETA) are synthetic glucocorticoids used clinically to reduce morbidity and mortality in infants at risk of premature birth. While their main role is to facilitate lung development, their effect on the developing nervous system and seizure susceptibility is unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that antenatal DEX or BETA treatment would alter seizure thresholds and spread of epileptiform activity in the brains of infant offspring. Pregnant dams received once daily injections with DEX, BETA, or vehicle on gestation days 15 to 18. Physical appearance, litter size, and weight of the pups were assessed postnatally. Seizure thresholds were determined on postnatal day 14 using electroconvulsive shock delivered through ear clips (i.e., generalized seizure) or kindling stimulation of the left hippocampus through indwelling electrodes (i.e., partial seizure). The rate of acquisition of kindled seizures was determined on postnatal days 14 and 15. Pups from dams treated with DEX and BETA were growth restricted. Antenatal BETA treatment increased seizure threshold for both models. Antenatal DEX treatment increased kindling threshold, but not electroconvulsive shock threshold. Kindling rate was unaffected by either antenatal treatment. In summary, repeated glucocorticoid treatments had adverse effects on weight, skin and litter size, raised seizure thresholds, and reduced seizure vulnerability. Although these effects are seemingly desirable with respect to seizure susceptibility, they suggest that the functional organization of the nervous system is altered with antenatal synthetic glucocorticoid treatment.

  2. Outcomes of resective surgery in children and adolescents with focal lesional epilepsy: The experience of a tertiary epilepsy center.

    PubMed

    Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Kurt, Gokhan; Erdem, Atilla; Capraz, Irem; Bilir, Erhan; Vural, Ozge; Ucar, Murat; Oner, Ali Yusuf; Onal, Baran; Akdemir, Ozgur; Atay, Ozlem; Arhan, Ebru; Aydin, Kursad

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of resective surgery in children with focal lesional epilepsy by evaluating the predictive value of pre- and postsurgical factors in terms of seizure freedom. This study included 61 children aged between 2 and 18years who were admitted to the pediatric video-EEG unit for presurgical workup. Each patient was evaluated with a detailed history, video-EEG, neuroimaging, and postsurgical outcomes according to Engel classification to predict postsurgical seizure freedom. All the possible factors including history, etiology, presurgical evaluation, surgical procedures, and postsurgical results were analyzed for their predictive value for postoperative seizure freedom. Of the 61 patients, 75% were diagnosed as having temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and 25% were diagnosed with extra-TLE. Two years after the surgery, 78.6% were seizure-free, of which 89% had TLE, and 50% had extra-TLE (p<0.05). Patients were more likely to have a favorable outcome for seizure freedom if they had rare seizure frequency, focal EEG findings, and focal seizures; had a temporal epileptogenic zone; or had TLE and hippocampal sclerosis. On the other hand, patients were more likely to have unfavorable results for seizure freedom if they had younger age of seizure onset, frequent seizures before the surgery, a frontal or multilobar epileptogenic zone, secondarily generalized seizures, extra-TLE with frontal lobe surgery, or focal cortical dysplasia. Resective surgery is one of the most effective treatment methods in children with intractable epilepsy. A history of young age of seizure onset, frequent seizures before surgery, secondarily generalized seizures, a multilobar epileptogenic zone, frontal lobe surgery, and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) are the most important predictive factors indicating that a patient would continue having seizures after surgery. On the other hand, focal seizure semiologies, temporal lobe localization, and hippocampal sclerosis

  3. Temporal pole abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: Clinical significance and seizure outcome after surgery.

    PubMed

    Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; D'Aniello, Alfredo; De Risi, Marco; Grillea, Giovanni; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Mascia, Addolorata; Grammaldo, Liliana G; Casciato, Sara; Morace, Roberta; Esposito, Vincenzo; Picardi, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    To assess the clinical significance of temporal pole abnormalities (temporopolar blurring, TB, and temporopolar atrophy, TA) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS) with a long post-surgical follow-up. We studied 60 consecutive patients with TLE-HS and 1.5 preoperative MRI scans who underwent surgery and were followed up for at least 5 years (mean follow-up 7.3 years). Based on findings of pre-surgical MRI, patients were classified according to the presence of TB or TA. Groups were compared on demographic, clinical, neuropsychological data, and seizure outcome. TB was found in 37 (62%) patients, while TA was found in 35 (58%) patients, always ipsilateral to HS, with a high degree of overlap (83%) between TB and TA (p<0.001). Patients with TB did not differ from those without TB with regard to history of febrile convulsions, GTCSs, age of epilepsy onset, side of surgery, seizure frequency, seizure outcome, and neuropsychological outcome. On the other hand, they were significantly older, had a longer duration of epilepsy, and displayed lower preoperative scores on several neuropsychological tests. Similar findings were observed for TA. Multivariate analysis corroborated the association between temporopolar abnormalities and age at onset, age at surgery (for TB only), and lower preoperative scores on some neuropsychological tests. Temporopolar abnormalities are frequent in patients with TLE-HS. Our data support the hypothesis that TB and TA are caused by seizure-related damages. These abnormalities did not influence seizure outcome, even after a long-term post-surgical follow-up. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nimodipine prevents early loss of hippocampal CA1 parvalbumin immunoreactivity after focal cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Z; De Jong, G I; Luiten, P G

    1995-01-01

    The effect of focal cerebral ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion on hippocampal interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) was studied in rats. Four hours after the onset of ischemia, a reduced number of PV-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons was observed in the lateral part of the CA1 region, while PV-ir was not altered in the CA2 and CA3 areas. Pretreatment with the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nimodipine prevented the ischemia-induced loss of PV-ir in the CA1, suggesting a role for L-type voltage sensitive calcium channels in the mechanism of early neuronal alterations in the hippocampus CA1 region after focal cerebral ischemia.

  5. The biochemical changes in hippocampal formation occurring in normal and seizure experiencing rats as a result of a ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Chwiej, Joanna; Skoczen, Agnieszka; Janeczko, Krzysztof; Kutorasinska, Justyna; Matusiak, Katarzyna; Figiel, Henryk; Dumas, Paul; Sandt, Christophe; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2015-04-07

    In this study, ketogenic diet-induced biochemical changes occurring in normal and epileptic hippocampal formations were compared. Four groups of rats were analyzed, namely seizure experiencing animals and normal rats previously fed with ketogenic (KSE and K groups respectively) or standard laboratory diet (NSE and N groups respectively). Synchrotron radiation based Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy was used for the analysis of distributions of the main organic components (proteins, lipids, compounds containing phosphate group(s)) and their structural modifications as well as anomalies in creatine accumulation with micrometer spatial resolution. Infrared spectra recorded in the molecular layers of the dentate gyrus (DG) areas of normal rats on a ketogenic diet (K) presented increased intensity of the 1740 cm(-1) absorption band. This originates from the stretching vibrations of carbonyl groups and probably reflects increased accumulation of ketone bodies occurring in animals on a high fat diet compared to those fed with a standard laboratory diet (N). The comparison of K and N groups showed, moreover, elevated ratios of absorbance at 1634 and 1658 cm(-1) for DG internal layers and increased accumulation of creatine deposits in sector 3 of the Ammon's horn (CA3) hippocampal area of ketogenic diet fed rats. In multiform and internal layers of CA3, seizure experiencing animals on ketogenic diet (KSE) presented a lower ratio of absorbance at 1634 and 1658 cm(-1) compared to rats on standard laboratory diet (NSE). Moreover, in some of the examined cellular layers, the increased intensity of the 2924 cm(-1) lipid band as well as the massifs of 2800-3000 cm(-1) and 1360-1480 cm(-1), was found in KSE compared to NSE animals. The intensity of the 1740 cm(-1) band was diminished in DG molecular layers of KSE rats. The ketogenic diet did not modify the seizure induced anomalies in the unsaturation level of lipids or the number of creatine deposits.

  6. Mice lacking doublecortin and doublecortin-like kinase 2 display altered hippocampal neuronal maturation and spontaneous seizures.

    PubMed

    Kerjan, Géraldine; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Han, Edward B; Dubé, Celine M; Djakovic, Stevan N; Patrick, Gentry N; Baram, Tallie Z; Heinemann, Stephen F; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2009-04-21

    Mutations in doublecortin (DCX) are associated with intractable epilepsy in humans, due to a severe disorganization of the neocortex and hippocampus known as classical lissencephaly. However, the basis of the epilepsy in lissencephaly remains unclear. To address potential functional redundancy with murin Dcx, we targeted one of the closest homologues, doublecortin-like kinase 2 (Dclk2). Here, we report that Dcx; Dclk2-null mice display frequent spontaneous seizures that originate in the hippocampus, with most animals dying in the first few months of life. Elevated hippocampal expression of c-fos and loss of somatostatin-positive interneurons were identified, both known to correlate with epilepsy. Dcx and Dclk2 are coexpressed in developing hippocampus, and, in their absence, there is dosage-dependent disrupted hippocampal lamination associated with a cell-autonomous simplification of pyramidal dendritic arborizations leading to reduced inhibitory synaptic tone. These data suggest that hippocampal dysmaturation and insufficient receptive field for inhibitory input may underlie the epilepsy in lissencephaly, and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for controlling epilepsy in these patients.

  7. CA3 Synaptic Silencing Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizures and Hippocampal Network Oscillations123

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lily M. Y.; Wintzer, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epilepsy is a neurological disorder defined by the presence of seizure activity, manifest both behaviorally and as abnormal activity in neuronal networks. An established model to study the disorder in rodents is the systemic injection of kainic acid, an excitatory neurotoxin that at low doses quickly induces behavioral and electrophysiological seizures. Although the CA3 region of the hippocampus has been suggested to be crucial for kainic acid-induced seizure, because of its strong expression of kainate glutamate receptors and its high degree of recurrent connectivity, the precise role of excitatory transmission in CA3 in the generation of seizure and the accompanying increase in neuronal oscillations remains largely untested. Here we use transgenic mice in which CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic transmission can be inducibly silenced in the adult to demonstrate CA3 excitatory output is required for both the generation of epileptiform oscillatory activity and the progression of behavioral seizures. PMID:27022627

  8. CA3 Synaptic Silencing Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Seizures and Hippocampal Network Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lily M Y; Polygalov, Denis; Wintzer, Marie E; Chiang, Ming-Ching; McHugh, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder defined by the presence of seizure activity, manifest both behaviorally and as abnormal activity in neuronal networks. An established model to study the disorder in rodents is the systemic injection of kainic acid, an excitatory neurotoxin that at low doses quickly induces behavioral and electrophysiological seizures. Although the CA3 region of the hippocampus has been suggested to be crucial for kainic acid-induced seizure, because of its strong expression of kainate glutamate receptors and its high degree of recurrent connectivity, the precise role of excitatory transmission in CA3 in the generation of seizure and the accompanying increase in neuronal oscillations remains largely untested. Here we use transgenic mice in which CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic transmission can be inducibly silenced in the adult to demonstrate CA3 excitatory output is required for both the generation of epileptiform oscillatory activity and the progression of behavioral seizures.

  9. SRF modulates seizure occurrence, activity induced gene transcription and hippocampal circuit reorganization in the mouse pilocarpine epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Lösing, Pascal; Niturad, Cristina Elena; Harrer, Merle; Reckendorf, Christopher Meyer Zu; Schatz, Theresa; Sinske, Daniela; Lerche, Holger; Maljevic, Snezana; Knöll, Bernd

    2017-07-17

    A hallmark of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is hippocampal neuronal demise and aberrant mossy fiber sprouting. In addition, unrestrained neuronal activity in TLE patients induces gene expression including immediate early genes (IEGs) such as Fos and Egr1.We employed the mouse pilocarpine model to analyze the transcription factor (TF) serum response factor (SRF) in epileptogenesis, seizure induced histopathology and IEG induction. SRF is a neuronal activity regulated TF stimulating IEG expression as well as nerve fiber growth and guidance. Adult conditional SRF deficient mice (Srf (CaMKCreERT2) ) were more refractory to initial status epilepticus (SE) acquisition. Further, SRF deficient mice developed more spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS). Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis uncovered a requirement of SRF for SE and SRS induced IEG induction (e.g. Fos, Egr1, Arc, Npas4, Btg2, Atf3). SRF was required for epilepsy associated neurodegeneration, mossy fiber sprouting and inflammation. We uncovered MAP kinase signaling as SRF target during epilepsy. Upon SRF ablation, seizure evoked induction of dual specific phosphatases (Dusp5 and Dusp6) was reduced. Lower expression of these negative ERK kinase regulators correlated with altered P-ERK levels in epileptic Srf mutant animals.Overall, this study uncovered an SRF contribution to several processes of epileptogenesis in the pilocarpine model.

  10. Standing waves as an explanation for generic stationary correlation patterns in noninvasive EEG of focal onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus Franziskus; Rummel, Christian; Goodfellow, Marc; Schindler, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    Cerebral electrical activity is highly nonstationary because the brain reacts to ever changing external stimuli and continuously monitors internal control circuits. However, a large amount of energy is spent to maintain remarkably stationary activity patterns and functional inter-relations between different brain regions. Here we examine linear EEG correlations in the peri-ictal transition of focal onset seizures, which are typically understood to be manifestations of dramatically changing inter-relations. Contrary to expectations we find stable correlation patterns with a high similarity across different patients and different frequency bands. This skeleton of spatial correlations may be interpreted as a signature of standing waves of electrical brain activity constituting a dynamical ground state. Such a state could promote the formation of spatiotemporal neuronal assemblies and may be important for the integration of information stemming from different local circuits of the functional brain network.

  11. Excitotoxicity by kainate-induced seizure causes diacylglycerol kinase ζ to shuttle from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Saino-Saito, Sachiko; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-05-02

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK), which consists of several isozymes, plays a pivotal role in lipid second-messenger diacylglycerol metabolism. A nuclear isozyme, DGKζ, which is translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in hippocampal neurons under transient ischemic stress, is implicated in nuclear events of delayed neuronal death. Kainate (KA)-induced seizure is another model used to study excitotoxic stress. Therefore, we examined whether DGKζ is implicated in a different type of degenerative excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons. We conducted immunohistochemical analysis of rat hippocampi after KA-induced seizures. DGKζ in hippocampal neurons shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. It never relocates to the nucleus during KA-induced seizures. Marked change in the immunoreactivity is first observed in CA1 pyramidal neurons 2h after injection during stage 3 seizures. Immunoreactivity for DGKι remains unchanged in the cytoplasm. That for NeuN remains mostly unchanged in the nucleus. Results show that nucleocytoplasmic translocation of DGKζ also occurs in a different model of excitotoxicity that results in apoptotic neuronal death. Cytoplasmic translocation of DGKζ might be involved in early events of the apoptotic cell death pathway in hippocampal neurons under stressed conditions.

  12. Facilitation of Hippocampal Kindling and Exacerbation of Kindled Seizures by Intra-CA1 Injection of Quinine: A Possible Role of Cx36 Gap Junctions.

    PubMed

    Etemadi, Fatemeh; Sayyah, Mohammad; Gholami Pourbadie, Hamid; Babapour, Vahab

    2016-11-01

    GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 area are mutually communicated by gap junctions (GJs) composed of connexin36 (Cx36). We examined the role of Cx36 in CA1 in manifestation of kindled seizures and hippocampal kindling in rats. Quinine, as the specific blocker of Cx36, was injected into CA1, and kindled seizures severity was examined 10 min afterward. Moreover, quinine was injected into CA1 once daily, and the rate of CA1 kindling was recorded. Quinine 0.5 and 1 mM caused 2- and 3.5-fold increase in the duration of total seizure behavior and generalized the seizures. Primary and secondary afterdischarges (AD) were also significantly increased. Quinine 0.1 mM augmented the rate of kindling and the growth of secondary AD. Cx36 GJs in CA1 are the main components of hippocampal inhibitory circuit. Any interruption in this path by pathologic or physical damages can trigger hippocampal hyperexcitability and facilitate epileptogenesis.

  13. Facilitation of Hippocampal Kindling and Exacerbation of Kindled Seizures by Intra-CA1 Injection of Quinine: A Possible Role of Cx36 Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Etemadi, Fatemeh; Sayyah, Mohammad; Pourbadie, Hamid Gholami; Babapour, Vahab

    2016-01-01

    Background: GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 area are mutually communicated by gap junctions (GJs) composed of connexin36 (Cx36). We examined the role of Cx36 in CA1 in manifestation of kindled seizures and hippocampal kindling in rats. Methods: Quinine, as the specific blocker of Cx36, was injected into CA1, and kindled seizures severity was examined 10 min afterward. Moreover, quinine was injected into CA1 once daily, and the rate of CA1 kindling was recorded. Results: Quinine 0.5 and 1 mM caused 2- and 3.5-fold increase in the duration of total seizure behavior and generalized the seizures. Primary and secondary afterdischarges (AD) were also significantly increased. Quinine 0.1 mM augmented the rate of kindling and the growth of secondary AD. Conclusion: Cx36 GJs in CA1 are the main components of hippocampal inhibitory circuit. Any interruption in this path by pathologic or physical damages can trigger hippocampal hyperexcitability and facilitate epileptogenesis. xx PMID:27108691

  14. Enhanced seizures and hippocampal neurodegeneration following kainic acid-induced seizures in metallothionein-I + II-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, J; Penkowa, M; Hadberg, H; Molinero, A; Hidalgo, J

    2000-07-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are major zinc binding proteins in the CNS that could be involved in the control of zinc metabolism as well as in protection against oxidative stress. Mice lacking MT-I and MT-II (MT-I + II deficient) because of targeted gene inactivation were injected with kainic acid (KA), a potent convulsive agent, to examine the neurobiological importance of these MT isoforms. At 35 mg/kg KA, MT-I + II deficient male mice showed a higher number of convulsions and a longer convulsion time than control mice. Three days later, KA-injected mice showed gliosis and neuronal injury in the hippocampus. MT-I + II deficiency decreased both astrogliosis and microgliosis and potentiated neuronal injury and apoptosis as shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated in situ end labelling (TUNEL), detection of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and by increased interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme (ICE) and caspase-3 levels. Histochemically reactive zinc in the hippocampus was increased by KA to a greater extent in MT-I + II-deficient compared with control mice. KA-induced seizures also caused increased oxidative stress, as suggested by the malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein tyrosine nitration (NITT) levels and by the expression of MT-I + II, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD). MT-I + II deficiency potentiated the oxidative stress caused by KA. Both KA and MT-I + II deficiency significantly affected the expression of MT-III, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and its receptor (GM-CSFr). The present results indicate MT-I + II as important for neuron survival during KA-induced seizures, and suggest that both impaired zinc regulation and compromised antioxidant activity contribute to the observed neuropathology of the MT-I + II-deficient mice.

  15. Age-dependent long-term structural and functional effects of early life seizures: evidence for a hippocampal critical period influencing plasticity in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Meyerand, M.E.; Sutula, T.

    2015-01-01

    Neural activity promotes circuit formation in developing systems and during critical periods permanently modifies circuit organization and functional properties. These observations suggest that excessive neural activity, as occurs during seizures, might influence developing neural circuitry with long-term outcomes that depend on age at the time of seizures. We systematically examined long-term structural and functional consequences of seizures induced in rats by kainic acid, pentylenetetrazol, and hyperthermia across postnatal ages from birth through postnatal day 90 in adulthood (P90). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and electrophysiological methods at ≥P95 following seizures induced from P1 to P90 demonstrated consistent patterns of gross atrophy, microstructural abnormalities in the corpus callosum and hippocampus, and functional alterations in hippocampal circuitry at ≥P95 that were independent of the method of seizure induction and varied systematically as a function of age at the time of seizures. Three distinct epochs were observed in which seizures resulted in distinct long-term structural and functional outcomes at ≥P95. Seizures prior to P20 resulted in DTI abnormalities in corpus callosum and hippocampus in the absence of gross cerebral atrophy, and increased paired pulse inhibition (PPI) in the dentate gyrus at ≥P95. Seizures after P30 induced a different pattern of DTI abnormalities in the fimbria and hippocampus accompanied by gross cerebral atrophy with increases in lateral ventricular volume, as well as increased PPI in the dentate gyrus at ≥P95. In contrast, seizures between P20-P30 did not result in cerebral atrophy or significant imaging abnormalities in the hippocampus or white matter, but irreversibly decreased PPI in the dentate gyrus compared to normal adult controls. These age-specific long-term structural and functional outcomes identify P20-P30 as a potential critical period in hippocampal

  16. Adjunctive lacosamide for focal epilepsy: an open-label trial evaluating the impact of flexible titration and dosing on safety and seizure outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baulac, Michel; Coulbaut, Safia; Doty, Pamela; McShea, Cindy; De Backer, Marc; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Vlaicu, Mihaela

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of lacosamide in a real-life setting with the use of a flexible dose titration schedule and individualised maintenance doses up to the maximum approved dose of 400 mg/day. Adults with a diagnosis of focal seizures, with or without secondary generalization, were enrolled in this open-label Phase IV trial (NCT01235403). Lacosamide was initiated at 100 mg/day (50 mg bid) and uptitrated over a 12-week period to 200, 300 or 400 mg/day, based on safety and seizure control. Although dose increases were to be in increments of 100 mg/day, intermediate doses were permitted at each escalation step for one week for patients known to be particularly sensitive to starting new AEDs. After receiving a stable, effective dose for three weeks, patients entered the 12-week maintenance period. Primary outcomes were incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and withdrawal due to TEAEs. Seizure outcomes, all secondary, were median focal seizure frequency, ≥50% reduction in focal seizure frequency, and seizure freedom. One hundred patients with a mean age of 44 years were enrolled and 74 completed the trial. The incidence of TEAEs was 64.0% (n=100), with the most frequently reported (≥5% of patients) being dizziness, headache, and asthenia. Fourteen patients withdrew due to TEAEs, most frequently due to dizziness (six patients; 6.0%), vomiting (two patients; 2%), and tremor (two patients; 2%). Among patients with baseline and maintenance phase seizure data (n=75), median reduction in focal seizure frequency from baseline was 69.7% and the ≥50% responder rate was 69.3%. Among 74 patients who completed the maintenance phase, 21 (28.4%) were seizure-free. Flexible lacosamide dosing in this open-label trial was associated with a favourable tolerability and safety profile; the nature of the TEAEs was consistent with that observed in previous pivotal trials. Treatment with lacosamide was also associated with effective seizure

  17. Family history and frontal lobe seizures predict long-term remission in newly diagnosed cryptogenic focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Sara; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Beghi, Ettore; Tripepi, Giovanni; Labate, Angelo; Mumoli, Laura; Leonardi, Cinzia G; Cianci, Vittoria; Latella, Maria Adele; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2013-11-01

    Cryptogenic focal epilepsy (CFE) is a heterogeneous clinical disorder including patients with severe refractory forms and patients with a fairly good prognosis. Predictors of prognosis in CFE are poorly understood. The aim of this retrospective study is to identify long-term (5-year) prognostic predictors in patients with newly diagnosed CFE. Subjects with cryptogenic focal epilepsy (CFE) seen from April 1987 to September 2011 in two twin Epilepsy Centres located in Reggio Calabria and Catanzaro, Calabria, Southern Italy, were screened. Patients were excluded if they had psychogenic seizures, major psychiatric disorders presence of brain lesions except for non-specific white matter T2-hyperintensities, short follow-up (less than five years) or for having received the diagnosis of CFE elsewhere. One hundred and eighty-six patients, firstly diagnosed in our Centres, constituted the study sample. Survival curves were generated according to the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. The endpoint was the cumulative time-dependent chance of 5-year remission after treatment start. Independent predictors of remission were tested by multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards function models. The accuracy of the resulting model was tested with Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. The cumulative incidence of remission was 23%. At Kaplan-Meier analysis, the only factor predicting remission was family history of epilepsy or febrile seizures (FS; p=0.02). At Cox regression, family history and frontal lobe epilepsy showed to be independent predictors of outcome (p=0.02 and 0.03, respectively). The accuracy of these predictors was good (area under ROC curve 0.648, 95% CI 0.575-0.716). Interestingly, we also found a considerable (7 years) diagnostic delay that did not result in a worse prognosis. About one quarter of subjects with newly diagnosed CFE attains 5-year seizure remission during follow-up. Family history of epilepsy or FS

  18. Ictal Spread of Medial Temporal Lobe Seizures With and Without Secondary Generalization: An Intracranial EEG Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Yeoun; Farooque, Pue; Chen, William; Youngblood, Mark W.; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Gerrard, Jason L.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective Secondary generalization of seizures has devastating consequences for patient safety and quality of life. The aim of this intracranial EEG (icEEG) study was to investigate the differences in onset and propagation patterns of temporal lobe seizures that remained focal vs. those with secondary generalization in order to better understand the mechanism of secondary generalization. Methods A total of 39 seizures were analyzed in 9 patients who met the following criteria: 1) icEEG-video monitoring with at least 1 secondarily generalized tonic clonic seizure (GTC), 2) pathologically proven hippocampal sclerosis, and 3) no seizures for at least 1 year after anteromedial temporal lobe resection. Seizures were classified as focal or secondary generalized by behavioral analysis of video. Onset and propagation patterns were compared by analysis of icEEG. Results We obtained data from 22 focal seizures without generalization (FS), and 17 GTC. Seizure onset patterns did not differ between FS and GTCs, but there were differences in later propagation. All seizures started with low voltage fast activity except 7 seizures in one patient (6 FS, 1 GTC), which started with sharply contoured theta activity. 15 of 39 seizures started from the hippocampus and 24 seizures (including 6 seizures in a patient without hippocampal contacts) started from other medial temporal lobe areas. We observed involvement or more prominent activation of the posterior-lateral temporal regions in GTCs prior to propagation to the other cortical regions, vs. FS which had no involvement or less prominent activation of the posterior lateral temporal cortex. Occipital contacts were not involved at the time of clinical secondary generalization. Significance The posterior-lateral temporal cortex may serve as an important “gateway” controlling propagation of medial temporal lobe seizures to other cortical regions. Identifying the mechanisms of secondary generalization of focal seizures may

  19. Seizure Onset Zone Localization from Ictal High-Density EEG in Refractory Focal Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Staljanssens, Willeke; Strobbe, Gregor; Holen, Roel Van; Birot, Gwénaël; Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vulliémoz, Serge; van Mierlo, Pieter

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery is the most efficient treatment option for patients with refractory epilepsy. Before surgery, it is of utmost importance to accurately delineate the seizure onset zone (SOZ). Non-invasive EEG is the most used neuroimaging technique to diagnose epilepsy, but it is hard to localize the SOZ from EEG due to its low spatial resolution and because epilepsy is a network disease, with several brain regions becoming active during a seizure. In this work, we propose and validate an approach based on EEG source imaging (ESI) combined with functional connectivity analysis to overcome these problems. We considered both simulations and real data of patients. Ictal epochs of 204-channel EEG and subsets down to 32 channels were analyzed. ESI was done using realistic head models and LORETA was used as inverse technique. The connectivity pattern between the reconstructed sources was calculated, and the source with the highest number of outgoing connections was selected as SOZ. We compared this algorithm with a more straightforward approach, i.e. selecting the source with the highest power after ESI as the SOZ. We found that functional connectivity analysis estimated the SOZ consistently closer to the simulated EZ/RZ than localization based on maximal power. Performance, however, decreased when 128 electrodes or less were used, especially in the realistic data. The results show the added value of functional connectivity analysis for SOZ localization, when the EEG is obtained with a high-density setup. Next to this, the method can potentially be used as objective tool in clinical settings.

  20. Expanded Safety and Efficacy Data for a New Method of Performing Electroconvulsive Therapy: Focal Electrically Administered Seizure Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sahlem, Gregory L; Short, E Baron; Kerns, Suzanne; Snipes, Jon; DeVries, William; Fox, James B; Burns, Carol; Schmidt, Matthew; Nahas, Ziad H; George, Mark S; Sackeim, Harold A

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most rapid and effective antidepressant treatment but with concerns about cognitive adverse effects. A new form of ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), was designed to increase the focality of stimulation and better match stimulus parameters with neurophysiology. We recently reported on the safety and feasibility of FEAST in a cohort (n = 17) of depressed patients. We now report on the safety, feasibility, preliminary efficacy, and cognitive effects of FEAST in a new cohort. Open-label FEAST was administered to 20 depressed adults (6 men; 3 with bipolar disorder; age 49.1 ± 10.6 years). Clinical and cognitive assessments were obtained at baseline and end of course. Time to orientation recovery was assessed at each treatment. Nonresponders switched to conventional ECT. Participants tolerated the treatment well with no dropouts. Five patients (25%) transitioned from FEAST to conventional ECT due to inadequate response. After FEAST (mean, 9.3 ± 3.5 sessions; range, 4-14), there was a 58.1% ± 36.0% improvement in Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores compared with that in the baseline (P < 0.0001); 13 (65%) of 20 patients met response criteria, and 11 (55%) of 20 met remission criteria. Patients achieved reorientation (4 of 5 items) in 4.4 ± 3.0 minutes (median, 4.5 minutes), timed from eyes opening. There was no deterioration in neuropsychological measures. These findings provide further support for the safety and efficacy of FEAST. The remission and response rates were in the range found using conventional ECT, and the time to reorientation may be quicker. However, without a randomized comparison group, conclusions are tentative.

  1. Cytochrome c oxidase deficit is associated with the seizure onset zone in young patients with focal cortical dysplasia Type II.

    PubMed

    Miles, Lili; Greiner, Hansel M; Mangano, Francesco T; Horn, Paul S; Leach, James L; Miles, Michael V

    2015-10-01

    It has been postulated that mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important factor in epileptogenesis of intractable epilepsy. The current study tests the hypothesis that mitochondrial Complex IV (CIV) or cytochrome c oxidase dysfunction is associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Subjects were selected based on: age <19y; epilepsy surgery between May, 2010 and October, 2011; pathological diagnosis of isolated focal cortical dysplasia Type I (FCDI) or Type II (FCDII); and sufficient residual cortical tissue to conduct analysis of electron transport chain complex (ETC) activity in SOZ and adjacent cortical regions. In this retrospective study, patients were identified who had sufficient unfixed, frozen brain tissue for biochemical analysis in tissue homogenates. Specimens were subtyped using ILAE classification for FCD, and excluded if diagnosed with FCD Type III or dual pathology. Analysis of ETC activity in resected tissues was conducted independently and without knowledge of the identity, diagnosis, or clinical status of individual subjects. Seventeen patients met the inclusion criteria, including 6 FCDI and 11 FCDII. Comparison of adjacent cortical resections showed decreased CIV activity in the SOZ of the FCDII group (P = 0.003), but no significant CIV difference in adjacent tissues of the FCDI group. Because of the importance of CIV as the terminal and rate-limiting complex in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, these authors conclude that 1) a deficit of CIV is associated with the SOZ of patients with FCDII; 2) CIV deficiency may contribute to the spectrum of FCD neuropathology; and 3) further investigation of CIV in FCD may lead to the discovery of new targets for neuroprotective therapies for patients with intractable epilepsy.

  2. Multichannel continuous electroencephalography-functional near-infrared spectroscopy recording of focal seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges in human epilepsy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ke; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) has emerged as a promising neuroimaging technique as it allows noninvasive and long-term monitoring of cortical hemodynamics. Recent work by our group and others has revealed the potential of fNIRS, combined with electroencephalography (EEG), in the context of human epilepsy. Hemodynamic brain responses attributed to epileptic events, such as seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), are routinely observed with a good degree of statistical significance and in concordance with clinical presentation. Recording done with over 100 channels allows sufficiently large coverage of the epileptic focus and other areas. Three types of seizures have been documented: frontal lobe seizures, temporal lobe seizures, and posterior seizures. Increased oxygenation was observed in the epileptic focus in most cases, while rapid but similar hemodynamic variations were identified in the contralateral homologous region. While investigating IEDs, it was shown that their hemodynamic effect is observable with fNIRS, that their response is associated with significant (inhibitive) nonlinearities, and that the sensitivity and specificity of fNIRS to localize the epileptic focus can be estimated in a sample of 40 patients. This paper first reviews recent EEG-fNIRS developments in epilepsy research and then describes applications to the study of focal seizures and IEDs. PMID:26958576

  3. Left Hippocampal Pathology Is Associated with Atypical Language Lateralization in Patients with Focal Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Bernd; Wellmer, Jorg; Reuber, Markus; Mormann, Florian; Weis, Susanne; Urbach, Horst; Ruhlmann, Jurgen; Elger, Christian E.; Fernandez, Guillen

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that the incidence of atypical language lateralization is increased in patients with focal epilepsy. The hypothesis that shifts in language dominance are particularly likely when epileptic lesions are located in close vicinity to the so-called language-eloquent areas rather than in more remote brain regions such as the…

  4. Left Hippocampal Pathology Is Associated with Atypical Language Lateralization in Patients with Focal Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Bernd; Wellmer, Jorg; Reuber, Markus; Mormann, Florian; Weis, Susanne; Urbach, Horst; Ruhlmann, Jurgen; Elger, Christian E.; Fernandez, Guillen

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that the incidence of atypical language lateralization is increased in patients with focal epilepsy. The hypothesis that shifts in language dominance are particularly likely when epileptic lesions are located in close vicinity to the so-called language-eloquent areas rather than in more remote brain regions such as the…

  5. Conditional Disabled-1 Deletion in Mice Alters Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Reduces Seizure Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Matthew J.; Mandle, Quinton J.; Parent, Jack M.

    2016-01-01

    Many animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) exhibit altered neurogenesis arising from progenitors within the dentate gyrus subgranular zone (SGZ). Aberrant integration of new neurons into the existing circuit is thought to contribute to epileptogenesis. In particular, adult-born neurons that exhibit ectopic migration and hilar basal dendrites (HBDs) are suggested to be pro-epileptogenic. Loss of reelin signaling may contribute to these morphological changes in patients with epilepsy. We previously demonstrated that conditional deletion of the reelin adaptor protein, disabled-1 (Dab1), from postnatal mouse SGZ progenitors generated dentate granule cells (DGCs) with abnormal dendritic development and ectopic placement. To determine whether the early postnatal loss of reelin signaling is epileptogenic, we conditionally deleted Dab1 in neural progenitors and their progeny on postnatal days 7–8 and performed chronic video-EEG recordings 8–10 weeks later. Dab1-deficient mice did not have spontaneous seizures but exhibited interictal epileptiform abnormalities and a significantly reduced latency to pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. After chemoconvulsant treatment, over 90% of mice deficient for Dab1 developed generalized motor convulsions with tonic-clonic movements, rearing, and falling compared to <20% of wild-type mice. Recombination efficiency, measured by Cre reporter expression, inversely correlated with time to the first sustained seizure. These pro-epileptogenic changes were associated with decreased neurogenesis and increased numbers of hilar ectopic DGCs. Interestingly, neurons co-expressing the Cre reporter comprised a fraction of these hilar ectopic DGCs cells, suggesting a non-cell autonomous effect for the loss of reelin signaling. We also noted a dispersion of the CA1 pyramidal layer, likely due to hypomorphic effects of the conditional Dab1 allele, but this abnormality did not correlate with seizure susceptibility. These findings suggest

  6. Fluvoxamine alleviates seizure activity and downregulates hippocampal GAP-43 expression in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice: role of 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Alhaj, Momen W; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2015-06-01

    Epilepsy has been documented to lead to many changes in the nervous system including cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting. Neuronal loss and aberrant neuroplastic changes in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus have been identified in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. Antiseizure activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been reported in several studies. In the current study, the protective effect of fluvoxamine against PTZ-kindling was investigated in terms of seizure scores, neuronal loss, and regulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity. Further, the role of 5-HT3 receptors was determined. Kindling was induced by repeated injections of PTZ (35 mg/kg) thrice weekly, for a total of 13 injections. One hundred male albino mice were allocated into 10 groups: (1) saline, (2) PTZ, (3) diazepam (1 mg/kg)+PTZ, (4-6) fluvoxamine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (7) ondansetron+fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (8) ondansetron+PTZ group, (9) ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.)+saline, and (10) fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+saline. PTZ-kindled mice showed high seizure activity, hippocampal neuronal loss, and expression of growth-associated phosphoprotein (GAP-43) compared with saline-treated mice. Repeated administration of fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg) in PTZ-kindled mice suppressed seizure scores, protected against hippocampal neuronal loss, and downregulated GAP-43 expression, without producing any signs of the 5-HT syndrome in healthy rats. Importantly, pretreatment with a selective 5-HT3 receptor blocker (ondansetron) attenuated the aforementioned effects of fluvoxamine. In conclusion, the ameliorating effect of fluvoxamine on hippocampal neurons and neuroplasticity in PTZ-kindled mice was, at least in part, dependent on enhancement of hippocampal serotoninergic transmission at 5-HT3 receptors.

  7. Chronic oleoylethanolamide treatment improves spatial cognitive deficits through enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Chao; Guo, Han; Zhou, Hao; Suo, Da-Qin; Li, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Yun; Yang, Wu-Shuang; Jin, Xin

    2015-04-15

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) has been shown to have neuroprotective effects after acute cerebral ischemic injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic OEA treatment on ischemia-induced spatial cognitive impairments, electrophysiology behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis. Daily treatments of 30 mg/kg OEA significantly ameliorated spatial cognitive deficits and attenuated the inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model. Moreover, OEA administration improved cognitive function in a manner associated with enhanced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Further study demonstrated that treatment with OEA markedly increased the expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α (PPARα). Our data suggest that chronic OEA treatment can exert functional recovery of cognitive impairments and neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemic insult in rats via triggering of neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which supports the therapeutic use of OEA for cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ketogenic diet change cPLA2/clusterin and autophagy related gene expression and correlate with cognitive deficits and hippocampal MFs sprouting following neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong; Zhao, Dong-Jing; Tian, Tian

    2016-02-01

    Because the ketogenic diet (KD) was affecting expression of energy metabolism- related genes in hippocampus and because lipid membrane peroxidation and its associated autophagy stress were also found to be involved in energy depletion, we hypothesized that KD might exert its neuroprotective action via lipid membrane peroxidation and autophagic signaling. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining the long-term expression of lipid membrane peroxidation-related cPLA2 and clusterin, its downstream autophagy marker Beclin-1, LC3 and p62, as well as its execution molecule Cathepsin-E following neonatal seizures and chronic KD treatment. On postnatal day 9 (P9), 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: flurothyl-induced recurrent seizures group and control group. On P28, they were further randomly divided into the seizure group without ketogenic diet (RS+ND), seizure plus ketogenic diet (RS+KD), the control group without ketogenic diet (NS+ND), and the control plus ketogenic diet (NS+KD). Morris water maze test was performed during P37-P43. Then mossy fiber sprouting and the protein levels were detected by Timm staining and Western blot analysis, respectively. Flurothyl-induced RS+ND rats show a long-term lower amount of cPLA2 and LC3II/I, and higher amount of clusterin, Beclin-1, p62 and Cathepsin-E which are in parallel with hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting and cognitive deficits. Furthermore, chronic KD treatment (RS+KD) is effective in restoring these molecular, neuropathological and cognitive changes. The results imply that a lipid membrane peroxidation and autophagy-associated pathway is involved in the aberrant hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting and cognitive deficits following neonatal seizures, which might be a potential target of KD for the treatment of neonatal seizure-induced brain damage.

  9. Phase-Amplitude Coupling Is Elevated in Deep Sleep and in the Onset Zone of Focal Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mina; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between different EEG frequency bands have been widely investigated in normal and pathologic brain activity. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is one of the important forms of this interaction where the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations is modulated by the phase of lower frequency activity. Here, we studied the dynamic variations of PAC of high (gamma and ripple) and low (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) frequency bands in patients with focal epilepsy in different sleep stages during the interictal period, in an attempt to see if coupling is different in more or less epileptogenic regions. Sharp activities were excluded to avoid their effect on the PAC. The results revealed that the coupling intensity was generally the highest in stage N3 of sleep and the lowest in rapid eye movement sleep. We also compared the coupling strength in different regions [seizure onset zone (SOZ), exclusively irritative zone, and normal zone]. PAC between high and low frequency rhythms was found to be significantly stronger in the SOZ compared to normal regions. Also, the coupling was generally more elevated in spiking channels outside the SOZ than in normal regions. We also examined how the power in the delta band correlates to the PAC, and found a mild but statistically significant correlation between slower background activity in epileptic channels and the elevated coupling in these channels. The results suggest that an elevated PAC may reflect some fundamental abnormality, even after exclusion of sharp activities and even in the interictal period. PAC may therefore contribute to understanding the underlying dynamics of epileptogenic brain regions. PMID:27536227

  10. Bromocriptine reduces lipid peroxidation and enhances spatial learning and hippocampal neuron survival in a rodent model of focal brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Kline, Anthony E; Massucci, Jaime L; Ma, Xiecheng; Zafonte, Ross D; Dixon, C Edward

    2004-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a significant contributor to the secondary sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and may mediate subsequent neurobehavioral deficits and histopathology. The present study examined the neuroprotective effects of bromocriptine (BRO), a dopamine D2 receptor agonist with significant antioxidant properties, on cognition, histopathology, and lipid peroxidation in a rodent model of focal brain trauma. BRO (5 mg/kg) or a comparable volume of vehicle (VEH) was administered intraperitoneally 15 min prior to cortical impact or sham injury. In experiment 1, spatial learning was assessed in an established water maze task on post-surgery days 14-18, followed by quantification of hippocampal cell survival and cortical lesion volume at 4 weeks. In experiment 2, rats were sacrificed 1 hr post-surgery, and malondialdehyde (MDA), the end product of lipid peroxidation, was measured in the frontal cortex, striatum, and substantia nigra using a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay. The TBI+BRO group was significantly more adept at locating a hidden platform in the water maze compared to the TBI+VEH group and also exhibited a greater percentage of surviving CA3 hippocampal neurons. TBI increased MDA in all examined regions of the VEH-treated, but not BRO-treated group versus SHAMs. MDA was significantly decreased in both the striatum (4.22 +/- 0.52 versus 5.60 +/- 0.44 nmol per mg/tissue +/- SEM) and substantia nigra (4.18 +/- 0.35 versus 7.76 +/- 2.05) of the TBI+BRO versus TBI+VEH groups, respectively, while only a trend toward decreased MDA was observed in the frontal cortex (5.44 +/- 0.44 versus 6.96 +/- 0.77). These findings suggest that TBI-induced oxidative stress is attenuated by acute BRO treatment, which may, in part, explain the benefit in cognitive and histological outcome.

  11. Neonatal seizures alter NMDA glutamate receptor GluN2A and 3A subunit expression and function in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengwen; Sun, Hongyu; Klein, Peter M.; Jensen, Frances E.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are commonly caused by hypoxic and/or ischemic injury during birth and can lead to long-term epilepsy and cognitive deficits. In a rodent hypoxic seizure (HS) model, we have previously demonstrated a critical role for seizure-induced enhancement of the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptor (GluA) in epileptogenesis and cognitive consequences, in part due to GluA maturational upregulation of expression. Similarly, as the expression and function of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor (GluN) is also developmentally controlled, we examined how early life seizures during the critical period of synaptogenesis could modify GluN development and function. In a postnatal day (P)10 rat model of neonatal seizures, we found that seizures could alter GluN2/3 subunit composition of GluNs and physiological function of synaptic GluNs. In hippocampal slices removed from rats within 48–96 h following seizures, the amplitudes of synaptic GluN-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were elevated in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Moreover, GluN eEPSCs showed a decreased sensitivity to GluN2B selective antagonists and decreased Mg2+ sensitivity at negative holding potentials, indicating a higher proportion of GluN2A and GluN3A subunit function, respectively. These physiological findings were accompanied by a concurrent increase in GluN2A phosphorylation and GluN3A protein. These results suggest that altered GluN function and expression could potentially contribute to future epileptogenesis following neonatal seizures, and may represent potential therapeutic targets for the blockade of future epileptogenesis in the developing brain. PMID:26441533

  12. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cannabidiol Post-Treatment Alleviates Rat Epileptic-Related Behaviors and Activates Hippocampal Cell Autophagy Pathway Along with Antioxidant Defense in Chronic Phase of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizure.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Naderi, Nima; Maghsoudi, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal and sometimes severe behavioral and molecular symptoms are usually observed in epileptic humans and animals. To address this issue, we examined the behavioral and molecular aspects of seizure evoked by pilocarpine. Autophagy can promote both cell survival and death, but there are controversial reports about the neuroprotective or neurodegenerative effects of autophagy in seizure. Cannabidiol has anticonvulsant properties in some animal models when used as a pretreatment. In this study, we investigated alteration of seizure scores, autophagy pathway proteins, and antioxidant status in hippocampal cells during the chronic phase of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy after treatment with cannabidiol. Cannabidiol (100 ng, intracerebroventricular injection) delayed the chronic phase of epilepsy. Single administration of cannabidiol during the chronic phase of seizure significantly diminished seizure scores such as mouth clonus, head nodding, monolateral and bilateral forelimb clonus and increased the activity of catalase enzyme and reduced glutathione content. Such a protective effect in the behavioral scores of epileptic rats was also observed after repeated administrations of cannabidiol at the onset of the silent phase. Moreover, the amount of Atg7, conjugation of Atg5/12, Atg12, and LC3II/LC3I ratio increased significantly in epileptic rats treated with repeated injections of cannabidiol. In short, our results suggest that post-treatment of Cannabidiol could enhance the induction of autophagy pathway and antioxidant defense in the chronic phase of epilepsy, which could be considered as the protective mechanisms of cannabidiol in a temporal lobe epilepsy model.

  14. The use of routine EEG in acute ischemic stroke patients without seizures: generalized but not focal EEG pathology is associated with clinical deterioration.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Ebert, Anne D; Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios

    2017-05-01

    Specialized electroencephalography (EEG) methods have been used to provide clues about stroke features and prognosis. However, the value of routine EEG in stroke patients without (suspected) seizures has been somewhat neglected. We aimed to assess this in a group of acute ischemic stroke patients in regard to short-term prognosis and basic stroke features. We assessed routine (10-20) EEG findings in 69 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients without seizures. Associations between EEG abnormalities and NIHSS scores, clinical improvement or deterioration as well as MRI stroke characteristics were evaluated. Mean age was 69 ± 18 years, 43 of the patients (62.3%) were men. Abnormal EEG was found in 40 patients (58%) and was associated with higher age (p = 0.021). The most common EEG pathology was focal slowing (30; 43.5%). No epileptiform potentials were found. Abnormal EEG in general and generalized or focal slowing in particular was significantly associated with higher NIHSS score on admission and discharge as well as with hemorrhagic transformation of the ischemic lesion. Abnormal EEG and generalized (but not focal) slowing were associated with clinical deterioration ( p = 0.036, p = 0.003). Patients with lacunar strokes had no EEG abnormalities. Abnormal EEG in general and generalized slowing in particular are associated with clinical deterioration after acute ischemic stroke. The study demonstrates the value of routine EEG as a simple diagnostic tool in the evaluation of stroke patients especially with regard to short-term prognosis.

  15. The effects of group III mGluR ligands on pentylenetetrazol-induced kindling of seizures and hippocampal amino acids concentration.

    PubMed

    Maciejak, Piotr; Szyndler, Janusz; Turzyńska, Danuta; Sobolewska, Alicja; Taracha, Ewa; Skórzewska, Anna; Lehner, Małgorzata; Bidziński, Andrzej; Hamed, Adam; Wisłowska-Stanek, Aleksandra; Płaźnik, Adam

    2009-07-28

    Considering the contribution of hippocampal formation and glutamate-mediated signalling to epileptogenesis, we investigated the effects of group III metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-selective ligands on the kindling of seizures. We also examined the concentration of the amino acid glutamate, GABA, alanine and taurine in the hippocampus of rats using a microdialysis technique. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a non-competitive antagonist of the GABA(A) receptor, was administered intraperitoneally at 35 mg/kg body weight to induce seizures. It was determined that the kindling of PTZ-induced seizures could be attenuated by post intracerebroventricular administration of 100 nmol of the group III mGluR antagonist CPPG [(RS)-a-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine]. There were significant differences in tested parameters during the final stages of the kindling procedure. The group III mGluR agonist L-AP4 [L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid at 100 nmol, i.c.v.] did not significantly affect the kindling of seizures in comparison to control rats, although there was acceleration of the process as compared to CPPG treated animals. We demonstrated that the baseline concentrations of glutamate, GABA, alanine, taurine, and the glutamine/GABA ratio were elevated in the hippocampus of fully kindled rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of a single dose of CPPG increased the concentrations of glutamate in the hippocampus of control, non-kindled rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of L-AP4 did not affect the hippocampal amino acid concentration in either animal group. Overall, these data suggest that there is a shift in the balance between neurotransmitters towards increased production of excitatory amino acids, and this may be mediated by group III mGluRs during seizure kindling.

  16. Low doses of ethanol markedly potentiate the anti-seizure effect of diazepam in a mouse model of difficult-to-treat focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sabine; Bankstahl, Marion; Gramer, Martina; Hausknecht, Maria; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol is commonly used as a solvent in injectable formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs. The concentrations of ethanol in such formulations are generally considered reasonably safe. It is long known that ethanol can potentiate central effects of sedatives and tranquillizers, particularly the benzodiazepines, most likely as a result of a synergistic interaction at the GABAA receptor. However, whether this occurs at the low systemic doses of ethanol resulting from its use as solvent in parenteral formulations of benzodiazepines is not known. In the present study we evaluated whether a commercial ethanol-containing aqueous solution of diazepam exerts more potent anti-seizure effects than an aqueous solution of diazepam hydrochloride or an aqueous emulsion of this drug in the intrahippocampal kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy in mice. Spontaneous epileptic seizures in this model are known to be resistant to major antiepileptic drugs. Administration of the ethanol-containing formulation of diazepam caused an almost complete suppression of seizures. This was not seen when the same dose (5 mg/kg) of diazepam was administered as aqueous solution or emulsion, although all three diazepam formulations resulted in similar drug and metabolite concentrations in plasma. Our data demonstrate that ethanol-containing solutions of diazepam are superior to block difficult-to-treat seizures to other formulations of diazepam. To our knowledge, this has not been demonstrated before and, if this finding can be translated to humans, may have important consequences for emergency treatment of acute seizures, series of seizures, and initial treatment of status epilepticus in patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic fate mapping of type-1 stem cell-dependent increase in newborn hippocampal neurons after electroconvulsive seizures.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tillmann; Baier, Vera; Lentz, Katharina; Herrmann, Elke; Krumm, Bertram; Sartorius, Alexander; Kronenberg, Golo; Bartsch, Dusan

    2013-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a uniquely effective treatment for major depressive disorder. An increase in hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in the recovery from depression. We used an inducible genetic mouse model in which only GFAP-expressing stem-like cells (type-1 cells) and their progeny are selectively labeled with the reporter protein β-galactosidase to track the process of neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus over 3 months following electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), the mouse equivalent of ECT. All ECS protocols tested induced a transient increase in type-1 cell divisions. While this led to an expansion of the type-1 cell pool after high-frequency ECS sessions for 5 consecutive days (5-ECS), asymmetric divisions drove neurogenesis by giving rise to Doublecortin (DCX)-expressing neuroblasts that matured into NeuN+ neurons. Significantly, the increase in newly generated DCX+ and NeuN+ cells after 5-ECS could be traced back to proliferating type-1 cells. Low-frequency continuation ECS (c-ECS) consisting of five single ECS sessions administered every 2 weeks resulted in a similar increase in newborn neurons as the high-frequency 5-ECS protocol. Moreover, the combination of 5-ECS and c-ECS led to a further significant increase in newborn neurons, suggesting a cellular mechanism responsible for the propitious effects of high-frequency ECT followed by continuation ECT in severely depressed patients. The ability of high- and low-frequency ECS to induce normally quiescent type-1 cells to proliferate and generate new neurons sets it apart from other antidepressant treatments and may underlie the superior clinical efficacy of ECT.

  18. Age of onset of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis: the effect of apolipoprotein E and febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Leal, Bárbara; Chaves, João; Carvalho, Cláudia; Bettencourt, Andreia; Freitas, Joel; Lopes, João; Ramalheira, João; Costa, Paulo P; Mendonça, Denisa; Silva, António M; Silva, Berta M

    2017-09-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) is the most frequent pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. It has been associated with febrile seizures (FS) in childhood. Its aetiology remains unclear but genetic factors are involved. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is the main lipoprotein secreted in brain. It has a critical immunomodulatory function, influences neurotransmission and it is involved in repairing damaged neurons. ApoE ϵ4 is an isoform of ApoE with altered protein function, previously associated with refractoriness and early onset epilepsy. This study was undertaken to determine if ApoE isoforms are risk factors for MTLE-HS and influence clinical characteristics. A group of 188 MTLE-HS patients (101 F, 87 M, mean age = 44.7 ± 11.6 years, 100 with FS antecedents) was studied and compared with a group of 342 healthy individuals in a case-control genetic association study. Data were analysed with Pearson Chi-squared Test or Student's t test, as appropriated. No differences in ApoE ϵ4 allelic frequencies between MTLE-HS patients and controls or between MTLE-HS subgroups were observed. Nevertheless, ApoE ϵ4 carriers had an earlier MTLE-HS onset (11.0 ± 7.9 years in ApoE ϵ4 carriers vs. 14.4 ± 11.2 years in ApoE ϵ4 non-carriers p < 0.05). Additionally, we observed that MTLE-HS patients with FS antecedents had a statistically significant early disease onset (11.5 ± 8.7 years in FS(+) vs. 16.0 ± 12.1 years in FS(-), p < 0.01). Our data show that ApoE ϵ4 and FS may not participate directly in etiopathogenic mechanisms of MTLE-HS but could hasten the disease development in predisposed individuals.

  19. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enhance the protective effect of levetiracetam against seizures, cognitive impairment and hippocampal oxidative DNA damage in young kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Basel A; Shaikh, Ibrahim A; Khateeb, Masood M; Habeeb, Shafiuddin M

    2015-08-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is a unique, effective, relatively safe antiepileptic drug that preferentially interacts with synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A). This study aimed to explore the effect of combined treatment of LEV with omega 3 (OM3) on cognitive impairment and hippocampal oxidative stress and DNA damage induced by seizures in the PTZ-kindled young rat model. Cognitive functions, biomarkers of oxidative stress, and DNA damage were assessed in PTZ-kindled young rats pretreated with single and combined treatment of LEV (30mg/kg, i.p.) and OM3 (200mg/kg, p.o.). Pretreatment with LEV and OM3 at the tested doses significantly attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and decreased cognitive impairment in both passive avoidance and elevated plus maze tests in the PTZ-kindled rats. Moreover, the increase in hippocampal glutamate, malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, as well as the decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and GSH-peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities induced by PTZ kindling, significantly decreased. These effects were higher with combined treatment of LEV with OM3 and significantly more than the observed effects of single LEV or OM3. In conclusion, the combined treatment of LEV with OM3 is more effective in seizure control and alleviating the cognitive impairment induced by PTZ kindling in the young rat model, the effects that result from the decrease in hippocampal oxidative stress and DNA damage which can be attributed to the antioxidant properties of both LEV and OM3. These results may be promising for the use of LEV and OM3 combination in the treatment of epileptic children.

  20. Deletion of the BH3-only protein Noxa alters electrographic seizures but does not protect against hippocampal damage after status epilepticus in mice.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Naoki; Alves, Mariana; Pfeiffer, Shona; Langa, Elena; Hernández-Santana, Yasmina E; Suzuki, Hidenori; Prehn, Jochen Hm; Engel, Tobias; Henshall, David C

    2017-01-12

    Several members of the Bcl-2 gene family are dysregulated in human temporal lobe epilepsy and animal studies show that genetic deletion of some of these proteins influence electrographic seizure responses to chemoconvulsants and associated brain damage. The BH3-only proteins form a subgroup comprising direct activators of Bax-Bak that are potently proapoptotic and a number of weaker proapoptotic BH3-only proteins that act as sensitizers by neutralization of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Noxa was originally characterized as a weaker proapoptotic, 'sensitizer' BH3-only protein, although recent evidence suggests it too may be potently proapoptotic. Expression of Noxa is under p53 control, a known seizure-activated pathway, although Noxa has been linked to energetic stress and autophagy. Here we characterized the response of Noxa to prolonged seizures and the phenotype of mice lacking Noxa. Status epilepticus induced by intra-amygdala kainic acid caused a rapid increase in expression of noxa in the damaged CA3 subfield of the hippocampus but not undamaged CA1 region. In vivo upregulation of noxa was reduced by pifithrin-α, suggesting transcription may be partly p53-dependent. Mice lacking noxa developed less severe electrographic seizures during status epilepticus in the model but, surprisingly, displayed equivalent hippocampal damage to wild-type animals. The present findings indicate Noxa does not serve as a proapoptotic BH3-only protein during seizure-induced neuronal death in vivo. This study extends the comprehensive phenotyping of seizure and damage responses in mice lacking specific Bcl-2 gene family members and provides further evidence that these proteins may serve roles beyond control of cell death in the brain.

  1. Controlling stimulation strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy via current amplitude and electrode size and spacing: comparison with magnetic seizure therapy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between the stimulus parameters of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and the electric field characteristics could guide studies on improving risk/benefit ratio. We aimed to determine the effect of current amplitude and electrode size and spacing on the ECT electric field characteristics, compare ECT focality with magnetic seizure therapy (MST), and evaluate stimulus individualization by current amplitude adjustment. Electroconvulsive therapy and double-cone-coil MST electric field was simulated in a 5-shell spherical human head model. A range of ECT electrode diameters (2-5 cm), spacing (1-25 cm), and current amplitudes (0-900 mA) was explored. The head model parameters were varied to examine the stimulus current adjustment required to compensate for interindividual anatomical differences. By reducing the electrode size, spacing, and current, the ECT electric field can be more focal and superficial without increasing scalp current density. By appropriately adjusting the electrode configuration and current, the ECT electric field characteristics can be made to approximate those of MST within 15%. Most electric field characteristics in ECT are more sensitive to head anatomy variation than in MST, especially for close electrode spacing. Nevertheless, ECT current amplitude adjustment of less than 70% can compensate for interindividual anatomical variability. The strength and focality of ECT can be varied over a wide range by adjusting the electrode size, spacing, and current. If desirable, ECT can be made as focal as MST while using simpler stimulation equipment. Current amplitude individualization can compensate for interindividual anatomical variability.

  2. SIRT5 Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Kainate-Induced Seizures and Exacerbates Hippocampal Neurodegeneration not through Mitochondrial Antioxidant Enzyme SOD2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengling; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common and serious neurological disorder characterized by occurrence of recurrent spontaneous seizures, and emerging evidences support the association of mitochondrial dysfunction with epilepsy. Sirtuin 5 (SIRT5), localized in mitochondrial matrix, has been considered as an important functional modulator of mitochondria that contributes to ageing and neurological diseases. Our data shows that SIRT5 deficiency strikingly increased mortality rate and severity of response to epileptic seizures, dramatically exacerbated hippocampal neuronal loss and degeneration in mice exposed to Kainate (KA), and triggered more severe reactive astrogliosis. We found that the expression of mitochondrial SIRT5 of injured hippocampus was relatively up-regulated, indicating its potential contribution to the comparably increased survival of these cells and its possible neuroprotective role. Unexpectedly, SIRT5 seems not to apparently alter the decline of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in hippocampus caused by KA exposure in our paradigm, which indicates the protective role of SIRT5 on seizures and cellular degeneration might through different regulatory mechanism that would be explored in the future. In the present study, we provided strong evidences for the first time to demonstrate the association between SIRT5 and epilepsy, which offers a new understanding of the roles of SIRT5 in mitochondrial functional regulation. The neuroprotection of SIRT5 in KA-induced epileptic seizure and neurodegeneration will improve our current knowledge of the nature of SIRT5 in central nervous system (CNS) and neurological diseases. PMID:27445698

  3. Progressive Seizure Aggravation in the Repeated 6-Hz Corneal Stimulation Model Is Accompanied by Marked Increase in Hippocampal p-ERK1/2 Immunoreactivity in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Costa, Anna M.; Lucchi, Chiara; Leo, Giuseppina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Torsello, Antonio; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    the third session. The vast majority of p-ERK1/2 immunopositive cells were co-labeled with FosB/ΔFosB antibodies, suggesting the existence of a relationship between the investigated markers in a subpopulation of neurons activated by seizures. These findings suggest that p-ERK1/2 are useful markers to define the aggravation of seizures and the response to anticonvulsant treatments. In particular, p-ERK1/2 expression clearly identified the involvement of hippocampal regions during seizure aggravation in the 6-Hz model. PMID:28018175

  4. Diazepam treatment blocks the elevation of hippocampal activity and the accelerated proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Nochi, Rokuya; Kaneko, Jun; Okada, Natsumi; Terazono, Yasushi; Matani, Ayumu; Hisatsune, Tatsuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is accelerated during the elevation of hippocampal neural activities under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. One of these conditions, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), induces both the hyperactivities of hippocampal network and the elevation of neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation. However, the causal relationship between the elevated activity and the elevation of NSC proliferation is still unclear. In this study, to block the elevation of hippocampal activity after MCAO in mice, we utilized a typical γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA ) receptor active modulator, diazepam. With MCAO mice treated with diazepam, we observed complete disappearance of the elevation of hippocampal activity. Additionally, the diazepam treatment blocked the elevation of NSC proliferation after MCAO. From this result, it is speculated that the increased NSC proliferation is blocked by the suppression of elevated neural activity. However, diazepam might have effects other than the suppression of hippocampal activity, so we performed additional experiment and found that diazepam did not affect the number of bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells under the normal condition, whereas the GABA agonist pentobarbital stimulated NSC/neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Next, we evaluated the expression of the diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI) protein and found that the cells expressed DBI in soma and on the surface of cell membrane. From these observations, we can propose that diazepam blocks the elevation of hippocampal activity and also NSC proliferation after MCAO. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Changes in Hippocampal Volume are Correlated with Cell Loss but Not with Seizure Frequency in Two Chronic Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Polli, Roberson S; Malheiros, Jackeline M; Dos Santos, Renan; Hamani, Clement; Longo, Beatriz M; Tannús, Alberto; Mello, Luiz E; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) or pilocarpine (PILO) have been used in rats to model human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) but the distribution and severity of structural lesions between these two models may differ. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have used quantitative measurements of hippocampal T2 (T2HP) relaxation time and volume, but simultaneous comparative results have not been reported yet. The aim of this study was to compare the MRI T2HP and volume with histological data and frequency of seizures in both models. KA- and PILO-treated rats were imaged with a 2 T MRI scanner. T2HP and volume values were correlated with the number of cells, mossy fiber sprouting, and spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) frequency over the 9 months following status epilepticus (SE). Compared to controls, KA-treated rats had unaltered T2HP, pronounced reduction in hippocampal volume and concomitant cell reduction in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3 at 3 months post SE. In contrast, hippocampal volume was unchanged in PILO-treated animals despite detectable increased T2HP and cell loss in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3. In the following 6 months, MRI hippocampal volume remained stable with increase of T2HP signal in the KA-treated group. The number of CA1 and CA3 cells was smaller than age-matched CTL group. In contrast, PILO group had MRI volumetric reduction accompanied by reduction in the number of CA1 and CA3 cells. In this group, T2HP signal was unaltered at 6 or 9 months after status. Reductions in the number of cells were not progressive in both models. Notably, the SRS frequency was higher in PILO than in the KA model. The volumetry data correlated well with tissue damage in the epileptic brain, suggesting that MRI may be useful for tracking longitudinal hippocampal changes, allowing the assessment of individual variability and disease progression. Our results indicate that the temporal changes in hippocampal morphology are distinct for both models of TLE and that

  6. Changes in Hippocampal Volume are Correlated with Cell Loss but Not with Seizure Frequency in Two Chronic Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Polli, Roberson S.; Malheiros, Jackeline M.; dos Santos, Renan; Hamani, Clement; Longo, Beatriz M.; Tannús, Alberto; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) or pilocarpine (PILO) have been used in rats to model human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) but the distribution and severity of structural lesions between these two models may differ. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have used quantitative measurements of hippocampal T2 (T2HP) relaxation time and volume, but simultaneous comparative results have not been reported yet. The aim of this study was to compare the MRI T2HP and volume with histological data and frequency of seizures in both models. KA- and PILO-treated rats were imaged with a 2 T MRI scanner. T2HP and volume values were correlated with the number of cells, mossy fiber sprouting, and spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) frequency over the 9 months following status epilepticus (SE). Compared to controls, KA-treated rats had unaltered T2HP, pronounced reduction in hippocampal volume and concomitant cell reduction in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3 at 3 months post SE. In contrast, hippocampal volume was unchanged in PILO-treated animals despite detectable increased T2HP and cell loss in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3. In the following 6 months, MRI hippocampal volume remained stable with increase of T2HP signal in the KA-treated group. The number of CA1 and CA3 cells was smaller than age-matched CTL group. In contrast, PILO group had MRI volumetric reduction accompanied by reduction in the number of CA1 and CA3 cells. In this group, T2HP signal was unaltered at 6 or 9 months after status. Reductions in the number of cells were not progressive in both models. Notably, the SRS frequency was higher in PILO than in the KA model. The volumetry data correlated well with tissue damage in the epileptic brain, suggesting that MRI may be useful for tracking longitudinal hippocampal changes, allowing the assessment of individual variability and disease progression. Our results indicate that the temporal changes in hippocampal morphology are distinct for both models of TLE and that

  7. Elevated expression of pleiotrophin in pilocarpine-induced seizures of immature rats and in pentylenetetrazole-induced hippocampal astrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuqin; Liang, Feng; Wang, Bing; Le, Yuan; Wang, Hua

    2014-03-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated cytokine that has emerged as an important neuromodulator with multiple neuronal functions. In the present study, we detected and compared the dynamic expression of PTN in the hippocampus and adjacent cortex of immature rats with pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Moreover, we also confirmed the results by examining PTN expression in hippocampal astrocytes cultured in the presence of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Immunohistochemistry showed faint immunostaining of PTN in the control hippocampus and adjacent cortex. Notably, PTN immunoreactivity began to increase in relatively small cells in the hippocampus and adjacent cortex at 2h and 3 weeks after seizures, and the labeling intensity reached the maximum level in the hippocampus and adjacent cortex at 8 weeks after seizures. Furthermore, we also found that PTZ treatment significantly reduced astrocytic viability in a dose-dependent manner and time-dependently increased expression levels of PTN in hippocampal astrocytes. In conclusion, our data suggest that increased expression of PTN in the brain tissues may be involved in epileptogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. [PI 3 K/Akt signaling pathway contributed to the protective effect of acupuncture intervention on epileptic seizure-induced injury of hippocampal pyramidal cells in epilepsy rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Ang, Wen-Ping; Shen, De-Kai; Liu, Xiang-Guo; Yang, Yong-Qing; Ma, Yun

    2013-02-01

    To observe the protective effect of acupuncture stimulation on pyramidal cells in hippocampal CA 1 and CA 3 regions and to analyze the involvement of phosphatidy linositol-3-kinase (PI 3 K)/protein kinase B(PKB or Akt) signaling pathway in the acupuncture effect in epilepsy rats. A total of 120 SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group, model group, LY 294002 (a specific antagonist for PI 3 K/Akt signaling) group, acupuncture+ LY 294002 group and acupuncture group (n = 24 in each group, 12 for H. E. staining, and 12 for electron microscope observation). Epilepsy model was established by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 5 microL). Manual acupuncture stimulation was applied to "Baihui" (GV 20) and "Dazhui" (GV 14) once daily for 5 days. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO, 5 microL, a control solvent) was given to rats of the normal, model and acupuncture groups, and LY294002 (5 microL, dissolved in DMSO) given to rats of the LY 294002 and acupuncture+ LY 294002 groups by lateral ventricular injection. Four hours and 24 h after modeling, the hippocampus tissues were sampled for observing pathological changes of CA 1 and CA 3 regions after H. E. staining under light microscope and for checkin ultrastructural changes of the pyramidal cells under transmission electron microscope. In comparison with the normal control group, the numbers of pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 3 region in the model group were decreased significantly 4 h and 24 h after epileptic seizure (P < 0.01). While compared to the model group, the pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 3 region in the acupuncture group were increased considerably in the number at both 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P < 0.01). No significant differences were found between the LY 294002 and model groups, and between the acupuncture+ LY 294002 and model groups in the numbers of pyramidal cells at 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P > 0.05). Findings of the light microscope and electron microscope showed that the

  9. Dreaming of seizures.

    PubMed

    Vercueil, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Could some dreams and temporal lobe seizures share an intrinsic neuronal network? At the interplay of emotion, memory, dream, and temporal lobe seizure, we report on a patient with a left dysplastic amygdala and temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with a typical seizure while dreaming. Neuronal networks subserving affective states are suggested to be involved in emotional dream, memory recall, and amygdalo-hippocampal seizures.

  10. The GABAergic projection of the dentate gyrus to hippocampal area CA3 of the rat: pre- and postsynaptic actions after seizures

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    The glutamatergic granule cells of the dentate gyrus transiently express GABAergic markers after seizures. Here we show that when this occurs, their activation produces (i) GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic field responses in CA3, with the physiological and pharmacological characteristics of mossy fibre transmission, and (ii) GABAA receptor-mediated collateral inhibition. Control hippocampal slices present, on stimulation of the dentate gyrus, population responses in stratum lucidum, which are blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. By contrast, in slices from rats subjected to seizures in vivo, dentate activation additionally produces GABAA receptor-mediated field synaptic responses in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists. One-dimensional current source density analysis confirmed the spatial coincidence of the glutamatergic and GABAergic dendritic currents. The GABAA receptor-mediated field responses show frequency-dependent facilitation and strong inhibition during activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. In the presence of glutamate receptor blockers, a conditioning pulse delivered to one site of the dentate gyrus inhibits the population synaptic response and the afferent volley provoked by the activation of a second site, in a bicuculline-sensitive manner. In accordance with this, antidromic responses evoked by mossy fibre activation were enhanced by perfusion of bicuculline. Our results suggest that, for GABA receptor-dependent field potentials to be detected, a considerable number of boutons of a well-defined GABAergic pathway should simultaneously release GABA to act on a large number of receptors. Therefore, putative GABA release from the mossy fibres acts on pre- and postsynaptic sites to affect hippocampal activity at the network level after seizures. PMID:16002442

  11. The long-term effects of neonatal morphine administration on the pentylenetetrazol seizure model in rats: the role of hippocampal cholinergic receptors in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Saboory, Ehsan; Gholami, Morteza; Zare, Samad; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2014-04-01

    Early life exposure to opiates may affect neuropathological conditions, such as epilepsy, during adulthood. We investigated whether neonatal morphine exposure affects pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in adulthood. Male rats were subcutaneously injected with morphine or saline on postnatal days 8-14. During adulthood, each rat was assigned to 1 of the following 10 sub-groups: saline, nicotine (0.1, 0.5, or 1 μg), atropine (0.25 or 1 μg), oxotremorine M (0.1 or 1 μg), or mecamylamine (2 or 8 μg). An intrahippocampal infusion of the indicated compound was administered 30 min before seizure induction (80 mg/kg PTZ). Compared with the saline/oxotremorine (1 μg), saline/saline, and morphine/saline groups, the morphine/oxotremorine (1 μg) group showed a significantly increased latency to the first epileptic behavior. The duration of tonic-clonic seizures was significantly lower in the morphine/oxotremorine (1 μg) group compared to the saline/saline and morphine/saline groups. The severity of seizure was significantly decreased in the morphine/atropine (1 μg) group than in the saline/atropine (1 μg). Seizure severity was also decreased in the morphine/mecamylamine (2 μg) group than in the saline/mecamylamine (2 μg) group. Latency for death was significantly lower in the morphine/mecamylamine (2 μg) group compared with the saline/mecamylamine (2 μg) group. Mortality rates in the morphine/atropine (1 μg) and morphine/mecamylamine (2 μg) groups were significantly lower than those in the saline/atropine (1 μg) and saline/mecamylamine (2 μg) groups, respectively. Chronic neonatal morphine administration attenuated PTZ-induced seizures, reduced the mortality rate, and decreased the impact of the hippocampal cholinergic system on seizures and mortality rate in adult rats. Neonatal morphine exposure induces changes to μ-receptors that may lead to activation of GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus. This pathway may explain the anti-convulsant effects of

  12. Controlling stimulation strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy via current amplitude and electrode size and spacing: comparison with magnetic seizure therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Understanding the relationship between the stimulus parameters of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and the electric field characteristics could guide studies on improving risk/benefit ratio. We aim to determine the effect of current amplitude and electrode size and spacing on the ECT electric field characteristics, compare ECT focality with magnetic seizure therapy (MST), and evaluate stimulus individualization by current amplitude adjustment. Methods ECT and double-cone-coil MST electric field was simulated in a 5-shell spherical human head model. A range of ECT electrode diameters (2–5 cm), spacing (1–25 cm), and current amplitudes (0–900 mA) were explored. The head model parameters were varied to examine the stimulus current adjustment required to compensate for interindividual anatomical differences. Results By reducing the electrode size, spacing, and current, the ECT electric field can be more focal and superficial without increasing scalp current density. By appropriately adjusting the electrode configuration and current, the ECT electric field characteristics can be made to approximate those of MST within 15%. Most electric field characteristics in ECT are more sensitive to head anatomy variation than in MST, especially for close electrode spacing. Nevertheless, ECT current amplitude adjustment of less than 70% can compensate for interindividual anatomical variability. Conclusions The strength and focality of ECT can be varied over a wide range by adjusting the electrode size, spacing, and current. If desirable, ECT can be made as focal as MST while using simpler stimulation equipment. Current amplitude individualization can compensate for interindividual anatomical variability. PMID:24263276

  13. Alterations of hippocampal GAbaergic system contribute to development of spontaneous recurrent seizures in the rat lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    André, V; Marescaux, C; Nehlig, A; Fritschy, J M

    2001-01-01

    Reorganization of excitatory and inhibitory circuits in the hippocampal formation following seizure-induced neuronal loss has been proposed to underlie the development of chronic seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here, we investigated whether specific morphological alterations of the GABAergic system can be related to the onset of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) in the rat lithium-pilocarpine model of TLE. Immunohistochemical staining for markers of interneurons and their projections, including parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR), calbindin (CB), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and type 1 GABA transporter (GAT1), was performed in brain sections of rats treated with lithium-pilocarpine and sacrificed after 24 h, during the silent phase (6 and 12 days), or after the onset of SRS (10-18 days after treatment). Semiquantitative analysis revealed a selective loss of interneurons in the stratum oriens of CA1, associated with a reduction of GAT1 staining in the stratum radiatum and stratum oriens. In contrast, interneurons in CA3 were largely preserved, although GAT1 staining was also reduced. These changes occurred within 6 days after treatment and were therefore insufficient to cause SRS. In the dentate gyrus, extensive cell loss occurred in the hilus. The pericellular innervation of granule cells by PV-positive axons was markedly reduced, although the loss of PV-interneurons was only partial. Most strikingly, the density of GABAergic axons, positive for both GAD and GAT1, was dramatically increased in the inner molecular layer. This change emerged during the silent period, but was most marked in animals with SRS. Finally, supernumerary CB-positive neurons were detected in the hilus, selectively in rats with SRS. These findings suggest that alterations of GABAergic circuits occur early after lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus and contribute to epileptogenesis. In particular, the reorganization of GABAergic axons in the dentate gyrus might

  14. Neurobehavioral Deficits in a Rat Model of Recurrent Neonatal Seizures Are Prevented by a Ketogenic Diet and Correlate with Hippocampal Zinc/Lipid Transporter Signals.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Ni, Hong; Sun, Bao-liang

    2015-10-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has been shown to be effective as an antiepileptic therapy in adults, but it has not been extensively tested for its efficacy in neonatal seizure-induced brain damage. We have previously shown altered expression of zinc/lipid metabolism-related genes in hippocampus following penicillin-induced developmental model of epilepsy. In this study, we further investigated the effect of KD on the neurobehavioral and cognitive deficits, as well as if KD has any influence in the activity of zinc/lipid transporters such as zinc transporter 3 (ZnT-3), MT-3, ApoE, ApoJ (clusterin), and ACAT-1 activities in neonatal rats submitted to flurothyl-induced recurrent seizures. Postnatal day 9 (P9), 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: flurothyl-induced recurrent seizure group (EXP) and control group (CONT). On P28, they were further randomly divided into the seizure group without ketogenic diet (EXP1), seizure plus ketogenic diet (EXP2), the control group without ketogenic diet (CONT1), and the control plus ketogenic diet (CONT2). Neurological behavioral parameters of brain damage (plane righting reflex, cliff avoidance reflex, and open field test) were observed from P35 to P49. Morris water maze test was performed during P51-P57. Then hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting and the protein levels of ZnT3, MT3, ApoE, CLU, and ACAT-1 were detected by Timm staining and Western blot analysis, respectively. Flurothyl-induced neurobehavioral toxicology and aberrant mossy fiber sprouting were blocked by KD. In parallel with these behavioral changes, rats treated with KD (EXP2) showed a significant down-regulated expression of ZnT-3, MT-3, ApoE, clusterin, and ACAT-1 in hippocampus when compared with the non-KD-treated EXP1 group. Our findings provide support for zinc/lipid transporter signals being potential targets for the treatment of neonatal seizure-induced brain damage by KD.

  15. Long-Term Seizure Suppression and Optogenetic Analyses of Synaptic Connectivity in Epileptic Mice with Hippocampal Grafts of GABAergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Katharine W.; Gupta, Jyoti; Tagliatela, Stephanie; Litvina, Elizabeth; Zheng, XiaoTing; Van Zandt, Meghan A.; Woods, Nicholas; Grund, Ethan; Lin, Diana; Royston, Sara; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Aaron, Gloster B.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodent epilepsy models suggest that GABAergic interneuron progenitor grafts can reduce hyperexcitability and seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Although integration of the transplanted cells has been proposed as the underlying mechanism for these disease-modifying effects, prior studies have not explicitly examined cell types and synaptic mechanisms for long-term seizure suppression. To address this gap, we transplanted medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) cells from embryonic day 13.5 VGAT-Venus or VGAT-ChR2-EYFP transgenic embryos into the dentate gyrus (DG) of adult mice 2 weeks after induction of TLE with pilocarpine. Beginning 3–4 weeks after status epilepticus, we conducted continuous video-electroencephalographic recording until 90–100 d. TLE mice with bilateral MGE cell grafts in the DG had significantly fewer and milder electrographic seizures, compared with TLE controls. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the transplants contained multiple neuropeptide or calcium-binding protein-expressing interneuron types and these cells established dense terminal arborizations onto the somas, apical dendrites, and axon initial segments of dentate granule cells (GCs). A majority of the synaptic terminals formed by the transplanted cells were apposed to large postsynaptic clusters of gephyrin, indicative of mature inhibitory synaptic complexes. Functionality of these new inhibitory synapses was demonstrated by optogenetically activating VGAT-ChR2-EYFP-expressing transplanted neurons, which generated robust hyperpolarizations in GCs. These findings suggest that fetal GABAergic interneuron grafts may suppress pharmacoresistant seizures by enhancing synaptic inhibition in DG neural circuits. PMID:25274826

  16. Voltage-gated Na+ channel II immunoreactivity is selectively up-regulated in hippocampal interneurons of seizure sensitive gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Kwak, Sung-Eun; Choi, Hui-Chul; Song, Hong-Ki; Kim, Yeong-In; Jo, Seung-Mook; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2008-06-27

    In the present study, we investigated the distribution of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) in the normal and epileptic hippocampus of gerbils (a genetic epilepsy model) in order to confirm the relationship between VGSC and seizure activity in these animals. There was no difference of VGSC I immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between seizure-resistant (SR) and seizure sensitive (SS) gerbils. VGSC II immunoreactivity was rarely detected in the perikarya of principal neurons and interneurons in the SR gerbil hippocampus. However, in the SS gerbil hippocampus, VGSC II immunoreactivity was densely observed in the somata of interneurons located in the stratum radiatum and stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Double immunofluorescent study showed immunoreactivity for calretinin (approximately 80% in VGSC II-positive neurons) or calbindin D-28k (approximately 20% in VGSC II-positive neurons) in VGSC II-immunoreactive neurons. VGSC II-immunoreactive neurons did not show parvalbumin immunoreactivity. These findings suggest that seizure activity in SS gerbils may be related to the selective hyperactivation of interneurons in stratum lacunosum-moleculare via the up-regulation of VGSC II expression, which leads to the disinhibition of CA1 pyramidal cells.

  17. Factors affecting seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery: an observational series.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gail S; de Tisi, Jane; Gonzalez-Fraile, Juan Carlos; Peacock, Janet L; McEvoy, Andrew W; Harkness, William F J; Foong, Jacqueline; Pope, Rebecca A; Diehl, Beate; Sander, Josemir W; Duncan, John S

    2017-11-01

    Surgical treatment can bring seizure remission in people with focal epilepsy but requires careful selection of candidates. To determine which preoperative factors are associated with postoperative seizure outcome. We audited seizure outcome of 693 adults who had resective epilepsy surgery between 1990 and 2010 and used survival analysis to detect preoperatively identifiable risk factors of poor seizure outcome. Seven factors were significantly associated with increased probability of recurrence of seizures with impaired awareness postsurgery: MRI findings (eg, HR adjusted for other variables in the model 2.5; 95% CI 1.6 to 3.8 for normal MRI compared with hippocampal sclerosis), a history of secondarily generalised convulsive seizures (2.3; 95% CI 1.7 to 3.0 for these seizures in the previous year vs never), psychiatric history (1.3; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.7), learning disability (1.8; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.6) and extratemporal (vs temporal) surgery (1.4; 95% CI 1.02, 2.04). People with an older onset of epilepsy had a higher probability of seizure recurrence (1.01; 95% CI 1.00, 1.02) as did those who had used more antiepileptic drugs (1.05; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.09). Combinations of variables associated with seizure recurrence gave overall low probabilities of 5-year seizure freedom (eg, a normal MRI and convulsive seizures in the previous year has a probability of seizure freedom at 5 years of approximately 0.19). Readily identified clinical features and investigations are associated with reduced probability of good outcome and need consideration when planning presurgical evaluation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Experimental Neonatal Status Epilepticus and the Development of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Unilateral Hippocampal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dunleavy, Mark; Shinoda, Sachiko; Schindler, Clara; Ewart, Claire; Dolan, Ross; Gobbo, Oliviero L.; Kerskens, Christian M.; Henshall, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is a common pathological finding in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, including children, but a causal relationship to early-life seizures remains in question. Neonatal status epilepticus in animals can result in neuronal death within the hippocampus, although macroscopic features of hippocampal shrinkage are not evident at adulthood. Here, we examined electrophysiological and pathological consequences of focally evoked status epilepticus triggered by intra-amygdala microinjection of kainic acid in postnatal day 10 rat pups. Neonatal status epilepticus resulted in extensive neuronal death in the ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields and hilus, as assessed by DNA fragmentation and Fluoro-Jade B staining 72 hours later. The contralateral hippocampus was not significantly damaged. Histopathology at P55/P65 revealed unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (grade IV, modified Wyler/Watson scale) comprising >50% CA1 and CA3 neuron loss and astrogliosis. Additional features included hydrocephalus ex vacuo, modest dentate granule cell layer widening, and altered neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity indicative of synaptic rearrangement. Hippocampal atrophy was also evident on magnetic resonance imaging. Depth electrode recordings at adulthood detected spontaneous seizures that involved the ipsilateral hippocampus and amygdala. A significant positive correlation was found between hippocampal pathology grade and both frequency and duration of epileptic seizures at adulthood. The current study demonstrates that experimental neonatal status epilepticus can result in classical unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:19948825

  19. Application of correlation dimension and pointwise dimension for non-linear topographical analysis of focal onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Feucht, M; Möller, U; Witte, H; Benninger, F; Asenbaum, S; Prayer, D; Friedrich, M H

    1999-03-01

    For many patients who are candidates for epilepsy surgery, non-invasive evaluation fails to provide sufficient information to permit surgical treatment. Since there are also definite risks and considerable costs associated with invasive procedures, new (non-invasive) techniques are required. This study provides empirical evidence that a non-linear approach applied to ictal surface electroencephalograms (EEGs) can help to delineate the area of seizure onset and may prove useful in complementing visual analysis of the EEG. Multichannel EEGs, recorded from eight patients with different drug-resistant localisation-related epilepsies, were analysed using the concept of correlation dimension and two extensions based on the pointwise dimension. The latter also provided results in cases where assessment of the correlation dimension was not feasible. Comparative values between 2 and 6 were accepted as the result of the algorithms, mostly 3-4 for the EEG channels strongly reflecting epileptic activity, and 4-6 for the other signals. The proportion of accepted pointwise values was usually 200-800% for strong epileptic EEG activity compared to the other data. The approach permitted the characterisation of the scalp area reflecting epileptic activity. The results obtained were in perfect concordance with those obtained during pre-surgical work-up and confirmed by the post-operative outcome.

  20. Neurogenesis in a young dog with epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Borschensky, C M; Woolley, J S; Kipar, A; Herden, C

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic seizures can lead to various reactions in the brain, ranging from neuronal necrosis and glial cell activation to focal structural disorganization. Furthermore, increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been documented in rodent models of acute convulsions. This is a report of hippocampal neurogenesis in a dog with spontaneous epileptic seizures. A 16-week-old epileptic German Shepherd Dog had marked neuronal cell proliferation (up to 5 mitotic figures per high-power field and increased immunohistochemical expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen) in the dentate gyrus accompanied by microglial and astroglial activation. Some granule cells expressed doublecortin, a marker of immature neurons; mitotically active cells expressed neuronal nuclear antigen. No mitotic figures were found in the brain of age-matched control dogs. Whether increased neurogenesis represents a general reaction pattern of young epileptic dogs should be investigated.

  1. Focal and Generalized Patterns of Cerebral Cortical Veins Due to Non-Convulsive Status Epilepticus or Prolonged Seizure Episode after Convulsive Status Epilepticus – A MRI Study Using Susceptibility Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev Kumar; Abela, Eugenio; Schindler, Kaspar; Krestel, Heinz; Springer, Elisabeth; Huber, Adrian; Weisstanner, Christian; Hauf, Martinus; Gralla, Jan; Wiest, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate variant patterns of cortical venous oxygenation during status epilepticus (SE) using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI). Methods We analyzed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 26 patients with clinically witnessed prolonged seizures and/or EEG-confirmed SE. All MRI exams encompassed SWI, dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI (MRI-DSC) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We aimed to identify distinct patterns of SWI signal alterations that revealed regional or global increases of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and DWI restrictions. We hypothesized that SWI-related oxygenation patterns reflect ictal or postictal patterns that resemble SE or sequelae of seizures. Results Sixteen patients were examined during nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) as confirmed by EEG, a further ten patients suffered from witnessed and prolonged seizure episode ahead of imaging without initial EEG. MRI patterns of 15 of the 26 patients revealed generalized hyperoxygenation by SWI in keeping with either global or multifocal cortical hyperperfusion. Eight patients revealed a focal hyperoxygenation pattern related to focal CBF increase and three patients showed a focal deoxygenation pattern related to focal CBF decrease. Conclusions SWI-related hyper- and deoxygenation patterns resemble ictal and postictal CBF changes within a range from globally increased to focally decreased perfusion. In all 26 patients the SWI patterns were in keeping with ictal hyperperfusion (hyperoxygenation patterns) or postictal hypoperfusion (deoxygenation patterns) respectively. A new finding of this study is that cortical venous patterns in SWI can be not only focally, but globally attenuated. SWI may thus be considered as an alternative contrast-free MR sequence to identify perfusion changes related to ictal or postictal conditions. PMID:27486662

  2. Effects of AT1 receptor antagonism on kainate-induced seizures and concomitant changes in hippocampal extracellular noradrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine levels in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Loyens, Ellen; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-05-01

    In the management of epilepsy, AT1 receptor antagonists have been suggested as an additional treatment strategy. A hyperactive brain angiotensin (Ang) II system and upregulated AT1 receptors are implicated in the cerebrovascular alterations in a genetic form of hypertension. Uncontrolled hypertension could also, in turn, be a risk factor for a seizure threshold decrease and development of epileptogenesis. The present study aimed to assess the effects of the selective AT1 receptor antagonist ZD7155 on kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) development and accompanying changes in the hippocampal extracellular (EC) neurotransmitter levels of noradrenaline (NAD), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and their parent strain Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, since monoamines are well-known neurotransmitters involved in mechanisms of both epilepsy and hypertension. Status epilepticus was evoked in freely moving rats by a repetitive intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of KA in subconvulsant doses. In the treatment group, ZD7155 (5mg/kg i.p.) was coadministered with the first KA injection. Spontaneously hypertensive rats exhibited higher susceptibility to SE than WKY rats, but the AT1 receptor antagonist did not alter the development of SE in SHRs or in WKY rats. In vivo microdialysis demonstrated significant KA-induced increases of the hippocampal NAD and DA levels in SHRs and of NAD, 5-HT, and DA in WKY rats. Although SHRs developed more severe seizures while receiving a lower dose of KA compared to WKY rats, AT1 receptor antagonism completely prevented all KA-induced increases of hippocampal monoamine levels in both rat strains without affecting seizure development per se. These results suggest a lack of direct relationship between KA-induced seizure susceptibility and adaptive changes of hippocampal NAD, 5-HT, and DA levels in the effects of ZD7155 in WKY rats and SHRs.

  3. Febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, Leena D

    2010-11-24

    Simple febrile seizures are generalised in onset, last <15 minutes, and do not occur more than once in 24 hours. Complex febrile seizures are longer lasting, have focal symptoms, and can recur within 24 hours. This review only deals with simple febrile seizures. About 2% to 5% of children in the USA and Western Europe, and 6% to 9% of infants and children in Japan will have experienced at least one febrile seizure by the age of 5 years. Simple febrile seizures may slightly increase the risk of developing epilepsy, but have no known adverse effects on behaviour, scholastic performance, or neurocognition. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments given during episodes of fever in children with one or more previous simple febrile seizures? What are the effects of long-term (daily, for >1 month) anticonvulsant treatment in children with a history of simple febrile seizures? What are the effects of treatments on reducing the risk of subsequent epilepsy in children with a history of simple febrile seizures? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: anticonvulsants (intermittent or continuous) and antipyretic treatments (physical antipyretic measures, paracetamol, ibuprofen).

  4. Variable electrobehavioral patterns during focal nonconvulsive status epilepticus induced by unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Arcieri, Salvatore; Velotti, Rosa; Noè, Francesco; Carriero, Giovanni; Cattalini, Alessandro; Galbardi, Barbara; Gnatkovsky, Vadym; de Curtis, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (ncSE) is a severe condition that may result in neurologic sequelae and epilepsy resistant to pharmacologic treatment. We analyze here seizure and electroencephalography (EEG) patterns and their correlation to the development of a chronic epileptic condition in a guinea pig model of focal ncSE induced by intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid (KA). Electrobehavioral patterns during ncSE induced by unilateral injection of 1 μg of KA in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were characterized by continuous video-EEG monitoring in 13 guinea pigs bilaterally implanted with recording electrodes in the hippocampus and neocortex. Video-EEG analysis demonstrates a high variability of seizure type and duration during KA-induced ncSE. Seizures showed focal signs correlated with diverse epileptiform EEG discharge distributions, either diffuse or localized. Nonfocal (bilateral motor) signs during seizures most likely correlated with a diffuse EEG pattern. The evolution into a chronic epileptic condition correlated neither with the severity of seizure pattern nor with the diffusion of the EEG discharges observed during the ncSE. Video-EEG monitoring in a guinea pig model of ncSE induced by unilateral hippocampal injection of KA demonstrates a high variability of electrobehavioral patterns. We demonstrate that the seizure severity score during focal ncSE is not a predictor of the evolution into a chronic epileptic condition of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Bumetanide reduce the seizure susceptibility induced by pentylenetetrazol via inhibition of aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis in neonatal rats after hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiang-Jian; Yang, Xing-Liang; Luo, Wen-Di; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2017-02-02

    Hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) is one of prevalent causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Our data demonstrated that hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induced Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-)-co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) increasing in hippocampus. Previous studies demonstrated that NKCC1 regulates various stages of neurogenesis. In this study, we studied the role of increased NKCC1 in regulating of HI-induced neurogenesis. HIBD model was established in 7days old Sprague-Dawley rat pup, and the expression of NKCC1 was detected by western blot and qPCR. Brain electrical activity in freely rats was monitored by electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. HI-induced neurogenesis was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Neurobehavioral test was to investigate the neuro-protective role of bumetanide, an inhibitor of NKCC1, on neonatal rats after HI. The results showed that bumetanide treatment significantly reduced brain electrical activity and the seizure stage of epilepsy induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) in vivo after HI. In addition, bumetanide restored aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis and associated cognitive function. Our data demonstrated that bumetanide reduces the susceptibility of epilepsy induced by PTZ in rats suffering from HI injury during neonatal period via restoring the ectopic newborn neurons in dentate gyrus (DG) and cognitive function.

  6. Lipoic acid inhibits caspase-dependent and -independent cell death pathways and is neuroprotective against hippocampal damage after pilocarpine-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Pauline Sousa; Feitosa, Chistiane Mendes; Saldanha, Gláucio Barros; Tomé, Adriana da Rocha; Feng, Dejiang; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid has some neuroprotective properties, but this action has not been investigated in models of epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective efficacy of α-lipoic acid (lipoic acid) against pilocarpine-induced cell death through the caspase-dependent or -independent mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. Wistar rats were injected intraperitoneally with 0.9% saline (control group), pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, pilocarpine group) alone, or α-lipoic acid (20 mg/kg) in association with pilocarpine (400 mg/kg) 30 min before administration of α-lipoic acid. After the treatments all groups were observed for 24 h. Cell death was reduced in lipoic acid-treated rats. Cytosolic translocation of cytochrome c and subsequent activation of caspase-3 were reduced by lipoic acid treatment. AIF nuclear translocation and subsequent large-scale DNA fragmentation were also decreased in lipoic acid-treated rats. Our study suggests that lipoic acid inhibits both caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways and may be neuroprotective against hippocampal damage during pilocarpine-induced seizures.

  7. Increase in α-tubulin modifications in the neuronal processes of hippocampal neurons in both kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hang Thi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ikegami, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegeneration includes acute changes and slow-developing alterations, both of which partly involve common cellular machinery. During neurodegeneration, neuronal processes are impaired along with dysregulated post-translational modifications (PTMs) of cytoskeletal proteins. In neuronal processes, tubulin undergoes unique PTMs including a branched form of modification called glutamylation and loss of the C-terminal tyrosine residue and the penultimate glutamic acid residue forming Δ2-tubulin. Here, we investigated the state of two PTMs, glutamylation and Δ2 form, in both acute and slow-developing neurodegenerations, using a newly generated monoclonal antibody, DTE41, which had 2-fold higher affinity to glutamylated Δ2-tubulin, than to unmodified Δ2-tubulin. DTE41 recognised glutamylated Δ2-tubulin preferentially in immunostaining than in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting. In normal mouse brain, DTE41 stained molecular layer of the cerebellum as well as synapse-rich regions in pyramidal neurons of the cerebral cortex. In kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure, DTE41-labelled signals were increased in the hippocampal CA3 region, especially in the stratum lucidum. In the hippocampi of post-mortem patients with Alzheimer’s disease, intensities of DTE41 staining were increased in mossy fibres in the CA3 region as well as in apical dendrites of the pyramidal neurons. Our findings indicate that glutamylation on Δ2-tubulin is increased in both acute and slow-developing neurodegeneration. PMID:28067280

  8. Spatiotemporal differences in the c-fos pathway between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice following flurothyl-induced seizures: A dissociation of hippocampal Fos from seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B; Papandrea, Dominick; Tuz, Karina; Anderson, Tara M; Jayakumar, Sachidhanand; Herron, Bruce J; Ferland, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Significant differences in seizure characteristics between inbred mouse strains highlight the importance of genetic predisposition to epilepsy. Here, we examined the genetic differences between the seizure-resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mouse strain and the seizure-susceptible DBA/2J (D2) strain in the phospho-Erk and Fos pathways to examine seizure-induced neuronal activity to uncover potential mechanistic correlates to these disparate seizure responsivities. Expression of neural activity markers was examined following 1, 5, or 8 seizures, or after 8 seizures, a 28 day rest period, and a final flurothyl rechallenge. Two brain regions, the hippocampus and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), had significantly different Fos expression profiles following seizures. Fos expression was highly robust in B6 hippocampus following one seizure and remained elevated following multiple seizures. Conversely, there was an absence of Fos (and phospho-Erk) expression in D2 hippocampus following one generalized seizure that increased with multiple seizures. This lack of Fos expression occurred despite intracranial electroencephalographic recordings indicating that the D2 hippocampus propagated ictal discharge during the first flurothyl seizure suggesting a dissociation of seizure discharge from Fos and phospho-Erk expression. Global transcriptional analysis confirmed a dysregulation of the c-fos pathway in D2 mice following 1 seizure. Moreover, global analysis of RNA expression differences between B6 and D2 hippocampus revealed a unique pattern of transcripts that were co-regulated with Fos in D2 hippocampus following 1 seizure. These expression differences could, in part, account for D2's seizure susceptibility phenotype. Following 8 seizures, a 28 day rest period, and a final flurothyl rechallenge, ∼85% of B6 mice develop a more complex seizure phenotype consisting of a clonic-forebrain seizure that uninterruptedly progresses into a brainstem seizure. This seizure phenotype

  9. Spatiotemporal differences in the c-fos pathway between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice following flurothyl-induced seizures: a dissociation of hippocampal Fos from seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B.; Papandrea, Dominick; Tuz, Karina; Anderson, Tara M.; Jayakumar, Sachidhanand; Herron, Bruce J.; Ferland, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    Significant differences in seizure characteristics between inbred mouse strains highlight the importance of genetic predisposition to epilepsy. Here, we examined the genetic differences between the seizure-resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mouse strain and the seizure-susceptible DBA/2J (D2) strain in the phospho-Erk and Fos pathways to examine seizure-induced neuronal activity to uncover potential mechanistic correlates to these disparate seizure responsivities. Expression of neural activity markers was examined following 1, 5, or 8 seizures, or after 8 seizures, a 28 day rest period, and a final flurothyl rechallenge. Two brain regions, the hippocampus and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), had significantly different Fos expression profiles following seizures. Fos expression was highly robust in B6 hippocampus following one seizure and remained elevated following multiple seizures. Conversely, there was an absence of Fos (and phospho-Erk) expression in D2 hippocampus following one generalized seizure that increased with multiple seizures. This lack of Fos expression occurred despite intracranial electroencephalographic recordings indicating that the D2 hippocampus propagated ictal discharge during the first flurothyl seizure suggesting a dissociation of seizure discharge from Fos and phospho-Erk expression. Global transcriptional analysis confirmed a dysregulation of the c-fos pathway in D2 mice following 1 seizure. Moreover, global analysis of RNA expression differences between B6 and D2 hippocampus revealed a unique pattern of transcripts that were co-regulated with Fos in D2 hippocampus following 1 seizure. These expression differences could, in part, account for D2’s seizure susceptibility phenotype. Following 8 seizures, a 28 day rest period, and a final flurothyl rechallenge, ~85% of B6 mice develop a more complex seizure phenotype consisting of a clonic-forebrain seizure that uninterruptedly progresses into a brainstem seizure. This seizure phenotype

  10. Transition to seizure: ictal discharge is preceded by exhausted presynaptic GABA release in the hippocampal CA3 region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang J; Koifman, Julius; Shin, Damian S; Ye, Hui; Florez, Carlos M; Zhang, Liang; Valiante, Taufik A; Carlen, Peter L

    2012-02-15

    How the brain transitions into a seizure is poorly understood. Recurrent seizure-like events (SLEs) in low-Mg2+/ high-K+ perfusate were measured in the CA3 region of the intact mouse hippocampus. The SLE was divided into a "preictal phase," which abruptly turns into a higher frequency "ictal" phase. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors shortened the preictal phase, abolished interictal bursts, and attenuated the slow preictal depolarization, with no effect on the ictal duration, whereas SLEs were blocked by glutamate receptor blockade. In CA3 pyramidal cells and stratum oriens non-fast-spiking and fast-spiking interneurons, recurrent GABAergic IPSCs predominated interictally and during the early preictal phase, synchronous with extracellularly measured recurrent field potentials (FPs). These IPSCs then decreased to zero or reversed polarity by the onset of the higher-frequency ictus. However, postsynaptic muscimol-evoked GABA(A) responses remained intact. Simultaneously, EPSCs synchronous with the FPs markedly increased to a maximum at the ictal onset. The reversal potential of the compound postsynaptic currents (combined simultaneous EPSCs and IPSCs) became markedly depolarized during the preictal phase, whereas the muscimol-evoked GABA(A) reversal potential remained unchanged. During the late preictal phase, interneuronal excitability was high, but IPSCs, evoked by local stimulation, or osmotically by hypertonic sucrose application, were diminished, disappearing at the ictal onset. We conclude that the interictal and early preictal states are dominated by GABAergic activity, with the onset of the ictus heralded by exhaustion of presynaptic release of GABA, and unopposed increased glutamatergic responses.

  11. Hippocampal Focal Knockout of CBP Affects Specific Histone Modifications, Long-Term Potentiation, and Long-Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Ruth M; Malvaez, Melissa; Kramar, Eniko; Matheos, Dina P; Arrizon, Abraham; Cabrera, Sara M; Lynch, Gary; Greene, Robert W; Wood, Marcelo A

    2011-01-01

    To identify the role of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CREB-binding protein (CBP) in neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus during memory formation, we examine the effects of a focal homozygous knockout of CBP on histone modifications, gene expression, synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We show that CBP is critical for the in vivo acetylation of lysines on histones H2B, H3, and H4. CBP's homolog p300 was unable to compensate for the loss of CBP. Neurons lacking CBP maintained phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, yet failed to activate CREB:CBP-mediated gene expression. Loss of CBP in dorsal CA1 of the hippocampus resulted in selective impairments to long-term potentiation and long-term memory for contextual fear and object recognition. Together, these results suggest a necessary role for specific chromatin modifications, selectively mediated by CBP in the consolidation of memories. PMID:21508930

  12. Hippocampal focal knockout of CBP affects specific histone modifications, long-term potentiation, and long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Ruth M; Malvaez, Melissa; Kramar, Eniko; Matheos, Dina P; Arrizon, Abraham; Cabrera, Sara M; Lynch, Gary; Greene, Robert W; Wood, Marcelo A

    2011-07-01

    To identify the role of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CREB-binding protein (CBP) in neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus during memory formation, we examine the effects of a focal homozygous knockout of CBP on histone modifications, gene expression, synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We show that CBP is critical for the in vivo acetylation of lysines on histones H2B, H3, and H4. CBP's homolog p300 was unable to compensate for the loss of CBP. Neurons lacking CBP maintained phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, yet failed to activate CREB:CBP-mediated gene expression. Loss of CBP in dorsal CA1 of the hippocampus resulted in selective impairments to long-term potentiation and long-term memory for contextual fear and object recognition. Together, these results suggest a necessary role for specific chromatin modifications, selectively mediated by CBP in the consolidation of memories.

  13. Ketone ester supplementation attenuates seizure activity, and improves behavior and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in an Angelman syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ciarlone, Stephanie L; Grieco, Joseph C; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Weeber, Edwin J

    2016-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare genetic and neurological disorder presenting with seizures, developmental delay, ataxia, and lack of speech. Previous studies have indicated that oxidative stress-dependent metabolic dysfunction may underlie the phenotypic deficits reported in the AS mouse model. While the ketogenic diet (KD) has been used to protect against oxidative stress and has successfully treated refractory epilepsy in AS case studies, issues arise due to its strict adherence requirements, in addition to selective eating habits and weight issues reported in patients with AS. We hypothesized that ketone ester supplementation would mimic the KD as an anticonvulsant and improve the behavioral and synaptic plasticity deficits in vivo. AS mice were supplemented R,S-1,3-butanediol acetoacetate diester (KE) ad libitum for eight weeks. KE administration improved motor coordination, learning and memory, and synaptic plasticity in AS mice. The KE was also anticonvulsant and altered brain amino acid metabolism in AS treated animals. Our findings suggest that KE supplementation produces sustained ketosis and ameliorates many phenotypes in the AS mouse model, and should be investigated further for future clinical use.

  14. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for recurrent or residual seizures after anterior temporal lobectomy in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis: long-term follow-up results of more than 4 years.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Mi; Kang, Joong Koo; Kim, Sang Joon; Hong, Seok Ho; Ko, Tae Sung; Lee, Sang Ahm; Lee, Do Heui; Lee, Jung Kyo

    2015-12-01

    Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has proven efficacy in the treatment of drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) and is comparable to conventional resective surgery. It may be effective as an alternative treatment to reoperation after failed temporal lobe surgery in patients with MTLE-HS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of GKRS in patients with unilateral MTLE-HS who did not achieve seizure control or had recurrent seizures after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL). Twelve patients (8 males; mean age 35.50 ± 9.90 years) with MTLE-HS who underwent GKRS after failed ATL (Engel Classes III-IV) were included. GKRS targets included the remnant tissue or adjacent regions of the previously performed ATL with a marginal dose of 24-25 Gy at the 50% isodose line in all patients. Final seizure outcome was assessed using Engel's modified criteria during the final 2 years preceding data analysis. A comparison between signal changes on follow-up MRI and clinical outcome was performed. All patients were followed up for at least 4 years with a mean duration of 6.18 ± 1.77 years (range 4-8.8 years) after GKRS. At the final assessment, 6 of 12 patients were classified as seizure free (Engel Class Ia, n = 3; Ic, n = 2; and Id, n = 1) and 6 patients were classified as not seizure free (Engel Class II, n = 1; III, n = 2; and IV, n = 3). Neither initial nor late MRI signal changes after GKRS statistically correlated with surgical outcome. Clinical seizure outcome did not differ significantly with initial or late MRI changes after GKRS. GKRS can be considered an alternative option when the patients with MTLE-HS who had recurrent or residual seizures after ATL refuse a second operation.

  15. The neuroprotective effect of topiramate on the ultrastructure of pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 sectors in an experimental model of febrile seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E; Lotowska, Joanna M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current ultrastructural study was to explore the potentiality of the neuroprotective effect of TPM against damage of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 sectors in an experimental model of febrile seizures (FS) in rats. The FS group exhibited variously pronounced submicroscopic lesions of the neuronal perikarya, including total cell disintegration. Advanced changes induced by hyperthermic stress were manifested by marked degenerative abnormalities, such as substantial swelling of the mitochondria, dilation, degranulation and disintegration of the granular endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuolar changes in the Golgi complex. The most substantially damaged pyramidal neurons showed features of aponecrosis (so-called "dark neurons"), resulting in a marked neuronal loss in the explored areas of the hippocampal cortex. The neurodegenerative changes were accompanied by distinct damage to the blood-brain barrier components. The administration of topiramate at a dose of 80/kg b.m. prior to the induction of hyperthermic stress (as prevention against febrile seizures) caused a substantial neuroprotective action - the drug efficiently lightened the neuronal damage, basically reduced cell aponecrosis and enhanced cell viability. However, TPM applied directly after FS induction did not exert any distinct neuroprotective effect on the perikarya of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal cortex.

  16. Water maze experience and prenatal choline supplementation differentially promote long-term hippocampal recovery from seizures in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J.E.; Glenn, Melissa J.; Mellott, Tiffany J.; Liu, Yi B.; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Williams, Christina L.

    2010-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) in adulthood dramatically alters the hippocampus and produces spatial learning and memory deficits. Some factors, like environmental enrichment and exercise, may promote functional recovery from SE. Prenatal choline supplementation (SUP) also protects against spatial memory deficits observed shortly after SE in adulthood, and we have previously reported that SUP attenuates the neuropathological response to SE in the adult hippocampus just 16 days after SE. It is unknown whether SUP can ameliorate longer-term cognitive and neuropathological consequences of SE, whether repeatedly engaging the injured hippocampus in a cognitive task might facilitate recovery from SE, and whether our prophylactic prenatal dietary treatment would enable the injured hippocampus to more effectively benefit from cognitive rehabilitation. To address these issues, adult offspring from rat dams that received either a control (CON) or SUP diet on embryonic days 12–17 first received training on a place learning water maze task (WM) and were then administered saline or kainic acid (KA) to induce SE. Rats then either remained in their home cage, or received three additional WM sessions at 3, 6.5, and 10 weeks after SE to test spatial learning and memory retention. Eleven weeks after SE, the brains were analyzed for several hippocampal markers known to be altered by SE. SUP attenuated SE-induced spatial learning deficits and completely rescued spatial memory retention by 10 weeks post-SE. Repeated WM experience prevented SE-induced declines in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and dentate gyrus neurogenesis, and attenuated increased glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP) levels. Remarkably, SUP alone was similarly protective to an even greater extent, and SUP rats that were water maze trained after SE showed reduced hilar migration of newborn neurons. These findings suggest that prophylactic SUP is protective against the long-term cognitive and neuropathological effects of

  17. Water maze experience and prenatal choline supplementation differentially promote long-term hippocampal recovery from seizures in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J E; Glenn, Melissa J; Mellott, Tiffany J; Liu, Yi B; Blusztajn, Jan K; Williams, Christina L

    2011-06-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) in adulthood dramatically alters the hippocampus and produces spatial learning and memory deficits. Some factors, like environmental enrichment and exercise, may promote functional recovery from SE. Prenatal choline supplementation (SUP) also protects against spatial memory deficits observed shortly after SE in adulthood, and we have previously reported that SUP attenuates the neuropathological response to SE in the adult hippocampus just 16 days after SE. It is unknown whether SUP can ameliorate longer-term cognitive and neuropathological consequences of SE, whether repeatedly engaging the injured hippocampus in a cognitive task might facilitate recovery from SE, and whether our prophylactic prenatal dietary treatment would enable the injured hippocampus to more effectively benefit from cognitive rehabilitation. To address these issues, adult offspring from rat dams that received either a control (CON) or SUP diet on embryonic days 12-17 first received training on a place learning water maze task (WM) and were then administered saline or kainic acid (KA) to induce SE. Rats then either remained in their home cage, or received three additional WM sessions at 3, 6.5, and 10 weeks after SE to test spatial learning and memory retention. Eleven weeks after SE, the brains were analyzed for several hippocampal markers known to be altered by SE. SUP attenuated SE-induced spatial learning deficits and completely rescued spatial memory retention by 10 weeks post-SE. Repeated WM experience prevented SE-induced declines in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and dentate gyrus neurogenesis, and attenuated increased glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP) levels. Remarkably, SUP alone was similarly protective to an even greater extent, and SUP rats that were water maze trained after SE showed reduced hilar migration of newborn neurons. These findings suggest that prophylactic SUP is protective against the long-term cognitive and neuropathological effects of

  18. [Gelastic seizures: etiology, semiology, therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Usacheva, E L; Mukhin, K Iu; Prityko, A G; Aĭvazian, S O; Kharlamov, L A; Shorina, M Iu

    2003-01-01

    Gelastic seizures (laughing seizures) are a rare type of epileptic seizure in which laugh in a main and dominating manifestation of the seizure. As a rule, the seizures are caused by organic cerebral pathology and are often reported as a specific epilepsy marker related to hypothalamic hamartoma. The interictal EEG frequently shows a focal activity. Based on examination of 2 patients with gelastic seizures and hypothalamic hamartoma, clinical features, EEG characteristics and therapeutic perspectives for the disorder are discussed.

  19. Enhanced Burst-Suppression and Disruption of Local Field Potential Synchrony in a Mouse Model of Focal Cortical Dysplasia Exhibiting Spike-Wave Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Anthony J.; Zhou, Chen; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are a common cause of brain seizures and are often associated with intractable epilepsy. Here we evaluated aberrant brain neurophysiology in an in vivo mouse model of FCD induced by neonatal freeze lesions (FLs) to the right cortical hemisphere (near S1). Linear multi-electrode arrays were used to record extracellular potentials from cortical and subcortical brain regions near the FL in anesthetized mice (5–13 months old) followed by 24 h cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Results indicated that FL animals exhibit a high prevalence of spontaneous spike-wave discharges (SWDs), predominately during sleep (EEG), and an increase in the incidence of hyper-excitable burst/suppression activity under general anesthesia (extracellular recordings, 0.5%–3.0% isoflurane). Brief periods of burst activity in the local field potential (LFP) typically presented as an arrhythmic pattern of increased theta-alpha spectral peaks (4–12 Hz) on a background of low-amplitude delta activity (1–4 Hz), were associated with an increase in spontaneous spiking of cortical neurons, and were highly synchronized in control animals across recording sites in both cortical and subcortical layers (average cross-correlation values ranging from +0.73 to +1.0) with minimal phase shift between electrodes. However, in FL animals, cortical vs. subcortical burst activity was strongly out of phase with significantly lower cross-correlation values compared to controls (average values of −0.1 to +0.5, P < 0.05 between groups). In particular, a marked reduction in the level of synchronous burst activity was observed, the closer the recording electrodes were to the malformation (Pearson’s Correlation = 0.525, P < 0.05). In a subset of FL animals (3/9), burst activity also included a spike or spike-wave pattern similar to the SWDs observed in unanesthetized animals. In summary, neonatal FLs increased the hyperexcitable pattern of burst activity induced by

  20. Enhanced Burst-Suppression and Disruption of Local Field Potential Synchrony in a Mouse Model of Focal Cortical Dysplasia Exhibiting Spike-Wave Seizures.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anthony J; Zhou, Chen; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are a common cause of brain seizures and are often associated with intractable epilepsy. Here we evaluated aberrant brain neurophysiology in an in vivo mouse model of FCD induced by neonatal freeze lesions (FLs) to the right cortical hemisphere (near S1). Linear multi-electrode arrays were used to record extracellular potentials from cortical and subcortical brain regions near the FL in anesthetized mice (5-13 months old) followed by 24 h cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Results indicated that FL animals exhibit a high prevalence of spontaneous spike-wave discharges (SWDs), predominately during sleep (EEG), and an increase in the incidence of hyper-excitable burst/suppression activity under general anesthesia (extracellular recordings, 0.5%-3.0% isoflurane). Brief periods of burst activity in the local field potential (LFP) typically presented as an arrhythmic pattern of increased theta-alpha spectral peaks (4-12 Hz) on a background of low-amplitude delta activity (1-4 Hz), were associated with an increase in spontaneous spiking of cortical neurons, and were highly synchronized in control animals across recording sites in both cortical and subcortical layers (average cross-correlation values ranging from +0.73 to +1.0) with minimal phase shift between electrodes. However, in FL animals, cortical vs. subcortical burst activity was strongly out of phase with significantly lower cross-correlation values compared to controls (average values of -0.1 to +0.5, P < 0.05 between groups). In particular, a marked reduction in the level of synchronous burst activity was observed, the closer the recording electrodes were to the malformation (Pearson's Correlation = 0.525, P < 0.05). In a subset of FL animals (3/9), burst activity also included a spike or spike-wave pattern similar to the SWDs observed in unanesthetized animals. In summary, neonatal FLs increased the hyperexcitable pattern of burst activity induced by anesthesia

  1. Seizure-Induced Axonal Sprouting: Assessing Connections Between Injury, Local Circuits, and Epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sutula, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Neurons and neural circuits undergo extensive structural and functional remodeling in response to seizures. Sprouting of axons in the mossy fiber pathway of the hippocampus is a prominent example of a seizure-induced structural alteration which has received particular attention because it is easily detected, is induced by intense or repeated brief seizures in focal chronic models of epilepsy, and is also observed in the human epileptic hippocampus. During the last decade the association of mossy fiber sprouting with seizures and epilepsy has been firmly established. Many anatomical features of mossy fiber sprouting have been described in considerable detail, and there is evidence that sprouting occurs in a variety of other pathways in association with seizures and injury. There is uncertainty, however, about how or when mossy fiber sprouting may contribute to hippocampal dysfunction and generation of seizures. Study of mossy fiber sprouting has provided a strong theoretical and conceptual framework for efforts to understand how seizures and injury may contribute to epileptogenesis and its consequences. It is likely that investigation of mossy fiber sprouting will continure to offer significant opportunities for insights into seizure-induced plasticity of neural circuits at molecular, cellular, and systems levels. PMID:15309153

  2. Seizure semiology and aging.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Diosely C; Jehi, Lara; Chapin, Jessica; Krishnaiengar, Suparna; Novak, Eric; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Najm, Imad

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of epilepsy is high in older individuals. However, epilepsy in the elderly may be underdiagnosed and undertreated because of diagnostic difficulties. The main goal of this study was to determine whether seizure semiology differs between older and younger adults with epilepsy in the outpatient setting. Fifty patients with focal epilepsy aged 55 years and older and 50 patients aged between 18 and 45 years were included. Review of medical records contained detailed seizure description. There were no differences in seizure semiology between groups, except that subtle perceptions of transient confusion were seen in older patients but not in younger patients (P=0.0028). Older patients had less generalized motor seizures, but the differences between groups did not reach significance (P=0.01). Older patients may present with subtle symptoms of seizures characterized by brief periods of confusion, which may contribute to greater difficulty diagnosing seizures in the elderly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Progressive neuronal activation accompanies epileptogenesis caused by hippocampal glutamine synthetase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Albright, Benjamin; Dhaher, Roni; Wang, Helen; Harb, Roa; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Zaveri, Hitten; Eid, Tore

    2017-02-01

    Loss of glutamine synthetase (GS) in hippocampal astrocytes has been implicated in the causation of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, the mechanism by which the deficiency in GS leads to epilepsy is incompletely understood. Here we ask how hippocampal GS inhibition affects seizure phenotype and neuronal activation during epilepsy development (epileptogenesis). Epileptogenesis was induced by infusing the irreversible GS blocker methionine sulfoximine (MSO) unilaterally into the hippocampal formation of rats. We then used continuous video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring and c-Fos immunohistochemistry to determine the type of seizures and spatial distribution of neuronal activation early (1-5days postinfusion) and late (16-43days postinfusion) in epileptogenesis. Early in epileptogenesis, seizures were preferentially mild (stage 1-2), activating neurons in the entorhinal-hippocampal area, the basolateral amygdala, the piriform cortex, the midline thalamus, and the anterior olfactory area. Late in epileptogenesis, the seizures were generally more severe (stages 4-5) with neuronal activation extending to the neocortex, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the mediodorsal thalamu\\s, and the central nucleus of the amygdala. Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of GS focally in the hippocampal formation triggers a process of epileptogenesis characterized by gradual worsening of seizure severity and involvement of progressively larger neuronal populations over a period of several weeks. Knowledge about the underlying mechanism of epileptogenesis is important because such knowledge may result in more specific and efficacious treatments of MTLE by moving away from large and poorly specific surgical resections to highly targeted surgical or pharmacological interventions of the epileptogenic process.

  5. Reflex operculoinsular seizures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Handsun; Tran, Thi Phuoc Yen; Pétrin, Myriam; Boucher, Olivier; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-03-01

    Activation of specific cortical territories by certain stimuli is known to trigger focal seizures. We report three cases of well documented operculo-insular reflex seizures, triggered by somatosensory stimuli in two and loud noises in the third. Limited operculoinsular resection resulted in an excellent outcome for all. We discuss these observations in regard to the literature on reflex epilepsy and known functions of the insula. [Published with video sequences online].

  6. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  7. Ultrastructure of the blood-brain barrier of the gyrus hippocampal cortex in an experimental model of febrile seizures and with the use of a new generation antiepileptic drug--topiramate.

    PubMed

    Łotowska, Joanna M; Sobaniec-Łotowska, Maria E; Sendrowski, Krzysztof; Sobaniec, Wojciech; Artemowicz, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of the gyrus hippocampal cortex in an experimental model of febrile seizures in rats and the effect of a new generation antiepileptic drug, topiramate, on the morphological status of this barrier were investigated. Advanced changes indicating a substantial increase in BBB permeability were observed in the animals with induced febrile seizures (FS), with approximately 2/3 of capillaries and perivascular astroglial processes being affected. Almost total occlusion of the capillary lumen was frequently seen, caused by damaged endothelial lining and by external pressure from markedly swollen perivascular astrocytic processes. Mitochondrial changes predominated among the abnormalities found in endoplasmic organelles of endothelial cells. Lesions in the BBB coexisted with damage to pyramidal neurons, mainly with features of aponecrosis ("dark neurons"). The study on topiramate seems to demonstrate its protective action on the BBB components of the ammonal cortex in the group receiving the drug as prevention, i.e. against febrile seizures. It was found to prevent marked BBB damage in over half of the capillaries. However, the application of topiramate directly after FS induction had no distinct beneficial effect on the structural BBB components.

  8. Classification of seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Riviello, James J

    2003-07-01

    The management of seizures and epilepsy begins with forming a differential diagnosis, making the diagnosis, and then classifying seizure type and epileptic syndrome. Classification guides treatment, including ancillary testing, management, prognosis, and if needed, selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED). Many AEDs are available, and certain seizure types or epilepsy syndromes respond to specific AEDs. The identification of the genetics, molecular basis, and pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy has resulted from classification of specific epileptic syndromes. The classification system used by the International League Against Epilepsy is periodically revised. The proposed revision changes the classification emphasis from the anatomic origin of seizures (focal vs generalized) to seizure semiology (ie, the signs or clinical manifestations). Modified systems have been developed for specific circumstances (eg, neonatal seizures, infantile seizures, status epilepticus, and epilepsy surgery). This article reviews seizure and epilepsy classification, emphasizing new data.

  9. Neurocysticercosis and microscopic hippocampal dysplasia in a patient with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Martins, Heloise Helena; Marques, Carolina Mattos; Yacubian, Elza Marcia Targas; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Carrete, Henrique; da Silva Centeno, Ricardo; Stavale, João Norberto; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão

    2006-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that neurocysticercosis (NC) is the main cause of symptomatic epilepsy in developing countries. The association between NC and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) has been reported by several authors. Recent data have shown that the presence of NC does not influence the clinical and pathological profile in MTLE patients and suggest that not all cysticercotic lesions are inevitably epileptogenic. We describe a 50-years-old woman with partial seizures due to NC which evolve to MTLE. The patient was submitted to a corticoamygdalohippocampectomy to treat refractory epilepsy. An immunohistochemical study using neuronal markers was made on hippocampal formation. Besides the typical aspects of Ammon's horn sclerosis (AHS), the microscopic examination demonstrates cellular features of hippocampal malformation including dysmorphic neurons and focal bilamination of granular cell layer. We suggest that, in this case, a developmental disorder lowered the threshold for the NC-induced seizures and contributed to the establishment of refractory epilepsy.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA attenuates post-seizure hippocampal microglia TLR4/MYD88 signaling and inhibits TLR4 gene expression via histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qing-Peng; Mao, Ding-An

    2016-05-18

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Seizure-induced TLR4/MYD88 signaling plays a critical role in activating microglia and triggering neuron apoptosis. SAHA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that regulates gene expression by increasing chromatin histone acetylation. In this study, we investigated the role of SAHA in TLR4/MYD88 signaling in a rat seizure model. Sprague-Dawley rats with kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures were treated with SAHA. The expression of TLR4, MYD88, NF-κB P65 and IL-1β in hippocampus was detected at hour 2 and 6 and day 1, 2, and 3 post seizure. SAHA pretreatment increased seizure latency and decreased seizure scores. The expression levels of TLR4, MYD88, NF-κB and IL-1β increased significantly in both activated microglia and apoptotic neurons after KA treatment. The effects were attenuated by SAHA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that the H3 histone acetylation levels significantly decreased while H3K9 levels significantly increased in the KA treatment group. The H3 and H3K9 acetylation levels returned to control levels after SAHA (50 mg/kg) pretreatment. There was a positive correlation between the expression of TLR4 and the acetylation levels of H3K9. Histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA can suppress seizure-induced TLR4/MYD88 signaling and inhibit TLR4 gene expression through histone acetylation regulation. This suggests that SAHA may protect against seizure-induced brain damage.

  11. Mouse repeated electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) does not reverse social stress effects but does induce behavioral and hippocampal changes relevant to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) side-effects in the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    van Buel, Erin M; Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Fikse, Lianne; Bosker, Fokko J; Schoevers, Robert A; Klein, Hans C; Pryce, Christopher R; Eisel, Ulrich Lm

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but can have negative side effects including amnesia. The mechanisms of action underlying both the antidepressant and side effects of ECT are not well understood. An equivalent manipulation that is conducted in experimental animals is electroconvulsive seizure (ECS). Rodent studies have provided valuable insights into potential mechanisms underlying the antidepressant and side effects of ECT. However, relatively few studies have investigated the effects of ECS in animal models with a depression-relevant manipulation such as chronic stress. In the present study, mice were first exposed to chronic social stress (CSS) or a control procedure for 15 days followed by ECS or a sham procedure for 10 days. Behavioral effects were investigated using an auditory fear conditioning (learning) and expression (memory) test and a treadmill-running fatigue test. Thereafter, immunohistochemistry was conducted on brain material using the microglial marker Iba-1 and the cholinergic fibre marker ChAT. CSS did not increase fear learning and memory in the present experimental design; in both the control and CSS mice ECS reduced fear learning and fear memory expression. CSS induced the expected fatigue-like effect in the treadmill-running test; ECS induced increased fatigue in CSS and control mice. In CSS and control mice ECS induced inflammation in hippocampus in terms of increased expression of Iba-1 in radiatum of CA1 and CA3. CSS and ECS both reduced acetylcholine function in hippocampus as indicated by decreased expression of ChAT in several hippocampal sub-regions. Therefore, CSS increased fatigue and reduced hippocampal ChAT activity and, rather than reversing these effects, a repeated ECS regimen resulted in impaired fear learning-memory, increased fatigue, increased hippocampal Iba-1 expression, and decreased hippocampal ChAT expression. As such, the current model does not provide insights into the

  12. Migrating partial seizures of infancy: expansion of the electroclinical, radiological and pathological disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    McTague, Amy; Appleton, Richard; Avula, Shivaram; Cross, J Helen; King, Mary D; Jacques, Thomas S; Bhate, Sanjay; Cronin, Anthony; Curran, Andrew; Desurkar, Archana; Farrell, Michael A; Hughes, Elaine; Jefferson, Rosalind; Lascelles, Karine; Livingston, John; Meyer, Esther; McLellan, Ailsa; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Spinty, Stefan; Kurian, Manju A; Kneen, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    Migrating partial seizures of infancy, also known as epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, is a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with poor prognosis, presenting with focal seizures in the first year of life. A national surveillance study was undertaken in conjunction with the British Paediatric Neurology Surveillance Unit to further define the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic features of this disorder. Fourteen children with migrating partial seizures of infancy were reported during the 2 year study period (estimated prevalence 0.11 per 100,000 children). The study has revealed that migrating partial seizures of infancy is associated with an expanded spectrum of clinical features (including severe gut dysmotility and a movement disorder) and electrographic features including hypsarrhythmia (associated with infantile spasms) and burst suppression. We also report novel brain imaging findings including delayed myelination with white matter hyperintensity on brain magnetic resonance imaging in one-third of the cohort, and decreased N-acetyl aspartate on magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Putaminal atrophy (on both magnetic resonance imaging and at post-mortem) was evident in one patient. Additional neuropathological findings included bilateral hippocampal gliosis and neuronal loss in two patients who had post-mortem examinations. Within this cohort, we identified two patients with mutations in the newly discovered KCNT1 gene. Comparative genomic hybridization array, SCN1A testing and genetic testing for other currently known early infantile epileptic encephalopathy genes (including PLCB1 and SLC25A22) was non-informative for the rest of the cohort.

  13. Migrating partial seizures of infancy: expansion of the electroclinical, radiological and pathological disease spectrum

    PubMed Central

    McTague, Amy; Appleton, Richard; Avula, Shivaram; Cross, J. Helen; King, Mary D.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Bhate, Sanjay; Cronin, Anthony; Curran, Andrew; Desurkar, Archana; Farrell, Michael A.; Hughes, Elaine; Jefferson, Rosalind; Lascelles, Karine; Livingston, John; Meyer, Esther; McLellan, Ailsa; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Spinty, Stefan; Kurian, Manju A.

    2013-01-01

    Migrating partial seizures of infancy, also known as epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, is a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with poor prognosis, presenting with focal seizures in the first year of life. A national surveillance study was undertaken in conjunction with the British Paediatric Neurology Surveillance Unit to further define the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic features of this disorder. Fourteen children with migrating partial seizures of infancy were reported during the 2 year study period (estimated prevalence 0.11 per 100 000 children). The study has revealed that migrating partial seizures of infancy is associated with an expanded spectrum of clinical features (including severe gut dysmotility and a movement disorder) and electrographic features including hypsarrhythmia (associated with infantile spasms) and burst suppression. We also report novel brain imaging findings including delayed myelination with white matter hyperintensity on brain magnetic resonance imaging in one-third of the cohort, and decreased N-acetyl aspartate on magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Putaminal atrophy (on both magnetic resonance imaging and at post-mortem) was evident in one patient. Additional neuropathological findings included bilateral hippocampal gliosis and neuronal loss in two patients who had post-mortem examinations. Within this cohort, we identified two patients with mutations in the newly discovered KCNT1 gene. Comparative genomic hybridization array, SCN1A testing and genetic testing for other currently known early infantile epileptic encephalopathy genes (including PLCB1 and SLC25A22) was non-informative for the rest of the cohort. PMID:23599387

  14. Frontal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Bagla, Ritu; Skidmore, Christopher T

    2011-05-01

    Frontal lobe epilepsy is the second most common localization-related or focal epilepsy. Frontal lobe seizures are challenging to diagnose as the clinical manifestations are diverse due to the complexity and variability of the patterns of epileptic discharges, and the scalp electroencephalograph (EEG) can often be normal or misleading. This review focuses on the clinical and EEG features of seizures arising from the frontal lobe. The clinical manifestations in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy are varied. Frontal lobe seizures can be divided into perirolandic, supplementary sensorimotor area, dorsolateral, orbitofrontal, anterior frontopolar, opercular, and cingulate types. Seizures originating from the perirolandic and supplementary sensorimotor areas are clinically distinct, characterized by motor activity or asymmetric tonic posturing with preserved awareness. Seizures arising from dorsolateral, orbitofrontal, frontopolar, and cingulate areas are not as well characterized and have more variable clinical manifestations. Scalp EEG recording is sometimes helpful in localization but is usually normal or misleading in frontal lobe epilepsy. The treatment is similar to other localization-related or focal epilepsies. Medications are the first line of therapy, and surgery is considered for patients who fail to respond to medications. The surgical outcome in frontal lobe resections is less favorable than in anterior temporal lobectomies due to the challenge in locating the epileptogenic zone and the presence of functional areas (eloquent cortex) that can limit the resection. Frontal lobe seizures are characterized by diverse behavioral manifestations. Only a few well-described frontal lobe syndromes exist. The variety of clinical manifestations reflects both the varying sites of seizure origin and propagation routes that seizures may take. Although this review provides a framework for the understanding of these seizures, one should remain cautious in diagnosing seizure

  15. Gelastic seizures: not always hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christina S; Parrent, Andrew G; Burneo, Jorge G

    2007-12-01

    Gelastic seizures are often associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. However, focal cortical dysplasias can also cause "laughing seizures", and such cases can be difficult to localize with EEG. This case report presents a 29-year-old woman who was successfully rendered free of gelastic seizures after resection of a frontal cortical dysplasia, localized through MRI and SPECT imaging.[Published with video sequences].

  16. Long-term consequences of a prolonged febrile seizure in a dual pathology model.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Steve; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Desgent, Sébastien; Awad, Patricia N; Clerk-Lamalice, Olivier; Levesque, Maxime; Vianna, Rose-Mari; Rébillard, Rose-Marie; Delsemme, Andrée-Anne; Hébert, David; Tremblay, Luc; Lepage, Martin; Descarries, Laurent; Di Cristo, Graziella; Carmant, Lionel

    2011-08-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that febrile status epilepticus (SE) in children can lead to acute hippocampal injury and subsequent temporal lobe epilepsy. The contribution of febrile SE to the mechanisms underlying temporal lobe epilepsy are however poorly understood. A rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy following hyperthermic SE was previously established in our laboratory, wherein a focal cortical lesion induced at postnatal day 1 (P1), followed by a hyperthermic SE (more than 30 min) at P10, leads to hippocampal atrophy at P22 (dual pathology model) and spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) with mild visuospatial memory deficits in adult rats. The goal of this study was to identify the long term electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular changes in this model. Following hyperthermic SE, all cortically lesioned pups developed progressive SRS as adults, characterized by the onset of highly rhythmic activity in the hippocampus. A reduction of hippocampal volume on the side of the lesion preceded the SRS and was associated with a loss of hippocampal neurons, a marked decrease in pyramidal cell spine density, an increase in the hippocampal levels of NMDA receptor NR2A subunit, but no significant change in GABA receptors. These findings suggest that febrile SE in the abnormal brain leads to hippocampal injury that is followed by progressive network reorganization and molecular changes that contribute to the epileptogenesis as well as the observed memory deficits.

  17. Varying seizure semiology according to age.

    PubMed

    Nordli, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of seizures change in a predictable fashion with advancing age. For focal seizures these changes can be summarized into domains similar to those used in developmental models. These include fine motor, communication, and gross motor manifestations. Instead of socialization the fourth domain for seizure semiology concerns synchronization. Focal seizures in the very young tend to be simpler with fewer fine motor manifestations. Auras are uncommon, even in young children with some linguistic skill and it is often difficult to discern alteration of consciousness. Infantile focal seizures can present with spasms or even diffuse tonic seizures. In terms of synchronization, orderly secondary generalization is rarely seen so that primary generalized clonic seizures are rarely recorded in infants. Amongst so-called "generalized" seizures spasms are most often seen in the first year of life. Absence seizures, myoclonic-astatic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures are all usually not seen until after age 2 years. A full description of the clinical details of seizures is probably the most important part of the epilepsy history. A detailed knowledge of seizure semiology can make the history more effective and also in the identification of the correct seizure classification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hippocampal malformation associated with sudden death in early childhood: a neuropathologic study: Part 2 of the investigations of The San Diego SUDC Research Project.

    PubMed

    Hefti, Marco M; Cryan, Jane B; Haas, Elisabeth A; Chadwick, Amy E; Crandall, Laura A; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Armstrong, Dawna D; Grafe, Marjorie; Krous, Henry F; Kinney, Hannah C

    2016-03-01

    Sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC), while rare, accounts for an important fraction of unexpected deaths in children >1 year of age. Previously we reported an association between febrile seizures, hippocampal maldevelopment, and sudden, unexpected deaths in young children (1-6 years), termed "hippocampal maldevelopment associated with sudden death (HMASD)." Here, we characterize in greater detail the hippocampal pathology in a large cohort of cases (n = 42) of this entity, and attempt to define possible new entities responsible for sudden, unexplained death in young children without HMASD/febrile seizure phenotypes. We performed comparative analysis on cases, which we classified in a cohort of 89 sudden and unexpected deaths as HMASD, explained deaths, SUDC with febrile seizure phenotype (SUDC-FS) but without hippocampal pathology, and SUDC (without hippocampal pathology or febrile seizure phenotype). The frequency of each subgroup was: HMASD 48% (40/83); SUDC 27% (22/83); SUDC-FS 18% (15/83); explained 7% (6/83). HMASD was characterized clinically by sudden, sleep-related death, term birth, and discovery in the prone position. Key morphologic features of HMASD were focal granule cell bilamination of the dentate gyrus with or without asymmetry and/or malrotation of the hippocampus, associated with significantly increased frequencies of 11 other developmental abnormalities. We identified no other distinct phenotype in the unexplained categories, except for an association of febrile seizures without hippocampal maldevelopment. HMASD is a distinct clinicopathologic entity characterized by a likely developmental failure of neuronal migration in the dentate gyrus. Future research is needed to determine the causal role of HMASD in sudden death in early childhood.

  19. Hippocampal volume and memory performance in children with perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jeffrey J; Trauner, Doris A

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric neurologists and neonatologists often are asked to predict cognitive outcome after perinatal brain injury (including likely memory and learning outcomes). However, relatively few data exist on how accurate predictions can be made. Furthermore, although the consequences of brain injury on hippocampal volume and memory performance have been studied extensively in adults, little work has been done in children. We measured the volume of the hippocampus in 27 children with perinatal stroke and 19 controls, and measured their performance on standardized verbal and non-verbal memory tests. We discovered the following: (1) As a group, children with perinatal stroke had smaller left and right hippocampi compared with control children. (2) Individually, children with perinatal stroke demonstrated 1 of 3 findings: no hippocampal loss, unilateral hippocampal loss, or bilateral hippocampal volume loss compared with control children. (3) Hippocampal volume inversely correlated with memory test performance in the perinatal stroke group, with smaller left and right hippocampal volumes related to poorer verbal and non-verbal memory test performance, respectively. (4) Seizures played a significant role in determining memory deficit and extent of hippocampal volume reduction in patients with perinatal stroke. These findings support the view that, in the developing brain, the left and right hippocampi preferentially support verbal and nonverbal memory respectively, a consistent finding in the adult literature but a subject of debate in the pediatric literature. This is the first work to report that children with focal brain injury incurred from perinatal stroke have volume reduction in the hippocampus and impairments in certain aspects of declarative memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Absence Seizure (Petit Mal Seizure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staff Absence seizures involve brief, sudden lapses of consciousness. They're more common in children than adults. ... have seizures, the brain's usual electrical activity is altered. During an absence seizure, these electrical signals repeat ...

  1. Beta/gamma oscillatory activity in the CA3 hippocampal area is depressed by aberrant GABAergic transmission from the dentate gyrus after seizures.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario; Vivar, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2007-01-03

    Oscillatory activity in the CA3 region is thought to be involved in the encoding and retrieval of information. These oscillations originate from the recurrent excitation between pyramidal cells that are entrained by the synchronous rhythmic inhibition of local interneurons. We show here that, after seizures, the dentate gyrus (DG) tonically inhibits beta/gamma (20-24 Hz) field oscillations in the CA3 area through GABA-mediated signaling. These oscillations originate in the interneuron network because they are maintained in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, and they can be blocked by GABA(A) receptor antagonists or by perfusion of a calcium-free extracellular medium. Inhibition of this oscillatory activity requires intact DG-to-CA3 connections, and it is suppressed by the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR). The influence of mGluR activation was reflected in the spontaneous subthreshold membrane oscillations of CA3 interneurons after one seizure but could also be observed in pyramidal cells after several seizures. Coincident stimulation of the DG at and beta/gamma frequencies produced a frequency-dependent excitation of interneurons and the inhibition of pyramidal cells. Indeed, these effects were maximal at the frequency that matched the mGluR-sensitive spontaneous field oscillations, suggesting a resonance phenomenon. Our results shed light on the mechanisms that may underlie the deficits in memory and cognition observed after epileptic seizures.

  2. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  3. Mouse repeated electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) does not reverse social stress effects but does induce behavioral and hippocampal changes relevant to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) side-effects in the treatment of depression

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Fikse, Lianne; Bosker, Fokko J.; Schoevers, Robert A.; Klein, Hans C.

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but can have negative side effects including amnesia. The mechanisms of action underlying both the antidepressant and side effects of ECT are not well understood. An equivalent manipulation that is conducted in experimental animals is electroconvulsive seizure (ECS). Rodent studies have provided valuable insights into potential mechanisms underlying the antidepressant and side effects of ECT. However, relatively few studies have investigated the effects of ECS in animal models with a depression-relevant manipulation such as chronic stress. In the present study, mice were first exposed to chronic social stress (CSS) or a control procedure for 15 days followed by ECS or a sham procedure for 10 days. Behavioral effects were investigated using an auditory fear conditioning (learning) and expression (memory) test and a treadmill-running fatigue test. Thereafter, immunohistochemistry was conducted on brain material using the microglial marker Iba-1 and the cholinergic fibre marker ChAT. CSS did not increase fear learning and memory in the present experimental design; in both the control and CSS mice ECS reduced fear learning and fear memory expression. CSS induced the expected fatigue-like effect in the treadmill-running test; ECS induced increased fatigue in CSS and control mice. In CSS and control mice ECS induced inflammation in hippocampus in terms of increased expression of Iba-1 in radiatum of CA1 and CA3. CSS and ECS both reduced acetylcholine function in hippocampus as indicated by decreased expression of ChAT in several hippocampal sub-regions. Therefore, CSS increased fatigue and reduced hippocampal ChAT activity and, rather than reversing these effects, a repeated ECS regimen resulted in impaired fear learning-memory, increased fatigue, increased hippocampal Iba-1 expression, and decreased hippocampal ChAT expression. As such, the current model does not provide insights into the

  4. Development of later life spontaneous seizures in a rodent model of hypoxia induced neonatal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Rakhade, Sanjay N; Klein, Peter; Huynh, Thanthao; Hilario-Gomez, Cristina; Kosaras, Bela; Rotenberg, Alexander; Jensen, Frances E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose To study the development of epilepsy following hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures in Long Evans rats and to establish the presence of spontaneous seizures in this model of early life seizures. Methods Long-Evans rat pups were subjected to hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures at postnatal day 10 (P10). Epidural cortical electroencephalography (EEG) and hippocampal depth electrodes were used to detect the presence of seizures in later adulthood (>P60). In addition, subdermal wire electrode recordings were used to monitor age at onset and progression of seizures in the juvenile period, at intervals between P10–P60. Timm staining was performed to evaluate mossy fiber sprouting in the hippocampi of P100 adult rats that had experienced neonatal seizures. Key Findings In recordings made from adult rats (P60–P180), the prevalence of epilepsy in cortical and hippocampal EEG recordings was 94.4% following early life hypoxic seizures. These spontaneous seizures were identified by characteristic spike and wave activity on EEG accompanied by behavioral arrest and facial automatisms (electroclinical seizures). Phenobarbital injection transiently abolished spontaneous seizures. EEG in the juvenile period (P10–60) showed that spontaneous seizures first occurred approximately 2 weeks after the initial episode of hypoxic seizures. Following this period, spontaneous seizure frequency and duration progressively increased with time. Furthermore, significantly increased sprouting of mossy fibers was observed in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus in adult animals following hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures. Notably, Fluoro-Jade B staining confirmed that hypoxic seizures at P10 did not induce acute neuronal death. Significance The rodent model of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures leads to the development of epilepsy in later life, accompanied by increased mossy fiber sprouting. In addition, this model appears to exhibit a seizure-free latent period

  5. Myocardial infarction following convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures.

    PubMed

    Montepietra, Sara; Cattaneo, Luigi; Granella, Franco; Maurizio, Annarita; Sasso, Enrico; Pavesi, Giovanni; Bortone, Ermelinda

    2009-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) has been rarely reported in association with seizures, and only of convulsive type. We describe a series of five patients observed over a 4-year period, who presented MI immediately following seizures, either convulsive or nonconvulsive. Patient 1 had pre-existent coronary disease (CD) and presented multiple focal nonconvulsive seizures. Patient 2 had no CD, normal coronary angiography and presented secondary generalized convulsive seizures. Patient 3 had no history of CD, normal angiography and had a first single convulsive seizure. Patient 4 had severe CD and suffered from a single convulsive event. Patient 5 had a partial and a generalized seizure and had no known CD. MI following seizures is not an exceptional event and can occur in a spectrum of conditions including single or repeated, convulsive or nonconvulsive seizures, in patients with or without pre-existing coronary disease. We suggest that the occurrence of MI should be considered in epileptic patients during and shortly after seizures.

  6. Mice deficient for the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-r show physiological and structural hallmarks of increased hippocampal excitability, but no increased susceptibility to seizures in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brenneke, F; Bukalo, O; Dityatev, A; Lie, A A

    2004-01-01

    Recognition molecules provide important cues for neuronal survival, axonal fasciculation, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and regeneration. Our previous studies revealed a link between perisomatic inhibition and the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-R (TN-R). Therefore, we here studied neuronal excitability and epileptic susceptibility in mice constitutively deficient in TN-R. In vitro analysis of populational spikes in hippocampal slices of TN-R-deficient mice revealed a significant increase in multiple spikes in the CA1 region, as compared with wild-type mice. This difference between genotypes was only partially reduced after blockade of GABA(A) receptors with picrotoxin, indicating a deficit in GABAergic inhibition and an increase in intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells in TN-R-deficient mice. Using a battery of immunohistochemical markers and histological stainings, we were able to identify two abnormalities in the hippocampus of TN-R-deficient mice possibly related to increased excitability: the high number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes and low number of calretinin-positive interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 regions. In order to test whether the revealed abnormalities give rise to increased susceptibility to seizures in TN-R-deficient mice, we used the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. No genotype-specific differences were found with regard to the time-course of pilocarpine-induced and spontaneous seizures, neuronal cell loss, aberrant sprouting and distribution of synaptic and inhibitory interneuron markers. However, pilocarpine-induced astrogliosis and reduction in calretinin-positive interneurons were less pronounced in TN-R mutants, thereby resulting in an occlusion of effects induced by TN-R deficiency and pilocarpine. Thus, TN-R-deficient mutants show several electrophysiological and morphological hallmarks of increased neuronal excitability, which, however, do not give rise to more

  7. Selective frontal, parietal, and temporal networks in generalized seizures.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Hal; Westerveld, Michael; Ostroff, Robert B; Vanderhill, Susan D; Freeman, Jason; Necochea, Alexandro; Uranga, Paula; Tanhehco, Tasha; Smith, Arien; Seibyl, John P; Stokking, Rik; Studholme, Colin; Spencer, Susan S; Zubal, I George

    2003-08-01

    Are "generalized" seizures truly generalized? Generalized tonic-clonic seizures are classified as either secondarily generalized with local onset or primarily generalized, without known focal onset. In both types of generalized seizures widespread regions of the nervous system engage in abnormally synchronous and high-frequency neuronal firing. However, emerging evidence suggests that all neurons are not homogeneously involved; specific nodes within the network may be crucial for the propagation and behavioral manifestations of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Study of human tonic-clonic seizures has been limited by problems with patient movement and variable seizure types. To circumvent these problems, we imaged generalized tonic-clonic seizures during electroconvulsive therapy, in which seizure type and timing are well controlled. (99m)Tc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime injections during seizures provide a "snapshot" of cerebral blood flow that can be imaged by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after seizure termination. Here we show that focal regions of frontal and parietal association cortex show the greatest relative signal increases. Involvement of the higher-order association cortex may explain the profound impairment of consciousness seen in generalized seizures. In addition, focal involvement of the dominant temporal lobe was associated with impaired retrograde verbal memory. Similar focal increases were also seen in imaging of spontaneous secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Relative sparing of many brain regions during both spontaneous and induced seizures suggests that specific networks may be more important than others in so-called generalized seizures.

  8. Possible involvement of NO/NOS signaling in hippocampal amyloid-beta production induced by transient focal cerebral ischemia in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Wang, Wei; Wang, Che; Tang, Yi-Yuan

    2010-02-12

    In the present study, to define the roles of nitric oxide (NO) signaling in amyloid-beta (A beta) production after transient cerebral ischemia, extracellular levels of NO and A beta were monitored by intracerebral microdialysis in the hippocampus of aged rats exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R). The results indicated that 1-h MCAO significantly upregulated hippocampal NO and A beta levels. In addition, the NO elevation preceded the A beta changes. The Western blotting suggested that acute hypoperfusion could increase the expression of beta-secretase 1 (BACE1) but not BACE2. The enhanced NO concentration in acute stage of MCAO/R was coincident with increased eNOS expression, while in subacute stage was coincident with increased iNOS and nNOS. Our results also indicated that pretreatment of L-NAME, one non-selective NOS inhibitor could decrease the BACE1 expression, reverse both NO and A beta changes and rescue the delayed neuronal death. These preliminary findings indicated that activation of NOS/NO signaling system could trigger A beta production through BACE1 pathway during acute ischemic episode. The present data may be important in understanding, at least in part, the pathological role of NO/NOS system involved in hippocampal A beta production and neuronal damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

  9. [Ecstatic seizures].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered.

  10. Leptin inhibits 4-aminopyridine- and pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures and AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in rodents.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Rensing, Nicholas; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Hai Xia; Thio, Liu Lin; Rothman, Steven M; Weisenfeld, Aryan E; Wong, Michael; Yamada, Kelvin A

    2008-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone that reduces excitability in some hypothalamic neurons via leptin receptor activation of the JAK2 and PI3K intracellular signaling pathways. We hypothesized that leptin receptor activation in other neuronal subtypes would have anticonvulsant activity and that intranasal leptin delivery would be an effective route of administration. We tested leptin's anticonvulsant action in 2 rodent seizure models by directly injecting it into the cortex or by administering it intranasally. Focal seizures in rats were induced by neocortical injections of 4-aminopyridine, an inhibitor of voltage-gated K+ channels. These seizures were briefer and less frequent upon coinjection of 4-aminopyridine and leptin. In mice, intranasal administration of leptin produced elevated brain and serum leptin levels and delayed the onset of chemical convulsant pentylenetetrazole-induced generalized convulsive seizures. Leptin also reduced neuronal spiking in an in vitro seizure model. Leptin inhibited alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in mouse hippocampal slices but failed to inhibit synaptic responses in slices from leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice. JAK2 and PI3K antagonists prevented leptin inhibition of AMPAergic synaptic transmission. We conclude that leptin receptor activation and JAK2/PI3K signaling may be novel targets for anticonvulsant treatments. Intranasal leptin administration may have potential as an acute abortive treatment for convulsive seizures in emergency situations.

  11. Leptin inhibits 4-aminopyridine– and pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures and AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Rensing, Nicholas; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Hai Xia; Thio, Liu Lin; Rothman, Steven M.; Weisenfeld, Aryan E.; Wong, Michael; Yamada, Kelvin A.

    2007-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone that reduces excitability in some hypothalamic neurons via leptin receptor activation of the JAK2 and PI3K intracellular signaling pathways. We hypothesized that leptin receptor activation in other neuronal subtypes would have anticonvulsant activity and that intranasal leptin delivery would be an effective route of administration. We tested leptin’s anticonvulsant action in 2 rodent seizure models by directly injecting it into the cortex or by administering it intranasally. Focal seizures in rats were induced by neocortical injections of 4-aminopyridine, an inhibitor of voltage-gated K+ channels. These seizures were briefer and less frequent upon coinjection of 4-aminopyridine and leptin. In mice, intranasal administration of leptin produced elevated brain and serum leptin levels and delayed the onset of chemical convulsant pentylenetetrazole-induced generalized convulsive seizures. Leptin also reduced neuronal spiking in an in vitro seizure model. Leptin inhibited α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptor–mediated synaptic transmission in mouse hippocampal slices but failed to inhibit synaptic responses in slices from leptin receptor–deficient db/db mice. JAK2 and PI3K antagonists prevented leptin inhibition of AMPAergic synaptic transmission. We conclude that leptin receptor activation and JAK2/PI3K signaling may be novel targets for anticonvulsant treatments. Intranasal leptin administration may have potential as an acute abortive treatment for convulsive seizures in emergency situations. PMID:18097472

  12. Ictal regional cerebral blood flow in frontal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R; Patterson, J; Hadley, D; Roberts, R

    1997-10-01

    99mTC (single photon emission computed tomography) (HMPAO SPECT) was carried out during 16 frontal-lobe seizures in 15 patients. Focal changes in regional cerebral blood flow were seen during all seizures. In 9 of 16 seizures SPECT showed hyperperfusion localized to one frontal lobe. In 1 of 16 seizures ictal hypoperfusion was seen in one frontal lobe. In 2 of 16 seizures there was hyperperfusion in both frontal lobes, and in 4 of 16 seizures hyperperfusion involved the frontal lobe or lobes plus other lobes of the brain. These changes were accompanied by hyperperfusion of subcortical structures in 13 seizures. SPECT thus localized to one frontal lobe in 10 of 16 seizures, and localized to the frontal lobes without lateralizing in two further seizures. No seizure showed a pattern of perfusion similar to that reported in mesial-temporal-lobe seizures. We conclude that ictal SPECT may provide useful localizing information in frontal-lobe seizures.

  13. Febrile seizures and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+).

    PubMed

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2015-06-01

    To review the literature about febrile seizures and GEFS plus with special emphasis on management and outcome. Selected literature review. Febrile seizures are the most common convulsive event in humans, occurring in 2-6% of the population. The aetiology is complex with strong evidence for a heterogeneous genetic predisposition interacting with fever of any cause, with certain viral infections having a greater effect. A large amount of literature has established that febrile seizures have no long-term consequences on cognition or behaviour. Unfortunately, about 40% of children with a first febrile seizure will have a recurrence. The strongest predictor of recurrence is age <14-16 months at the time of the first febrile seizure. Epilepsy follows febrile seizures in ∼3% cases, with the concepts of simple and complex febrile seizures providing relatively weak prediction. Very prolonged febrile seizures may lead to mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy although the degree of risk remains uncertain. Investigations beyond establishing the cause of the provoking fever are nearly always unnecessary. Treatment is mainly reassurance and there is some evidence that parents eventually "come to grips" with the fear that their children are dying during a febrile seizure. Antipyretic medications are remarkably ineffective to prevent recurrences. Daily and intermittent prophylactic medications are ineffective or have unacceptable side effects or risks. "Rescue" benzodiazepines may prevent prolonged recurrences for selected patients with a first prolonged febrile seizure although this has not been proven. Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a complex autosomal dominant disorder usually caused by mutations in SCN1A (a voltage-gated sodium channel). One third of patients have febrile seizures only; two thirds have a variety of epilepsy syndromes, both focal and generalized. Febrile seizures may distress parents but rarely have any long

  14. Effects of single-dose neuropeptide Y on levels of hippocampal BDNF, MDA, GSH, and NO in a rat model of pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure

    PubMed Central

    Kir, Hale Maral; Şahin, Deniz; Öztaş, Berrin; Musul, Mert; Kuskay, Sevinc

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, characterized by recurrent seizures, which may increase the content of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Neuropeptide Y on oxidative and nitrosative balance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by pentylenetetrazole (a standard convulsant drug) in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. Three groups of seven rats were treated intraperitoneally as follows: group 1 (saline + saline) 1 ml saline, group 2 (salin + Pentylenetetrazole) 1 ml saline 30 min before Pentylenetetrazole; and group 3 (Neuropeptide Y + Pentylenetetrazole) 60 μg/kg Neuropeptide Y 30 min before 60 mg/kg Pentylenetetrazole. After 24 h, the animals were euthanized by decapitation. Hippocampus were isolated to evaluate the malondi-aldehyde, glutathione, nitric oxide, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in three rat groups. The results of this study demonstrated that while intraperitoneally administered neuropeptide Y did not result in a statistically significant difference in BDNF levels, its administration caused a statistically significant decrease in malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels and an increase in glutathione levels in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure. Neuropeptide Y were able to reduce nitroxidative damage induced by pentylenetetrazole in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. PMID:24289760

  15. Gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Machado, René Andrade; Astencio, Adriana Goicoechea

    2012-01-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a patient with gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe. Our patient, an 8-year-old girl, underwent interictal video/EEG monitoring and MRI. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic spikes and waves in the left parietal lobe. MRI revealed the characteristic features of focal cortical dysplasia. Our findings suggest that the left parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures.

  16. Localization of pediatric seizure semiology.

    PubMed

    Vendrame, Martina; Zarowski, Marcin; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Wyllie, Elaine; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between semiology of seizures in children and adolescents to the corresponding EEG localization. Charts of 225 consecutive pediatric epilepsy patients undergoing Video-EEG monitoring (VEM) over 2 years were reviewed. Seizure semiology recorded during VEM was classified according to ILAE seizure semiology terminology and EEG localization, and analyzed based on onset as defined by the EEG data (generalized, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital or multilobar). A total of 1008 seizures were analyzed in 225 children (mean age 8.5 years, range 0-20), with 50% boys. Auras and seizures with automatisms arose predominantly from the temporal lobes (p<0.001). Tonic, clonic and tonic-clonic seizures had most commonly generalized onset (p<0.001). Hypomotor seizures were most frequently seen from the frontal lobes (p<0.001). Hypermotor seizures had most commonly temporal lobe or multiple lobe onset (p<0.001 and p<0.05 respectively). Atonic, myoclonic seizures and epileptic spasms had almost exclusively a generalized onset (p<0.001). Different seizure semiologies relate to specific brain regions, with overlap between focal and generalized semiological seizure types, as identified electrographically. Semiology of seizures can provide important information for epilepsy localization, and should not be overlooked, especially in patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation. Separation of clinical seizure description and EEG findings may be useful, in particular when only incomplete information is available. i.e. during the first office visit. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors of recurrent seizure, co-morbidities, and mortality in new onset seizure in elderly.

    PubMed

    Phabphal, Kanitpong; Geater, Alan; Limapichat, Kitti; Sathirapanya, Pornchai; Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna

    2013-09-01

    To determine the risk factors of seizure recurrence and the most common comorbidities in elderly patients with epilepsy. We did a retrospective study of 278 patients older than 65 years with first seizure. We evaluated electrolytes, blood glucose, urea and creatinine levels, and performed electrocardiography (ECG), and routine electroencephalogram (EEG) on all patients. We evaluated seizure recurrence and comorbidities at 2 years. Univariate analysis found that significant (P<0.05) factors affecting seizure recurrence were etiology of seizure, EEG, and status epilepticus at first presentation. In multivariate regression analysis, etiology of seizure and EEG were significant statistical factors in seizure recurrence at 2 years follow up. Age, sex, duration of time between first seizure and diagnosis of seizure, seizure type, misdiagnosis of non-epileptic seizure, and use of antiepileptic drugs were not significant factors for predicting seizure recurrence. Depression and anxiety were the most common comorbidities in our study, followed by sleep-related disorders and stroke. There were no statistically significantly differences in comorbidities between patients who remained seizure free and patients who had recurrent seizure. Most of the new onset seizures in our elderly patients were focal onset. Acute symptomatic etiology, remote symptomatic etiology, progressive symptomatic etiology and abnormal EEG features were powerful predictors of seizure recurrence, and mood disorder, sleep disorder and stroke were the common comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcriptome profiling of hippocampal CA1 after early-life seizure-induced preconditioning may elucidate new genetic therapies for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, L K; Mancuso, J; Patel, A; Kudur, V; Leheste, J R; Iacobas, S; Botta, J; Iacobas, D A; Spray, D C

    2013-07-01

    Injury of the CA1 subregion induced by a single injection of kainic acid (1 × KA) in juvenile animals (P20) is attenuated in animals with two prior sustained neonatal seizures on P6 and P9. To identify gene candidates involved in the spatially protective effects produced by early-life conditioning seizures we profiled and compared the transcriptomes of CA1 subregions from control, 1 × KA- and 3 × KA-treated animals. More genes were regulated following 3 × KA (9.6%) than after 1 × KA (7.1%). Following 1 × KA, genes supporting oxidative stress, growth, development, inflammation and neurotransmission were upregulated (e.g. Cacng1, Nadsyn1, Kcng1, Aven, S100a4, GFAP, Vim, Hrsp12 and Grik1). After 3 × KA, protective genes were differentially over-expressed [e.g. Cat, Gpx7, Gad1, Hspa12A, Foxn1, adenosine A1 receptor, Ca(2+) adaptor and homeostasis proteins, Cacnb4, Atp2b2, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene members, intracellular trafficking protein, Grasp and suppressor of cytokine signaling (Socs3)]. Distinct anti-inflammatory interleukins (ILs) not observed in adult tissues [e.g. IL-6 transducer, IL-23 and IL-33 or their receptors (IL-F2 )] were also over-expressed. Several transcripts were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and immunohistochemistry. QPCR showed that casp 6 was increased after 1 × KA but reduced after 3 × KA; the pro-inflammatory gene Cox1 was either upregulated or unchanged after 1 × KA but reduced by ~70% after 3 × KA. Enhanced GFAP immunostaining following 1 × KA was selectively attenuated in the CA1 subregion after 3 × KA. The observed differential transcriptional responses may contribute to early-life seizure-induced pre-conditioning and neuroprotection by reducing glutamate receptor-mediated Ca(2+) permeability of the hippocampus and redirecting inflammatory and apoptotic pathways. These changes could lead to new genetic therapies for epilepsy. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience

  19. Reflex seizures triggered by cutaneous stimuli.

    PubMed

    Sala-Padró, J; Toledo, M; Sarria, S; Santamarina, E; Gonzalez-Cuevas, M; Sueiras-Gil, M; Salas-Puig, J

    2015-12-01

    Among the different precipitating stimuli for reflex seizures, Touch-Induced Seizures (TIS) and Hot Water Seizures (HWS) are consistently described in different reports. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical, EEG and image data of patients with TIS and HWS. We retrospectively analyzed patients who were followed up in our Epilepsy Unit and had seizures triggered by these stimuli. All patients were studied with electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance (MR). We recruited six patients, including five men, with an age range of 30-64 years-old. Four patients had TIS; all them had focal motor seizures after the stimuli, with epileptic foci in the fronto-central regions associated with peri-central gyri lesions on MR. One patient had HWS related to a septo-optic dysplasia with periopercular polymicrogyria, and one patient had focal seizures that evolved into bilateral convulsions triggered by washing the mouth with cold water. We considered this last patient to have water contact-induced seizures (WCIS). Seizures in TIS are most likely focal, without impairment of awareness, and refractory to medical treatment. Antiepileptic drugs can prevent the progression to bilateral convulsion. The origins of such seizures seem to be related to small lesions or epileptogenic zones in the perirolandic areas. Lesional HWS and WCIS are focal seizures that involve impairment of consciousness or focal seizures that evolve to bilateral convulsion, are not such location specific and involve larger ictogenic areas. In both epilepsies, stimulus avoidance is the most effective treatment. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Does the co-occurrence of FGFR3 gene mutation in hypochondroplasia, medial temporal lobe dysgenesis, and focal epilepsy suggest a syndrome?

    PubMed

    Romeo, Antonino; Lodi, Monica; Viri, Maurizio; Parente, Eliana; Baldi, Maurizia; Righini, Andrea; Milani, Donatella

    2014-04-01

    Hypochondroplasia is a rare skeletal dysplasia characterized by disproportionately short stature, lumbar lordosis, and limited extension of the elbow caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene that plays a role in controlling nervous system development. Hypochondroplasia with FGFR3 mutation associated with bilateral medial temporal lobe anomalies and focal epilepsy was previously reported in several patients. We report clinical, electroclinical, and neuroradiological findings of one patient affected by hypochondroplasia. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the FGFR3 gene, which showed a N540 K mutation. The patient had normal psychomotor development and showed early-onset focal seizures with left temporal localization on interictal and ictal electroencephalograph. The seizures were well controlled, and the patient has been seizure-free since infancy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal anteriorly posteriorly infolding in the hippocampus and abnormally oriented parahippocampus sulci, and additional cortical rim dysplasia with gray-white matter junction blurring in the hippocampus. The present case of hypochondroplasia and FGFR3 mutation in Asn540Lys associated with characteristic abnormalities involving bilaterally medial temporal lobe structures, probable hippocampal cortex focal dysplasia, and early onset of focal epilepsy underscores the possibility of a rare syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbon monoxide offers neuroprotection from hippocampal cell damage induced by recurrent febrile seizures through the PERK-activated ER stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Yi, Wenxia; Qin, Jiong; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Jing; Chang, Xingzhi

    2015-01-12

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is neuroprotective in various models of brain injury, but the precise mechanisms for this are yet to be established. In the present study, using a rat model of recurrent febrile seizures (FSs), we found an increase in plasma CO, evidence of neuronal damage and apoptosis, an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) marker glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous binding protein (CHOP), and an increase in phosphorylated protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (p-PERK)/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (p-eIF2α) in the hippocampus after 10 FSs. Administration of Hemin (a CO donor) in FS rats alleviated the neuronal damage, reduced neuronal apoptosis, upregulated GRP78 expression, decreased CHOP, and increased p-PERK and p-eIF2α expression in the hippocampus, compared to FS control rats. In contrast, treating FS rats with ZnPP-IX (a CO synthase inhibitor) aggravated the neuronal damage, enhanced neuronal apoptosis, downregulated GRP78 expression, increased CHOP, and decreased p-PERK and p-eIF2α expression, compared to FS control rats. These results suggest that endogenous CO limits the neuronal damage induced by recurrent FSs, through the PERK-activated ERS pathway.

  2. Febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Janet L; Carapetian, Stephanie A; Hageman, Joseph R; Kelley, Kent R

    2013-12-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures, affecting 2% to 5% of children. They are considered benign and self-limiting; however, a febrile seizure is a terrifying event for most parents, and is one of the most common causes of trips to the emergency room. A febrile seizure is "an event in infancy or childhood, usually occurring between 3 months and 5 years of age, associated with fever but without evidence of intracranial infection or defined cause." This definition excludes seizures with fever in children who have had a prior afebrile seizure. In 2011, The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published a clinical practice guideline defining a febrile seizure as "a seizure accompanied by fever (temperature ≥ 100.4°F or 38°C by any method), without central nervous system infection, that occurs in infants and children 6 through 60 months of age." Febrile seizures are further classified as simple or complex. This article reviews the evaluation, management, and prognosis of simple and complex seizures, including febrile status epilepticus. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Hippocampal sclerosis in association with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Singla, Monika; Singh, Parampreet; Kaushal, Sandeep; Bansal, Rajinder; Singh, Gagandeep

    2007-09-01

    To discuss the possible mechanisms underlying a dual pathology combining neurocysticercosis and hippocampal atrophy, illustrated by the observation of four patients with epilepsy. The first patient presented at the age of four years with a first episode of status epilepticus, presumably due to an inflamed, calcified, parenchymal cysticercus granuloma. Thereafter, he had occasional seizures. Routine MRI undertaken several years later revealed unilateral hippocampal atrophy and sclerosis. Two other patients with initial imaging evidence of active neurocysticercosis located close to the hippocampus, and occasional seizures, developed ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis. The seizure disorder of our fourth patient, with medically intractable epilepsy, was initially attributed to a calcified cysticercus granuloma. Clinical description, video-EEG telemetry and imaging work-up suggested a diagnosis of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis. Definitive conclusions as to the underlying mechanisms cannot be derived from the present, retrospective series of only four patients. However, the following suggestions can be made: 1) seizures due to neurocysticercosis may constitute the initial precipitating illness for the development of hippocampal sclerosis, 2) the hippocampus may be involved in host brain inflammation and gliosis in response to a nearby, degenerating cysticercus, 3) the seizure focus formed by the degenerating cysticercus, engenders epileptogenic changes in the hippocampus through kindling, and 4) the two conditions may coexist purely by chance. Systematic and prospective, serial MRI evaluations of hippocampal structures in patients with neurocysticercosis should contribute to further clarify the underlying mechanisms.

  4. Hippocampal Formation Maldevelopment and Sudden Unexpected Death across the Pediatric Age Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Hannah C; Poduri, Annapurna H; Cryan, Jane B; Haynes, Robin L; Teot, Lisa; Sleeper, Lynn A; Holm, Ingrid A; Berry, Gerald T; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Warfield, Simon K; Brownstein, Catherine; Abram, Harry S; Kruer, Michael; Kemp, Walter L; Hargitai, Beata; Gastrang, Joanne; Mena, Othon J; Haas, Elisabeth A; Dastjerdi, Roya; Armstrong, Dawna D; Goldstein, Richard D

    2016-10-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC) are defined as sudden death in a child remaining unexplained despite autopsy and death scene investigation. They are distinguished from each other by age criteria, i.e. with SIDS under 1 year and SUDC over 1 year. Our separate studies of SIDS and SUDC provide evidence of shared hippocampal abnormalities, specifically focal dentate bilamination, a lesion classically associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, across the 2 groups. In this study, we characterized the clinicopathologic features in a retrospective case series of 32 children with sudden death and hippocampal formation (HF) maldevelopment. The greatest frequency of deaths was between 3 weeks and 3 years (81%, 26/32). Dentate anomalies were found across the pediatric age spectrum, supporting a common vulnerability that defies the 1-year age cutoff between SIDS and SUDC. Twelve cases (38%) had seizures, including 7 only with febrile seizures. Subicular anomalies were found in cases over 1 year of age and were associated with increased risk of febrile seizures. Sudden death associated with HF maldevelopment reflects a complex interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that lead to death at different pediatric ages, and may be analogous to sudden unexplained death in epilepsy.

  5. A gain-of-function mutation in the sodium channel gene Scn2a results in seizures and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kearney, J A; Plummer, N W; Smith, M R; Kapur, J; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G; Goldin, A L; Meisler, M H

    2001-01-01

    The GAL879-881QQQ mutation in the cytoplasmic S4-S5 linker of domain 2 of the rat brain IIA sodium channel (Na(v)1.2) results in slowed inactivation and increased persistent current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The neuron-specific enolase promoter was used to direct in vivo expression of the mutated channel in transgenic mice. Three transgenic lines exhibited seizures, and line Q54 was characterized in detail. The seizures in these mice began at two months of age and were accompanied by behavioral arrest and stereotyped repetitive behaviors. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring detected focal seizure activity in the hippocampus, which in some instances generalized to involve the cortex. Hippocampal CA1 neurons isolated from presymptomatic Q54 mice exhibited increased persistent sodium current which may underlie hyperexcitability in the hippocampus. During the progression of the disorder there was extensive cell loss and gliosis within the hippocampus in areas CA1, CA2, CA3 and the hilus. The lifespan of Q54 mice was shortened and only 25% of the mice survived beyond six months of age. Four independent transgenic lines expressing the wild-type sodium channel were examined and did not exhibit any abnormalities. The transgenic Q54 mice provide a genetic model that will be useful for testing the effect of pharmacological intervention on progression of seizures caused by sodium channel dysfunction. The human ortholog, SCN2A, is a candidate gene for seizure disorders mapped to chromosome 2q22-24.

  6. New onset seizures in HIV--seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and viral loads.

    PubMed

    Modi, Mala; Mochan, Andre; Modi, Girish

    2009-05-01

    Thirty-seven HIV-positive patients with new-onset seizures (NOS) were prospectively identified during a 1-year study period. The patients were categorized according to the different mechanisms causing NOS in HIV, namely focal brain lesion (FBL) in 21 patients (57%), meningitis in 6 patients (16%), metabolic derangement (no patient), and no identified cause (NIC) other than HIV itself (10 patients, 27%). Seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and blood and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) viral loads were studied to identify any special characteristics of the different categories. With respect to seizure semiology, all NIC patients had generalized seizures. Two-thirds of the meningitis patients had generalized seizures with one-third having focal seizures. Half of the patients with FBL had generalized seizures and one-third had focal seizures. Status epilepticus was strongly associated with FBL. No significant difference could be detected between the subgroups with respect to CD4 counts and serum and CSF viral loads. The median CD4 count in all patients was 108 cells/ml, indicating advanced immunosuppression. In the FBL group this was 104 cells/ml. In the meningitis group the median CD4 count was 298 cells/ml, and in the NIC group this was 213 cells/ml. Similarly, no differences were noted in the NOS categories with respect to serum and CSF viral loads. Seizures in HIV are a nonspecific manifestation of the seizure mechanism.

  7. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to epilepsy and associated cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Ok; Lybrand, Zane R; Ito, Naoki; Brulet, Rebecca; Tafacory, Farrah; Zhang, Ling; Good, Levi; Ure, Kerstin; Kernie, Steven G; Birnbaum, Shari G; Scharfman, Helen E; Eisch, Amelia J; Hsieh, Jenny

    2015-03-26

    Acute seizures after a severe brain insult can often lead to epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis follows the insult but the role of adult-generated neurons in the development of chronic seizures or associated cognitive deficits remains to be determined. Here we show that the ablation of adult neurogenesis before pilocarpine-induced acute seizures in mice leads to a reduction in chronic seizure frequency. We also show that ablation of neurogenesis normalizes epilepsy-associated cognitive deficits. Remarkably, the effect of ablating adult neurogenesis before acute seizures is long lasting as it suppresses chronic seizure frequency for nearly 1 year. These findings establish a key role of neurogenesis in chronic seizure development and associated memory impairment and suggest that targeting aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis may reduce recurrent seizures and restore cognitive function following a pro-epileptic brain insult.

  8. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to epilepsy and associated cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung-Ok; Lybrand, Zane R.; Ito, Naoki; Brulet, Rebecca; Tafacory, Farrah; Zhang, Ling; Good, Levi; Ure, Kerstin; Kernie, Steven G.; Birnbaum, Shari G.; Scharfman, Helen E.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Hsieh, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Acute seizures after a severe brain insult can often lead to epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis follows the insult but the role of adult-generated neurons in the development of chronic seizures or associated cognitive deficits remains to be determined. Here we show that the ablation of adult neurogenesis before pilocarpine-induced acute seizures in mice leads to a reduction in chronic seizure frequency. We also show that ablation of neurogenesis normalizes epilepsy-associated cognitive deficits. Remarkably, the effect of ablating adult neurogenesis before acute seizures is long lasting as it suppresses chronic seizure frequency for nearly 1 year. These findings establish a key role of neurogenesis in chronic seizure development and associated memory impairment and suggest that targeting aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis may reduce recurrent seizures and restore cognitive function following a pro-epileptic brain insult. PMID:25808087

  9. Ultrastructural features of astrocytes in the cortex of the hippocampal gyrus and in the neocortex of the temporal lobe in an experimental model of febrile seizures and with the use of topiramate.

    PubMed

    Łotowska, Joanna M; Sobaniec-Łotowska, Maria E; Sobaniec, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the current study was ultrastructural assessment of astroglia in specimens of the hippocampal cortex and neocortex of the temporal lobe in our own experimental model of febrile seizures (FS) in rats, as well as the analysis of the influence of a structurally novel broad spectrum anticonvulsant, topiramate (TPM), upon these cells in the CNS regions studied. The current study was inspired by some interesting literature reports on the in vitro investigation into the biological effects of TPM in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes and by the lack of data concerning astroglial morphology in vivo in an experimental model with this antiepileptic. In the FS group, the most pronounced changes in the study cell population referred to protoplasmic astroglia and were observed in approximately 3/4 of these cells. The abnormalities were similarly expressed in the two CNS regions studied, in terms of both quantity and quality. They were characterized by considerable swelling and degenerative changes, both in astrocytic perikarya and their processes. Changes were visible in the elements of the granular endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which had a condensed configuration. In the group receiving topiramate directly after the induction of FS, submicroscopic changes in protoplasmic astrocytes were similarly expressed as in the FS group. However, in the group receiving the drug prior to the induction of FS its protective action was observed on the morphology of approximately 1/3 of the population of the protoplasmic astroglial cells. The remaining protoplasmic astrocytes still showed features of considerable or moderately pronounced injury. The beneficial effect of TPM on the ultrastructure of part of the population of the protoplasmic astroglia in the group in which the drug was applied prior to the induction of FS can be explained, among others, by a protective effect of the blood-brain barrier enhanced by the drug administration, as indicated by our

  10. Low-frequency stimulation in anterior nucleus of thalamus alleviates kainate-induced chronic epilepsy and modulates the hippocampal EEG rhythm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liang, Jiao; Xu, Cenglin; Wang, Ying; Kuang, Yifang; Xu, Zhenghao; Guo, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Gao, Feng; Chen, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the anterior nucleus of thalamus (ANT) is a new and alternative option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. However, the responder rate is relatively low. The present study was designed to determine the effect of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) in ANT on chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures and related pathological pattern in intra-hippocampal kainate mouse model. We found that LFS (1 Hz, 100 μs, 300 μA), but not HFS (100 Hz, 100 μs, 30 μA), in bilateral ANT significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures, either non-convulsive focal seizures or tonic-clonic generalized seizures. The anti-epileptic effect persisted for one week after LFS cessation, which manifested as a long-term inhibition of the frequency of seizures with short (20-60 s) and intermediate duration (60-120 s). Meanwhile, LFS decreased the frequency of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) and interictal spikes, two indicators of seizure severity, whereas HFS increased the HFO frequency. Furthermore, LFS decreased the power of the delta band and increased the power of the gamma band of hippocampal background EEG. In addition, LFS, but not HFS, improved the performance of chronic epileptic mice in objection-location task, novel objection recognition and freezing test. These results provide the first evidence that LFS in ANT alleviates kainate-induced chronic epilepsy and cognitive impairment, which may be related to the modulation of the hippocampal EEG rhythm. This may be of great therapeutic significance for clinical treatment of epilepsy with deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Empathy in Hippocampal Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Beadle, J. N.; Tranel, D.; Cohen, N. J.; Duff, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. The scientific investigation of empathy has focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, and has pointed to the importance of a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate). While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy research, the hallmark properties of the hippocampal declarative memory system (e.g., representational flexibility, relational binding, on-line processing capacity) make it well-suited to meet some of the crucial demands of empathy, and a careful investigation of this possibility could make a significant contribution to the neuroscientific understanding of empathy. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the role of the hippocampal declarative memory system in empathy. Participants were three patients (1 female) with focal, bilateral hippocampal (HC) damage and severe declarative memory impairments and three healthy demographically matched comparison participants. Empathy was measured as a trait through a battery of gold standard questionnaires and through on-line ratings and prosocial behavior in response to a series of empathy inductions. Patients with hippocampal amnesia reported lower cognitive and emotional trait empathy than healthy comparison participants. Unlike healthy comparison participants, in response to the empathy inductions hippocampal patients reported no increase in empathy ratings or prosocial behavior. The results provide preliminary evidence for a role for hippocampal declarative memory in empathy. PMID:23526601

  12. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pinpoint factors that can help predict which children are likely to have reoccurring or prolonged febrile seizures. Investigators continue to monitor the long-term impact that febrile seizures might have on intelligence, behavior, school achievement, and the development of epilepsy. ...

  13. Effect of levetiracetam on molecular regulation of hippocampal glutamate and GABA transporters in rats with chronic seizures induced by amygdalar FeCl3 injection.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yuto; Doi, Taku; Nagatomo, Keiko; Tokumaru, Jun; Takaki, Mayuko; Willmore, L James

    2007-06-02

    Enhancement of the glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission efficacy in the FeCl3 induced epilepsy model is associated with changes in the levels of glutamate and GABA transporter proteins. This study examined the effect of levetiracetam (LEV) on glutamate overflow and glutamate/GABA transporters expression in rats with epileptogenesis induced by the amygdalar injection of 1.0 microl of 100 mM FeCl3 (epileptic rat) and in control rats receiving amygdalar acidic saline injection (non-epileptic rat). In amygdalar acidic saline injected rats, 40 mM KCl-evoked glutamate overflow was significantly suppressed by both 32 and 100 microM LEV co-perfusion. In unilateral amygdalar FeCl3 injected rats, 32 microM LEV was ineffective, but the 100 microM LEV statistically suppressed glutamate overflow. Western blotting was employed to determine the hippocampal expression of glutamate/GABA transporters in epileptic or non-epileptic rats. The rats were treated for 14 days with 54 mg/kg LEV or vehicle intraperitoneally injection. Following 14 days of treatment, the ipsilateral hippocampus was removed for a Western blot analysis. In non-epileptic rats, the expression increased for all of the glutamate and GABA transporters (GLAST, GLT-1, EAAC-1, GAT-1 and GAT-3) while the glutamate transporter regulating protein (GTRAP3-18) decreased in comparison to those of normal rats that were treated with the vehicle. In epileptic rats receiving LEV, the EAAC-1 and GAT-3 levels increased while GTRAP3-18 (89%) decreased in comparison to those of the epileptic rats treated with the vehicle. GTRAP3-18 inhibitor regulates glutamate-binding affinity to EAAC-1. The anti-epileptic action of LEV may be partially due to a reduction of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and an enhancement of the GABAergic inhibition as observed with the inhibitory effect on the 40 mM KCl-evoked glutamate overflow. These conclusions are supported by the increase in the expression of glial glutamate transporters (GLAST

  14. Classification of clinical semiology in epileptic seizures in neonates.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Palumbo, Linda; Ghosh, Soumya

    2012-03-01

    The clinical semiology of 61 neonatal seizures with EEG correlates, in 24 babies was analysed. Most seizures (89%) had multiple features during the EEG discharge. The seizures were classified using the prominent clinical feature at onset, and all features seen during the seizure, using an extended classification scheme. Orolingual features occurred most frequently at onset (30%), whereas ocular phenomena occurred most often during the seizure (70%). Orolingual, ocular and autonomic features were seen at onset in 55% of the seizures. Seizure onsets with clonic, tonic and hypomotor features were seen in 20%, 8% and 18% respectively. Clinico-electrical correlations were as follows. The EEG discharge involved both hemispheres in 54% of all seizures, in clonic seizures this was 93%. Focal clonic seizures were associated with EEG seizure onset from the contralateral hemisphere. Majority of the clonic and hypomotor seizures had a left hemisphere ictal EEG onset. Orolingual seizures frequently started from the right hemisphere, whereas ocular and autonomic seizures arose from either hemisphere. There was no significant difference in mortality, morbidity, abnormal neuroimaging and EEG background abnormalities in babies with or without clonic seizures. This study provides insights into neuronal networks that underpin electroclinical seizures, by analysing and classifying the obvious initial clinical features and those during the seizure. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuro-inflammation, blood-brain barrier, seizures and autism.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Zhang, Bodi

    2011-11-30

    Many children with Autism Spectrum Diseases (ASD) present with seizure activity, but the pathogenesis is not understood. Recent evidence indicates that neuro-inflammation could contribute to seizures. We hypothesize that brain mast cell activation due to allergic, environmental and/or stress triggers could lead to focal disruption of the blood-brain barrier and neuro-inflammation, thus contributing to the development of seizures. Treating neuro-inflammation may be useful when anti-seizure medications are ineffective.

  16. First seizure: EEG and neuroimaging following an epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd; Newton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    An early EEG (within 48 h) and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (hr_MRI) are the methods of choice for an accurate diagnosis after a first seizure presentation. Together with a careful history and examination, they will allow definition of the epilepsy syndrome in two-thirds of patients and help assess the individual risk for seizure recurrence, which is determined by the specific syndrome and is highest with focal epileptiform activity on EEG. Despite the heterogeneity of first seizure studies, EEG and etiology are consistently found to be the best predictors for seizure recurrence and prognosis. The additional yield of sleep-deprived EEG and sleep EEG is uncertain; yet MRI is essential for detecting brain tumors and other structural bases for new epilepsy. The rate occurrence of remote symptomatic seizures increases significantly with age and the most common etiology in the elderly with a first seizure is stroke; however, its exact relevance to epileptogenicity is yet to be defined. There is a striking lack of systematic studies using early EEG and hr_MRI in order to better characterize epileptogenic areas and elucidate the mechanisms of seizure provocation.

  17. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  18. Do Single Seizures Cause Neuronal Death in the Human Hippocampus?

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luisa L; Lopez-Meraz, Maria-Leonor; Niquet, Jerome; Wasterlain, Claude G

    2007-01-01

    The question of whether repeated single seizures cause neuronal death in the adult human brain is of great clinical importance and might have broad therapeutic implications. Reviewed here are recent studies on the effects of repeated single seizures (in the absence of status epilepticus) on hippocampal volume and on neuronal death markers in blood and in surgically ablated hippocampi. PMID:17520081

  19. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  20. Early Post Traumatic Seizures in Military Personnel Result in Long Term Disability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    had status epilepticus. In over ½ of the patients, the seizures were nonconvulsive in nature and could not be detected without EEG monitoring. Post...TBI in Neurology 2010 (in press). “ Nonconvulsive Seizures after Traumatic Brain Injury are Associated with Hippocampal Atrophy”. Neurology 2. IRB...press). “ Nonconvulsive Seizures after Traumatic Brain Injury are Associated with Hippocampal Atrophy”. Neurology. 2010 Aug 31;75(9):792-8. PMID

  1. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis after limbic kindling: Relationship to BDNF and hippocampal-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Botterill, J J; Brymer, K J; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2015-06-01

    Seizures dramatically increase the number of adult generated neurons in the hippocampus. However, it is not known whether this effect depends on seizures that originate in specific brain regions or whether it is nonspecific to seizure activity regardless of origin. We used kindling of different brain sites to address this question. Rats received 99 kindling stimulations of the basolateral amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, or caudate nucleus over a 6-week period. After kindling, we counted the number of adult generated hippocampal neurons that were birth-dated with the proliferative marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to evaluate cell proliferation and survival under conditions of repeated seizures. Next, we counted the number of doublecortin immunoreactive (DCX-ir) cells and evaluated their dendritic complexity to determine if limbic and nonlimbic seizures have differential effects on neuronal maturation. We also quantified hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) protein levels using an ELISA kit and assessed memory performance using a hippocampal-dependent fear conditioning paradigm. We found that limbic, but not nonlimbic, seizures dramatically increased hippocampal cell proliferation and the number of hilar-CA3 ectopic granule cells. Further, limbic kindling promoted dendritic outgrowth of DCX-ir cells and the number of DCX-ir cells containing basal dendrites. Limbic kindling also enhanced BDNF protein levels throughout the entire hippocampus and impaired the retrieval of fear memories. Collectively, our results suggest a relationship between limbic seizures, neurogenesis, BDNF protein, and cognition.

  2. Epileptic seizure after treatment with thiocolchicoside

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Tanno, Luciana Kase; Ensina, Luis Felipe Chiaverini; Motta, Antôno Abílio; Kalil, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of inpatient and outpatient morbidity. Thiocolchicoside is a semisynthetic derivate of naturally occurring colchicoside, which is largely used in humans as a centrally acting muscle relaxant. Epileptic seizures after thiocolchicoside intake have been reported in individuals with a history of epilepsy, acute brain injury or possible blood–brain barrier disruption. Case report: We report the case of a 66-year-old male patient presenting a sudden epileptic seizure temporally related to the intake of thiocolchicoside for muscle contracture and pain. The probably causes of the seizures were thiocolchicoside intake and cerebral microhemorrhages attributed to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Discussion: Drugs only rarely cause focal seizures. Our case indicates that thiocolchicoside can precipitate seizures in predisposed patients, and that its use should be avoided in patients with brain diseases (and therefore lower seizure thresholds) or blood–brain barrier disruption. This information should be provided in the drug package insert. PMID:19707540

  3. Focal cortical dysplasias in temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Challenge in defining unusual variants according to the last ILAE classification.

    PubMed

    Martinoni, Matteo; Marucci, Gianluca; Rubboli, Guido; Volpi, Lilia; Riguzzi, Patrizia; Marliani, Federica; Toni, Francesco; Naldi, Ilaria; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo; Michelucci, Roberto; Baruzzi, Agostino; Giulioni, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) represent a common architectural cortical disorder underlying pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy. The recent ILAE classification defines different types of FCDs based on their histopathological features, MRI imaging, and presumed pathogenesis; however, their clinical features and their prognostic significance are still incompletely defined. In addition, the combination of different histopathological abnormalities can represent "unusual" subtypes that can be difficult to classify. The aim of our study was to analyze the incidence and the significance of these "unusual" subtypes of FCDs in drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We retrospectively analyzed 133 patients consecutively submitted to tailored anteromesial temporal lobe resection for pharmacoresistant MTLE. Seizure onset, seizure duration, age at surgery, and postoperative seizure outcome were evaluated in relation to the different neuropathological groups defined according to the new ILAE classification. Focal cortical dysplasias were found in 80 out of 133 patients. Six patients were affected by isolated FCD type I, 12 patients by FCD type II, and 44 patients by FCD type III. Furthermore, we found 18 "atypical" cases (20.5% of all FCD cases and 26.6% of FCDs associated with a principal lesion): 10 cases of associated FCD type II-hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and 8 cases associated with FCD II-epilepsy-associated tumors (EATs). Our results indicate that "unusual" subtypes of FCDs, in particular associated FCD type II, are not uncommon findings, suggesting that they deserve a classification recognition. Similarities in seizure outcome and immunohistochemical and molecular evidences, shared by FCD type II+EATs and EATs, suggest a common pathogenic link. The choice to create a specific unifying class or, on the contrary, to also include "associated FCD type II" in the definition of the new unifying class FCD type III should be further discussed. Copyright © 2015

  4. Should consciousness describe seizures and what terms should be applied? Epilepsia's survey results.

    PubMed

    Mathern, Gary W; Beninsig, Laurie; Nehlig, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    From May to September 2014, Epilepsia conducted an online survey seeking opinions on whether consciousness should be used in describing focal and generalized seizures, and what terms should be applied to describe focal seizures with loss of awareness and amnesia. This study reports the findings of that survey. Two questions asked if consciousness should be used to classify seizures and what terms should be applied. Another four questions addressed demographic information. Of 209 individuals that started the poll, 147 (70.3%) completing it, and most that completed it were epileptologists (66%) from Europe (41%) and North America (27%). A majority (64%) indicated that the presence or absence of consciousness should be used to describe focal and generalized seizures, whereas 23% said it should not be used. When asked what term should be used to describe focal seizures with altered awareness and amnesia, 36% said focal impaired consciousness seizures (FICS), 30% selected complex partial seizures (CPS), and 16% answered focal dyscognitive seizures. This survey indicates that most responders prefer that consciousness be considered in the description of focal and generalized seizures, despite the difficulty in determining awareness clinically. Furthermore, responders could not agree on a single term that could be used to define focal seizures with loss of awareness and amnesia. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Dopey's seizure.

    PubMed

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Copyright 1999 BEA Trading Ltd.

  6. Seizures in adults with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Zoons, E; Weisfelt, M; de Gans, J; Spanjaard, L; Koelman, J H T M; Reitsma, J B; van de Beek, D

    2008-05-27

    To evaluate the occurrence and prognostic relevance of seizures in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. An observational cross-sectional study, in which patients with seizures are selected from a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired bacterial meningitis, confirmed by culture of CSF in patients aged >16 years. We retrospectively collected data on EEGs. Seizures occurred in 121 of 696 episodes (17%). Death occurred in 41% of patients with seizures compared to 16% of patients without seizures (p < 0.001). The median number of seizures was 2 (interquartile range [IQR] 1 to 4). The median time between admission and the first seizure was 1 day (IQR 0 to 3). Patients with in-hospital seizures were more likely to have a CSF leukocyte count below 1,000 cells/mm(3) (36% vs 25%; p = 0.01), had higher median CSF protein levels (4.8 g/L [IQR 3.4 to 7.6] vs 4.1 g/L [IQR 2.1 to 6.8]), and higher median erythrocyte sedimentation rate (46 mm/hour [IQR 31 to 72] vs 36 mm/hour [IQR 18 to 69]; p = 0.02) than patients without in-hospital seizures. Focal cerebral abnormalities developed more often in patients with in-hospital seizures than in those without (41% vs 14%; p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, seizures were significantly more likely in patients with predisposing conditions, tachycardia, a low Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and focal cerebral abnormalities. Neuroimaging was performed on admission in 70% of episodes with prehospital seizures, with CT revealing a focal lesion in 32% of those episodes. Antiepileptic drugs were administered in 82% of patients with seizures and EEG was performed in 31% of episodes; a status epilepticus was recorded in five patients. Seizures occur frequently in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. Seizures are associated with severe CNS and systemic inflammation, structural CNS lesions, pneumococcal meningitis, and predisposing

  7. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure - grand mal; Grand mal seizure; Seizure - generalized; Epilepsy - generalized seizure ... occur as part of a repeated, chronic illness (epilepsy). Some seizures are due to psychological problems (psychogenic).

  8. Evaluation of first nonfebrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Wilden, Jessica A; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-08-15

    Nonfebrile seizures may indicate underlying disease or epilepsy. The patient history can often distinguish epileptic seizures from nonepileptic disorders by identifying the events directly preceding the convulsion, associated conditions, and details of the seizure, including triggers, length, and type of movements. Laboratory testing, lumbar puncture, and neuroimaging may be indicated depending on the presentation, suspected etiology, and patient's age. Electroencephalography should be performed 24 to 48 hours after a first seizure because of its substantial yield and ability to predict recurrence. Neuroimaging is recommended for adults, infants, and children who have cognitive or motor developmental delay or a focal seizure. Neuroimaging may be scheduled on an outpatient basis for patients with stable vital signs who are awake and have returned to neurologic baseline. Emergent neuroimaging should be performed in patients with persistent decreased mental status or a new focal neurologic abnormality. Although magnetic resonance imaging is generally preferred to head computed tomography because of its greater sensitivity for intracranial pathology, computed tomography should be performed if intracranial bleeding is suspected because of recent head trauma, coagulopathy, or severe headache. Treatment with an antiepileptic drug after a first seizure does not prevent epilepsy in the long term, but it decreases the short-term likelihood of a second seizure. Adults with an unremarkable neurologic examination, no comorbidities, and no known structural brain disease who have returned to neurologic baseline do not need to be started on antiepileptic therapy. Treatment decisions should weigh the benefit of decreased short-term risk of recurrence against the potential adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs.

  9. Familial temporal lobe epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia type IIIa.

    PubMed

    Fabera, Petr; Krijtova, Hana; Tomasek, Martin; Krysl, David; Zamecnik, Josef; Mohapl, Milan; Jiruska, Premysl; Marusic, Petr

    2015-09-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) represents a common cause of refractory epilepsy. It is considered a sporadic disorder, but its occasional familial occurrence suggests the involvement of genetic mechanisms. Siblings with intractable epilepsy were referred for epilepsy surgery evaluation. Both patients were examined using video-EEG monitoring, MRI examination and PET imaging. They underwent left anteromedial temporal lobe resection. Electroclinical features pointed to left temporal lobe epilepsy and MRI examination revealed typical signs of left-sided hippocampal sclerosis and increased white matter signal intensity in the left temporal pole. PET examination confirmed interictal hypometabolism in the left temporal lobe. Histopathological examination of resected tissue demonstrated the presence FCD type IIIa, i.e. hippocampal sclerosis and focal cortical dysplasia in the left temporal pole. We present a unique case of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy in siblings, characterized by an identical clinical profile and histopathology of FCD type IIIa, who were successfully treated by epilepsy surgery. The presence of such a high concordance between the clinical and morphological data, together with the occurrence of epilepsy and febrile seizures in three generations of the family pedigree points towards a possible genetic nature of the observed FCD type IIIa. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Frontal lobe epilepsy with atypical seizure semiology resembling shuddering attacks or wet dog shake seizures.

    PubMed

    Jahodova, Alena; Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir; Kudr, Martin; Kyncl, Martin; Zamecnik, Josef; Tichy, Michal

    2012-03-01

    We report a girl with a drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia, who exhibited uncommon seizures. The seizures consisted of shoulder or whole body shuddering after a short psychic aura and face grimacing. Consciousness was fully preserved. The seizures resembled "wet dog shake" seizures described in rat models of epilepsy or shuddering attacks in infants. EEG findings were inconclusive, however, MRI showed a clear dysplastic lesion in the right frontal mesial and polar structures. The patient underwent an extended lesionectomy guided by neuronavigation and intraoperative electrocorticography. Focal cortical dysplasia type Ib was histologically confirmed and the patient has been seizure-free for the three years following resection. [Published with video sequences].

  11. Remembering preservation in hippocampal amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2017-01-01

    The lesion-deficit model dominates neuropsychology. This is unsurprising given powerful demonstrations that focal brain lesions can affect specific aspects of cognition. Nowhere is this more evident than in patients with bilateral hippocampal damage. In the last sixty years the amnesia and other impairments exhibited by these patients have helped to delineate the functions of the hippocampus and shape the field of memory. We do not question the value of this approach. However, less prominent are the cognitive processes that remain intact following hippocampal lesions. Here, we collate the piecemeal reports of preservation of function following focal bilateral hippocampal damage, highlighting a wealth of information often veiled by the field’s focus on deficits. We consider how a systematic understanding of what is preserved as well as what is lost could add an important layer of precision to models of memory and the hippocampus. PMID:26361051

  12. Ictal scalp EEG recording during sleep and wakefulness: diagnostic implications for seizure localization and lateralization.

    PubMed

    Buechler, Robbie D; Rodriguez, Alcibiades J; Lahr, Brian D; So, Elson L

    2008-02-01

    To determine the localizing value of electroencephalography (EEG) for seizures during sleep versus seizures during wakefulness, we compared scalp EEG for 58 seizures that occurred during sleep with 76 seizures during wake in 28 consecutive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Regression analysis showed that seizures during sleep are 2.5 times more likely to have focal EEG onset (p = 0.01) and 4 times more likely to correctly localize seizure onset (p = 0.04) than seizures during wake. EEG seizure onset preceded clinical onset by a longer duration in sleep seizures (mean, 4.69 s) than in wake seizures (mean, 1.23 s; p < 0.01). Sleep seizures showed fewer artifacts, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). For temporal lobectomy candidates undergoing video-EEG monitoring, the recording of seizures during sleep may be favored.

  13. Pathology-Based Approach to Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Pharmacoresistant Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Martinoni, Matteo; Berti, Pier Paolo; Marucci, Gianluca; Rubboli, Guido; Volpi, Lilia; Riguzzi, Patrizia; Marliani, Federica; Toni, Francesco; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo; Michelucci, Roberto; Baruzzi, Agostino; Giulioni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common cause of drug-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Structural abnormalities such as HS, granule cell pathology (GCP), and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) have been classified histopathologically, possibly allowing a more accurate assessment of prognostic seizure and neuropsychologic outcomes. We correlated seizure outcome with comprehensive temporal lobe pathologic findings, identified according to the most recent classification systems of HS, GCP, and FCD. All the 83 patients who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for drug-resistant MTLE and with a proven diagnosis of HS between April 2001 and May 2014 were collected. Patients were divided in 2 main groups: 1) isolated HS with/without GCP (HS +/- GCP); and 2) HS associated with FCD with/without GCP (HS+FCD +/- GCP). Patients were followed up at least 1 year, and seizure outcome was reported in accordance with Engel classification. Group I: HS +/- GCP: Statistical analysis confirmed a better outcome in HS + GCP patients than in HS-no GCP (P < 0.05). Moreover, a better outcome for the patients affected by GCP type I was observed (P < 0.05). Group II: HS+FCD +/- GCP: Patients with HS variant type I presented a better seizure outcome than the patients with HS type II (Engel class IA HS type I vs. type II: 69% vs. 40%). A pathology-based approach to epilepsy surgery might improve the interpretation of the results, could predict which cases will enjoy a better seizure outcome, and could help to the comprehension of the causes of failures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S.; Hunter, Jessica E.; Epstein, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Methods Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Results Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48–7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54– 3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. Significance We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. PMID:26948972

  15. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Melodie R; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S; Hunter, Jessica E; Epstein, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59-7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48-7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54-3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04-2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    Frontal lobe seizures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Frontal lobe seizures are a common form of epilepsy, a ... seizures originate in the front of the brain. Frontal lobe seizures may also be caused by abnormal brain ...

  17. The adult seizure and social outcomes of children with partial complex seizures.

    PubMed

    Camfield, Carol S; Camfield, Peter R

    2013-02-01

    Most intellectually normal children with focal epilepsy have partial complex or focal with secondary generalization seizures without a precise epilepsy syndrome. Their long-term outcome is largely unknown. Cases were identified from the population-based Nova Scotia Childhood Epilepsy cohort. Those eligible had seizure onset at 1 month to 16 years between 1977 and 1985, normal intelligence, ≥10 years of follow-up, only focal seizures and no benign epilepsy syndromes. There were 108 patients with partial complex with or without secondary generalization as the only seizure type(s) throughout (partial complex group) and 80 with secondary generalization as the only seizure type (secondary generalization group). Average age ± standard deviation at onset was 7.3 ± 4.5 years and follow-up was 27.9 ± 5.4 years. At follow-up, 57% of the partial complex group were in remission versus 81% of the secondary generalization group (P = 0.001). The partial complex group was more likely to be intractable or have undergone epilepsy surgery (36% versus 5%, P = 0.000). In the partial complex group, 28% had <5 years seizure free versus 5% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.000). More patients in the partial complex group had undergone mental health assessments (59% versus 32%, P = 0.000), and 33% had a psychiatric diagnosis versus 15% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.004). More patients with partial complex seizures had specific learning disorders (63% versus 45%, P = 0.03). Seven markers of poor social outcome were more common in patients with partial complex seizures (>2 markers: 34% versus 10%, P = 0.000). During 25-30 years of follow-up, >50% of intellectually normal patients with childhood-onset partial complex seizures had difficult-to-control seizures and learning and psychiatric/social problems. Most with secondary generalized seizures only had remission and better academic and psychiatric/social outcomes.

  18. Inheritance of Febrile Seizures in Sudden Unexplained Death in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Ingrid A.; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Krous, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians. PMID:22490769

  19. Single photon emission computed tomography in seizure disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Denays, R; Rubinstein, M; Ham, H; Piepsz, A; Noël, P

    1988-01-01

    Fourteen children with various seizure disorders were studied using a cerebral blood flow tracer, 123I iodoamphetamine (0.05 mCi/kg), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the five patients with radiological lesions, SPECT showed congruent or more extensive abnormalities. Five of the nine children with a normal scan on computed tomography had abnormal SPECT studies consisting of focal hypoperfusion, diffuse hemispheric hypoperfusion, multifocal and bilateral hypoperfusion, or focal hyperperfusion. A focal lesion seen on SPECT has been found in children with tonic-clonic seizures suggesting secondarily generalised seizures. Moreover the pattern seen on SPECT seemed to be related to the clinical status. An extensive impairment found on SPECT was associated with a poor evolution in terms of intellectual performance and seizure frequency. Conversely all children with a normal result on SPECT had less than two seizures per year and normal neurological and intellectual development. Images Figure PMID:3264135

  20. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  1. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... workup, which includes an EEG , head CT , and lumbar puncture (spinal tap) . Further testing may be needed if the child: Is younger than 9 months or older than 5 years Has a brain, nerve, or developmental disorder Had the seizure in only ...

  2. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  3. L-Theanine intake increases threshold for limbic seizures but decreases threshold for generalized seizures.

    PubMed

    Schallier, Anneleen; Vermoesen, Katia; Loyens, Ellen; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Michotte, Yvette; Smolders, Ilse; Massie, Ann

    2013-03-01

    L-Theanine, an ethylamide derivate of glutamate found in abundance in green tea, has been shown to exert beneficial actions in animal models for several neurological disorders. We here investigated for the first time the effect of L-theanine intake on seizure susceptibility using acute pilocarpine and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) mouse models for studying, respectively, limbic seizures or primarily generalized seizures. Moreover, we studied the effect of l-theanine intake on extracellular hippocampal and cortical glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels, using in vivo microdialysis. Feeding mice with a 4% L-theanine solution significantly decreased their susceptibility to pilocarpine-induced seizures whereas susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures was increased. The latter effect was linked to decreased extracellular GABA concentrations in frontal cortex.

  4. Epileptic Seizures From Abnormal Networks: Why Some Seizures Defy Predictability

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Feraz; Kudela, Pawel; Bergey, Gregory K.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Seizure prediction has proven to be difficult in clinically realistic environments. Is it possible that fluctuations in cortical firing could influence the onset of seizures in an ictal zone? To test this, we have now used neural network simulations in a computational model of cortex having a total of 65,536 neurons with intercellular wiring patterned after histological data. A spatially distributed Poisson driven background input representing the activity of neighboring cortex affected 1% of the neurons. Gamma distributions were fit to the interbursting phase intervals, a non-parametric test for randomness was applied, and a dynamical systems analysis was performed to search for period-1 orbits in the intervals. The non-parametric analysis suggests that intervals are being drawn at random from their underlying joint distribution and the dynamical systems analysis is consistent with a nondeterministic dynamical interpretation of the generation of bursting phases. These results imply that in a region of cortex with abnormal connectivity analogous to a seizure focus, it is possible to initiate seizure activity with fluctuations of input from the surrounding cortical regions. These findings suggest one possibility for ictal generation from abnormal focal epileptic networks. This mechanism additionally could help explain the difficulty in predicting partial seizures in some patients. PMID:22169211

  5. Epileptic seizures from abnormal networks: why some seizures defy predictability.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William S; Azhar, Feraz; Kudela, Pawel; Bergey, Gregory K; Franaszczuk, Piotr J

    2012-05-01

    Seizure prediction has proven to be difficult in clinically realistic environments. Is it possible that fluctuations in cortical firing could influence the onset of seizures in an ictal zone? To test this, we have now used neural network simulations in a computational model of cortex having a total of 65,536 neurons with intercellular wiring patterned after histological data. A spatially distributed Poisson driven background input representing the activity of neighboring cortex affected 1% of the neurons. Gamma distributions were fit to the interbursting phase intervals, a non-parametric test for randomness was applied, and a dynamical systems analysis was performed to search for period-1 orbits in the intervals. The non-parametric analysis suggests that intervals are being drawn at random from their underlying joint distribution and the dynamical systems analysis is consistent with a nondeterministic dynamical interpretation of the generation of bursting phases. These results imply that in a region of cortex with abnormal connectivity analogous to a seizure focus, it is possible to initiate seizure activity with fluctuations of input from the surrounding cortical regions. These findings suggest one possibility for ictal generation from abnormal focal epileptic networks. This mechanism additionally could help explain the difficulty in predicting partial seizures in some patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant) were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible) following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure-induced cell death following kainate

  7. Adaptive electric field control of epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, B J; Nguyen, H; Weinstein, S L; Schiff, S J

    2001-01-15

    We describe a novel method of adaptively controlling epileptic seizure-like events in hippocampal brain slices using electric fields. Extracellular neuronal activity is continuously recorded during field application through differential extracellular recording techniques, and the applied electric field strength is continuously updated using a computer-controlled proportional feedback algorithm. This approach appears capable of sustained amelioration of seizure events in this preparation when used with negative feedback. Seizures can be induced or enhanced by using fields of opposite polarity through positive feedback. In negative feedback mode, such findings may offer a novel technology for seizure control. In positive feedback mode, adaptively applied electric fields may offer a more physiological means of neural modulation for prosthetic purposes than previously possible.

  8. Outcome of epilepsy surgery in focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kral, T; Clusmann, H; Blumcke, I; Fimmers, R; Ostertun, B; Kurthen, M; Schramm, J

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe the outcome of surgery in patients with drug resistant epilepsy and a histopathological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia. Methods and subjects: Analysis of histories and presurgical and follow up data was carried out in 53 patients with a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia. Their mean age was 24.0 years (range 5 to 46), and they included 14 children and adolescents. Mean age at seizure onset was 12.4 years (0.4 to 36) and mean seizure duration was 11.6 years (1 to 45). Results: The presurgical detection rate of focal cortical dysplasia with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was 96%. There were 24 temporal and 29 extratemporal resections; additional multiple subpial transections were done in 12 cases to prevent spread of seizure discharges. There was a 6% rate of complications with permanent neurological deficit, but no deaths. All resected specimens were classified by neuropathological criteria as focal cortical dysplasia. Balloon cells were seen in most cases of extratemporal focal cortical dysplasia. After a mean follow up of 50 months, 38 patients (72%) were seizure-free, two (4%) had less than two seizures a year, nine (17%) had a reduction of seizure frequency of more than 75%, and four (8%) had no improvement. Seizure outcome was similar after temporal and extratemporal surgery. The patients in need of multilobar surgery had the poorest outcome. Conclusions: Circumscribed lesionectomy of focal dysplastic lesions provides seizure relief in patients with chronic drug resistant temporal and extratemporal epilepsy. There was a trend for the best seizure outcome to be in patients with early presurgical evaluation and early surgery, and in whom lesions were identified on the preoperative MRI studies. PMID:12531945

  9. Hyperactive mTOR signals in the proopiomelanocortin-expressing hippocampal neurons cause age-dependent epilepsy and premature death in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Yuki; Sakai, Yasunari; Shimmura, Mitsunori; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Nishio, Miki; Akamine, Satoshi; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Suzuki, Akira; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a frequent comorbidity in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Recent studies utilizing massive sequencing data identified subsets of genes that are associated with epilepsy and FCD. AKT and mTOR-related signals have been recently implicated in the pathogenic processes of epilepsy and FCD. To clarify the functional roles of the AKT-mTOR pathway in the hippocampal neurons, we generated conditional knockout mice harboring the deletion of Pten (Pten-cKO) in Proopiomelanocortin-expressing neurons. The Pten-cKO mice developed normally until 8 weeks of age, then presented generalized seizures at 8–10 weeks of age. Video-monitored electroencephalograms detected paroxysmal discharges emerging from the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. These mice showed progressive hypertrophy of the dentate gyrus (DG) with increased expressions of excitatory synaptic markers (Psd95, Shank3 and Homer). In contrast, the expression of inhibitory neurons (Gad67) was decreased at 6–8 weeks of age. Immunofluorescence studies revealed the abnormal sprouting of mossy fibers in the DG of the Pten-cKO mice prior to the onset of seizures. The treatment of these mice with an mTOR inhibitor rapamycin successfully prevented the development of seizures and reversed these molecular phenotypes. These data indicate that the mTOR pathway regulates hippocampal excitability in the postnatal brain. PMID:26961412

  10. Febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder of childhood, and occurs in an age-related manner. FS are classified into simple and complex. FS has a multifactorial inheritance, suggesting that both genetic and environmental factors are causative. Various animal models have elucidated the pathophysiological mechanisms of FS. Risk factors for a first FS are a family history of the disorder and a developmental delay. Risk factors for recurrent FS are a family history, age below 18 months at seizure onset, maximum temperature, and duration of fever. Risk factors for subsequent development of epilepsy are neurodevelopmental abnormality and complex FS. Clinicians evaluating children after a simple FS should concentrate on identifying the cause of the child's fever. Meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for any febrile child. A simple FS does not usually require further evaluation such as ordering electroencephalography, neuroimaging, or other studies. Treatment is acute rescue therapy for prolonged FS. Antipyretics are not proven to reduce the recurrence risk for FS. Some evidence shows that both intermittent therapy with oral/rectal diazepam and continuous prophylaxis with oral phenobarbital or valproate are effective in reducing the risk of recurrence, but there is no evidence that these medications reduce the risk of subsequent epilepsy. Vaccine-induced FS is a rare event that does not lead to deleterious outcomes, but could affect patient and physician attitudes toward the safety of vaccination. PMID:25324864

  11. Instruction manual for the ILAE 2017 operational classification of seizure types.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Cross, J Helen; D'Souza, Carol; French, Jacqueline A; Haut, Sheryl R; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirsch, Edouard; Jansen, Floor E; Lagae, Lieven; Moshé, Solomon L; Peltola, Jukka; Roulet Perez, Eliane; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Somerville, Ernest; Sperling, Michael; Yacubian, Elza Márcia; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    This companion paper to the introduction of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) 2017 classification of seizure types provides guidance on how to employ the classification. Illustration of the classification is enacted by tables, a glossary of relevant terms, mapping of old to new terms, suggested abbreviations, and examples. Basic and extended versions of the classification are available, depending on the desired degree of detail. Key signs and symptoms of seizures (semiology) are used as a basis for categories of seizures that are focal or generalized from onset or with unknown onset. Any focal seizure can further be optionally characterized by whether awareness is retained or impaired. Impaired awareness during any segment of the seizure renders it a focal impaired awareness seizure. Focal seizures are further optionally characterized by motor onset signs and symptoms: atonic, automatisms, clonic, epileptic spasms, or hyperkinetic, myoclonic, or tonic activity. Nonmotor-onset seizures can manifest as autonomic, behavior arrest, cognitive, emotional, or sensory dysfunction. The earliest prominent manifestation defines the seizure type, which might then progress to other signs and symptoms. Focal seizures can become bilateral tonic-clonic. Generalized seizures engage bilateral networks from onset. Generalized motor seizure characteristics comprise atonic, clonic, epileptic spasms, myoclonic, myoclonic-atonic, myoclonic-tonic-clonic, tonic, or tonic-clonic. Nonmotor (absence) seizures are typical or atypical, or seizures that present prominent myoclonic activity or eyelid myoclonia. Seizures of unknown onset may have features that can still be classified as motor, nonmotor, tonic-clonic, epileptic spasms, or behavior arrest. This "users' manual" for the ILAE 2017 seizure classification will assist the adoption of the new system.

  12. Low distribution of synaptic vesicle protein 2A and synaptotagimin-1 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of spontaneously epileptic rats exhibiting both tonic convulsion and absence seizure.

    PubMed

    Hanaya, R; Hosoyama, H; Sugata, S; Tokudome, M; Hirano, H; Tokimura, H; Kurisu, K; Serikawa, T; Sasa, M; Arita, K

    2012-09-27

    The spontaneously epileptic rat (SER) is a double mutant (zi/zi, tm/tm) which begins to exhibit tonic convulsions and absence seizures after 6 weeks of age, and repetitive tonic seizures over time induce sclerosis-like changes in SER hippocampus with high brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Levetiracetam, which binds to synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A), inhibited both tonic convulsions and absence seizures in SERs. We studied SER brains histologically and immunohistochemically after verification by electroencephalography (EEG), as SERs exhibit seizure-related alterations in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. SERs did not show interictal abnormal spikes and slow waves typical of focal epilepsy or symptomatic generalized epilepsy. The difference in neuronal density of the cerebral cortex was insignificant between SER and Wistar rats, and apoptotic neurons did not appear in SERs. BDNF distributions portrayed higher values in the entorhinal and piriform cortices which would relate with hippocampal sclerosis-like changes. Similar synaptophysin expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was found in both animals. Low and diffuse SV2A distribution portrayed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of SERs was significantly less than that of all cerebral lobes and inner molecular layer (IML) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of Wistar rats. The extent of low SV2A expression/distribution in SERs was particularly remarkable in the frontal (51% of control) and entorhinal cortices (47%). Lower synaptotagmin-1 expression (vs Wistar rats) was located in the frontal (31%), piriform (13%) and entorhinal (39%) cortices, and IML of the DG (38%) in SER. Focal low distribution of synaptotagmin-1 accompanying low SV2A expression may contribute to epileptogenesis and seizure propagation in SER.

  13. miRNA Expression Profile after Status Epilepticus and Hippocampal Neuroprotection by Targeting miR-132

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M.; Bray, Isabella; Sanz-Rodriguez, Amaya; Engel, Tobias; McKiernan, Ross C.; Mouri, Genshin; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Sano, Takanori; Saugstad, Julie A.; Simon, Roger P.; Stallings, Raymond L.; Henshall, David C.

    2011-01-01

    When an otherwise harmful insult to the brain is preceded by a brief, noninjurious stimulus, the brain becomes tolerant, and the resulting damage is reduced. Epileptic tolerance develops when brief seizures precede an episode of prolonged seizures (status epilepticus). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. We investigated how prior seizure preconditioning affects the miRNA response to status epilepticus evoked by intra-amygdalar kainic acid in mice. The miRNA was extracted from the ipsilateral CA3 subfield 24 hours after focal-onset status epilepticus in animals that had previously received either seizure preconditioning (tolerance) or no preconditioning (injury), and mature miRNA levels were measured using TaqMan low-density arrays. Expression of 21 miRNAs was increased, relative to control, after status epilepticus alone, and expression of 12 miRNAs was decreased. Increased miR-132 levels were matched with increased binding to Argonaute-2, a constituent of the RNA-induced silencing complex. In tolerant animals, expression responses of >40% of the injury-group-detected miRNAs differed, being either unchanged relative to control or down-regulated, and this included miR-132. In vivo microinjection of locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides (antagomirs) against miR-132 depleted hippocampal miR-132 levels and reduced seizure-induced neuronal death. Thus, our data strongly suggest that miRNAs are important regulators of seizure-induced neuronal death. PMID:21945804

  14. The role of histopathologic subtype in the setting of hippocampal sclerosis-associated mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gales, Jordan M; Jehi, Lara; Nowacki, Amy; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-05-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) are among the most common neuropathological findings in those undergoing surgery for refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Existing data regarding differences among the most recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) HS subtypes remain limited. This study sought to characterize the roles of HS subtype and coexistent FCD. Epilepsy surgery pathologic specimens in 307 cases of temporal lobe epilepsy with HS were reviewed (mean age±SD, 37±15years; 56% women). HS and coexistent FCD were classified according to ILAE guidelines. Medical records were reviewed for data on seizure recurrence and seizure burden (clinical follow-up mean duration ± SD, 5±4years). Cases of typical HS (ILAE type I) predominated (ILAE type Ia: 41%, Ib: 47%, II: 11%, and III: 0.7%]. The HS subtypes shared similar demographic and etiologic characteristics, as well as associated pathology and postoperative seizure outcomes. Individuals with type Ib HS were more likely to remain seizure free at long-term follow-up when compared with other subtypes, and they had a later age of seizure onset. Two hundred forty-three cases (79%) demonstrated FCD within the adjacent temporal lobe. Its presence was associated with a significantly decreased risk of seizure recurrence (P=.02). When present, FCD was predominantly type I (98%). HS subtype does not appear to affect epilepsy surgery outcomes despite some clinical differences between the subgroups. FCD is often observed in association with HS in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy; the finding of FCD was associated with better postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Reconsideration of psychomotor seizure--importance of medio-dorsal thalmic nucleus].

    PubMed

    Murasaki, Mitsukuni

    2007-01-01

    Recently, to my regret, the opportunities for psychiatrists to join in clinical and experimental activities to combat epilepsy are decreasing. In the period of 1960-1980, experimental epileptology was one of the main areas in the field of psychiatry. Now, I have been given an opportunity to reevaluate my paper, entitled "Role of the Mediodorsal Thalamic Nucleus in Temporal Lobe Seizures--An Experimental Study", published in this journal in 1968. Therefore, I would like to reconsider psychomotor seizures, which are classified as complex partial seizures at present. The psychomotor seizures mentioned above are so-called amygdalo hippocampal seizures. At first, I was very much interested in the amygdala and hippocampus, because these seizures are quite similar to psychomotor seizures which are clinically observed in epileptics. I observed a lot of important phenomena. A amygdaloid and hippocampal seizures are quite different from each other, both regarding their behavior and EEG findings which are observed during the attacks. Hippocampal seizures consisted of staring in the arrest reaction. On the contrary, amygdaloid seizures showed typical automatisms, such as facial and behavioral automatisms. From these results, it was considered that the clinically observed psychomotor seizures began in the hippocampus and immediately induced the self-sustained amygdaloid seizures. In my experiments, I often observed that self-sustained amygdaloid seizures were easily induced by hippocampal seizures. Moreover, I noted the fact that stimulation of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus elicited both amygdaloid and hippocampal seizures. By means of stimulation and surgical interruption methods among the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus, amygdala, and hippocampus, I found that the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus plays the main role in amygdalo-hippocampal seizures. According to my experiments, the thalamic nucleus controls the limbic seizures. So, I concluded that the therapeutic approach to the

  16. Therapeutic epilepsy research: from pharmacological rationale to focal adenosine augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Stewart, Kerry-Ann

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common seizure disorder affecting approximately 70 million people worldwide. Current pharmacotherapy is neuron-centered, frequently accompanied by intolerable side-effects, and fails to be effective in about one third of patients. Therefore, new therapeutic concepts are needed. Recent research suggests an astrocytic basis of epilepsy, presenting the possibility of novel therapeutic targets. In particular, dysfunction of the astrocyte-controlled, endogenous, adenosine-based seizure control system of the brain is implicated in seizure generation. Thus, astrogliosis – a pathological hallmark of the epileptic brain – is associated with upregulation of the adenosine-removing enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK), resulting in focal adenosine deficiency. Both astrogliotic upregulation of ADK in epilepsy and transgenic overexpression of ADK are associated with seizures, and inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. These findings link adenosine deficiency with seizures and predict that adenosine augmentation therapies (AATs) will likely be effective in preventing seizures. Given the widespread systemic and central side effects of systemically administered AATs, focal AATs (i.e., limited to the astrogliotic lesion) are a necessity. This Commentary will discuss the pharmacological rationale for the development of focal AATs. Additionally, several AAT strategies will be discussed: (1) adenosine released from silk-based brain implants; (2) adenosine released from locally implanted encapsulated cells; (3) adenosine released from stem cell-derived brain implants; and (4) adenosine augmenting gene therapies. Finally, new developments and therapeutic challenges in using focal AATs for epilepsy therapy will critically be evaluated. PMID:19682439

  17. Hyperkinetic motor seizures: a common semiology generated by two different cortical seizure origins.

    PubMed

    Vaugier, Lisa; McGonigal, Aileen; Lagarde, Stanislas; Trébuchon, Agnes; Szurhaj, William; Derambure, Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2017-08-22

    We report a 37-year-old, right-handed patient with drug-resistant focal epilepsy whose seizures were characterized by explosive hyperkinetic behaviour. Video-SEEG revealed bifocal organization of epilepsy with two distinct cortical origins of seizures: the right temporal pole and left temporal lateral and perisylvian cortex. Irrespective of the cortical pattern of seizure onset, the hyperkinetic semiology was extremely similar. This supports a major role for "final common pathway" subcortical circuits in the genesis of the hyperkinetic semiology in this patient.

  18. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures that cause a loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements, called grand mal seizures , are especially ... of seizure that causes loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements. Intrauterine Device: A small device that ...

  19. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000128.htm Epilepsy or seizures - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  20. Age-dependent seizure semiology in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fogarasi, András; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Janszky, József; Janszky, Imre; Rásonyi, György; Kelemen, Anna; Halász, Péter

    2007-09-01

    To examine the effects of age on different aspects of temporal lobe seizure semiology. We performed a video analysis of 605 archived seizures from 155 consecutive patients (age 10 months to 49 years) selected by seizure freedom after temporal lobectomy. Eighty patients had hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Beside semiological seizure classification, we assessed age dependency of several axes of seizure semiology: (1) aura, (2) number of different lateralizing signs, occurrence of ictal (3) emotional signs, (4) autonomic symptoms, (5) automatisms, and (6) secondary generalization as well as (7) the ratio of motor seizure components. From the 155 patients, 117 reported aura, 39 had ictal emotional signs, 51 had autonomic symptoms, 130 presented automatisms, while 18 patients showed secondary generalization at least once during their seizures. Altogether 369 (median: 2/patient) different lateralizing signs were recorded. Frequency of HS (p < 0.001), ictal automatisms (p < 0.001), secondary generalization (p = 0.014), number of different lateralizing signs (p < 0.001) increased while the ratio of motor seizure component (p = 0.007) decreased by age. Auras, emotional symptoms, and autonomic signs occurred independently of patients' ages. Hippocampal sclerosis adjusted linear models revealed that the frequency of automatisms and secondarily generalized seizures as well as the number of different lateralizing signs are HS-independent significant variables. Our findings support that brain maturation significantly influences the evolution of some important aspects (motor seizures, lateralizing signs) of temporal lobe seizure semiology. Conversely, other aspects (aura, emotional, and autonomic signs) are independent of the maturation process. This is the first report investigating age dependency of epileptic seizure semiology comparing all age groups.

  1. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  2. FGF-2 Overexpression Increases Excitability and Seizure Susceptibility but Decreases Seizure-Induced Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zucchini, Silvia; Buzzi, Andrea; Barbieri, Mario; Rodi, Donata; Paradiso, Beatrice; Binaschi, Anna; Coffin, J. Douglas; Marzola, Andrea; Cifelli, Pierangelo; Belluzzi, Ottorino

    2008-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) has multiple, pleiotropic effects on the nervous system that include neurogenesis, neuroprotection and neuroplasticity. Thus, alteration in FGF-2 expression patterns may have a profound impact in brain function, both in normal physiology and in pathology. Here, we used FGF-2 transgenic mice (TgFGF2) to study the effects of endogenous FGF-2 overexpression on susceptibility to seizures and to the pathological consequences of seizures. TgFGF2 mice display increased FGF-2 expression in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and dentate granule cells. Increased density of glutamatergic synaptic vesicles was observed in the hippocampus of TgFGF2 mice, and electrophysiological data (input/output curves and patch-clamp recordings in CA1) confirmed an increase in excitatory inputs in CA1, suggesting the presence of a latent hyperexcitability. Indeed, TgFGF2 mice displayed increased susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures compared with wild-type (WT) littermates, in that latency to generalized seizure onset was reduced, whereas behavioral seizure scores and lethality were increased. Finally, WT and TgFGF2 mice with similar seizure scores were used for examining seizure-induced cellular consequences. Neurogenesis and mossy fiber sprouting were not significantly different between the two groups. In contrast, cell damage (assessed with Fluoro-Jade B, silver impregnation and anti-caspase 3 immunohistochemistry) was significantly lower in TgFGF2 mice, especially in the areas of overexpression (CA1 and CA3), indicating reduction of seizure-induced necrosis and apoptosis. These data suggest that FGF-2 may be implicated in seizure susceptibility and in seizure-induced plasticity, exerting different, and apparently contrasting effects: favoring ictogenesis but reducing seizure-induced cell death. PMID:19052202

  3. Regulating hippocampal hyperexcitability through GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Min; Moradi‐Chameh, Homeira; Zahid, Tariq; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Valiante, Taufik; Zhang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Disturbances of GABAergic inhibition are a major cause of epileptic seizures. GABA exerts its actions via ionotropic GABAA receptors and metabotropic G protein‐coupled GABAB receptors. Malfunction of GABAA inhibition has long been recognized in seizure genesis but the role of GABAB receptors in controlling seizure activity is still not well understood. Here, we examined the anticonvulsive, or inhibitory effects, of GABAB receptors in a mouse model of hippocampal kindling as well as mouse hippocampal slices through the use of GS 39783, a positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulator, and CGP 55845, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. When administered via intraperitoneal injections in kindled mice, GS 39783 (5 mg/kg) did not attenuate hippocampal EEG discharges, but did reduce aberrant hippocampal spikes, whereas CGP 55845 (10 mg/kg) prolonged hippocampal discharges and increased spike incidences. When examined in hippocampal slices, neither GS 39783 at 5 μmol/L nor the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen at 0.1 μmol/L alone significantly altered repetitive excitatory field potentials, but GS 39783 and baclofen together reversibly abolished these field potentials. In contrast, CGP 55845 at 1 μmol/L facilitated induction and incidence of these field potentials. In addition, CGP 55845 attenuated the paired pulse depression of CA3 population spikes and increased the frequency of EPSCs in individual CA3 pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that GABABB receptors regulate hippocampal hyperexcitability by inhibiting CA3 glutamatergic synapses. We postulate that positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors may be effective in reducing seizure‐related hyperexcitability. PMID:24771688

  4. Novel anticonvulsive effects of progesterone in a mouse model of hippocampal electrical kindling.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, M; Lang, M; Gane, J; Chow, E; Wu, C; Zhang, L

    2014-01-17

    Progesterone is a known anticonvulsant, with its inhibitory effects generally attributed to its secondary metabolite, 5α,3α-tetrahydroprogesterone (THP), and THP's enhancement of GABAA receptor activity. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests that progesterone may have non-genomic actions independent of the GABAA receptor. In this study, we explored THP/GABAA-independent anticonvulsive actions of progesterone in a mouse model of hippocampal kindling and in mouse entorhinal slices in vitro. Specifically, we examined the effects of progesterone in kindled mice with or without pretreatments with finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor known to block the metabolism of progesterone to THP. In addition, we examined the effects of progesterone on entorhinal epileptiform potentials in the presence of a GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin and finasteride. Adult male mice were kindled via a daily stimulation protocol. Electroencephalographic (EEG) discharges were recorded from the hippocampus or cortex to assess "focal" or "generalized" seizure activity. Kindled mice were treated with intra-peritoneal injections of progesterone (10, 35, 100 and 160mg/kg) with or without finasteride pretreatment (50 or 100mg/kg), THP (1, 3.5, 10 and 30mg/kg), midazolam (2mg/kg) and carbamazepine (50mg/kg). Entorhinal cortical slices were prepared from naïve young mice, and repetitive epileptiform potentials were induced by 4-aminopyridine (100μM), picrotoxin (100μM) and finasteride (1μM). Pretreatment with finasteride did not abolish the anticonvulsant effects of progesterone. In finasteride-pretreated mice, progesterone at 100 and 160mg/kg decreased cortical but not hippocampal afterdischarges (ADs). Carbamazepine mimicked the effects of progesterone with finasteride pretreatments in decreasing cortical discharges and motor seizures, whereas midazolam produced effects similar to progesterone alone or THP in decreasing hippocampal ADs and motor seizures. In brain slices, progesterone

  5. Safety Profile of Eslicarbazepine Acetate as Add-On Therapy in Adults with Refractory Focal-Onset Seizures: From Clinical Studies to 6 Years of Post-Marketing Experience.

    PubMed

    Gama, Helena; Vieira, Mariana; Costa, Raquel; Graça, Joana; Magalhães, Luís M; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2017-07-27

    Eslicarbazepine acetate was first approved in the European Union in 2009 as adjunctive therapy in adults with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization. The objective of this study was to review the safety profile of eslicarbazepine acetate analyzing the data from several clinical studies to 6 years of post-marketing surveillance. We used a post-hoc pooled safety analysis of four phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies (BIA-2093-301, -302, -303, -304) of eslicarbazepine acetate as add-on therapy in adults. Safety data of eslicarbazepine acetate in special populations of patients aged ≥65 years with partial-onset seizures (BIA-2093-401) and subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (BIA-2093-111) and renal impairment (BIA-2093-112) are also considered. The incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and serious adverse events were analyzed. The global safety database of eslicarbazepine acetate was analyzed for all cases from post-marketing surveillance from 1 October, 2009 to 21 October, 2015. From a pooled analysis of four phase III studies, it was concluded that the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and adverse drug reactions were dose dependent. Dizziness, somnolence, headache, and nausea were the most common treatment-emergent adverse events (≥10% of patients) and the majority were of mild-to-moderate intensity. No dose-dependent trend was observed for serious adverse events and individual serious adverse events were reported in less than 1% of patients. Hyponatremia was classified as a possibly related treatment-emergent adverse event in phase III studies (1.2%); however, after 6 years of post-marketing surveillance it represents the most frequently (10.2%) reported adverse drug reaction, with more than half of these cases occurring with eslicarbazepine acetate at

  6. Childhood absence epilepsy in patients with benign focal epileptiform discharges.

    PubMed

    Sarkis, Rani A; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Burgess, Richard C; Wyllie, Elaine

    2009-12-01

    Few reports are available of ictal recordings in patients with benign focal epileptiform discharges. The study objective was to estimate the frequency of such recordings and to describe their clinical and electrophysiologic presentation. We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing routine electroencephalography (EEG) with video during a 10-year period. Among 214 patients with benign focal epileptiform discharges, 5 patients were identified with recorded EEG seizures (2.3%). Epilepsy syndromes included one case of benign focal epilepsy of childhood, three cases of childhood absence epilepsy, and in one case the patient presented with both. Only 1 of the 214 patients (0.4%) had a seizure characteristic of benign focal epilepsy of childhood. A literature review revealed the coexistence of childhood absence and benign focal epilepsy of childhood or benign focal epileptiform discharges within the same patient. These findings suggest that benign focal epilepsy of childhood seizures are rarely recorded during routine EEG, probably because seizures occur during the early morning part of the sleep cycle, which may differ from the brief nap during routine EEG. There was concurrence of generalized spike and wave discharges in these patients. It is unclear whether this is related to a common pathophysiologic factor.

  7. Effects of hippocampal high-frequency electrical stimulation in memory formation and their association with amino acid tissue content and release in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Meneses, Alfredo; Peña-Ortega, Fernando; Gaona, Andres; Rocha, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal high frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) at 130 Hz has been proposed as a therapeutical strategy to control neurological disorders such as intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This study was carried out to determine the effects of hippocampal HFS on the memory process and the probable involvement of amino acids. Using the autoshaping task, we found that animals receiving hippocampal HFS showed augmented short-term, but not long-term memory formation, an effect blocked by bicuculline pretreatment and associated with enhanced tissue levels of amino acids in hippocampus. In addition, microdialysis experiments revealed high extracellular levels of glutamate, aspartate, glycine, taurine, and alanine during the application of hippocampal HFS. In contrast, GABA release augmented during HFS and remained elevated for more than 1 h after the stimulation was ended. HFS had minimal effects on glutamine release. The present results suggest that HFS has an activating effect on specific amino acids in normal hippocampus that may be involved in the enhanced short-term memory formation. These data further provide experimental support for the concept that hippocampus may be a promising target for focal stimulation to treat intractable seizures in humans.

  8. SOX11 identified by target gene evaluation of miRNAs differentially expressed in focal and non-focal brain tissue of therapy-resistant epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Sierk; Zhao, Yi; Chhibber, Aparna; Kaiboriboon, Kitti; Do, Lynn V; Vogelgesang, Silke; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Alldredge, Brian K; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Cascorbi, Ingolf; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally control the expression of their target genes via RNA interference. There is increasing evidence that expression of miRNAs is dysregulated in neuronal disorders, including epilepsy, a chronic neurological disorder characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a common type of focal epilepsy in which disease-induced abnormalities of hippocampal neurogenesis in the subgranular zone as well as gliosis and neuronal cell loss in the cornu ammonis area are reported. We hypothesized that in MTLE altered miRNA-mediated regulation of target genes could be involved in hippocampal cell remodeling. A miRNA screen was performed in hippocampal focal and non-focal brain tissue samples obtained from the temporal neocortex (both n=8) of MTLE patients. Out of 215 detected miRNAs, two were differentially expressed (hsa-miR-34c-5p: mean increase of 5.7 fold (p=0.014), hsa-miR-212-3p: mean decrease of 76.9% (p=0.0014)). After in-silico target gene analysis and filtering, reporter gene assays confirmed RNA interference for hsa-miR-34c-5p with 3'-UTR sequences of GABRA3, GRM7 and GABBR2 and for hsa-miR-212-3p with 3'-UTR sequences of SOX11, MECP2, ADCY1 and ABCG2. Reporter gene assays with mutated 3'-UTR sequences of the transcription factor SOX11 identified two different binding sites for hsa-miR-212-3p and its primary transcript partner hsa-miR-132-3p. Additionally, there was an inverse time-dependent expression of Sox11 and miR-212-3p as well as miR-132-3p in rat neonatal cortical neurons. Transfection of neurons with anti-miRs for miR-212-3p and miR-132-3p suggest that both miRNAs work synergistically to control Sox11 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that differential miRNA expression in neurons could contribute to an altered function of the transcription factor SOX11 and other genes in the setting of epilepsy, resulting not only in impaired neural

  9. STEP Regulation of Seizure Thresholds in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Gloster; Briggs, Stephen; Walker, Jeffrey; Asik, Kemal; Lombroso, Paul; Naegele, Janice

    2010-01-01

    Summary Purpose To investigate whether STriatal Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) influences ictogenesis. Methods STEP knockout mice were compared to wild-type (WT) mice in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slices were also prepared from these two mouse populations, allowing the examination of ictal-like stimulation in these slices using calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings. Results To examine seizure thresholds, increasing doses of pilocarpine were administered to adult mice and seizures were scored behaviorally. Significantly fewer STEP knockout mice developed seizures that progressed to the stage of status epilepticus compared to WT mice. To examine potential differences in neural circuits that might account for this finding, seizure-like activity was induced in hippocampal slices. Electrical stimulation of the hippocampal-entorhinal cortex pathway in STEP knockout mice resulted in less activation of the dentate granule cell layer, but greater activation of the hilus in STEP knockouts, compared with heterozygous slices. Conclusions STEP deficiency is associated with higher seizure thresholds. The locus of these effects appears to include the dentate gyrus granule cell layer and hilus. PMID:21204826

  10. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  11. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  12. Clinical analysis of leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 protein antibody associated with limbic encephalitis onset with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhimei; Cui, Tao; Shi, Weixiong; Wang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We summarized the clinical characteristics of patients presenting with seizures and limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 protein antibody (LGI1) in order help recognize and treat this condition at its onset. We analyzed clinical, video electroencephalogram (VEEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laboratory data of 10 patients who presented with LGI1-LE and followed up their outcomes from 2 to 16 (9.4 ± 4.2) months. All patients presented with seizures onset, including faciobrachial dystonic seizure (FBDS), partial seizure (PS), and generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS). Four patients (Cases 3, 5, 7, and 8) had mild cognitive deficits. Interictal VEEG showed normal patterns, focal slowing, or sharp waves in the temporal or frontotemporal lobes. Ictal VEEG of Cases 4, 5, and 7 showed diffuse voltage depression preceding FBDS, a left frontal/temporal origin, and a bilateral temporal origin, respectively. Ictal foci could not be localized in other cases. MRI scan revealed T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensity and evidence of edema in the right medial temporal lobe in Case 3, left hippocampal atrophy in Case 5, hyperintensities in the bilateral medial temporal lobes in Case 7, and hyperintensities in the basal ganglia and frontal cortex in Case 10. All 10 serum samples were positive for LGI1 antibody, but it was only detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 7 patients. Five patients (Cases 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8) presented with hyponatremia. One patient (Case 2) was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer. While responses to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were poor, most patients (except Case 2) responded favorably to immunotherapy. LGI1-LE may initially manifest with various types of seizures, particularly FBDS and complex partial seizures (CPS) of mesial temporal origin, and slowly progressive cognitive involvement. Clinical follow-up, VEEG monitoring, and MRI scan are helpful in early

  13. Seizure-induced reduction in PIP3 levels contributes to seizure-activity and is rescued by valproic acid☆

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pishan; Walker, Matthew C.; Williams, Robin S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (3–5) trisphosphate (PIP3) is a central regulator of diverse neuronal functions that are critical for seizure progression, however its role in seizures is unclear. We have recently hypothesised that valproic acid (VPA), one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of epilepsy, may target PIP3 signalling as a therapeutic mode of action. Here, we show that seizure induction using kainic acid in a rat in vivo epilepsy model resulted in a decrease in hippocampal PIP3 levels and reduced protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) phosphorylation, measured using ELISA mass assays and Western blot analysis, and both changes were restored following VPA treatment. These finding were reproduced in cultured rat hippocampal primary neurons and entorhinal cortex–hippocampal slices during exposure to the GABA(A) receptor antagonist pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), which is widely used to generate seizures and seizure-like (paroxysmal) activity. Moreover, VPA's effect on paroxysmal activity in the PTZ slice model is blocked by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition or PIP2 sequestration by neomycin, indicating that VPA's efficacy is dependent upon PIP3 signalling. PIP3 depletion following PTZ treatment may also provide a positive feedback loop, since enhancing PIP3 depletion increases, and conversely, reducing PIP3 dephosphorylation reduces paroxysmal activity and this effect is dependent upon AMPA receptor activation. Our results therefore indicate that PIP3 depletion occurs with seizure activity, and that VPA functions to reverse these effects, providing a novel mechanism for VPA in epilepsy treatment. PMID:24148856

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome, sleep, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Hoppenbrouwers, Toke

    2015-06-01

    benign febrile seizures seen in 7% of infants before 6 months play a role in the terminal pathway in a subset of sudden infant death syndrome victims. Supporting evidence: (1) lack of 5-hydroxitryptamine, one consistent finding in sudden infant death syndrome that Kinney et al coined a developmental serotonopathy, is consistent with risk for seizures. (2) Non-rapid eye movement sleep increasing during the age of highest risk for sudden infant death syndrome facilitates some seizures (seizure gate). (3) Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is associated with severe hypoxemia and hypercapnia during postictal generalized electroencephalographic (EEG) suppression. In toddlers, sudden unexplained deaths are associated with hippocampal abnormalities and some seizures. (4) The sudden nature of both deaths warrants an exploration of similarities in the terminal pathway. Moreover, sudden infant death syndrome, febrile seizures, sudden unexplained death in childhood, and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy share some of the following risk factors: prone sleeping, infections, hyperthermia, preterm birth, male gender, maternal smoking, and mutations in genes that regulate sodium channels. State-of-the-art molecular studies can be exploited to test this hypothesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Tiagabine in clinical practice: effects on seizure control and behavior.

    PubMed

    Vossler, David G; Morris, George L; Harden, Cynthia L; Montouris, Georgia; Faught, Edward; Kanner, Andres M; Fix, Aaron; French, Jacqueline A

    2013-08-01

    Preapproval randomized controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs provide data in limited patient groups. We assessed the side effect and seizure reduction profile of tiagabine (TGB) in typical clinical practice. Investigators recorded adverse effect (AE), seizure, and assessment-of-benefit data prospectively in sequential patients treated open label with TGB. Two hundred ninety-two patients (39 children) were enrolled to be treated long term with TGB. Seizure types were focal-onset (86%), generalized-onset (12%), both focal- and generalized-onset (0.3%), and multiple associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (2%). Two hundred thirty-one received at least one dose of TGB (median = 28 mg/day) and had follow-up seizure or AE data reported. Common AEs were fatigue, dizziness, psychomotor slowing, ataxia, gastrointestinal upset, weight change, insomnia, and "others" (mostly behavioral). Serious AEs occurred in 19 patients: behavioral effects (n = 12), status epilepticus (n = 3), others (n = 3), and sudden unexplained death (n = 1). No patients experienced suicidal ideation/behavior, rash, nephrolithiasis, or organ failure. Seizure outcomes were seizure freedom (5%), ≥75% reduction (12%), ≥50% reduction (23%), and increased number of seizures (17%), or new seizure type (1%). Behavioral AEs occurred in a larger proportion of patients compared to those reported in TGB preapproval randomized controlled trials. A moderate percentage of patients had a meaningful reduction in seizure frequency. In clinical practice, TGB remains a useful antiepileptic drug. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered expression of adrenocorticotropic hormone in the epileptic gerbil hippocampus following spontaneous seizure.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yun-Jung; Kim, Heung-No; Jeong, Ji-Heon; Park, Dae-Kyoon; Park, Kyung-Ho; Ko, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Duk-Soo

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the temporal alterations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus after seizure onset. Expression of ACTH was observed within interneurons in the pre-seizure group of seizure sensitive gerbils, whereas its immunoreactivities were rarely detected in seizure resistant gerbil. Three hr after the seizure, ACTH immunoreactivity was significantly increased in interneurons within all hippocampal regions. On the basis of their localization and morphology through immunofluorescence staining, these cells were identified as GABAA α1-containing interneurons. At the 12 hr postictal period, ACTH expression in these regions was down-regulated, in a similar manner to the pre-seizure group of gerbils. These findings support the increase in ACTH synthesis that contributes to a reduction of corticotrophin-releasing factor via the negative feedback system which in turn provides an opportunity to enhance the excitability of GABAergic interneurons. Therefore, ACTH may play an important role in the reduction of excitotoxicity in all hippocampal regions.

  17. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ghanim; Schiff, Steven J

    2010-05-06

    Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  18. Ictal electroencephalograms in neonatal seizures: characteristics and associations.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Soumya; Palumbo, Linda

    2011-07-01

    The characteristics of ictal electroencephalograms in 160 neonatal seizures of 43 babies were correlated with mortality and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal seizures are focal at onset, most frequently temporal, and often occur during sleep. Twenty-one percent of babies with seizures died, and 76% of survivors manifested neurodevelopmental impairment during 2-6-year follow-up. A low-amplitude ictal electroencephalogram discharge was associated with increased mortality, and a frequency of <2 Hz with increased morbidity. Status epilepticus, ictal fractions, multiple foci, and bihemispheric involvement did not influence outcomes. Of 160 seizures, 99 exhibited no associated clinical features (electrographic seizures). Neonatal seizures with clinical correlates (electroclinical seizures) exhibited a higher amplitude and frequency of ictal electroencephalogram discharge than electrographic seizures. During electroclinical seizures, the ictal electroencephalogram was more likely to involve larger areas of the brain and to cross the midline. Mortality and morbidity were similar in babies with electroclinical and electrographic seizures, emphasizing the need to diagnose and treat both types. Ictal electroencephalogram topography has implications for electrode application during limited-channel, amplitude-integrated electroencephalograms. We recommend temporal and paracentral electrodes. Video electroencephalograms are important in diagnosing neonatal seizures and providing useful information regarding ictal electroencephalogram characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Can Seizure-Alert Dogs predict seizures?

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen W; Goldstein, Laura H

    2011-12-01

    An index observation where a dog was trained to alert to, as well as respond to, human tonic-clonic seizures led to further research and refinement of training techniques. This was followed by anecdotal reports of pet dogs spontaneously anticipating human epileptic seizures. An industry has since developed training Seizure-Alert Dogs (SADs) to give humans warnings of their seizures. In some cases this has been accompanied by a reduction in seizure frequency. SADs may be trained along with the person with epilepsy, responding specifically to that person's seizures, or may be trained separately. Recent sceptical reports of non-epileptic seizures in some people with SADs have cast doubt on dogs' ability to anticipate true epileptic seizures. This may reflect selection criteria for training programmes as well as training methods used, but does not necessarily indicate that SADs might not be able to predict epileptic seizures. Whether the seizures are epileptic or non-epileptic, it is speculated that SADs probably alert to subtle pre-ictal human behaviour changes, but may also be sensitive to heart rate or olfactory cues. As yet, however, no rigorous data exist as to whether seizure prediction by SADS is better than chance, and what false positive and negative prediction rates might be.

  20. Atypical multifocal Dravet syndrome lacks generalized seizures and may show later cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Bellows, Susannah; McMahon, Jacinta M; Iona, Xenia; Damiano, John; Dibbens, Leanne; Kelley, Kent; Gill, Deepak; Cross, J Helen; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2014-01-01

    To show that atypical multifocal Dravet syndrome is a recognizable, electroclinical syndrome associated with sodium channel gene (SCN1A) mutations that readily escapes diagnosis owing to later cognitive decline and tonic seizures. Eight patients underwent electroclinical characterization. SCN1A was sequenced and copy number variations sought by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. All patients were female (age range at assessment 5-26y) with median seizure onset at 6.5 months (range 4-19mo). The initial seizure was brief in seven and status epilepticus only occurred in one; three were febrile. Focal seizures occurred in four patients and bilateral convulsion in the other four. All patients developed multiple focal seizure types and bilateral convulsions, with seizure clusters in six. The most common focal seizure semiology (six out of eight) comprised unilateral clonic activity. Five also had focal or asymmetric tonic seizures. Rare or transient myoclonic seizures occurred in six individuals, often triggered by specific antiepileptic drugs. Developmental slowing occurred in all: six between 3 years and 8 years, and two around 1 year 6 months. Cognitive outcome varied from severe to mild intellectual disability. Multifocal epileptiform discharges were seen on electroencephalography. Seven out of eight patients had SCN1A mutations. Atypical, multifocal Dravet syndrome with SCN1A mutations may not be recognized because of later cognitive decline and frequent tonic seizures. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Does semiology tell us the origin of seizures consisting mainly of an alteration in consciousness?

    PubMed

    Baykan, Betül; Altindag, Ebru; Feddersen, Berend; Ozel, Sevda; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2011-08-01

    Studies on seizures only with an alteration of consciousness were limited mainly to generalized epilepsy. This seizure type has been described rarely in focal epilepsy. We aimed to analyze the semiologic features of this seizure type in focal and generalized epilepsies in a blinded design. A total of 338 seizure videos in 100 patients were included exclusively by semiologic criteria. Two investigators evaluated the seizure semiology (aura, seizure duration, blinking, mild motor phenomena including automatisms, and so on) from the videos. Primarily the ictal electroencephalography (EEGs) studies and all laboratory findings were evaluated for the localization of the epileptogenic zone and delineating the syndromes, in the second step. Of the focal epilepsy patients (n = 57), the epileptogenic zone could be localized to the temporal (n = 20), frontal (n = 9), and parietooccipital (n = 3) regions. The most common etiology of the generalized epilepsy patients (n = 43) was presumably genetic (n = 33). The presence of aura (none in generalized epilepsy vs. 35% in focal epilepsy; p = 0.0008), lack of blinking (19.3% in focal vs 65.1% in generalized epilepsy; p = 0.01), and longer seizure duration (generalized 14.3 ± 17.7 s vs focal 54.9 ± 40.1 s; p < 0.0001) are significantly associated with focal epilepsy, whereas high seizure frequency (p = 0.002), family history of epilepsy (p = 0.016), and responsiveness to therapy (p = 0.004) point to generalized epilepsy with logistic regression analysis. Seizures consisting mainly of an alteration in consciousness may originate from any brain lobe in focal epilepsies and also occur in generalized epilepsies. Several semiologic and clinical features that help to differentiate between focal and generalized epilepsy should be considered in the syndrome diagnosis. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Focal status epilepticus as atypical presentation of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Akira; Takeoka, Masanori; Kelly, Peter J; Krishnamoorthy, Kalpahty S

    2005-08-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy usually presents in the neonatal period or even in utero, is refractory to antiepileptic medications, and is treatable with lifelong administration of pyridoxine. The seizures are typically generalized tonic-clonic, although myoclonic seizures or infantile spasms have been described. We report an infant who presented at 5 months of age with a right-sided clonic seizure with fever. Subsequently, she had recurrent right focal or generalized seizures despite sequential treatment with various antiepileptic medications. At 7 months, she was hospitalized with status epilepticus, which was finally controlled with pyridoxine. After she became seizure free, she continued to have a strong left arm preference with mild weakness of the right arm and delayed language skill. Eventually, she outgrew these symptoms. This case illustrates that pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, although rare, must be included in the differential diagnosis of focal seizures, especially when the seizures are refractory to traditional antiepileptic drugs.

  3. Comparison of electric field strength and spatial distribution of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy in a realistic human head model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Laine, Andrew F.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2017-01-01

    Background This study examines the strength and spatial distribution of the electric field induced in the brain by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST). Methods The electric field induced by standard (bilateral, right unilateral, and bifrontal) and experimental (focal electrically administered seizure therapy and frontomedial) ECT electrode configurations as well as a circular MST coil configuration was simulated in an anatomically realistic finite element model of the human head. Maps of the electric field strength relative to an estimated neural activation threshold were used to evaluate the stimulation strength and focality in specific brain regions of interest for these ECT and MST paradigms and various stimulus current amplitudes. Results The standard ECT configurations and current amplitude of 800–900 mA produced the strongest overall stimulation with median of 1.8–2.9 times neural activation threshold and more than 94% of the brain volume stimulated at suprathreshold level. All standard ECT electrode placements exposed the hippocampi to suprathreshold electric field, although there were differences across modalities with bilateral and right unilateral producing respectively the strongest and weakest hippocampal stimulation. MST stimulation is up to 9 times weaker compared to conventional ECT, resulting in direct activation of only 21% of the brain. Reducing the stimulus current amplitude can make ECT as focal as MST. Conclusions The relative differences in electric field strength may be a contributing factor for the cognitive sparing observed with right unilateral compared to bilateral ECT, and MST compared to right unilateral ECT. These simulations could help understand the mechanisms of seizure therapies and develop interventions with superior risk/benefit ratio. PMID:27318858

  4. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16-20 months-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6-8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of seizure clusters in adult patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baibing; Choi, Hyunmi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Katz, Austen; Legge, Alexander; Wong, Rebecca A; Jiang, Alfred; Kato, Kenneth; Buchsbaum, Richard; Detyniecki, Kamil

    2017-07-01

    In the current study, we explored the prevalence of physician-confirmed seizure clusters. We also investigated potential clinical factors associated with the occurrence of seizure clusters overall and by epilepsy type. We reviewed medical records of 4116 adult (≥16years old) outpatients with epilepsy at our centers for documentation of seizure clusters. Variables including patient demographics, epilepsy details, medical and psychiatric history, AED history, and epilepsy risk factors were then tested against history of seizure clusters. Patients were then divided into focal epilepsy, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), or symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), and the same analysis was run. Overall, seizure clusters were independently associated with earlier age of seizure onset, symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), central nervous system (CNS) infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, absence of 1-year seizure freedom, and having failed 2 or more AEDs (P<0.0026). Patients with SGE (27.1%) were more likely to develop seizure clusters than patients with focal epilepsy (16.3%) and IGE (7.4%; all P<0.001). Analysis by epilepsy type showed that absence of 1-year seizure freedom since starting treatment at one of our centers was associated with seizure clustering in patients across all 3 epilepsy types. In patients with SGE, clusters were associated with perinatal/congenital brain injury. In patients with focal epilepsy, clusters were associated with younger age of seizure onset, complex partial seizures, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, CNS infection, and having failed 2 or more AEDs. In patients with IGE, clusters were associated with presence of an aura. Only 43.5% of patients with seizure clusters were prescribed rescue medications. Patients with intractable epilepsy are at a higher risk of developing seizure clusters. Factors such as having SGE, CNS infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus or an early seizure onset, can also

  6. Sex Differences in Seizure Types and Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Chad; Dugan, Patricia; Kirsch, Heidi E; Friedman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing interest in sex differences in disease manifestations and responses to treatment, very few data are available on sex differences in seizure types and semiology. The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative study that aims to create a comprehensive repository of detailed clinical information and DNA samples from a large cohort of people with epilepsy. We used this well-characterized cohort to explore differences in seizure types as well as focal seizure symptoms between males and females. Methods We reviewed the EPGP database and identified individuals with generalized epilepsy of unknown etiology (GE) (n=760; female 446, male 314), non-acquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) (n=476; female 245, male 231), or both (n=64; female 33, male 31). Demographic data along with characterization of seizure type and focal seizure semiologies were examined. Results In GE, males reported atonic seizures more frequently than females (6.5% vs. 1.7%; p<0.001). No differences were observed in other generalized seizure types. In NAFE, no sex differences were seen for seizure types with or without alteration of consciousness or progression to secondary generalization. Autonomic (16.4% vs. 26.6%; p=0.005), psychic (26.7% vs. 40.3%; p=0.001), and visual symptoms (10.3% vs. 19.9%; p=0.002) were more frequently reported in females than males. Specifically, of psychic symptoms, more females than males endorsed déjà vu (p=0.001), but not forced thoughts, derealization/depersonalization, jamais vu, or fear. With corrections for multiple comparisons, there were no significant differences in aphasic, motor, somatosensory, gustatory, olfactory, auditory, vertiginous, or ictal headache symptoms between sexes. Conclusions Significant differences between the sexes were observed in the reporting of atonic seizures, which was more common in males with GE, and for autonomic, visual, and psychic symptoms associated with NAFE

  7. Hippocampal deep brain stimulation in nonlesional refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongbo; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhao, Zengyi; Ma, Li; Ma, Fa; Chen, Yao; Liu, Qianwei

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of chronic continuous hippocampal deep brain stimulation (DBS) in nonlesional refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Three adult patients with medically intractable epilepsy treated with hippocampal DBS were studied. Two patients underwent invasive recordings with depth stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) electrodes to localize ictal onset zone prior to implantation of DBS electrodes. All the patients with no lesion in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan received bilateral implantation of DBS electrodes. Chronic continuous high-frequency hippocampal stimulation was applied during treatment. The number of seizures in each patient before and after stimulation was compared. Long-term hippocampal stimulation produced a median reduction in seizure frequency of 93%. Two out of these patients received unilateral activation of the electrodes and experienced a 95% and 92% reduction in seizure frequency after hippocampal DBS respectively. The last patient had bilateral electrode activation and had a seizure-frequency reduction of 91%. None of the patients had neuropsychological deterioration and showed side effects. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures disappeared completely after hippocampal DBS. Chronic continuous hippocampal DBS demonstrated a potential efficiency and safety in nonlesional refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and might represent an effective therapeutic option for these patients. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Epileptogenesis provoked by prolonged experimental febrile seizures: mechanisms and biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Celiné M.; Ravizza, Teresa; Hamamura, Mark; Zha, Qinqin; Keebaugh, Andrew; Fok, Kimberly; Andres, Adrienne M.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Obenaus, Andre; Vezzani, Annamaria; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2010-01-01

    Whether long febrile seizures (FS) can cause epilepsy in the absence of genetic or acquired predisposing factors is unclear. Having established causality between long FS and limbic epilepsy in an animal model, we studied here if the duration of the inciting FS influenced the probability of developing subsequent epilepsy and the severity of the spontaneous seizures. We evaluated if interictal epileptifom activity and/or elevation of hippocampal T2 signal on MRI provided predictive biomarkers for epileptogenesis, and if the inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β (IL-1β), an intrinsic element of FS generation, contributed also to subsequent epileptogenesis. We found that febrile status epilepticus, lasting an average of 64 minutes, increased the severity and duration of subsequent spontaneous seizures compared with FS averaging 24 minutes. Interictal activity in rats sustaining febrile status epilepticus was also significantly longer and more robust, and correlated with the presence of hippocampal T2 changes in individual rats. Neither T2 changes nor interictal activity predicted epileptogenesis. Hippocampal levels of IL-1β were significantly higher for over 24 hours after prolonged FS. Chronically, IL-1β levels were elevated only in rats developing spontaneous limbic seizures after febrile status epilepticus, consistent with a role for this inflammatory mediator in epileptogenesis. Establishing seizure duration as an important determinant in epileptogenesis, and defining the predictive roles of interictal activity, MRI, and inflammatory processes are of paramount importance to the clinical understanding of the outcome of FS, the most common neurological insult in infants and children. PMID:20519523

  9. Methylxanthines, seizures, and excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    Clinical evidence, in particular the wide use of theophylline as a bronchodilator, suggests that methylxanthines can cause seizures in patients without known underlying epilepsy. Theophylline is also known to be an added risk factor for seizure exacerbation in patients with epilepsy. The proconvulsant activity of methylxanthines can best be explained by their antagonizing the brain's own anticonvulsant adenosine. Recent evidence suggests that adenosine dysfunction is a pathological hallmark of epilepsy contributing to seizure generation and seizure spread. Conversely, adenosine augmentation therapies are effective in seizure suppression and prevention, whereas adenosine receptor antagonists such as methylxanthines generally exacerbate seizures. The impact of the methylxanthines caffeine and theophylline on seizures and excitotoxicity depends on timing, dose, and acute versus chronic use. New findings suggest a role of free radicals in theophylline-induced seizures, and adenosine-independent mechanisms for seizure generation have been proposed.

  10. Consciousness and epilepsy: why are patients with absence seizures absent?

    PubMed Central

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures cause dynamic, reversible changes in brain function and are often associated with loss of consciousness. Of all seizure types, absence seizures lead to the most selective deficits in consciousness, with relatively little motor or other manifestations. Impaired consciousness in absence seizures is not monolithic, but varies in severity between patients and even between episodes in the same patient. In addition, some aspects of consciousness may be more severely involved than other aspects. The mechanisms for this variability are not known. Here we review the literature on human absence seizures and discuss a hypothesis for why effects on consciousness may be variable. Based on behavioral studies, electrophysiology, and recent neuroimaging and molecular investigations, we propose absence seizures impair focal, not generalized brain functions. Imapired consciousness in absence seizures may be caused by focal disruption of information processing in specific corticothalamic networks, while other networks are spared. Deficits in selective and varying cognitive functions may lead to impairment in different aspects of consciousness. Further investigations of the relationship between behavior and altered network function in absence seizures may improve our understanding of both normal and impaired consciousness. PMID:16186030

  11. Childhood onset temporal lobe epilepsy: Beyond hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mühlebner, Angelika; Breu, Markus; Kasprian, Gregor; Schmook, Maria T; Stefanits, Harald; Scholl, Theresa; Samueli, Sharon; Gröppel, Gudrun; Dressler, Anastasia; Prayer, Daniela; Czech, Thomas; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Feucht, Martha

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal Sclerosis (HS) is widely recognized as a significant underlying cause of drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in adults. In contrast, HS is a rare finding in pediatric surgical series, and a higher incidence of HS associated with cortical dysplasia (i.e. FCD type IIIa according to the new ILAE classification) than in adult series has been reported. Data about the electro-clinical characteristics of this subgroup are scarce. We studied 15 children and adolescents with drug-resistant TLE and HS who had anterior temporal lobe resection at our center with regard to electroclinical characteristics, MRI features and histopathology. Children in whom histopathology was consistent with Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) type IIIa (n = 7) were compared with those who had HS only (n = 8). Clinical characteristics associated with this highly selective subset of patients with FCD type IIIa were: the presence of febrile seizures during infancy, a shorter duration of active epilepsy and a lower age at epilepsy surgery. In addition, there were non-significant trends towards more extended abnormalities on both EEG and neuroimaging. We were, however, not able to find group differences with respect to neuropathologic subtyping of the HS. We present the first detailed description and comprehensive data analysis of children with FCD type IIIa. According to our results, this patient group seems to show a distinct clinical phenotype. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Focal cerebral infarction in the newborn: a distinct entity.

    PubMed

    Filipek, P A; Krishnamoorthy, K S; Davis, K R; Kuehnle, K

    1987-01-01

    Recent reports, which described early computed tomography findings of unsuspected cerebral arterial infarctions in term newborns who presented with seizures, prompted a review of our neonatal intensive care unit records. Seven newborns demonstrated arterial infarctions by computed tomography. Five of the 7 had focal motor seizures and 2 had generalized seizures. Electroencephalograms of 6 infants correlated with the area of infarct, mainly disclosing focal spike- and/or sharp-wave activity. All infarcts involved the territory of the middle cerebral arteries and all were evident on initial scans. Subsequent examinations at age 12 months to 9 years demonstrated 4 children with spastic hemiparesis, and 3 children with normal neurologic examinations. Neonatal cerebral arterial infarction is a distinct entity which should be recognized and should be included in the differential diagnosis of neonatal seizures, regardless of the presenting symptoms or predisposing factors.

  13. Duration of complex partial seizures: an intracranial EEG study.

    PubMed

    Afra, Pegah; Jouny, Christophe C; Bergey, Gregory K

    2008-04-01

    The dynamics of partial seizures originating from neocortical and mesial temporal regions are thought to differ, yet there are no quantitative comparative studies. The studies reported here investigate the duration of complex partial seizures in these populations using analyses of seizures recorded from intracranial arrays. Data were collected from patients undergoing presurgical evaluation with intracranial electrodes. Seizure duration was defined as the time of earliest sustained ictal activity until the termination either in all electrodes (global duration, GD), or at the onset area (focal duration, FD). Patients were divided into three groups: mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (NCTLE), and neocortical extratemporal lobe epilepsy (NCXTLE). Complex partial seizure durations were significantly longer in the MTLE group compared to the NCXTLE group. Median GD for MTLE was 106 s, and for NCXTLE was 78 s. There were no significant differences between seizure durations when comparing MTLE group to NCTLE group, or comparing NCTLE group to NCXTLE group. In the MTLE group, patients with bilateral recording arrays had significantly longer median seizure durations (GD and FD) than those sampled with unilateral arrays. In this select group of patients there is a significant difference between the duration of complex partial seizures of mesial temporal and neocortical extratemporal origin with mesial temporal complex partial seizures being longer. This may result from a number of possibilities including the bilateral propagation of some mesial temporal seizures and differences in ictal generators of the underlying networks.

  14. Reevaluating the mechanisms of focal ictogenesis: The role of low-voltage fast activity.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Marco; Gnatkovsky, Vadym

    2009-12-01

    The mechanisms that control the transition into a focal seizure are still uncertain. The introduction of presurgical intracranial recordings to localize the epileptogenic zone in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies opened a new window to the interpretation of seizure generation (ictogenesis). One of the most frequent focal patterns observed with intracranial electrodes at seizure onset is characterized by low-voltage fast activity in the beta-gamma range that may or may not be preceded by changes of ongoing interictal activities. In the present commentary, the mechanisms of generation of focal seizures are reconsidered, focusing on low-voltage fast activity patterns. Experimental findings on models of temporal lobe seizures support the view that the low-voltage fast activity observed at seizure onset is associated with reinforcement and synchronization of inhibitory networks. A minor role for the initiation of the ictal pattern is played by principal neurons that are progressively recruited with a delay, when inhibition declines and synchronous high-voltage discharges ensue. The transition from inhibition into excitatory recruitment is probably mediated by local increase in potassium concentration associated with synchronized interneuronal firing. These findings challenge the classical theory that proposes an increment of excitation and/or a reduction of inhibition as a cause for the transition to seizure in focal epilepsies. A new definition of ictogenesis mechanisms, as herewith hypothesized, might possibly help to develop new therapeutic strategies for focal epilepsies.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  16. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparable seizure characteristics in magnetic seizure therapy and electroconvulsive therapy for major depression.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Sarah; Bewernick, Bettina H; Hurlemann, René; Soehle, Martin; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2013-11-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly effective for treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, its use for less severe forms of depression is somewhat limited by a lack of control over current spreading to medial temporal lobe memory structures, resulting in various cognitive side effects. In contrast, magnetic seizure therapy (MST), which uses high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for local seizure induction, has been associated with reduced cognitive side effects. To assess whether different characteristics of seizures induced by both methods are responsible for the differences in neuropsychological side-effect profile, we studied seven TRD-patients undergoing both MST and ECT in an open-label, within subject, controlled crossover pilot study. Comparison parameters included seizure-related ictal characteristics, including motor activity, electromyogram (EMG), electroencephalogram (EEG), and postictal recovery and reorientation times.Our results showed no differences in motor activity or EMG and EEG characteristics, thus implicating similar electrophysiological processes in seizure induction with MST and ECT. In line with previous studies, we observed shorter postictal recovery and reorientation times following MST.The ictal characteristics of induced seizures were found similar with ECT and MST suggesting that the more focal seizure induction associated with MST may account for the more beneficial neuropsychological side effect profile of MST.

  18. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  19. Operational classification of seizure types by the International League Against Epilepsy: Position Paper of the ILAE Commission for Classification and Terminology.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Cross, J Helen; French, Jacqueline A; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirsch, Edouard; Jansen, Floor E; Lagae, Lieven; Moshé, Solomon L; Peltola, Jukka; Roulet Perez, Eliane; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) presents a revised operational classification of seizure types. The purpose of such a revision is to recognize that some seizure types can have either a focal or generalized onset, to allow classification when the onset is unobserved, to include some missing seizure types, and to adopt more transparent names. Because current knowledge is insufficient to form a scientifically based classification, the 2017 Classification is operational (practical) and based on the 1981 Classification, extended in 2010. Changes include the following: (1) "partial" becomes "focal"; (2) awareness is used as a classifier of focal seizures; (3) the terms dyscognitive, simple partial, complex partial, psychic, and secondarily generalized are eliminated; (4) new focal seizure types include automatisms, behavior arrest, hyperkinetic, autonomic, cognitive, and emotional; (5) atonic, clonic, epileptic spasms, myoclonic, and tonic seizures can be of either focal or generalized onset; (6) focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizure replaces secondarily generalized seizure; (7) new generalized seizure types are absence with eyelid myoclonia, myoclonic absence, myoclonic-atonic, myoclonic-tonic-clonic; and (8) seizures of unknown onset may have features that can still be classified. The new classification does not represent a fundamental change, but allows greater flexibility and transparency in naming seizure types. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Seizure risk from cavernous or arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Josephson, C.B.; Leach, J.-P.; Duncan, R.; Roberts, R.C.; Counsell, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the risk of epileptic seizures due to a brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or cavernous malformation (CM). Methods: In a prospective population-based study of new diagnoses of AVMs (n = 229) or CMs (n = 139) in adults in Scotland in 1999–2003, we used annual medical records surveillance, general practitioner follow-up, and patient questionnaires to quantify the risk of seizures between clinical presentation and AVM/CM treatment, last follow-up, or death. Results: The 5-year risk of first-ever seizure after presentation was higher for AVMs presenting with intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurologic deficit (ICH/FND: n = 119; 23%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9%–37%) than for incidental AVMs (n = 40; 8%, 95% CI 0%–20%), CMs presenting with ICH/FND (n = 38; 6%, 95% CI 0%–14%), or incidental CMs (n = 57; 4%, 95% CI 0%–10%). For adults who had never experienced ICH/FND, the 5-year risk of epilepsy after first-ever seizure was higher for CMs (n = 23; 94%, 95% CI 84%–100%) than AVMs (n = 37; 58%, 95% CI 40%–76%; p = 0.02). Among adults who never experienced ICH/FND and presented with or developed epilepsy, there was no difference in the proportions achieving 2-year seizure freedom over 5 years between AVMs (n = 43; 45%, 95% CI 20%–70%) and CMs (n = 35; 47%, 95% CI 27%–67%). Conclusions: AVM-related ICH confers a significantly higher risk of a first-ever seizure compared to CMs or incidental AVMs. Adults with a CM have a high risk of epilepsy after a first-ever seizure but achieve seizure freedom as frequently as those with epilepsy due to an AVM. PMID:21536634

  1. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    PubMed Central

    ESMAILI GOURABI, Hamed; BIDABADI, Elham; CHERAGHALIPOUR, Fatemeh; AARABI, Yasaman; SALAMAT, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Because of geographical and periodical variation, we prompted to determine the demographic features and causative factors for febrile seizure in Rasht. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all 6–month- to 6-year-old children with the diagnosis of febrile seizure admitted to 17 Shahrivar hospital in Rasht, from August, 2009 to August, 2010 were studied. Age, sex, family history of the disease, seizure types, body temperature upon admission and infectious causes of the fever were recorded. All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software, version 16. Results Of the 214 children (mean age, 25.24±15.40 months), 124 were boys and 109 had a positive family history. Complex seizures were seen in 39 cases. In patients with a complex febrile seizure, 59% had the repetitive type, 20.5% had the focal type and 20.5% had more than 15 minutes duration of seizures. Most of the repetitive seizures (78.3%) occurred in patients under 2 years old; the difference between under and over 2-year-old patients was statistically significant. Study results did not show significant differences between the two genders for simple or complex seizures. The mean body temperature upon admission was 38.2±1.32◦C (38.31±0.82 degrees in boys and 38.04±1.78 in girls). Upper respiratory infections were seen in most patients (74.29%). All cases of lower respiratory infections were boys. There was a statistically significant difference between boys and girls in causes of fever. Conclusion Most of the children had a positive family history and the most common causative factor was upper respiratory infection. PMID:24665278

  2. Recognition memory is impaired in children after prolonged febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal injury may be evident in human children after prolonged febrile seizures. The current study addressed this question by investigating memory abilities in 26 children soon after a prolonged febrile seizure (median: 37.5 days) and compared their results to those of 37 normally developing children. Fifteen patients were reassessed at a mean of 12.5 months after their first assessment to determine the transiency of any observed effects. We used the visual paired comparison task to test memory abilities in our group, as this task does not depend on verbal abilities and also because successful performance on the task has been proven to depend on the presence of functional hippocampi. Our findings show that patients perform as well as controls in the absence of a delay between the learning phase and the memory test, suggesting that both groups are able to form representations of the presented stimulus. However, after a 5-min delay, patients’ recognition memory is not different from chance, and comparison of patients and controls points to an accelerated forgetting rate in the prolonged febrile seizure group. The patients’ performance was not related to the time elapsed from the acute event or the duration of the prolonged febrile seizure, suggesting that the observed effect is not a by-product of the seizure itself or a delayed effect of medication administered to terminate the seizure. By contrast, performance was related to hippocampal size; participants with the smallest mean hippocampal volumes revealed the biggest drop in performance from the immediate to the delayed paradigm. At follow-up, children were still showing

  3. Time-frequency analysis of intracranial EEG in patients with myoclonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Zhang, Guojun; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yan, Xiaoming; Li, Liping; Xu, Cuiping; Yu, Tao; Liu, Chunyan; Zhu, Yu; Lin, Yicong; Wang, Yuping

    2016-12-01

    Myoclonic seizures are defined as generalized seizures according to the classification of seizure by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). The pathogenesis of myoclonic seizures is not yet clear. There are very few studies on the focal surgical treatment of myoclonic seizures. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of myoclonic seizure onset in different bands of the intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) and their dynamic changes in temporal and spatial evolution. We studied four patients with myoclonic seizures who were under the focal resection of the epileptogenic zone. We retrospectively analyzed the semiology, electrocorticogram (ECoG) and imaging data of these patients, and conducted time-frequency analysis of broadband ECoG activity. We found that myoclonic seizures without clinical lateralizing signs could be improved by the resection of the epileptogenic zone. The ECoG power in different frequency bands increased to a peak at 0.5s before the clinical seizure onset and decreased quickly afterwards. The power of alpha activity was highest during the preictal and ictal periods. The central zone had higher power than the epileptogenic zone in all frequency bands during the preictal period, but this difference was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that myoclonic seizures in some patients might have a focal origination, with a fast bilateral propagating network in all frequency bands, especially the alpha band.

  4. Dysplastic Cerebellar Epilepsy: Complete Seizure Control Following Resection of a Ganglioglioma.

    PubMed

    Martins, William Alves; Paglioli, Eliseu; Hemb, Marta; Palmini, Andre

    2016-08-01

    Subcortical epilepsy has been a controversial issue, partially settled by evidence showing seizure generation in hypothalamic hamartomas and also by reports of seizures caused by cerebellar lesions. We report 4-year-old girl with right hemifacial seizures and autonomic phenomena, in whom MRI showed an irregular mass in the right cerebellar peduncle. Despite several unremarkable video-EEG recordings, seizure origin in the lesion was hypothesized. Complete resection was feasible, histopathology showed a ganglioglioma, and she has been seizure free for 3 years. A fine line separates these developmental tumors from focal cortical dysplasia, and the homogeneous presentation of this entity led us to propose the terminology dysplastic cerebellar epilepsy.

  5. Features and futures: seizure detection in partial epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Harnod, Tomor; Liu, Wentai

    2011-10-01

    Many factors underlying basic epileptic conditions determine the characteristics of epileptic seizures and the therapeutic outcome. Diagnosis and treatment rely on the clinical manifestations as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptic activities. This article briefly reviews the fundamentals of the EEG, interictal, and ictal electrical activities of both extracranial and intracranial EEG of partial epilepsies, based on the information obtained from epilepsy patients who have undergone epilepsy surgery. The authors also present the status of their current research, focusing on decomposed seizure sources and the rendered spatial-temporal transitions in focal seizure.

  6. Clinically silent seizures in a neonate with tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Mitsuru; Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Hisata, Ken; Shoji, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Although seizures during infancy in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are common, seizures in neonates are infrequent. Here, we report the clinical course and electroencephalography (EEG) findings of a neonate with tuberous sclerosis complex associated with clinically silent seizures. The patient was a girl in whom cardiac tumors were detected on fetal ultrasonography. Brain magnetic resonance imaging during the neonatal period showed subependymal and cortical tubers. Routine EEG indicated unexpected ictal changes with no noticeable clinical symptoms. Ictal EEG was associated with a subtle increase in heart rate and a brief increase in chin electromyogram. These changes were difficult to identify clinically. The patient later developed focal seizures and epileptic spasms and had severe psychomotor delay. The present case suggests the occurrence of clinically silent seizures before the appearance of epileptic spasms in infants with tuberous sclerosis, and that EEG is an option for neonates with a prenatal diagnosis. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. AED discontinuation may be dangerous for seizure-free patients.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Dieter

    2011-02-01

    Despite its benefits, stopping antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in seizure-free patients is associated with several risks. AED discontinuation doubles the risk of seizure recurrence for up to 2 years compared with continued treatment. On average, one in three patients has a seizure recurrence, though the range can go up to 66% (34%, range 12-66%, 95% CI: 27-43). Furthermore, the outcome of treating a seizure recurrence in patients who have been seizure-free for years is surprisingly poor in some patients. Although the long-term prognosis is not worsened by drug discontinuation, one in five patients does not re-enter remission and for some patients, it may take several years to become seizure-free again. The risk of seizure recurrence is particularly high for those with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and symptomatic focal epilepsy, the most frequent epilepsies in adults. Seizure-recurrence may have devastating, medical, psychological and social consequences for the individual, for example injury, loss of self-esteem, unemployment and losing a driver's license. Discontinuation should be avoided in patients with a high risk of seizure recurrence. Given these risks, patients will ultimately have to decide themselves whether they wish to discontinue drug treatment after full informed consent.

  8. Noninvasive Dynamic Imaging of Seizures in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tyvaert, Louise; LeVan, Pierre; Dubeau, Francois; Gotman, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are due to abnormal synchronized neuronal discharges. Techniques measuring electrical changes are commonly used to analyze seizures. Neuronal activity can be also defined by concomitant hemodynamic and metabolic changes. Simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-functional MRI (fMRI) measures noninvasively with a high-spatial resolution BOLD changes during seizures in the whole brain. Until now, only a static image representing the whole seizure was provided. We report in 10 focal epilepsy patients a new approach to dynamic imaging of seizures including the BOLD time course of seizures and the identification of brain structures involved in seizure onset and discharge propagation. The first activation was observed in agreement with the expected location of the focus based on clinical and EEG data (three intracranial recordings), thus providing validity to this approach. The BOLD signal preceded ictal EEG changes in two cases. EEG-fMRI may detect changes in smaller and deeper structures than scalp EEG, which can only record activity form superficial cortical areas. This method allowed us to demonstrate that seizure onset zone was limited to one structure, thus supporting the concept of epileptic focus, but that a complex neuronal network was involved during propagation. Deactivations were also found during seizures, usually appearing after the first activation in areas close or distant to the activated regions. Deactivations may correspond to actively inhibited regions or to functional disconnection from normally active regions. This new noninvasive approach should open the study of seizure generation and propagation mechanisms in the whole brain to groups of patients with focal epilepsies. PMID:19507156

  9. Cracking Down on Inhibition: Selective Removal of GABAergic Interneurons from Hippocampal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Flavia; Alpár, Alán; Kacza, Johannes; Caleo, Matteo; Verderio, Claudia; Giani, Alice; Martens, Henrik; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Allegra, Manuela; Grosche, Jens; Michalski, Dominik; Erck, Christian; Hoffmann, Anke; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory (GABAergic) interneurons entrain assemblies of excitatory principal neurons to orchestrate information processing in the hippocampus. Disrupting the dynamic recruitment as well as the temporally precise activity of interneurons in hippocampal circuitries can manifest in epileptiform seizures, and impact specific behavioral traits. Despite the importance of GABAergic interneurons during information encoding in the brain, experimental tools to selectively manipulate GABAergic neurotransmission are limited. Here, we report the selective elimination of GABAergic interneurons by a ribosome inactivation approach through delivery of saporin-conjugated anti-vesicular GABA transporter antibodies (SAVAs) in vitro as well as in the mouse and rat hippocampus in vivo. We demonstrate the selective loss of GABAergic—but not glutamatergic—synapses, reduced GABA release, and a shift in excitation/inhibition balance in mixed cultures of hippocampal neurons exposed to SAVAs. We also show the focal and indiscriminate loss of calbindin+, calretinin+, parvalbumin/system A transporter 1+, somatostatin+, vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3)/cholecystokinin/CB1 cannabinoid receptor+ and neuropeptide Y+ local-circuit interneurons upon SAVA microlesions to the CA1 subfield of the rodent hippocampus, with interneuron debris phagocytosed by infiltrating microglia. SAVA microlesions did not affect VGLUT1+ excitatory afferents. Yet SAVA-induced rearrangement of the hippocampal circuitry triggered network hyperexcitability associated with the progressive loss of CA1 pyramidal cells and the dispersion of dentate granule cells. Overall, our data identify SAVAs as an effective tool to eliminate GABAergic neurons from neuronal circuits underpinning high-order behaviors and cognition, and whose manipulation can recapitulate pathogenic cascades of epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric illnesses. PMID:22323713

  10. Chronic exercise dampens hippocampal glutamate overflow induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Reiss, Jenny I; Murray, Patrick S; Dishman, Rod K; Spradley, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported that chronic, voluntary exercise diminishes seizure-related behaviors induced by convulsant doses of kainic acid. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that exercise exerts this protective effect through a mechanism involving suppression of glutamate release in the hippocampal formation. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running or sedentary conditions, rats were injected with 10 mg/kg of kainic acid, and hippocampal glutamate was measured in real time using a telemetric, in vivo voltammetry system. A separate experiment measured electroencephalographic (EEG) activity following kainic acid treatment. Results of the voltammetry experiment revealed that the rise in hippocampal glutamate induced by kainic acid is attenuated in exercising rats compared to sedentary controls, indicating that the exercise-induced protection against seizures involves regulation of hippocampal glutamate release. The findings reveal the potential benefit of regular exercise in the treatment and prevention of seizure disorders and suggest a possible neurobiological mechanism underlying this effect.

  11. Interference of TRPV1 function altered the susceptibility of PTZ-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yun-Fang; Li, Ying-Chao; Tang, Yan-Ping; Cao, Jun; Wang, Li-Ping; Yang, Yue-Xiong; Xu, Lin; Mao, Rong-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS) including hippocampus, and regulates the balance of excitation and inhibition in CNS, which imply its important role in epilepsy. We used both pharmacological manipulations and transgenic mice to disturb the function of TRPV1 and then studied the effects of these alterations on the susceptibility of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. Our results showed that systemic administration of TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (CAP, 40 mg/kg) directly induced tonic-clonic seizures (TCS) without PTZ induction. The severity of seizure was increased in lower doses of CAP groups (5 and 10 mg/kg), although the latency to TCS was delayed. On the other hand, systemic administration of TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (CPZ, 0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg) and TRPV1 knockout mice exhibited delayed latency to TCS and reduced mortality. Furthermore, hippocampal administration of CPZ (10 and 33 nmol/μL/side) was firstly reported to increase the latency to TCS, decrease the maximal grade of seizure and mortality. It is worth noting that decreased susceptibility of PTZ-induced seizures was observed in hippocampal TRPV1 overexpression mice and hippocampal CAP administration (33 nmol/μL/side), which is opposite from results of systemic agonist CAP. Our findings suggest that the systemic administration of TRPV1 antagonist may be a novel therapeutic target for epilepsy, and alteration of hippocampal TRPV1 function exerts a critical role in seizure susceptibility.