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Sample records for focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis

  1. Molecular mimicry in pauci-immune focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Renate; Exner, Markus; Brandes, Ricarda; Ziebermayr, Reinhard; Cunningham, Dawn; Alderson, Carol A; Davidovits, Agnes; Raab, Ingrid; Jahn, Renate; Ashour, Oliver; Spitzauer, Susanne; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere; Fukuda, Minoru; Klemm, Per; Rees, Andrew J; Kerjaschki, Dontscho

    2009-01-01

    Pauci-immune focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis (FNGN) is a severe inflammatory disease associated with autoantibodies to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens (ANCA). Here we characterize autoantibodies to lysosomal membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) and show that they are a new ANCA subtype present in almost all individuals with FNGN. Consequently, its prevalence is nearly twice that of the classical ANCAs that recognize myeloperoxidase or proteinase-3. Furthermore, antibodies to LAMP-2 cause pauci-immune FNGN when injected into rats, and a monoclonal antibody to human LAMP-2 (H4B4) induces apoptosis of human microvascular endothelium in vitro. The autoantibodies in individuals with pauci-immune FNGN commonly recognize a human LAMP-2 epitope (designated P41–49) with 100% homology to the bacterial adhesin FimH, with which they cross-react. Rats immunized with FimH develop pauci-immune FNGN and also develop antibodies to rat and human LAMP-2. Finally, we show that infections with fimbriated pathogens are common before the onset of FNGN. Thus, FimH-triggered autoimmunity to LAMP-2 provides a previously undescribed clinically relevant molecular mechanism for the development of pauci-immune FNGN. PMID:18836458

  2. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis: rapidly progressive necrotizing glomerulonephritis in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Mariana; Bocanegra, Victoria; Vallés, Patricia G

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is associated with a broad range of clinical manifestations including renal disease. It is a systemic vasculitis that is rarely encountered in children. We present a 14-year-old girl who suffered from pharyngitis 1 week before admittance to hospital. She was admitted for macroscopic hematuria and oliguria, under the possibility of nephritic syndrome. Renal failure with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis occurred within 24 hours. Immunologic tests showed the presence of type-C anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA with antiproteinase 3 specificity) and renal biopsy revealed pauci-immune crescentic focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis. Treatment including methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide intravenous pulses allowed renal recovery after 3 weeks. The clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters improved substantially, achieving remission. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis, although rare in children, should be considered in the above clinical scenario. This case underlines that knowledge of renal histology diagnosis and early aggressive immunosuppressive therapy are essential for the management of these patients. PMID:24790466

  3. MPO-ANCA-associated necrotizing glomerulonephritis in rheumatoid arthritis; a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Góis, Mário; Messias, Ana; Carvalho, Dulce; Carvalho, Fernanda; Sousa, Helena; Sousa, João; Nolasco, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    Renal involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is common and has a negative impact on patient survival. Only few cases have been reported of necrotizing glomerulonephritis (GN) associated with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) in patients with RA. We report a patient with RA who developed a necrotizing GN associated with ANCA-MPO, treated with rituximab (RTX). A 55-year-old man with a 27-year history of RA under secukinumab was referred to our nephrology clinic with worsening renal function associated with microhematuria and proteinuria. Our laboratory evaluation showed hypocomplementemia and positive titers for MPO-ANCA (615 U/mL). A renal biopsy demonstrated pauci-immune necrotizing GN. The patient was treated with 3 consecutive pulses of methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone (1 mg/Kg) and rituximab (1000 mg, repeated 14 days later). After a 10-month follow-up, the arthritis remains well-controlled, renal function stabilized, proteinuria improved and MPO-ANCA titer normalized (6.3 U/mL). Necrotizing GN is a rare but a serious condition and an early diagnosis is essential to treatment. This is the first case of necrotizing GN (without extra-renal manifestations of vasculitis) in a patient with active RA, successfully treated with RTX.

  4. Focal transmural necrotic tracheitis in commercial meat turkeys.

    PubMed

    Sentíes-Cué, Gabriel; Crespo, Rocio; Chin, R P

    2003-01-01

    This report describes an unusual presentation of severe focal necrotic tracheitis in a flock of 8-wk-old commercial turkeys. The flock was kept on a range that is located near a cotton field. The cotton field had been chemically defoliated 2 wk before the birds were submitted for necropsy. At necropsy, most of the birds had a 1-cm, yellow-white constricture in the upper third of the trachea at which the lumen was partially occluded by necrotic tissue. Microscopically, there was severe, transmural necrosis with an accumulation of inflammatory exudate in the tracheal lumen and numerous bacteria within the necrotic debris, mucosa, and lamina propria. Mixed bacteria were isolated from the trachea. No viruses were detected. Neither abnormal heavy metal concentrations in the liver nor paraquat in the respiratory tract were detected. The exact cause of this severe, necrotic tracheitis was not determined. Based on the clinical history and laboratory findings, it was concluded that a combination of a toxic irritant, possibly an aerosolized cotton defoliant, and bacterial infections were likely the cause of this lesion.

  5. Necrotizing ANCA-Positive Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Culture-Negative Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Van Haare Heijmeijer, Sophie; Wilmes, Dunja; Aydin, Selda; Clerckx, Caroline; Labriola, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and small-vessel vasculitis may have similar clinical features, including glomerulonephritis. Furthermore the association between IE and ANCA positivity is well documented, making differential diagnosis between IE- and ANCA-associated vasculitis particularly difficult, especially in case of culture-negative IE. We report on one patient with glomerulonephritis secondary to culture-negative IE caused by Bartonella henselae which illustrates this diagnostic difficulty. PMID:26819786

  6. C1q nephropathy and isolated CD59 deficiency manifesting as necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis: A rare association of two diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruchika; Sharma, Alok; Agarwal, Sanjay K; Dinda, Amit K

    2015-11-01

    C1q nephropathy is a recently described clinico-pathologic entity with a variable clinical presentation and pathology. Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) has been reported in only two patients in the available literature. CD59 deficiency, along with lack of CD55, is responsible for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). Few cases of isolated CD59 deficiency have been described with PNH-like features. A middle-aged adult male presented with rapidly progressive renal failure. Serological investigations were negative. A renal biopsy revealed necrotizing crescentic GN with rupture of Bowman's capsule. Immunofluorescence on the frozen sections showed dominant mesangial deposits of C1q along with IgM. Hematological work-up of the patient revealed isolated CD59 deficiency. Hence, a final diagnosis of C1q nephropathy and CD59 deficiency manifesting as crescentic GN and hemolytic anemia was made. The co-existence of two rare disorders, C1q nephropathy and CD59 deficiency, in a patient with necrotizing crescentic GN is described for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The pathogenetic link of these two entities with the clinical manifestation requires further study.

  7. Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis presenting with preserved renal function in patients with underlying multisystem autoimmune disease: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Anisha; Randone, Olga; Tam, Frederick W. K.; Tarzi, Ruth M.; Levy, Jeremy B.; Griffith, Megan; Lightstone, Liz; Cook, H. Terence; Cairns, Tom; Pusey, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Necrotizing and crescentic GN usually presents with rapidly declining renal function, often in association with multisystem autoimmune disease, with a poor outcome if left untreated. We aimed to describe the features of patients who have presented with these histopathological findings but minimal disturbance of renal function. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review (1995–2011) of all adult patients with native renal biopsy–proven necrotizing or crescentic GN and normal serum creatinine (<120 μmol/l) at our centre. Results. Thirty-eight patients were identified. The median creatinine at presentation was 84 μmol/l and the median proportion of glomeruli affected by necrosis or crescents was 32%. Clinicopathological diagnoses were ANCA-associated GN (74%), LN (18%), anti-GBM disease (5%) and HScP (3%). Only 18% of cases had pre-existing diagnoses of underlying multisystem autoimmune disease, although the majority (89%) had extra-renal manifestations accompanying the renal diagnosis. All patients received immunosuppression and most had good long-term renal outcomes (median duration of follow-up 50 months), although two progressed to end-stage renal disease within 3 years. We estimate that renal biopsy had an important influence on treatment decisions in 82% of cases. Conclusion. Necrotizing and crescentic GN may present in patients with no or only minor disturbance of renal function. This often occurs in patients with underlying systemic autoimmune disease; early referral for biopsy may affect management and improve long-term outcomes in these cases. PMID:25431483

  8. Glomerulonephritis mediated by antibody to glomerular basement membrane. Immunological, clinical, and histopathological characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    McPhaul, J J; Mullins, J D

    1976-01-01

    A prospective study was undertaken to establish the incidence of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis and its histopathological characteristics in a clinical group of patients presenting with renal disease. Biopsies from 43 of 409 consecutive patients technically satisfactory for direct immunofluorescent (IF) examination had diffuse and generalized linear localization of host immunoglobulin (Ig); two other badly scarred kidneys tested negative to IF although GBM antibodies were eluted. Confirmatory evidence of GBM antibody-mediated disease in these patients came from whole kidney or biopsy elutions (15 patients), serologic assays for circulating GBM antibodies by indirect IF (9 of 38 patients), radioimmunoassay (26 of 34), and hemagglutination (31 of 32). Although sera were not tested from six patients, circulating antibodies were demonstrated by some test in 36 of 39 of the remainder. Histologically, half of the patients had minor and nonspecific glomerular abnormalities or mild focal proliferative glomerulonephritis. More severely involved kidneys had focal necrotizing (17%), rapidly progressive (7%), and chronic, usually sclerosing, glomerulonephritis (27%). Clinical courses of these patients comparably were quite variable, ranging from indolent microhematuria and/or gross hematuric bouts to progressive renal failure; nephrotic syndrome was observed in 11 patients. GBM antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis may be a relatively mild disease with apparently stable renal function, although 16 patients have experienced functional deterioration, and 11 have progressed to dialysis, renal transplantation, or death. Images PMID:56340

  9. Pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis with crescentic and full moon extracapillary proliferation: clinico-pathologic correlation and follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Mehtat; Kiremitci, Saba; Ensari, Arzu; Ozluk, Yasemin; Kilicaslan, Isin; Ozdemir, Binnaz Handan; Ates, Deniz; Ertoy Baydar, Dilek; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Memis, Leyla; Sarsik, Banu; Sen, Sait; Akkaya, Bahar; Orhan, Diclehan; Gonlusen, Gulfiliz; Ellidokuz, Hulya; Ada, Sibel; Cavdar, Caner; Akagun, Tulin; Kamali, Sevil; Aksu, Kenan; Yazisiz, Veli; Paydas, Saime; Soylu, Alper; Sarioglu, Sulen

    2013-02-15

    The prognostic value of the type and extent of extracapillary proliferation (ECP) in pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephitis (PIGN) was evaluated in this study. In 141 PIGN cases, all glomeruli with ECP were grouped according to type (cellular, fibrocellular and fibrous) and extent of the lesions in Bowman's space; (segmental, semicircumferential and circumferential, which might be termed full moon-FM). Cases with cellular and fibrous lesions involving ≥ 50% of glomeruli with ECP were classified as cellular and fibrous groups, respectively, while the remaining cases were classified as fibrocellular. Cases with segmental and circumferential (FM glomerulus) lesions involving ≥ 50% of glomeruli with ECP were classified as ECPI and ECPIII (FM) groups, respectively, while the rest were classified as ECPII. All the cases were classified according to Berden et al. Significant results were only nearly obtained for the FM group, including the need for dialysis. The Cox regression model revealed a 2.6-fold risk for FM cases regarding dialysis requirement. We propose that the percentage of FM glomeruli should be noted in the pathology report, and cases with more than 50% of FM glomeruli (FM group) should be identified in the group with increased risk of dialysis requirement. Our series also suggests that classification according to Berden et al. is of clinical relevance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel class of autoantigens of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis: the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein h-lamp-2 in neutrophil granulocytes and a related membrane protein in glomerular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN) is frequently associated with circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA). It is established that ANCA are specific for soluble enzymes of granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN), such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) or protease 3 (PR3). The purpose of this study was to identify membrane proteins of PMNs, and/or glomerular cells, as additional autoantigenic ANCA targets. When membrane protein fractions were prepared from PMNs and isolated human glomeruli, and immunoblotted with ANCA sera of NCGN patients, two bands with apparent molecular masses of 170 and 80-110 kD (gp170/80-110) were labeled in PMNs, and a 130-kD glycoprotein (gp130) in glomeruli. Gp130 was purified, and monoclonal and rabbit antibodies (Abs) were produced which showed the same double specificity as the patient's ANCA. Using these probes, evidence was provided that gp170/80-110 is identical with human lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (h-lamp-2), because both proteins were immunologically cross-reactive and screening of a cDNA expression library from human promyelocytic leukemia cells with anti- gp130 Ab yielded a clone derived from h-lamp-2. Gp170/80-110 was localized primarily in granule membranes of resting PMNs, and was translocated to the cell surfaces by activation with FMLP. By contrast, gp130 was localized in the surface membranes of endothelial cells of human glomerular and renal interstitial capillaries, rather than in lysosomes, as found for h-lamp-2. Potential clinical relevance of autoantibodies to gp170/80-110 and gp130 was assessed in a preliminary trial, in which ANCA sera of patients (n = 16) with NCGN were probed with purified or recombinant antigens. Specific reactivity was detected in approximately 90% of cases with active phases of NCGN, and frequently also in combination with autoantibodies specific for PR3 or MPO. Collectively, these data provide evidence that h-lamp-2 in PMNs and a

  11. Quantitative morphometry of glomerulonephritis with crescents. Diagnostic and predictive value.

    PubMed

    Elfenbein, I B; Baluarte, H J; Cubillos-Rojas, M; Gruskin, A B; Coté, M; Cornfeld, D

    1975-01-01

    Histologic patterns in the glomerular tufts in "Glomerulonephritis with many crescents" take three main forms: (1) compression and sclerosis of glomeruli, (2) necrotizing glomerulitis, and (3) proliferation with or without exudation. In the third group, histologic differentiation between patients with poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis with many crescents (AGN) and those with nonstreptococcal rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) may be impossible. In a retrospective study, quantitative morphometry of glomeruli effectively separated three patients with AGN from two patients with RPGN after the usual histologic and electron microscopic observations had failed. Parameters studied were areas of tufts and crescents and total number of cells and granulocytes in tufts and crescents. Surface areas of tufts and crescents were separately determined by photographing glomeruli, projecting and tracing outlines of tufts and crescents, and cutting out and weighing the tracings. The cell density of glomerular tufts (cell per 1000-sq. mum. area) was significantly greater in AGN than in RPGN when either total cell densities (17.64 plus or minus 0.41 versus 13.63 plus or minus 0.30) or total cells minus granulocytes (16.39 plus or minus 0.50 versus 12.99 plus or minus 0.52) were compared. The cell density in the tufts was 120 and 70 per cent greater than controls in AGN and RPGN, respectively. Exudation of inflammatory cells is contributory but not the major cause of hypercellularity in AGN. Follow-up studies with biopsies showed marked resolution in two of three patients with AGN, with normal blood urea nitrogen levels and focal scarring in the third, whereas the two patients with RPGN had either extensive scarring and reduced renal function or required chronic hemodialysis.

  12. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis as the sole renal lesion in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Salwa

    2010-11-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis usually presents with focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis with crescents. We present here a 45-year old man who was treated for tuberculosis and later presented with bilateral ankle swelling. His serum creatinine was 2.4 mg/dL and urine analysis revealed hematuria and proteinuria. His 24-hour urine protein excretion was 1.9 g. Anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) test was positive with cytoplasmic florescence pattern. Renal biopsy revealed focal segmental sclerosis with no active vasculitis and lung biopsy revealed extensive breakdown with cavitations and scattered granulomas.

  13. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  14. Glomerulonephritis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... salt, and potassium diuretics (medicines that increase urine production) medicines to lower blood pressure (if high blood pressure is a problem) antibiotics (if a bacterial infection is causing glomerulonephritis) steroids ...

  15. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis presenting as crescentic glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, H. H.; Thakkar, J.; Pullman, J. M.; Mathew, A. T.

    2017-01-01

    Fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN) is a rare primary glomerular disease that commonly presents clinically with hypertension, proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and varying degree of renal insufficiency. Histologically, FGN can present with different patterns of glomerular injury, more commonly mesangioproliferative, membranoproliferative, and membranous nephropathy. While crescent formation has been described in some kidney biopsy series of FGN, crescentic glomerulonephritis pattern of glomerular injury has been rarely described. Optimal therapy and outcomes in FGN presenting with crescentic GN is not currently known. We report an adult patient who presented with massive proteinuria and severe renal failure. The kidney biopsy revealed crescentic FGN (C-FGN). The patient remained dialysis dependent despite immunosuppressive therapy. We also briefly review FGN, and the few reported cases of C-FGN that presented as rapidly progressive or advanced renal failure in the literature. PMID:28356674

  16. Necrotizing vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000432.htm Necrotizing vasculitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Necrotizing vasculitis is a group of disorders that involve inflammation ...

  17. Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Necrotizing ... For Parents > Necrotizing Enterocolitis Print A A A What's in ...

  18. Crescentic glomerulonephritis in children.

    PubMed

    Jardim, H M; Leake, J; Risdon, R A; Barratt, T M; Dillon, M J

    1992-05-01

    Data on patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis (greater than 50% glomeruli with crescents), referred to the Hospital for Sick Children during the past 13 years, were reviewed. Thirty patients (13 male, 17 female) aged 3.7-15.7 years (mean 9.5) were evaluated. Initial clinical features included: oedema (24/30), hypertension (19/30), gross haematuria (15/30), oliguria (15/30) and a decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR less than 30 ml/min per 1.73 m2) (22/30). Henoch-Schönlein purpura was present in 9 patients, microscopic polyarteritis in 3, polyarteritis nodosa in 1, Wegener's granulomatosis in 1, systemic lupus erythematosus in 1, post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis in 2, mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis in 7, anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis in 2, and 4 were idiopathic. In 10 patients 50%-79% of glomeruli were affected by crescentic changes (group 1) and in the remaining 20, 80% or more (group 2). The crescents were cellular, fibrocellular or fibrous, and the degree of sclerosis was assessed. Patients in both groups were treated with plasma exchange, corticosteroids, anticoagulants, cyclophosphamide and azathioprine in different combinations. On follow-up, 3 patients were dead, 1 was lost to follow-up, 12 were on dialysis/transplant programmes, 4 had a GFR of less than 30 and 10 a GFR of more than 30 ml/min per 1.73 m2. In our experience, 50% progressed to end-stage renal failure. The interval between disease onset and start of treatment was a prognostic factor for outcome. Fibrous crescents were associated with a worse outcome than fibrocellular crescents (P less than 0.05). Outcome was not, however, related to the percentage of glomeruli affected (P greater than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivan, Jagdish; Maroju, Nanda Kishore; Balasubramaniam, Anandh

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is among the most challenging surgical infections faced by a surgeon. The difficulty in managing this entity is due to a combination of difficulty in diagnosis, and also of early as well as late management. For the patient, such a diagnosis means prolonged hospital stay, painful dressings, an extended recovery, and in some unfortunate cases even loss of limb or life. Necrotizing fasciitis is a fairly common condition in surgical practice in the Indian context resulting in a fairly large body of clinical experience. This article reviews literature on MEDLINE with the key words “necrotizing,” “fasciitis,” and “necrotizing infections” from 1970, as well as from articles cross referenced therein. The authors attempt to draw comparisons to their own experience in managing this condition to give an Indian perspective to the condition. PMID:24459334

  20. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated glomerulonephritis and vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Jennette, J. C.; Wilkman, A. S.; Falk, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) react with constituents of neutrophil primary granules and monocyte lysosomes. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using alcohol-fixed neutrophils demonstrates two ANCA types: one causing cytoplasmic staining (C-ANCA), and a second causing artifactual perinuclear staining (P-ANCA) that frequently has specificity for myeloperoxidase. Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy (IIFM) and enzyme immunoassays (EIA), sera from over 300 patients with renal disease, with and without systemic vasculitis, were analyzed. Of 76 patients with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with crescents or necrosis, 87% had ANCA by IIFM (38% of C-ANCA type, 49% of P-ANCA type), and 78% had ANCA by EIA. Of 55 patients with nonlupus immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis, only 11% had ANCA by IIFM and 5% had ANCA by EIA. Of 24 patients with anti-GBM antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis, none had ANCA. Renal and extrarenal lesions were studied in 81 patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. These patients formed a pathologic continuum ranging from renal-limited to widespread systemic vascular injury, including patients with primary crescentic glomerulonephritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, and polyarteritis nodosa. In ANCA-positive patients the frequency of C-ANCA and P-ANCA correlated with disease distribution. P-ANCA was most frequent with renal-limited disease and C-ANCA was most frequent when there was lung and sinus involvement. It is proposed that ANCA are not only useful diagnostic markers, but may also be directly involved in a novel pathogenetic mechanism that is a frequent cause of crescentic glomerulonephritis and systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2683800

  1. Significance of CD163-Positive Macrophages in Proliferative Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Liu, Chang-Hua; Xu, Dao-Liang; Gao, Bo

    2015-11-01

    CD163, a marker of M2 macrophages, possesses anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims to investigate the clinicopathological significance of CD163-positive macrophages in proliferative glomerulonephritis. Renal tissue samples from patients with lupus nephritis (LN, n = 22), antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated pauci-immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis (PNGN, n = 10), type 1 membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (n = 5), minimal change disease (n = 8) and normal control kidneys (n = 3) were included in this study. The expression of CD163, CD68, CD20 and CD3 in renal tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. The level of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CD163 was mainly expressed in active crescentic glomerulonephritis, proliferative glomerular lesions and areas of tubulointerstitial injury. Patients with LN-IV and PNGN had numerous CD163-positive cells in glomerular and acute tubulointerstitial lesions. CD163-positive cells in glomeruli positively correlated to proteinuria yet negatively correlated to estimated glomerular filtration rate. There was a positive correlation between the number of CD163 cells in acute tubulointerstitial lesions and NGAL levels, whereas a negative correlation between CD163 numbers and estimated glomerular filtration rate. The number of CD163-positive cells in crescentic glomerulonephritis was more than other groups. In LN, the number of CD163 cells in the tubulointerstitial and glomerular lesions had a positive correlation with activity index. Dual staining showed that CD163-positive cells also expressed CD68, although they did not show any staining for CD20 or CD3. CD163-positive macrophages were involved in the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerular lesions, active crescentic glomerulonephritis and acute tubular injury of patients with PNGN and active LN.

  2. [Glomerulonephritis in diabetics].

    PubMed

    Mágori, A; Sonkodi, S; Lászik, Z; Mohácsi, G

    1989-10-01

    Diagnosis of glomerulonephritis (GN) is rare among diabetics and few data relevant to this issue can be found in literature. In Institute of Pathology of "Szent-Györgyi Albert" University of Medicine the presence of GN was found in cases during the examination of renal biopsy material of 36 diabetics. All patients have suffered from diabetes mellitus of 2nd type and of less than 10 year existence, requiring no insulin treatment. In 2 cases diffuse diabetic glomerulosclerosis associated with GN. It is emphasized that kidney biopsy and its complex--light and electronmicroscopic and immunhistological--examination are essential to the diagnosis of GN of diabetics.

  3. Necrotizing Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Elitsa V; Bartlett, Allison H

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia refers to the development of necrosis, liquefication, and cavitation of the lung parenchyma from an infectious pathogen. Nearly 4% of all community-acquired pneumonias are necrotizing, although studies retrospectively evaluating the incidence have found it to be increasing during the past 20 years. Common presenting symptoms include fever, tachypnea, and cough, and most of those afflicted also develop complications such as parapneumonic effusions, empyemas, or bronchopleural fistulae. When compared to age-matched controls with parapneumonic effusions or severe pneumonias without a necrotizing component, those with necrotizing pneumonia have been shown to have more elevated white blood cell counts and inflammatory markers that take longer to normalize, a longer duration of symptoms despite initiation of therapy, and a longer hospital stay. Despite the high incidence of complications during the acute phase of illness, the overall prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia has been shown to be promising, with nearly all children surviving the illness. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(2):e65-e68.].

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Puvanendran, Rukshini; Huey, Jason Chan Meng; Pasupathy, Shanker

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To describe the defining characteristics and treatment of necrotizing fasciitis (NF), emphasizng early diagnostic indications. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE PubMed was searched using the terms necrotizing fasciitis and necrotizing soft tissue infections, paired with early diagnosis. Results were limited to human studies in English. Additional articles were obtained from references within articles. Evidence is levels II and III. MAIN MESSAGE Necrotizing fasciitis is classified according to its microbiology (polymicrobial or monomicrobial), anatomy, and depth of infection. Polymicrobial NF mostly occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Monomicrobial NF is less common and affects healthy individuals who often have a history of trauma (usually minor). Patients with NF can present with symptoms of sepsis, systemic toxicity, or evidence of skin inflammation, with pain that is disproportional to the degree of inflammation. However, these are also present in less serious conditions. Hyperacute cases present with sepsis and quickly progress to multiorgan failure, while subacute cases remain indolent, with festering soft-tissue infection. Because the condition is rare with minimal specific signs, it is often misdiagnosed. If NF is suspected, histology of tissue specimens is necessary. Laboratory and radiologic tests can be useful in deciding which patients require surgical consultation. Once NF is diagnosed, next steps include early wound debridement, excision of nonviable tissue, and wide spectrum cover with intravenous antibiotics. CONCLUSION Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon disease that results in gross morbidity and mortality if not treated in its early stages. At onset, however, it is difficult to differentiate from other superficial skin conditions such as cellulitis. Family physicians must have a high level of suspicion and low threshold for surgical referral when confronted with cases of pain, fever, and erythema. PMID:19826154

  5. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in association with Gitelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ceri, Mevlut; Unverdi, Selman; Altay, Mustafa; Unverdi, Hatice; Kurultak, Ilhan; Yılmaz, Rahmi; Ensari, Arzu; Duranay, Murat

    2011-09-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. Glomerulonephritis associated with GS is rarely documented in the literature. We present an adult patient with GS whose renal biopsy revealed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

  6. Patterns of glomerulonephritis in Zimbabwe: survey of disease characterised by nephrotic proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Seggie, J; Davies, P G; Ninin, D; Henry, J

    1984-01-01

    Ninety-eight Zimbabweans with glomerulonephritis characterised by nephrotic proteinuria were studied. There was no evidence to implicate Schistosoma mansoni or S. haemotobium in the aetiology, although schistosomiasis was diagnosed in 54 patients in the series. Similarly, Plasmodium malariae proved unimportant as a cause of the nephrotic syndrome, only one patient showing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis which was associated with subclinical quartan malarial infection. Nevertheless, infections were shown to play a major role in the genesis of glomerulonephritis which was associated with beta-haemolytic streptococcal, hepatitis B and syphilitic infection in 45 patients in the series. The major patterns of disease in childhood proved to be membranous glomerulopathy associated with hepatitis B antigenaemia. In young adults post-streptococcal proliferative glomerulonephritis constituted the commonest disease pattern. In older adult patients a miscellany of primary and secondary glomerulonephritides was encountered but proliferative glomerulonephritis, which was both idiopathic and streptococcus-related, predominated.

  7. [Systemic enzyme therapy of experimental gout glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Ignatenko, G A; Mukhin, I V

    2004-01-01

    Renal lesion deteriorates the course and prognosis of gouty glomerulonephritis. Current pathogenetic therapy is not sufficiently effective. Effects of different treatments on morphological and functional manifestations of renal disorders in experimental gouty glomerulonephritis are reviewed.

  8. [Nephrotic syndrome presumable caused by an complex glomerulonephritis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Seelig, H P; Seelig, R; Fischer, K; Maurer, R; Safer, A; Schnitzlein, W

    1977-04-29

    The nephrotic syndrome presumably caused by an immune complex glomerulonephritis constitutes a major side effect attendant upon chronic administration of penicillamine. The possible induction of an immune-complex glomerulonephritis by penicillamine and its further development after stopping the drug was investigated in rats. --60 rats were fed perorally 2000 mg D-Penicillamine/kg BW/die resp. for a period of 8--44 days. Following unilateral nephrectomy the animals were observed for further 5 weeks. --Dependent to the time of penicillamine application there was an increasing deposition of IgG and C3 in a granular pattern along the glomerular basement membrane and within the mesangium. The IgG deposits initially were focal and segmental later on diffuse and global in distribution. 5 weeks after stopping the penicillamine the immune globulin deposits had disappeared completely or at least in part as did the mild focal glomerulonephritis and the moderate proteinuria which developed in some animals after a 44 day treatment with penicillamine. --The results confirm the hitherto presumed immune complex pathogenesis of the penicillamine induced nephropathy. The disappearance of the immunoglobulins deposited and of proteinuria stopping penicillamine alludes the good prognosis of this kind of nephropathy.

  9. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very severe and usually deadly form of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to the ...

  10. Do food antigens play a role in the pathogenesis of some cases of human glomerulonephritis?

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, F J; Hoedemaeker, P J; van der Giessen, M; de Graeff, P A; de Monchy, J; The, T H; van der Hem, G K

    1983-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes after a test meal were measured with three methods (PEG precipitation, Clq-ELISA and the indirect granulocyte phagocytosis test) in 10 controls, two symptomless persons with selective IgA deficiency and 14 patients with various types of glomerulonephritis, of which two patients (with idiopathic membranous glomerulopathy and local focal glomerulonephritis) also had selective IgA deficiency. The PEG and Clq-ELISA test did not show significant differences between the groups. In the two symptomless persons with selective IgA deficiency and in the patient with local focal glomerulonephritis and selective IgA deficiency the indirect granulocyte phagocytosis test (IGFT) showed a reproducible increase in IgG, IgM and complement containing immune complexes. In the last patient multiple food antigens were probably responsible for this phenomenon, a rapid amelioration of kidney function could be induced three times by giving an antigen free diet. PMID:6851247

  11. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Adikari, Madura; Priyangika, Dilani; Marasingha, Indika; Thamotheram, Sharmila; Premawansa, Gayani

    2014-09-13

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical radiographic syndrome of heterogeneous etiologies. Developing hypertensive encephalopathy following post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis is a known but uncommon manifestation and developing posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in such a situation is very rare. We report a case with contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the background of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. A thirteen-year-old Sri Lankan boy presented with a focal fit by way of secondary generalization with duration of 10 minutes, and developed 2 similar fits subsequently following admission. He later developed severe hypertension with evidence of glomerulonephritis, which was diagnosed as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging of brain done on day-3 revealed non-enhancing low-attenuating areas in fronto-parietal regions. A T2 weighted film of magnetic resonance imaging was done on day-10 of the admission and found to have linier sub-cortical hyper intensities in both parietal regions which were compatible with the radiological diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis is an important cause of acute nephritic syndrome especially in children. This case report illustrates a rare association of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis.

  12. Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in two types of proliferative glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Stangou, M.; Bantis, C.; Skoularopoulou, M.; Korelidou, L.; Kouloukouriotou, D.; Scina, M.; Labropoulou, I. T.; Kouri, N. M.; Papagianni, A.; Efstratiadis, G.

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and focal segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis (FSNGN) are characterized by proliferation of native glomerular cells and infiltration by inflammatory cells. Several cytokines act as mediators of kidney damage in both diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Th1, Th2 and Treg/T17 cytokines in these types of proliferative glomerulonephritis. Simultaneous measurement of Th1 interleukin (IL-2, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [INF-γ]), Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13), Treg/T17 transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], IL-17) cytokines and C-C chemokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 [MIP-1] β) was performed in first-morning urine samples, at the day of renal biopsy, using a multiplex cytokine assay. Cytokine concentrations were correlated with histological findings and renal function outcome. Urinary excretion of Th1, Th2 and Treg/Th17 cytokines were significantly higher in FSNGN compared to IgAN patients. In IgAN patients (n = 50, M/F: 36/14, M age: 40.7 [17–67] years), Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines correlated significantly with the presence of endocapillary proliferation, while in FSNGN patients (n = 40, M/F: 24/16, M age: 56.5 [25–80] years), MCP-1 and TGF-β1 had a positive correlation with severe extracapillary proliferation (P = 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Urinary IL-17 was the only independent parameter associated with endocapillary proliferation in IgAN and with MCP-1 urinary excretion in FSNGN. Response to treatment was mainly predicted by IL-6 in IgAN, and by Th2 (IL-4, IL-6), Treg (GM-CSF) cytokines and MIP-1 β in FSNGN. Th1, Th2 and T17 cytokines were directly implicated in renal pathology in IgAN and possibly through MCP-1 production in FSNGN. IL-17 and IL-6 seem to have a central role in inflammation and progression of kidney injury. PMID:27194829

  13. [An autopsy case of Goodpasture syndrome preceded with membranous glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Takeda, T; Sakai, I; Taneichi, K; Shibaki, H

    1997-12-01

    Goodpasture syndrome (GS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the association of pulmonary hemorrhage and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The pathogenesis of GS is still unknown, but was shown to be the result that antibodies directed against glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antigens could injure both glomerular and pulmonary alveolar basement membrane. And membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) is a glomerular disease characterized by epimembranous immune deposits and basement membrane thickening. MGN typically presents with the onset of nephrotic syndrome, but it often presents with only asymptomatic proteinuria. We reported an autopsy case of GS preceded with MGN. A 70-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute renal failure in May 2, 1996. Percutaneous renal biopsy demonstrated a crescentic glomerulonephritis associated with MGN and linear immunofluorescent staining of the basement membrane with antibodies to IgG. Two weeks later on admission he began to develop slight hemoptysis and chest X-ray showed pulmonary hemorrhage, Furthermore, his serum anti-GBM antibodies titer was very high. He was diagnosed as GS associated with MGN and treated with plasma exchange, glucocorticoid, and cyclophosphamide. Though his symptom was improved for intensive support, he suddenly died on June 22. Autopsied lungs showed focal pulmonary hemorrhage, but were not considered to be life-threatening. The cause of the death remained unclear.

  14. The classification of glomerulonephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus revisited.

    PubMed

    Weening, Jan J; D'Agati, Vivette D; Schwartz, Melvin M; Seshan, Surya V; Alpers, Charles E; Appel, Gerald B; Balow, James E; Bruijn, Jan A; Cook, Terence; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Ginzler, Ellen M; Hebert, Lee; Hill, Gary; Hill, Prue; Jennette, J Charles; Kong, Norella C; Lesavre, Philippe; Lockshin, Michael; Looi, Lai-Meng; Makino, Hirofumi; Moura, Luiz A; Nagata, Michio

    2004-02-01

    The currently used classification reflects our understanding of the pathogenesis of the various forms of lupus nephritis, but clinicopathologic studies have revealed the need for improved categorization and terminology. Based on the 1982 classification published under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO) and subsequent clinicopathologic data, we propose that class I and II be used for purely mesangial involvement (I, mesangial immune deposits without mesangial hypercellularity; II, mesangial immune deposits with mesangial hypercellularity); class III for focal glomerulonephritis (involving <50% of total number of glomeruli) with subdivisions for active and sclerotic lesions; class IV for diffuse glomerulonephritis (involving > or = 50% of total number of glomeruli) either with segmental (class IV-S) or global (class IV-G) involvement, and also with subdivisions for active and sclerotic lesions; class V for membranous lupus nephritis; and class VI for advanced sclerosing lesions]. Combinations of membranous and proliferative glomerulonephritis (i.e., class III and V or class IV and V) should be reported individually in the diagnostic line. The diagnosis should also include entries for any concomitant vascular or tubulointerstitial lesions. One of the main advantages of the current revised classification is that it provides a clear and unequivocal description of the various lesions and classes of lupus nephritis, allowing a better standardization and lending a basis for further clinicopathologic studies. We hope that this revision, which evolved under the auspices of the International Society of Nephrology and the Renal Pathology Society, will contribute to further advancement of the WHO classification.

  15. The classification of glomerulonephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus revisited.

    PubMed

    Weening, Jan J; D'Agati, Vivette D; Schwartz, Melvin M; Seshan, Surya V; Alpers, Charles E; Appel, Gerald B; Balow, James E; Bruijn, Jan A; Cook, Terence; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Ginzler, Ellen M; Hebert, Lee; Hill, Gary; Hill, Prue; Jennette, J Charles; Kong, Norella C; Lesavre, Philippe; Lockshin, Michael; Looi, Lai-Meng; Makino, Hirofumi; Moura, Luiz A; Nagata, Michio

    2004-02-01

    The currently used classification reflects our understanding of the pathogenesis of the various forms of lupus nephritis, but clinicopathologic studies have revealed the need for improved categorization and terminology. Based on the 1982 classification published under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO) and subsequent clinicopathologic data, we propose that class I and II be used for purely mesangial involvement (I, mesangial immune deposits without mesangial hypercellularity; II, mesangial immune deposits with mesangial hypercellularity); class III for focal glomerulonephritis (involving <50% of total number of glomeruli) with subdivisions for active and sclerotic lesions; class IV for diffuse glomerulonephritis (involving > or =50% of total number of glomeruli) either with segmental (class IV-S) or global (class IV-G) involvement, and also with subdivisions for active and sclerotic lesions; class V for membranous lupus nephritis; and class VI for advanced sclerosing lesions. Combinations of membranous and proliferative glomerulonephritis (i.e., class III and V or class IV and V) should be reported individually in the diagnostic line. The diagnosis should also include entries for any concomitant vascular or tubulointerstitial lesions. One of the main advantages of the current revised classification is that it provides a clear and unequivocal description of the various lesions and classes of lupus nephritis, allowing a better standardization and lending a basis for further clinicopathologic studies. We hope that this revision, which evolved under the auspices of the International Society of Nephrology and the Renal Pathology Society, will contribute to further advancement of the WHO classification.

  16. IgM associated primary diffuse mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, W; Williams, G; Tarpey, P; Mallick, N P

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-three cases of IgM associated primary diffuse mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis are presented. In 18, IgM was the sole localising host immunoglobulin, and it was the predominant globulin in five; C3 was also present in 18. Light microscopy revealed variable diffuse and global mesangial proliferation in all cases, with additional focal global sclerosis in 16, focal segmental sclerosis in 15, and small capsular crescents in seven. Material for electron microscopy was available from 19 patients; in 13, occasional intramesangial electron dense deposits were identified, and in 18 there were irregular, rather ill defined areas of increased electron density in mesangial regions. Clinically, 14 patients presented with the nephrotic syndrome, and nine had asymptomatic proteinuria. During follow-up, only 10 patients showed no change in renal function or improved; the remainder showed increasing hypertension and/or renal function deterioration and four developed end stage renal failure. It is suggested that IgM associated mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis should be considered as a distinct clinicoimmunopathological entity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7002957

  17. Spectrum and outcome of primary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Al Wakeel, Jamal S; Mitwalli, Ahmed H; Tarif, Nauman; Alam, Awatif A; Hammad, Durdana; Abu-Aisha, Hassan; Memon, Nawaz; Sulimani, Fathia; Askar, Akram; Qudsi, Abdo

    2004-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a major cause of chronic renal failure (CRF). To evaluate the trends and outcome with modern improved treatment strategies, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 120 patients with biopsy proven primary GN at our center from January 1990 to June 2001. All the biopsy specimens were subjected to light, electron and immunofluorescent microscopy. The recorded clinical parameters included the presenting symptoms, blood pressure readings, complete blood count, urinalysis, 24-hr urinary protein excretion, creatinine clearance besides rendered therapy and the outcome. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most common GN and accounted for 56 (47.6%) cases. The frequency of other GN cases in our study included IgA GN in 21 (17.5%) patients, membranous GN in 20 (16.7%), minimal change disease (MCD) in 13 (10.8%), membranoproliferative GN in 4 (3.3%), post infection in 4 (3.3%) and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) in 2 (1.7%). The type of nephropathy had great influence on outcome and response to therapy. The deterioration of patients with FSGS was the fastest of the glomerulopathies, and nine (16.1%) patients developed end-stage renal failure (ESRD). MCD and post infection GN had the best outcome. Corticosteroids alone along with supportive medication conferred good results in MCD, while combined therapies of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and/or cyclophosphamide with corticosteroids provided better outcomes in the rest of the GN. RPGN responded well to the cyclophosphamide and the patients did not develop ESRD. Hyperuricemia, high serum creatinine and hypertension predicted worse outcomes. The control of blood pressure and glucose, and treatment of hyperuricemia and hypoalbuminemia had salutary effect on the outcome. We conclude that due to the better delivered care the outcome of primary GN has improved over the years. However, FSGS is still the most frequently encountered primary GN and has the worst outcome. In the

  18. Glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen, including: Nerve inflammation (polyneuropathy) Signs of fluid overload, including abnormal heart and lung sounds Swelling ( edema ) ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  19. Glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of removing extra fluids and waste from your blood — typically by an artificial kidney machine. Chronic kidney disease. Your kidneys gradually lose their filtering ability. Kidney function that deteriorates to less than 10 percent of ... High blood pressure. Damage to your kidneys and the resulting ...

  20. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and Pott's disease.

    PubMed

    Ram, Rapur; Sandeep, Peddi; Sridhar, Annapindi Venkatasatya Surya Naga; Rukumangadha, Nandyala; Sivakumar, Vishnubotla

    2014-08-01

    The reports of glomerular lesions of kidney due to tuberculosis are sparse. A 48-year-old gentleman, presented with swelling of feet of 3 months duration. As he had renal impairment, proteinuria and normal-sized kidneys, he was subjected to renal biopsy. The light microscopy and immunofluorescence revealed the diagnosis was membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis. During hospital stay, the patient complained fever and stiffness at thoracic spine. The MRI of thoraco-lumbo-sacral spine revealed paravertebral abscess at D11-D12. The pus aspirated was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. He was started on anti-tuberculous medication. After 8 weeks of therapy, the serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL and 24 h urine protein 250 mg.

  1. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis in Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Miadonna, A; Salmaso, C; Palazzi, P; Elli, A; Braidotti, P; Lambertenghi Deliliers, G

    1998-01-01

    Castleman's disease is an uncommon lymph node disorder which can be associated with renal disease. In this report we describe a patient with fever, weight loss, anorexia, increase in inflammatory proteins, anemia and nephrotic syndrome. Castleman's disease, plasma cell type, was diagnosed by histologic analysis after surgical excision of a pelvic lymph node. The disease was considered localized, since further investigations did not show any other pathologic mass. After resection of the pelvic lymphoid mass, clinical remission of systemic symptoms and laboratory abnormalities was observed, with the exception of the nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy was performed and showed a pattern compatible with fibrillary glomerulonephritis. Progressive decline in renal function was observed, despite immunosuppressive therapy.

  2. Rituximab for Treatment of Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis and C3 Glomerulopathies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) is a histological pattern of injury resulting from predominantly subendothelial and mesangial deposition of immunoglobulins or complement factors with subsequent inflammation and proliferation particularly of the glomerular basement membrane. Recent classification of MPGN is based on pathogenesis dividing MPGN into immunoglobulin-associated MPGN and complement-mediated C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) and dense deposit disease (DDD). Current guidelines suggest treatment with steroids, cytotoxic agents with or without plasmapheresis only for subjects with progressive disease, that is, nephrotic range proteinuria and decline of renal function. Rituximab, a chimeric B-cell depleting anti-CD20 antibody, has emerged in the last decade as a treatment option for patients with primary glomerular diseases such as minimal change disease, focal-segmental glomerulosclerosis, or idiopathic membranous nephropathy. However, data on the use of rituximab in MPGN, C3GN, and DDD are limited to case reports and retrospective case series. Patients with immunoglobulin-associated and idiopathic MPGN who were treated with rituximab showed partial and complete responses in the majorities of cases. However, rituximab was not effective in few cases of C3GN and DDD. Despite promising results in immunoglobulin-associated and idiopathic MPGN, current evidence on this treatment remains weak, and controlled and prospective data are urgently needed. PMID:28573137

  3. Kartagener syndrome associated with mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Sriram; Choudhary, Bharat; Rajesh, Nachiappa Ganesh; Ramesh, Ananthakrishnan; Srinivasan, Sadagopan

    2012-05-01

    An 11-year-old girl with clinical features of Kartagener syndrome presented with signs of acute glomerulonephritis. Blood urea and creatinine were mildly elevated and anti-streptolysin O and C3 levels were normal. Renal biopsy demonstrated mesangial proliferation and direct immunofluorescence showed IgM and C3 deposits. This appears to be the first report of Kartagener syndrome in association with mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. The literature is reviewed and the possible mechanisms for this association are discussed.

  4. ANCA-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis with mesangial IgA deposits.

    PubMed

    Haas, M; Jafri, J; Bartosh, S M; Karp, S L; Adler, S G; Meehan, S M

    2000-10-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) are commonly associated with a necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) that is pauci-immune, with few or no glomerular immune complex deposits detectable by immunofluorescence (IF) or electron microscopy (EM). Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy may also be manifest as a crescentic GN, but it is characterized by mesangial immune complex deposits containing IgA and is rarely associated with myeloperoxidase (MPO)- or proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific ANCA when an enzyme immunoassay is used to detect these antibodies. This report describes six patients with severe crescentic GN with mesangial IgA deposits by IF and mesangial electron-dense deposits by EM in patients with positive ANCA serological test results (four patients, anti-PR3; one patient, anti-MPO; one patient, anti-PR3 and anti-MPO). Patients presented with acute or progressive renal insufficiency, hematuria, proteinuria (nephrotic range in two patients), and hypertension. Three patients had evidence of systemic vasculitis: two patients at initial presentation and one patient later in the clinical course. Renal biopsy specimens showed crescents in greater than 50% of glomeruli in all cases, but only mild, focal and segmental mesangial and endocapillary hypercellularity, more typical of ANCA-associated crescentic GN than of crescentic IgA nephropathy without associated ANCA. Semiquantitative analysis of mesangial and endocapillary cellularity performed on renal biopsy slides from these six patients and from eight ANCA-negative patients with IgA nephropathy and crescents in greater than 50% of glomeruli showed significantly greater hypercellularity in the ANCA-negative cases. Three of five ANCA-positive patients for whom follow-up clinical data were available showed improved renal function after treatment with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids and have not developed end-stage renal disease 17, 20, and 25 months postbiopsy. The remaining two patients were

  5. Bartonella henselae infection-associated vasculitis and crescentic glomerulonephritis leading to renal allograft loss.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, A R; Chaudhry, M R; Papadimitriou, J C; Drachenberg, C B

    2015-06-01

    Bartonella henselae (BH) is the main cause of cat scratch disease (CSD), which more typically presents as a self-limited localized suppurative lymphadenopathy in immunocompetent individuals. In contrast, immunocompromised patients commonly have systemic disease with life-threatening complications. In addition to the angioproliferative lesions, such as bacillary angiomatosis, an increasing number of immune post-infectious complications are being recognized with BH infections, including glomerulonephritis, vasculitis, hemophagocytic syndrome, and neurological problems. We report the case of a renal transplant recipient who developed CSD in the second year post transplantation. In addition to prolonged fever and generalized lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly requiring differentiation from a post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, the course was complicated by the development of dermal leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, which led to failure of the renal graft. Glomerulonephritis as a complication of CSD has never been described in a kidney allograft, to our knowledge. Awareness of the diverse clinical symptoms associated with BH, including granulomatous/suppurative lesions and other less common complications can lead to more rapid and accurate diagnosis. Also, as recommended by the current guidelines, a thorough history of pet ownership should be part of the clinical evaluation before and after transplantation for all transplant recipients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Crescentic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Enríquez, Ricardo; Sirvent, Ana Esther; Amorós, Francisco; Pérez, Miguel; Matarredona, Jaime; Reyes, Adolfo

    2005-01-01

    We describe the association of crescentic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. A 39-year-old woman presented edema and proteinuria and later a non-pruritic urticarial rash. Laboratory results showed nephrotic syndrome, hypocomplementemia and positive anti-C1q antibodies. Skin biopsy disclosed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Acute renal failure developed. Renal biopsy revealed crescentic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. She was treated with corticosteroids and cyclosphosphamide with improvement of the renal function and partial remission of the nephrotic syndrome. Afterwards the nephrotic syndrome relapsed, mycophenolate mofetil in monotherapy was administered with reduction in proteinuria. As far as we know only 3 cases, 2 in children and one in an adult, of crescentic glomerulonephritis and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome have been reported. In our patient renal manifestations preceded urticarial lesions. We provide information on the evolution during a 42-month follow-up.

  7. Proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with monoclonal immune deposits: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Fatima, R; Jha, R; Gowrishankar, S; Narayen, G; Rao, B S

    2014-11-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a newly recognized entity caused by monoclonal deposition of IgG. PGNMID resembles immune complex glomerulonephritis (GN) on light and electron microscopy. The monotypic immunoglobulin deposits seen on immunofluorescence (IF) clinches the diagnosis. We report a case of proliferative GN associated MGRS and review the relevant literature. The patient had significant proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine. The renal biopsy showed proliferative GN with focal crescents and monoclonal immune deposits confirming a diagnosis of PGNMID. Serum work up showed no monoclonal proteins. Proliferative GN as a manifestation of a monoclonal gammopathy needs to be borne in mind especially in renal biopsies of older patients.

  8. Proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with monoclonal immune deposits: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, R.; Jha, R.; Gowrishankar, S.; Narayen, G.; Rao, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a newly recognized entity caused by monoclonal deposition of IgG. PGNMID resembles immune complex glomerulonephritis (GN) on light and electron microscopy. The monotypic immunoglobulin deposits seen on immunofluorescence (IF) clinches the diagnosis. We report a case of proliferative GN associated MGRS and review the relevant literature. The patient had significant proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine. The renal biopsy showed proliferative GN with focal crescents and monoclonal immune deposits confirming a diagnosis of PGNMID. Serum work up showed no monoclonal proteins. Proliferative GN as a manifestation of a monoclonal gammopathy needs to be borne in mind especially in renal biopsies of older patients. PMID:25484532

  9. IgA glomerulonephritis. Mesangial IgA deposition without systemic signs (Berger's disease).

    PubMed

    Nagy, J; Brasch, H; Süle, T; Hámori, A; Deák, G; Ambrus, M

    1979-01-01

    Renal biopsy specimens from 204 patients with glomerulonephritis or nephrotic syndrome have been studied. In ten of the patients not suffering from acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, systemic lupus erythematosus or Schönlein-Henoch syndrome, diffuse, selective mesangial IgA deposition was observed. Clinically, persistent microscopic haematuria, mild proteinuria and, except in one patient, normal renal function were found. Light microscopically the histological picture was dominated by a diffuse or focal increase in volume of the mesangial matrix, and mild mesangial cell proliferation. Exceptionally, there was also crescent formation. Immunofluorescence revealed large IgA, IgG and C3 deposits, as well as small IgM and fibrinogen deposits in the mesangial glomeruli. The authors' assumption that immunocomplexes containing a secretory component might be implicated in the pathomechanism of Berger's disease, could not be proved.

  10. Bartonella Endocarditis and Pauci-Immune Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Raybould, Jillian E.; Raybould, Alison L.; Morales, Megan K.; Zaheer, Misbah; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Timpone, Joseph G.; Kumar, Princy N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Among culture-negative endocarditis in the United States, Bartonella species are the most common cause, with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana comprising the majority of cases. Kidney manifestations, particularly glomerulonephritis, are common sequelae of infectious endocarditis, with nearly half of all Bartonella patients demonstrating renal involvement. Although a pauci-immune pattern is a frequent finding in infectious endocarditis–associated glomerulonephritis, it is rarely reported in Bartonella endocarditis. Anti–neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positivity can be seen with many pathogens causing endocarditis and has been previously reported with Bartonella species. In addition, ANCA-associated vasculitis can also present with renal and cardiac involvement, including noninfectious valvular vegetations and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Given the overlap in their clinical presentation, it is difficult to differentiate between Bartonella endocarditis and ANCA-associated vasculitis but imperative to do so to guide management decisions. We present a case of ANCA-positive Bartonella endocarditis with associated pauci-immune glomerulonephritis that was successfully treated with medical management alone. PMID:27885316

  11. A Molecular Signature of Proteinuria in Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Heather N.; Tritchler, David; Cattran, Daniel C.; Eichinger, Felix; Boucherot, Anissa; Henger, Anna; Berthier, Celine C.; Nair, Viji; Cohen, Clemens D.

    2010-01-01

    Proteinuria is the most important predictor of outcome in glomerulonephritis and experimental data suggest that the tubular cell response to proteinuria is an important determinant of progressive fibrosis in the kidney. However, it is unclear whether proteinuria is a marker of disease severity or has a direct effect on tubular cells in the kidneys of patients with glomerulonephritis. Accordingly we studied an in vitro model of proteinuria, and identified 231 “albumin-regulated genes” differentially expressed by primary human kidney tubular epithelial cells exposed to albumin. We translated these findings to human disease by studying mRNA levels of these genes in the tubulo-interstitial compartment of kidney biopsies from patients with IgA nephropathy using microarrays. Biopsies from patients with IgAN (n = 25) could be distinguished from those of control subjects (n = 6) based solely upon the expression of these 231 “albumin-regulated genes.” The expression of an 11-transcript subset related to the degree of proteinuria, and this 11-mRNA subset was also sufficient to distinguish biopsies of subjects with IgAN from control biopsies. We tested if these findings could be extrapolated to other proteinuric diseases beyond IgAN and found that all forms of primary glomerulonephritis (n = 33) can be distinguished from controls (n = 21) based solely on the expression levels of these 11 genes derived from our in vitro proteinuria model. Pathway analysis suggests common regulatory elements shared by these 11 transcripts. In conclusion, we have identified an albumin-regulated 11-gene signature shared between all forms of primary glomerulonephritis. Our findings support the hypothesis that albuminuria may directly promote injury in the tubulo-interstitial compartment of the kidney in patients with glomerulonephritis. PMID:20976140

  12. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Weyer, Nils; Metzger, Marc C; Schön, Ralf

    2006-05-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a fast spreading acute soft tissue inflammation. Death can occur within 12-24 h. Early identification and treatment is needed. We report the case of a 75 year old woman with diabetes and high cholesterol, adipositas who developed cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odotongenic origin with massive subcutaneous air collection and first sign of septicaemia. Surgical treatment with debridement and drainage in combination with intravenous broadbased antibiotics as well as daily irrigation of the wound with iodine solution (Betaisodona) and metronidazol (local antibiotic treatment) was performed. The patient recovered completely. Surgical debridement combined with broad-spectrum of antibiotics showed satisfying result for the management of cervical necrotizing fasciitis of dentogenous origin.

  13. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of tongue

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Tanu; Varghese, Ipe; Shameena, PM; Sudha, S; Nair, Resmi G

    2009-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia, is a benign inflammatory lesion primarily involving the minor salivary glands of the hard palate. The lesion often presents itself as a deep-seated palatal ulcer with clinical and histological features similar to those of a malignant neoplasm. Here we report a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia in a 40-year-old female, present on the lateral border of the tongue, mimicking squamous cell carcinoma, clinically. A correct diagnosis to avoid mutilant surgical treatments is essential, considering that it is a self-limiting disease. PMID:21886996

  14. [Necrotizing fasciitis after varicella].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, E; Furtado, F; Estrada, J; Vale, M C; Pinto, M; Santos, M; Moura, G; Vasconcelos, C

    2001-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and severe infection characterised by extremely rapid progressive involvement of the superficial fascias and deep dermal layers of the skin, with resultant vasculitis and necrosis. The authors present three clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis; all three patients previously had varicella rash, rapid progressive spreading erythema with severe pain and toxic shock syndrome. Two patients had positive cultures of b-haemolytic streptococcus. Early stage differential diagnosis with celulitis, aggressive antibiotic treatment and pediatric intensive care support are essential. However, the main therapy is early extensive surgical approach involving all indurate areas, down to and including the muscle fascia.

  15. Loxoscelism and necrotic arachnidism.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, G S; Anderson, P C

    The Brown recluse spider has emerged into a potent venomous creature. Loxoscelism and necrotic arachnidism is not an infrequent medical problem. Spiders other than L. reclusa are capable of inflicting painful and persisting necrotic wounds, however, management of the local cutaneous lesions are similar. Systemic complications of loxoscelism appear to be characteristic for spiders of the genus loxosceles. The authors review an indepth discussion of the spider, venom, diagnosis, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, treatment, and prevention. The literature on loxoscelism is contradictory because of the individuality of the reaction. Experience with many patients is the only guide to management of these cases.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis secondary to diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Tatiana; Martín-Cuesta, Laura; Arnáiz, Javier; de Lucas, Enrique Marco; Pellón, Raúl; García-Bolado, Ana; González, Francisco

    2007-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, rapidly progressive infectious process primarily involving the fascia and the subcutaneous tissue, with thrombosis of the cutaneous microcirculation. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis secondary to diverticulitis in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is characterized by circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin owing to clonal proliferation of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Clonal proliferation of B lymphocytes is seen in B-cell lymphoma/leukemia, and clonal plasma cell proliferation is seen in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. The monoclonal immunoglobulin in the setting of a B-cell or plasma cell disorder can cause a proliferative glomerulonephritis via 2 mechanisms: (1) glomerular deposition of the monoclonal immunoglobulin with activation of the classical pathway of complement (direct mechanism), resulting in an immunoglobulin-positive C3-positive glomerulonephritis, and (2) glomerular deposition of complement factors of the alternative and terminal pathway via inhibition of alternative pathway-regulating proteins by the monoclonal immunoglobulin (indirect mechanism), resulting in immunoglobulin-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis (C3 glomerulopathy). Evaluation should include serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation as well as serum-free light-chain assay. If a monoclonal immunoglobulin is detected on these tests, bone marrow biopsy or imaging is needed to exclude more advanced plasma cell dyscrasia. Evaluation of alternative pathway of complement should be done in patients with Ig-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis. If monoclonal gammopathy is due to an underlying malignant disease such as myeloma, lymphoma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, then specific treatment should be aimed at treating the malignant disease, with the goal of eradicating the clonal cells producing the immunoglobulin. In contrast, if monoclonal gammopathy is due to a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, treatment options include bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone for a non-IgM monoclonal immunoglobulin and rituximab alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone for an IgM monoclonal

  18. [Oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia complicated by glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Kan'shina, N F; Rykov, V A; Lakhno, P A

    1990-01-01

    Clinico-anatomical data of a rare condition congenital oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia with a glomerulonephritis as a complication are available for a 13-year-old girl who died of chronic renal failure. Large aglomerular zones consisting of primitive canaliculi in a loose stroma were observed in kidneys that were decreased in size. The glomeruli were few in number, some of them of a large size (2-2.5-fold), firmly attached to the capsule, with pronounced extracapillary proliferation.

  19. Biopsy-proven childhood glomerulonephritis in Johor.

    PubMed

    Khoo, J J; Pee, S; Thevarajah, B; Yap, Y C; Chin, C K

    2004-06-01

    There has been no published study of biopsy-proven childhood glomerulonephritis in Malaysia. To determine the pattern of childhood glomerulonephritis in Johor, Malaysia from a histopathological perspective and the various indications used for renal biopsy in children. Retrospective study was done of all renal biopsies from children under 16 years of age, received in Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Johor between 1994 and 2001. The histopathological findings were reviewed to determine the pattern of biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis. The indications for biopsy, mode of therapy given after biopsy and the clinical outcome were studied. 122 adequate biopsies were received, 9 children had repeat biopsies. Of the 113 biopsies, minimal change disease formed the most common histopathological diagnosis (40.7%) while lupus nephritis formed the most common secondary glomerulonephritis (23.0%). The main indications for biopsy were nephrotic syndrome (50.8%), lupus nephritis (25.4%) and renal impairment (13.1%). The mode of therapy was changed in 59.8% of the children. Of 106 patients followed-up, 84 children were found to have normal renal function in remission or on treatment. 4 patients developed chronic renal impairment and 16 reached end stage renal disease. Five of the 16 children with end stage disease had since died while 11 were on renal replacement therapy. Another 2 patients died of other complications. The pattern of childhood GN in our study tended to reflect the more severe renal parenchymal diseases in children and those requiring more aggressive treatment. This was because of our criteria of selection (indication) for renal biopsy. Renal biopsy where performed appropriately in selected children may not only be a useful investigative tool for histological diagnosis and prognosis but may help clinicians plan the optimal therapy for these children.

  20. Ameliorative effects of arctiin from Arctium lappa on experimental glomerulonephritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Guo; Wu, Jin-Zhong; Sun, Lian-Na; Han, Ting; Du, Jian; Ye, Qi; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu-Guang

    2009-11-01

    Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) remains the most common cause of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome in the world and up to 40% of untreated patients will progress to end-stage renal disease. Although the treatment of MGN with immunosuppressants or steroid hormones can attenuate the deterioration of renal function, numerous treatment-related complications have also been established. In this study, the ameliorative effects of arctiin, a natural compound isolated from the fruits of Arctium lappa, on rat glomerulonephritis induced by cationic bovine serum albumin (cBSA) were determined. After oral administration of arctiin (30, 60, 120 mg/kgd) for three weeks, the levels of serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and 24-h urine protein content markedly decreased, while endogenous creatinine clearance rate (ECcr) significantly increased. The parameters of renal lesion, hypercellularity, infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), fibrinoid necrosis, focal and segmental proliferation and interstitial infiltration, were reversed. In addition, we observed that arctiin evidently reduced the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), suppressed nuclear factor-kappaB p65 (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity, and enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. These findings suggest that the ameliorative effects of arctiin on glomerulonephritis is carried out mainly by suppression of NF-kappaB activation and nuclear translocation and the decreases in the levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, while SOD is involved in the inhibitory pathway of NF-kappaB activation. Arctiin has favorable potency for the development of an inhibitory agent of NF-kappaB and further application to clinical treatment of glomerulonephritis, though clinical studies are required.

  1. Diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, T; Masutani, K; Yokoyama, M; Tokumoto, M; Tsuruya, K; Fukuda, K; Kanai, H; Katafuchi, R; Nagatoshi, Y; Hirakata, H

    2002-09-01

    A 15-year-old boy developed nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure 4 years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for lymphoid crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia. On admission, he presented with clinical features of chronic GVHD including transient exacerbation of cholestatic liver injury. Renal biopsy showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis with cellular crescents. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy (1 g/day, for 3 days) followed by oral prednisolone. Renal function gradually improved but nephrotic state was persistent. A second renal biopsy showed improvement of acute tubular necrosis and endocapillary proliferation and transformation of crescents into a fibrous form. After tapering of oral prednisolone, cyclophosphamide was started, which resulted in a gradual improvement of proteinuria. Several cases of nephrotic syndrome occurring after BMT have already been reported, but most cases had membranous nephropathy. In our case, renal biopsy revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis with findings of active cellular immunity, and aggressive treatment resulted in attenuation of these findings. Moreover, chronic GVHD-related liver injury was noted at the time of this episode. Our findings suggest that chronic GVHD may be complicated with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis through unknown cellular immune mechanism.

  2. α-1-Antitrypsin detected by MALDI imaging in the study of glomerulonephritis: Its relevance in chronic kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; De Sio, Gabriele; Ferrario, Franco; Scalia, Carla; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Pieruzzi, Federico; Pontillo, Claudia; Filip, Szymon; Markoska, Katerina; Granata, Antonio; Spasovski, Goce; Jankowski, Joachim; Capasso, Giovambattista; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic glomerulonephritis (GN), such as membranous glomerulonephritis, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and IgA nephropathy (IgAN), represent the most frequent primary glomerular kidney diseases (GKDs) worldwide. Although the renal biopsy currently remains the gold standard for the routine diagnosis of idiopathic GN, the invasiveness and diagnostic difficulty related with this procedure highlight the strong need for new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to be translated into less invasive diagnostic tools. MALDI-MS imaging MALDI-MSI was applied to fresh-frozen bioptic renal tissue from patients with a histological diagnosis of FSGS (n = 6), IgAN, (n = 6) and membranous glomerulonephritis (n = 7), and from controls (n = 4) in order to detect specific molecular signatures of primary glomerulonephritis. MALDI-MSI was able to generate molecular signatures capable to distinguish between normal kidney and pathological GN, with specific signals (m/z 4025, 4048, and 4963) representing potential indicators of chronic kidney disease development. Moreover, specific disease-related signatures (m/z 4025 and 4048 for FSGS, m/z 4963 and 5072 for IgAN) were detected. Of these signals, m/z 4048 was identified as α-1-antitrypsin and was shown to be localized to the podocytes within sclerotic glomeruli by immunohistochemistry. α-1-Antitrypsin could be one of the markers of podocyte stress that is correlated with the development of FSGS due to both an excessive loss and a hypertrophy of podocytes.

  3. Familial Mediterranean fever and membranous glomerulonephritis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ceri, Mevlut; Unverdi, Selman; Altay, Mustafa; Unverdi, Hatice; Ensari, Arzu; Duranay, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and painful episodes of sterile polyserositis. Kidney involvement may occur as a result of secondary amyloidosis during the course of FMF. Previously, different types of glomerulopathies such as IgM and IgA nephropathy, crescentic glomerulonephritis, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis, minimal change disease, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis were rarely reported. We herein represent a first case of membranous glomerulonephritis who had complete remission with colchicine treatment in the course of familial Mediterranean fever.

  4. Sjögren Syndrome-Related Membranous Glomerulonephritis Progressing to Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Junko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Ueno, Toshiharu; Hoshino, Junichi; Sekine, Akinari; Hayami, Noriko; Oguro, Masahiko; Kunisawa, Kyohei; Kawada, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Sumida, Keiichi; Mizuno, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Eiko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Ohashi, Kenichi; Fujii, Takeshi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of glomerulopathy in a 36-year-old Japanese woman with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS). The first renal biopsy suggested membranous glomerulonephritis. However, repeat biopsy was performed after 16 years because of increased proteinuria, revealing membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with mesangial deposits, subendothelial deposits, and subepithelial deposits. Immunofluorescent studies showed predominant deposition of IgG2 and IgG4. This patient was positive for antinuclear antibody and anti-SS-A antibody. Sicca syndrome was confirmed by a positive Schirmer test and positive Rose Bengal test. Therefore, pSS-related glomerulopathy was considered to be the most likely diagnosis.

  5. Sjögren Syndrome-Related Membranous Glomerulonephritis Progressing to Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, Junko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Ueno, Toshiharu; Hoshino, Junichi; Sekine, Akinari; Hayami, Noriko; Oguro, Masahiko; Kunisawa, Kyohei; Kawada, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Sumida, Keiichi; Mizuno, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Eiko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Ohashi, Kenichi; Fujii, Takeshi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of glomerulopathy in a 36-year-old Japanese woman with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS). The first renal biopsy suggested membranous glomerulonephritis. However, repeat biopsy was performed after 16 years because of increased proteinuria, revealing membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with mesangial deposits, subendothelial deposits, and subepithelial deposits. Immunofluorescent studies showed predominant deposition of IgG2 and IgG4. This patient was positive for antinuclear antibody and anti-SS-A antibody. Sicca syndrome was confirmed by a positive Schirmer test and positive Rose Bengal test. Therefore, pSS-related glomerulopathy was considered to be the most likely diagnosis. PMID:27904866

  6. Crescentic glomerulonephritis in Wegener's granulomatosis: morphology, therapy, outcome.

    PubMed

    Grotz, W; Wanner, C; Keller, E; Böhler, J; Peter, H H; Rohrbach, R; Schollmeyer, P

    1991-06-01

    Fourteen patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and severe renal and extrarenal involvement were studied (serum creatinine on admission 5.8 +/- 3.4 mg/dl). Renal histology showed a necrotizing, crescentic glomerulonephritis in all patients. Despite advanced renal disease on admission cyclophosphamide, steroids (in 13 patients) and plasma exchange (in 9 patients) caused a rapid and sustained improvement of renal function. Four patients required intermittent hemodialysis over a period of one week. After 2 weeks of treatment serum creatinine values below 2 mg/dl (n = 4) indicated a nearly complete recovery of renal function in the long-term follow up (mean serum creatinine achieved after 12 months therapy: 1.1 +/- 0.1 mg/dl (n = 4). Therefore serum creatinine values observed after 2 weeks of therapy, appear to be of prognostic value with regard to renal outcome. No relapse of active WG or progressive renal deterioration was observed during follow-up (22 +/- 13 months) except in one patient with persisting renal impairment. Three patients died (staphylococcus sepsis, intracerebral hemorrhage during hypertensive crisis, pulmonary embolism) during the first two months of therapy. The decline of serum creatinine seemed to be a better indicator of successful therapy than the decrease of anticytoplasmatic antibody (ANCA), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and hematuria. On admission ANCA titer neither correlated with serum creatinine, the degree of renal involvement, nor was it of prognostic value. ANCA, serum creatinine and hematuria normalized within 2 to 8 months, whereas ESR and proteinuria remained elevated. Our data indicate a good prognosis of WG even with advanced renal involvement and generalized vasculitis provided aggressive treatment is performed early.

  7. Sjögren Syndrome and Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ananya; Krishna, Gopal G; Sibley, Richard K; Kambham, Neeraja

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with Sjögren syndrome and cryoglobulinemia. The patient presented with nephrotic syndrome, hematuria, and reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate. The kidney biopsy revealed diffuse endocapillary proliferation and leukocyte exudation with focal intraluminal hyaline thrombi, prominent tubulointerstitial inflammation, and vasculitis. Diffuse granular mesangial and segmental to global capillary wall staining was observed on immunofluorescence with antisera to C3 and immunoglobulin M (IgM), with less intense staining indicative of IgG and κ and λ light chains. A biopsy diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome-related cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and vasculitis was rendered. Subsequent investigations revealed the presence of circulating type II cryoglobulins with cryocrit of 9%. Although rare, Sjögren syndrome is the most common cause of non-hepatitis C virus-related mixed cryoglobulinemia. We discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of mixed cryoglobulinemia and its evolution to lymphoma, as best described in the setting of hepatitis C virus infection. Although the specific antigen involved is unknown, it is likely that the mixed cryoglobulinemia in Sjögren syndrome is triggered by the long-term B-cell stimulation, resulting in clonal proliferation of B cells. Additional chromosomal aberrations and cytokine milieu alterations, as seen in hepatitis C virus infection, may result in prolonged B-cell survival and progression to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Giant necrotic pituitary apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Andrew A; Quigley, Edward P; Chin, Steven S; Couldwell, William T

    2013-10-01

    Apoplexy of the pituitary gland is a rare complication of pituitary adenomas, involving hemorrhage with or without necrosis within the tumor. This condition may be either asymptomatic or may present with severe headache, visual impairment, ophthalmoplegia, and pituitary failure. Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice, and early intervention is usually required to ensure reversal of visual impairment. Reports of pituitary apoplectic lesions exceeding 60.0mm in diameter are very rare. A 39-year-old man with long-standing history of nasal congestion, decreased libido and infertility presented with a sudden onset of severe headache and diplopia. MRI of the head demonstrated a massive skull base lesion of 70.0 × 60.0 × 25.0mm, compatible with a giant pituitary macroadenoma. The lesion failed to enhance after administration of a contrast agent, suggesting complete necrotic apoplexy. Urgent surgical decompression was performed, and the lesion was resected via a transnasal transsphenoidal approach. Pathological analysis revealed evidence of necrotic pituitary apoplexy. At the 2 month follow-up, the patient had near-complete to complete resolution of his visual impairment. To the authors' knowledge, this report is unique as the patient demonstrated complete necrotic apoplexy and it underlines the diagnostic dilemma in such a case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Post-infectious glomerulonephritis following infective endocarditis: Amenable to immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Mantan, M.; Sethi, G. R.; Batra, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis develops in about 20% patients with infective endocarditis (IE), but is mostly asymptomatic. Heavy proteinuria or derangement of kidney functions is uncommon. We report here a child with IE and proliferative glomerulonephritis who manifested as significant proteinuria that recovered on treatment with immunosupressants. PMID:24049276

  10. Membranous glomerulonephritis and tuberculous peritonitis: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Biswadip; Pande, Arindam; Ghosh, Anirban; Banerjee, Arnab; Saha, Sandip

    2011-07-27

    Membranous glomerulonephritis is rarely associated with tuberculosis infection. We report a case of a 24-year-old female with tuberculous peritonitis associated with membranous glomerulonephritis causing subnephrotic range proteinuria. Histological examination confirmed both diagnoses. The patient showed improvement with anti-tubercular drugs over six months of follow-up.

  11. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Hadim; Dede, Fatih; Akoglu, Gulsen; Gonul, Ipek Isik; Odabas, Ali Riza

    2009-01-01

    Psoriasis is a hereditary, chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin. Generally, the psoriatic process is limited to the skin; however, internal organs such as the kidneys may be involved in the course. Several glomerular diseases have been distinguished due to renal histological findings of psoriatic patients to date. The underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of these associations remain unclear because of the limited number of cases. We report a case of primary membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) in a psoriatic patient. This is the first reported case that demonstrates the coexistence of MPGN and psoriasis.

  12. Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis after immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, M G; Atkins, M B; Ucci, A A; Levey, A S

    1995-04-01

    Cytokines have been used in experimental and standard protocols for immune enhancement for cancer. The combination of interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha 2 beta has been used in experimental protocols for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. A man who developed rapidly progressive renal failure after receiving this combination therapy is reported. A renal biopsy revealed a pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies were absent. The spectrum of renal disease and potentially related extrarenal manifestations associated with interleukin-2 and inteferon-alpha are reviewed. A pathogenesis of altered cell-mediated immunity, consistent with abnormalities in extrarenal organs after immune enhancement, is proposed.

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis due to appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Groth, D; Henderson, S O

    1999-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis, although rare, is one of the more serious, life-threatening complications of missed acute appendicitis. Patients who are predisposed to developing necrotizing fasciitis, regardless of the cause, are typically immunocompromised. We present a case of a 49-year-old immunocompetent female whose diagnosis of acute appendicitis was missed and who subsequently developed necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and flank. She recovered 1 month after admission due to aggressive surgical and medical therapy.

  14. Acute glomerulonephritis with bacteriuria: a probable etiologic relationship.

    PubMed

    El Said, W; Awad, S; Farid, F; Maged, Z; Fattah, F A; El Maghraby, M

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of acute glomerulonephritis in children with no previous history of renal disease were studied. Urinary infection with a rising titre of serum agglutinins against the organisms isolated from urine was found in 5 cases. No evidence of previous streptococcal infection was found in these cases. In the meantime all 8 cases with post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis remained without bacteriuria. In one case acute glomerulonephritis followed virus hepatitis, and in the remaining 7 cases the cause of glomerulonephritis was unknown. It is suggested that in predisposed patients the bacteria present in urinary infections might act as antigens starting immunologic reactions in the glomeruli, leading to glomerulonephritis. The final proof of this theory awaits immunofluorescence identification of these antigens in the glomeruli.

  15. An unusual case of IgA-dominant postinfectious glomerulonephritis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wagrowska-Danilewicz, M; Danilewicz, M; Fisiak, I; Piskorska, J

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of IgA-dominant postinfectious glomerulonephritis in a 49-year-old man presenting with acute kidney injury, nephrotic range proteinuria and hematuria. He suffered from ischemic heart disease, cardiac insufficiency, mitral regurgitation, tricuspid insufficiency, septal aneurysm and hypertension. Renal biopsy revealed segmental and focal endocapillary and mesangial hypercellularity, and thickening of the glomerular capillary wall. Immunofluorescence showed co-dominant strong coarse granular immunostaining of IgA, IgG and C3 mainly along the glomerular capillary wall. On electron microscopy some large subepithelial hump-shaped deposits were present. In summary, this case demonstrates the presence of a broad spectrum of glomerular histological findings in postinfectious glomerulonephritis.

  16. Statin attenuates experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis together with the augmentation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Emiko; Shimizu, Akira; Masuda, Yukinari; Kuwahara, Naomi; Arai, Takashi; Nagasaka, Shinya; Aki, Kaoru; Mii, Akiko; Natori, Yasuhiro; Iino, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Yasuo; Fukuda, Yuh

    2010-09-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and include classically activated M1 and alternatively activated M2 macrophages, characterized by pro- and anti-inflammatory functions, respectively. Macrophages that express heme oxygenase-1 also exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. We assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of statin in experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis and in vitro, focusing on the macrophage heterogeneity. Rats were induced anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis and treated with atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (control). Control rats showed infiltration of macrophages in the glomeruli at day 3 and developed crescentic glomerulonephritis by day 7, together with increased mRNA levels of the M1 macrophage-associated cytokines, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-12. In contrast, statin reduced the level of proteinuria, reduced infiltration of macrophages in glomeruli with suppression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression, and inhibited the formation of necrotizing and crescentic lesions. The number of glomerular ED3-positive macrophages decreased with down-regulation of M1 macrophage-associated cytokines. Furthermore, statin augmented ED2-positive M2 macrophages with up-regulation of the M2 macrophage-associated chemokines and cytokines, chemokine (C-C motif) Iigand-17 and interleukin-10. Statin also increased the glomerular interleukin-10-expressing heme oxygenase-1-positive macrophages. Statin inhibited macrophage development, and suppressed ED3-positive macrophages, but augmented ED2-positive macrophages in M2-associated cytokine environment in vitro. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory effects of statin in glomerulonephritis are mediated through inhibition of macrophage infiltration as well as augmentation of anti-inflammatory macrophages.

  17. [Immune complex glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Villar, I; Hernández, E; Cozzi, J; Paletta, C; Mathurín, S

    1994-01-01

    A 32 year old man was admitted for dyspnea, hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria, hypertension (140/100), peripheral edema and hemodynamic decompensation. Lung Xrays revealed pulmonary edema and a cavity in the left apex. Laboratory determinations revealed an altered renal function with increased creatinine and urea levels and nephrotic syndrome. There was leucocyturia, hematuria and cylindruria. The sputum showed a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The patient began anti-tuberculosis treatment with three drugs (isoniacid, rifampicin, pirazinamide). On ultrasonography, both kidneys revealed ecogenic lesions with size, shape and cortico-medular relationship preserved. The patient persisted with altered renal function, steady levels of urea nitrogen, creatinine and potassium, preserved diuresis and hypertension. Bidimensional echocardiogram: LVDD 55 mm, hypoquinetic septum, pericardic effusion, thickened pericardium, pleural effusion, shortening fraction decreased. He received treatment for this congestive cardiac failure and hypertension with enalapril, nifedipine and fursemide. A percutaneous renal biopsy was performed with anatomopathologic diagnosis of diffuse encocapillar proliferative glomerulonephritis with crescents (15%) and total glomerular sclerosis (33%). Immunofluorescence: positive, immune-complexes with IgM and C3. The patient gradually recovered his normal renal function, improved his pleural effusions and normalized his cardiac function. He was discharged in good clinical condition on the 69th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment. An association between pulmonary tuberculosis and glomerulonephritis is discussed. It is proposed that renal lesions might be the consequence of the tuberculosis due to the sedimentation of circulating immune-complexes.

  18. [Glomerulonephritis with IgA mesangial deposits].

    PubMed

    Pillebout, Evangéline; Nochy, Dominique

    2010-11-01

    IgA nephropathy is the primitive glomerulonephritis the most frequently encountered worldwide. In about one case out of three, it is responsible for the progression from progressive renal failure to end-stage renal failure. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this disease which is mediated by immune complexes remain unclear. The presentation, clinical progression and optical microscope aspect of the renal biopsy may widely vary, making any histological classification very difficult. Most therapeutic studies include the patients only on clinical criteria of severity. The only consensual management is that of patients with a nephropathy and mild glomerular lesions and a nephritic syndrome, or with an extracapillar glomerulonephritis and a rapidly progressive renal failure; corticoids are indicated in former cases while corticoids must be combined with immunosuppressive agents in the latter ones. Corticotherapy may be considered in patients with a proteinuria higher than 1g/day without renal failure. In any patient with primitive IgA nephropathy, the overall management used for chronic glomerulopathy must be initiated, including, in case of arterial hypertension or proteinuria, the renin-angiotensin system blockade.

  19. Necrotizing myopathy: clinicoserologic associations.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Elizabeth; Ann Tan, Ju; Lester, Sue; Tucker, Graeme; Blumbergs, Peter; Roberts-Thomson, Peter; Limaye, Vidya

    2012-02-01

    Necrotizing myopathy (NM) is distinguished from idiopathic inflammatory myositis (IIM) by dominance of myofiber necrosis, lack of mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates, and presence of antibodies to signal recognition particle (SRP). The clinical features of 64 cases of NM were determined. Measurement of autoantibodies was undertaken on stored sera from 23 patients with NM. The incidence of malignancy was determined from the South Australian Cancer Registry. NM patients showed male predominance (61%), more frequent myalgias, and higher creatine kinase (CK) levels compared with IIM patients. Patients with NM had a high incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (21%), hypertension (11 of 17, 65%), and diabetes mellitus (3 of 13, 23%). No patient had antibodies to SRP. NM patients showed no altered risk for malignancy compared with the South Australian population (P = 0.86). NM is associated with SLE, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Comprehensive assessment of cardiovascular risk is indicated in NM, which raises the possibility of targeted interventions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Membranous glomerulonephritis in the Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Angeles; Sánchez, Belén; Pérez Alenza, Dolores; García, Pilar; López, Jose Vicente; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Alvaro; Martínez, Fernando; Vargas, Astrid; Peña, Laura

    2008-01-15

    The Iberian lynx is the most endangered felid species in the world, confined nowadays to two isolated metapopulations in the southwest of Spain, where less than 200 individuals survive. Little is known about the diseases that affect these animals in the wild or in captivity. Kidney samples from necropsies of 27 Iberian lynxes, wild and captive, were examined by histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IgG, IgM, IgA, laminin, type IV collagen, and fibronectin), electron microscopy (n=8) and immunogold labelling for IgM, IgG and IgA in one case, in order to characterize the glomerulopathy prevalent in this species. Urinalyses from records were available for 9 of the necropsied animals and blood and urine samples from 23 free ranging and captive Iberian lynxes were prospectively obtained in order to evaluate the renal function of the living population. A focal, diffuse membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) that progressed with age was diagnosed in all but one of the animals in different stages not associated to concurrently known infectious diseases. Positive immunoexpression of IgM and IgG was observed in the glomerular capillary basement membranes and intramembranous electron-dense deposits, compatible with immune complexes (ICs) were seen with electron microscopy. The immunogold labelling was also positive for IgM and IgG in the electron-dense areas. The serum biochemistry and urinalyses also revealed signs of mild chronic kidney disease in 16 of the 23 animals evaluated. In conclusion, the membranous glomerulopathy affecting the Iberian lynx is a progressive disease of immune origin. We postulate a possible genetic predisposition towards the disease, enhanced by inbreeding and a possible connection to an immune-mediated systemic disease.

  1. Pediatric Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    King, Ericka; Chun, Robert; Sulman, Cecille

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a case of a pediatric cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF), a rapidly progressive infection, and a review of a 10-year pediatric inpatient database. Design Case report and review. Setting Pediatric intensive care unit. Patients A healthy 5-year-old male who developed NF of the lower lip 36 hours following minor trauma. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code 728.86 (NF), was the inclusion criteria for the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) in 1997 and 2006. Results A pediatric case is presented with a thorough photographic record demonstrating the need for rapid diagnosis and treatment. In a review of the KID from 1997 and 2006, the relative risk of being discharged with NF in 2006 vs 1997 was 1.4 (95% CI, 9.95-2.28). Age at diagnosis of NF was older in 2006 compared with 1997 (11.5 years vs 8.05 years; P<.001). Deaths with a diagnosis of NF increased from 1997 compared with 2006: from 3.9% to 5.4%. In 2006, the odds of death were 15.1 times higher in pediatric discharges with a diagnosis of NF compared with discharges without a diagnosis of NF (P<.001; 95% CI, 9.3-23.1). Conclusions Even with the advent of new treatments and antibiotics, the incidence and death rates of NF have changed little over the past 10 years. While it is still a rare diagnosis, knowledge and awareness of necrotizing fasciitis with aggressive medical and surgical treatment are still the foundation in disease survival. PMID:22508620

  2. [Mechanisms of immune deposit formation in glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Bussolati, B; Camussi, G

    1996-03-01

    Recent experimental studies allowed the identification of several mechanisms of immune deposit formation, which are able to reproduce the morphological and clinical pattern of human glomerulonephritis. Moreover, it was shown that most of the lesions considered, in the past, as due to circulating immune complexes (IC), are instead caused by the "in situ" formation of IC. As a result of these studies, the following schematic classification was proposed: 1) immune deposits formed by glomerular localization of IC primarily formed in the circulation; 2) immune deposits formed "in situ" by reaction of circulating antibodies with fixed structural antigens; 3) immune deposits formed "in situ" by antibodies reactive with movable structural antigens; 4) immune deposits formed "in situ" by antibodies reactive with sequestered antigens leaking out of tissues; 5) IC formed "in situ" by antibodies reactive with exogenous or non-glomerular endogenous antigens planted in the glomeruli; 6) ANCA-associated glomerular disease.

  3. Predictors of outcome in idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (IRPGN)

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Efstathios; Gionanlis, Lazaros; Papayianni, Ekaterini; Kokolina, Elizabeth; Leontsini, Maria; Memmos, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    Background Small vessel vasculitides are known to follow a devastating course towards end-stage renal disease, unless treated with immunosuppressive regiments. We investigated the value of clinical, histological and immunohistochemical parameters as predictors of outcome at diagnosis in patients with pauci immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis. Methods In 34 patients the percentage and evolution stage of crescents, the presence of glomerular necrosis, the degree or severity of arteriosclerosis, as well as the extent of tubulointerstitial infiltration, interstial fibrosis and tubular atrophy were assessed. Monoclonal antibodies were used to identify infiltrating macrophages, α-SMA(+) and PCNA(+) cells, the expression of integrins α3β1 and LFA-1β, the adhesion molecule ICAM-1, the growth factor TGF-β1 and the terminal complement component C5b-9. Results 24 pts (70.6%) showed a complete or partial response to the treatment. The follow-up period was 20 ± 22 months. At multivariate analysis, serum CRP (p = 0.024), the intensity of tubular expression of C5b-9 (p < 0.0001) as well as the extent of glomerular and tubular expression of α3β1 integrin (p = 0.001 and 0.008 respectively) independently predicted the response to treatment. The response rate was better in ANCA(+) pts (p = 0.008). The extent of interstitial infiltrate (p < 0.0001), the severity of tubulointerstitial fibrosis (p < 0.0001) and the severity of tubular TGF-β1 expression (p < 0.0001) were independent predictors of long term outcome of renal function. Conclusion Patients with ANCA-associated renal vasculitis seem to respond better to the treatment. Acute phase reactants, such as CRP, implying a more intense parenchymal inflammatory reaction, as well as the intensity of the de novo expression of C5b-9 and the glomerular and tubular expression of α3β1 integrin predict the response to therapy. The severity of TIN lesions and of the tubulo-interstitial TGF-β1 and C5b-9 expression predict an

  4. Is it necrotizing fasciitis or necrotizing cellulitis after varicella zoster infection? Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Gundeslioglu, Ayse Ozlem; Selimoglu, Muhammed Nebil; Toy, Hatice

    2014-08-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis and necrotizing cellulitis are serious cutaneous complications in varicella patients. Differentiation of necrotizing cellulitis from necrotizing fasciitis can initially be challenging because of indistinct clinical course at the onset of infection and the lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This paper reports 2 children with necrotizing cellulitis that developed after varicella infection to draw the attention of health care providers to necrotizing cellulitis that showed slower clinical course than necrotizing fasciitis and recovered with conservative treatment approaches without aggressive surgical intervention.

  5. [Experimental systemic enzyme therapy of gouty and primary glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Mukhin, I V; Nikolenko, V Iu

    2003-01-01

    The influence of a systemic enzymotherapy on the morphological, biochemical, and functional manifestations of the kidney damage during the experimental gouty and primary glomerulonephritis is described in comparison to the results obtained by traditional methods.

  6. A case of multicentric Castleman's disease with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type 3-like lesion.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kei; Usui, Joichi; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Unai, Kei; Hiwatashi, Akira; Arakawa, Yoh; Togashi, Amane; Morito, Naoki; Saito, Chie; Yoh, Keigyou; Tsuruoka, Syuichi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Aita, Kumi; Nagata, Michio; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2011-11-01

    Renal involvement is a significant complication of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) and various glomerular involvements have been reported. A 45-year-old Japanese man presented with persistent proteinuria, with lymphadenopathy and hypergammaglobulinemia. He had been diagnosed 4 years previously with MCD. As his renal impairment had progressed to renal failure, he underwent a renal biopsy. Histology revealed diffuse and global membranous lesions with large and heterogeneous epimembranous deposits. In addition, mesangial cell proliferation and focal extracapillary lesions were found. Under immunofluorescence, granular staining for anti-IgG, IgG1, IgG2 and IgA was strongly positive in the capillary loop, and weakly positive in the mesangium. As such, there was a diversity of histological features. Our perspective with regard to pathogenesis is that the formation of the immune-complex contributed to the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type 3-like lesion. This histological multiform with MCD is valuable for increasing our understanding of the mechanism for onset of immune-complex glomerular deposition and cellular proliferation of glomerulonephritis.

  7. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage in ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gagangeet; Casares, Pablo; Farias, Antony; Ranade, Aditi; Jones, James

    2010-10-01

    Pulmonary renal syndrome (PRS) is a combination of diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage and glomerulonephritis (GN). Though an established form of presentation in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated GN and vasculitis, diffuse pulmonary haemorrhage is extremely unusual in those with ANCA-negative GN. We present here a case of a 76-year-old Hispanic female with stage IV chronic kidney disease (serum creatinine of 2 mg/dL), who presented with diffuse alveolar haemorrhage and nephritic syndrome. Less than 1 week prior to the full-blown PRS, she was treated for an apparent pneumonia as was evidenced by a right lower lobe infiltrate on her chest X-ray. Retrospectively, this was likely a focal pulmonary haemorrhage. ANCA were persistently negative, and the remainder of her immunologic workup was normal. Renal biopsy was diagnostic of crescentic pauci-immune GN. The patient required a ventilator and haemodialysis support (serum creatinine 6 mg/dL), and was successfully treated with methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide and a total of six cycles of plasmapheresis. Once her oliguria resolved, the creatinine plateaued at 2.7 mg/dL. Our case illustrates that diffuse alveolar haemorrhage can be a distinct clinical feature even in patients with ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis.

  8. [Treatment of dyslipoproteinemia by systemic enzyme therapy in experimental glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Mukhin, I V

    2002-01-01

    Patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (CG) develop disturbances of lipid blood spectrum leading to additional damage to renal structure. The existent methods of pathogenetic therapy have no effect on lipid imbalance. Recently, many autoimmune diseases have been treated with systemic enzyme therapy (SET). The authors studied SET effect in disturbed lipid metabolism in experimental glomerulonephritis. Experimental animals showed morphological and biochemical changes similar to those in CG of man. SET reduced renal tissue damage and symptoms of dyslipoproteinemia.

  9. Membranous glomerulonephritis associated with Mycobacterium shimoidei pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kushida, Yoshio; Bandoh, Shuji; Ishii, Tomoya; Haba, Reiji; Tadokoro, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Takahama, Takayuki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Male, 83 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Membranous glomerulonephritis Symptoms: Producting cough Medication: - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Nephrology. Rare disease. Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur secondarily from infectious diseases. There are no reports describing membranous glomerulonephritis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection. However, several cases with membranous glomerulonephritis due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported. Mycobacterium shimoidei is an uncommon pathogen, and less than 20 cases with this species have been reported. A therapeutic regimen for this infection has not been established yet. An 83-year-old Japanese man presented with productive cough for 6 months. Computed tomography scan showed multiple cavities in the bilateral pulmonary fields. Acid-fast bacilli were evident in his sputum by Ziehl-Neelsen staining (Gaffky 3). PCR amplifications for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare were all negative. Finally, Mycobacterium shimoidei was identified by rpoB sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing. Urine examination showed a sub-nephrotic range of proteinuria and histology of the kidney showed membranous glomerulonephritis. Antimycobacterial treatment with clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol dramatically improved not only the pulmonary disease, but also the proteinuria. To the best of our knowledge, the presented case is the first report showing non-tuberculous mycobacterium-induced secondary membranous glomerulonephritis. A combination with clarithromycin, ethambutol, and rifampicin might be effective for treatment of Mycobacterium shimoidei infection.

  10. Probiotics and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Paul; Hall, Nigel J; Eaton, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have attracted a huge interest. Combined data from heterogeneous randomised controlled trials suggest that probiotics may decrease the incidence of NEC. However, the individual studies use a variety of probiotic products, and the group at greatest risk of NEC, i.e., those with a birth weight of less than 1000 g, is relatively under-represented in these trials so we do not have adequate evidence of either efficacy or safety to recommend universal prophylactic administration of probiotics to premature infants. These problems have polarized neonatologists, with some taking the view that it is unethical not to universally administer probiotics to premature infants, whereas others regard the meta-analyses as flawed and that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine probiotic administration. Another problem is that the mechanism by which probiotics might act is not clear, although some experimental evidence is starting to accumulate. This may allow development of surrogate endpoints of effectiveness, refinement of probiotic regimes, or even development of pharmacological agents that may act through the same mechanism. Hence, although routine probiotic administration is controversial, studies of probiotic effects may ultimately lead us to effective means to prevent this devastating disease.

  11. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a large mixed-breed dog.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M; Scott, Steven J; Cerda-Gonzalez, Sofia

    2014-12-01

    A 4-year-old 26-kg (57.2-lb) spayed female Staffordshire Bull Terrier mix was evaluated because of a 24-hour history of cluster seizures. Neurologic examination revealed altered mentation and multifocal intracranial signs; MRI was performed. The MRI findings included multifocal, asymmetric forebrain lesions affecting both the gray and white matter, an area suggestive of focal necrosis, and loss of corticomedullary distinction. A midline shift and caudal transtentorial herniation were noted, suggestive of greater than normal intracranial pressure. Because the dog's clinical signs worsened despite medical treatment and additional evidence of increased intracranial pressure, bilateral craniectomy and durectomy were performed. Histologic evaluation of a brain biopsy specimen revealed bilateral and asymmetric areas of necrosis in the subcortical white matter and adjacent gray matter. At the periphery of the necrotic areas, there was increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Virchow-Robin spaces were expanded by CD3+ lymphocytes. Results of immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue were negative for canine distemper virus, Neospora canis, and Toxoplasma gondii. These clinical, imaging, and histopathologic findings were compatible with necrotizing meningoencephalitis. The dog's neurologic status continued to worsen following surgery. Repeated MRI revealed ongoing signs of increased intracranial pressure, despite the bilateral craniectomy. The owners elected euthanasia. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a large mixed-breed dog. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs other than small or toy breeds that have signs suggestive of inflammatory disease.

  12. CT appearance of focal fatty infiltration of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, R.A.; Korobkin, M.; Ram, P.C.; Thompson, W.M.

    1982-08-01

    Focal fatty infiltration of the liver is an entity that may be confused with liver metastasis on computed tomography (CT). The imaging results and medical records of 16 patients with CT appearance suggestive of focal fatty liver were reviewed, three of whom had the simultaneous presence of metastitic liver disease. Focal fatty liver often has a distinctive appearance with CT, usually with a nonspherical shape, absence of mass effect, and density close to water. Liver metastases are usually round or oval, and unless cystic or necrotic, they have CT attenuation values closer to normal liver parenchyma than water. A radionuclide liver scan almost always resolves any confusion about the differential diagnosis of focal fatty liver: a well defined focus of photon deficiency is due to neoplasm rather than focal fatty infiltration. Sonography sometimes helps to confirm the CT impression, but may be misleading if the diagnosis of focal or diffuse fatty infiltration is not suspected before the examination.

  13. Haematuria on the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Claudia; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Juan Antonio; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a pathogenic role for glomerular haematuria among renal function. However, there is no data on the prevalence of haematuria from a large renal biopsy registry. We analysed the prevalence of gross (GH) and microscopic (mH) haematuria in 19,895 patients that underwent native renal biopsies from the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis. Haematuria’s overall incidence was 63% (GH 8.6% and mH 55.1%), being more frequent in males (64.7% vs. 62.4%). GH was more prevalent in patients <18 years (21.3% vs. 7.7%). The commonest clinical presentation associated with GH was acute kidney injury (31.5%) and IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) (33.6%) was the most frequent histological finding. GH patients showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower eGFR and proteinuria levels as compared with patients with mH and without haematuria. Moreover, mH was more prevalent in adults (56.3%). Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest clinical presentation in mH patients (32.2%) and IgAN (18.5%) the most frequent histological finding. In conclusion, haematuria, is a frequent urinalysis finding in patients underwent native renal biopsy. The most frequent histological finding in both GH and mH is IgAN. Whereas, GH is more frequent in young males with acute kidney injury, mH is commoner among adults with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26818712

  14. Haematuria on the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Claudia; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Juan Antonio; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-28

    Recent studies suggest a pathogenic role for glomerular haematuria among renal function. However, there is no data on the prevalence of haematuria from a large renal biopsy registry. We analysed the prevalence of gross (GH) and microscopic (mH) haematuria in 19,895 patients that underwent native renal biopsies from the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis. Haematuria's overall incidence was 63% (GH 8.6% and mH 55.1%), being more frequent in males (64.7% vs. 62.4%). GH was more prevalent in patients <18 years (21.3% vs. 7.7%). The commonest clinical presentation associated with GH was acute kidney injury (31.5%) and IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) (33.6%) was the most frequent histological finding. GH patients showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower eGFR and proteinuria levels as compared with patients with mH and without haematuria. Moreover, mH was more prevalent in adults (56.3%). Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest clinical presentation in mH patients (32.2%) and IgAN (18.5%) the most frequent histological finding. In conclusion, haematuria, is a frequent urinalysis finding in patients underwent native renal biopsy. The most frequent histological finding in both GH and mH is IgAN. Whereas, GH is more frequent in young males with acute kidney injury, mH is commoner among adults with nephrotic syndrome.

  15. Myeloperoxidase-Specific Plasma Cell Depletion by Bortezomib Protects from Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies–Induced Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Bontscho, Julia; Manz, Rudolf A.; Schneider, Wolfgang; Luft, Friedrich C.; Kettritz, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) cause vasculitis and necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN). Steroids and cytotoxic drugs reduce mortality but can cause significant adverse events. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) prevents glomerulonephritis in mouse models of lupus but its efficacy in ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis is unknown. We induced anti-MPO IgG-mediated NCGN by transplanting wild-type bone marrow (BM) into irradiated MPO-deficient mice immunized with MPO. Four weeks after BM transplantation, we treated mice with steroid/cyclophosphamide (S/CYC) or BTZ. Compared with untreated control mice, both S/CYC and BTZ significantly reduced urine abnormalities, NCGN, and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. Response to BTZ depended on timing of administration: BTZ abrogated NCGN if begun 3 weeks, but not 5 weeks, after BM transplantation. BTZ treatment significantly reduced total and MPO-specific plasma cells in both the spleen and bone marrow, resulting in significantly reduced anti-MPO titers. Furthermore, BTZ affected neither B cells nor total CD4 and CD8 T cells, including their naive and effector subsets. In contrast, S/CYC reduced the total number of cells in the spleen, including total and MPO-specific plasma cells and B cells. In contrast to BTZ, S/CYC did not affect total and MPO-specific plasma cells in the bone marrow. Three of 23 BTZ-treated mice died within 36 hours after BTZ administration. In summary, BTZ depletes MPO-specific plasma cells, reduces anti-MPO titers, and prevents NCGN in mice. PMID:21233415

  16. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck].

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Delalija, Boris

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and rapidly progressive infection characterized by necrosis of the superficial fascia and spread on the surrounding skin or muscles, which can be fatal. It usually occurs in the limbs, abdominal wall and perineum. In this retrospective review, the authors present 15 patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis. The patient mean age was 54.7 years and they had one or more comorbid health problems. Five of them had descending necrotizing mediastinitis and three had progressive sepsis with toxic shock syndrome. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered to all patients immediately, and in three of them we used five-day intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for the signs of toxic shock syndrome. After positive computed tomography imaging for necrotizing fasciitis, we used surgical exploration and debridement of necrotic tissue. In five patients, the initial surgery also included mediastinal transcervical drainage. Preoperative tracheotomy was performed in six patients and delayed tracheotomy in one patient. Histopathologically, all cases showed extensive necrosis of debrided fascia and vascular thrombosis of the neck soft tissue. The mortality rate was 6.7% (1/15). The authors point to the importance of early diagnosis and timely surgical management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy when patients are too unstable to undergo surgery.

  17. Idiopathic necrotizing dermatitis: current management.

    PubMed

    Lui, P C; Petersen, D; Kimble, R M; Raven, R J; Pearn, J H

    2005-01-01

    To identify and demonstrate necrotizing dermatitis in infancy; an uncommon, puzzling syndrome, in which anecdotal reporting and personal experience indicates that one third of cases may require skin grafting. Much informed discussion about the pathogenesis of this distressing syndrome centres on the role of spider envenomation; and in particular on the speculative role of the Australian White-tailed spider, Lampona cylindrata. We present here six cases of necrotizing dermatitis treated surgically at the Royal Children's Hospital and Mater Children's Hospital in Brisbane over the period from 1991 to 1999. Clinical history, surgical details and pathological investigations were reviewed in each case. Microbiological investigation of necrotic ulcers included standard aerobic and anaerobic culture. Nocardia and Staphylococcus were cultured in two cases, but no positive bites were witnessed and no spiders were identified by either the children or their parents. All cases were treated with silver sulphadiazine creme. Two of the infants required general anaesthesia, excision debridement and split skin grafting. The White-tailed spider, Lampona cylindrata, does not occur in Queensland, but Lampona murina does; neither species has necrotizing components in its venom. Circumstantial evidence is consistent with this syndrome being due to invertebrate envenomation, possibly following arachnid bites. In our experience there is insufficient evidence to impute a specific genus as the cause, at this stage of scientific knowledge. If the offending creature is a spider, we calculate that the syndrome of necrotizing dermatitis occurs in less than 1 in 5000 spider bites.

  18. The associations of HLA and other genetic markers with glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, H U; Papiha, S S; Agroyannis, B; Morley, A R; Ward, M K; Roberts, D F; Kerr, D N

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine patients with various forms of glomerulonephritis confirmed histologically were tested for HLA A and B antigens: Thirty-four with membranous glomerulonephritis were also typed for DR antigens. One hundred and forty-one of these patients were further tested for blood group, red cell enzyme, and plasma protein systems. The minimal-change and the mesangio-capillary glomerulonephritis showed a significant association with B8 and Bw44 antigens respectively, whereas the membranous nephritis in addition to B8 was also found to be associated with DR3 antigen. Previously described associations with Henoch-Schönlein and Berger's nephritis were not proved. A large group with nonspecific proliferative glomerulonephritis did not show any association with HLA. Among the other single-gene characters studied, a significant association was found with Bf (Factor B or C3 proactivator) and adenosine deaminase, both markers thought to be involved in the immune response. The close association of the markers located on chromosome 6 and glomerulonephritis indicates that there may be an immunological component in the aetiology of the disease. The significance of the various associations found is discussed.

  19. Heparanase Is Essential for the Development of Acute Experimental Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Garsen, Marjolein; Benner, Marilen; Dijkman, Henry B; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Li, Jin-Ping; Rabelink, Ton J; Vlodavsky, Israel; Berden, Jo H M; Rops, Angelique L W M M; Elkin, Michael; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Heparanase, a heparan sulfate (HS)--specific endoglucuronidase, mediates the onset of proteinuria and renal damage during experimental diabetic nephropathy. Glomerular heparanase expression is increased in most proteinuric diseases. Herein, we evaluated the role of heparanase in two models of experimental glomerulonephritis, being anti-glomerular basement membrane and lipopolysaccharide-induced glomerulonephritis, in wild-type and heparanase-deficient mice. Induction of experimental glomerulonephritis led to an increased heparanase expression in wild-type mice, which was associated with a decreased glomerular expression of a highly sulfated HS domain, and albuminuria. Albuminuria was reduced in the heparanase-deficient mice in both models of experimental glomerulonephritis, which was accompanied by a better renal function and less renal damage. Notably, glomerular HS expression was preserved in the heparanase-deficient mice. Glomerular leukocyte and macrophage influx was reduced in the heparanase-deficient mice, which was accompanied by a reduced expression of both types 1 and 2 helper T-cell cytokines. In vitro, tumor necrosis factor-α and lipopolysaccharide directly induced heparanase expression and increased transendothelial albumin passage. Our study shows that heparanase contributes to proteinuria and renal damage in experimental glomerulonephritis by decreasing glomerular HS expression, enhancing renal leukocyte and macrophage influx, and affecting the local cytokine milieu. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kidney Transplantation Rates Across Glomerulonephritis Subtypes in the United States.

    PubMed

    OʼShaughnessy, Michelle M; Liu, Sai; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Lafayette, Richard A; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2017-10-01

    Whether kidney transplantation rates differ by glomerulonephritis (GN) subtype remains largely unknown. Using the US Renal Data System, we identified all adult patients with end-stage renal disease attributed to 1 of 6 GN subtypes who initiated dialysis in the US (1996-2013). Patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) served as "external" non-GN comparators. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, with death considered a competing risk, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for first kidney transplantation, controlling for year, demographics, comorbidities, socioeconomic factors, and Organ Procurement Organization. Among 718 480 patients studied, unadjusted and multivariable-adjusted transplant rates differed considerably across GN subtypes. Adjusted transplant rates were highest for patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) (referent) and lower for all other groups: focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.77-0.82), membranous nephropathy (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.83-0.93), membranoproliferative GN (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76-0.92), lupus nephritis (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.66-0.71), vasculitis (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.61-0.70), DN (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.47-0.52), ADPKD (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.82-0.88). Reduced kidney transplantation rates among comparator groups were driven more so by lower rates of waitlisting (HRs vs IgAN, ranged from 0.49 for DN to 0.92 for membranous nephropathy or ADPKD) than by lower rates of deceased donor kidney transplantation after waitlisting (rates were only significantly lower, vs IgAN, for those with secondary GN subtypes: lupus nephritis [HR,0.91; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97], vasculitis [HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.94), DN [HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.69-0.77]). Identifying underlying reasons for apparent disease-specific barriers to kidney transplantation might inform center-specific transplant candidate selection procedures, along with national organ allocation policies, leading

  1. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zand, Ladan; Fervenza, Fernando C; Nasr, Samih H; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-04-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has been classified based on its pathogenesis into immune complex-mediated and complement-mediated MPGN. The immune complex-mediated type is secondary to chronic infections, autoimmune diseases or monoclonal gammopathy. There is a paucity of data on MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases. We reviewed the Mayo Clinic database over a 10-year period and identified 12 patients with MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases, after exclusion of systemic lupus erythematosus. The autoimmune diseases included rheumatoid arthritis, primary Sjögren's syndrome, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis and Graves' disease. Nine of the 12 patients were female, and the mean age was 57.9 years. C4 levels were decreased in nine of 12 patients tested. The serum creatinine at time of renal biopsy was 2.2 ± 1.0 mg/dl and the urinary protein was 2,850 ± 3,543 mg/24 h. Three patients required dialysis at the time of renal biopsy. Renal biopsy showed an MPGN in all cases, with features of cryoglobulins in six cases; immunoglobulin (Ig)M was the dominant Ig, and both subendothelial and mesangial electron dense deposits were noted. Median follow-up was 10.9 months. Serum creatinine and proteinuria improved to 1.6 ± 0.8 mg/dl and 428 ± 677 mg/24 h, respectively, except in 3 patients with end-stage renal disease. In summary, this study describes the clinical features, renal biopsy findings, laboratory evaluation, treatment and prognosis of MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases.

  2. Infectious causes of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Sarah A.; Wynn, James L.; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency among premature infants. Although a large body of research has focused on understanding its pathogenesis, the exact mechanism has not been elucidated. Of particular interest is the potential causative role of infectious culprits in the development of NEC. A variety of reports describe bacterial, viral, and fungal infections occurring in association with NEC; however, no organism has emerged as being definitively involved in NEC pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the body of research on infectious causes of necrotizing enterocolitis. PMID:25678001

  3. Glomerulonephritis associated with tuberculosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Anil, Melih; Atalay, Huseyin; Ozbek, Orhan; Turkmen, Kultigin; Polat, Ilker; Turk, Suleyman

    2013-06-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis caused mycobacterium tuberculosis is rare; however, three case have been reported to date. Crescentic glomerulonephritis is a life-threatening disease and together with the presence of tuberculous infection is associated with a poor outcome if treatment is inadequate and delayed. We describe the case of a 31-year-old female patient with nephrotic syndrome and progressive renal failure secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. Renal biopsy showed crescent formation in 14 out of 27 glomeruli, and there was diffuse linear staining of immunoglobulin G deposits. Treatment included corticosteroids in combination with antituberculosis drugs for 2 months, and resulted in a significant improvement in renal function, the disappearance of proteinuria and pulmonary symptoms. We also present a review of the pertinent literature and discuss the pathophysiology of tuberculosis-related acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Arterial hypertension in chronic glomerulonephritis. An analysis of 310 cases.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, H; Kornerup, H J; Olsen, S; Posborg, V

    1983-06-01

    310 cases of glomerulonephritis classified morphologically according to the criteria of the WHO were analyzed retrospectively in order to determine the frequency of arterial hypertension. The overall prevalence of arterial hypertension was 61%. Hypertension was most frequent and severe in membranoproliferative and sclerotic glomerulonephritis, but often mild and transient in extracapillary glomerulonephritis. Hypertension usually developed during the early stages of the disease when kidney function was well preserved and in only 16% was hypertension first seen during the uremic stage. No correlation was found between hypertension and the presence of the nephrotic syndrome. During dialysis, hypertension was present in 78%; in 90% of these patients hypertension was "controllable" and in 10% it was "uncontrollable".

  5. ANCA positivity in a patient with infective endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Gopal Chandra; Sharma, Brijesh; Katageri, Bhimarey; Bhardwaj, Minakshi

    2014-09-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is an immunological phenomenon in bacterial endocarditis. These may be pauci-immune/vasculitic GN, post-infective GN, and sub-endothelial membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Each type of glomerulonephritis usually occurs in isolation. We report a case of infective endocarditis with dual existence of pauci-immune/vasculitic GN and post infective type of GN at the same time.

  6. Pathologic findings in mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis in Navajo Indians.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Hoy, W E; Pathak, D; Megill, D M; Tung, K S; Hughson, M D

    1989-02-01

    Immune complex-associated mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis was found in 64% of renal biopsies performed on Navajos over a 16-year period. It is characterized by mild mesangial expansion and predominant immunoglobulin (Ig) A and/or IgM deposits. Statistical analysis shows that glomerular deposits of IgG and C3, glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, interstitial inflammation, and tubular atrophy are associated with renal insufficiency at the time of biopsy, and can be integrated into a pathologic index that has a high correlative value. Mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis is probably responsible for the high rates of non-diabetic end-stage renal disease seen in Navajo Indians.

  7. Enzymatic Debridement in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murat; Tekin, Ahmet; Kucukkartallar, Tevfik; Vatansev, Husamettin; Kartal, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ failure and pancreatic necrosis are the factors that determine prognosis in acute pancreatitis attacks. We investigated the effects of collagenase on the debridement of experimental pancreatic necrosis. The study covered 4 groups; each group had 10 rats. Group I was the necrotizing pancreatitis group. Group II was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge by isotonic irrigation following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group III was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group IV was the intraperitoneal collagenase group following necrotizing pancreatitis. The progress of the groups was compared hematologically and histopathologically. There was no difference among the groups regarding the levels of leukocyte, hemogram, and urea. The differences in AST levels between Group I and II; and differences in glucose, calcium, LDH, AST, and amylase between Group II and III; between Group II and IV; between Group I and III; and between Group I and IV were statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between Group II and III, and Group II and IV regarding edema, acinar necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and fat necrosis (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the collagenase preparation used in this experimental pancreatitis model was found to be effective in the debridement of pancreatic necrosis. PMID:26011212

  8. Necrotizing fasciitis following gall-bladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Rehman, A; Walker, M; Kubba, H; Jayatunga, A P

    1998-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis continues to carry a very high mortality and prolonged morbidity. Gallstones have previously not been reported as a cause of this condition. We report a patient who presented with gallbladder perforation leading to necrotizing fasciitis of the anterior abdominal wall. The only organism isolated was Escherichia Coli, cultured from necrotic issue.

  9. Gray matter heterotopia and acute necrotizing encephalopathy in trichothiodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wetzburger, C L; Van Regemorter, N; Szliwowski, H B; Abramowicz, M J; Van Bogaert, P

    1998-11-01

    Trichothiodystrophy was diagnosed in a 3-year-old male presenting with speech delay, brittle hair, chronic neutropenia, and a history of febrile convulsions. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a focal subcortical and periventricular gray matter heterotopia. An acute encephalopathy with status epilepticus and coma occurred when he was 4 years of age during an upper respiratory tract infection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multifocal T2-weighted hypersignal lesions involving mainly the thalami, hippocampi, midbrain, and pons. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid revealed hyperproteinorachia without pleocytosis. Results of an extensive metabolic evaluation of this acute brain injury, resembling the syndrome of acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood described in Japan, were negative. Focal neuronal migration disorder and acute encephalopathy with symmetric thalamic involvement are newly described neurologic manifestations of syndromes with trichothiodystrophy, which suggests that these conditions may have a common genetic background.

  10. Nonodontogenic Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Sialadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Veyseller, Bayram; Vural, Omer; Ozturan, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infectious disease of the soft tissue with high mortality and morbidity rates. Necrotizing fasciitis is occasionally located in the head and neck region and develops after odontogenic infections. Factors affecting treatment success rates are early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment, and surgical debridement. We present a necrotizing fasciitis case located in the neck region that developed after sialoadenitis. It is important to emphasize that necrotizing fasciitis to be seen in the neck region is very rare. Nonodontogenic necrotizing fasciitis is even more rare. PMID:27822398

  11. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a cow.

    PubMed

    Rissi, D R; Barros, C S L

    2013-09-01

    An 18-month-old Charolais cow developed depression and drooling and was submitted for necropsy after euthanasia. The cow was 1 of 50 moved between 2 farms approximately 5 days before the onset of clinical disease. Gross findings included swollen and hemorrhagic areas of malacia in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Microscopically there was a necrotizing meningoencephalitis with intranuclear astrocytic and neuronal eosinophilic viral inclusions in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cerebral cortex as well as in the basal nuclei and thalamus. The gross and microscopic findings were consistent with necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by bovine herpesvirus (BHV-1 or BHV-5), and the diagnosis was confirmed by detection of bovine herpesviral antigen on fresh samples of brain via fluorescent antibody test using a monoclonal antibody against BHV-1 glycoprotein C.

  12. Survival from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Gausepohl, Jeniffer S.; Wagner, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is an uncommon, yet clinically significant infection that rapidly progresses to involve the deep neck spaces. Early recognition and aggressive surgical intervention and debridement are important, as this disease is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In this report, we present a case of CNF and descending mediastinitis from a non-odontogenic source in a patient presenting with neck swelling and odynophagia. PMID:25671035

  13. [Necrotizing Fasciitis: A comprehensive review].

    PubMed

    Carbonetti, F; Carusi, V; Guidi, M; David, V

    Even though necrotizing fasciitis is considered a rare disease, the spreading of the predisposing factors such as diabetes and chronic diseases, contribute to increase the incidence of this infection. Thus, how to diagnose and treat this clinical pathology, which represents an emerging need. This infection could be fatal for patients if not early diagnosed and treated and it represents a challenge both for the clinicians both for the surgeons. From this consideration was born the idea to write this review article in order to furnish to the readers a helpful tool in the management of this disease starting from its clinical and epidemiological features leading to the diagnosis, both clinical and radiological, and concluding with the treatment both medical both surgical .This article reviews literature on PubMed/MEDLINE with key words "necrotizing", "fasciitis" and "necrotizing fasciitis" from 1967 to 2014, considering all the aspects of the disease. The authors attempt to draw comparisons to their own experience managing this condition to give an Italian perspective to the condition.

  14. Validation of the new classification of pauci-immune glomerulonephritis in a United States cohort and its correlation with renal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal biopsies provide important diagnostic and prognostic information in ANCA associated glomerulonephritis. A new classification for prognostication of pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) based on four categories (Mixed, Crescentic, Sclerotic and Focal) was proposed by an international working group of renal pathologists (IWGRP). The goal of our study was to apply the proposed classification system to a United States cohort of vasculitis patients and determine the association of IWGRP class with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at one year. Methods Seventy-six cases of pauci-immune glomerulonephritis diagnosed from 1995 to 2011 from a single center were identified for this retrospective study. Clinical data were collected by abstraction from medical records. Histology was reviewed by a pathologist and classified according to the new classification. MDRD formula was used to calculate eGFR. We correlated IWGRP class to renal function at presentation and at one year. ×2, ANOVA, and linear regression analysis were performed as appropriate. Results Renal biopsies were categorized as focal: n = 20, crescentic: n = 18, mixed: n = 27, sclerotic: n = 11. The baseline e-GFR was lowest in the crescentic class and highest in the focal class. In linear regression analysis investigating e-GFR at 1 year; age and baseline e-GFR were independent predictors of e-GFR at 1 year. Conclusions The e-GFR at diagnosis and age were predictors of e-GFR at 1 year. Pathologic class at diagnosis may also be a helpful tool in risk stratification at diagnosis. PMID:24093336

  15. Focal Choroidal Excavation

    PubMed Central

    Cebeci, Zafer; Bayraktar, Şerife; Oray, Merih; Kır, Nur

    2016-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation is a choroidal pit that can be detected by optical coherence tomography. Central serous chorioretinopathy, choroidal neovascularization and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy are pathologies associated with focal choroidal excavation. In this article, we present the follow-up and treatment outcomes of three eyes of two patients with focal choroidal excavation. PMID:28050329

  16. Focal Choroidal Excavation.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Zafer; Bayraktar, Şerife; Oray, Merih; Kır, Nur

    2016-12-01

    Focal choroidal excavation is a choroidal pit that can be detected by optical coherence tomography. Central serous chorioretinopathy, choroidal neovascularization and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy are pathologies associated with focal choroidal excavation. In this article, we present the follow-up and treatment outcomes of three eyes of two patients with focal choroidal excavation.

  17. Burn Center Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Burn Center Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis David J. Barillo, MD, FACS,*† Albert T. McManus, PhD,* Leopoldo C. Cancio, MD, FACS,* Alfred Sofer...MD,† Cleon W. Goodwin, MD, FACS* Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive soft-tissue infection associated with significant morbidity and...mortality. Necrotizing fasciitis is similar to invasive burn wound infection in that diagnosis requires histologic examination of affected tissue and

  18. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies crescentic allograft glomerulonephritis after sofosbuvir therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gadde, Shilpa; Lee, Belinda; Kidd, Laura; Zhang, Rubin

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are well known to be associated with several types of vasculitis, including pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, a form of rapid progressive glomerular nephritis (RPGN). ANCA vasculitis has also been reported after administration of propylthiouracil, hydralazine, cocaine (adulterated with levimasole), allopurinol, penicillamine and few other drugs. All previously reported cases of drug-associated ANCA glomerulonephritis were in native kidneys. Sofosbuvir is a new and effective drug for hepatitis C virus infection. Here, we report a case of ANCA vasculitis and RPGN following sofosbuvir administration in a kidney transplant recipient. It also represents the first case of drug-associated ANCA vasculitis in a transplanted kidney. Further drug monitoring is necessary to elucidate the degree of association and possible causal effect of sofosbuvir and perinuclear ANCA vasculitis. PMID:27872837

  19. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis in a patient with essential thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Ozkan, Gulsum; Sonmez, Mehmet; Mungan, Sevdegül; Köseoğlu, Rahman; Cansız, Muammer; Kaynar, Kübra

    2015-01-01

    In addition to being the main cause of glomerulonephritis in children, poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) has recently been shown in older patients, especially those with malignancy or diabetes mellitus. The pathogenesis of PSGN has been ascribed to activation of complement 3 (C3) of the alternative complement cascade which, along with immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM deposits, is observed in renal tissue. Our aim here is to discuss the probable causes of PSGN developing with isolated IgM deposition in a 52-year-old patient with essential thrombocytosis followed-up over the previous 3.5 years. These characteristics make our case the first to be reported in the literature.

  20. Primary glomerulonephritis: A review of important recent discoveries

    PubMed Central

    Floege, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The publication of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines on the treatment of glomerular diseases in 2012 marked a milestone in this field, as it is the first time that comprehensive guidelines are provided for such disease entities. The current review focuses on major findings, both pathogenesis related and clinical, in the primary glomerulonephritis that have been made after the guidelines came into effect. PMID:26877924

  1. Membranous glomerulonephritis and Landry-Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B F; Gonzales, M F; Ebeling, P; Fairley, K F; Kincaid-Smith, P

    1986-10-01

    Two cases of idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis associated with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (Landry-Guillian-Barre syndrome) are described. In both of the patients, the onset of the nephrotic syndrome coincided with the development of severe ascending sensorimotor neuropathy. Although this association has previously been reported in four other isolated cases, it is not generally recognized by nephrologists and may be of significance in the future understanding of the immunopathogenesis of both diseases.

  2. Plasmodium vivax malaria associated with acute post infectious glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, Kamal V; Vanikar, Aruna V; Kute, Vivek Balkrishna; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2013-08-01

    Malaria remains a major health problem in many parts of the world leading to high morbidity and mortality related to renal dysfunction and relapsing nature of Plasmodium vivax malaria. Acute renal failure occurs commonly in Plasmodium falciparum malaria, although its rare occurrences have been reported in P. vivax malaria also. We reported a rare case of P. vivax malaria monoinfection associated with acute post infectious glomerulonephritis.

  3. Primary glomerulonephritis: A review of important recent discoveries.

    PubMed

    Floege, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    The publication of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines on the treatment of glomerular diseases in 2012 marked a milestone in this field, as it is the first time that comprehensive guidelines are provided for such disease entities. The current review focuses on major findings, both pathogenesis related and clinical, in the primary glomerulonephritis that have been made after the guidelines came into effect.

  4. MRI in necrotizing fasciitis of the extremities.

    PubMed

    Ali, S Z; Srinivasan, S; Peh, W C G

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft-tissue infection of bacterial origin, which involves mainly the deep fascia. Early recognition of this condition may be hampered by the uncommon nature of the disease and non-specificity of initial clinical signs and symptoms in less fulminant cases, making the role of imaging important. MRI is the most useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The presence of thick (>3 mm) hyperintense signal in the deep fascia (particularly intermuscular fascia) on fat-suppressed T2 weighted or short tau inversion-recovery images is an important marker for necrotizing fasciitis. Contrast enhancement of the thickened necrotic fascia can be variable, with a mixed-pattern of enhancement being more commonly encountered. Involvement of multiple musculofascial compartments increases the likelihood of necrotizing fasciitis. It is important to remember that T2-hyperintense signal in the deep fascia is not specific to necrotizing fasciitis and can also be seen in cases such as non-infective inflammatory fasciitis or muscle tear. In this pictorial essay, we aim to review the MRI findings in necrotizing fasciitis, discuss its limitations and pitfalls and identify differentiating features from non-necrotizing soft-tissue infections, such as cellulitis and infective myositis/pyomyositis, conditions which may clinically mimic necrotizing fasciitis.

  5. MRI in necrotizing fasciitis of the extremities

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, S; Peh, W C G

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft-tissue infection of bacterial origin, which involves mainly the deep fascia. Early recognition of this condition may be hampered by the uncommon nature of the disease and non-specificity of initial clinical signs and symptoms in less fulminant cases, making the role of imaging important. MRI is the most useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The presence of thick (>3 mm) hyperintense signal in the deep fascia (particularly intermuscular fascia) on fat-suppressed T2 weighted or short tau inversion–recovery images is an important marker for necrotizing fasciitis. Contrast enhancement of the thickened necrotic fascia can be variable, with a mixed-pattern of enhancement being more commonly encountered. Involvement of multiple musculofascial compartments increases the likelihood of necrotizing fasciitis. It is important to remember that T2-hyperintense signal in the deep fascia is not specific to necrotizing fasciitis and can also be seen in cases such as non-infective inflammatory fasciitis or muscle tear. In this pictorial essay, we aim to review the MRI findings in necrotizing fasciitis, discuss its limitations and pitfalls and identify differentiating features from non-necrotizing soft-tissue infections, such as cellulitis and infective myositis/pyomyositis, conditions which may clinically mimic necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:24288403

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis: a surgical emergency.

    PubMed

    de Tullio, Damiano; Rossi, Camilla; Bolzon, Stefano; Scagliarini, Lucia; Occhionorelli, Savino

    2010-10-01

    Accurate assessment and timely interventions are critical in the treatment of patients affected with necrotizing fasciitis, a rare, fulminating, potentially life-threatening, infectious process of the soft tissues. Understanding the natural history and unique characteristics of this disease is crucial to achieve early recognition, effective management and a favorable patient outcome. Classic symptoms include severe pain, erythema, mottling, crepitus, skin anesthesia, warmth, tenderness, bullous formations and edema in the affected area and fever. This article aims at reviewing the information known about this disease, collected from various sources. Radical surgical debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics, negative pressure wound therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy are considered to be the cornerstones of treatment.

  7. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Victoria A; Mallipeddi, Mohan K; Perez, Alexander; Pappas, Theodore N

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications. PMID:27826206

  8. Human parvovirus B19-induced acute glomerulonephritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Homare; Higuchi, Takashi; Ogawa, Yujiro; Fujita, Shogo; Nagai, Miho; Imaizumi, Masahiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection is well known as a cause of erythema infectiosum in children. Acute glomerulonephritis due to HPVB19 infection is rarely observed in adults. Here, we present the case of a 45-year-old female who showed acute glomerulonephritis induced by HPVB19 infection with various autoantibodies. She had proteinuria (175 mg/g creatinine) and hematuria (20-29 erythrocytes per high-power field) in a urinalysis, and various autoantibodies such as antinuclear antibodies, proteinase-3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (PR3-ANCA), antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies, and anticardiolipin antibodies in a blood examination. A renal biopsy showed that endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis comprised of mononuclear cell infiltration. By using immunofluorescence microscopy, IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, and C1q deposits were detected mainly in glomerular capillaries. Electron-dense deposits were detected in the subendothelial area and mesangial area by using electron microscopy. All symptoms and abnormal laboratory data were self-improved. Our patient's case may provide a clue to the etiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis or lupus nephritis.

  9. Effectiveness of mycophenolate mofetil in C3 glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Rabasco, Cristina; Cavero, Teresa; Román, Elena; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Olea, Teresa; Espinosa, Mario; Cabello, Virginia; Fernández-Juarez, Gema; González, Fayna; Ávila, Ana; Baltar, José María; Díaz, Montserrat; Alegre, Raquel; Elías, Sandra; Antón, Monserrat; Frutos, Miguel Angel; Pobes, Alfonso; Blasco, Miguel; Martín, Francisco; Bernis, Carmen; Macías, Manuel; Barroso, Sergio; de Lorenzo, Alberto; Ariceta, Gema; López-Mendoza, Manuel; Rivas, Begoña; López-Revuelta, Katia; Campistol, José María; Mendizábal, Santiago; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Praga, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis is a clinicopathologic entity defined by the presence of isolated or dominant deposits of C3 on immunofluorescence. To explore the effect of immunosuppression on C3 glomerulonephritis, we studied a series of 60 patients in whom a complete registry of treatments was available over a median follow-up of 47 months. Twenty patients had not received immunosuppressive treatments. In the remaining 40 patients, 22 had been treated with corticosteroids plus mycophenolate mofetil while 18 were treated with other immunosuppressive regimens (corticosteroids alone or corticosteroids plus cyclophosphamide). The number of patients developing end-stage renal disease was significantly lower among treated compared with untreated patients (3 vs. 7 patients, respectively). No patient in the corticosteroids plus mycophenolate mofetil group doubled serum creatinine nor developed end-stage renal disease, as compared with 7 (significant) and 3 (not significant), respectively, in patients treated with other immunosuppressive regimens. Renal survival (100, 80, and 72% at 5 years) and the number of patients achieving clinical remission (86, 50, and 25%) were significantly higher in patients treated with corticosteroids plus mycophenolate mofetil as compared with patients treated with other immunosuppressive regimens and untreated patients, respectively. Thus, immunosuppressive treatments, particularly corticosteroids plus mycophenolate mofetil, can be beneficial in C3 glomerulonephritis.

  10. Urinary neopterin: an immune activation marker in mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuyuki; Shimizu, Masaki; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Ishikawa, Sayaka; Tasaki, Yuko; Inoue, Natsumi; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yachie, Akihiro

    2015-04-01

    To clarify in vivo neopterin expression within the human kidney and its clinical role as a biomarker for immune complex-mediated mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (mesPGN) in children. We examined neopterin expression within the kidneys of 14 patients with mesPGN and five patients with minimal changes. We also measured the serum and urinary neopterin levels in fourteen patients with mesPGN and sixteen age-matched healthy controls and correlated the histological findings and clinical features. Neopterin expression was observed within the distal tubular epithelial cells. It was induced within the glomerular endothelial cells and infiltrated CD68-positive macrophages in the glomeruli and interstitial areas. Furthermore, urinary neopterin levels were significantly elevated and positively correlated with histopathological findings and the degree of proteinuria. These findings indicate that increased urinary neopterin may reflect macrophage activation and active inflammation within the kidney in immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Neopterin may thus represent a useful biomarker of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in the clinical setting.

  11. Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in the Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Mejda; Hedri, Hafedh; Ounissi, Mondher; Gergah, Taher; Goucha, Rim; Barbouch, Samia; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2013-11-01

    Kidney disease is a rare complication in patients with the Down's syndrome. However, with increased survival, it appears that a growing number of these patients present with glomerulonephritis. Most cases have been reported as case reports and include lesions such as mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis with hypo-complementemia, crescentic glomerulonephritis with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), amyloidosis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy. We report the observation of a 38-year-old man with the Down's syndrome who presented with severe renal failure, proteinuria and microscopic hematuria evolving over two months. There was no history of congenital heart disease or urinary symptoms. Percutaneous renal biopsy revealed fibrous crescents, rupture of Bowman's capsule and peri-glomerular granuloma; there were no deposits on immunofluorescence study. Thoracic computerized tomography scan showed alveolar congestion. The patient tested negative for ANCA. At the time of reporting, the patient is on regular chronic hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a distinct entity that further expands the spectrum of renal disease known to occur in the Down's syndrome. Early detection of the renal disorders may prevent or slow down the progression.

  12. Molecular Mapping of the Goodpasture's Epitope for Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, W. Kline; Chen, Lanlin; Hellmark, Thomas; Fox, Jay; Wieslander, Jorgen

    2005-01-01

    Goodpasture's syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by pulmonary hemorrhage, glomerulonephritis, and antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies. We have studied a rat model with chimeric proteins (CPs) consisting of portions of the nephritogenic non-collagenous domain of α3 type IV collagen (α3(IV)NC1) and non-nephritogenic α1(IV)NC1. CPs with aminoterminal α3 that contains the major epitope for Goodpasture antibody binding induced EAG. We next immunized with D3, an α1(IV)NC1 CP with 69AA of α3(IV)NC1 (binds Goodpasture sera), D4, the D3 construct shortened by 4 AA (nonbinding), P9 and P10, single AA mutants (nonbinding) and S2, an α1(IV)NC1 with nine AA of α3(IV)NC1 (binding). GBM, S2 and D3 induced EAG. GBM immunized rats had intense IgG deposits but S2 and D3 rats had minimal deposits. A 13 mer rat peptide encompassing the aminoterminal site induced EAG sans antibody, while peptides not encompassing the region failed to induce GN. Asparagine at position 19 rather than isoleucine was essential for disease induction. These studies define critical limited AA sequences of α3(IV)NC1 associated with glomerulonephritis without antibody, and demonstrate that this region contains a T-cell epitope responsible for induction of glomerulonephritis. PMID:16555617

  13. Pyoderma Gangrenosum Simulating Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Erik Friedrich Alex; da Silva, Guilherme Almeida Rosa; dos Santos, Gustavo Randow; Motta, Heloisa Loureiro de Sá Neves; Cardoso, Pedro Afonso Nogueira Moisés; de Azevedo, Marcelo Costa Velho Mendes; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Motta, Rogerio Neves; Silva, Walter de Araujo Eyer; Ferry, Fernando Raphael de Almeida; Pinto, Jorge Francisco da Cunha

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum received this name due to the notion that this disease was related to infections caused by bacteria in the genus Streptococcus. In contrast to this initial assumption, today the disease is thought to have an autoimmune origin. Necrotizing fasciitis was first mentioned around the fifth century AD, being referred to as a complication of erysipelas. It is a disease characterized by severe, rapidly progressing soft tissue infection, which causes necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and the fascia. On the third day of hospitalization after antecubital venipuncture, a 59-year-old woman presented an erythematous and painful pustular lesion that quickly evolved into extensive ulceration circumvented by an erythematous halo and accompanied by toxemia. One of the proposed etiologies was necrotizing fasciitis. The microbiological results were all negative, while the histopathological analysis showed epidermal necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of dermal neutrophils. Pyoderma gangrenosum was considered as a diagnosis. After 30 days, the patient was discharged with oral prednisone (60 mg/day), and the patient had complete healing of the initial injury in less than two months. This case was an unexpected event in the course of the hospitalization which was diagnosed as pyoderma gangrenosum associated with myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:26783395

  14. Aggressive necrotizing pseudomonal sinonasal infections.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Tajudeen, Bobby A; Welch, Kevin C; Chandra, Rakesh K; Glasgow, Ben J; Suh, Jeffrey D

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium frequently implicated in recalcitrant sinonasal infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. We report 6 cases of rapidly progressive pseudomonal acute rhinosinusitis producing tissue necrosis and, in certain cases, cranial nerve palsies. Retrospective review of 6 patients with aggressive necrotizing sinonasal infections treated at 4 tertiary academic medical centers with sinonasal cultures growing P. aeruginosa in the absence of other pathology. A total of 6 patients were identified. In all cases, there was tissue necrosis that appeared to mimic an invasive process such as mucormycosis, prompting urgent surgical intervention. Pathologic analysis revealed fibropurulent exudates in backgrounds of positive P. aeruginosa cultures without evidence of invasive fungal organisms or malignancy. Four of the 6 patients presented with cranial nerve palsies, with 3 patients having vision changes and 3 complaining of trigeminal neuropathy. Four of 6 patients improved clinically over time after surgery and antibiotic therapy; 1 remains in follow-up without complete improvement and 1 has succumbed to other causes. P. aeruginosa is a tenacious organism that is frequently associated with severe, recalcitrant sinonasal infections. We report the first case series of necrotizing sinonasal infections caused by this organism, and illustrate that, in rare cases, P. aeruginosa may mimic and behave like life-threatening conditions such as fulminant invasive fungal sinusitis or malignancy. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  15. Contralateral recurrence of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate after five months: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia usually heals within 4 to 10 weeks with conservative treatment, and rarely recurs. When necrotizing sialometaplasia is present on the hard palate it may occur unilaterally or bilaterally. In this case, necrotizing ulceration occurred on the left hard palate of a 36-year-old woman after root canal treatment of the upper left first premolar under local anesthesia. After only saline irrigation the defect of the lesion completely healed and filled with soft tissue. After 5 months, however, a similar focal necrosis was found on the contralateral hard palate without any dental treatment having been performed on that side and progressed in similar fashion as the former lesion. We conducted an incisional biopsy and obtained a final pathological diagnosis for the palatal mass of necrotizing sialometaplasia. At the 3-year follow-up, the patient's oral mucosa of the hard palate was normal, without any signs and symptoms of the condition. We report a case of a second occurrence of necrotizing sialometaplasia on the contralateral side from the first, with a time lapse between the first and second occurrence. PMID:26734562

  16. Contralateral recurrence of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate after five months: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chan-Woo; Youn, Taegyun; Kim, Hyun Sil; Park, Kwang-Ho; Huh, Jong-Ki

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia usually heals within 4 to 10 weeks with conservative treatment, and rarely recurs. When necrotizing sialometaplasia is present on the hard palate it may occur unilaterally or bilaterally. In this case, necrotizing ulceration occurred on the left hard palate of a 36-year-old woman after root canal treatment of the upper left first premolar under local anesthesia. After only saline irrigation the defect of the lesion completely healed and filled with soft tissue. After 5 months, however, a similar focal necrosis was found on the contralateral hard palate without any dental treatment having been performed on that side and progressed in similar fashion as the former lesion. We conducted an incisional biopsy and obtained a final pathological diagnosis for the palatal mass of necrotizing sialometaplasia. At the 3-year follow-up, the patient's oral mucosa of the hard palate was normal, without any signs and symptoms of the condition. We report a case of a second occurrence of necrotizing sialometaplasia on the contralateral side from the first, with a time lapse between the first and second occurrence.

  17. [Analysis of the treatment with traditional Chinese medicine in chronic glomerulonephritis based on histopathologic type].

    PubMed

    Hu, Z Y; Chen, Y P; Zha, P

    1992-08-01

    The histopathologic type of 189 cases of chronic glomerulonephritis (GN) were confirmed by renal biopsies, they were subdivided into 3 groups. 77 patients of Western medicine (WM) group was treated by conventional WM (prednison or CTX), and after treatment the total effective rate was 55.8%. The TCM-WM group was treated by the same WM plus treatment according to Syndrome Differentiation with Chinese medicinal herbs, and the total effective rate was 86% in 50 patients. The TCM group was treated by Chinese medicinal herbs, and the total effective rate was 67.3% in 62 cases. There was very significant difference (P < 0.01) between the WM and the TCM-WM group. Among the patients of TCM-WM and TCM groups, 67% of 112 cases were manifested as Dampness-Heat Syndrome, so it suggested that one of the important method for GN treatment is clearing away Dampness-Heat. The effects of TCM-WM group is much better than the WM group in treating mesangio-proliferative GN and membranous GN. It was difficult for WM in treating IgA nephropathy, membrano-proliferative GN and focal glomerulosclerosis, but Chinese medicinal herbs were effective with replenishing Qi and strengthening the Spleen, clearing away Dampness-Heat, promoting blood circulation and relieving Stasis, etc.

  18. [Dense deposit nephropathy: a peculiar variant of glomerulonephritis or a distinct disease entity (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rossmann, P; Matousovic, K; Bucek, J

    1975-01-01

    In four renal biopsies of two patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), the so-called dense deposit nephropathy (NDD) was diagnosed by means of light, electron, and immunofluorescence microscopy. In routine paraffin sections the picture approached that of the membrano-proliferative GN. In semithin sections (toluidine blue, periodic acid-Ag-methenamine) and especially in the ultrastructure there appeared extensive confluent deposits of a very dense substance, infiltrating the lamina densa of glomerular capillaries, basal membranes of both Bowman's capsules and tubules, and arteriolar walls. In this localization, a non-diffuse "psdudolinear" deposition of beta1c was detected, whereas antisera to main Ig-fractions and fibrin(ogen) were not fixed. In a biopsy performed six years later, a concentration of dense depositis towards the mesangial area and a partial regeneration of basal membranes were observed. In a part of dense deposits there appeared vacuolization, primarily in tubular and arteriolar basal membranes. In glomeruli, focal IgM deposits were apparent at an advanced stage. NDD apparently is a sequel of a particular metabolic (immune?) process, afflicting solely the renal membranous system and distinctly dns known at present. The noncharacteristic clinical presentation resembles chronic. GN, is very protracted, lengthy, and relatively benigh, with a chance of functional and possible even morphological remission.

  19. Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis in murine malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi AS, infected NC mice.

    PubMed

    Yashima, Akihito; Mizuno, Masashi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Shimada, Koki; Suzuki, Norihiko; Tawada, Hideo; Sato, Waichi; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Matsuo, Seiichi; Ohno, Tamio

    2017-08-01

    Malaria is an important tropical disease and has remained a serious health problem in many countries. One of the critical complications of malarial infection is renal injury, such as acute renal failure and chronic glomerulopathy. Few animal models of nephropathy related to malarial infection have been reported. Therefore, we developed and investigated a novel malarial nephropathy model in mice infected by murine malaria parasites. NC mice and C57BL/6J mice were infected with Ttwo different murine malaria parasites, Plasmodium (P.) chabaudi AS and P. yoelii 17X. After the infection, renal pathology and blood and urinary biochemistry were analyzed. NC mice infected by the murine malaria parasite P. chabaudi AS, but not P. yoelii 17X, developed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with endothelial damage, and decreased serum albumin concentration and increased proteinuria. These pathological changes were accompanied by deposition of immunoglobulin G and complement component 3, mainly in the mesangium until day 4 and in the mesangium and glomerular capillaries from day 8. On day 21, renal pathology developed to focal segmental sclerosis according to light microscopy. In C57BL/6J mice, renal injuries were not observed from either parasite infection. The clinical and pathological features of P. chabaudi AS infection in NC mice might be similar to quartan malarial nephropathy resulting from human malaria parasite P. malariae infection. The NC mouse model might therefore be useful in analyzing the underlying mechanisms and developing therapeutic approaches to malaria-related nephropathy.

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis in a pediatric orthopedic population.

    PubMed

    Tancevski, Aleksandar; Bono, Kenneth; Willis, Leisel; Klingele, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have analyzed necrotizing fasciitis in children, and all have relied on cases of necrotizing fasciitis in the abdomen, head, and neck region. The authors sought to correlate the preoperative values of several laboratory tests previously validated in the adult literature, such as the Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis, with surgically confirmed necrotizing fasciitis in children to provide clinical guidance for the preoperative laboratory workup of necrotizing fasciitis. A retrospective chart review was performed on consecutive patients younger than 18 years with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. A total of 13 patients with an average age of 7.9 years (range, 9 months-16 years) were included. Ten (76.9%) infections were found in the lower extremity and 3 (23.1%) in the upper extremity. Seven (53.8%) patients had ecchymosis on examination. All patients presented with an elevated white blood cell count. No amputations were performed, and no mortality occurred. All patients underwent surgery within 24 hours of presentation. Elevated temperature, white blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein values are typically seen in pediatric patients with necrotizing fasciitis; however, no correlation existed between other the preoperative laboratory values with the previously described scoring systems, such as the Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis. Aggressive monitoring of signs and symptoms is suggested, even if a patient does not meet all conventional diagnostic criteria. The authors recommend prompt surgical debridement and early administration of antibiotics, which should include clindamycin.

  1. Left ventricular outflow obstruction and necrotizing enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, H.A.; Haney, P.J.

    1984-02-01

    Two neonates had unusually rapid development of necrotizing enterocolitis within 24 hours of birth. Both patients had decreased systemic perfusion secondary to aortic atresia. Onset of either clinical or radiographic manifestations of necrotizing enterocolitis in the first day of life should alert one to the possible presence of severe left ventricular outflow obstruction.

  2. [Therapeutic attitude in acute necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Leşe, Mihaela; Pop, C; Naghi, Ildiko; Mureşan, Lavinia

    2002-01-01

    The necrosectomy, celiostomy and pancreatic drainage represent the surgical treatment of choice in necrotizing pancreatitis. We present the clinical observation of a patient 59 years old operated in surgical service of Baia Mare for acute necrotizing pancreatitis, discussing the moment of operation, tips of operations, postoperative complications as well as our experience in acute grave pancreatitis treatment.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Study of 48 Cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurjit; Bharpoda, Pragnesh; Reddy, Raghuveer

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis represents a group of highly lethal infections characterized by rapidly progressing inflammation and necrosis. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical profile, microbial flora, and predisposing risk factors in patients with necrotizing fasciitis. Lastly, we aimed to formulate a protocol for management of necrotizing fasciitis. Forty-eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis patients who reported to our hospital between April 2007 and September 2009 were included in the study. The commonest predisposing factors were age greater than 50 years (58 % cases) and diabetes mellitus (52 % cases). The commonest site involved was extremity (70.8 %). Majority of infections were polymicrobial (87.5 %). Repeated aggressive debridement was the commonest surgical procedure performed. Early and aggressive surgical debridement, often in multiple sittings, supplemented by appropriate antibiotics and supportive therapy, forms the key to a successful outcome in necrotizing fasciitis.

  4. Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suma; Li, Yuebing

    2015-04-15

    Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is a recently characterized entity belonging to the spectrum of statin myotoxicity. It is a more severe form, and is usually associated with significant proximal muscle weakness, strikingly elevated creatine kinase levels and persistent symptoms despite statin discontinuation. The characteristic pathological finding is a marked muscle fiber necrosis with minimal or no inflammation on muscle biopsy. SINAM is an autoimmune disorder associated with an antibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and the antibody titer is a useful marker for assessing treatment response. However, anti-HMGCR positive myopathies are also caused by unknown etiologies other than statin exposure, especially in the younger population. SINAM should be promptly recognized as immunosuppressive therapy can improve its clinical outcome significantly. Further research is needed to elucidate its pathogenesis and provide evidence based guidelines for management.

  5. Surgical therapy for necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, R R

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-one infants were treated surgically for necrotizing enterocolitis utilizing a uniform protocol from July 1980 through July 1983. The indications for surgery were pneumoperitoneum or a paracentesis indicative of bowel infarction. Segmental intestinal resection and exteriorization of the bowel ends through the upper abdominal transverse incision was the usual procedure. Intestinal continuity was reestablished when the patient reached 10 pounds, or sooner if he was failing to thrive with his ileostomy. The overall survival was 72.5%, and it was 82% for those patients have a definitive surgical procedure. This survival rate was not adversely affected by the patient's weight or age at the time of operation, nor by the presence of bowel perforation. The 37 survivors endured multiple postoperative complications. The most significant long-term sequela was short-gut syndrome, which occurred in 11% of survivors. PMID:6486914

  6. Experimental autoimmune anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis: a protective role for IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Kitching, A Richard; Turner, Amanda L; Semple, Timothy; Li, Ming; Edgtton, Kristy L; Wilson, Gabrielle R; Timoshanko, Jennifer R; Hudson, Billy G; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2004-07-01

    IL-12 and IFN-gamma play key roles in murine lupus and planted antigen models of glomerulonephritis. However, their roles in renal organ-specific autoimmunity are unknown. To establish the roles of endogenous IFN-gamma and IL-12 in experimental autoimmune anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis (EAG), EAG was induced in normal C57BL/6 mice (WT), IL-12p40-deficient (IL-12p40-/-) mice, and IFN-gamma-deficient (IFN-gamma-/-) mice by immunization with alpha3-alpha5(IV)NC1 heterodimers. At 13 wk, WT mice developed EAG with linear mouse anti-GBM antibody deposition, histologic injury, proteinuria, and mild tubulointerstitial disease. Compared with WT mice, IL-12p40-/- mice had decreased histologic injury and trends to decreased leukocyte infiltrates. In contrast, 40% (4 of 10) of IFN-gamma-/- mice developed significant crescent formation and focal or diffuse interstitial infiltrates (WT, 0 of 8). Compared with WT and/or IL-12p40-/- mice, IFN-gamma-/- mice developed increased injury: histologic injury, total glomerular cell numbers, leukocytes in glomeruli, and renal expression of P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. All groups developed similar serum anti-alpha3-alpha5(IV)NC1 antibodies and glomerular Ig deposition, but IFN-gamma-/- mice had decreased anti-alpha3-alpha5(IV)NC1 IgG2a. Therefore, IFN-gamma-/- mice developed increased cellular reactants despite a potentially less damaging antibody response. Dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity was increased in alpha3-alpha5(IV)NC1 immunized IFN-gamma-/- mice and was suppressed by recombinant murine IFN-gamma. CD4+ cells from draining nodes of immunized IFN-gamma-/- mice showed increased proportions of proliferating CD4+ cells but similar numbers of apoptotic cells. These studies demonstrate that in renal organ-specific autoimmunity, IL-12 is pathogenetic but IFN-gamma is protective. They lend weight to the hypothesis that depending on the context/severity of the nephritogenic immune response

  7. Be alert to tuberculosis-mediated glomerulonephritis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Yuan, Q; Feng, J; Yao, L; Fan, Q; Ma, J; Wang, L

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection causing glomerulonephritis is a rare disorder. This retrospective study analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis-mediated glomerulonephritis (TB-GN) between 2002 and 2009, as well as the diagnostic tools used. These findings were then compared with those of patients with primary glomerulonephritis (P-GN). The records of all patients were reviewed. The diagnosis of TB-GN was based on renal hematuria and/or proteinuria and cure after antituberculosis therapy alone plus urine culture positive for M. tuberculosis, demonstration of typical tubercle granulomas on renal biopsy specimens, or the detection of M. tuberculosis DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on renal specimens. Forty-six patients with TB-GN and 49 patients with P-GN were included. Compared with patients in the P-GN group, most (76%) patients with TB-GN had a history of TB. Systemic symptoms were much more frequent in patients with TB-GN than local genitourinary symptoms. Serological testing showed a statistical difference between the two groups. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy was found in the majority (72%) of patients with TB-GN. M. tuberculosis DNA detection was positive in 39 (84.8%) patients, a much higher positive rate of diagnosis than that with urine culture for M. tuberculosis. The manifestation of TB-GN is atypical and nonspecific. It warrants a high index of suspicion when patients with renal hematuria and proteinuria fail to respond to standard treatments for P-GN. Clinicians should pay close attention to the medical history and results of special laboratory tests. M. tuberculosis DNA detection on renal biopsy specimens should be considered in order to confirm the diagnosis of TB-GN.

  8. Infantile immunoglobulin A nephropathy showing features of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Akira; Oka, Noriko; Hamaguchi, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Joh, Kensuke

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) showing predominant IgA and complement 3 (C3) deposition on the mesangium is an immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. This renal disease is the most common primary glomerular disease worldwide. However, infantile onset of IgAN is rare. In the present patient, urinary protein and occult blood were detected in a girl aged 1 year and 8 months on urinalysis at a nursery school. Despite being young, a kidney biopsy was performed for diagnosis and the correct choice of therapy. Glomerular mesangial cell proliferation and a double contour of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) resembling a railroad track were noted on light microscopy. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed morphologically with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), because mesangial hypercellularity and thickening of the GBM were identified. However, on immunofluorescent staining, the deposition of immune complexes mainly consisting of IgA, IgG, and C3 was noted in the mesangial region and glomerular capillary loops. On electron microscopy, electron-dense deposits were recognized in the subendothelial and paramesangial regions associated with mesangial cell interposition into the subendothelial space. Autoimmune diseases and infection-associated secondary glomerulonephritis were clinically excluded, because there were no relevant signs or symptoms. Steroid treatment was initiated and findings of urinalysis were normalized within 8 months. This patient was finally diagnosed with IgA nephropathy showing the features of MPGN. The present patient was the youngest among reported cases of IgA nephropathy, suggesting that early onset of IgAN is associated with an MPGN-like lesion. The present report provides information for pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

  9. Necrotizing pancreatitis: diagnosis, imaging, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Jeffrey Y; Sainani, Nisha I; Sahni, V Anik; Chick, Jeffrey F; Chauhan, Nikunj R; Conwell, Darwin L; Clancy, Thomas E; Banks, Peter A; Silverman, Stuart G

    2014-01-01

    Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a severe form of acute pancreatitis characterized by necrosis in and around the pancreas and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Although acute interstitial edematous pancreatitis is diagnosed primarily on the basis of signs, symptoms, and laboratory test findings, the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis are based in large part on imaging findings. On the basis of the revised Atlanta classification system of 2012, necrotizing pancreatitis is subdivided anatomically into parenchymal, peripancreatic, and combined subtypes, and temporally into clinical early (within 1 week of onset) and late (>1 week after onset) phases. Associated collections are categorized as "acute necrotic" or "walled off" and can be sterile or infected. Imaging, primarily computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, plays an essential role in the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis and the identification of complications, including infection, bowel and biliary obstruction, hemorrhage, pseudoaneurysm formation, and venous thrombosis. Imaging is also used to help triage patients and guide both temporizing and definitive management. A "step-up" method for the management of necrotizing pancreatitis that makes use of imaging-guided percutaneous catheter drainage of fluid collections prior to endoscopic or surgical necrosectomy has been shown to improve clinical outcomes. The authors present an algorithmic approach to the care of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and review the use of imaging and interventional techniques in the diagnosis and management of this pathologic condition.

  10. [Antioxidant effect of wobenzym applied for patients with chronic glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Mukhin, I V

    2007-01-01

    There is formation of free radicals in mesangial cells in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis which increases destruction of renal tissue and enable autoimmune inflammation. The unbalance between activity of oxidizing and antioxidazing starts developing. It accelerates the progression of the disease. The article presents the assessment of influence of enzyme medication Wobenzym on main indices of oxidizing and antioxidazing systems. It was established the presence of antioxidant effect in Wobenzym medication. The use of this medication in combination with other drugs and without them enables restoration of the disturbed balance.

  11. [Activators and inhibitors of fibrinolysis in chronic glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Podorol'skaia, L V; Andreenko, G V; Poliantseva, L R; Bumblite, I D

    1996-01-01

    Functional activities of plasminogen activators (FPAA) and their inhibitors and plasminogen activators's (PA), antigen level were determined in 31 patients with chronic glomerulonephritis, 23 patients with amyloidosis and 15 healthy persons. High FPAA correlated with favourable prognosis of diseases, elevated PA antigen level and diminished alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 2-macroglobulin and antiactivator activities. There were decreased PA antigen level and increased inhibitor's activities in group with zero FPAA. Protein loaded functional probe demonstrated the presence of PA reserves in high FPAA patients and "pathological proteolysis" in zero FPAA patients. The last phenomenon was likely connected to nonspecific proteases differed from PA.

  12. Concomitant severe normocytic and normochromic anemia in poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Asano, Takeshi; Sudoh, Mariko; Watanabe, Makoto; Fujino, Osamu

    2009-10-01

    Although anemia frequently occurs in poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN), severe anemia is rare. We report severe normocytic, normochromic anemia (hematocrit, 19.8%) in PSAGN in a 6-year-old girl with edema, macrohematuria, and proteinuria for 1 month. The potential causes of severe anemia found in this case were: 1) longer duration of massive hematuria from onset of macrohemauria to treatment, 2) a level of erythropoietin much lower than that in cases of iron deficiency anemia, and 3) hemodilution. We speculate that these factors combined to cause an unusual case of severe anemia in PSAGN.

  13. Monoclonal gammopathy associated membranous glomerulonephritis: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Gowda, K K; Joshi, K; Ramachandran, R; Nada, R

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with nephrotic syndrome. Light microscopic analysis of the renal biopsy showed thickening of the glomerular capillary wall. Immunofluorescence examination revealed granular deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) G3-kappa and complement C3 along the glomerular basement membrane. Electron microscopy showed subepithelial electron dense deposits, thus confirming membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with monoclonal gammopathy. MGN with monoclonal gammopathy is an extremely rare but distinctive entity. This patient was treated with a combination of bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone and showed partial remission of his nephrotic state and dysproteinemia.

  14. Study of Proteins and Fibrinolysis in Patients with Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, E. N.; Menon, I. S.; Rastogi, S. P.

    1970-01-01

    Plasma and urine fibrinolysis were studied in 36 patients with glomerulonephritis and proteinuria. In 40% of these plasma fibrinolytic activator activity was moderately reduced and fibrinolytic inhibitors were increased. Globulins with antiplasmin effect were raised, particularly in the earlier months. Both the serum cholesterol and the plasma fibrinogen were related to the level of serum albumin, and those patients with high fibrinogen levels were also those with poor plasma fibrinolytic activator and those showing a steady deterioration. Urinary fibrinolysis was greatly reduced in most patients and bore no relation to plasma fibrinolysis levels. Hence urokinase is not derived from circulating plasminogen activator. PMID:4246192

  15. An approach to the child with acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Welch, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a common condition in childhood. Many children with AGN can be managed in the primary care setting. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of urinary findings, especially the presence of red blood cell casts. One of the most important initial investigations is determining the complement C3 level; hypocomplementemia is most characteristic of post streptococcal AGN, while normocomplementemia is most often seen with IgA nephropathy. Children whose AGN is accompanied by significant hypertension or renal insufficiency should be assessed by a specialist immediately. The presence of serious extrarenal signs or symptoms also merits urgent referral. Otherwise, serial followup in the primary care office is appropriate.

  16. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Togashi, Masaru; Sawada, Ken-Ichi; Wakui, Hideki

    2013-06-01

    A 25-year-old woman was admitted because of proteinuria. A renal biopsy showed mesangial/endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis with IgG2-κ deposits. Electron microscopy showed immune complex-type deposits. She also had Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia, anticardiolipin antibodies, and antinuclear antibodies. Middle-dose steroid therapy led to improvement of proteinuria and hemolytic anemia. Six years later, she developed crescentic glomerulonephritis with IgG2-κ deposits during pregnancy. Middle-dose steroid therapy improved renal dysfunction. This is an exceptional case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID), a recently described rare dysproteinemia-related glomerulonephritis, associated with autoimmune disease. This case also suggests that crescentic glomerulonephritis can be superimposed on PGNMID.

  17. Mortality associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Roberson, J B; Harper, J L; Jauch, E C

    1996-09-01

    Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection but still occurs and carries a mortality rate up to 60%. It is a polymicrobial infection that is characterized by diffuse necrosis of fascial planes and subcutaneous tissues. Diagnosing early stages of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in relationship to other soft tissue infections of odontogenic origin is difficult and leads to less aggressive treatment with resulting increased morbidity and mortality. To prevent this significant mortality and morbidity associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis early presentation, recognition and treatment by health care provider is essential.

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus presented as non-inflammatory necrotizing vasculopathy-induced ischemic glomerulopathy and small vessels-related ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sung, J M; Hsu, S C; Chen, F F; Huang, J J

    2002-01-01

    The clinical significance of lupus non-inflammatory necrotizing vasculopathy (NINV) is not well established. For example, since lupus renal NINV is usually reported to coexist with proliferative and active glomerulonephritis, it is difficult to demonstrate the role of NINV on renal pathophysiology. Here we report a 16-year-old SLE boy with renal NINV presenting as ischemic glomerulopathy and small vessels-related ischemic heart failure. The renal biopsy demonstrated mild proliferative glomerulonephritis and NINV initially, and one month later repeated renal biopsy showed NINV with ischemic glomerulopathy. These findings established that NINV, but not proliferative glomerulonephritis, was responsive for his acute renal failure (ARF). Another interesting question is about the pathophysiology of his myocardial dysfunction. This patient presented typical angina and congestive heart failure (CHF). Echocardiograms and ventriculography revealed dilatation of four chambers and low ejection fraction. Serial electrocardiograms demonstrated evolutionary ischemic changes. Coronary angiography revealed no abnormality of large vessels. These findings suggested small vascular lesions-induced myocardial ischemia was the underlying mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy. As myocardial biopsy was not done in our case, we could only speculate, but not prove, that the NINV observed in renal biopsy may also involve in cardiac microvascular beds. Nevertheless, this interesting case emphasized the role of obliterative small vascular lesions in the pathophysiology of ARF and myocardial dysfunction. The patient was treated with high-dose corticosteroid, plasma infusion and hemodialysis. His cardiac function improved gradually, however the renal function did not recover.

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis: a case report of a premature infant with necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Casey, Denise M; Stebbins, Karen; Howland, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a severe infection involving the superficial fascia, subcutaneous tissue, and, occasionally, deeper tissue layers. Usual treatment is with surgical debridement in combination with antibiotics. In review of the literature there is one neonatal report of NF associated with necrotizing enterocolitis. We present a case report of a 25 week gestation infant with necrotizing fasciitis and the complexity of wound and pain management presented for the nursing staff in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  20. Nephrotoxic nephritis and glomerulonephritis: animal model versus human disease.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, S

    2014-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) encompasses a range of immune-mediated disorders that cause inflammation within the glomerulus of the kidney. The pathogenesis of GN is complex. Intricacy arises from factors such as autoimmunity, cancer and structural abnormalities within the kidney. Studies using animal models have highlighted crucial interaction between inflammatory cells and cells intrinsic to the kidney, both of which are fundamental to the pathogenesis of GN. This review aims to provide insight on a 'suitable' model for nephrotoxic nephritis and glomerulonephritis (NTN GN) and relate its experimental validity to humans. The BALB/c NTN murine model and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat have held experimental validity in the study of GN in humans. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 also mediates renal T-cell recruitment and subsequent tissue injury in NTN. It is noteworthy to consider CXCR3 blockade in Th1-mediated renal inflammation as future therapeutic options for patients with GN and subsets thereof. Currently used immunosuppressive therapies for GN are not always uniformly effective and are frequently associated with serious side-effects. Corticosteroids are effective in several types of GN owing to their ability to inhibit the pro-inflammatory effects of cytokines known to promote glomerular inflammation. Differences between experimental and human GN complicate translation of experimental therapies into practice. More research is required to translate animal model research into a better comprehension of human GN disease. However, the complexity of GN research makes findings a challenge to replicate.

  1. Familial C4B Deficiency and Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, K; Wu, YL; Ortiz, A; Aparício, SR; Yu, CY

    2010-01-01

    Homozygous complement C4B deficiency is described in a Southern European young female patient with Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type III characterized by renal biopsies with strong complement C4 and IgG deposits. Low C4 levels were independent of clinical evolution or type of immunosuppression and were found in three other family members without renal disease or infections. HLA typing revealed that the patient has homozygous A*02, Cw*06, B*50 at the class I region, and DRB1*08 and DQB1*03 at the class II region. Genotypic and phenotypic studies demonstrated that the patient has homozygous monomodular RCCX in the HLA class III region, with single long C4A genes coding for C4A3 and complete C4B deficiency. Her father, mother, son and niece have heterozygous C4B deficiency. The patient’s deceased brother had a history of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP), an immune complex-mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. These findings challenge the putative pathophysiological roles of C4A and C4B and underscore the need to perform functional assays, C4 allotyping and genotyping on patients with persistently low serum levels of a classical pathway complement component and glomerulopathy associated with immune deposits. PMID:20580617

  2. Familial C4B deficiency and immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Soto, K; Wu, Y L; Ortiz, A; Aparício, S R; Yu, C Y

    2010-10-01

    Homozygous complement C4B deficiency is described in a Southern European young female patient with Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type III characterized by renal biopsies with strong complement C4 and IgG deposits. Low C4 levels were independent of clinical evolution or type of immunosuppression and were found in three other family members without renal disease or infections. HLA typing revealed that the patient has homozygous A*02, Cw*06, B*50 at the class I region, and DRB1*08 and DQB1*03 at the class II region. Genotypic and phenotypic studies demonstrated that the patient has homozygous monomodular RCCX in the HLA class III region, with single long C4A genes coding for C4A3 and complete C4B deficiency. Her father, mother, son and niece have heterozygous C4B deficiency. The patient's deceased brother had a history of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP), an immune complex-mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. These findings challenge the putative pathophysiological roles of C4A and C4B and underscore the need to perform functional assays, C4 allotyping and genotyping on patients with persistently low serum levels of a classical pathway complement component and glomerulopathy associated with immune deposits. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Mary; Robin, Adam; Lorna, Campbell; Rosenthal, Ann K.

    2016-01-01

    Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis is commonly seen in ANCA-associated vasculitis but it is rarely seen during the course of other connective tissue diseases like lupus or Sjogren's syndrome or MCTD. We report 3 cases of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in patients with connective tissue disease other than vasculitis. We reviewed literature and made summary of previously reported cases of this rare entity. Clinical and laboratory features of these patients varied widely, but most of patients have met criteria for lupus. In this small population of patients there is no correlation with ANCAs. Most of the patients were treated with aggressive immunosuppression and did well if they were treated early in the course of their disease. One of our patients required renal transplant, but she presented late in the course of her disease, as evidenced by chronicity on her renal biopsy. Whether these patients are overlap of vasculitis and other connective tissue diseases or to be considered as a separate entity is yet to be described. Clinicians must be aware of these presentations because initial presentation can be severe. PMID:27504208

  4. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis with pulmonary edema presenting as respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Yung; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Wong, Kin-Sun; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Lin, Chi-Jen; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2004-11-01

    Acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis(PSGN) is characterized by an abrupt onset of edema,hypertension, and hematuria. Although the association of pulmonary edema with acute glomerulonephritis has been established, it is uncommon for children with PSGN to present with respiratory distress due to pulmonary edema. We encountered six such patients, aged 6-10 years, during a 10-month period. The demographic data, clinical manifestations, laboratory data, radiographic pictures, and clinical courses were collected. All patients presented to the primary pediatricians with dyspnea and alveolar infiltrates with bilateral pleural effusions on plain chest radiographs that were misinterpreted as pneumonia initially. The diagnosis of PSGN was de-layed until the awareness of the presence of pulmonary edema complicating PSGN. Subsequent urinalysis and blood pressure measurement all showed microscopic hematuria and hypertension. Elevated serum antistreptolysin 0 titers and depressed serum complement C3 levels confirmed the diagnosis of PSGN. Two patients progressed to respiratory failure because of a delayed diagnosis of PSGN. All patients recovered without sequelae following appropriate diuresis and antihypertensive therapy. We conclude that in preschool and school-age children who present with dyspneic respirations and a chest radiograph showing radiographic features of pulmonary edema, proper evaluation including blood pressure recording and urinalysis should be performed immediately. Prompt diagnosis and early therapy of PSGNmay avoid mortality and unnecessary therapeutic intervention.

  5. Statin-associated necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Geórgea Hermogenes; Zanoteli, Edmar; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) is a severe adverse effect of statins. We report a 66-year-old Caucasian female who had progressive proximal muscle weakness after treatment with statins. Results of a muscle biopsy showed necrotizing myopathy with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrate and increased major histocompatibility class I antigen expression in muscle fibers. The clinical and laboratory parameters improved significantly with immunosuppressive treatment. Although it is a rare event, statin-induced NAM should be included as a differential diagnosis of myopathies.

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis--the hazards of delay.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, T S

    1995-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis was first described in a specific body region by Fournier in 1883 and as a more generalized condition by Meleney in 1924. The use of the term 'necrotizing fasciitis' can be attributed to Wilson in 1952. It is perceived as a rare condition, causing potentially devastating morbidity and frequent mortality. Prompt surgical management is generally accepted as the mainstay of treatment. This report illustrates the relationship between delay in definitive treatment and morbidity. Management options are also reviewed. PMID:7629767

  7. Bimaxillary Oral Focal Mucinosis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunil; Malik, Sunita; Mittal, Hitesh Chander; Singh, Gurdarshan; Kamra, Hemlata

    2016-10-01

    Oral focal mucinosis is considered as oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis. The preoperative diagnosis of mucinosis is almost impossible because of its rarity and clinical similarity to other lesions of various etiologies. The histological diagnosis of oral mucinosis is important to better understand the etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities, and any recurrence of the lesion besides differentiating from the other soft tissue lesions.The purpose of this paper is to report the first case of bimaxillary involvement with dome-shaped elevated, rounded, asymptomatic, normally colored swelling in left posterior palatal mucosa and left mandibular posterior region in a 25-year old woman who was diagnosed as oral focal mucinosis histopathologically.

  8. Necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in a child.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Xia, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Varicella is a self-limited disease, but sometimes it may be associated with some serious life-threatening complications.Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare complication of varicella. This is a case of a 7-year-old girl with septic shock caused by necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of varicella. Swelling and pain in the left inguinal region and left axillary region were found five days after varicella. Then a high fever occurred followed by hypotension. Fluid infusion, vasopressor and antibiotics were administered. Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from exudates from the wounds. The clinical symptoms markedly improved after surgical drainage and removal of the necrotic tissue. Both wounds were covered with skin grafts after healthy granulation tissue formed. Although there have been few reports of life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in western countries, it is rare in China. Usually patients with varicella were admitted to pediatric or infectious disease department but not surgical departments; so that the clinicians should be aware that varicella may be complicated by life-threatening surgical infections. Necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients of varicella who showed an increasing pain and swelling in any body areas associated with increasing fever and local erythema. Early identification, surgical drainage and debridement are essential for successful treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.

  9. Impact of posttransplantation glomerulonephritis on long-term outcome of kidney transplants: single-center 20-year experience.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tung-Min; Wen, Mei-Chin; Wu, Ming-Ju; Chen, Cheng-Hsu; Cheng, Chi-Hung; Li, Chi-Yuan; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung

    2012-12-01

    Successful renal transplantation has been performed in patients with end-stage renal disease and has been routine in patients with end-stage renal failure for more than two decades. Despite advances in the use of immunosuppressants, there has been only modest improvement in long-term allograft survival. Accumulating data have demonstrated that chronic rejection and recurrent glomerulonephritis are major causes of long-term allograft loss. However, data regarding the long-term impact of posttransplantation glomerulonephritis (PTGN) on ethnic Chinese populations are still unavailable. From 1984 to 2010, a total of 268 patients who underwent renal allograft biopsies were reviewed retrospectively. Renal outcomes were compared by Kaplan-Meier analysis, and risk factors for renal survival and all-cause mortality were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. In all, 85 patients (31.7%) had PTGN, and the mean time of disease onset was 5.32±5.18 years after transplantation. Among the 85 PTGN cases, 33 (39%) were immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy, 24 (28%) were focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and 8 (9.4%) were membranous GN. Significant risk was associated with posttransplant IgA GN in hepatitis B virus carriers (odds ratio 5.371, 95% confidence interval 1.68, 17.19; p=0.0064). A total of 45 PTGN patients had allograft loss, of whom 49% had IgA nephropathy. Patients with PTGN had inferior allograft survival rates compared to those with other pathologic findings (p<0.0003). Taken together, our results indicate that PTGN had a strong negative impact on long-term kidney graft survival. Posttransplant IgA nephropathy is a leading cause of allograft loss in Chinese kidney transplant patients with PTGN.

  10. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called the glomerulus. The glomeruli serve as filters that help the body get rid of harmful substances. Each kidney has thousands of glomeruli. "Focal" means that some of the glomeruli become scarred. Others ...

  11. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  12. A Case of Concurrent MPO-/PR3-Negative ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis and Membranous Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Yasuyuki; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Takahashi, Yasuto; Yoshida, Hiraku; Hara, Yoriko; Okonogi, Hideo; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Arimura, Yoshihiro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case in which antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody- (ANCA-) associated glomerulonephritis and membranous glomerulopathy (MGN) were detected concurrently. The patient showed rapidly progressive renal deterioration. A renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis, together with marked thickening and spike and bubbling formations in the glomerular basement membranes. Indirect immunofluorescence examination of the patient's neutrophils showed a perinuclear pattern. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that the ANCA in this case did not target myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) but bactericidal-/permeability-increasing protein, elastase, and lysosome. The relationship between these two etiologically distinct entities, MPO-/PR3-negative ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis and MGN, remains unclear. PMID:25648906

  13. Treatment of nephrotic syndrome associated with idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Maduell, F; Sánchez-Alcaraz, A; Sigüenza, F; Caridad, A; Sangrador, G

    1993-02-01

    Recent reports suggest that cyclosporin A is beneficial in inducing remission of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. Nephrotic syndrome is seen in 10-30% of patients with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. We report a case of a 69-year-old man with nephrotic syndrome, associated with idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, who was treated initially with corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide. Three months later he developed thrombophlebitis and leucopenia and cyclophosphamide was suspended. Relapse of nephrotic syndrome associated with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis developed and therapy with cyclosporin A was used with a good response.

  14. Formation of tight junctions between neighboring podocytes is an early ultrastructural feature in experimental crescentic glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Succar, Lena; Boadle, Ross A; Harris, David C; Rangan, Gopala K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In crescentic glomerulonephritis (CGN), the development of cellular bridges between podocytes and parietal epithelial cells (PECs) triggers glomerular crescent formation. However, the sequential changes in glomerular ultrastructure in CGN are not well defined. This study investigated the time course of glomerular ultrastructure in experimental CGN. Methods Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed using kidney samples from rats with nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NSN) from day 1 to day 14. Morphometric analysis was conducted on randomly selected glomeruli captured on TEM digital images. Results On day 1 of NSN, there was widespread formation of focal contacts between the cell bodies of neighboring podocytes, and tight junctions were evident at the site of cell-to-cell contact. This was confirmed by the increased expression of the tight junction molecule, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), which localized to the points of podocyte cell–cell body contact. On day 2, the interpodocyte distance decreased and the glomerular basement membrane thickness increased. Foot process effacement (FPE) was segmental on day 3 and diffuse by day 5, accompanied by the formation of podocyte cellular bridges with Bowman’s capsule, as confirmed by a decrease in podocyte-to-PEC distance. Fibrinoid necrosis and cellular crescents were evident in all glomeruli by days 7 and 14. In vitro, the exposure of podocytes to macrophage-conditioned media altered cellular morphology and caused an intracellular redistribution of ZO-1. Conclusion The formation of tight junctions between podocytes is an early ultrastructural abnormality in CGN, preceding FPE and podocyte bridge formation and occurring in response to inflammatory injury. Podocyte-to-podocyte tight junction formation may be a compensatory mechanism to maintain the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier following severe endocapillary injury. PMID:27920570

  15. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G deposits complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Anri; Kawanishi, Kunio; Horita, Shigeru; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Ochi, Ayami; Komoda, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Unagami, Kohei; Okumi, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy (IgAN) is a known autoimmune disease due to abnormal glycosylation of IgA1, and occasionally, IgG co-deposition occurs. The prognosis of IgG co-deposition with IgAN is adverse, as shown in the previous studies. However, in the clinical setting, monoclonality of IgG co-deposition with IgAN has not been observed. We describe a case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) combined with IgAN in a renal allograft. A-21-year-old man developed end-stage renal failure with unknown aetiology and underwent living-donor kidney transplantation from his mother 2 years after being diagnosed. One year after kidney transplantation, proteinuria 2+ and haematuria 2+ were detected; allograft biopsy revealed mesangial IgA and C3 deposits, indicating a diagnosis of IgAN. After tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy, proteinuria and haematuria resolved. However, 4 years after transplantation, pedal oedema, proteinuria (6.89 g/day) and allograft dysfunction (serum creatinine (sCr) 203.3 µmol/L) appeared. A second allograft biopsy showed mesangial expansion and focal segmental proliferative endocapillary lesions with IgA1λ and monoclonal IgG1κ depositions. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a massive amount of deposits, located in the mesangial and subendothelial lesions. A diagnosis of PGNMID complicated with IgAN was made, and rituximab and plasmapheresis were added to steroid pulse therapy. With this treatment, proteinuria was alleviated to 0.5 g/day, and the allograft dysfunction recovered to sCr 132.6 µmol/L. This case suggests a necessity for investigation of PGNMID and IgA nephropathy in renal allografts to detect monoclonal Ig deposition disease.

  16. Circulating suPAR as a biomarker of disease severity in children with proteinuric glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Soltysiak, Jolanta; Zachwieja, Jacek; Benedyk, Anna; Lewandowska-Stachowiak, Maria; Nowicki, Michal; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta

    2016-04-12

    The increase of circulating urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was demonstrated in various diseases showing its prognostic value as well as the link to the inflammatory reaction. In glomerular diseases suPAR was consider to be a causative factor of proteinuria. In present study we aimed to evaluate serum concentration of suPAR in children with primary and secondary glomerulonephritis (GN) and its association with disease severity. The study involved 22 children with minimal change disease (MCD), 9 with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), 7 with Henoch-Schönlein nephritis (HSN), 7 with lupus nephritis (LN) and 16 controls. Serum suPAR was significantly higher in children with FSGS and LN than controls (respectively: 4.47±1.39 ng/mL vs. 3.23±0.76 ng/mL; p=0.011 and 6.17±1.12 ng/mL vs. 3.23±0.76 ng/mL; p<0.0001). Further, suPAR was increased in LN when compared to FSGS (p=0.031). In the total group suPAR showed negative correlation with eGFR, serum complement C3 and positive with left ventricular mass index. In children with MCD and FSGS the inverse association of suPAR with eGFR was also shown. In children with primary and secondary glomerulonphritis suPAR levels is not associated with proteinuria. In primary GN elevated suPAR levels may result from reduced eGFR reflecting renal damage. In LN, circulating suPAR can be increased further indicating both multi-organ involvement and systemic inflammation reflecting disease severity.

  17. Crescentic glomerulonephritis in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Kudo, Tomoo; Makino, Yoshinori; Mochizuki, Yasumasa; Takagi, Takayo; Une, Yumi

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in animals has only been reported in dog and sheep. We report the pathological features of CrGN in a 17-year-old male polar bear that died due to renal failure. Histologically, the lesions were characterized by fibrocellular crescents, adhesion between Bowman's capsule and the glomerular capillary tuft and an increase in the mesangial matrix in glomeruli. The proliferating cells in the crescent were partly immunopositive for cytokeratin and intensely positive for vimentin, WT-1 and α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting they originated from parietal epithelial cells. Ultrastructually, thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and loss of epithelial cell foot processes were observed with electron-dense deposits.

  18. Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in a Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus)

    PubMed Central

    BABA, Hiroshi; KUDO, Tomoo; MAKINO, Yoshinori; MOCHIZUKI, Yasumasa; TAKAGI, Takayo; UNE, Yumi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spontaneous crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in animals has only been reported in dog and sheep. We report the pathological features of CrGN in a 17-year-old male polar bear that died due to renal failure. Histologically, the lesions were characterized by fibrocellular crescents, adhesion between Bowman’s capsule and the glomerular capillary tuft and an increase in the mesangial matrix in glomeruli. The proliferating cells in the crescent were partly immunopositive for cytokeratin and intensely positive for vimentin, WT-1 and α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting they originated from parietal epithelial cells. Ultrastructually, thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and loss of epithelial cell foot processes were observed with electron-dense deposits. PMID:23856758

  19. [Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis: a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency].

    PubMed

    Halfon, Matthieu; Teta, Daniel; Rotman, Samuel; Pruijm, Menno; Humbert, Antoine

    2014-02-26

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPG) is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by kidney damage that can lead to irreversible kidney failure. RPG can be caused by primary glomerular disease or can be part of a systemic autoimmune disorder. All RPG have a similar pathophysiology (proliferation of cells in Bowman's capsule and formation of crescents) and clinical evolution (rapidly progressive kidney failure with proteinuria and an active urine sediment). Immunosuppressive therapy and sometimes plasma exchanges are required. Overall- and kidney survival are closely linked to the blood creatinine level at presentation, the percentage of damaged glomeruli, and to the underlying cause. RPG is therefore a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency that needs quick referral to a nephrologist.

  20. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Jin Uk; Bang, Ki Tae; Shin, Jong Ho; Yoo, Ji Hyung; Kim, Nak Min; Park, Jun Hyung; Kim, Joo Heon

    2015-01-01

    A 58-yr-old man presented with leg edema and subacute weakness of his bilateral lower extremities. Urinary and serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed the presence of lambda-type Bence Jones proteins. He was ultimately diagnosed with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). A renal biopsy specimen showed fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN), which was randomly arranged as 12–20 m nonbranching fibrils in the basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies were negative for immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgM, IgA, C3, and kappa light chains in the capillary walls and mesangial areas. A Congo red stain for amyloid was negative. Electromyography and nerve conduction velocity examinations results were compatible with the presence of demyelinating polyneuropathy. This case showed a rare combination of FGN, without Ig deposition, and MGUS combined with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). PMID:26484033

  1. White-blue pyelocalyceal cyst with hydrotic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai Kumar; Soni, Mayank; Ahmed, Murad; Naim, Mohammed

    2013-12-17

    A 5-month-old male infant presented with a 15 day history of distension of abdomen. On clinical examination, a soft lump was palpable in the left lumbar region. Radiological findings suggested an enlarged non-functional left kidney with ureteropelvic adhesive obstruction. The left renal mass was excised and submitted for histopathological examination. The excised renal mass was cystic with its wall partly white and partly blue. Gross and histopathological findings were diagnostic of a white-blue pyelocalyceal cyst with hydrotic glomerulonephritis. This entity needs to be differentiated from a large number of other cystic diseases of the kidney. Intrauterine screening and diagnosis may be significant for a possible early intrauterine uro-laparoscopic recanalisation of the pyeloureteral obstruction to save the affected kidney.

  2. Efficacy of school urinary screening for membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Y; Suzuki, J; Nozawa, R; Suzuki, H

    2002-01-01

    Aims: In order to evaluate the efficacy of a school urinary screening programme, children with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type 1 were studied. Methods: A total of 52 patients who had been diagnosed with MPGN type 1 from 1970 to 1997 were studied; 35 were identified after 1974 on screening (group S), and 17 were identified by presenting symptoms (group N), mostly before 1989. Results: Mean blood pressure was 89 mm Hg in group S and 104 mm Hg in group N; urinary protein excretion was 0.9 g/day in group S and 3.0 g/day in group N. Histopathological evidence of chronic changes was found in six group S and 15 group N patients. No patients in group S had renal insufficiency, but five patients in group N required regular haemodialysis. Conclusions: Results suggest that early identification by school urinary screening may enable early management and so improve prognosis of MPGN. PMID:11806875

  3. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis with hepatitis C viral infection and hypocomplementemia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Susan; Rouse, Kelly; Appis, Andrew; Novak, Robert; Haller, Nairmeen Awad

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN) is a relatively rare cause of renal disease, found in only 0.6-1.5% of native renal biopsies. The pathogenesis of FGN is not well described, and very few associations with disease processes other than hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been made. We describe a case that provides evidence in support of the FGN-HCV association, as well as introduces the association of FGN-HCV and hypocomplementemia. The case is a 53-year-old African-American female demonstrating a classical presentation of FGN complicated by a concomitant HCV infection. Treating an HCV infection with alpha-interferon has been shown to result in subsequent improvement in the nephrotic syndrome and renal function. However, this patient is unique in that she is complicated with hypocomplementemia, creating a complex treatment situation.

  4. Treatment of focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Batla, Amit; Stamelou, Maria; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2012-06-01

    Dystonia is characterized by repetitive twisting movements or abnormal postures due to involuntary muscle activity. When limited to a single body region it is called focal dystonia. Examples of focal dystonia include cervical dystonia (neck), blepharospasm (eyes), oromandibular dystonia, focal limb dystonia, and spasmodic dysphonia, which are discussed here. Once the diagnosis is established, the therapeutic plan is discussed with the patients. They are informed that there is no cure for dystonia and treatment is symptomatic. The main therapeutic option for treating focal dystonias is botulinum toxin (BoNT). There have been several attempts to characterize the procedure, the type of toxin, dosage, techniques, and combination with physical measures in each of the focal dystonia forms. The general treatment principles are similar. The affected muscles are injected at muscle sites based on evidence and experience using standard dosages based on the type of toxin used. The injections are repeated after 3 to 6 months based on the individual response duration. In the uncommon event of nonresponse with BoNT, the dose and site are reassessed. Oral drug treatment could be considered as an additional option. Once the condition is thought to be medically refractory, the opinion from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) team for the suitability of the patient for DBS is taken. The successful use of DBS in cervical dystonia has led to increased acceptance for trial in other forms of focal dystonias. DBS surgery in focal dystonias other than cervical is, however, still experimental. The patients may be offered the surgery with adequate explanation of the risks and benefits. Patient education and directing the patients towards dystonia support groups and relevant websites that provide scientific information may be useful for long-term compliance and benefit.

  5. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  6. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction.

    PubMed

    Arruda, José Alcides; Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections.

  7. Targeting Spleen Tyrosine Kinase-Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Axis for Immunologically Mediated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Shuen; Chang, Li-Chien; Huang, Shyh-Jer

    2014-01-01

    The importance of B-cell activation and immune complex-mediated Fc-receptor activation in the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated glomerulonephritis has long been recognized. The two nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), are primarily expressed by hematopoietic cells, and participate in B-cell-receptor- and Fc-receptor-mediated activation. Pharmacological inhibitors of Syk or Btk are undergoing preclinical development and clinical trials for several immune diseases; and Syk inhibitors have been shown to reduce disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis patients. However, the clinical therapeutic efficacies of these inhibitors in glomerulonephritis have not been evaluated. Herein, we review recent studies of Syk and Btk inhibitors in several experimental primary and secondary glomerulonephritis models. These inhibitors suppressed development of glomerular injury, and also ameliorated established kidney disease. Thus, targeting Syk and Btk signaling pathways is a potential therapeutic strategy for glomerulonephritis, and further evaluation is recommended. PMID:24795896

  8. An unusual case of Plasmodium vivax malaria monoinfection associated with crescentic glomerulonephritis: a need for vigilance.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohan P; Kute, Vivek B; Gumber, Manoj R; Gera, Dinesh N; Shah, Pankaj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Trivedi, Hargovind L; Vanikar, Aruna V

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax infection is increasingly a major public health burden and the second most frequent human malaria. Higher levels of clinical severity and chloroquine resistance are major factors responsible for such increases. Malarial glomerular injury is uncommon and mainly observed in Plasmodium malariae-infected patients. Occasionally, transient immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis is associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection. Coexistent crescentic glomerulonephritis and vivax malaria have not previously been reported. We report a fatal case of P. vivax malaria, who presented with acute renal failure. P. vivax monoinfection status was diagnosed with peripheral blood smear and rapid antigen test. Further evaluation for renal failure related to systemic illness and immunological markers were inconclusive. He was treated with antimalarial drugs, hemodialysis, and supportive therapy. Renal biopsy performed for nonrecovering renal failure reveled crescentic glomerulonephritis. This case highlights the need to thoroughly search for malaria-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis using renal biopsy after nonrecovering renal failure.

  9. Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis: management of glomerulonephritis in adults.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, Andrey V; Walsh, Michael; Knoll, Greg; Hladunewich, Michelle; Bargman, Joanne; Reich, Heather; Humar, Atul; Samuel, Susan; Bitzan, Martin; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Mammen, Cherry; Pinsk, Maury; Muirhead, Norman

    2014-03-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) clinical practice guideline for management of glomerulonephritis was recently released. The Canadian Society of Nephrology convened a working group to review the recommendations and comment on their relevancy and applicability to the Canadian context. A subgroup of adult nephrologists reviewed the guideline statements for management of glomerular disease in adults and agreed with most of the guideline statements developed by KDIGO. This commentary highlights areas for which there is lack of evidence and areas in need of translation of evidence into clinical practice. Areas of controversy or uncertainty, including the choice of second-line agents, are discussed in more detail. Existing practice variation also is addressed. The relevance of treatment recommendations to the Canadian practitioner is discussed.

  10. Acute post-infection glomerulonephritis caused by new 'thongs'. A case report.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, D; Markowitz, S

    1986-04-26

    Acute glomerulonephritis complicated secondary infection in a patient suffering from traumatic blisters caused by new footwear. This unlikely setting for acute glomerulonephritis was made more interesting by its occurrence in an adult in contrast with its more frequent recognition in a child. The age of the patient and the severity of the local symptoms masked the significance of the initial finding of haematuria until deteriorating renal function indicated the diagnosis of concomitant glomerular disease.

  11. Anesthetic implications of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Durrani, Mehmood A; Mansfield, John F

    2003-08-01

    Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis is a necrotizing soft tissue infection of face and neck spreading at the level of fascia. It has been described as a putrid ulcer, phagedaena, and hospital gangrene. It has a high mortality rate, and presents a challenge to anesthesiologists who must secure an airway to deliver anesthesia safely. We report a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in which the patient underwent repeated radical surgical debridement of face and neck, including a mandibulectomy. These critically ill patients often present with sepsis and multiple system organ failure. Extensive preoperative evaluation, invasive monitoring, and possibly the use of vasopressors and inotropes are essential in treating these patients. The tracheas of these patients should remain intubated after initial debridement. Tracheostomy should be performed early. Antibiotic therapy, nutritional support, early debridement, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy all help to decrease mortality in these patients.

  12. Necrotizing soft-tissue infection: laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing soft tissue infections score.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Madhuri; Vijay Kumar, Gs; Sowmya, Gs; Madhu, Cp; Ramya, Sr

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI) can be rapidly progressive and polymicrobial in etiology. Establishing the element of necrotizing infection poses a clinical challenge. A 64-year-old diabetic patient presented to our hospital with a gangrenous patch on anterior abdominal wall, which progressed to an extensive necrotizing lesion within 1 week. Successive laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing softtissue infections (LRINEC) scores confirmed the necrotizing element. Cultures yielded Enterococci, Acinetobacter species and Apophysomyces elegans and the latter being considered as an emerging agent of Zygomycosis in immunocompromised hosts. Patient was managed with antibiotics, antifungal treatment and surgical debridement despite which he succumbed to the infection. NSTI's require an early and aggressive management and LRINEC score can be applied to establish the element of necrotizing pathology. Isolation of multiple organisms becomes confusing to establish the etiological role. Apophysomyces elegans, which was isolated in our patient is being increasingly reported in cases of necrotizing infections and may be responsible for high morbidity and mortality. This scoring has been proposed as an adjunct tool to Microbiological diagnosis when NSTI's need to be diagnosed early and managed promptly to decrease mortality and morbidity, which however may not come in handy in an immunocompromised host with polymicrobial aggressive infection.

  13. CD11b is protective in complement-mediated immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jessy J; Chaves, Lee D; Chang, Anthony; Jacob, Alexander; Ritchie, Maria; Quigg, Richard J

    2015-05-01

    In chronic serum sickness, glomerular immune complexes form, yet C57BL/6 mice do not develop glomerulonephritis unless complement factor H (CfH) is absent, indicating the relevance of complement regulation. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b) and Fcγ receptors on leukocytes, and CfH on platelets, can bind immune complexes. Here we induced immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in CfH(-/-) mice chimeric for wild-type, CfH(-/-), CD11b(-/-), or FcRγ(-/-) bone marrow stem cells. Glomerulonephritis was worse in CD11b(-/-) chimeras compared with all others, whereas disease in FcRγ(-/-) and wild-type chimeras was comparable. Disease tracked strongly with humoral immune responses, but not glomerular immune complex deposits. Interstitial inflammation with M1 macrophages strongly correlated with glomerulonephritis scores. CD11b(-/-) chimeras had significantly more M1 macrophages and CD4(+) T cells. The renal dendritic cell populations originating from bone marrow-derived CD11c(+) cells were similar in all experimental groups. CD11b(+) cells bearing colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor were present in kidneys, including CD11b(-/-) chimeras; these cells correlated negatively with glomerulonephritis scores. Thus, experimental immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis is associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages and CD4(+) T cells in kidneys and functional renal insufficiency. Hence, CD11b on mononuclear cells is instrumental in generating an anti-inflammatory response in the inflamed kidney.

  14. Anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis following nintedanib for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Nigam, Sonu; Parnham, Alan; Srinivasa, Vinay

    2017-08-06

    We report a previously unrecognized and unreported case of a patient with anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis following nintedanib, an orally active small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor. A 59-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis presented with severe acute kidney injury (creatinine 285 umol/L) secondary to anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis disease 4 months after commencement of nintedanib. She had hematuria with red blood cell casts, nephrotic range proteinuria (3.5g/24 hours) and significantly elevated anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis titers at 860 chemiluminescent units. A kidney biopsy confirmed severe crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear immunoglobulin G deposition in glomerular basement membrane. Despite the commencement of treatment with plasma exchange and cyclophosphamide, she remained dialysis dependent. Nintedanib was discontinued. Onset of acute anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis was found to be associated with recent nintedanib use suggesting that nintedanib may be a potential trigger for anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis. This case highlights the importance of close monitoring of patients receiving new targeted therapies. Management of novel targeted agents in patients receiving dialysis is challenging because of the scarcity of specific data.

  15. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  16. Vitelliform focal choroidal excavation.

    PubMed

    Or, Chris; Forooghian, Farzin

    2014-05-30

    Focal choroidal excavations (FCE) are characterized by foveal or perifoveal choroid excavations seen on optical coherence tomography (OCT). The authors report a case of FCE associated with a vitelliform lesion within the excavation. A case of FCE associated with a small vitelliform lesion has been described previously, but the larger extent of the vitelliform lesion observed in the current case has not been previously reported. This may represent a novel category of FCE, vitelliform focal choroidal excavation, in which deposition of vitelliform material is associated with its development.

  17. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Vera-Iglesias, E; García-Arpa, M; Sánchez-Caminero, P; Romero-Aguilera, G; Cortina de la Calle, P

    2007-11-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare disease of the oral mucosa caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). It appears as a benign epithelial growth, usually in the mucosa of the lower lip. It is mainly associated with HPV serotypes 13 and 32 and there is a clear racial predilection for the disease in Native Americans and Eskimos. We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl from Ecuador with multiple papular lesions in both lips that were clinically and histologically consistent with focal epithelial hyperplasia. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction detected HPV serotype 13.

  18. Variable focal length microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L. G., Commander; Day, S. E.; Selviah, D. R.

    2000-04-01

    Refractive surface relief microlenses (150 μm diameter) are immersed in nematic liquid crystal in a cell. Application of a variable voltage across the cell effectively varies the refractive index of the liquid crystal and results in a change of the focal length by the lensmakers formula (E. Hecht, Optics, 2nd edn., Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts, 1987, p. 138). We describe the cell design and construction and demonstrate a range of focal lengths from +490 to +1000 μm for 2 to 12 V applied. A diverging lens results when the voltage is lower. Theoretical models are developed to account for some of the observed aberrations.

  19. Focal brainstem gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J.; Alaqeel, Ahmed M.

    2015-01-01

    Improved neuronavigation guidance as well as intraoperative imaging and neurophysiologic monitoring technologies have enhanced the ability of neurosurgeons to resect focal brainstem gliomas. In contrast, diffuse brainstem gliomas are considered to be inoperable lesions. This article is a continuation of an article that discussed brainstem glioma diagnostics, imaging, and classification. Here, we address open surgical treatment of and approaches to focal, dorsally exophytic, and cervicomedullary brainstem gliomas. Intraoperative neuronavigation, intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring, as well as intraoperative imaging are discussed as adjunctive measures to help render these procedures safer, more acute, and closer to achieving surgical goals. PMID:25864061

  20. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  1. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis following periodontal abscess.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Rui; Catunda, Ivson de Sousa; Queiroz, Isaac Vieira; de Morais, Hecio Henrique Araujo; Leao, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue infections are characterized by acute inflammation, diffuse edema, and suppuration, and are often associated with symptoms such as malaise, fever, tachycardia, and chills. Necrotizing fasciitis is a destructive bacterial infection affecting subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia and is associated with high rates of mortality. It usually involves the abdomen and extremities, but it also can occur in the head and neck. Early diagnosis is critical and the most commonly accepted treatment includes radical surgical intervention and administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics. This article reports and discusses the case of a patient with odontogenic cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, and emphasizes the importance of early and effective treatment.

  2. [Acute necrotizing myelitis in an AIDS patient].

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Soto, Isabel; Villafañe, María F; Bouzas, Belén; Duarte, Juan Manuel; Yampolsky, Claudio; Schtirbu, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    In the setting of HIV infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus type 1-2 (HSV 1-2) can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. These agents can involve the spinal cord and produce a necrotizing transverse myelitis. This usually occurs in AIDS patients with severe immunodeficiency: CD4+ lymphocyte counts typically are less than 50 cell/microL. The clinical presentation, CSF and imaging studies can provide a high level of suspicion diagnosis. Prompt initiation of antiviral specific drugs is essential. We report a patient with an acute necrotizing myelitis (cauda equina syndrome) secondary to CMV and HSV infections.

  3. Ascending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to emphysematous pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Dajer-Fadel, Walid Leonardo; Pichardo-González, Martha; Estrada-Ramos, Sandra; Palafox, Damián; Navarro-Reynoso, Francisco Pascual; Argüero-Sánchez, Rubén

    2014-09-01

    Mediastinal infections usually originate from postoperative complications or in a descending manner from a cervical infectious process; few reports have emerged describing an ascending trajectory. A 56-year-old woman with a Huang class 1 left emphysematous pyelonephritis was referred due to a progression of an ascending necrotizing mediastinitis. A left posterolateral thoracotomy was performed, drainage and thorough lavage were carried out with a successful outcome. We believe this is the first reported case of ascending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to an emphysematous renal infection. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. [Necrotizing fasciitis in head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Sántha, Beáta; Sári, Katalin; Fülep, Zoltán; Patyi, Márta; Oberna, Ferenc

    2017-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant infection of the deeper layers of skin and subcutaneous tissues characterized by progressive soft tissue necrosis and high mortality. It rarely occurs in the head and neck area. The clinical picture includes non-specific but typical local and systemic symptoms. The treatment is a complex, multidisciplinary task which includes radical surgical exploration, debridement and drainage, empirically started and then targeted intravenous antibiotics and supportive therapy. Authors report a case of necrotizing fasciitis localized on the right side of the face which caused multi-organ failure and phlegmone of the neck.

  5. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bassioukas, K; Danielides, V; Georgiou, I; Photos, E; Zagorianakou, P; Skevas, A

    2000-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by HPV 13 or HPV 32. In Caucasians there have been only a few cases reported. We present the first case in Greece in a young Caucasian girl in which HPV 13 was detected with PCR analysis. The patient was successfully treated with CO2 laser.

  6. [The interaction of atrial natriuretic peptide with other bioregulators of kidney function in chronic glomerulonephritis in children].

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, A G; Markov, Kh M; Zokirov, N Z; Naumova, V I

    1994-01-01

    A study was made of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity and plasmic concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide (NUP) as well as antidiuretic hormone in children with primary glomerulonephritis. A close relationship was established of these parameters in regulation of water-salt homeostasis. The above systems are involved in pathogenesis of childhood glomerulonephritis. This finding should be considered in development of pathogenetically validated therapy of glomerulonephritis, including introduction of synthetic NUP.

  7. Simultaneous comprehensive multiplex autoantibody analysis for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Mandy; Trezzi, Barbara; Hiemann, Rico; Schierack, Peter; Grossmann, Kai; Scholz, Juliane; Somma, Valentina; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Radice, Antonella

    2016-11-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is mainly caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis, immune-complex or anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides and leads to rapid loss of renal function. Detection of ANCA and autoantibodies (autoAbs) to GBM and dsDNA enables early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of RPGN aiding in preventing end-stage renal disease.Determination of ANCA on neutrophils (ANCA) as well as autoAbs to myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA), proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA), GBM, and dsDNA was performed by the novel multiplex CytoBead technology combining cell- and microbead-based autoAb analyses by automated indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Forty patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 48 with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), 2 with eosinophilic GPA, 42 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 43 with Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), 57 with infectious diseases (INF), and 55 healthy subjects (HS) were analyzed and findings compared with classical single testing.The CytoBead assay revealed for GPA, MPA, GPS, and SLE the following diagnostic sensitivities and for HS and INF the corresponding specificities: PR3-ANCA, 85.0% and 100.0%; MPO-ANCA, 77.1% and 99.1%; anti-GBM autoAb, 88.4% and 96.4%; anti-dsDNA autoAb, 83.3% and 97.3%; ANCA, 91.1% and 99.1%, respectively. Agreement with classical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and IIF was very good for anti-GBM autoAb, MPO-ANCA, PR3-ANCA, and ANCA, respectively. Anti-dsDNA autoAb comparative analysis demonstrated fair agreement only and a significant difference (P = 0.0001).The CytoBead technology provides a unique multiplex reaction environment for simultaneous RPGN-specific autoAb testing. CytoBead RPGN assay is a promising alternative to time-consuming single parameter analysis and, thus, is well suited for emergency situations.

  8. Simultaneous comprehensive multiplex autoantibody analysis for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Mandy; Trezzi, Barbara; Hiemann, Rico; Schierack, Peter; Grossmann, Kai; Scholz, Juliane; Somma, Valentina; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Radice, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is mainly caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis, immune-complex or anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides and leads to rapid loss of renal function. Detection of ANCA and autoantibodies (autoAbs) to GBM and dsDNA enables early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of RPGN aiding in preventing end-stage renal disease. Determination of ANCA on neutrophils (ANCA) as well as autoAbs to myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA), proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA), GBM, and dsDNA was performed by the novel multiplex CytoBead technology combining cell- and microbead-based autoAb analyses by automated indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Forty patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 48 with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), 2 with eosinophilic GPA, 42 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 43 with Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), 57 with infectious diseases (INF), and 55 healthy subjects (HS) were analyzed and findings compared with classical single testing. The CytoBead assay revealed for GPA, MPA, GPS, and SLE the following diagnostic sensitivities and for HS and INF the corresponding specificities: PR3-ANCA, 85.0% and 100.0%; MPO-ANCA, 77.1% and 99.1%; anti-GBM autoAb, 88.4% and 96.4%; anti-dsDNA autoAb, 83.3% and 97.3%; ANCA, 91.1% and 99.1%, respectively. Agreement with classical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and IIF was very good for anti-GBM autoAb, MPO-ANCA, PR3-ANCA, and ANCA, respectively. Anti-dsDNA autoAb comparative analysis demonstrated fair agreement only and a significant difference (P = 0.0001). The CytoBead technology provides a unique multiplex reaction environment for simultaneous RPGN-specific autoAb testing. CytoBead RPGN assay is a promising alternative to time-consuming single parameter analysis and, thus, is well suited for emergency situations. PMID:27858870

  9. Necrotizing fasciitis: a rare complication of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mazza, J F; Augenstein, J S; Kreis, D J

    1987-09-01

    The mortality of acute appendicitis increases sixfold if perforation occurs. We have reported a case of perforated appendix complicated by necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneum. We believe this complication has not been previously described in the English literature.

  10. [Necrotizing otitis externa: report of 36 cases].

    PubMed

    Gassab, Elyes; Krifa, Nesrine; Sayah, Najoua; Khaireddine, Noura; Koubaa, Jamel; Gassab, Aicha

    2011-02-01

    Necrotizing otitis externa is a potentially lethal form of otitis externa which occurs mainly in elderly diabetic. To study the clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of necrotizing otitis externa and to describe the outcomes of this disease. We report in this retrospective study, a series of 36 patients treated in our department for necrotizing otitis externa over a period of 9 years. Our series consisted of 34 diabetics. The average age of our patients was 62 years. The diagnosis was based on clinical, biological and bacteriological data and on imaging findings. A medical treatment based on a systemic antibiotic therapy combining a third generation cephalosporin to a fluoroquinolone was prescribed in 24 cases and to an aminoglycoside in 12 cases. In addition, a local treatment was performed daily and included meticulous cleaning of the external auditory canal and topical application of antimicrobial agents. Surgical debridement of infected soft tissues and bone sequestra was indicated in 8 cases because of the lack of improvement with medical treatment. Only one patient underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The cure rate was estimated at 86%. Only one death was noted. Necrotizing otitis externa is a severe infection. Its prognosis has improved markedly since the advent of antibiotics effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Its management must be started without delay and its treatment must be prolonged.

  11. Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) Efficacy in Glomerulonephritis (GN), a Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huraib, Sameer O; Qureshi, Junaid I; Quadri, Khaja Hm; Al Flaiw, Ahmed; Al Ghamdi, Ghormullah; Jumani, Abdulqadir; Al Hejaili, Fayez; Raza, Hammad; Al Johani, Abdulaziz; Al-Katheri, Abdulmalik; Al-Khader, Abdullah A

    2005-01-01

    Mycophenolate Mofetil MMF has been widely used in post-transplant immunosuppression. Its role is emerging in GN. MMF demonstrated promising results compared with cyclosphosphamide in stage IV lupus nephritis, in a recently published trial. It has been found to have a wide safety profile, with mostly gastroinetestinal side effects, which can be avoided through titration. Its action is through inhibition of the enzyme IMDPH (ionosine monophosphate dehydrogenase), leading to purine antagonism and inhibition of lymphocytes. We were aiming to demonstrate the efficacy of MMF in our GN population. In this study, we reviewed 17 patients who received MMF (dose - 1 gm po bid) for the past year. They were only included if it was given for the management of resistant primary glomerulonephritis. Complete remission has been defined as proteinuria of less than 0.5 g/day and partial remission as a reduction of proteinuria 50% of starting MMF therapy; all 17 MMF therapy patients uniformly achieved good BP ((29%) achieved complete remission and this group consisted of 1 membranous GN, 2 lupus GN (type IV and membranous), one FSGS and one with MPGN. Four of 17 (23%) were non-responders to therapy. This group articles.aspx? id=41 to side effects. We conclude that the MMF appears to be an effective alternate treatment modality in resistant membranous GN, lupus nephritis (type IV and V) and possibly MPGN, and to a lesser extent in resistant FSGS. Further prospective data may demonstrate the efficacy of MMF in GN.

  12. [Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis in a 68-year-old man].

    PubMed

    Rubio, E; Acevedo, M

    2004-01-01

    A 68-year-old male with macroscopic hematuria and constitutional symptoms as fever and weight loss. There was nothing interesting in the anamnesis or in the physical exploration. The laboratory test had an elevation of creatinine of 4 mg/dL and ten days before it had been 1.4 mg/dL. In the urine analysis: proteinuria of 1.5 G/24 h, and hematuria. On the second day we made a renal biopsy where we could seen segmental glomerular necrosis and crescent fromation in 80% of the glomeruli. In the immune study c-ANCA anti-PR3 was positive. In the complementary studies we didn't find other organs affected. With the diagnosis of pauci-immune glomerulonephritis limited to the kidney we began treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. As the renal function was severely affected the patient needed one dialysis session. We began with 1 g intravenous methylprednisolone daily for 3 days followed by oral prednisone 60 mg daily tapering to 10 mg daily by 3 months. This was combined with 150 mg oral cyclophosphamide daily. Seven plasma exchanges were performed. At the beginning of treatment creatinine was 7 mg/dL, it was decreasing rapidly and three week after cretinine was 3 mg/Dl and he was asymptomatic. One year after treatment, creatinine is 1.4 mg/dL and the urine analysis is normal, C-ANCA are negative.

  13. Clinicopathological insights into lupus glomerulonephritis in Japanese and Asians.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Hideki

    2011-06-01

    Lupus nephritis comprises a spectrum of glomerular, vascular, and tubulointerstitial lesions, which has significant racial variation in severity and manifestations. The current classification (ISN/RPS 2003) has been improved successfully for the categorization of lupus glomerulonephritis (LGN). On the basis of this classification, 480 Japanese cases revealed the following distribution: class I 3%, class II 16%, class III 13%, class IV-S 11%, class IV-G 41%, class V 16%, and class VI 1%. Class IV-G with chronicity tended to have the worst renal outcome. Nephrotic syndrome was a more frequent complication in class IV-S (50%), class IV-G (72%), and class V (56%), with poor renal and actuarial outcomes. With regard to therapy, treatment options including glucocorticoids alone or combined with antimetabolites (azathioprine, mizoribine, mycophenolate mofetil), calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporine A, tacrolimus), or alkylating agents (intravenous cyclophosphamide injection) improved the outcome of LGN; however, there is no high-grade clinical evidence from Japan. Further studies are needed to resolve the clinicopathological problems of LGN, especially IV-S, IV-G, and pure membranous lupus nephritis in Japanese patients.

  14. Focal dystonia in musicians.

    PubMed

    Aránguiz, R; Chana-Cuevas, P; Alburquerque, D; León, M

    2011-01-01

    A special group of focal dystonia is that known as occupational, which include dystonic disorders triggered by repetitive motor activity, closely associated with the professional activity of a specific task that the affected person performs. In this sense, musicians are a population particularly vulnerable to this disorder, which is presented during the execution of highly trained movements. This article reviews the pathophysiology of focal dystonia and its therapeutic implications. The pathophysiological basis of focal dystonia in the musician is still not well established. However, due to the contribution of neurophysiological studies and functional neuroimaging, there is growing evidence of anomalies in the processing of sensory information, sensory-motor integration, cortical and subcortical inhibitory processes, which underline this disease. Clinically, it is characterised by the appearance of involuntary muscle contractions, and is associated with loss of motor control while practicing music. It is a gradual appearance and sometimes there may be a history of musculoskeletal injuries or non-physiological postures preceding the appearance of the symptoms. The neurological examination is usually normal, although subtle dystonic postures can develop spontaneously or with movements that involve the affected segments. The dystonia remains focal and is not generalised. Treatment is based on using multiple strategies for the management of the dystonia, with variable results. Although a specific therapy has not been defined, there are general principles that are combined in each situation looking for results. This includes, among others, pharmacological interventions, management with botulinum toxin, and sensory re-training techniques. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, Pía; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Berdugo, Lucero

    2010-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign, asymptomatic disease. It appears as papules, principally on the lower lip, although it can also be found on the retro-commissural mucosa and tongue and, less frequently, on the upper lip, gingiva and palate. FEH is caused by human papillomavirus subtype 13 or 32. The condition occurs in many populations and ethnic groups. We present the clinical case of a 31-year-old male with lesions that clinically and histologically corresponded to FEH.

  16. [A clinico-morphologico-functional study of the kidneys in glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Varshavskiĭ, V A; Sorokina, M N; Tomlina, N A; Kupriianova, L A

    1975-01-01

    The article deals with the results of a clinico-functional-morphological study of the kidneys in glomerulonephritis (50 observations) which was carried out with the use of the method of puncture biopsy of the kidneys. It was shown that clinical forms of glomerulonephritis, accompanied with hematuria, were characterized by the absence of fixation of immune complexes in the basal membrane of the glomeruli. According to the electron microscopy data, this corresponds to the dissappearance of deposits from the subendothelial parts of the basal membrane. The extramembranous glomerulonephritis, revealed with the help of electron microscopy technique, was characterized by the nephrotic syndrome. An increased tension of immunological processes in the glomeruli was accompanied by a more grave clinical course of glomerulonephritis, by impairment of not only glomerulous but tubular functions as well. A greater dicrease in the function of osmotic concentration of the urine in fibroplastic types of glomerulonephritis, as compared with non-firboplastic ones, was apparently connected not only with lesiones of tubules but rather with more expressed sclerotic changes in the interstitial tissue of the kidney.

  17. Anti–LAMP-2 Antibodies Are Not Prevalent in Patients With Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael C.; Smith, Rex Neal; Badhwar, Anshul K.; Parente, Oscar; Chung, Hyun chul; O’Dell, Donna; Bunch; McGregor, JulieAnne G.; Hogan, Susan L.; Hu, Yichun; Yang, Jia-Jin; Berg, Elisabeth A.; Niles, John; Jennette, J. Charles; Preston, Gloria A.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) is a target of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) in addition to the more commonly known targets proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. The prevalence of anti–LAMP-2 antibodies and their relationship to disease in ANCA glomerulonephritis are not well described. We measured anti–LAMP-2 reactivity in 680 sera samples (two academic centers) from patients with ANCA glomerulonephritis (n=329); those with ANCA-negative glomerulonephritis (n=104); those with fimbriated, gram-negative Escherichia coli urinary tract infection (n=104); disease controls (n=19); and healthy volunteers (n=124). With levels in healthy controls used to define a reference range, anti–LAMP-2 reactivity was present in 21% of ANCA sera from two of the centers; reactivity was present in 16% of the control group with urinary tract infection. Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy did not verify positivity. Titers of anti-myeloperoxidase and anti–proteinase 3 antibodies were 1500-fold and 10,000-fold higher than anti–LAMP-2 titers, respectively. There was no correlation between anti–LAMP-2 antibodies and disease activity. Furthermore, Wistar Kyoto rats injected with anti–LAMP-2 antibodies did not develop glomerulonephritis. In conclusion, antibodies that react with LAMP-2 may exist at very low titers in a minority of patients with ANCA disease. These data do not support a mechanistic relationship between anti–LAMP-2 antibodies and ANCA glomerulonephritis. PMID:22021709

  18. Epidemiology of Histologically Proven Glomerulonephritis in Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Okpechi, Ikechi G.; Ameh, Oluwatoyin I.; Bello, Aminu K.; Ronco, Pierre; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Kengne, Andre P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Data on epidemiology and outcomes of glomerular diseases from Africa is still limited. We conducted a systematic review on the epidemiology of histologically proven glomerular diseases in Africa between 1980 and 2014. Materials and methods We searched literature using PubMed, AfricaWide, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature on EBSCO Host, Scopus, African Journals online databases, and the African Index Medicus, for relevant studies. The review was conducted using standard methods and frameworks using only biopsy-confirmed data. Results Twenty four (24) studies comprising 12,093 reported biopsies from 13 countries were included in this analysis. The median number of biopsies per study was 127.0 (50–4436), most of the studies (70.0%) originated from North Africa and the number of performed kidney biopsies varied from 5.2 to 617 biopsies/year. Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest indication of renal biopsy. The frequency of reported primary pathologic patterns included, minimal change disease (MCD); 16.5% (95%CI: 11.2–22.6), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS); 15.9% (11.3–21.1), mesangiocapillary GN (MCGN); 11.8% (9.2–14.6), crescentic GN; 2.0% (0.9–3.5) and IgA nephropathy 2.8% (1.3–4.9). Glomerular diseases related to hepatitis B and systemic lupus erythematosus had the highest prevalence among assessed secondary diseases: 8.4% (2.0–18.4) and 7.7% (4.5–11.7) respectively. There was no evidence of publication bias and regional differences were seen mostly for secondary GNs. Conclusions Glomerular diseases remain poorly characterized in sub-Saharan Africa due to declining renal biopsy rates and consequent paucity of data on pathologic patterns of key renal diseases. Development of renal biopsy registries in Africa is likely to enable adequate characterization of the prevalence and patterns of glomerular diseases

  19. Epidemiology of Histologically Proven Glomerulonephritis in Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Okpechi, Ikechi G; Ameh, Oluwatoyin I; Bello, Aminu K; Ronco, Pierre; Swanepoel, Charles R; Kengne, Andre P

    2016-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Data on epidemiology and outcomes of glomerular diseases from Africa is still limited. We conducted a systematic review on the epidemiology of histologically proven glomerular diseases in Africa between 1980 and 2014. We searched literature using PubMed, AfricaWide, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature on EBSCO Host, Scopus, African Journals online databases, and the African Index Medicus, for relevant studies. The review was conducted using standard methods and frameworks using only biopsy-confirmed data. Twenty four (24) studies comprising 12,093 reported biopsies from 13 countries were included in this analysis. The median number of biopsies per study was 127.0 (50-4436), most of the studies (70.0%) originated from North Africa and the number of performed kidney biopsies varied from 5.2 to 617 biopsies/year. Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest indication of renal biopsy. The frequency of reported primary pathologic patterns included, minimal change disease (MCD); 16.5% (95%CI: 11.2-22.6), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS); 15.9% (11.3-21.1), mesangiocapillary GN (MCGN); 11.8% (9.2-14.6), crescentic GN; 2.0% (0.9-3.5) and IgA nephropathy 2.8% (1.3-4.9). Glomerular diseases related to hepatitis B and systemic lupus erythematosus had the highest prevalence among assessed secondary diseases: 8.4% (2.0-18.4) and 7.7% (4.5-11.7) respectively. There was no evidence of publication bias and regional differences were seen mostly for secondary GNs. Glomerular diseases remain poorly characterized in sub-Saharan Africa due to declining renal biopsy rates and consequent paucity of data on pathologic patterns of key renal diseases. Development of renal biopsy registries in Africa is likely to enable adequate characterization of the prevalence and patterns of glomerular diseases; this could have a positive impact on chronic kidney disease evaluation and

  20. Incidental healed postinfectious glomerulonephritis: a study of 1012 renal biopsy specimens examined by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Haas, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) characterized by immune complex deposits typical of postinfectious GN but with a paucity or absence of overt clinical symptoms and/or urinary abnormalities may occur after a group A streptococcus infection. The overall incidence of this type of subclinical GN is not known. To address this question, electron microscopy findings in 1012 consecutive renal biopsy specimens (952 native kidney, 60 transplant) examined by a single renal pathologist from August 1999 to April 2002 were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of distinct subepithelial and intramembranous deposits indicative of postinfectious GN. Such deposits were noted in 83 biopsy specimens, including 26 with a primary diagnosis of postinfectious GN (acute, persistent, or latent) and 57 in which these deposits were an incidental finding. In each of the latter 57 cases, some or all of the deposits showed partial or extensive loss of electron density typical of partially or largely resorbed deposits. A diagnosis of incidental postinfectious GN was not made in any biopsy specimen exhibiting another immune complex-related glomerular disease that could possibly account for the deposits, composing 443 of the 1012 biopsy specimens examined. Thirty of the 57 biopsy specimens with incidental postinfectious GN showed mesangial hypercellularity, although this was focal and segmental in all but 3 cases and was not accompanied by the endocapillary hypercellularity typical of acute postinfectious lesions. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed glomerular deposits of C3 in >90% of these biopsy specimens and IgM deposits in 66%, but only rare IgG, IgA, and Cq deposits. Twenty-three (40%) of these 57 biopsy specimens exhibited diabetic nephropathy, either alone or in combination with another lesion; for perspective, only 128 (13%) of the 1012 biopsy specimens examined showed evidence of diabetic nephropathy. In summary, incidental evidence of resolving or largely healed postinfectious GN was noted

  1. Vibrio Vulnificus Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kotton, Yael; Soboh, Soboh; Bisharat, Naiel

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe life-threatening infection of the deep subcutaneous tissues and fascia. Infection with Vibrio vulnificus, a halophilic Gram-negative bacillus found worldwide in warm coastal waters, can lead to severe complications, particularly among patients with chronic liver diseases. We herein present an unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by V. vulnificus triggered by acupuncture needle insertion. The patient, who suffered from diabetes mellitus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and worked at a fish hatchery, denied any injury prior to acupuncture. This is the first ever reported case of V. vulnificus infection triggered by acupuncture needle insertion, clearly emphasizing the potential hazards of the prolonged survival of V. vulnificus on the skin. The potential infectious complications of acupuncture needle insertion are discussed. PMID:26500738

  2. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis - an unusual association: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is an inherited disorder that is characterized by the development and growth of cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Urinary protein excretion is usually less than 1 g/24 hours in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and an association of nephrotic syndrome with this condition is considered rare. There are only anecdotal case reports of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease associated with nephrotic syndrome, with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis being the most commonly reported histopathological diagnosis. Nephrotic-range proteinuria in the presence of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, with or without an accompanying decline in renal function, should be investigated by open renal biopsy to exclude coexisting glomerular disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with histologically proven diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis presenting with nephrotic-range proteinuria. No other reports of this could be found in a global electronic search of the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 35-year-old Indo-Aryan man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease associated with nephrotic syndrome and a concomitant decline in his glomerular filtration rate. Open renal biopsy revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis. An accurate diagnosis enabled us to manage him conservatively with a successful outcome, without the use of corticosteroid which is the standard treatment and the drug most commonly used to treat nephrotic syndrome empirically. Conclusion Despite the reluctance of physicians to carry out a renal biopsy on patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, our case supports the idea that renal biopsy is needed in patients with polycystic kidney disease with nephrotic-range proteinuria to make an accurate diagnosis. It also illustrates the importance of open renal

  3. Identifying statin-associated autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Albayda, Jemima; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    Statins up-regulate expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis and the major target of autoantibodies in statin-associated immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. As muscle cells regenerate, they express high levels of HMGCR, which may sustain the immune response even after statin therapy is stopped. Awareness of this entity will help physicians who prescribe statins to take action to limit the associated morbidity.

  4. Necrotizing pancreatitis: a review of multidisciplinary management.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Anthony; Goussous, Naeem; Sardana, Neeraj; Patel, Shirali; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this review is to summarize the current state of the art of the management of necrotizing pancreatitis, and to clarify some confusing points regarding the terminology and diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis, as these points are essential for management decisions and communication between providers and within the literature. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Despite the publication of the Atlanta guidelines, misuse of pancreatitis terminology continues in the literature and in clinical practice, especially regarding the local complications associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Necrotizing pancreatitis is a manifestation of severe acute pancreatitis associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is aided by pancreas-protocol computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, ideally 72 h after onset of symptoms to achieve the most accurate characterization of pancreatic necrosis. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, organ failure, need for debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach, ideally at a high-volume pancreatic center. The role of antibiotics is determined by the presence of infected necrosis. Early enteral feeds improve outcomes compared with parenteral nutrition. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with a multitude of complications which can lead to long-term morbidity or mortality. Interventional therapy should be guided by available resources and the principle of a minimally invasive approach. When open debridement is necessary, it should be delayed at least 3-6 weeks to allow demarcation of necrotic from viable tissue.

  5. Necrotizing Fasciitis: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Galust, Henrik; Oliverio, Matthew H; Giorgio, Daniel J; Espinal, Alexis M

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare and rapidly progressing life-threatening infectious process. By progressing through a simulation involving a patient with NF and participating in a post-scenario debriefing, learners will gain the necessary skills and knowledge to properly diagnose and manage patients with NF. Learners are taught to initiate appropriate and timely treatment and to advocate on behalf of their patient after inappropriate pushback from consultants to improve outcomes. PMID:27733963

  6. Necrotizing pneumonia caused by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed Central

    D'Antonio, D; Violante, B; Farina, C; Sacco, R; Angelucci, D; Masciulli, M; Iacone, A; Romano, F

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of necrotizing pneumonia due to Penicillium chrysogenum in a 57-year-old woman operated on for lung cancer. The residual right lower pulmonary lobe was infiltrated by Penicillium chrysogenum. The patient underwent a second pulmonary right lobectomy and was successfully treated with oral itraconazole. To our knowledge, this is the first case of pneumonia due to P. chrysogenum. PMID:9399551

  7. Maximal suppression of renin-angiotensin system in nonproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Iodice, Carmela; Balletta, Mario M; Minutolo, Roberto; Giannattasio, Paolo; Tuccillo, Stefano; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; D'Amora, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Giorgio; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Conte, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Luca

    2003-06-01

    Elimination of residual proteinuria is the novel target in renoprotection; nevertheless, whether a greater suppression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) effectively improves the antiproteinuric response in patients with moderate proteinuria remains ill-defined. We evaluated the effects of maximizing RAS suppression on quantitative and qualitative proteinuria in ten patients with stable nonnephrotic proteinuria (2.55 +/- 0.94 g/24 hours) due to primary nonproliferative glomerulonephritis (NPGN), and normal values of creatinine clearance (103 +/- 17 mL/min). The study was divided in three consecutive phases: (1) four subsequent 1-month periods of ramipril at the dose of 2.5, 5.0, 10, and 20 mg/day; (2) 2 months of ramipril 20 mg/day + irbesartan 300 mg/day; and (3) 2 months of irbesartan 300 mg/day alone. Maximizing RAS suppression was not coupled with any major effect on renal function and blood pressure; conversely, a significant decrement in hemoglobin levels, of 0.8 g/dL on average, was observed during up-titration of ramipril dose. The 2.5 mg dose of ramipril significantly decreased proteinuria by 29%. Similar changes were detected after irbesartan alone (-28%). The antiproteinuric effect was not improved either by the higher ramipril doses (-30% after the 20 mg dose) or after combined treatment (-33%). The reduction of proteinuria led to amelioration of the markers of tubular damage, as testified by the significant decrement of alpha 1 microglobulin (alpha 1m) excretion and of the tubular component of proteinuria at sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In nonnephrotic NPGN patients, standard doses of either ramipril or irbesartan lead to significant reduction of residual proteinuria and amelioration of the qualitative features suggestive of tubular damage. The enhancement of RAS suppression up to the maximal degree does not improve the antiproteinuric response and is coupled with a decrement of hemoglobin levels.

  8. ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis: Risk Factors for Renal Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Göçeroğlu, Arda; Berden, Annelies E.; Fiocco, Marta; Floßmann, Oliver; Westman, Kerstin W.; Ferrario, Franco; Gaskin, Gill; Pusey, Charles D.; Hagen, E. Christiaan; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Rasmussen, Niels; Waldherr, Rüdiger; Walsh, Michael; Bruijn, Jan A.; Jayne, David R. W.; Bajema, Ingeborg M.

    2016-01-01

    Relapse in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has been studied previously, but there are few studies on renal relapse in particular. Identifying patients at high risk of renal relapse may aid in optimizing clinical management. We investigated which clinical and histological parameters are risk factors for renal relapse in ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis (AAGN). Patients (n = 174) were newly diagnosed and had mild–moderate or severe renal involvement. Data were derived from two trials of the European Vasculitis Society: MEPEX and CYCAZAREM. The Cox regression model was used to identify parameters increasing the instantaneous risk (= rate) of renal relapse (useful for instant clinical decisions). For identifying predictors of renal relapse during follow-up, we used Fine & Gray’s regression model. Competing events were end-stage renal failure and death. The cumulative incidence of renal relapse at 5 years was 9.5% (95% CI: 4.8–14.3%). In the Cox model, sclerotic class AAGN increased the instantaneous risk of renal relapse. In Fine & Gray’s model, the absence of interstitial infiltrates at diagnosis was predictive for renal relapse. In this study we used two different models to identify possible relationships between clinical and histopathological parameters at time of diagnosis of AAV with the risk of experiencing renal relapse. Sclerotic class AAGN increased the instantaneous risk of renal relapse. This association is most likely due to the high proportion of sclerosed glomeruli reducing the compensatory capacity. The absence of interstitial infiltrates increased the risk of renal relapse which is a warning sign that patients with a relatively benign onset of disease may also be prone to renal relapse. Renal relapses occurring in patients with sclerotic class AAGN and renal relapses occurring in patients without interstitial infiltrates were mutually exclusive, which may indicate that they are essentially different. PMID:27973575

  9. Experimental immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in the nonhuman primate

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, L.A.; Cosio, F.G.; Birmingham, D.J.; Mahan, J.D.; Sharma, H.M.; Smead, W.L.; Goel, R. )

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a model of immune complex (IC)-mediated glomerulonephritis (GN) in the nonhuman primate that could be used in subsequent studies to examine critically the role of the erythrocyte complement receptor (E-CR) in the pathogenesis of IC-mediated disease. Cynomolgus monkeys were chosen for study because they constitutively express E-CR levels that are either less than, equal to, or greater than that seen in normal man. After immunization with bovine gamma globulin (BGG), the GN induction protocol was begun in 10 cynomolgus by initiating daily i.v. administration of BGG in amounts sufficient to achieve or exceed antigen/antibody equivalence (assessed by the quantitative precipitin assay) for precipitating antibody present in the plasma volume. We found that within eight weeks of daily BGG administration of all the cynomolgus developed IC-mediated GN, irrespective of the initial E-CR level of the animals. However, the high E-CR cynomolgus tended to receive the higher BGG doses because of higher initial antibody levels to BGG. When the total number of glomerular deposits (determined by morphometric studies) per total BGG dose for each animal was plotted against the initial CR/E of that animal, there was a tendency for the animals with higher CR/E levels to have a lower number of glomerular deposits/BGG dose. Also, the total number of glomerular deposits correlated with the severity of the GN. During the early weeks of the GN induction protocol, the IC that formed in vivo (assessed by infusion of 125I-BGG) bound in large amounts to the circulating erythrocytes of the cynomolgus with medium or high E-CR levels. However, when tested after the onset of heavy proteinuria, which occurred between weeks 5 and 8 of daily BGG administration, the IC that formed in the circulation bound only poorly to circulating erythrocytes.

  10. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  11. Surgical management of necrotizing pancreatitis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kokosis, George; Perez, Alexander; Pappas, Theodore N

    2014-11-21

    Necrotizing pancreatitis is an uncommon yet serious complication of acute pancreatitis with mortality rates reported up to 15% that reach 30% in case of infection. Traditionally open surgical debridement was the only tool in our disposal to manage this serious clinical entity. This approach is however associated with poor outcomes. Management has now shifted away from open surgical debridement to a more conservative management and minimally invasive approaches. Contemporary approach to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and/or infectious pancreatitis is summarized in the 3Ds: Delay, Drain and Debride. Patients can be managed in the intensive care unit and any intervention should be delayed. Percutaneous drainage can be utilized first and early in the course of the disease, followed by endoscopic drainage or video assisted retroperitoneoscopic drainage if necrosectomy is deemed necessary. Open surgery is now less frequently performed and should be reserved for cases refractory to any other approach. The management of necrotizing pancreatitis therefore requires a multidisciplinary dynamic model of approach rather than being a surgical disease.

  12. Surgical management of necrotizing pancreatitis: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kokosis, George; Perez, Alexander; Pappas, Theodore N

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing pancreatitis is an uncommon yet serious complication of acute pancreatitis with mortality rates reported up to 15% that reach 30% in case of infection. Traditionally open surgical debridement was the only tool in our disposal to manage this serious clinical entity. This approach is however associated with poor outcomes. Management has now shifted away from open surgical debridement to a more conservative management and minimally invasive approaches. Contemporary approach to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and/or infectious pancreatitis is summarized in the 3Ds: Delay, Drain and Debride. Patients can be managed in the intensive care unit and any intervention should be delayed. Percutaneous drainage can be utilized first and early in the course of the disease, followed by endoscopic drainage or video assisted retroperitoneoscopic drainage if necrosectomy is deemed necessary. Open surgery is now less frequently performed and should be reserved for cases refractory to any other approach. The management of necrotizing pancreatitis therefore requires a multidisciplinary dynamic model of approach rather than being a surgical disease. PMID:25473162

  13. [Cutaneous necrotic loxoscelism. A case report].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Olivas, Manuel Anastacio; Valencia-Zavala, Martha Patricia; Sánchez-Olivas, Jesús Alberto; Sepulveda-Velázquez, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Brown recluse (Loxosceles spp.) spiders are arachnid species known to cause necrotic arachnidism. The envenomation, described as loxoscelism, is associated with localized pain, erythema, and edema followed by the development of necrosis. However, the specific pathophysiological mechanisms by which Loxosceles venom exerts these noxious symptoms are multifactorial and not fully understood. The causative factor for production of necrotic lesions is generally considered to be the enzyme sphingomyelinase D (SMD), which cleaves sphingomyelin to form choline and ceramide 1-phosphate. Four active forms of SMD with molecular weight of 32 000 are found in L recluse. Sphingomyelinases of comparable size are also described in the venoms of Loxosceles intermedia, gaucho and laeta. Here we describe the case of a young male adult who suffered a spider bite on his left forearm which evolved into a necrotic lesion, and after a few days the injury healed completely. One week later the patient developed two similar lesions on his left leg. The diagnosis was established by clinical data and by biopsy findings. The patient did not developed systemic complications.

  14. Rare Complication of Stomas: Peristomal Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Peker, Kivanc Derya; Ilhan, Burak M

    2016-12-01

    A stoma formation is a frequently performed procedure in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Although stoma formation is a simple process, it should be performed with caution. The aim of this study was to attract physicians' attention to this rare disease and also to identify the surgical and medical treatment options for peristomal necrotizing fasciitis as a rare complication. Risk factors including age, sex, additional diseases, previous surgical procedures, source of infection, physical findings, and vital signs of 14 patients with peristomal necrotizing fasciitis over a period of 10 years from 2005 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Of the 14 patients, 9 were men and 5 were women. The average age was 63.28 years (range, 45-85 years). Risk factors were also observed: diabetes mellitus, 4 (28.57%); obesity, 3 (21.42%); alcoholism, 1 (7.14%); and malignancy, 10 (71.42%). Prophylactic antibiotic treatment was given to all patients, and they all underwent debridement and stoma replacement. Peristomal necrotizing fasciitis is an urgent and mortal disease. Risk factors, physical findings, and infection sources should be determined, and treatment modalities should be applied immediately. Medical treatment and surgical options should be performed, and vacuum devices should also be considered when treating this complication.

  15. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  16. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Yolanda; Torrelo, Antonio; Colmenero, Isabel; Zambrano, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign proliferation of the oral mucosa with well defined clinical and histological characteristics. It has been associated with infection of the oral mucosa by types 13 and 32 of the human papillomavirus (HPV), and to a lesser extent, with other types. Its clinical course is variable, although it usually persists for months or years; cases with spontaneous resolution have been described, as have others with prolonged persistence. We present the case of an Ecuadorian boy whose visit was motivated by lesions in the oral mucosa consistent with a diagnosis of FEH, which were confirmed in the histological study, and in which HPV type 13 DNA was identified.

  17. CD11b is protective in complement-mediated immune complex glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessy J; Chaves, Lee D; Chang, Anthony; Jacob, Alexander; Ritchie, Maria; Quigg, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    In chronic serum sickness, glomerular immune complexes form, yet C57BL/6 mice do not develop glomerulonephritis unless complement factor H (CfH) is absent, indicating the relevance of complement regulation. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b) and Fcγ receptors on leukocytes, and CfH on platelets, can bind immune complexes. Here we induced immune complex–mediated glomerulonephritis in CfH−/− mice chimeric for wild-type, CfH−/−, CD11b−/−, or FcRγ−/− bone marrow stem cells. Glomerulonephritis was worse in CD11b−/− chimeras compared with all others, whereas disease in FcRγ−/− and wild-type chimeras was comparable. Disease tracked strongly with humoral immune responses, but not glomerular immune complex deposits. Interstitial inflammation with M1 macrophages strongly correlated with glomerulonephritis scores. CD11b−/− chimeras had significantly more M1 macrophages and CD4+ T cells. The renal dendritic cell populations originating from bone marrow–derived CD11c+ cells were similar in all experimental groups. CD11b+ cells bearing colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor were present in kidneys, including CD11b−/− chimeras; these cells correlated negatively with glomerulonephritis scores. Thus, experimental immune complex–mediated glomerulonephritis is associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages and CD4+ T cells in kidneys and functional renal insufficiency. Hence, CD11b on mononuclear cells is instrumental in generating an anti-inflammatory response in the inflamed kidney. PMID:25565310

  18. Adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen for necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Levett, Denny; Bennett, Michael H; Millar, Ian

    2015-01-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) involves the therapeutic administration of 100% oxygen in a pressure chamber at pressures above one atmosphere absolute. This therapy has been used as an adjunct to surgery and antibiotics in the treatment of patients with necrotizing fasciitis with the aim of reducing morbidity and mortality. To review the evidence concerning the use of HBOT as an adjunctive treatment for patients with necrotizing fasciitis (NF). Specifically, we wish to address the following questions.1. Does administration of HBOT reduce mortality or morbidity associated with NF?2. What adverse effects are associated with use of HBOT in the treatment of individuals with NF? We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE Ovid (1966 to September 2014); the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) Ovid (1982 to September 2014); EMBASE Ovid (1980 to September 2014); and the Database of Randomised Controlled Trials in Hyperbaric Medicine (DORCTHIM, M Bennett) (from inception to September 2014). In addition, we performed a systematic search of specific hyperbaric literature sources. This included handsearching of relevant hyperbaric textbooks; hyperbaric journals (Hyperbaric Medicine Review, South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society Journal, European Journal of Underwater and Hyperbaric Medicine, Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine Journal); and conference proceedings of the major hyperbaric societies (Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society, European Underwater and Baromedical Society, International Congress of Hyperbaric Medicine). We included all randomized and pseudo-randomized trials (trials in which an attempt at randomization has been made but the method was inappropriate, for example, alternate allocation) that compared the effects of HBOT with the effects of no HBOT (no treatment or sham) in the treatment of children and adults with necrotizing

  19. Implications of Antiphospholipid and Antineutrophilic Cytoplasmic Antibodies in the Context of Postinfectious Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    While antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positivity has been documented in some patients with postinfectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) and is associated with more severe disease, antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) are not known to be a common occurrence. We describe a child with severe acute kidney injury who was noted to have prolonged positivity of both ANCA and APA; a renal biopsy showed noncrescentic immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis with subepithelial deposits compatible with PIGN. He recovered without maintenance immunosuppressive therapy and at last follow-up had normal renal function. We discuss the cooccurrence and implications of ANCA and APA in children with PIGN. PMID:28255306

  20. [Goodpasture syndrome and (idiopathic) immune complex glomerulonephritis with pulmonary hemorrhage: 2 different syndromes?].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, M; Gartmann, J; Grob, P J; Widder, W; Hartmann, G

    1984-06-23

    While Goodpasture syndrome was previously defined purely clinically by the combination of pneumorrhagia and glomerulonephritis, today the following immunologic criteria must also be satisfied: evidence, provided by immunofluorescent investigation of the kidneys and lungs, of antibasement membrane antibodies in the serum and linear deposits of immunoglobulins, due to direct apposition of antibasement membrane antibodies. Cases where the lesions are caused by immune complexes should no longer be designated as Goodpasture syndrome. In the light of one of our own cases of immune complex glomerulonephritis with pneumorrhagia, the question is raised whether this subdivision by means of immunologic investigations is meaningful for the clinician.

  1. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate. Ulcerative or necrotizing stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati?

    PubMed

    Philipsen, H P; Petersen, J K; Simonsen, B H

    1976-12-01

    A typical case of the recently described tumor-suspect lesion, necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) of the palate, in a 54-year old Caucasian male is presented. Results of complete blood- and urinanalysis including serum electrophoresis and labial salivary gland biopsy strongly pointed at a local etiologic factor. Previous statements that the disease represents a new entity are questioned. The present authors favor the idea that NS is the necrotizing (ulcerative) or terminal stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati (nicotinic stomatitis). It is of particular importance that this lesion is not diagnosed as a malignancy, as it heals spontaneously and uneventfully.

  2. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Youn; Park, So Young; Moon, Soo-Youn; Son, Jun Seong; Lee, Mi Suk

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is known to be a highly lethal infection of deep-seated subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia. Reports of necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae are exceedingly rare. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a 62-yr-old man with liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. He presented with painful swelling of left leg and right hand. On the day of admission, compartment syndrome was aggravated and the patient underwent surgical exploration. Intra-operative findings revealed necrotizing fasciitis and cultures of two blood samples and wound aspirates showed S. pneumoniae. The patient died despite debridement and proper antimicrobial treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis with meningitis reported in Korea. We also review and discuss the literature on pneumococcal necrotizing fasciitis.

  3. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by a primary appendicocutaneous fistula.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Makoto; Higashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Tuyoshi; Hiraide, Takanori; Maruo, Hirotoshi

    2012-08-01

    We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the loin of a 76-year old man with several coexisting or past health issues, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, alcohol-related liver cirrhosis, gastrectomy for gastric cancer, subarachnoid hemorrhage, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and cerebral infarction. Incision of the necrotizing fasciitis was successful, but it revealed an appendicocutaneous fistula; thus, we performed appendectomy and fistulectomy. We think that the necrotizing fasciitis was caused by appendicitis perforation involving the retroperitoneum, inducing the formation of an appendicocutaneous fistula. Necrotizing fasciitis and appendicocutaneous fistulae are rare complications of appendicitis. Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first report of fluoroscopic examination demonstrating that a primary appendicocutaneous fistula had caused necrotizing fasciitis. Our search of the literature found 12 cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by preoperative appendicitis. We discuss the characteristics and findings of these cases.

  4. Scrotal Abscess: A Rare Presentation of Complicated Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mirhashemi, Seyyedhadi; Soori, Mohsen; Faghih, Gholamhossein; Peyvandi, Hassan; Shafagh, Omid

    2017-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by activation of digestive enzymes inside the pancreas. In severe pancreatitis, necrosis of pancreas and surrounding tissues may occur. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis commonly presents as pancreatic abscess occasionally with systemic complications. Rarely, necrotic tissue may be drained from scrotum due to retroperitoneal extension of necrotic process. Here, we report a case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 29-year-old man who presented with severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. A computerized tomography (CT) scan confirmed necrotizing pancreatitis with multiple abscesses spreading bilaterally in the pelvic cavity. Several surgical operations were performed, including necrosectomy and drainage. Subsequently, the patient developed a scrotal abscess, which was drained surgically. The patient's condition was complicated by pleural effusion, acute respiratory distress syndrome, colocutaneous and scrotal fistulas, and incisional hernia. It seems that the scrotal abscess is a very rare complication of necrotizing pancreatitis.

  5. The prognosis and pathogenesis of severe lupus glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Melvin M; Korbet, Stephen M; Lewis, Edmund J

    2008-04-01

    The International Society of Nephrology/ Renal Pathology Society classification (ISN/RPS) of lupus glomerulonephritis (GN) divides diffuse GN (>/=50% involvement) into diffuse segmental (IV-S) and diffuse global GN (IV-G). This division tests whether the pathogenesis and clinical outcomes are the same as when similar patients are classified using the World Health Organization (WHO) classification into severe segmental (WHO III >/=50%) and diffuse global (WHO-IV) GN. Thirty-nine renal biopsies with WHO class IV and 44 with WHO III >/= 50% were reclassified using the ISN/RPS and were correlated with pathogenesis and outcome. There were 22 biopsies with ISN/RPS class IV-S. ISN/RPS class IV-G comprises two morphologically discrete classes of renal biopsies: 39 biopsies originally classified as WHO class IV (WHO-IV) and 22 that switched from WHO III >/=50% to ISN/RPS class IV-G (IV-Q). We will analyze IV-S, IV-Q and WHO-IV separately. WHO-IV had significantly more immune aggregate deposition than IV-S and IV-Q. WHO-IV had lower serum complements C3 (P = 0.05) and C4 (P = 0.05) than patients with IV-Q. Patients with WHO-IV had more remissions (56%) than IV-Q (23%) (P = 0.01), and stable renal function at the last follow-up was less frequent in patients with IV-Q (18%) than IV-S (50%, P = 0.05) and WHO-IV (62%, P = 0.001). Renal survival and renal survival without end-stage renal disease were different when the patients were diagnosed as WHO classes III >/=50% and IV, but the outcomes for ISN/RPS class IV-S and IV-G (WHO-IV plus IV-Q) were not different. WHO III >/=50% and WHO-IV lupus GN are not congruent with ISN/RPS IV-S and IV-G. The ISN/RPS minimizes pathological and outcome differences between classes IV-S and IV-G which results in the loss of informational content from the renal biopsies. ISN/RPS does not detect pathogenetic or clinical differences among patients with severe lupus GN.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Atlas, S.W.; Grossman, R.I.; Packer, R.J.; Goldberg, H.I.; Hackney, D.B.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1987-01-01

    Disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy is a rare syndrome of progressive neurologic deterioration seen most often in patients who have received central nervous system irradiation combined with intrathecal or systemic chemotherapy in the treatment or prophylaxis of various malignancies. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive than computed tomography in detecting white matter abnormalities in the case of disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy reported here. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in diagnosing incipient white matter changes in disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy, thus permitting early, appropriate therapeutic modifications.

  7. Focal plane polarimeter design

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.B.

    1983-10-12

    Measurement of polarization transfer or so-called triple-scattering parameters have been made recently for proton-nucleon scattering at TRIUMF, SIN, and LAMPF using carbon polarimeters and have been essential in determining the proton-nucleon amplitudes up to 800 MeV. An extension to the case is described where the scattered proton polarization is analyzed after passage through some type of spectrometer. Most of the experience with this type of focal plane polarimeter (FPP) has been gained in the field of proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies but is certainly not confined to such specific cases. The salient features of an FPP are emphasized by describing a minimal system which includes all the necessary components then go on to a more complete system. 10 references. (WHK)

  8. Extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Shoryabi, Ali; Adhami, Shahrzad; Mehrabizadeh Honarmand, Hoda

    2010-01-01

    Heck's disease or focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign contagious disease caused by human papillomavirus types 13 or 32. It occurs with low frequency in the Iranian population. This condition is characterized by the occurrence of multiple, small papules or nodules in the oral cavity, especially on the labial and buccal mucosa and tongue. In some populations, up to 39% of children are affected. Conservative surgical excision of lesions may be performed for diagnostic or aesthetic purposes. The risk of recurrence after this therapy is minimal, and there seems to be no malignant transformation potential. In the present work, we presented the clinical case of a 12-year-old Iranian girl with oral lesions that clinically and histologically correspond to Heck's disease.

  9. Postoperative Necrotizing Scleritis: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudipta; Saurabh, Kumar; Biswas, Jyotrimay

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative necrotizing scleritis should be considered in cases of persistent localized postoperative inflammation following all forms of surgical trauma. We present the history, clinical findings, and follow-up data of four patients with postoperative necrotizing scleritis. The clinical records of four patients who developed scleritis following ocular surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The first step in managing necrotizing scleritis is to rule out infectious etiology. Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis is an immune-mediated condition that can coexist with concomitant infectious condition, i.e. endophthalmitis, but response to immunosuppression leads to resolution of the disease and verifies the diagnosis. PMID:25371644

  10. C4d immunohistochemical staining is a sensitive method to confirm immunoreactant deposition in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue in membranous glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Val-Bernal, J F; Garijo, M F; Val, D; Rodrigo, E; Arias, M

    2011-11-01

    Although the diagnosis of membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) may be suspected on routine histology of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, fresh-frozen tissue must be used to show the immunologic nature of the process by direct immunofluorescence (IF). The efficiency of IF or immunoperoxidase (IP) detection of IgG and C3 using paraffin sections is controversial. This study was designed to evaluate whether glomerular C4d deposition using an IP method in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue may be a useful marker for MGN. We showed characteristic glomerular, granular basement membrane deposition of C4d in 31 (100%) cases of idiopathic MGN and in 5 cases (100%) of pure class V membranous lupus nephritis, in which we had a positive diagnosis of the lesions for conventional IF study. Control cases were negative. Nineteen cases of different glomerulopathies, including IgA nephropathy, primary type I membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and minimal change disease showed diverse reproducible patterns of C4d deposition, without intrinsic background. Our results indicate that staining of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue for C4d can be used for confirmation of granular basement membrane immunoreactant deposition in cases of MGN. This proved to be a reliable method that could potentially obviate the need for rebiopsy in cases with absence of glomeruli in renal frozen sections or when other adjunct IF or IP methods on paraffin sections are negative. C4d immunostaining, using an IP method, deserves a place as an adjunct method in the biopsy diagnosis of MGN.

  11. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis in the elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazzella, Antonio; Santagata, Mario; Cecere, Atirge; La Mart, Ettore; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Tartaro, Gianpaolo; Tafuri, Domenico; Testa, Domenico; Grella, Edoardo; Perrotta, Fabio; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Santini, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Descending Necrotizing Mediastinitis (DNM) is a polymicrobic, dangerous and often fatal process, arising from head or neck infections and spreading along the deep fascial cervical planes, descending into the mediastinum. It can rapidly progress to sepsis and can frequently lead to death. It has a high mortality rate, up to 40% in the different series, as described in the literature. Surgical and therapeutic management has been discussed for long time especially in an elderly patient population. The literature has been reviewed in order to evaluate different pathogenesis and evolution and to recognise a correct therapeutic management. PMID:28352835

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis: strategies for diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Taviloglu, Korhan; Yanar, Hakan

    2007-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is uncommon and difficult to diagnose, and it cause progressive morbidity until the infectious process is diagnosed and treated medically and surgically. The literature addressed NF contains confusing information, inaccurate bacteriologic data, and antiquated antibiotic therapy. A delay in diagnosis is associated with a grave prognosis and increased mortality. The main goal of the clinician must be to establish the diagnosis and initially treat the patient within the standard of care. This review is planned as a guide for the clinician in making an early diagnosis of NF and initiating effective medical and surgical therapy. PMID:17683625

  13. Association of Generalized Psoriasis and Mixed Glomerulonephritis in a 10-year-old Girl.

    PubMed

    Milošević, Danko; Husar, Karmela; Batinić, Danica; Ćorić, Marijana; Jović, Anamaria; Turudić, Daniel; Pelajić, Stipe; Dumić Čule, Ivo

    2017-07-01

    Generalized psoriasis and renal function disorder were previously described in sporadic adult cases, revealing a new entity - psoriatic nephropathy. So far there have been only two cases describing this association in children. We present and discuss a case of 10-year-old girl with the unique biopsy findings of double glomerulonephritis associated with the simultaneous onset of generalized psoriasis.

  14. [Prophylaxis and prognosis of preeclampsia in patients with chronic pyelonephritis and chronic glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Zufarova, Sh A

    2010-01-01

    The investigations performed showed that pregnant women with chronic pyelonephritis (CP) and chronic glomerulonephritis (CG) have certain response to therapy done in accordance with level of kidney function activity. In the pregnant women with CP and CG and kidney functional reserve KFR > 10% and from 5 to 10% the treatment efficacy was higher and practically absent in pregnant women with KFR < 5%.

  15. [Efficiency of a complex preventive therapy including wobenzym in pregnant women with chronic pyelonephritis and glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Zufarova, Sh A

    2010-01-01

    Pregnant women with pyelonephritis (PN) and glomerulonephritis (GN) were shown to have response to the therapy in accordance with level of kidney functional activity. The women with PN and GN have the treatment efficacy higher with Kidney Functional Reserve KFR > 10% and from 5 to 10% and practically absent in pregnant women with KFR < 5% (Kidney functional reserve).

  16. Brief communication: Glomerulonephritis in patients with hepatitis C cirrhosis undergoing liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Brendan M; Julian, Bruce A; Bynon, J Steve; Cook, William J; King, Steven J; Curtis, John J; Accortt, Neil A; Eckhoff, Devin E

    2006-05-16

    Patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) frequently develop renal failure after liver transplantation. To describe renal histologic characteristics and concomitant clinical features in HCV-infected patients with end-stage cirrhosis. Case series. Single-center liver transplant program in the United States. 30 patients who received liver transplants for HCV-induced cirrhosis. Kidney biopsy during liver engraftment. Clinical data and laboratory tests of renal function within 6 months before liver transplantation. Twenty-five patients had immune-complex glomerulonephritis: membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type 1 (n = 12), IgA nephropathy (n = 7), and mesangial glomerulonephritis (n = 6). Of these patients, 10 had normal serum creatinine levels, normal urinalysis results, and normal quantitative proteinuria. For 5 others, the only renal abnormality was an increased serum creatinine level. No patient had cryoglobulins in the blood or kidney. This small observational study did not include patients with nonviral cirrhosis and did not document post-transplantation outcomes. Immune-complex glomerulonephritis was common in patients with end-stage HCV-induced cirrhosis and was often clinically silent. Its potential to cause renal failure after liver transplantation may be underappreciated.

  17. HBV-Associated Postinfectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Report of 10 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Junxia; Peng, Weihua; Yu, Guoqing; Wang, Liping; Chen, Jian; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Postinfectious acute glomerulonephritis (PIGN) may occur after various bacterial and viral infections. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a cause of chronic glomerulonephritis. We report here 10 cases (ages 7–20 years-old) of chronic HBV carriers with acute glomerulonephritis, with positive glomerular staining of hepatitis B surface antigen, and detectable presence of HBV DNA in the glomeruli. This form of PIGN, HBV-PIGN, has not been previously identified. To further characterize clinical and pathological features of HBV- PIGN, we selected 10 cases of age-matched non-HBV PIGN for comparison. While both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN similarly presented as proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension, there was a trend of higher acute kidney injury and worsened prognosis in HBV-PIGN. 6 months after the onset, 4 patients with HBV associated PIGN did not show improvement from the disease, whereas all patients with non-HBV PIGN had complete or partial recovery. Pathologically, both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN showed typical diffuse glomerular endocapillary proliferation, but HBV associated PIGN differed from classical PIGN with much fewer sub-epithelial glomerular “hump-shape” immune complex depositions. In conclusion, we have identified a novel association of HBV infection with acute glomerulonephritis. PMID:27512989

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus with membranous glomerulonephritis and transverse myelitis associated with anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Radis, C D; Callis, K P

    1997-10-01

    This report describes a 29-year-old bodybuilder taking anabolic steroids who presented with urinary retention, arthralgias, and peripheral edema, subsequently developed acute lower-extremity paralysis, and was diagnosed as having transverse myelitis and membranous glomerulonephritis secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The association of anabolic steroid use and hyperprolactinemia, and their possible link to the development of SLE, are reviewed.

  19. Bartonella Endocarditis and Pauci-Immune Glomerulonephritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Jillian E; Raybould, Alison L; Morales, Megan K; Zaheer, Misbah; Lipkowitz, Michael S; Timpone, Joseph G; Kumar, Princy N

    2016-09-01

    Among culture-negative endocarditis in the United States, Bartonella species are the most common cause, with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana comprising the majority of cases. Kidney manifestations, particularly glomerulonephritis, are common sequelae of infectious endocarditis, with nearly half of all Bartonella patients demonstrating renal involvement. Although a pauci-immune pattern is a frequent finding in infectious endocarditis-associated glomerulonephritis, it is rarely reported in Bartonella endocarditis. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positivity can be seen with many pathogens causing endocarditis and has been previously reported with Bartonella species. In addition, ANCA-associated vasculitis can also present with renal and cardiac involvement, including noninfectious valvular vegetations and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Given the overlap in their clinical presentation, it is difficult to differentiate between Bartonella endocarditis and ANCA-associated vasculitis but imperative to do so to guide management decisions. We present a case of ANCA-positive Bartonella endocarditis with associated pauci-immune glomerulonephritis that was successfully treated with medical management alone.

  20. Crescentic glomerulonephritis: a possible complication of streptokinase treatment for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, N; Lyons, J; Chappell, M

    1986-01-01

    Twenty days after a streptokinase infusion given for myocardial infarction, a patient developed a group G streptococcal throat infection. Thirteen days later he presented with a serum sickness type illness and progressive renal failure. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:3790385

  1. Glomerular nitrite synthesis in in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, H. T.; Sullivan, R.

    1991-01-01

    Nitrite (NO2-) is the major end product of nitric oxide (NO) production in cell culture. The authors have examined nitrite production by glomeruli in in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat. Glomerulonephritis was induced by unilateral renal perfusion of cationized human gamma G immunoglobulin (IgG) in preimmunized rats. NO2- was measured in culture supernatants of isolated glomeruli after 48 hours. NO2- was produced by nephritic glomeruli with a maximum 4 days after induction of glomerulonephritis (24.4 +/- 11.4 pmol/glomerulus/48 hours). Production was increased by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 micrograms/ml) (54 +/- 4.9 pmol/glomerulus; P less than 0.001). NO2- production was inhibited by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine demonstrating synthesis through NO. Dexamethasone (10(-7) mol/l [molar]) reduced LPS-stimulated production by peritoneal macrophages and nephritic glomeruli (P less than 0.01). Macrophages isolated from nephritic glomeruli produced NO2- (4.9 +/- 0.6 nmols/10(5) cells). The production of NO by nephritic glomeruli has implications for mechanisms of glomerular injury and glomerular hemodynamics. The effect of dexamethasone may explain in part the ameliorative effect of steroids in glomerulonephritis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1951626

  2. A rare adult case of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis with a retropharyngeal abscess.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Sae; Nonaka, Mai; Matsumoto, Keiichiro; Awanami, Yuki; Yamasaki, Masatora; Fukuda, Makoto; Miyazono, Motoaki; Ikeda, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    Retropharyngeal abscess is an infection involving the retropharyngeal space which is posterior to the pharynx and oesophagus, and it results as a complication of a primary infection elsewhere in the head and neck including the nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, or middle ear, which drain lymph to the retropharyngeal lymph nodes. Their lymph nodes are prominent in children and atrophy with age. Therefore, retropharyngeal abscess is most frequently encountered in children, with 75% of cases occurring before the age of 5 years, and often in the first year of life. We experienced a rare adult case of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis with a retropharyngeal abscess, and conservative therapy ameliorated them. According to past reports, only one child with a retropharyngeal abscess and poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis has been presented at a conference to date; this is the first adult case of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis with a retropharyngeal abscess. Retropharyngeal abscess can be fatal including airway compression, so it is important to remember retropharyngeal abscess in a case of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis with severe symptoms of neck.

  3. Interleukin-6 exacerbates glomerulonephritis in (NZB x NZW)F1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ryffel, B.; Car, B. D.; Gunn, H.; Roman, D.; Hiestand, P.; Mihatsch, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ability of interleukin-6 (IL-6) to modulate immune parameters and mesangial cell function suggests a role for this cytokine in the development of autoimmune glomerulonephritis. This hypothesis was tested in 6-month-old female (NZB x NZW)F1 mice that were administered recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) (50 and 250 micrograms/kg s.c.) for 12 weeks, resulting in an accelerated and severe form of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with marked upregulation of mesangial major histocompatibility complex class II antigen and glomerular ICAM-1 expression. To distinguish direct effects of rhIL-6 on the renal mesangium from those mediated through the immune system, (NZB x NZW)F1 mice were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin. Immunosuppression by cyclosporin inhibited the development of glomerulonephritis, decreased class II antigen expression, and abrogated IL-6-mediated effects. Administration of neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibody had no effect on the spontaneous development of glomerulonephritis in (NZB x NZW)F1 mice. This finding, together with undetectable IL-6 serum levels, makes a pathogenetic role of endogenously produced IL-6 in this disease model unlikely. In contrast to (NZB x NZW)F1 mice, parental NZW or BALB/c mice given high doses of rhIL-6 (500 micrograms/kg) or recombinant murine IL-6 (100 micrograms/kg) daily for 4 weeks failed to develop morphological or biochemical evidence of glomerulonephritis. Induction of acute phase proteins, anemia, thrombocytosis, and induction of renal class II antigen confirmed the biological activity of IL-6 in these mice. In conclusion, while non-nephritogenic in normal mice, IL-6 accelerates the development of the genetically determined glomerulonephritis of (NZB x NZW)F1 mice through effects mediated by a modulated immune system. Since neutralizing IL-6 antibody treatment did not prevent the development of glomerulonephritis, it is unlikely that increased IL-6 production plays a role in the pathogenesis of lupus

  4. Urinary cystatin C as a renal biomarker and its immunohistochemical localization in anti-GBM glomerulonephritis rats.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yuko; Imura, Naoko; Miyamoto, Yohei

    2013-11-01

    The usefulness of urinary cystatin C for the early detection of renal damage in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis rats was investigated and compared to other biomarkers (β2-microglobulin, calbindin, clusterin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), alpha-glutathione S-transferase (GST-α), mu-glutathione S-transferase (GST-μ), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), osteopontin, tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease-1 (TIMP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)). Urinary levels of cystatin C increased in anti-GBM glomerulonephritis rats, whereas the conventional markers, plasma creatinine and UN did not, demonstrating its usefulness for the early detection of renal damage associated with anti-GBM glomerulonephritis. As well as cystatin C, urinary β2-microglobulin, clusterin, GST-α, GST-μ, KIM-1, and NGAL also had the potential to detect renal damage associated with anti-GBM glomerulonephritis. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical localization of cystatin C in the kidney was examined. Cystatin C expression was mainly observed in the proximal renal tubules in anti-GBM glomerulonephritis rats, and its expression barely changed with the progression of glomerulonephritis. Cystatin C expression was also observed in the tubular lumen of the cortex and medulla when glomerulonephritis was marked, which was considered to be characteristic of renal damage. In conclusion, urinary cystatin C, β2-microglobulin, clusterin, GST-α, GST-μ, KIM-1, and NGAL could be useful biomarkers of renal damage in anti-GBM glomerulonephritis rats. Immunohistochemical cystatin C expression in the proximal renal tubules was barely changed by the progression of glomerulonephritis, but it was newly observed in the tubular lumen when renal damage was apparent. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. NF-κB upregulates ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 1 in diseased podocytes in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxia; Mao, Xing; Sun, Yu; Hu, Ruimin; Luo, Weili; Zhao, Zhonghua; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    Podocyte injury is a pivotal factor during the progression of glomerular diseases. It has been demonstrated that the expression of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is increased in injured podocytes in a number of types of glomerulonephritis. However, its mechanism of regulation remains to be elucidated. A previous study by our group suggested that UCH-L1 is a downstream protein of nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling. In the present study, the involvement of NF-κB in the regulation of the expression of UCH-L1 was investigated in diseased podocytes in vivo and in vitro. Increases in the expression of phosphorylated NF-κB at p65 and UCH-L1 were detected using immunohistochemical analysis of kidney biopsy tissues from 56 cases of nephritis, including immunoglobulin A nephropathy, membranous glomerulonephritis and lupus nephritis. The two indicators were also analyzed using western blot analysis in cultured murine podocytes stimulated by inflammatory factors. The results of the present study demonstrated that in human renal biopsies of several cases of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis, the increases of NF-κB and UCH-L1 were positively correlated with the number of diseased podocytes. By contrast, in non-immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis, no clear activation of NF-κB and increase of UCH-L1 expression was observed. In vitro, immune stimulation also led to the upregulation of UCH-L1 through the NF-κB signaling pathway in mouse podocytes. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that the activation of NF-κB and upregulation of UCH-L1 in podocytes may be vital in podocyte injury associated with immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis.

  6. The effects of soluble recombinant complement receptor 1 on complement-mediated experimental glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Couser, W G; Johnson, R J; Young, B A; Yeh, C G; Toth, C A; Rudolph, A R

    1995-05-01

    Complement is a major mediator of tissue injury in several types of glomerulonephritis. However, no therapeutic agents that inhibit complement activation are available for human use. sCR1 (TP10, BRL 55736) is a recombinant, soluble human complement receptor 1 (CR1) molecule lacking transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that inhibits C3 and C5 convertase activity by preferentially binding C4b and C3b. To test the efficacy of sCR1 on complement-mediated glomerulonephritis, rats were pretreated with sCR1 (60 mg/kg per day) before and during the induction of three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis (concanavalin A and antithymocyte serum models of proliferative glomerulonephritis, passive Heyman nephritis). Daily sCR1 and complement hemolytic activity levels were measured, and renal histology and urine protein excretion were examined. Mean serum sCR1 levels of 100 to 200 micrograms/mL were maintained with a reduction in complement hemolytic activity to less than 15% in most animals. In the antithymocyte serum model, sCR1-treated animals had significant reductions in mesangiolysis, glomerular platelet and macrophage infiltrates, and proteinuria at 48 h. In the concanavalin A model, sCR1 significantly reduced glomerular C3 and fibrin deposits, platelet infiltrates, and proteinuria at 48 h. In passive Heymann nephritis, proteinuria was also significantly reduced (199 +/- 8.5 versus 125 +/- 16 mg/day, P < 0.002) at 5 days. It was concluded that sCR1 significantly reduces both morphologic and functional consequences of several different types of complement-mediated glomerulonephritis and deserves evaluation as a potential therapeutic agent in complement-mediated immune glomerular disease in humans.

  7. Electromyogram-evoked focal myositis

    PubMed Central

    Snipes, George; Quan, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Focal myositis is a rarely reported inflammatory disease of skeletal muscle, particularly of an extremity. It is often misinterpreted as an infectious syndrome, leading to prolonged antibiotic use and a delay in immunosuppressive therapy. Without a confirmed etiology to date, we present a case of recurrent focal myositis following an electromyogram. PMID:28127151

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  9. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma associated with necrotizing scleritis.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Amir; Walsh, Noreen; Green, Peter; Dorey, Michael W; Seamone, Christopher; Pasternak, Sylvia

    2012-08-01

    A 57-year-old man presented to the ophthalmology clinic with a red right eye. He denied pain, diplopia, tearing, and blurred vision. His medical history included asymptomatic annular plaques on the trunk and extremities for at least a decade. Ophthalmological examination revealed a necrotizing scleritis of the right eye. Examination of the skin demonstrated variable sized annular plaques with central atrophy, some with prominent indurated border and yellow discoloration. No periorbital lesions were present. The ocular lesion rapidly progressed and areas of scleral melting developed in the right eye, which eventually required a scleral patch graft. The left eye also developed necrotizing scleritis with areas of scleral melting. Two sets of skin biopsies were performed a few weeks apart. An initial set of skin punch biopsies revealed extensive palisading granulomatous inflammation throughout the dermis, extending into the subcutis. The accompanying perivascular mononuclear infiltrate contained the collections of plasma cells. Scattered multinucleated giant cells were noted. The possibility of necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum was suggested. Subsequent skin biopsies showed more prominent and extensive necrobiosis, raising the possibility of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. Protein electrophoresis was performed, which revealed an IgG λ monoclonal protein.

  10. [Dermo-hypodermitis and necrotizing fasciitis].

    PubMed

    Zahar, J R; Brun-Buisson, C

    2001-03-31

    Acute gangrenous dermo-hypodermitis and necrotizing fasciitis are potentially life-threatening infections of skin and soft tissues, which may be difficult to recognize at an early stage. A combination of local signs (erythema, mottling, bullous formation) and of symptoms suggestive of sepsis should prompt early suspicion and therapeutic intervention. Group A streptococci remain the major pathogen involved in necrotizing fasciitis involving extremities, following minor trauma or surgery, and sometimes apparently spontaneously. The most severe form is streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, where production of exotoxins (superantigens) is a major factor contributing to the severity of the syndrome. A number of other pathogens, often combined in mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections may be involved, especially in post-surgical and perineal gangrene. Surgery remains the mainstay of therapy, and should be considered as soon as the clinical suspicion arises. Antibiotic therapy is based on penicillins (penicillin G for streptococcal gangrene, or beta-lactamases penicillins in polymicrobial infections). New therapeutic approaches (clindamycin and immunoglobulins) may be useful in streptococcal toxic shock. The prognosis appears to have improved in recent years with early therapeutic intervention, but remains largely dependent on the severity of the septic response and underlying diseases.

  11. An Unusual Necrotizing cholangiohepatitis in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Janet L.; Julian, Richard J.; Hampson, Robert J.; Trenton, Ron G.; Yo, Ignatius H.

    1988-01-01

    A diagnosis of toxic necrotizing cholangiohepatitis was made in approximately 35% of a flock of 23,000 commercial broiler chickens. Affected chickens were small, and had discrete green foci throughout the liver. Seven to twelve days prior to shipping the flock to slaughter, premixes containing oxytetracycline, monensin, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid had been added to the ration because the birds had wet droppings and were growing slowly. The 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid had been inadvertently incorporated at ten times the recommended level. Liver and kidney of affected birds had elevated levels of total arsenic, and special strains demonstrated arsenic in necrotic foci in liver. Histologically there was marked dilation of intrahepatic bile ducts, and patchy necrosis and hyperplasia of the bile duct epithelium. Damage to bile ducts may have been a toxic manifestation of altered metabolism and excretion of the three drugs being fed to birds suffering from intercurrent diarrhea and/or undefined interactions among the drugs. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17423098

  12. Growth of Necrotic Cores in Vulnerable Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Pak-Wing

    2011-03-01

    Plaques are fatty deposits that grow mainly in arteries and develop as a result of a chronic inflammatory response. Plaques are called vulnerable when they are prone to mechanical rupture. Vulnerable Plaques (VPs) are characterized by lipid-rich, necrotic cores that are heavily infiltrated with macrophages. The rupture of VPs releases thrombogenic agents into the bloodstream, usually resulting in myocardial infarctions. We propose a quantitative model to predict the development of a plaque's necrotic core. By solving coupled reaction-diffusion equations for macrophages and dead cells, we explore the joint effects of hypoxic cell death and chemo-attraction to Ox-LDL, a molecule that is strongly linked to atherosclerosis. Our model predicts cores that have approximately the right size and shape. Normal mode analysis and subsequent calculation of the smallest eigenvalues allow us to compute the times required for the system to reach its steady state. This study allows us to make quantitative predictions for how quickly vulnerable plaques develop and how their growth depends on system parameters such as chemotactic coefficients and cell death rates.

  13. A child with spider bite and glomerulonephritis: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Lung, J M; Mallory, S B

    2000-04-01

    coagulase negative staphylococci in the blood culture were considered to be a contaminant. Cefotaxime and oxacillin were given intravenously. His leg was elevated and cooled with ice packs. The patient's fever resolved within 24 h. The lesion became less erythematous and nontender with decreased warmth and lymphadenopathy. The child was discharged on Duricef for 10 days. Because the patient experienced hematuria rather than hemoglobinuria, nephritis was suggested. In this case, poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis was the most likely cause. His anti-streptolysin-O titer was elevated at 400 U (normal, <200 U) and C3 was 21.4 mg/dL (normal, 83-177 mg/dL). His urine lightened to yellow-brown in color. His blood pressure was normal. Renal ultrasound showed severe left hydronephrosis with cortical atrophy, probably secondary to chronic/congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction. His right kidney was normal.

  14. A case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis arising from chronic lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Jun, Young Joon; Kang, In Sook; Lee, Jung Ho; Kim, Sue Min; Kim, Young Jin

    2013-12-01

    Chronic lymphedema and lymphangitis are common adverse effects following treatment for gynecological cancer. Because the early symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis are similar to those of lymphangitis, fatal outcome can occur if patients or physicians underestimate this condition. Here, we present a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a patient with chronic lymphedema.

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis: contribution and limitations of diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Malghem, Jacques; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Omoumi, Patrick; Maldague, Baudouin E; Vande Berg, Bruno C

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, rapidly spreading, deep-seated infection causing thrombosis of the blood vessels located in the fascia. Necrotizing fasciitis is a surgical emergency. The diagnosis typically relies on clinical findings of severe sepsis and intense pain, although subacute forms may be difficult to recognize. Imaging studies can help to differentiate necrotizing fasciitis from infections located more superficially (dermohypodermitis). The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, which can be visualized using computed tomography and, above all, magnetic resonance imaging (high signal on contrast-enhanced T1 images and T2 images, best seen with fat saturation). These findings lack specificity, as they can be seen in non-necrotizing fasciitis and even in non-inflammatory conditions. Signs that support a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis include extensive involvement of the deep intermuscular fascias (high sensitivity but low specificity), thickening to more than 3mm, and partial or complete absence on post-gadolinium images of signal enhancement of the thickened fasciae (fairly high sensitivity and specificity). Ultrasonography is not recommended in adults, as the infiltration of the hypodermis blocks ultrasound transmission. Thus, imaging studies in patients with necrotizing fasciitis may be challenging to interpret. Although imaging may help to confirm deep tissue involvement and to evaluate lesion spread, it should never delay emergency surgical treatment in patients with established necrotizing fasciitis.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis in association with Ludwig's angina - A case report.

    PubMed

    Kavarodi, A M

    2011-07-01

    A 28 year old male diabetic patient developed Ludwig's angina which subsequently evolved into cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. The differential characteristic of Ludwig's angina and cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, as it relates to this rare presentation is discussed. The clinical and radiological features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management that resulted in a successful outcome are presented.

  17. How are necrotic cells recognized by their predators?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zao; Zhou, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Necrosis is a type of cell death often caused by cell injury and is linked to human diseases including neuron degeneration, stroke, and cancer. Cells undergoing necrosis are engulfed and degraded by engulfing cells, their predators. The mechanisms by which necrotic cells are recognized and removed remain elusive. Here we comment on our recent findings that reveal new molecular mechanisms of necrotic-cell recognition. Through studying the C. elegans touch neurons undergoing excitotoxic necrosis, we identified a receptor/ligand pair that enables engulfing cells to recognize necrotic neurons. The phagocytic receptor CED-1 is activated through interaction with its ligand phosphatidylserine (PS), exposed on the surface of necrotic cells. Furthermore, against the common belief that necrotic cells have ruptured plasma membrane, we found that necrotic C. elegans touch neurons actively present PS on their outer surfaces while maintaining plasma membrane integrity. We further identified 2 mechanisms governing the presentation of PS, one of which is shared with cells undergoing apoptosis, a “cell suicide” event, whereas the other is unique to necrotic neurons. The influx of Ca2+, a key necrosis-triggering factor, is implicated in activating a neuronal PS-scramblase for PS exposure. We propose that the mechanisms controlling PS-exposure and necrotic-cell recognition by engulfing cells are likely conserved from worms to humans. PMID:27073733

  18. Urinary intestinal fatty acid binding protein predicts necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Katherine E; Winston, Abigail B; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Dawood, Hassan Y; Fashemi, Titilayo; Fichorova, Raina N; Van Marter, Linda J

    2014-06-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis, characterized by sudden onset and rapid progression, remains the most significant gastrointestinal disorder among premature infants. In seeking a predictive biomarker, we found intestinal fatty acid binding protein, an indicator of enterocyte damage, was substantially increased within three and seven days before the diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis.

  19. Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Haemophilus influenzae Serotype f

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, Grant; St. Geme, Joseph W.; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a rare cause of soft tissue infection. In this report, we present a case of multifocal necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy adult patient, secondary to Haemophilus influenzae serotype f infection, and we review literature on this rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:24989609

  20. Periorbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to Candida parapsilosis and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Matthew; Chelnis, James; Mawn, Louise A

    Necrotizing fasciitis is most often caused by either polymicrobial bacterial infections or by Gram-positive organisms, such as Streptococcus or Staphylococcus; however, rare cases of fungal necrotizing fasciitis have been reported. Candida parapsilosis is an emerging fungal pathogen. This fungus grows in either a yeast or pseudohyphal form. C. parapsilosis has been reported to cause keratitis, intraocular infection, and seeding of frontalis slings. C. parapsilosis is a commensal of human skin and can be acquired by nosocomial spread. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Candida has rarely been reported, but to date C. parapsilosis has not been identified as the causative organism in necrotizing fasciitis. This is the first documented case of human periocular soft tissue infection by C. parapsilosis, and also the first report providing evidence of mycotic infection in a necrotizing fasciitis concurrently infected by Streptococcus pyogenes.

  1. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chi-Woong; Yoon, Hyun-Joong; Jung, Da-Woon; Lee, Sang-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is defined as rapidly progressive necrosis of subcutaneous fat and fascia. Although NF of the face is rare, its mortality rate is nearly 30%. It usually originates from dental infection and can lead to involvement of the neck, mediastinum, and chest wall. Complications resulting from pre-existing systemic diseases can increase the mortality rate. Known complication factors for NF include diabetes, malnutrition, advanced age, peripheral vascular disease, renal failure, and obesity. Here, we report a case of NF originating from dental infection in an 88-year-old woman already diagnosed with hypertension, thoracic aortic aneurysm, and renal diseases. Such conditions limited adequate surgical and antibiotic treatment. However, interdisciplinary treatment involving multiple departments was implemented with good results. PMID:27489813

  2. Necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the glans penis.

    PubMed

    Christodoulidou, Michelle; Bunker, Christopher B; Trevisan, Giorgia; Muneer, Asif

    2016-08-24

    We describe the case of a 73-year-old man who presented with a 10-month history of an ulcerating lesion on the glans penis. Initially this was thought to be an invasive squamous cell carcinoma but a biopsy showed histological features consistent with necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Extensive serological, immunological and microbiological tests only showed a positive antinuclear and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies indicating a possible autoimmune aetiology but an underlying systemic cause was not identified. Treatment with oral corticosteroids limited the inflammatory process but due to the gross destruction of the glans penis, he still required a glansectomy and split-skin graft reconstruction from which he recovered well. Although this patient ultimately required surgery for this rare presentation, this case highlights the differential diagnosis of penile ulceration (that transcends neoplasia) and the importance of performing and interpreting penile biopsies before undertaking potentially mutilating definitive surgery.

  3. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended.

  4. Epizootic necrotic enteritis in wild geese.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, G; Rainnie, D J

    1987-07-01

    Outbreaks of a disease characterized by severe necrotic enteritis occurred among Canada geese (Branta canadensis), lesser snow geese (Anser caerulescens), Ross' geese (A. rossi), and white-fronted geese (A. albifrons) on lakes in Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the autumn of 1983, 1984 and 1985. Ducks using the lakes were apparently not affected. Lesions in the geese closely resembled those described in enteritides in other species associated with the proliferation of Clostridium perfringens in the small intestine. Clostridium perfringens was present in large numbers in the affected areas of the intestine of the geese; other pathogens were not identified. It is hypothesized that an abrupt change in diet as geese begin to feed on grain disrupts the intestinal microflora, allowing C. perfringens to proliferate in the upper small intestine. Toxins produced by the bacteria then cause mucosal necrosis. Protease-inhibitory substances in some grains might also have a role in the disease.

  5. Necrotizing dermatitis in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dreizen, S; McCredie, K B; Bodey, G P; Keating, M J

    1987-03-01

    Necrotizing dermatitis in patients being treated with cancer chemotherapeutic agents can be of several types. Microbial causes can include a variety of bacteria and fungi, the most common being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Gangrene from occlusive causes is not uncommon among cancer patients with coexisting atheromatous, thromboembolic, or obliterative vascular disease. Toxic gangrene is most commonly caused by extravasation of intravenously administered cytotoxic antineoplastic drugs but has also been associated with the use of coumarin congeners and the bite of the brown recluse spider. Pyoderma gangrenosum is an idiopathic condition that has been reported in association with myeloproliferative disorders. Finally, necrosis can be caused by the neoplasm itself, when its growth is so great that blood vessels are compressed and ischemia of the surrounding tissue results.

  6. [Pathogenesis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) is a slowly progressive inflammatory destruction of lung tissue due to Aspergillus infection. The main radiographic features are chronic pulmonary infiltrates, progressive cavitation, and subsequent aspergilloma formation. Although pre-existing cavity is not seen, the presence of pre-existing airspaces such as emphysematous bullae, cannot be excluded. Chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis (CCPA), which is synonymous with complex aspergilloma, shows one or more pre-existing and / or newly formed pulmonary cavities that may or may not contain an aspergilloma, and cavity expansion and / or increasing pericavitary infiltrates. CNPA can be distinguished from CCPA by careful observation of progression of the cavitary lesion if a series of adequate radiography films are available. In some cases, however, it is difficult to distinguish the two subtypes if prior radiographs are not available Aiso, intermediate or overlapping types may exist. We therefore clinically and therapeutically proposed the syndrome including both CNPA and CCPA as chronic progressive pulmonary aspergillosis (CPPA).

  7. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in five Chihuahua dogs.

    PubMed

    Higgins, R J; Dickinson, P J; Kube, S A; Moore, P F; Couto, S S; Vernau, K M; Sturges, B K; Lecouteur, R A

    2008-05-01

    An acute to chronic idiopathic necrotizing meningoencephalitis was diagnosed in 5 Chihuahua dogs aged between 1.5 and 10 years. Presenting neurologic signs included seizures, blindness, mentation changes, and postural deficits occurring from 5 days to 5.5 months prior to presentation. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses from 2 of 3 dogs sampled were consistent with an inflammatory disease. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of 2 dogs demonstrated multifocal loss or collapse of cortical gray/white matter demarcation hypointense on T1-weighted images, with T2-weighted hyperintensity and slight postcontrast enhancement. Multifocal asymmetrical areas of necrosis or collapse in both gray and white matter of the cerebral hemispheres was seen grossly in 4 brains. Microscopically in all dogs, there was a severe, asymmetrical, intensely cellular, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis usually with cystic necrosis in subcortical white matter. There were no lesions in the mesencephalon or metencephalon except in 1 dog. Immunophenotyping defined populations of CD3, CD11d, CD18, CD20, CD45, CD45 RA, and CD79a immunoreactive inflammatory cells varying in density and location but common to acute and chronic lesions. In fresh frozen lesions, both CD1b,c and CD11c immunoreactive dendritic antigen-presenting cells were also identified. Immunoreactivity for canine distemper viral (CDV) antigen was negative in all dogs. The clinical signs, distribution pattern, and histologic type of lesions bear close similarities to necrotizing meningoencephalitis as described in series of both Pug and Maltese breed dogs and less commonly in other breeds.

  8. Absence of hypoalbuminemia despite nephrotic proteinuria in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis secondary to polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sükrü; Ozkan, Gülsüm; Sönmez, Mehmet; Mungan, Sevdegül; Kaynar, Kübra; Cansiz, Muammer; Kazaz, Nazli

    2010-01-01

    In addition to displaying geographic variation, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) has become the commonest cause of the nephrotic syndrome seen in adults in recent years. Secondary FSGS in particular, is observed when glomerular workload is increased. Polycythemia vera (PV) is a hematological disease characterized by abnormal proliferation in the erythroid series. The number of case reports belonging to glomerulonephritis secondary to PV is limited. In the literature, there are few reports of FSGS. One study pointed out that the presence of normoalbuminemia was detected in patients with FSGS secondary to hyperfiltration when there was nephrotic proteinuria. Here, we report a case of FSGS following a course with normoalbuminemia despite nephrotic range proteinuria developing secondary to PV. Our case is the first report in the literature with thes characteristics.

  9. Available and incoming therapies for idiopathic focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Belingheri, Mirco; Moroni, Gabriella; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2017-05-03

    Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a histological pattern clinically characterized by nephrotic proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, edema and dyslipidemia. Approximately 50% of patients progress to end-stage renal disease within 5-10 years, particularly those not responding to the therapies. FSGS pathogenesis is largely unknown and therapy is symptomatic and unspecific. The podocyte is considered as the pathogenetic main target and FSGS is now categorized as a podocytopathy together with minimal change disease, diffuse mesangial proliferation and collapsing glomerulonephritis. This paper provides an overview on the treatment of idiopathic FSGS in adults, citing the latest published trials and the most reliable pathogenetic hypotheses of the disease. A large part of the review then focuses on emerging therapies, specifying for each new drug the assumed mechanism of action and the data available in the literature on the drug's use in experimental animals and humans.

  10. Statistical Earthquake Focal Mechanism Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The new whole Earth focal mechanism forecast, based on the GCMT catalog, has been created. In the present forecast, the sum of normalized seismic moment tensors within 1000 km radius is calculated and the P- and T-axes for the focal mechanism are evaluated on the basis of the sum. Simultaneously we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms. This average angle shows tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The method was originally proposed by Kagan and Jackson (1994, JGR). Recent interest by CSEP and GEM has motivated some improvements, particularly to extend the previous forecast to polar and near-polar regions. The major problem in extending the forecast is the focal mechanism calculation on a spherical surface. In the previous forecast as our average focal mechanism was computed, it was assumed that longitude lines are approximately parallel within 1000 km radius. This is largely accurate in the equatorial and near-equatorial areas. However, when one approaches the 75 degree latitude, the longitude lines are no longer parallel: the bearing (azimuthal) difference at points separated by 1000 km reach about 35 degrees. In most situations a forecast point where we calculate an average focal mechanism is surrounded by earthquakes, so a bias should not be strong due to the difference effect cancellation. But if we move into polar regions, the bearing difference could approach 180 degrees. In a modified program focal mechanisms have been projected on a plane tangent to a sphere at a forecast point. New longitude axes which are parallel in the tangent plane are corrected for the bearing difference. A comparison with the old 75S-75N forecast shows that in equatorial regions the forecasted focal mechanisms are almost the same, and the difference in the forecasted focal mechanisms rotation angle is close to zero. However, though the forecasted focal mechanisms are similar

  11. Retroperitoneal Necrotizing Fasciitis Masquerading as Perianal Abscess - Rare and Perilous.

    PubMed

    Amaranathan, Anandhi; Sahoo, Ashok Kumar; Barathi, Deepak; Shankar, Gomathi; Sistla, Sarath Chandra

    2017-01-17

    Necrotizing fasciitis is one of the uncommon presentations of a rapidly spreading subcutaneous tissue infection. Although the actual cause is unclear in many cases, most of them are due to the rapid proliferation of microorganisms. Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis is extremely rare. It is a potentially lethal infection that requires immediate and aggressive surgical care. Early diagnosis is the key to a better prognosis. The possibility of retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients with symptoms of sepsis that are disproportionate to clinical findings. The rapid deterioration of the patient also gives a clue towards the diagnosis. We report a 35-year-old male with perianal abscess who had been progressed to retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis. The patient was managed successfully with aggressive debridement and drainage after laparotomy. Appropriate antibiotics were used to combat the sepsis. The patient recovered well at follow up, three months after discharge. Another patient, a 45-year-old male with a retroperitoneal abscess, progressed to retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis, and extra peritoneal drainage and debridement was done. Antibiotics depending upon the culture and sensitivity were used to control sepsis. But the patient succumbed to death 45 days after surgery due to uncontrolled sepsis. Necrotizing fasciitis of any anatomical site needs aggressive surgical care with early intervention. But retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis needs an extra effort for diagnosis. After diagnosis, it needs timely surgical intervention and appropriate antibiotic therapy for the recovery of the patients.

  12. [Cosmetic blepharoplasty complicated by necrotizing periorbital fasciitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Laouar, K; Ruban, J-M; Baggio, E; Dupeyron, G

    2012-06-01

    Necrotizing periorbital or palpebro-orbital fasciitis represents a unique anatomical site for necrotizing fasciitis, which is an extremely rare and very severe, potentially devastating bacterial infection, rapidly leading to facial necrosis with loss of vision and even death of the patient from toxic shock. In this paper, we report a case of necrotizing periorbital fasciitis as a complication of cosmetic lower eyelid blepharoplasty. Necrotizing fasciitis most often affects the upper and lower limbs, the trunk and the perineal area. It is rarely observed in the facial region due to the rich blood supply in this area. The most commonly implicated pathogen is group A, β-hemolytic "pyogenic"Streptococcus, either alone or in combination with other bacteria, such as staphylococcus or pseudomonas. Mortality varies according to the series and anatomical site. The mortality rate for necrotizing fasciitis is approximately 28 %. It is slightly lower in the periorbital area (15 %). Risk factors for death include alcoholism, diabetes mellitus, immunocompromise, hematologic or pulmonary diseases, and the identity of the causative agent (group A Streptococcus), although approximately 50 % of patients have no predisposing conditions. Management of periorbital necrotizing fasciitis is based on early detection of initial symptoms and on aggressive multidisciplinary treatment including surgical debridement of necrotic areas and antibiotic coverage. The timeliness of treatment and the multidisciplinary approach are considered to be the two essential factors in influencing the mortality and morbidity of this condition.

  13. Cadaver-based Necrotizing Fasciitis Model for Medical Training

    PubMed Central

    Mohty, Kurt M; Cravens, Matthew G; Adamas-Rappaport, William J; Amini-Shervin, Bahareh; Irving, Steven C; Stea, Nicholas; Adhikari, Srikar

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a devastating infectious disease process that is characterized by extensive soft tissue necrosis along deep fascial planes, systemic toxicity, and high mortality. Ultrasound imaging is a rapid and non-invasive tool that can be used to help make the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis by identifying several distinctive sonographic findings. The purpose of this study is to describe the construction of a realistic diagnostic training model for necrotizing fasciitis using fresh frozen cadavers and common, affordable materials. Presently, fresh non-embalmed cadavers have been used at medical institutions for various educational sessions including cadaver-based ultrasound training sessions. Details for the preparation and construction of a necrotizing fasciitis cadaver model are presented here. This paper shows that the images obtained from the cadaver model closely imitate the ultrasound appearance of fluid and gas seen in actual clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis. Therefore, it can be concluded that this cadaver-based model produces high-quality sonographic images that simulate those found in true cases of necrotizing fasciitis and is ideal for demonstrating the sonographic findings of necrotizing fasciitis. PMID:28507840

  14. Forty years abuse of baking soda, rhabdomyolysis, glomerulonephritis, hypertension leading to renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Terje; Koistinen, Arvo; Anttinen, Jorma; Wagner, Bodo; Miettinen, Marja

    2008-01-01

    We present a patient who had ingested sodium bicarbonate for treatment of alcoholic dyspepsia during forty years at increasing doses. During the last year he had used more than 50 grams daily. He presented with metabolic alkalosis, epileptic convulsions, subdural hematoma, hypertension and rhabdomyolysis with end stage renal failure, for which he had to be given regular intermittent hemodialysis treatment. Untreated hypertension and glomerulonephritis was probably present prior to all these acute incidents. Examination of the kidney biopsy revealed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and arterial wall thickening causing nephrosclerosis together with interstitial calcinosis. The combination of all these pathologic changes might be responsible for the development of progressive chronic renal failure ending up with the need for continuous intermittent hemodialysis treatment.

  15. Forty Years Abuse of Baking Soda, Rhabdomyolysis, Glomerulonephritis, Hypertension Leading to Renal Failure: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, Terje; Koistinen, Arvo; Anttinen, Jorma; Wagner, Bodo; Miettinen, Marja

    2008-01-01

    We present a patient who had ingested sodium bicarbonate for treatment of alcoholic dyspepsia during forty years at increasing doses. During the last year he had used more than 50 grams daily. He presented with metabolic alkalosis, epileptic convulsions, subdural hematoma, hypertension and rhabdomyolysis with end stage renal failure, for which he had to be given regular intermittent hemodialysis treatment. Untreated hypertension and glomerulonephritis was probably present prior to all these acute incidents. Examination of the kidney biopsy revealed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and arterial wall thickening causing nephrosclerosis together with interstitial calcinosis. The combination of all these pathologic changes might be responsible for the development of progressive chronic renal failure ending up with the need for continuous intermittent hemodialysis treatment. PMID:24179353

  16. [First case of primary IgA glomerulonephritis (Berger's disease) in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Diouf, B; Diao, M; Niang, A; Ka, E F; Moreira Diop, T

    1999-01-01

    Berger's disease or IgA glomerulonephritis is the most common glomerular nephropathy in Europe and represent a rare event in blacks. Here, we describe the case of a 43 years old black Senegalese whose disease was discovered while investigating a persistent proteinuria with high blood pressure and chronic renal failure, but without hematuria. We point out the uncommon feature of this clinical presentation and the importance of bad prognostic factors presented by this patient. We obtained a good outcome by means of converting enzyme inhibitors and corticosteroid therapies: regression of renal failure and normalization of blood pressure. The generalization of renal biopsy practice would lead to a better knowledge of the incidence of this disease among Senegalese people. Indeed, renal biopsy is the main tool to diagnose glomerulonephritis and subsequently adapt the therapy aimed at preventing the possible evolution to end stage renal disease.

  17. Coexistence of Acute Crescent Glomerulonephritis and IgG4-Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan; Yin, Jianyong; Bao, Hongda; Jiao, Qiong; Wu, Huijuan; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Niansong; Zhang, Zhigang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disorder that may involve almost each organ or system. IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) refers to renal lesions associated with IgG4-RD. The most frequent morphological type of renal lesions is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) which is associated with increased IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Case Report Herein, we present a rare case with coexisting IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis with concomitant severe tubulointerstitial lesions instead of classic IgG4-TIN. Conclusion IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis can occur in the same patient. This case may give us a clearer viewpoint of the disease. PMID:27504450

  18. Endostreptosin: isolation of the probable immunogen of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, W; Deol, H; Azadegan, A; Lange, K

    1989-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) is the consequence of the formation of antigen-antibody-complement complexes on the basement membrane of the glomerulus and that the antigen is of streptococcal origin. In cases of acute PSGN a high titre of specific antibodies to a streptococcal cytoplasmic extract can be found at the very beginning of the disease. This cytoplasmic antigen which we called endostreptosin (ESS) is probably the pathogenetic antigen of glomerulonephritis. It is deposited on the subendothelial side of the basement membrane in the first few days of the disease and is rapidly covered by newly-formed and specific antibody and complement with resultant immune injury causing signs and symptoms of symptomatic but also frequently asymptomatic acute glomerulonephritis. To further characterize and isolate ESS we used immunoaffinity chromatography and Western blotting techniques. PAGE analysis of the affinity-isolated ESS revealed the major component to have a molecular weight of approximately 45 kD. Sera from patients with PSGN or sera of rabbits immunized with affinity-isolated ESS reacted by Western blotting with at least one antigenic component with a molecular weight of approximately 45 kD. Normal human sera or the sera of non-immunized rabbits failed to demonstrate activity against this antigen. The basement membranes of the glomeruli of patients with very early PSGN stain with fluorescein-labelled gammaglobulin of patients with glomerulonephritis. This staining can be prevented when these sera are pre-absorbed with ESS but not by pre-absorption with intact cells or cytoplasmic extracts of other bacteria. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:2667818

  19. Acute Cardiac Tamponade in a 58-Year-Old Male with Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Bottinor, Wendy; Fronk, Daniel; Sadruddin, Salima; Foster, Harriet; Patel, Nilang; Prinz, Andreas; Jovin, Ion S

    2016-01-01

    Pericarditis in conjunction with nephritis is an uncommon clinical scenario with a broad differential diagnosis. We present the case of a 58-year-old male who developed nephritis and pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology. In the following, we discuss the differential diagnosis for concomitant nephritis and pericarditis and discuss the work-up performed on our patient. We also review the epidemiology of postinfectious glomerulonephritis in adults and describe previous cases of Streptococcus pyogenes pericarditis in the literature. PMID:27826373

  20. Renal biopsy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Not just lupus glomerulonephritis!

    PubMed

    Howell, David N

    2017-01-01

    Kidney biopsy is a mainstay in the diagnosis and management of renal disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Though biopsies from patients with lupus typically show various forms of immune complex glomerulonephritis, other pathologies are occasionally encountered, including unusual lupus-related nephropathies, other forms of autoimmune disease, and occasional renal disorders without any direct connection with lupus or autoimmunity. Electron microscopy is a powerful tool for detecting and classifying these unusual conditions, which frequently have important therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  1. Acute Cardiac Tamponade in a 58-Year-Old Male with Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bottinor, Wendy; Fronk, Daniel; Sadruddin, Salima; Foster, Harriet; Patel, Nilang; Prinz, Andreas; Jovin, Ion S

    2016-09-01

    Pericarditis in conjunction with nephritis is an uncommon clinical scenario with a broad differential diagnosis. We present the case of a 58-year-old male who developed nephritis and pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology. In the following, we discuss the differential diagnosis for concomitant nephritis and pericarditis and discuss the work-up performed on our patient. We also review the epidemiology of postinfectious glomerulonephritis in adults and describe previous cases of Streptococcus pyogenes pericarditis in the literature.

  2. Suppression of Rapidly Progressive Mouse Glomerulonephritis with the Non-Steroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist BR-4628

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Frank Y.; Han, Yingjie; Nikolic-Paterson, David J.; Kolkhof, Peter; Tesch, Greg H.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim Steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) are effective in the treatment of kidney disease; however, the side effect of hyperkalaemia, particularly in the context of renal impairment, is a major limitation to their clinical use. Recently developed non-steroidal MRAs have distinct characteristics suggesting that they may be superior to steroidal MRAs. Therefore, we explored the benefits of a non-steroidal MRA in a model of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Methods Accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis was induced in groups of C57BL/6J mice which received no treatment, vehicle or a non-steroidal MRA (BR-4628, 5mg/kg/bid) from day 0 until being killed on day 15 of disease. Mice were examined for renal injury. Results Mice with anti-GBM glomerulonephritis which received no treatment or vehicle developed similar disease with severe albuminuria, impaired renal function, glomerular tuft damage and crescents in 40% of glomeruli. In comparison, mice which received BR-4628 displayed similar albuminuria, but had improved renal function, reduced severity of glomerular tuft lesions and a 50% reduction in crescents. The protection seen in BR-4628 treated mice was associated with a marked reduction in glomerular macrophages and T-cells and reduced kidney gene expression of proinflammatory (CCL2, TNF-α, IFN-γ) and profibrotic molecules (collagen I, fibronectin). In addition, treatment with BR-4626 did not cause hyperkalaemia or increase urine Na+/K+ excretion (a marker of tubular dysfunction). Conclusions The non-steroidal MRA (BR-4628) provided substantial suppression of mouse crescentic glomerulonephritis without causing tubular dysfunction. This finding warrants further investigation of non-steroidal MRAs as a therapy for inflammatory kidney diseases. PMID:26700873

  3. An atypical case of necrotizing fasciitis of the breast.

    PubMed

    Mufty, H; Smeets, A; Christiaens, M R

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and aggressive soft tissue infection involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissues. It carries a high mortality and morbidity rate. In literature, the few case reports on necrotizing fasciitis of the breast, describe the need for a mastectomy in 90% of the cases. We report on a case of a 72-year old Caucasian women with an atypical presentation of necrotizing fasciitis of the breast in combination with an acute abdomen, successfully treated with breast-conserving debridement and secondary wound closure.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, A; Robaina, R; Pérez, G; Cairoli, E

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive destructive soft tissue infection with high mortality. Streptococcus pneumoniae as etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. The increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is probably a multifactorial phenomenon. We report a case of a patient, a 36-year-old Caucasian female with 8-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus who presented a fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis. The role of computed tomography and the high performance of blood cultures for isolation of the causative microorganism are emphasized. Once diagnosis is suspected, empiric antibiotic treatment must be prescribed and prompt surgical exploration is mandatory.

  5. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the lip simulating squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gad, A; Willén, H; Willén, R; Thorstensson, S; Ekman, L

    1980-01-01

    A case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the lip in an 68-year-old pipe smoker is described. Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a self-healing non-neoplastic disease probably of ischaemic nature. Thirty-nine cases of sialometaplasia are described in the literature up to early 1979. These cases appeared in the palate, nasal cavity, gingiva, lip, hypopharynx and maxillary sinus. Six cases have also been reported from major salivary glands. Histologically there is necrosis of mucous cells with partial replacement by squamous epithelium. This entity has often been mistaken for squamous or mucoepidermoid carcinoma. One has to be familiar with the existence of necrotizing sialometaplasia in ordeg surgery.

  6. [Necrotizing fasciitis caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa (an obervation)].

    PubMed

    Abada, A; Benhmidoune, L; Tahiri, H; Essalim, K; Chakib, A; Elbelhadji, M; Rachid, R; Zaghloul, K; Amraoui, A

    2007-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an exceptional and severe form of subcutaneous gangrene which requires early diagnosis and emergency treatment. We report the case of a 24 year old woman presenting with necrotizing fasciitis after pansinusitis resistant to treatment. The germ detected was pseudomonas aeruginosa. The infection was controled with intensive care, antibiotics and surgical resection of necrotic tissues. The aim of this observation is to highlight the clinical characteristics of this disease, and to insist on the necessity to recognize the early symptoms and to start treatment as soon as possible.

  7. A Case of Necrotizing Epiglottitis Due to Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jessica A; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Suchi, Mariko; Chun, Robert H; Willoughby, Rodney E

    2015-07-01

    Diphtheria is a rare cause of infection in highly vaccinated populations and may not be recognized by modern clinicians. Infections by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae are emerging. We report the first case of necrotizing epiglottitis secondary to nontoxigenic C diphtheriae. A fully vaccinated child developed fever, poor oral intake, and sore throat and was found to have necrotizing epiglottitis. Necrotizing epiglottitis predominantly occurs in the immunocompromised host. Laboratory evaluation revealed pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy was diagnostic for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Clinicians should be aware of aggressive infections that identify immunocompromised patients. This case highlights the features of a reemerging pathogen, C diphtheriae.

  8. Jund is a determinant of macrophage activation and is associated with glomerulonephritis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Behmoaras, Jacques; Bhangal, Gurjeet; Smith, Jennifer; McDonald, Kylie; Mutch, Brenda; Lai, Ping Chin; Domin, Jan; Game, Laurence; Salama, Alan; Foxwell, Brian M; Pusey, Charles D; Cook, H Terence; Aitman, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis is an important cause of human kidney failure for which the underlying molecular basis is largely unknown. In previous studies, we mapped several susceptibility loci, Crgn1–Crgn7, for crescentic glomerulonephritis in the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat1. Here we show by combined congenic, linkage and microarray studies that the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor JunD is a major determinant of macrophage activity and is associated with glomerulonephritis susceptibility. Introgression of Crgn2 from the nonsusceptible Lewis strain onto the WKY background leads to significant reductions in crescent formation, macrophage infiltration, Fc receptor–mediated macrophage activation and cytokine production. Haplotype analysis restricted the Crgn2 linkage interval to a 430-kb interval containing Jund, which is markedly overexpressed in WKY macrophages and glomeruli. Jund knockdown in rat and human primary macrophages led to significantly reduced macrophage activity and cytokine secretion, indicating conservation of JunD function in macrophage activation in rats and humans and suggesting in vivo inhibition of Jund as a possible new therapeutic strategy for diseases characterized by inflammation and macrophage activation. PMID:18443593

  9. Histologically confirmed superimposition of post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis during IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Horita, Yoshio; Tadokoro, Masato; Taura, Koichi; Suyama, Naofumi; Taguchi, Takashi; Miyazaki, Masanobu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2004-12-01

    We describe a 39-year-old Japanese man with post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN) super-imposed on long-term immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgA-N). The histological findings of the first renal biopsy, done at 21 years of age, revealed mild mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with mesangial IgA deposition. Nineteen years later, acute nephritic syndrome with hypocomplementemia and an increasing anti-streptolysin O (ASO) titer developed 2 weeks after the onset of an upper respiratory infection. A second renal biopsy revealed severe segmental endocapillary proliferative and exudative glomerulonephritis, with fibrocellular crescents in about 40% of the glomeruli. Immunofluorescence showed that more C3 than IgA was deposited in the mesangium and that the IgA deposits had decreased. Electron microscopy revealed "hump" electron-dense deposits on the epithelial side of the glomerular basement membrane. These features were consistent with PSAGN superimposed on IgA-N. After 2 weeks of observation, blood pressure, C3 level, and ASO titer had returned to normal, although the persisting nephritic syndrome necessitated steroid therapy. Six months after the onset of the acute nephritic syndrome, the patient remained asymptomatic, except for microhematuria.

  10. Glomerular C3c localization indicates ongoing immune deposit formation and complement activation in experimental glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, M.; Pruchno, C. J.; Burns, M.; Baker, P. J.; Johnson, R. J.; Couser, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    In antibody-mediated glomerular disease, deposits of C3 (C3b) are common and are degraded by factor I to C3c and C3d. However, the kinetics of C3b degradation in glomerulonephritis have not been defined. To do this, we studied three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis with established C3 deposits (passive Heymann nephritis, cationized immunoglobulin G membranous nephropathy, and concanavalin A-anticoncanavalin A glomerulonephritis). C3b deposition was halted by administration of cobra venom factor, and the disappearance of C3c and C3d from glomeruli was measured with specific antibodies and quantitative fluorescence densitometry. Results showed that C3c deposits were reduced by over 85% within 24 hours in all three models. C3c clearance was unaffected by site or mechanism of deposit formation. C3d deposits persisted despite lack of ongoing complement activation. In passive Heymann nephritis when disease activity was monitored by urinary C5b-9 excretion, C3c was cleared in parallel with return of urine C5b-9 excretion to normal values. We conclude that glomerular deposits of C3c are cleared within 24 hours of cessation of complement activation. Positive staining for C3 utilizing antibody specific for the C3c portion documents recent complement activation usually reflecting new immune deposit formation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7678717

  11. CCR6 Recruits Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells to the Kidney in Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jan-Eric; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Peters, Anett; Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Erhardt, Annette; Wegscheid, Claudia; Velden, Joachim; Fehr, Susanne; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Tiegs, Gisa; Stahl, Rolf A.K.

    2010-01-01

    T cells recruited to the kidney contribute to tissue damage in crescentic and proliferative glomerulonephritides. Chemokines and their receptors regulate T cell trafficking, but the expression profile and functional importance of chemokine receptors for renal CD4+ T cell subsets are incompletely understood. In this study, we observed that renal FoxP3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and IL-17–producing CD4+ T (Th17) cells express the chemokine receptor CCR6, whereas IFNγ-producing Th1 cells are CCR6−. Induction of experimental glomerulonephritis (nephrotoxic nephritis) in mice resulted in upregulation of the only CCR6 ligand, CCL20, followed by T cell recruitment, renal tissue injury, albuminuria, and loss of renal function. CCR6 deficiency aggravated renal injury and increased mortality (from uremia) among nephritic mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, CCR6 deficiency reduced infiltration of Tregs and Th17 cells but did not affect recruitment of Th1 cells in the setting of glomerulonephritis. Adoptive transfer of WT but not CCR6-deficient Tregs attenuated morphologic and functional renal injury in nephritic mice. Furthermore, reconstitution with WT Tregs protected CCR6−/− mice from aggravated nephritis. Taken together, these data suggest that CCR6 mediates renal recruitment of both Tregs and Th17 cells and that the reduction of anti-inflammatory Tregs in the presence of a fully functional Th1 response aggravates experimental glomerulonephritis. PMID:20299360

  12. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment efficacy in children with primary and secondary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Malinska, Agnieszka; Silska, Magdalena; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zachwieja, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to analyse the efficacy and safety of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as part of the complex immunosuppressive therapy in children with different types of primary and secondary glomerulonephritis, who were not eligible for the standard treatment routine suggested by evidence-based guidelines. Material and methods The study group comprised 85 children with proteinuric glomerulopathies hospitalized between 2007 and 2010, who were non-responders to immunosuppressive therapy. The dose of MMF was established as 1 g/m2/24 h. Remission was defined as negative proteinuria in three consecutive urinalyses. Results The patients were divided into 4 groups: idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (n = 35), primary glomerulonephritis (n = 15), auto-antibody associated glomerulonephritis (n = 20) and lupus nephropathy (LN, n = 15). Ten patients from the first group (29%) and 5 patients each from the second and third group (34% and 25% respectively) did not respond to MMF therapy. On the other hand, all the children diagnosed with LN have reached clinical and biochemical remission. Conclusions Alternative rescue MMF therapy should always be taken into consideration in proteinuric patients who are non-responders to steroids, cyclosporine A and cyclophosphamide in whom the initial glomerular filtration rate is higher than 60 ml/min/1.73m2. It is recommended that MMF be administered as part of the standard treatment regimen in patients diagnosed with lupus nephropathy. In these groups of patients, the potent benefits of this therapy are higher than expected side-effects. PMID:22328889

  13. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment efficacy in children with primary and secondary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Malinska, Agnieszka; Silska, Magdalena; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zachwieja, Jacek; Nowicki, Michal

    2011-12-31

    The aim of our study was to analyse the efficacy and safety of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as part of the complex immunosuppressive therapy in children with different types of primary and secondary glomerulonephritis, who were not eligible for the standard treatment routine suggested by evidence-based guidelines. The study group comprised 85 children with proteinuric glomerulopathies hospitalized between 2007 and 2010, who were non-responders to immunosuppressive therapy. The dose of MMF was established as 1 g/m(2)/24 h. Remission was defined as negative proteinuria in three consecutive urinalyses. The patients were divided into 4 groups: idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (n = 35), primary glomerulonephritis (n = 15), auto-antibody associated glomerulonephritis (n = 20) and lupus nephropathy (LN, n = 15). Ten patients from the first group (29%) and 5 patients each from the second and third group (34% and 25% respectively) did not respond to MMF therapy. On the other hand, all the children diagnosed with LN have reached clinical and biochemical remission. Alternative rescue MMF therapy should always be taken into consideration in proteinuric patients who are non-responders to steroids, cyclosporine A and cyclophosphamide in whom the initial glomerular filtration rate is higher than 60 ml/min/1.73m(2). It is recommended that MMF be administered as part of the standard treatment regimen in patients diagnosed with lupus nephropathy. In these groups of patients, the potent benefits of this therapy are higher than expected side-effects.

  14. A Case of Post-Streptococcal Glomerulonephritis with Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hye-Young; Lim, Chang Hoon; Shin, Mi-Jung; Kim, Young Ok; Song, Ho-Chul; Kim, Suk Young; Choi, Euy Jin; Chang, Yoon Sik; Bang, Byung Kee

    2007-01-01

    Acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) is characterized by an abrupt onset of edema, hypertension, and hematuria. Life-threatening diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is rarely associated with acute PSGN. There have been only two reported cases worldwide, and no case has been reported previously in Korea. Here, we present a patient who clinically presented with pulmonary-renal syndrome; the renal histology revealed post-infectious glomerulonephritis of immune complex origin. A 59-yr-old woman was admitted with oliguria and hemoptysis two weeks after pharyngitis. Renal insufficiency rapidly progressed, and respiratory distress developed. Chest radiography showed acute progressive bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. The clinical presentation suggested DAH with PSGN. Three days after treatment with high-dose steroids, the respiratory distress and pulmonary infiltrates resolved. Electron microscopy of a renal biopsy specimen sample revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis with characteristic subendothelial deposits of immune complex ("hump"). The renal function of the patient was restored, and the serum creatinine level was normalized after treatment. PMID:18162726

  15. Correlation of disease activity in proliferative glomerulonephritis with glomerular spleen tyrosine kinase expression.

    PubMed

    McAdoo, Stephen P; Bhangal, Gurjeet; Page, Theresa; Cook, H Terence; Pusey, Charles D; Tam, Frederick W K

    2015-07-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is an important component of the intracellular signaling pathway for various immunoreceptors. Inhibition of SYK has shown promise in preclinical models of autoimmune and glomerular disease. However, the description of SYK expression in human renal tissue, which would be desirable ahead of clinical studies, is lacking. Here we conducted immunohistochemical analysis for total and phosphorylated SYK in biopsy specimens from >120 patients with a spectrum of renal pathologies, including thin basement membrane lesion, minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and acute tubular necrosis. We found significant SYK expression in proliferative glomerulonephritis and that glomerular expression levels correlated with presenting serum creatinine and histological features of disease activity that predict outcome in IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis, and antiglomerular basement membrane disease. SYK was phosphorylated within pathological lesions, such as areas of extracapillary and endocapillary proliferation, and appeared to localize to both infiltrating leucocytes and to resident renal cells within diseased glomeruli. Thus SYK is associated with the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerulonephritides, suggesting that these conditions may respond to SYK inhibitor treatment.

  16. Atorvastatin-induced necrotizing autoimmune myositis

    PubMed Central

    Troyanov, Yves; Landon-Cardinal, Océane; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Ferreira, José; Targoff, Ira N.; Rich, Eric; Goulet, Michelle; Goulet, Jean-Richard; Bourré-Tessier, Josiane; Robitaille, Yves; Drouin, Julie; Albert, Alexandra; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The general aim of this study was to evaluate the disease spectrum in patients presenting with a pure polymyositis (pPM) phenotype. Specific objectives were to characterize clinical features, autoantibodies (aAbs), and membrane attack complex (MAC) in muscle biopsies of patients with treatment-responsive, statin-exposed necrotizing autoimmune myositis (NAM). Patients from the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal autoimmune myositis (AIM) Cohort with a pPM phenotype, response to immunosuppression, and follow-up ≥3 years were included. Of 17 consecutive patients with pPM, 14 patients had a NAM, of whom 12 were previously exposed to atorvastatin (mean 38.8 months). These 12 patients were therefore suspected of atorvastatin-induced AIM (atorAIM) and selected for study. All had aAbs to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and none had overlap aAbs, aAbs to signal recognition particle, or cancer. Three stages of myopathy were recognized: stage 1 (isolated serum creatine kinase [CK] elevation), stage 2 (CK elevation, normal strength, and abnormal electromyogram [EMG]), and stage 3 (CK elevation, proximal weakness, and abnormal EMG). At diagnosis, 10/12 (83%) patients had stage 3 myopathy (mean CK elevation: 7247 U/L). The presenting mode was stage 1 in 6 patients (50%) (mean CK elevation: 1540 U/L), all of whom progressed to stage 3 (mean delay: 37 months) despite atorvastatin discontinuation. MAC deposition was observed in all muscle biopsies (isolated sarcolemmal deposition on non-necrotic fibers, isolated granular deposition on endomysial capillaries, or mixed pattern). Oral corticosteroids alone failed to normalize CKs and induce remission. Ten patients (83%) received intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) as part of an induction regimen. Of 10 patients with ≥1 year remission on stable maintenance therapy, IVIG was needed in 50%, either with methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy or combination immunosuppression. In the remaining

  17. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar; Ummunissa, Firdous; Hanssen, Yolande; Al Makki, Hussam; Shokr, Hamdy M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim: To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods: Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3%) had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM) in 3 patients (60%). Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC), 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP), and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS) and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion: According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in patients with history

  18. International survey on the management of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; Eaton, Simon; Puri, Prem; Rintala, Risto; Lukac, Marija; Bagolan, Pietro; Kuebler, Joachim F; Hoellwarth, Michael E; Wijnen, Rene; Tovar, Juan; Pierro, Agostino

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to define patterns in the management of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). A total of 80 delegates (81% senior surgeons) from 29 (20 European) countries completed a survey at the European Pediatric Surgeons' Association 2013 annual meeting. Overall, 59% surgeons work in centers where>10 cases of NEC are treated per year. 76% surgeons request both anteroposterior and lateral abdominal X-rays, which are performed at regular intervals by 66%; 50% surgeons also request Doppler ultrasonography; most frequently used biochemical markers are platelets (99% of surgeons), C-reactive protein (90%), and white cell count (83%). Laparoscopy is performed for diagnosis and/or treatment of NEC by only 8% surgeons. Overall, 43% surgeons reported being able to diagnose focal intestinal perforation preoperatively. Medical NEC: medical NEC is managed by surgical and neonatal teams together in most centers (84%). Most surgeons (67%) use a combination of two (51%) or three (48%) antibiotics for more than 7 days, and keep patients nil by mouth for 7 (41%) or 10 (49%) days. Surgical NEC: In extremely low-birth-weight infants (< 1,000 g) with intestinal perforation, 27% surgeons opt for primary peritoneal drainage (PPD) as definitive treatment. Overall, 67% think that peritoneal drainage is important for stabilization and transport. At laparotomy, treatments vary according to NEC severity. About 75% surgeons always close the abdomen, and 29% leave a patch to prevent compartment syndrome. Infants are kept nil by mouth for 5 to 7 days by 46% surgeons, more than 7 days by 42%, and less than 5 days by 12% surgeons. Most surgeons (77%) restart infants on breast milk, 11.5% on aminoacid-based formulas, and 11.5% on hydrolyzed formulas. Most surgeons (92%) follow-up NEC patients after discharge, up to 5 years of life (56%) and 65% surgeons organize a neurodevelopmental follow-up. Many aspects of NEC management are lacking consensus and surgeons differ especially over

  19. Precise Measurement of Effective Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.; Young, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Computerized instrument measures effective focal lengths to 0.01 percent accuracy. Laser interferometers measure mirror angle and stage coordinate y in instrument for accurate measurment of focal properties of optical systems. Operates under computer control to measure effective focal length, focal surface shape, modulation transfer function, and astigmatism.

  20. Metabolomic determinants of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm piglets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies in premature infants and animals show that carbohydrate malabsorption and gut microbiota colonisation are key elements for triggering necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Our aim was to determine how dietary carbohydrate composition affects the metabolomic profile and whether unique metabolite s...

  1. Klebsiella pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in a Latin American male.

    PubMed

    Persichino, Jon; Tran, Richard; Sutjita, Made; Kim, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae, is a rare and life-threatening bacterial infection. Most documented cases have been reported from Asia, particularly associated with diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of this infection in the USA is rare, especially among persons of non-Asian descent and those without travel to Asia. We report a case of disseminated necrotizing fasciitis, caused by K. pneumoniae, in a Latin American male with diabetes mellitus. Given our review of the literature, this is the only case report, to our knowledge, of a Latin American patient with Klebsiella necrotizing fasciitis in the USA. This case may reflect the geographical spread and emergence of K. pneumoniae infection in the USA. Clinicians need to be aware of the possible relationship between this organism and necrotizing fasciitis in persons of Latin American descent with diabetes mellitus.

  2. Pulp revascularization in an immature necrotic tooth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Richard; Park, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Immature permanent teeth damaged by caries or trauma can present a challenge to dentistry. Currently, triple antibiotic paste (TAP) containing ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline is used to attempt revascularization in necrotic immature teeth. Therefore, the purpose of this report was to present a case of pulp revascularization in an immature necrotic tooth. An 8-year-old male presented with trauma to the permanent maxillary left and right central incisors. Upon clinical and radiographic examination, the left central incisor was deemed necrotic. Revascularization therapy was performed over multiple visits. At 11 months follow-up, healing of the periapical area and apexogenesis were found to be complete. With an increasing breadth of clinical evidence and practitioner acceptance, regenerative techniques may become a standard technique in treating immature necrotic permanent teeth.

  3. Avian necrotic enteritis: Experimental models, climate change, and vaccine development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This review summarizes recent developments in disease models, pathogenesis, host immunity, risk factors, and vaccine development for Clostridium perfringens infection of poultry and necrotic enteritis (NE). The increasing trends of legislative restrictions and voluntary removal of antibiotic growth...

  4. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: An Underrecognized Clinicoradiologic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Wei; Pan, Wei; Wu, Limin; Liu, Kangding; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare but distinctive type of acute encephalopathy with global distribution. Occurrence of ANE is usually preceded by a virus-associated febrile illness and ensued by rapid deterioration. However, the causal relationship between viral infections and ANE and the exact pathogenesis of ANE remain unclear; both environmental and host factors might be involved. Most cases of ANE are sporadic and nonrecurrent, namely, isolated or sporadic ANE; however, few cases are recurrent and with familial episodes. The recurrent and familial forms of ANE were found to be incompletely autosomal-dominant. Further the missense mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2) were identified. Although the clinical course and the prognosis of ANE are diverse, the hallmark of neuroradiologic manifestation of ANE is multifocal symmetric brain lesions which are demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The treatment of ANE is still under investigation. We summarize the up-to-date knowledge on ANE, with emphasis on prompt diagnosis and better treatment of this rare but fatal disease. PMID:25873770

  5. Necrotizing Fasciitis and The Diabetic Foot.

    PubMed

    Iacopi, Elisabetta; Coppelli, Alberto; Goretti, Chiara; Piaggesi, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) represents a rapidly progressive, life-threatening infection involving skin, soft tissue, and deep fascia. An early diagnosis is crucial to treat NF effectively. The disease is generally due to an external trauma that occurs in predisposed patients: the most important risk factor is represented by diabetes mellitus. NF is classified into 3 different subtypes according to bacterial strains responsible: type 1 associated to polymicrobial infection, type 2 NF, generally associated to Streptococcus species, often associated to Staphylococcus aureus and, eventually, Type 3, due to Gram-negative strains, such as Clostridium difficile or Vibrio. NF is usually characterized by the presence of the classic triad of symptoms: local pain, swelling, and erythema. In daily clinical practice immune-compromised or neuropathic diabetic patients present with atypical symptomatology. This explains the high percentage of misdiagnosed cases in the emergency department and, consequently, the worse outcome presented by these patients. Prompt aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic systemic therapy are the cornerstone of its treatment. These must be associated with an accurate systemic management, consisting in nutritional support, glycemic compensation, and hemodynamic stabilization. Innovative methods, such as negative pressure therapy, once the acute conditions have resolved, can help fasten the surgical wound closure. Prompt management can improve prognosis of patients affected from NF reducing limb loss and saving lives.

  6. Maternal Risk Factors for Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    March, Melissa I.; Gupta, Munish; Modest, Anna M.; Wu, Lily; Hacker, Michele R.; Martin, Camilia R.; Rana, Sarosh

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the relationship between maternal hypertensive disease and other risk factors and the neonatal development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Methods This was a retrospective case control study of infants with NEC from 2008 to 2012. The primary exposure of interest was maternal hypertensive disease, which has been hypothesized to put infants at risk for NEC. Other variables collected included demographics, pregnancy complications, medications, and neonatal hospital course. Data was abstracted from medical records. Results 28 cases of singleton neonates with NEC and 81 matched controls were identified and analyzed. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome. Fetuses with an antenatal diagnosis of growth restriction were more likely to develop NEC (p=0.008). Infants with NEC had lower median birth weight than infants without NEC (p=0.009). Infants with NEC had more late-onset sepsis (p=0.01) and mortality before discharge (p=0.001). Conclusions The factors identified by this case-control study that increased the risk of neonatal NEC included intrauterine growth restriction and lower neonatal birth weight. The primary exposure, hypertensive disease, did not show a significantly increased risk of neonatal NEC, however there was a nearly two-fold difference observed. Our study was underpowered to detect the observed difference. PMID:25162307

  7. Necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis: a rarity in childhood.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, D; Gordjani, N; Trusen, A; Marx, A; Hebestreit, H

    2003-05-01

    Necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis (NSG) is characterized by pulmonary nodular infiltrates, a typical histology, and a benign clinical course. The etiology and pathogenesis of the disease are still unknown. In childhood, it is extremely rare, with only three reported cases so far. Here we report on an 8-year-old girl, who to our knowledge is the youngest reported patient with NSG. The girl presented with shortness of breath and a sore throat. Chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) scan revealed multiple nodular opacities of the lung. The symptoms and radiological findings disappeared within 6 months without any treatment. The diagnosis was based on the typical signs and symptoms of NSG and on the exclusion of other diseases. As abnormal immunological findings such as the lack of specific diphtheria antibodies in spite of vaccination against diphtheria were present, we suggest that immunologic mechanisms could play an etiologic role in the pathogenesis of NSG. In addition, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in the peripheral blood was significantly reduced, whereas the CD4+/CD8+ T-cell ratio in the immunohistochemical staining of the lung tissue was elevated. Since this compartmentalization is a typical finding in sarcoidosis, it supports the theory that NSG may represent a variant of sarcoidosis. However, because some characteristics of NSG are uncommon in typical sarcoidosis, NSG may also be an entity in its own right.

  8. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, L; Navarro, S; Valderrama, R; Sáenz, A; Guarner, L; Aparisi, L; Espi, A; Jaurietta, E; Marruecos, L; Gener, J

    1994-04-01

    A multicenter study of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) classified in accordance with the Balthazar criteria (grades D and E), has been performed in 12 teaching hospitals. A total of 233 patients were reviewed, and the mortality rate was 26.6%. The most common etiology was biliary pancreatitis (45.5%). Among the complications, shock, renal insufficiency, pulmonary insufficiency and hemorrhagic gastritis were associated with a mortality rate of 51-66%. Diffuse fluid collections were associated with a higher mortality rate (26.8%) than localized fluid collections (14.5%). In 106 patients with gallstone pancreatitis, early surgery was performed in 17, and 5 patients (29.4%) died. No mortality was observed in 32 patients with delayed surgery. Sphincterotomy was performed in 13 patients, and 4 (30.7%) died. Early surgery (necrosectomy and closed peritoneal lavage) was undertaken in 75 patients, with a mortality rate of 39%. In conclusion, the morbidity and mortality rates of ANP can be improved with proper monitoring, adequate supportive care and the judicious use of surgery based on clinical and morphological findings.

  9. Necrotizing pancreatitis: A review of the interventions.

    PubMed

    Bugiantella, Walter; Rondelli, Fabio; Boni, Marcello; Stella, Paolo; Polistena, Andrea; Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Avenia, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis may have a wide range of severity, from a clinically self-limiting to a quickly fatal course. Necrotizing pancreatitis (NP) is the most dreadful evolution associated to a poor prognosis: mortality is approximately 15% and up to 30-39% in case of infected necrosis, which is the major cause of death. Intervention is generally required for infected pancreatic necrosis and less commonly in patients with sterile necrosis who are symptomatic (gastric or duodenal outlet or biliary obstruction). Traditionally the most widely used approach to infected necrosis has been open surgical necrosectomy, but it is burdened by high morbidity (34-95%) and mortality (11-39%) rates. In the last two decades the treatment of NP has significantly evolved from open surgery towards minimally invasive techniques (percutaneous catheter drainage, per-oral endoscopic, laparoscopy and rigid retroperitoneal videoscopy). The objective of this review is to summarize the current state of the art of the management of NP and to clarify some aspects about its diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Probiotics and prevention of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Frost, Brandy L; Caplan, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    This review will summarize the clinical trials evaluating the role of prophylactic probiotic supplementation in preterm infants in order to reduce the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Evidence suggests that probiotic supplementation in preterm infants reduces the incidence of NEC. In fact, recent meta-analyses have called for the use of probiotics as preventive therapy in subsets of this population. However, although multiple studies have evaluated the use of probiotics for this indication in preterm infants, these trials have used different formulations of bacteria, at differing doses and using varied protocols for administration; thus many unanswered questions remain. In addition, theoretical safety issues and concerns regarding quality of product still need to be addressed. As NEC remains a serious problem for preterm neonates, proven therapies for prevention and treatment of this dreaded disease are needed. While the evidence does support a future role for probiotics in the prevention of NEC, it is of utmost importance to first ensure that a safe and high-quality product meeting rigorous standards will be provided to these at-risk infants.

  11. Leukocyte and serum S100A8/S100A9 expression reflects disease activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, Ruth J; Hamour, Sally; Chavele, Konstantia-Maria; Todd, Sarah K; Rasmussen, Niels; Flint, Shaun; Lyons, Paul A; Smith, Kenneth G C; Pusey, Charles D; Cook, H Terence; Salama, Alan D

    2013-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis (AAV) commonly results in glomerulonephritis, in which neutrophils and monocytes have important roles. The heterodimer calprotectin (S100A8/S100A9, mrp8/14) is a Toll-like receptor-4 ligand found in neutrophils and monocytes and is elevated in inflammatory conditions. By immunohistochemistry of renal biopsies, patients with focal or crescentic glomerular lesions were found to have the highest expression of calprotectin and those with sclerotic the least. Serum levels of calprotectin as measured by ELISA were elevated in patients with active AAV and the levels decreased but did not normalize during remission, suggesting subclinical inflammation. Calprotectin levels in patients with limited systemic disease increased following treatment withdrawal and were significantly elevated in patients who relapsed compared with those who did not. As assessed by flow cytometry, patients with AAV had higher monocyte and neutrophil cell surface calprotectin expression than healthy controls, but this was not associated with augmented mRNA expression in CD14+ monocytes or CD16+ neutrophils. Thus, serum calprotectin is a potential disease biomarker in patients with AAV, and may have a role in disease pathogenesis. PMID:23423260

  12. Necrotizing enterocolitis and cytomegalovirus infection in a premature infant.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lynn; Ferris, Michael; Norori, Johana; Stark, Matthew; Craver, Randall; Dowd, Scot; Penn, Duna

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. The etiology is considered multifactorial. Risk factors include prematurity, enteral feeding, hypoxia, and bacterial colonization. The etiologic role of viruses is unclear. We present a case of necrotizing enterocolitis associated with cytomegalovirus and Proteobacteria in a 48-day-old, ex-premature infant and discuss the effects of potential viral-bacterial interactions on host susceptibility to this disease.

  13. Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis: Microbial and Immunologic Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    CATALOG NUMIDER 4. TITLE (And ,w*utlo) S. Type OP REPORT a PenRIOO coveno Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis : Annual Report Microbial and...etiology and immunopathology of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG). Thirty one patients have been studied as of the date of this report...they are not financ:ially stable, they smoke and do not display normal living patterns. Subgingival plaque samples taken from the patients revealed the

  14. Necrotizing gastritis due to Bacillus cereus in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Le Scanff, J; Mohammedi, I; Thiebaut, A; Martin, O; Argaud, L; Robert, D

    2006-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly being acknowledged as a serious bacterial pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of acute necrotizing gastritis caused by B. cereus in a 37-year-old woman with acute myeloblastic leukemia, who recovered following total parenteral nutrition and treatment with imipenem and vancomycin. B. cereus was isolated from gastric mucosa and blood cultures. Up to now, no case of acute necrotizing gastritis due to this organism has been reported.

  15. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis following elective inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Sistla, S C; Sankar, G; Sistla, S

    2011-02-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs) following elective hernia repair are extremely uncommon, though they can occur following emergency surgery for complicated hernias. They are also usually seen in individuals with impaired immunity. We report a case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis following elective hernia repair in an otherwise healthy young patient. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this condition early, as it is difficult to differentiate it from superficial surgical site infection.

  16. Clostridium perfringens - A bacterial pathogen gaining recognition in necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Rakhi; K, Deepika; Sistla, Sujatha; Chandra Sistla, Sarath; Amaranathan, Anandhi

    2017-10-01

    We report an interesting case of necrotizing pancreatitis due to Clostridium perfringens in an elderly man who came to the hospital with complaints of severe abdominal pain. The infection further worsened with the dissemination to other internal organs. The patient did not show any improvement despite intensive care and treatment. This emphasizies the fact that early diagnosis and appropriate treatment would reduce the morbidity associated with necrotizing pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacterial translocation and intestinal injury in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis model.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, I; Ozdemir, M; Aktan, M; Aslan, K

    2012-01-01

    To study the occurrence of bacterial translocation and to assess the impact of breastfeeding on bacterial translocation in the animal model of necrotizing enterocolitis. A total of 20 neonate Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in the study. Rats were randomly allocated into either control or study group just after birth. Ten newborn rats in the control group were left with their mother to be breast-fed. In contrary, necrotizing enterocolitis group consisted of neonates that were separated from their mothers, housed in an incubator and were gavaged with a special rodent formula three times daily. Survival rates, weight changes, and morphologic scoring obtained after microscopic evaluation were determined as microbiologic evaluation criteria. All the rats in the control group survived, while 1 (10 %) rat died in the necrotizing enterocolitis group. Mortality rates of the two groups were similar. All the formula-fed animals in the necrotizing enterocolitis group had significant weight loss compared to the breast milk-fed rats in the control group (p<0.05). A total of 7 (70 %) and 2 (20 %) E. coli growths were identified in the bowel lumen, liver, and spleen of necrotizing enterocolitis and control groups, respectively. This difference was statistically significant. In peritoneal smear cultures, a total of 3 (30 %) growths were detected in the necrotizing enterocolitis group and 1 (10 %) growth in the control group. As the result of a disturbance in the intestinal flora and impairment of the intestinal barrier in necrotizing enterocolitis, microrganisms in the bowel pass through the intestinal barrier and reach the liver and the spleen via the hematogenous route. This condition is closely related to the impairment of physiological and functional features of the intestinal barrier and is independent from the degree of intestinal injury. Bacterial translocation should be remembered in cases suspected of necrotizing enterocolitis, and a rapid and effective treatment

  18. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest Wall: Report of Pediatric Cases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Monica; Meeks, Andrew; Kearl, Liza

    2015-09-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection uncommonly described in children and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not treated early and aggressively. Reports of cases involving the upper torso are rare in general. In adults, necrotizing fasciitis is most commonly described in the abdomen, perineum, and extremities. For children, particularly neonates, necrotizing fasciitis most commonly involves the trunk presenting as omphalitis. In this report, we describe 2 pediatric cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall that presented within 6 months from each other at Los Angeles County Hospital/University of Southern California Pediatric Emergency Department. Both cases involved previously healthy children with above normal body mass indices of 36 and 25.6, respectively. These cases are noteworthy because of the rarity of necrotizing fasciitis among children especially in the chest wall, atypical presentation with nonspecific symptoms which made the diagnosis challenging, and suggestion that obesity may be a potential risk factor. Despite the rarity of this disease, the information presented in these cases may aid in raising the index of suspicion for diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis.

  19. Genetic models of focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Boillot, Morgane; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2016-02-15

    Focal epilepsies were for a long time thought to be acquired disorders secondary to cerebral lesions. However, the important role of genetic factors in focal epilepsies is now well established. Several focal epilepsy syndromes are now proven to be monogenic disorders. While earlier genetic studies suggested a strong contribution of ion channel and neurotransmitter receptor genes, later work has revealed alternative pathways, among which the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signal transduction pathway with DEPDC5. In this article, we provide an update on the mutational spectrum of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes (CHRNA4, CHRNB2, CHRNA2) and KCNT1 causing autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE), and of LGI1 in autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF). We also emphasize, through a review of the current literature, the contribution of in vitro and in vivo models developed to unveil the pathogenic mechanisms underlying these two epileptic syndromes.

  20. Continuously variable focal length lens

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  1. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: Case report.

    PubMed

    Puriene, Alina; Rimkevicius, Arunas; Gaigalas, Mindaugas

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to present a 15 year-old patient with focal epithelial hyperplasia and to review the references on the subject-related etiological, pathological, diagnostic and treatment aspects. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare human papilloma virus (HPV) related to oral lesion with very low frequency within our population. Surgical treatment with a biopsy was performed, acanthosis and parakeratosis are consistent histopathological features, since the patient had no history of sexual contact and HIV infection, the virus was probably acquired from environmental sources.

  2. Optimal treatment of cervical necrotizing fasciitis associated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis.

    PubMed

    Karkas, A; Chahine, K; Schmerber, S; Brichon, P-Y; Righini, C A

    2010-04-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) associated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a rapidly evolving and life-threatening condition. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe a treatment strategy for CNF with DNM and present a management algorithm for mediastinal extensions of CNF. Patients diagnosed and treated for CNF with DNM over 14 years in a tertiary referral centre were included. Seventeen adult patients were included. The origin of infection was mainly oropharyngeal. The diagnosis of CNF/DNM was based on clinical and computed tomography findings. All patients underwent cervicotomy for CNF. In ten patients, DNM was located above the carina and could be accessed by a cervical approach. In seven patients, DNM was below the carina, and necessitated sternotomy for anteroinferior mediastinal involvement and posterolateral thoracotomy for posteroinferior mediastinal involvement. All patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics. One patient died 3 days after surgery. The median hospital stay was 30 days. There was no recurrence during long-term follow-up. Prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment are essential for reducing mortality in CNF/DNM. All patients should undergo extensive cervicotomy. The surgical approach to the mediastinum depends on the supracarinal or infracarinal location of the disease. Copyright (c) 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A Case of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Glomerulonephritis Complicated by Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Mimicking Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Yoshihiro; Tanimoto, Izumi; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Shiojiri, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 44 Final Diagnosis: Anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis Symptoms: Fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) tends to complicate other autoimmune diseases. When considering renal dysfunction in patients with DM, diabetic nephropathy is a likely diagnosis. By contrast, anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis, an autoimmune disease, is one cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Case Report: We report the case of a 44-year-old woman diagnosed with anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis. The diagnosis was made on the basis of serological test results and pathological findings of a renal biopsy. Five years before admission, she was diagnosed with type 1 DM. At admission, she presented with a fever, chills, nausea, low back pain, and malaise, which were followed by progressive renal dysfunction. The initial presentation mimicked a urinary tract infection, which delayed the correct diagnosis. Conclusions: Our patient’s course strongly suggests that rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis should be considered as an early differential diagnosis in cases of progressive renal dysfunction, especially when accompanied by fever, regardless of the underlying disease. PMID:28344312

  4. [Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated rapid progressive glomerulonephritis complicated with both limited and diffuse scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Naoko; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Matsukawa, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Shigemasa; Nishinarita, Susumu; Horie, Takashi

    2002-12-01

    We report two patients with scleroderma, 73-year-old female and 67-year-old female, who developed anti neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) associated rapid progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN). Both patients have had a long history of scleroderma (23 and 14 years, respectively) when ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis occurred. In the first patient, scleroderma was localized in both fingers. She has been followed-up as CREST syndrome rather than systemic sclerosis. The complaints on admission were leg edema and left chest pain in the first patient, and a pyrexia and dyspnea in the second patient. Both patients showed pulmonary manifestation (pleural effusion in the first patient, interstitial pneumonia and alveolar hemorrhage in the second patient, respectively) and rapid progressive glomerulonephritis. Both patients died in spite of corticosteroid therapy. Autopsy findings in the second patient demonstrated crescentic glomerulonephritis and alveolar hemorrhage. Our cases demonstrated that MPO-ANCA associated glomerulonephritis could be associated with limited scleroderma as well as systemic scleroderma. In these condition, the prognosis will be poor if scleroderma seemed to be stable.

  5. Clinical outcome parameters for necrotizing otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Verim, Ayşegül; Naiboğlu, Bariş; Karaca, Çigdem Tepe; Seneldir, Lütfü; Külekçi, Semra; Oysu, Çağatay

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the duration of time elapsed between the onset of symptoms for necrotizing external otitis (NEO) and admission to hospital that may play a role in patient outcome. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral center. Fourteen consecutive male patients with NEO with no improvement from the previous course of antibiotherapy and with findings of osteomyelitis on temporal bone CT, MRI, and positive detection of Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate on temporal bone, admitted as inpatients between 2008 and 2012. Medical treatment of NEO and surgical debridement. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to median time elapsed between onset of symptoms and hospitalization (<30 d or >30 d). HbA1c, fasting blood sugar, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, pain intensity, radiologic grade, improvement since diagnosis, and total time to cure were compared according to the groups. The relationships between the laboratory data were analyzed to determine the parameters associated with time to recovery. Otalgia was significantly worse in patients who were admitted to hospital greater than 30 days after symptom onset (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.002). Blood glucose increased related to delayed admission time (p < 0.001). CRP results were independently elevated from the admission time (p < 0.112). There was a statistically significant difference between groups according to ESR levels and recovery time (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.004 and p < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between HbA1c levels and recovery time in Group 1 and between ESR levels and recovery time in Group 2 (r = 0.872, p = 0.044; r = 0.630, p = 0.039). Clinical, laboratory, and outcome data worsen later than 30 days in NEO.

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis: a six-year experience.

    PubMed

    Tunovic, Edin; Gawaziuk, Justin; Bzura, Tom; Embil, John; Esmail, Ali; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening infectious disease whose incidence has been on the rise. Commonly a consequence of group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infection, it results in high levels of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is difficult and treatment involves emergent surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy. The aim of this study is to examine the incidence of NF in Manitoba with the goal of observing whether there is a geographic variation in incidence and outcomes based on Regional Health Authorities (RHAs). This is a 6-year retrospective chart review of all NF patients who presented to the Health Sciences Center from 2004 to 2009. A total of 130 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 47 ± 16 years. The most common comorbidities were diabetes (33.8%) and hypertension (33.1%). The overall mortality was 13.1% with advanced age being an independent risk factor (P < .05). Lower extremity was the most common location of infection (44.6%) and the most common causative organism was group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (63.9%). The type of infection (mono- vs. polymicrobial) was not found to affect length of stay, amputation rate, or mortality. There was no statistical difference in rate of amputations, length of stay, or mortality based on RHA. Incidence within the province, however, varied significantly based on RHA and ethnicity (P < .05). We determined that regardless of origin before admission, all our patients have equivalent prognosis. Burntwood RHA was found to have substantially higher incidence than the rest of the province, and higher incidence was established among the Aboriginal population.

  7. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase to treat necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Biesterveld, Ben E; Koehler, Shannon M; Heinzerling, Nathan P; Rentea, Rebecca M; Fredrich, Katherine; Welak, Scott R; Gourlay, David M

    2015-06-15

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity is decreased in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and IAP supplementation prevents NEC development. It is not known if IAP given after NEC onset can reverse the course of the disease. We hypothesized that enteral IAP given after NEC induction would not reverse intestinal injury. NEC was induced in Sprague-Dawley pups by delivery preterm followed by formula feedings with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and hypoxia exposure and continued up to 4 d. IAP was added to feeds on day 2 until being sacrificed on day 4. NEC severity was scored based on hematoxylin and eosin-stained terminal ileum sections, and AP activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. IAP and interleukin-6 expression were measured using real time polymerase chain reaction. NEC pups' alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was decreased to 0.18 U/mg compared with controls of 0.57 U/mg (P < 0.01). Discontinuation of LPS and hypoxia after 2 d increased AP activity to 0.36 U/mg (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation in matched groups did not impact total AP activity or expression. Discontinuing LPS and hypoxia after NEC onset improved intestinal injury scores to 1.14 compared with continued stressors, score 2.25 (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation decreased interleukin-6 expression two-fold (P < 0.05), though did not reverse NEC intestinal damage (P = 0.5). This is the first work to demonstrate that removing the source of NEC improves intestinal damage and increases AP activity. When used as a rescue treatment, IAP decreased intestinal inflammation though did not impact injury making it likely that IAP is best used preventatively to those neonates at risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Focal fits during chlorambucil therapy

    PubMed Central

    Naysmith, A.; Robson, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    An elderly man receiving chlorambucil for chronic lymphatic leukaemia developed focal fits. The onset and frequency were dose related. There was no evidence of metabolic disturbance or of meningeal leukaemia. Although reported in children and well recognized in animals, chlorambucil-induced fits in an adult have not been previously recorded. PMID:118440

  9. Vermont management in focal areas

    Treesearch

    Judy Rosovsky; Bruce L. Parker; Luke Curtis

    1991-01-01

    Following the 1979 outbreak of gypsy moths Lymantria dispar L. in Vermont, state personnel began monitoring a number of focal areas for signs of increase in gypsy moth populations. In 1986 data from this early warning system indicated an incipient outbreak. We took advantage of this increase to test an experimental management technique. Would...

  10. T helper (Th)-cytokines in the urine of patients with primary glomerulonephritis treated with immunosuppressive drugs: Can they predict outcome?

    PubMed

    Kalavrizioti, Dimitra; Gerolymos, Miltiadis; Rodi, Maria; Kalliakmani, Pantelitsa; Provatopoulou, Simela; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Mouzaki, Athanasia; Goumenos, Dimitrios S

    2015-12-01

    Glomerulonephritides (GNs) represent common causes of chronic kidney disease associated with a wide spectrum of clinical and histological features. Various factors that activate the inflammatory cascade are involved in the development of kidney injury. The aim of this study was to estimate the urinary excretion of pro-inflammatory (IL-2, INF-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β1) cytokines, as well as the chemokine MCP-1 in patients with various types of GN treated by immunosuppressive drugs and to identify any prognostic value of excreted cytokines for future renal function. Ninety-seven patients (62 M/35 F, age 53.1 ± 15.6 years) with primary glomerulonephritis and 32 healthy controls were studied. The original diagnoses were membranous nephropathy (MN, n=36), IgA nephropathy (IgAN, n=31) and minimal changes disease or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (MCD/FSGS, n=30). All patients had been treated with immunosuppressive drugs and, at the time of measurement of urinary cytokine excretion, were either in clinical remission or still had active disease with persistent proteinuria. GN patients had significantly higher levels of all cytokines and MCP-1 compared to healthy controls. A strong positive correlation between TGF-β1 and MCP-1 concentrations was observed in all GN patients. Increased urinary excretion of all tested cytokines apart from TNF-α and TGF-β1 was observed even in patients with clinical remission. The main difference between patients with proteinuria and those in clinical remission was the level of MCP-1 urinary excretion. The urinary excretion of MCP-1 and TGF-β1 was significantly higher in patients with MN who showed deterioration of renal function over a follow-up period of five years. Increased levels of cytokines are observed in the urine of patients with different types of glomerulonephritis, even after the achievement of clinical remission with the administration of immunosuppressive drugs. Urinary

  11. Statistical earthquake focal mechanism forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Yan Y.; Jackson, David D.

    2014-04-01

    Forecasts of the focal mechanisms of future shallow (depth 0-70 km) earthquakes are important for seismic hazard estimates and Coulomb stress, and other models of earthquake occurrence. Here we report on a high-resolution global forecast of earthquake rate density as a function of location, magnitude and focal mechanism. In previous publications we reported forecasts of 0.5° spatial resolution, covering the latitude range from -75° to +75°, based on the Global Central Moment Tensor earthquake catalogue. In the new forecasts we have improved the spatial resolution to 0.1° and the latitude range from pole to pole. Our focal mechanism estimates require distance-weighted combinations of observed focal mechanisms within 1000 km of each gridpoint. Simultaneously, we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms, using the method of Kagan & Jackson proposed in 1994. This average angle reveals the level of tectonic complexity of a region and indicates the accuracy of the prediction. The procedure becomes problematical where longitude lines are not approximately parallel, and where shallow earthquakes are so sparse that an adequate sample spans very large distances. North or south of 75°, the azimuths of points 1000 km away may vary by about 35°. We solved this problem by calculating focal mechanisms on a plane tangent to the Earth's surface at each forecast point, correcting for the rotation of the longitude lines at the locations of earthquakes included in the averaging. The corrections are negligible between -30° and +30° latitude, but outside that band uncorrected rotations can be significantly off. Improved forecasts at 0.5° and 0.1° resolution are posted at http://eq.ess.ucla.edu/kagan/glob_gcmt_index.html.

  12. T cells, adhesion molecules and modulation of apoptosis in visceral leishmaniasis glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immune complex deposition is the accepted mechanism of pathogenesis of VL glomerulopathy however other immune elements may participate. Further in the present study, no difference was seen between immunoglobulin and C3b deposit intensity in glomeruli between infected and non-infected dogs thus T cells, adhesion molecules and parameters of proliferation and apoptosis were analysed in dogs with naturally acquired VL from an endemic area. The dog is the most important domestic reservoir of the protozoa Leishmania (L.) chagasi that causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The similarity of VL manifestation in humans and dogs renders the study of canine VL nephropathy of interest with regard to human pathology. Methods From 55 dogs with VL and 8 control non-infected dogs from an endemic area, kidney samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for immunoglobulin and C3b deposits, staining for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, ICAM-1, P-selectin and quantified using morphometry. Besides proliferation marker Ki-67, apoptosis markers M30 and TUNEL staining, and related cytokines TNF-α, IL-1α were searched and quantified. Results We observed similar IgG, IgM and IgA and C3b deposit intensity in dogs with VL and non-infected control dogs. However we detected the Leishmania antigen in cells in glomeruli in 54, CD4+ T cells in the glomeruli of 44, and CD8+ T cells in 17 of a total of 55 dogs with VL. Leishmania antigen was absent and T cells were absent/scarse in eight non-infected control dogs. CD 4+ T cells predominate in proliferative patterns of glomerulonephritis, however the presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were not different in intensity in different patterns of glomerulonephritis. The expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin was significantly greater in the glomeruli of infected dogs than in control dogs. In all patterns of glomerulonephritis the expression of ICAM-1 ranged from minimum to moderately severe and P-selectin from absent to severe. In the control animals the

  13. The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on proteinuria in patients with primary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ayli, Deniz; Gonul, Ipek; Yuksel, Osman; Ozturk, Ramazan; Yildiz, Ayla; Yenigun, Ezgi; Piskinpasa, Serhan; Turgut, Didem; Koc, Eyup; Odabas, Ali Riza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Glomerulonephritis is still the primary cause among the diseases causing end stage renal disease. Helicobacter pylori (HP), also having a local proinflammatory effect on gastric mucosa, can trigger a local and systemic inflammatory response, and consequently have a role in the development of extragastrointestinal defects. Material and methods The study was composed of patients diagnosed with primary glomerulonephritis who had dyspeptic complaints throughout the diagnosis. Patients who received endoscopic biopsy upon the determination of pathologic findings in their upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were HP positive in their biopsy material. A triple eradication therapy was initiated for HP. Results The study included 14 female and 19 male patients, 33 in total, whose biopsy material was determined to be HP positive. Before the eradication for HP, we found serum albumin to be 34.0 (19.0–51.0) g/l, serum total protein 58.6 ±12.9 g/l, serum creatinine 0.9 (0.5–1.2) and proteinuria 3069 (652–12392) mg/day in 24-hour urine. After the eradication, however, serum albumin was found to be 40 (20–52) g/l, serum total protein 62.3 ±11.1 g/l, serum creatinine 1.02 (0.6–1.29) mg/dl and proteinuria was 2850 (172–15181) mg/day in 24-hour urine. A comparison of the results showed that a statistically significant difference is established between the serum albumin, total protein and creatinine values (p = 0.001, p = 0.001 and p = 0.021, respectively), but not between proteinuria values in 24-hour urine (p = 0.990). Conclusions Patients with primary glomerulonephritis, HP eradication treatment has an effect on serum albumin levels. PMID:26322088

  14. Curcumin alleviates immune-complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in factor-H-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Alexander; Chaves, Lee; Eadon, Michael T; Chang, Anthony; Quigg, Richard J; Alexander, Jessy J

    2013-01-01

    Complement factor H (Cfh) is a key regulator of the complement cascade and protects C57BL/6 mice from immune complex-mediated complement-dependent glomerulonephritis. In chronic serum sickness (CSS) there are increased deposits of immune complexes in the glomeruli with inflammation and a scarring phenotype. As cucurmin is an effective anti-inflammatory agent and reduces complement activation, we hypothesized that it should alleviate renal disease in this setting. To determine the effectiveness of curcumin, an apoferritin-induced CSS model in Cfh-deficient (Cfh−/−) mice was used. Curcumin treatment (30 mg/kg) given every day in parallel with apoferritin reduced glomerulonephritis and enhanced kidney function (blood urea nitrogen, 45·4 ± 7·5 versus 35·6 ± 5·1; albuminuria, 50·1 ± 7·1 versus 15·7 ± 7·1; glomerulonephritis, 2·62 + 0·25 versus 2 + 0·3, P < 0·05). In line with reduced IgG deposits in mice with CSS given curcumin, C9 deposits were reduced indicating reduced complement activation. Mice treated with curcumin had a significant reduction in the number of splenic CD19+ B cells and the ratio of CD19 : CD3 cells (P < 0·05) with no change in the T-cell population. Myeloperoxidase assay showed reduced macrophages in the kidney. However, a significant reduction in the M2 subset of splenic macrophages by apoferritin was prevented by curcumin, suggesting a protective function. Curcumin treatment reduced mRNA expression of inflammatory proteins monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β and matrix proteins, fibronectin, laminin and collagen. Our results clearly illustrate that curcumin reduces glomerulosclerosis, improves kidney function and could serve as a therapeutic agent during serum sickness. PMID:23347386

  15. Curcumin alleviates immune-complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in factor-H-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Alexander; Chaves, Lee; Eadon, Michael T; Chang, Anthony; Quigg, Richard J; Alexander, Jessy J

    2013-07-01

    Complement factor H (Cfh) is a key regulator of the complement cascade and protects C57BL/6 mice from immune complex-mediated complement-dependent glomerulonephritis. In chronic serum sickness (CSS) there are increased deposits of immune complexes in the glomeruli with inflammation and a scarring phenotype. As cucurmin is an effective anti-inflammatory agent and reduces complement activation, we hypothesized that it should alleviate renal disease in this setting. To determine the effectiveness of curcumin, an apoferritin-induced CSS model in Cfh-deficient (Cfh(-/-)) mice was used. Curcumin treatment (30 mg/kg) given every day in parallel with apoferritin reduced glomerulonephritis and enhanced kidney function (blood urea nitrogen, 45·4 ± 7·5 versus 35·6 ± 5·1; albuminuria, 50·1 ± 7·1 versus 15·7 ± 7·1; glomerulonephritis, 2·62 + 0·25 versus 2 + 0·3, P < 0·05). In line with reduced IgG deposits in mice with CSS given curcumin, C9 deposits were reduced indicating reduced complement activation. Mice treated with curcumin had a significant reduction in the number of splenic CD19(+) B cells and the ratio of CD19 : CD3 cells (P < 0·05) with no change in the T-cell population. Myeloperoxidase assay showed reduced macrophages in the kidney. However, a significant reduction in the M2 subset of splenic macrophages by apoferritin was prevented by curcumin, suggesting a protective function. Curcumin treatment reduced mRNA expression of inflammatory proteins monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β and matrix proteins, fibronectin, laminin and collagen. Our results clearly illustrate that curcumin reduces glomerulosclerosis, improves kidney function and could serve as a therapeutic agent during serum sickness.

  16. Glomerular common gamma chain confers B- and T-cell-independent protection against glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Luque, Yosu; Cathelin, Dominique; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Xu, Xiaoli; Sohier, Julie; Placier, Sandrine; Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Louis, Kevin; Hertig, Alexandre; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Vasseur, Florence; Campagne, Fabien; Di Santo, James P; Vosshenrich, Christian; Rondeau, Eric; Mesnard, Laurent

    2017-01-19

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis is a life-threatening renal disease that has been extensively studied by the experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis (anti-GBM-GN) model. Although T cells have a significant role in this model, athymic/nude mice and rats still develop severe renal disease. Here we further explored the contribution of intrinsic renal cells in the development of T-cell-independent GN lesions. Anti-GBM-GN was induced in three strains of immune-deficient mice (Rag2(-/-), Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-), and Rag2(-/-)Il2rb(-/-)) that are devoid of either T/B cells or T/B/NK cells. The Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) or Rag2(-/-)Il2rb(-/-) mice harbor an additional deletion of either the common gamma chain (γC) or the interleukin-2 receptor β subunit (IL-2Rβ), respectively, impairing IL-15 signaling in particular. As expected, all these strains developed severe anti-GBM-GN. Additionally, bone marrow replenishment experiments allowed us to deduce a protective role for the glomerular-expressed γC during anti-GBM-GN. Given that IL-15 has been found highly expressed in nephritic kidneys despite the absence of lymphocytes, we then studied this cytokine in vitro on primary cultured podocytes from immune-deficient mice (Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) and Rag2(-/-)Il2rb(-/-)) compared to controls. IL-15 induced downstream activation of JAK1/3 and SYK in primary cultured podocytes. IL-15-dependent JAK/SYK induction was impaired in the absence of γC or IL-2Rβ. We found γC largely induced on podocytes during human glomerulonephritis. Thus, renal lesions are indeed modulated by intrinsic glomerular cells through the γC/IL-2Rβ receptor response, to date classically described only in immune cells.

  17. Pauci-immune glomerulonephritis in a captive chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), and a review of spontaneous cases in animals.

    PubMed

    Neidig, Lauren E; Owston, Michael A; Ball, Erin; Dick, Edward J

    2016-08-10

    Crescentic glomeruli are the hallmark finding in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) and are characterized by disruption and proliferation of the glomerular capsule and an influx of cells into Bowman's space. Pauci-immune-type RPGN is identified by a lack of immunoglobulins and immune complexes in the glomerular basement membrane. Complete necropsy and histology were performed on the affected chimpanzee. Electron microscopy was performed on kidney sections. A search of the literature was performed to identify spontaneous RPGN in animals. We report a case of crescentic glomerulonephritis of the pauci-immune-type in a hepatitis C virus-infected 28-year-old male chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) who was humanely euthanized for a cardiac-related decline in health. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in a non-human primate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva with Infective Endocarditis Complicated with Post-Infectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Rare Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Daga, Mradul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva (RSOV) is a rarely seen disease condition. RSOV can have varied presentations from being asymptomatic with just a cardiac murmur to profound hypotension. There has been simultaneous occurrence of RSOV with Infective Endocarditis (IE) in literature. Glomerulonephritis has also been reported in approximately 20% patients with IE. Large amount of proteinuria or decline in kidney functions is rarely encountered and mostly this finding has been incidental on routine evaluation. The co-existence of all the three conditions in a single patient is rare. This case was diagnosed to have RSOV with IE and was also diagnosed with post-infectious glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy. Patient was advised corrective cardiac surgery, but due to financial constraints, patient could not be operated and he died. Here, we report for the first time an unusual presence of both RSOV and sub-aortic membrane with IE complicated by glomerulonephritis. PMID:27891383

  19. Association of parvovirus B19 infection with acute glomerulonephritis in healthy adults: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mori, Y; Yamashita, H; Umeda, Y; Uchiyama-Tanaka, Y; Nose, A; Kishimoto, N; Kijima, Y; Nagata, T; Mori, M; Matsubara, H; Yoshida, H; Iwasaka, T

    2002-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 20-year-old woman presented with an erythematous rash on her face as well as arthralgia and anemia. She also had systemic edema, proteinuria and hypertension. Laboratory data on admission showed hypocomplementemia, human parvovirus B 19 (HPV) DNA and both immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG antibodies to HPV in her serum. Renal biopsy specimens showed features of endocapillary glomerulonephritis under light microscopy. Electron microscopy showed massive subendothelial electron-dense deposits. No cause was probable other than immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis associated with HPV infection. In a review of this and similar cases reported in the literature, several characteristic features come to light: female dominance, onset in the second or third decade of life, hypocomplementemia, histologic renal endocapillary and/or mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis with subendothelial deposits and spontaneous recovery.

  20. Biology of the mesangial cell in glomerulonephritis--role of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ooi, B S; Cohen, D J; Veis, J H

    1996-12-01

    The mesangial cell occupies a central position in the genesis of the pertubations occurring during the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis. In vitro studies have shown that this cell is a metabolically active cell producing a variety of cytokines which act as autocoids; such cytokines are also liberated by the monocytes/macrophages which infiltrate the glomerulus in nephritis. This review summarizes the evidence for the participation of these cytokines in animal models of nephritis and in human renal disease, focusing on the roles of basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, colony-stimulating factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6.

  1. Tonsillar Kaposi sarcoma in a patient with membranous glomerulonephritis on immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Brahim, Nabeel; Zaki, Ashraf H; El-Merhi, Khaled; Ahmad, Mahmoud S

    2013-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a malignant vascular neoplasm uncommonly seen in immunosuppressed patients. Herein we report an unusual case of tonsillar Kaposi sarcoma in a patient with membranous glomerulonephritis treated with prednisolone and cyclosporine. The patient presented after 10 months of starting the treatment with a tonsillar mass. Histological examination was typical of monomorphic spindle cell proliferation with slit-like vascular channels. The tumor cells expressed CD34, D2-40 and positive nuclear stain for HHV-8. Kaposi sarcoma is associated with immunosuppression and rarely occurs in the tonsil. Clinicians should be aware of this rare presentation of Kaposi sarcoma.

  2. Membranous glomerulonephritis and cellular crescents induced by levamisole-adulterated cocaine abuse: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moll-Guillen, Jose-Luis; Espí-Reig, Jordi; Blanes-Julia, Marino; García-Martínez, Ana-María; Pujol-Marco, Conrad; Hernández-Jaras, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole is illicitly employed as a cocaine adulterant. The consumption of levamisole-adulterated cocaine can provoke anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated syndromes. Patients carrying an HLAB27 allele are known to be at higher risk of developing agranulocytosis when treated with levamisole. Likewise, patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and internal organ involvement have typically been exposed to offending agents for prolonged periods of time, often on the order of years. Here, we report an unusual case of a patient in which kidney biopsy showed membranous glomerulonephritis with cellular crescents associated with levamisole-contaminated cocaine use. PMID:26605317

  3. Progeria with post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis: a rare case report with differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alphy A; Ahsan, Auswaf K

    2013-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by craniofacial disproportion, delayed dentition, micrognathia, and plucked bird appearance. The genetic defect is mainly de nova mutation in the lamin A gene. This report describes a 16-year-old patient with classical features of progeria along with post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. The symptoms of hepatomegaly were also present in the patient. The differential diagnoses of this lesion are also discussed in detail in this literature.

  4. Glomerulonephritis associated with simultaneous canine adenovirus-1 and Dirofilaria immitis infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Salguero, F J; Núnez, A; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Carrasco, L

    2002-06-01

    This article describes a case of glomerulonephritis and immunocomplex (IgM, IgG and C3c) deposition in the mesangium and basement membranes of a 2-year-old dog with canine viral hepatitis and dirofilariasis. The deposits observed in the mesangium were in the vicinity of cells with viral replication. However, no clear relationship was found between viral replication and the deposition of immunocomplexes in the glomerular capillary basement membranes, which may be the reason why these deposits have only been tentatively related to the concomitant infestation by Dirofilaria immitis.

  5. Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in IgA Multiple Myeloma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moscoso-Solorzano, Grace T.; Madureira-Silva, Marcus V.; Balda, Carlos; Franco, Marcello F.; Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna

    2011-01-01

    Background There are few reports of glomerulonephritis (GN) with crescents and a rapidly progressive course that lead to a diagnosis of a previously unsuspected B-cell dyscrasia. Case Presentation: We report a case of rapidly progressive GN: the patient showed no evidence of etiology at the time of biopsy and was diagnosed as IgA multiple myeloma (MM) during investigation based on a renal biopsy. He presented diffuse proliferative and exudative GN and marked plasma cell infiltration of the kidney. Conclusion The present case raises the possibility that proliferative GN with crescents may be a rare mode of presentation of MM. PMID:22470380

  6. Polyarthritis and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis as paraneoplastic manifestation of Hodgkin's lymphoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Erlij, Daniel; Calderón, Beatriz; Rivera, Angela; Mella, Cristián; Valladares, Ximena; Roessler, Emilio; Rivera, María Teresa; Méndez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes can be presented in multiple ways, which include endocrinological, hematologic, rheumatologic and nephrologic manifestations. While most of the publications described solid tumors as responsible for these manifestations, hematologic neoplasms are important cause to consider as part of the differential diagnosis. We report the case of a 46 year-old man with seronegative symmetric polyarthritis of large and small joints associated with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with deposits of immune complexes and acute impairment of renal function, as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary of a classical Hodgkin lymphoma with bone marrow invasion, which reversed completely with chemotherapy treatment.

  7. Erythropoietin-producing cells in the liver of ICR-derived glomerulonephritis (ICGN) mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Yamada, Misuzu; Akashi, Naotsugu; Goto, Yasufumi; Anan, Sayuri; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Ogura, Atsuo; Manabe, Noboru

    2006-01-01

    The ICR-derived glomerulonephritis (ICGN) mouse is an appropriate model for anemia associated with chronic renal disorder (CRD). Insufficient renal production of erythropoietin (EPO) induces the anemia associated with CRD. EPO mRNA is expressed in both kidneys and liver of progressing-stage ICGN mice. Hypoxic stimulation induced the EPO mRNA expression in the liver as well as in the kidneys of ICGN mice. The localization of EPO-producing cells in the liver remains controversial. Present study using an amplified in situ hybridization technique identified that nonparenchymal cells were the source of hepatic EPO production in ICGN mice under both normoxia and hypoxia.

  8. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N.; Obah, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects. PMID:27124161

  9. Hydralazine-induced pauci-immune glomerulonephritis: intriguing case series with misleading diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Babar, Faizan; Posner, Jeffery N; Obah, Eugene A

    2016-01-01

    Hydralazine has been used since the 1950s for the management of hypertension. Evidence for hydralazine-associated vasculitis dates to pre-ANCA (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) era. This abstract describes two cases of ANCA-positive pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (GN) in challenging scenarios where diagnosis was misconstrued. A comprehensive literature review was done to understand the pathogenesis of drug-induced pauci-immune GN. We have described key diagnostic features that are helpful in distinguishing idiopathic ANCA vasculitis from drug-induced vasculitis. Additionally, we have also described different treatments meant to provide therapy options with the least side effects.

  10. Modification by Drugs of Urinary Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products in Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, A. R.; MacDonald, Mary K.; Cash, John D.; Robson, James S.

    1972-01-01

    Treatment with indomethacin, aspirin, or prednisone has been shown to reduce urinary fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (F.D.P.) in approximately two-thirds of patients with proliferative glomerulonephritis. This reduction which is dose-dependent for prednisone but not for indomethacin or aspirin in the range of doses used occurs within two to three days of beginning treatment and is thought to result from decreased intraglomerular fibrin deposition rather than alteration of glomerular permeability to F.D.P. In patients who responded in this manner treatment was associated with reductions in the degree of proteinuria and maintenance or improvement in renal function. PMID:5046478

  11. Synchrotron radiation (SR) diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) of chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) mode.

    PubMed

    Chen-Chen, Xia; Yadav, Arun Kumar; Kai, Zhang; Yi-Feng, Peng; Qing-Xi, Yuan; Pei-Ping, Zhu; Li-Jin, Feng; Xu-Dong, Xu; A-Shan, Wu; Guang-Yu, Tang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate microstructural changes in chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) rabbit model under diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) technology of synchrotron radiation (SR). The chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) models were obtained within two months after 5 New Zealand white rabbits were treated with doxorubicin hydrochloride. Blood exams, urine tests and kidney histological studies were carried out after the 5 rabbits were humanely sacrificed by hyperanesthesia. The kidney tissues were fixed in 4% formalin for one week before DEI experiment, with another 5 normal rabbits used as the control group. The experiment was performed at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) with a 4W1A beam line (beam energy was 14keV). On routine scanning process, the rocking curve was detected, and slope position on the curve was selected to make a 360° spatial CT scan; DEI reconstruction software was used to generate a 3-dimensional image, from which the difference in grey value between the chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) group and the control group was measured and analyzed using MATLAB and SPSS. Without radio-contrast, DEI provided clear visibility of the microstructures including artery, vein, straight collecting ducts, papillary tubules, glomeruli in both the chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) group and the control group, with a spatial resolution as low as 10μm. MATLAB grey value extraction and SPSS analysis showed that cortex of CGN group (91 to 112) lost more gray value compared to the control group (121 to 141), T tests P <  0.05. Equivalant cortical ROI (data points 450×80) quantitative analysis showed that gross grey value of CGN group (ranking from 55 to 160) was smaller than the control group (ranking from 75 to 175). DEI images correlated well with pathologic images. Morphological changes in the microstructure of contstartabstractCGN kidney was revealed, due to the advantage of phase-contrast imaging (PCI) mechanism, and the diagnostic

  12. Clinical spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Rampelli, S K; Rajesh, N G; Srinivas, B H; Harichandra Kumar, K T; Swaminathan, R P; Priyamvada, P S

    2016-01-01

    There is limited data on the etiology, clinical and histopathological spectrum and outcomes of crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) in adult Indian population. This prospective study was done to evaluate the etiology, clinicohistological patterns and predictors of outcome of CrGN in South Indian population. All the patients received standard protocol based immunosuppression in addition to supportive care. Immune-complex glomerulonephritis (ICGN) was the most common etiology (n = 31; 77.5%) followed by pauci-immune glomerulonephritis (PauciGN; n = 8; 20%) and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (n = 1; 2.5%). The most common etiology of ICGN was IgA nephropathy (n = 11; 27.5%) followed by lupus nephritis (n = 7; 17.5%) and post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (n = 7; 17.5%). The patients with PauciGN were significantly older compared to those with ICGN (44.5 ± 15 years vs. 31.8 ± 11 years; P = 0.01). The patients with PauciGN presented with significantly higher serum creatinine (9.7 ± 4.4 vs. 6.6 ± 3.3 mg/dl; P = 0.03). The histopathologic parameters of ICGN and PauciGN were comparable except for a higher proportion of sclerosed glomeruli in ICGN. At the end of 3 months follow-up, only two patients went into complete remission (5.4%). Majority of the patients had end-stage renal failure (48.6%) and were dialysis dependent and seven patients (18.9%) expired. There was no signifi difference in the renal survival (10.9 ± 1.9 vs. 9.6 ± 3.3 months) or patient survival (17.5 ± 2.1 vs. 17.3 ± 4.3 months). The parameters associated with adverse outcomes at 3 months were hypertension (odds ratio [OR]: 0.58; confidence interval [CI]: 0.36-0.94), need for renal replacement therapy (OR: 0.19; CI: 0.04-0.9), serum creatinine at admission (P = 0.019), estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.022) and percentage of fibrocellular crescents (P = 0.022).

  13. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a patient with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis caused by impetigo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Kei; Hamaguchi, Akihiko; Ogura, Makoto; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of pulmonary renal syndrome with nephritis in a 17-year-old boy with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The patient exhibited hemoptysis two weeks after developing impetigo, and DAH was diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Respiratory failure progressed, and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy was administered; the respiratory failure regressed immediately after the onset of therapy. Streptococcus pyogenes was detected in an impetigo culture, and, together with the results of the renal biopsy, a diagnosis of APSGN was made. This case demonstrates the effects of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy in improving respiratory failure.

  14. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Abdominal Wall Caused by Serratia Marcescens.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Naheed A; Narsinghani, Umesh; Kumar, Ritu

    2015-04-15

    In this article, we present the first case of necrotizing fasciitis affecting the abdominal wall caused by Serratia marcescens and share results of a focused review of S. marcescens induced necrotizing fasciitis. Our patient underwent aorto-femoral bypass grafting for advanced peripheral vascular disease and presented 3 weeks postoperatively with pain, erythema and discharge from the incision site in the left lower abdominal wall and underwent multiple debridement of the affected area. Pathology of debrided tissue indicated extensive necrosis involving the adipose tissue, fascia and skeletal muscle. Wound cultures were positive for Serratia marcescens. She was successfully treated with antibiotics and multiple surgical debridements. Since necrotizing fasciitis is a medical and surgical emergency, it is critical to examine infectivity trends, clinical characteristics in its causative spectrum. Using PubMed we found 17 published cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Serratia marcescens, and then analyzed patterns among those cases. Serratia marcescens is prominent in the community and hospital settings, and information on infection presentations, risk factors, characteristics, treatment, course, and complications as provided through this study can help identify cases earlier and mitigate poor outcomes. Patients with positive blood cultures and those patients where surgical intervention was not provided or delayed had a higher mortality. Surgical intervention is a definite way to establish the diagnosis of necrotizing infection and differentiate it from other entities.

  15. Two successive necrotic lesions secondary to presumed loxosceles envenomation.

    PubMed

    Tarullo, David B; Jacobsen, Ryan C; Algren, D Adam

    2013-06-01

    Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomations with subsequent necrotic skin lesions occur infrequently, and systemic loxoscelism is rarer still. We report a case of 2 successive developing necrotic lesions, each on adjacent medial aspects of the legs, secondary to presumed Loxosceles envenomation. A 31-year-old man with no significant past medical history presented to the emergency department with 2, large, necrotic lesions, 1 on each medial thigh. They had progressed over the course of 1 month from small blisters to large necrotic lesions with eschar. He underwent surgical debridement without skin grafting with no further complications. Bites from recluse spiders that progress to necrosis usually present as single lesions. The differential diagnoses for a necrotic skin lesion is large. The presence of more than 1 lesion argues against Loxosceles envenomation; however, in the absence of underlying infection, systemic diseases, immunodeficiency, or malignancy, the diagnosis must be considered if the case presents in an endemic area. Brown recluse spiders rarely bite multiple times, thus confounding the diagnosis of an already nonspecific clinical finding. Copyright © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis score for early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis in Darwin.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Vignesh; Ooi, Geraldine; Weidlich, Stephanie; Carson, Phillip

    2017-03-15

    Soft tissue infections are a major health burden in the Top End of the Northern Territory of Australia. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is associated with mortality rates from 8 to 40%. Early recognition and aggressive surgical debridement are the cornerstones of successful treatment. The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC) score, developed by Wong et al., uses six routine biochemical variables to aid early diagnosis. We aim to assess the diagnostic efficacy of the LRINEC score in our population. A retrospective review of patients with NF between 2005 and 2013 was conducted. A time matched cohort of abscesses/cellulitis was selected. Admission bloods were used to calculate the LRINEC score. An intraoperative finding of NF was used as the gold standard definition for comparison. The diagnostic accuracy of the LRINEC score was assessed. Ninety-eight patients with NF and 205 control patients were identified. The area under the receiver operator curve for the LRINEC score in detecting NF was 0.925 (0.890-0.959, P < 0.001). The sensitivity of the LRINEC ≥5 for NF was 76.3%, with a specificity of 93.1%. The positive and negative predictive values were 95.5 and 88.1%, respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 11 and 0.25. The LRINEC score is a useful, robust, non-invasive and easily calculated scoring system that can be used as an adjunct to early diagnosis of NF. However, a high degree of clinical suspicion remains the most important factor in early diagnosis of NF. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. Focal hyperhidrosis: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Aamir; Solish, Nowell

    2005-01-01

    HYPERHIDROSIS, A CONDITION CHARACTERIZED by excessive sweating, can be generalized or focal. Generalized hyperhidrosis involves the entire body and is usually part of an underlying condition, most often an infectious, endocrine or neurologic disorder. Focal hyperhidrosis is idiopathic, occurring in otherwise healthy people. It affects 1 or more body areas, most often the palms, armpits, soles or face. Almost 3% of the general population, largely people aged between 25 and 64 years, experience hyperhidrosis. The condition carries a substantial psychological and social burden, since it interferes with daily activities. However, patients rarely seek a physician's help because many are unaware that they have a treatable medical disorder. Early detection and management of hyperhidrosis can significantly improve a patient's quality of life. There are various topical, systemic, surgical and nonsurgical treatments available with efficacy rates greater than 90%–95%. PMID:15632408

  18. Variable focal length deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc; Schwarz, Jens

    2007-06-12

    A variable focal length deformable mirror has an inner ring and an outer ring that simply support and push axially on opposite sides of a mirror plate. The resulting variable clamping force deforms the mirror plate to provide a parabolic mirror shape. The rings are parallel planar sections of a single paraboloid and can provide an on-axis focus, if the rings are circular, or an off-axis focus, if the rings are elliptical. The focal length of the deformable mirror can be varied by changing the variable clamping force. The deformable mirror can generally be used in any application requiring the focusing or defocusing of light, including with both coherent and incoherent light sources.

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis secondary to carcinoma of the gallbladder with perforation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ken-ichi; Shatari, Tomoo; Yamamoto, Tatsuma; Sasaki, Takahiro; Suwa, Tatsushi; Furuuchi, Takayuki; Takenaka, Yoshifumi; Hori, Masao; Sakuma, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    We present an unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis in the upper abdominal wall caused by penetrating perforation of the gallbladder. It was manifested as an elastic and reddish abdominal swelling with severe tenderness, but no peritoneal irritation. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated water density with a slightly elevated CT value and air bubbles in the subcutaneous space. The preoperative diagnosis was subcutaneous abscess with fasciitis. At surgery, necrotizing fasciitis and subcutaneous abscess secondary to penetrating perforation of the gallbladder were revealed. Cholecystectomy and peritoneal irrigation were performed. Although no tumor was evident during surgery, a tumor located close to the perforation site was found just after the operation. Pathological examination revealed gallbladder carcinoma without stones. There have been very few previous reports of necrotizing fasciitis following gallbladder perforation. The presentation, diagnosis, and management of fasciitis, as well as carcinoma of the gallbladder with perforation, are discussed.

  20. Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy associated with statins.

    PubMed

    Grable-Esposito, Phyllis; Katzberg, Hans D; Greenberg, Steven A; Srinivasan, Jayashri; Katz, Jonathan; Amato, Anthony A

    2010-02-01

    We report patients from two neuromuscular centers who were evaluated between the years 2000 and 2008 and met the following criteria: (1) proximal muscle weakness occurring during or after treatment with statins; (2) elevated serum creatine kinase (CK); (3) persistence of weakness and elevated CK despite discontinuation of the statin; (4) improvement with immunosuppressive agents; and (5) muscle biopsy showing necrotizing myopathy without significant inflammation. Twenty-five patients fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Twenty-four patients required multiple immunosuppressive agents. Fifteen patients relapsed after being tapered off immunosuppressive therapy. Exposure to statins prior to onset was significantly higher in patients with necrotizing myopathy (82%) as compared to those with dermatomyositis (18%), polymyositis (24%), and inclusion-body myositis (38%) seen in the same time period. The lack of improvement following discontinuation of statins, the need for immunosuppressive therapy, and frequent relapse when treatment was tapered suggest an immune-mediated etiology for this rare, statin-associated necrotizing myopathy.

  1. Necrotic adenoids in post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Spinato, L; Brihaye, P; De Ganseman, A; Marquet, T; Mansbach, A L

    2011-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a potentially fatal complication after solid organ transplantation. The majority of cases are associated with Epstein Barr virus infection (EBV). The first manifestations of PTLD are frequently observed in the ENT area with adenoidal and/or tonsillar enlargement. We present the case of a 12-year old girl with a total nasal obstruction and tonsillitis five months after a kidney transplantation for bilateral congenital kidney hypoplasia. The EBV genome was detected by polymerase reaction three months after surgery. Fiberoptic examination revealed an obstructive necrotic mass in the naso-pharynx. The anatomic-pathologic analysis revealed necrotic adenoids. Necrotic tonsillitis is common. Necrosis of the adenoids, although rarer, can also occur and explains the important respiratory distress. Since two thirds of PTLD patients present with clinical symptoms in the ENT area, the otorhinolaryngologist should be aware of this complication.

  2. Stigmatic flat focal field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczyk, T. M.; Gobeli, G. W.

    Advances in two dimensional detectors have created a need for a spectrograph that can produce high fidelity images. Aberrations that detract from image quality in conventional spectrographs are discussed. Ray trace and experimental results obtained for a unique spectrograph designed for use with array detectors, i.e., designed to produce high fidelity images, are presented. The spectrograph employs toroidal mirrors to achieve stigmatic imaging in a flat focal field.

  3. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for curl-ups.…

  4. Persistent Focal Behavior and Physical Activity Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the proclivity and performance attributes of focal students across time and activities using data from 9,345 students. Three systematic focal behavior partitions are examined: Across activities, across time, and across activities and time. A student's performance is focal if it ends in 0 or 5 for push-ups and 0 for curl-ups.…

  5. Almost Unilateral Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Solam; Choe, Sung Jay

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia, caused by mutations in PORCN, is an X-linked ectodermal dysplasia, also known as Goltz syndrome. Only seven cases of unilateral or almost unilateral focal dermal hypoplasia have been reported in the English literature and there have been no previously reported cases in the Republic of Korea. A 19-year-old female presented with scalp defects, skin lesions on the right leg and the right trunk, and syndactyly of the right fourth and fifth toes. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple atrophic plaques and a brown and yellow mass with fat herniation and telangiectasia that was mostly located on the lower right leg. She had syndactyly on the right foot and the scalp lesion appeared to be an atrophic, membranous, fibrotic alopecic scar. A biopsy of the calf revealed upper dermal extension of fat cells, dermal atrophy, and loss of dermal collagen. A diagnosis of almost unilateral focal dermal hypoplasia was made on the basis of physical and histologic findings. Henceforth, the patient was referred to a plastic surgeon and an orthopedics department to repair her syndactyly. PMID:28223754

  6. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis presenting as arthropathy and cardiac valvulopathy in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Chuiyoung; Choi, Seung Won; Kim, Misung; Park, Jongha; Lee, Jong Soo; Chung, Hyun Chul

    2014-10-22

    Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by chronic urticarial vasculitis, arthralgia, arthritis, and hypocomplementemia. Previously, only six patients with concomitant hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, Jaccoud's arthropathy, and valvular heart disease have been reported. A 30-year-old Korean man presented with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. In addition to urticarial cutaneous lesions, he experienced polyarthralgia and arthritis that resulted in progressive deformity of the joints of both hands, cardiac valvulopathy with mitral, tricuspid, and aortic regurgitation, and intermittent neck swelling with laryngeal edema. He also developed nephritis with azotemia. His renal biopsy results revealed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, type I. He showed a partial response to a combination therapy of steroid, cyclophosphamide, and mycophenolate mofetil. We describe, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of glomerulonephritis presenting a arthropathy and cardiac valvulopathy in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. A combination of corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, and mycophenolate mofetil appear to be a safe and effective treatment for nephropathy, however are less effective for cutaneous vasculitis, cardiac valvulopathy, and arthropathy.

  7. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis presenting as arthropathy and cardiac valvulopathy in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by chronic urticarial vasculitis, arthralgia, arthritis, and hypocomplementemia. Previously, only six patients with concomitant hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, Jaccoud’s arthropathy, and valvular heart disease have been reported. Case presentation A 30-year-old Korean man presented with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. In addition to urticarial cutaneous lesions, he experienced polyarthralgia and arthritis that resulted in progressive deformity of the joints of both hands, cardiac valvulopathy with mitral, tricuspid, and aortic regurgitation, and intermittent neck swelling with laryngeal edema. He also developed nephritis with azotemia. His renal biopsy results revealed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, type I. He showed a partial response to a combination therapy of steroid, cyclophosphamide, and mycophenolate mofetil. Conclusions We describe, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of glomerulonephritis presenting a arthropathy and cardiac valvulopathy in hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. A combination of corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, and mycophenolate mofetil appear to be a safe and effective treatment for nephropathy, however are less effective for cutaneous vasculitis, cardiac valvulopathy, and arthropathy. PMID:25339233

  8. Vanillic Acid Ameliorates Cationic Bovine Serum Albumin Induced Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Motiram Kakalij, Rahul; Tejaswini, G; Patil, Madhoosudan A; Dinesh Kumar, B; Diwan, Prakash V

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research Vanillic acid (VA) is a dihydroxybenzoic acid derivative widely used as a flavoring agent. It has chemopreventive effects on experimentally-induced carcinogenesis and in ulcerative colitis. The object of the present study was to investigate the effects of VA, alone and in combination with methylprednisolone (MP), on cationic bovine serum albumin (cBSA induced immune-complex glomerulonephritis in female BALB/c mice. Pre-immunization was carried out with cBSA in BALB/c mice and repeated (cBSA, 13 mg/kg, 3 times/week, i.v.) for 6 weeks to induce glomerulonephritis which was confirmed by the presence of severe proteinuria. The effect of VA (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) and its combination with MP (12.5 mg/kg, p.o.) was assessed in the nephrotic disease model. Treatment with VA decreased inflammatory nephrotic injury as evidenced by decreased proteinuria, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, serum IgG1 and TNF-α levels. Co-administration of VA with MP showed an improvement in the immunohistochemistry of glomerular nephrin and podocin. The present results indicate that VA has a nephroprotective effect in the management of autoimmune nephritis. Drug Dev Res 77 : 171-179, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Characterisation of the macrophage transcriptome in glomerulonephritis-susceptible and -resistant rat strains

    PubMed Central

    Maratou, Klio; Behmoaras, Jacques; Fewings, Chris; Srivastava, Prashant; D’Souza, Zelpha; Smith, Jennifer; Game, Laurence; Cook, Terence; Aitman, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) is a major cause of rapidly progressive renal failure for which the underlying genetic basis is unknown. WKY rats show marked susceptibility to CRGN, while Lewis rats are resistant. Glomerular injury and crescent formation are macrophage-dependent and mainly explained by seven quantitative trait loci (Crgn1-7). Here, we used microarray analysis in basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages to identify genes that reside on pathways predisposing WKY rats to CRGN. We detected 97 novel positional candidates for the uncharacterised Crgn3-7. We identified 10 additional secondary effector genes with profound differences in expression between the two strains (>5-fold change, <1% False Discovery Rate) for basal and LPS-stimulated macrophages. Moreover, we identified 8 genes with differentially expressed alternatively spliced isoforms, by using an in depth analysis at probe-level that allowed us to discard false positives due to polymorphisms between the two rat strains. Pathway analysis identified several common linked pathways, enriched for differentially expressed genes, which affect macrophage activation. In summary, our results identify distinct macrophage transcriptome profiles between two rat strains that differ in susceptibility to glomerulonephritis, provide novel positional candidates for Crgn3-7, and define groups of genes that play a significant role in differential regulation of macrophage activity. PMID:21179115

  10. The role of Th1 and Th17 cells in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Nader; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-04-01

    T helper (Th) cells as an important part of the immune is responsible for elimination of invading pathogens. But, if Th cell responses are not regulated effectively, the autoimmune diseases might develop. The Th17 subset usually produces interleukin-17A which in experimental models of organ-specific autoimmune inflammation is very important. Directory of open access journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Embase, Scopus, PubMed and Web of Science have been searched. Fifty-six articles were found and searched. In the present review article, we tried to summarize the recently published data about characteristics and role of Th1 and Th17 cells and discuss in detail, the potential role of these T helpers immune responses in renal inflammation and renal injury, focusing on glomerulonephritis. Published papers in animal and human studies indicated that autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, classically believed to be Th1-mediated, are mainly derived from a Th17 immune response. Identification of the Th17 subgroup has explained seemingly paradoxical observations and improved our understanding of immune-mediated inflammatory responses. Secretion of IL-17A, as well as IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, suggests that Th17 subset may play a crucial role as a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory Th subset. There is experimental evidence to support the notion that Th1 and Th17 cells contribute to kidney injury in renal inflammatory diseases like glomerulonephritis.

  11. [A case of MPO ANCA associated glomerulonephritis with interstitial pneumonitis complicated with lung tuberculosis and pericarditis].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Suda, S; Takayama, M; Deguchi, F; Matsuda, O; Tachibana, K; Yoshimura, A

    2000-10-01

    The main target organs of myeloperoxidase (MPO) antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-related disease are the kidney and lung. This report describes a 71-year-old man with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) and interstitial pneumonitis associated with MPO ANCA. The patient was admitted to our hospital because of bloody sputum, low grade fever and appetite loss on October, 1998. He was diagnosed as having interstitial pneumonitis from the findings of chest X-ray and CT examinations. Moderate proteinuria and hematuria, renal dysfunction(serum creatinine: 5.6 mg/dl, BUN: 58.0 mg/dl) and positivity for MPO ANCA were noted. He was negative for anti-glomerular antibody and PR3-ANCA. Renal biopsy was performed and revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis without deposition of immunoglobulins. Therefore, the diagnosis of pauci immune type RPGN was made. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone(1.0 g/day x 3 days) following oral administration of prednisolone (60 mg/day) found marked improvement of renal function maintenance and interstitial pneumonitis, respectively. However, he died because of lung tuberculosis and acute tuberculous pericarditis during treatment with prednisolone. In this case, MPO ANCA might have been directly associated with both RPGN and interstitial pneumonitis. Furthermore, chronic lung disease, such as interstitial pneumonitis, is important as a preceding disease of RPGN. MPO ANCA-related disease is more frequent in aged persons, therefore particular attention should be paid during their treatment with an immunosuppressant.

  12. Lymphocyte surface markers in acute rheumatic fever and post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R C; Zabriskie, J B; Mahros, F; Hassaballa, F; Abdin, Z H

    1977-01-01

    Lymphocyte cell-surface markers were examined in forty children with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and twelve with acute post-streptococal glomerulonephritis (AGN) and compared to thirty-six normal controls of similar age. Cell-surface-marker studies included surface Ig using fluorescein-labelled F(ab)2 anti-F(AB')2, IgG aggregate binding cells, and EAC rosettes. T cells were identified both as 'active' rosettes and total E-binding cells. Proportions and absolute numbers of cells bearing surface Ig and Fc receptors were elevated in subjects with AGN (Pless than0-01-0-5), whereas proportions of cells producing EAC rosettes were diminished. Patients with acute rheumatic carditis or chorea showed a substantial elevation in proportions and numbers of active T-cell rosettes (Pless than0-01). Streptococcal antigen binding cells capable of forming rosettes with autologous cells coated with group A streptococcal membranes were elevated in the acute phase of both rheumatic fever and acute glomerulonephritis(Pless than0-01). The majority of such cells were removed by passage over insolubilized Ig-anti-IgG columns and appeared to be B cells. PMID:300301

  13. Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited disorder that is characterized by the development of cysts in the kidneys and other organs. Urinary protein excretion is usually less than 1 g/day, and ADPKD is rarely associated with nephrotic syndrome or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN). To date, myeloperoxidase (MPO)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) has not been reported in a patient with ADPKD. Case presentations We report two cases of MPO-ANCA positive ADPKD. A 60-year-old Japanese woman (case 1) and a 54-year-old Japanese woman (case 2) presented with RPGN featuring severe proteinuria and microscopic hematuria. In both patients percutaneous needle biopsy of the kidney revealed MPO-ANCA-associated CrGN with a paucity of glomerular immunoglobulin staining. Each patient received intravenous methylprednisolone for 3 days, followed by oral prednisolone. Case 1 showed gradual improvement and has not progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but case 2 developed ESRD requiring hemodialysis within one month despite treatment. Conclusion These are the first two reported cases of MPO-ANCA-associated CrGN in patients with ADPKD. Our experience suggests that serial measurement of the ANCA titer and renal biopsy should be considered for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of ADPKD patients who present with proteinuria, hematuria, and rapid decline of renal function. PMID:23617397

  14. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting as Pauci-Immune Crescentic Glomerulonephritis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kunjal, Ryan; Makary, Raafat; Poenariu, Andreea

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis rarely affects females of reproductive age. A 28-year-old African American woman presented at 8 weeks of gestation with intractable vomiting attributed to hyperemesis gravidarum. She was found to have acute kidney injury that was unresponsive to vigorous fluid resuscitation and urine sediment examination was suggestive of an underlying glomerulonephritis. Serum c-ANCA and PR3 were elevated and there was no peripheral eosinophilia. During her course she also developed one episode of small volume hemoptysis with right upper lobe infiltrates on CT Chest. There were no cutaneous manifestations of vasculitis or upper respiratory symptoms. Renal biopsy revealed a pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN). The diagnosis was consistent with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Management initially comprised teratogen sparing agents; steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin; and plasma exchange. The response was suboptimal and she became dependent on daily renal replacement therapy. Ultimately the pregnancy was terminated allowing for traditional treatment approaches with dramatic effect. This is the first case of GPA presenting as PICGN in pregnancy and highlights the challenges of its management. PMID:27293925

  15. Characterization of the macrophage transcriptome in glomerulonephritis-susceptible and -resistant rat strains.

    PubMed

    Maratou, K; Behmoaras, J; Fewings, C; Srivastava, P; D'Souza, Z; Smith, J; Game, L; Cook, T; Aitman, T

    2011-03-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (CRGN) is a major cause of rapidly progressive renal failure for which the underlying genetic basis is unknown. Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats show marked susceptibility to CRGN, whereas Lewis rats are resistant. Glomerular injury and crescent formation are macrophage dependent and mainly explained by seven quantitative trait loci (Crgn1-7). Here, we used microarray analysis in basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages to identify genes that reside on pathways predisposing WKY rats to CRGN. We detected 97 novel positional candidates for the uncharacterized Crgn3-7. We identified 10 additional secondary effector genes with profound differences in expression between the two strains (>5-fold change, <1% false discovery rate) for basal and LPS-stimulated macrophages. Moreover, we identified eight genes with differentially expressed alternatively spliced isoforms, by using an in-depth analysis at the probe level that allowed us to discard false positives owing to polymorphisms between the two rat strains. Pathway analysis identified several common linked pathways, enriched for differentially expressed genes, which affect macrophage activation. In summary, our results identify distinct macrophage transcriptome profiles between two rat strains that differ in susceptibility to glomerulonephritis, provide novel positional candidates for Crgn3-7 and define groups of genes that play a significant role in differential regulation of macrophage activity.

  16. Role of the plasma contact system in the pathogenesis of experimental anti-GBM glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Villaro, J; Sánchez Ibarrola, A; Purroy, A

    1988-01-01

    To study the participation of the Hageman factor-related contact system of plasma in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis (GN), an anti-BM GN was induced in a group of 10 normal Brown Norway rats and another of seven Brown Norway BN/Mai Pfd f rats. The latter strain is characterized by a congenital deficiency of plasma prekallikrein and of high-molecular weight kininogen, with lengthening of the activated partial thromboplastin time. In the deficient group, one animal developed crescents in less than 25% of glomeruli, five in 25-50% and one in 50-75%. In the group of normal rats, extracapillary proliferation was of greater severity: one animal showed crescents in less than 25% of glomeruli, two in 50-75% and five in more than 75% of glomeruli. Although in both groups intense glomerular fibrin deposition was documented, the intensity of these deposits was less severe in the deficient animals. These data suggest, in the first place, that functional integrity of the contact system is not a necessary requirement for glomerular fibrinogenesis, other mechanisms being implicated in this phenomenon. On the other hand, this functional deficit has exerted a protective effect on crescent formation, which suggests that the contact system can play a role as a mediator of injury in glomerulonephritis, perhaps through the release of contact system-dependent mediators of inflammation. PMID:3396222

  17. C3 glomerulonephritis and autoimmune disease: more than a fortuitous association?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Mariam P; Fervenza, Fernando C; De Vriese, An S; Smith, Richard J H; Nasr, Samih H; Cornell, Lynn D; Herrera Hernandez, Loren P; Zhang, Yuzhou; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2016-04-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) results from genetic or acquired dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. A subset of patients may have clinical and biochemical characteristics compatible with an autoimmune disorder. We studied a cohort of 85 patients with confirmed C3GN (2007-2014), of which ten patients (3 male, 7 female; mean age 38.5 years) had an associated autoimmune disorder. All patients had abnormal ANA titers, 6 also had positive ds-DNA titers. At the time of presentation with C3GN, all 7 female patients had autoimmune-related presentations. Of the 3 male patients, only 1 patient had autoimmune-related presentations. Kidney biopsy showed predominantly mesangial proliferative or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. In 5 patients, the alternative pathway was evaluated. All had allele variants/polymorphisms associated with C3GN. One patient was also positive for C3Nefs. Treatment varied form conservative management to the use of prednisone alone or with cytotoxic therapy. Mean serum creatinine decreased from 2.0 to 1.4 mg/dL while proteinuria decreased from 2300 to 994 mg/24 h in 8 patients with follow-up. The study highlights the association between C3GN and autoimmune disorders, particularly in female patients. The study suggests that an autoimmune milieu may act as a trigger for the development of C3GN in genetically susceptible patients. Short-term prognosis of C3GN associated with autoimmune disorders appears excellent.

  18. An immune-complex glomerulonephritis of Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Lumsden, J S; Russell, S; Huber, P; Wybourne, B A; Ostland, V E; Minamikawa, M; Ferguson, H W

    2008-12-01

    Chinook salmon from New Zealand were shown to have a generalized membranous glomerulonephritis that was most severe in large fish. Marked thickening of the glomerular basement membrane was the most consistent lesion, with the presence of an electron-dense deposit beneath the capillary endothelium.Severely affected glomeruli also had expansion of the mesangium and loss of capillaries,synechiae of the visceral and parietal epithelium and mild fibrosis of Bowmans capsule. Chinook salmon from British Columbia, Canada with bacterial kidney disease caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum had similar histological lesions. They also had thickened glomerular basement membranes that were recognized by rabbit antiserum to rainbow trout immunoglobulin. This was true only when frozen sections of kidney were used and not formalin-fixed tissue. An attempt to experimentally produce a glomerulopathy in rainbow trout by repeated immunization with killed R. salmoninarum was not successful. Case records from the Fish Pathology Laboratory at the University of Guelph over a 10-year period revealed that a range of species were diagnosed with glomerulopathies similar to those seen in Chinook salmon. The majority of these cases were determined to have chronic inflammatory disease. This report has identified the presence of immunoglobulin within thickened basement membranes of Chinook salmon with glomerulonephritis and supports the existence of type III hypersensitivity in fish.

  19. [The x-ray diagnosis of a predisposition to nephrogenic pulmonary edema in glomerulonephritis patients].

    PubMed

    Kamenetskiĭ, M S; Pervak, M B; Tkachenko, G D; Vernikov, B L

    1995-01-01

    To develop criteria for determining predisposition to pulmonary edema in patients with glomerulonephritis, clinical, laboratory and X-ray examinations were made in 697 patients with glomerulonephritis at different stages of its development. X-ray examination included chest tele X-ray and its densitometric analysis. Twenty two patients underwent computerized tomography with histographic analysis. In 106 patients, X-ray findings were compared with the volume of circulating blood, cardiac and stroke indices. Changes in the lungs and pleural cavities were found in 22.7%, pulmonary edema was revealed in 15.7% of the patients. The prognostically unfavourable criteria for the development of pulmonary edema were found to be Stage II pulmonary venous hypertension with hypervolemia and peripheral edemas. The densitometrically detected increase in the density of the lower lungs in patients with Stage II venous hypertension suggests early manifestations of interstitial edema of the lung and the narrowing of the histogram angle limited by its ascending and descending lines is indicative of the fact that interstitial edema progresses to alveolar one.

  20. Classifying murine glomerulonephritis using optical coherence tomography and optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Chang, Anthony; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V

    2016-08-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis caused by antiglomerular basement membrane marked by high mortality. The primary reason for this is delayed diagnosis via blood examination, urine analysis, tissue biopsy, or ultrasound and X-ray computed tomography imaging. Blood, urine, and tissue-based diagnoses can be time consuming, while ultrasound and CT imaging have relatively low spatial resolution, with reduced sensitivity. Optical coherence tomography is a noninvasive and high-resolution imaging technique that provides superior spatial resolution (micrometer scale) as compared to ultrasound and CT. Changes in tissue properties can be detected based on the optical metrics analyzed from the OCT signals, such as optical attenuation and speckle variance. Furthermore, OCT does not rely on ionizing radiation as with CT imaging. In addition to structural changes, the elasticity of the kidney can significantly change due to nephritis. In this work, OCT has been utilized to quantify the difference in tissue properties between healthy and nephritic murine kidneys. Although OCT imaging could identify the diseased tissue, its classification accuracy is clinically inadequate. By combining optical metrics with elasticity, the classification accuracy improves from 76% to 95%. These results show that OCT combined with OCE can be a powerful tool for identifying and classifying nephritis. Therefore, the OCT/OCE method could potentially be used as a minimally invasive tool for longitudinal studies during the progression and therapy of glomerulonephritis as well as complement and, perhaps, substitute highly invasive tissue biopsies. Elastic-wave propagation in mouse healthy and nephritic kidneys.

  1. Pediatric case of crescentic post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Hiroaki; Sawanobori, Emi; Koizumi, Keiichi; Ohashi, Ryuji; Higashida, Kosuke

    2015-04-01

    Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) generally has a good renal prognosis, and immunosuppressive therapies are not needed. However, a few patients present with severe acute kidney injury and extensive crescent formations. The etiology of such patients is not well known, and involvement of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies is rarely reported. A 9-year-old girl with rapidly progressive nephritic syndrome was diagnosed with PSGN. A biopsy showed diffuse crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunoglobulin G and C3 deposits; moreover, humps were observed on electron microscopy. After she was administered methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide, followed by prednisolone and azathioprine therapy, her urinary abnormalities improved and renal function normalized. However, the myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) titers gradually increased. We speculated that PSGN may be augmented by increased MPO-ANCA levels. Therefore, the patient is currently being treated with losartan, enalapril, azathioprine, and prednisolone. Although the MPO-ANCA titer remains high, urinary findings show mild proteinuria and her renal function has been norma for 18 months since onset. A progressive clinical course and severe histological findings may indicate the involvement of ANCA in deterioration of condition in patients with PSGN. Furthermore, in such cases immunosuppressive therapies should be considered even in pediatric PSGN.

  2. Effects of exchange transfusion on cytokine profiles in necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tokio; Kouwaki, Masanori; Goto, Kenji; Endo, Takeshi; Ito, Koichi; Koyama, Norihisa; Togari, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    To study the effect of exchange transfusion on cytokine profiles in a patient with necrotizing enterocolitis, the levels of 12 cytokines and serum calprotectin were measured among exchange transfusion. A male extremely low birth weight infant was in non-compensated shock and diagnosed stage 3 necrotizing enterocolitis. Exchange transfusion was performed for critical condition, refractory hypotension and disseminated intravascular coagulation. After exchange transfusion, the patient's blood pressure increased and stabilized. Then an enterostomy was performed and revealed necrosis of the ascending colon. Of the cytokines examined, interleukin-8 and serum calprotectin were high before exchange transfusion and decreased after exchange transfusion.

  3. Necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. III. Reproduction of the disease.

    PubMed Central

    Long, J R; Truscott, R B

    1976-01-01

    Lesions typical of necrotic enteritis could be produced experimentally in from 11-26% of broiler chickens consuming feed containing approximately 10(7) Clostridium perfringens per gram. Highest mortality was produced using isolates from field cases of necrotic enteritis which were reisolated from experimental cases in the laboratory. Penicillin in the drinking water at 100,000 I.U./litre completely prevented mortality whereas chloramphenicol at 110 mg/litre delayed the onset and reduced the number of deaths compared to controls. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:187291

  4. Neonatal necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Junpei; Inoue, Nobuaki; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Terakawa, Toshiro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-04-01

    We herein describe the case of a 27-day-old male infant who was brought to the emergency room for intermittent crying, and swelling of the left scrotum. Based on the clinical findings, necrotizing fasciitis was suspected, and surgical intervention was successfully completed within a few hours of admission. Streptococcus agalactiae type Ia was cultured from the drained abscess, and was considered the causative pathogen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of neonatal necrotizing fasciitis caused by S. agalactiae. Prompt diagnosis and immediate surgical debridement are crucial in the initial management of this disease.

  5. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: report of three cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Balcerak, R J; Sisto, J M; Bosack, R C

    1988-06-01

    Three cases of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis have been reported, two of dental etiology, and one the result of blunt and abrasive facial trauma. All cases responded well to aggressive surgical intervention in combination with broad spectrum antibiotic coverage and supportive medical therapy. The presence of increased vascularity in the head and neck region probably minimizes the amount of overlying soft tissue that must be excised during surgical management (in comparison to extremity and trunk necrotizing fasciitis cases). The key to successful management of such infections is early diagnosis of the disease process with prompt surgical and medical intervention.

  6. A case of fever of unknown origin: necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Unlü, G; Onyılmaz, T A; Barış, S A; Turhan, N; Vural, C; Başyiğit, I; Boyacı, H

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis is a rare type of vasculitis; its etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease primarily affects the lungs, although extra-pulmonary involvement has been reported. The typical symptoms are cough, chest pain, dyspnea, and weight loss; high temperatures have been reported in rare cases. We present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was diagnosed with lymph node tuberculosis, for which she received treatment for six months. The patient experienced no improvement in her symptoms, which included fever, weakness and dyspnea. A re-evaluation of previously collected thoracoscopic biopsy material revealed compatibility with necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis.

  7. Bilateral renal artery thrombosis secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thajudeen, Bijin; Budhiraja, Pooja; Bracamonte, Erika R.

    2013-01-01

    Renal artery thrombosis is a rare, but serious and often under-diagnosed condition. We report a case of bilateral renal artery thrombosis secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis. A 66-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and acute kidney injury (AKI). A renal biopsy showed organized intraluminal thrombi and a computer tomography scan of the abdomen showed bilateral renal artery thrombosis. Emergent laprotomy showed necrosed pancreas. Doppler studies showed deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremities and internal jugular vein thrombosis. Workup for hypercoagulability was unremarkable. The final diagnosis was AKI secondary to bilateral renal artery thrombosis probably due to hypercoagulability of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:26064514

  8. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Occurring after Exposure to Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shivani S; Tavana, M Lance; Boger, M Sean; Win, Soe Soe; Rimawi, Bassam H

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been attributed to aquarium or fish exposure after a break in the skin barrier. In most instances, the upper limbs and fingers account for a majority of the infection sites. While previous cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections related to M. marinum have been documented, the importance of our presenting case is to illustrate the aggressive nature of M. marinum resulting in a persistent necrotizing soft tissue infection of a finger that required multiple aggressive wound debridements, followed by an amputation of the affected extremity, in order to hasten recovery.

  9. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Occurring after Exposure to Mycobacterium marinum

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shivani S.; Tavana, M. Lance; Boger, M. Sean; Win, Soe Soe; Rimawi, Bassam H.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been attributed to aquarium or fish exposure after a break in the skin barrier. In most instances, the upper limbs and fingers account for a majority of the infection sites. While previous cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections related to M. marinum have been documented, the importance of our presenting case is to illustrate the aggressive nature of M. marinum resulting in a persistent necrotizing soft tissue infection of a finger that required multiple aggressive wound debridements, followed by an amputation of the affected extremity, in order to hasten recovery. PMID:25506004

  10. A novel fibrillin-1 mutation in an egyptian marfan family: A proband showing nephrotic syndrome due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Haggar, Mohammad; Bakr, Ashraf; Wahba, Yahya; Coucke, Paul J; El-Hussini, Fatma; Hafez, Mona; Eid, Riham; Eid, Abdel-Rahman; Sarhan, Amr; Shaltout, Ali; Hammad, Ayman; Yahia, Sohier; El-Rifaie, Ahmad; Abdel-Hadi, Dina

    2017-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), the founding member of connective tissue disorder, is an autosomal dominant disease; it is caused by a deficiency of the microfibrillar protein fibrillin-1 (FBN1) and characterized by involvement of three main systems; skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular. More than one thousand mutations in FBN1 gene on chromosome 15 were found to cause MFS. Nephrotic syndrome (NS) had been described in very few patients with MFS being attributed to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis secondary to infective endocarditis. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) had been reported in NS in conjunction with MFS without confirming the diagnosis by mutational analysis of FBN1. We hereby present an Egyptian family with MFS documented at the molecular level; it showed a male proband with NS secondary to FSGS, unfortunately, we failed to make any causal link between FBN dysfunction and FSGS. In this context, we review the spectrum of renal involvements occurring in MFS patients.

  11. [Follow-up of two patients with mesangial IgA glomerulonephritis exposed to cadmium and organic solvents].

    PubMed

    Fernández, J; Colomé, Jaime Fernández; Sanz-Gallén, P; Sanz-Gallén, Pere; Nogué, S; Xarau, Santiago Nogué

    2010-01-01

    For several years we carried out a follow-up of two patients with IgA mesangial glomerulonephritis with antecedents of exposure to toxic substances (cadmium and organic solvents). The first case involved a 47 year old male who was diagnosed with mesangial IgA glomerulonephritis eight years ago; he had been working for twelve years as a solderer. He had used metal bars containing 25% cadmium as part of the soldering material. Very high levels of cadmium were detected in his blood and urine. The second case involved a 50 year male who was exposed to a wide number of organic dissolvents for 23 years. Three years ago he was diagnosed with a proliferative diffuse mesangial glomerulonephritis with IgA deposits; in spite of that, the patient continued working until one year ago, when was found to have a chronic stage 3 renal disease secondary to IgA nephropathy. Patients diagnosed with mesangial IgA glomerulonephritis should be kept apart from exposure to nephrotoxic substances.

  12. Association of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and antiproteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (anti PR3-ANCA).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Odriozola, P; Gutiérrez-Macías, A; Moina Eguren, I; Arrieta Lezama, J

    2008-09-01

    We report a case of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with serum antiproteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (anti-PR3-ANCA), without clinical or histological signs of Wegener's granulomatosis, in a 46-year-old man. Our case and previously reported cases showing the same association support the hypothesis that the association is not fortuitous, but reflects a common immunological mechanism.

  13. Experimental glomerulonephritis is attenuated by CD8+ T cell chimerism and prevented by Mls-1-incompatible thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Sutmuller, M; Baelde, H J; Tysma, O M; de Heer, E; Bruijn, J A

    1998-07-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) in mice is a model resembling glomerulonephritis in human systemic lupus erythematosus. In the present study congenic mouse strains were used to investigate the pathogenetic role of (1) donor T cell subset chimerism and (2) donor thymocytes in this model. In GvHD employing minor lymphocyte-stimulating-1 (Mls-1)-compatible donors and recipients, full-blown immune complex glomerulonephritis was associated with a low-donor CD8(+) T cell chimerism. Injection of lymphocytes from Mls-1-negative donors (Mls-1(b)) into Mls-1-positive recipients (Mls-1(a)) induces a type of GvHD characterized by rapid self-limitation accompanied by the immediate inhibition of donor T cell chimerism and the absence of glomerulonephritis. However, omission of thymocytes from the donor inoculate does result in glomerular depositions containing immunoglobulins. These results suggest that donor CD8(+) T cell chimerism is associated with attenuation of immune complex glomerulonephritis, whereas Mls-1-incompatible donor T cell precursors prevent the disease. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens II. Pathology and Proposed Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Long, J. R.; Barnum, D. A.; Pettit, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The intestines from 124 dead, sick and normal broiler chickens from 24 cases of necrotic enteritis were subjected to histological examination. Tissue sections from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and ceca from each broiler were examined histologically for lesions of necrotic enteritis and the presence of coccidia. Lesions of necrotic enteritis were present in one or more areas of the intestine in all but six of 94 dead or sick birds and they were most common and severe in the jejunum. Coccidia were found in only small numbers in both diseased and normal birds. Brown and Brenn stained sections showed Gram-positive bacilli intimately associated with early necrotic lesions on the tips of villi. Tissue sections from the intestines of sick birds permitted a proposed pathogenesis for this disease with the lesion starting at the tips of villi. The similarity in pathogenesis and pathological lesions in this disease of broilers and Clostridium perfringens type C enteritis in baby pigs is discussed. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:4373152

  15. Identification of cultivable microorganisms from primary teeth with necrotic pulps.

    PubMed

    Ledezma-Rasillo, Gildardo; Flores-Reyes, Hector; Gonzalez-Amaro, Ana M; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo; Ruiz-Rodriguez, M del Socorro; Pozos-Guillen, Amaury J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify cultivable microorganisms from primary teeth with necrotic pulps. This experimental study included 21 patients of both sexes between 4 and 7 years of age with necrotic pulps in primary teeth. Twenty-one maxillary and mandibular molars containing at least 1 necrotic canal, an abscess or sinus tract, one or more radiolucent areas in the furcation or periapical region, teeth having at least two thirds of root length, and carious lesions directly exposed to the oral environment were included. After antisepsis of the oral cavity, anesthesia of the affected tooth, and isolation and disinfection of the operative field, 3 sterile absorbent paper points were sequentially placed for 30 seconds for the collection of samples. The samples were immediately processed in an anaerobic chamber, and all isolated microorganisms were identified. Anaerobic species (anaerobic facultative and moderate anaerobes) were isolated in all root canals; 68.4% of root canal samples studied showed a polymicrobial nature. Most of the isolate consisted of Bifidobacterium Spp2 and Streptococcus intermedius. Other less frequently encountered species were Actinomyces israelii, Bifidobacterium spp 1, Clostridium spp, and Candida albicans. Results indicate the existence of combinations of bacterial species in root canal infections of the primary dentition with necrotic pulps, anaerobic bacteria predominating.

  16. Carbohydrate maldigestion induces necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major gastrointestinal disorder in preterm infants. Key risk factors for NEC are enteral feeding and microbial colonization. Maldigestion of carbohydrate secondary to immature digestive function has been suspected to cause bacterial overgrowth and NEC. We investi...

  17. [Method and procedures in bacteriological study of necrotic teeth].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ponce, A; López Campos, A; López Paz, J; Pazos Sierra, R

    1991-01-01

    Research was conducted of 160 radicular canals with necrotic pulp. Results of different bacteriological analyses are presented. Culture analyses in aerobic and anaerobic media, resulted in the isolation of Staphylococcus Epidermidis, Streptococcus Viridans and Corynebacterium sp in the group studied, as the most frequent bacteria. There was no evidence of a specific germ linked with the pulp necrosis.

  18. Necrotizing fasciitis – a diagnostic dilemma: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Necrotizing soft tissue infections can affect various tissue planes. Although predisposing etiologies are many, they mostly center on impaired immunity occurring directly or indirectly and loss of integrity of protective barriers which predispose to infection. The nonspecific presentation may delay diagnosis and favor high mortality. Case presentation Two case vignettes are presented. The first patient, a 44-year-old healthy South Asian man with a history of repeated minor traumatic injury presented to a primary health care center with a swollen left lower limb. He was treated with antibiotics with an initial diagnosis of cellulitis. Because he deteriorated rapidly and additionally developed intestinal obstruction, he was transferred to our hospital which is a tertiary health care center for further evaluation and management. Prompt clinical diagnosis of necrotizing soft tissue infection was made and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging as necrotizing fasciitis. Urgent debridement was done, but the already spread infection resulted in rapid clinical deterioration with resultant mortality. The second patient was a 35-year-old South Asian woman with systemic lupus erythematous receiving immunosuppressive therapy who developed left lower limb pain and fever. Medical attention was sought late as she came to the hospital after 4 days. Her condition deteriorated rapidly as she developed septic shock and died within 2 days. Conclusions Necrotizing fasciitis can be fatal when not recognized and without early intervention. Clinicians and surgeons alike should have a greater level of suspicion and appreciation for this uncommon yet lethal infection. PMID:24965382

  19. Evidence of new viruses infecting freesia hybrids showing necrotic disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Different cultivars of Freesia plants with necrotic symptoms were collected in the Sanremo area of Northern Italy. Symptomatic foliar tissue was used both for mechanical inoculation of Nicotiana benthamiana and for virus purification. Total virus-enriched RNA extract was tested by Sequence-Independe...

  20. Necrotizing enterocolitis. New thoughts about pathogenesis and potential treatments.

    PubMed

    MacKendrick, W; Caplan, M

    1993-10-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. An incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis has hampered efforts to devise an effective preventative strategy. New insights into the pathogenesis of NEC, particularly at the cellular and biochemical level, however, offer a rational basis for the development of new approaches to this disease.

  1. [Dentogene Focus as a Rare Cause of Necrotizing Fasciitis].

    PubMed

    Kloth, Christopher; Hoefert, Sebastian; Fischborn, Till; Schraml, Christina

    2017-02-01

    History and clinical findings We elaborate the case of a 72-year-old patient who presented with a painful swelling of the lower jaw in the emergency unit. Investigations and diagnosis In the clinical examination and the CT scan, a widespread cervical emphysema was found which raised suspicion for the presence of a necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck due to aerogenic infection. Close spatial vicinity to the teeth of the left upper and lower jaw was present, so that the necrotizing fasciitis was assumed to be odontogenic. Treatment and course Based on the clinical presentation and the imaging findings the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis in the sense of a possible infection with gas building bacteria accompanying with an infection of the mediastinum was made. Immediately performed therapy included sternotomy and extended surgical debridement of necrosis. Conclusion The presented case emphasizes that necrotizing fasciitis due to gas-producing infections should be considered as a differential diagnosis for cervical soft tissue emphysema for which an odontogenic focus is the most common cause. Rapid diagnosis is essential for successful treatment consisting of immediate surgical debridement and intravenous antibiotics.

  2. Necrotizing hepatitis associated with enteric salmonellosis in an alpaca

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Salmonella typhimurium was isolated from the feces of an alpaca suffering anorexia and weight loss. Multifocal necrotizing and suppurative hepatitis consistent with bacterial infection was found in the liver biopsies. Enteric salmonellosis may be associated with milder physical and clinicopathological changes in camelids than in other large animal species. PMID:15144106

  3. Two cases of an atypical presentation of necrotizing stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this report was to describe the clinical and microbiological characteristics of two rare cases of necrotizing stomatitis, and the outcomes of a non-invasive treatment protocol applied in both cases. Methods We report two cases of necrotizing stomatitis in a rare location in the hard palate of a 40-year-old woman and a 28-year-old man. Neither had a relevant medical history and both presented with highly painful ulceration in the palate and gingival margin that was accompanied by suppuration and necrosis. 3% hydrogen peroxide was applied to the lesions using sterile swabs, and antibiotic and anti-inflammatory treatment was prescribed to both patients in addition to two daily oral rinses of 0.2% chlorhexidine. Results In both cases, radiological examination ruled out bone involvement, and exfoliative cytology revealed a large inflammatory component and the presence of forms compatible with fusobacteria and spirochetes. There was a rapid response to treatment and a major improvement was observed after 48 hours, with almost complete resolution of the ulcerated lesions and detachment of necrotic areas with partial decapitation of gingival papillae. Conclusions Necrotizing periodontal lesions can hinder periodontal probing and the mechanical removal of plaque in some cases due to the extreme pain suffered by the patients. We present a non-invasive treatment approach that can manage these situations effectively. PMID:26734496

  4. Carbohydrate maldigestion induces necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains the most severe gastrointestinal disorder in preterm infants. It is associated with the initiation of enteral nutrition and may be related to immature carbohydrate digestive capacity. We tested the hypothesis that a formula containing maltodextrin vs. lactose ...

  5. [Necrotic leg ulcer revealing vasculitis induced by vitamin K antagonists].

    PubMed

    Chabli, H; Hocar, O; Akhdari, N; Amal, S; Hakkou, M; Hamdaoui, A

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists are widely used in thromboembolic diseases. Hemorrhagic complications related to drug overdose represent their main side effect. We report a rare side effect, a severe and unexpected type of skin vasculitis - necrotic leg ulcer - induced by vitamin K antagonist. A 63-year-old female with a history of diabetes developed hyperalgesic necrotic ulcerations on the lower limbs one month after starting an acenocoumarol-based treatment for ischemic heart disease. Histological examination revealed lymphocytic vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis. Etiological explorations searching for vasculitis were negative. In the absence of a precise etiology, drug-induced ulcer was suspected. Low molecular weight heparin was prescribed to replace acenocoumarol. The lesions slowly resolved with topical treatment. The chronological criteria and the negativity of etiological explorations allowed the diagnosis of vitamin K antagonist-induced necrotic skin ulcer. Clinicians should be aware of this rare complication induced by oral anticoagulants because of its practical therapeutic implications. This is the first case of necrotic leg ulcer induced by acenocoumarol corresponding histologically to necrotising lymphocytic vasculitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporary feed restriction partially protects broilers from necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Tsiouris, V; Georgopoulou, I; Batzios, Chr; Pappaioannou, N; Ducatelle, R; Fortomaris, P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feed restriction on the intestinal ecosystem and on the pathogenesis of experimental necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks. To induce subclinical necrotic enteritis, an experimental challenge model using a specific diet formulation, Gumboro vaccination, oral inoculation of broilers with a 10-fold dose of attenuated anticoccidial vaccine and multiple oral inoculations with a specific strain of Clostridium perfringens was adopted. Two hundred and forty 1-day-old Cobb 500 broilers were randomly allocated to four groups: feed restricted, challenged, both feed restricted and challenged, and negative control. At 21, 22, 23 and 24 days of age, the intestines, gizzard and liver were collected from 15 birds in each group and scored for gross lesions. The intestinal digesta was collected for pH and viscosity determination. One caecum from each bird was taken for microbiological analysis. The application of feed restriction in birds challenged with C. perfringens reduced the necrotic enteritis lesion score significantly (P ≤ 0.05) and feed restriction significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) pH in the small intestine, the viscosity of the jejunum digesta as well as the C. perfringens counts in the caeca compared with the controls. In conclusion, feed restriction of broilers has a positive effect on the intestinal ecosystem and a significant protective effect against necrotic enteritis in the subclinical experimental model.

  7. Tomato necrotic streak virus, a novel subgroup 2 ilarvirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel plant virus has been identified infecting fresh market tomato plants in south and southeast Florida. The virus causes necrosis of tomato leaves, petioles and stems, and necrotic rings or spots on tomato fruits. Symptomatic tomato plant tissue was used to mechanically inoculate tomato plant...

  8. Allelism and Molecular Mapping of Soybean Necrotic Root Mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mutability of the w4 flower color locus in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is conditioned by an allele designated w4-m. Germinal revertants recovered among self-pollinated progeny of mutable plants have been associated with the generation of necrotic root mutations, chlorophyll-deficiency mutation...

  9. An update on sequence diversity of Impatiens necrotic spot virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV; genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is an economically important viral pathogen for a wide range of plants, including greenhouse ornamental and vegetable crops. In many cases, symptoms induced by INSV are similar, though not identical, to those induced by Toma...

  10. [Necrotizing fasciitis caused by cutaneous mucormycosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Pérez-Ortíz, Andric Christopher; Telich-Vidal, José

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis are opportunistic infections with high morbidity and mortality caused by fungi of the class Zygomycetes, they mainly affect diabetic and immunocompromised patients. In up to 20% of all cases the main infection is localized in the skin, with a great number of them presenting in healthy patients that have suffered from severe trauma or burns. Zygomycetes tend to invade arteries, which leads to thrombosis and generates wide necrotic areas; this favors the progress of the infection and invasion of deep tissues. Up to 24% of primary cutaneous mucormycosis can be complicated with necrotizing fasciitis. We present the case of a 52 year-old male that received the clinical diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The patient received wide spectrum antibiotics and was submitted to extensive debridement of the wound bed; transoperative biopsy revealed the presence of zygomycetes in the tissues and the diagnosis of primary cutaneous zygomycosis was made. Antifungal treatment with amphotericin B was initiated and two weeks later autologous skin grafts were applied over the wounds. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose cutaneous zygomycosis, therefore it should always be considered amongst the differentials of necrotic wounds that do not respond to standard treatment. The rapid evolution of the disease remarks the importance of biopsying the wound bed early and treating aggressively.

  11. Biobrane™ and skin staples: beware of necrotic ulceration.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Ela J; Maze, Deborah; Lawrence, Torey; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew Ja

    2016-10-01

    Biobrane™ is a product used for temporary wound coverage post major paediatric burn wound debridement. We report two cases of necrotic ulceration associated with the use of Biobrane™ with skin staples. We suggest securing Biobrane™ with alternatives such as adhesive tapes and glue to prevent the occurrence of this adverse outcome. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Interictal spikes in focal epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, M; Avanzini, G

    2001-04-01

    Interictal electroencephalography (EEG) potentials in focal epilepsies are sustained by synchronous paroxysmal membrane depolarization generated by assemblies of hyperexcitable neurons. It is currently believed that interictal spiking sets a condition that preludes to the onset of an ictal discharge. Such an assumption is based on little experimental evidence. Human pre-surgical studies and recordings in chronic and acute models of focal epilepsy showed that: (i) interictal spikes (IS) and ictal discharges are generated by different populations of neuron through different cellular and network mechanisms; (ii) the cortical region that generates IS (irritative area) does not coincide with the ictal-onset area; (iii) IS frequency does not increase before a seizure and is enhanced just after an ictal event; (iv) spike suppression is found to herald ictal discharges; and (v) enhancement of interictal spiking suppresses ictal events. Several experimental evidences indicate that the highly synchronous cellular discharge associated with an IS is generated by a multitude of mechanisms involving synaptic and non-synaptic communication between neurons. The synchronized neuronal discharge associated with a single IS induces and is followed by a profound and prolonged refractory period sustained by inhibitory potentials and by activity-dependent changes in the ionic composition of the extracellular space. Post-spike depression may be responsible for pacing interictal spiking periodicity commonly observed in both animal models and human focal epilepsies. It is proposed that the strong after-inhibition produced by IS protects against the occurrence of ictal discharges by maintaining a low level of excitation in a general condition of hyperexcitability determined by the primary epileptogenic dysfunction.

  13. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  14. Interferon Induced Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bayram Kayar, Nuket; Alpay, Nadir; Hamdard, Jamshid; Emegil, Sebnem; Bag Soydas, Rabia; Baysal, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology which involves recurring oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular lesions as well as articular, vascular, and nervous system involvement. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is usually seen in viral infections, immune deficiency syndrome, sickle cell anemia, and hyperfiltration and secondary to interferon therapy. Here, we present a case of FSGS identified with kidney biopsy in a patient who had been diagnosed with Behçet's disease and received interferon-alpha treatment for uveitis and presented with acute renal failure and nephrotic syndrome associated with interferon. PMID:27847659

  15. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: Heck disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P R; Hebert, A A; Adler-Storthz, K

    1993-09-01

    Two sisters of Mexican ancestry had focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). The lesions on the oral mucosa of the older child were initially misinterpreted as representing sexual abuse. Microscopic evaluation of a hematoxylin and eosin-stained section from a lower lip papule demonstrated the histologic features of FEH. Although human papillomavirus (HPV) type 13 and HPV32 have been most consistently present in FEH lesions, types 6, 11, 13, and 32 were not detected in the paraffin-embedded tissue specimen of our patient using an in situ hybridization technique. The lesions persisted or recurred during management using destructive modalities; subsequently, they completely resolved spontaneously.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Filipino female in North America.

    PubMed

    Ng, Daniel; Frazee, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae has been described in Southeast Asia, but has only recently begun to emerge in North America. The hypermucoviscous strain of K. pneumoniae is a particularly virulent strain known to cause devastatingly invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Here we present the first known case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae in North America.

  17. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... glomeruli. The glomeruli of the kidney help filter wastes and fluids from the blood to form urine. ... the glomerular basement membrane. This membrane helps filter wastes and extra fluids from the blood. Damage to ...

  18. Pathogenesis of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Beom Jin; Yang, Jae Won; Do, Woo Sung; Fogo, Agnes B.

    2016-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is characterized by focal and segmental obliteration of glomerular capillary tufts with increased matrix. FSGS is classified as collapsing, tip, cellular, perihilar and not otherwise specified variants according to the location and character of the sclerotic lesion. Primary or idiopathic FSGS is considered to be related to podocyte injury, and the pathogenesis of podocyte injury has been actively investigated. Several circulating factors affecting podocyte permeability barrier have been proposed, but not proven to cause FSGS. FSGS may also be caused by genetic alterations. These genes are mainly those regulating slit diaphragm structure, actin cytoskeleton of podocytes, and foot process structure. The mode of inheritance and age of onset are different according to the gene involved. Recently, the role of parietal epithelial cells (PECs) has been highlighted. Podocytes and PECs have common mesenchymal progenitors, therefore, PECs could be a source of podocyte repopulation after podocyte injury. Activated PECs migrate along adhesion to the glomerular tuft and may also contribute to the progression of sclerosis. Markers of activated PECs, including CD44, could be used to distinguish FSGS from minimal change disease. The pathogenesis of FSGS is very complex; however, understanding basic mechanisms of podocyte injury is important not only for basic research, but also for daily diagnostic pathology practice. PMID:27744657

  19. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis complicated by gouty arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, Yasutaka; Kamura, Azusa; Yasuda, Sumie; Tashiro, Makoto

    2015-06-17

    Gouty arthritis is uncommon in childhood and adolescence. On the other hand, there has been no report of cases with development of gouty arthritis with post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN) in pediatric patients. Here we report the case of a mildly obese 12-year-old boy with PSAGN complicated by gouty arthritis of the left first metatarsophalangeal joint. On follow-up, it was confirmed that as serum C3 level returned to normal, urinary excretion of uric acid increased and serum uric acid level decreased, thereby resolving the burning pain of the left big toe. In this case, not only did renal insufficiency associate with PSAGN but also mild obesity may have led to hyperuricemia and gouty arthritis. In conclusion, clinicians should be aware that PSAGN may be complicated by gouty arthritis in obese pediatric patients.

  20. Anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis with subsequent pulmonary hemorrhage in the course of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yao-Peng; Wen, Yao-Ko

    2012-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with uremia and on hemodialysis was referred to our hospital because of hemoptysis. A chest radiograph showed diffuse infiltration in the right lung field. Laboratory data were remarkable for renal failure accompanied by hematuria and proteinuria. A kidney biopsy revealed diffuse crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear staining of IgG along the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Circulating IgG anti-GBM antibody was not detected. Because the findings of renal biopsy suggested anti-GBM disease, the patient was treated with plasmapheresis and pulse steroid therapy, which resulted in a rapid resolution of his pulmonary symptoms and chest radiograph abnormalities. However, sputum culture submitted on admission yielded Mycobacterium tuberculosis 3 weeks later. Therefore, immunosuppressive agents were discontinued and antituberculous agents were administrated. No relapse of pulmonary hemorrhage occurred during the next 1-year period of follow-up, but the patient did not regain renal function and remained on hemodialysis.

  1. Treatment-resistant recurrent membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in renal allograft responding to rituximab: case report.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, M; Alsaad, K; Aloudah, N; Alhamdan, H

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of idiopathic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) recurring 2 years after a living-unrelated kidney transplantation. The disease was refractory to intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. Treatment with 2 doses of rituximab resulted in remission of the disease. The disease relapsed 18 months later after an episode of cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. After treatment of the pneumonitis, a lung biopsy was performed owing to persistent chest symptoms, which revealed bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia. Bone marrow examination and culture revealed presence of acid-fast bacilli, and culture grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A repeated course of rituximab was withheld because of infection with tuberculosis, the patient's chest symptoms, and rare reports of noninfectious lung disease after the use of rituximab. The patient continues to have proteinuria with impaired kidney function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with hepatitis B induced type 1 membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, Vishwanath; Razak, Abdul; Narayan, Girish; Prabhu, Mukhyaprana; Ramachandran, Balasubramanian; Ranjini, Kudva; Vidya, Monappa; Joshi, Kusum

    2010-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome and corticosteroid therapy. Here, we discuss an 18 year old man with type 1 membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) secondary to hepatitis B infection who developed posterior leukoencephalopathy while on therapy with lamivudine and prednisone. He developed seizures and vision loss. He also had hypertension, but no sudden elevation was recorded at any time. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed patchy areas of altered signal intensity involving cortical gray and subcortical white matter in the bilateral frontoparietal regions, occipital cortices, temporal cortices and cerebellar hemispheres, and hyperintensity on T2W and FLAIR sequences. Tapering of prednisone and controlling hypertension resulted in clinical improvement within a few days, and in a month MRI was normal. Diagnosing PRES requires a high index of suspicion when treating similarly susceptible patients. PRES as a complication during the treatment of MPGN secondary to hepatitis B has, to our knowledge, never been reported previously in the literature.

  3. Antiglomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis after intranasal cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Navascués, R A; Baltar, J; Seco, M; Alvarez, J

    1999-01-01

    We report a case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to antiglomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies that progressed to end-stage renal disease in a 35-year-old man who used intranasal cocaine on an occasional basis. In contrast to many prior reports of acute renal failure occurring with cocaine-associated rhabdomyolysis, this patient did not have any evidence of acute muscle damage and myoglobin release. Circulating anti-GBM antibodies and renal biopsy with linear IgG and C3 deposits confirmed the diagnosis of anti-GBM disease. The possibility of anti-GBM must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute renal failure in cocaine addicts. This unusual combination raises complex questions regarding the pathogenesis of this type of renal injury.

  4. The dissociation of arterial hypertension and lupus glomerulonephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Petrin, J; Rozman, B; Dolenc, P; Logar, D; Bozic, B; Vizjak, A; Ferluga, D; Jezersek, P

    1993-06-01

    In spite of several articles questioning the general opinion that arterial hypertension in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is only the consequence of lupus glomerulonephritis (LGN), this still remains the usual pathophysiologic explanation. The purpose of this study was to explore the correlations between hypertension and LGN and to assess the importance of hypertension control for the prognosis of patients. A retrospective analysis of 173 patients with SLE over a period of 14 years was performed. For most of the patients, data were available from regular follow-up visits over an average of 6 years. Our results show a dissociation of hypertension and LGN and an association of hypertension and renal dysfunction. Severe hypertensive renal vascular lesions correlated well with a decrease of renal function. Successful treatment of hypertension is therefore essential in order to prevent deterioration of renal function in patients with LGN.

  5. Plasma exchange for renal vasculitis and idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael; Catapano, Fausta; Szpirt, Wladimir; Thorlund, Kristian; Bruchfeld, Annette; Guillevin, Loic; Haubitz, Marion; Merkel, Peter A.; Peh, Chen Au; Pusey, Charles; Jayne, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasma exchange may be effective adjunctive treatment for renal vasculitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized control trials of plasma exchange for renal vasculitis. Study Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of manuscripts identified from electronic databases, bibliographies, and studies identified by experts. Data was abstracted in parallel by two reviewers. Setting & Population Adults with idiopathic renal vasculitis or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis Selection Criteria for Studies Randomized controlled trials that compared standard care with standard care plus adjuvant plasma exchange in adult patients with either renal vasculitis or idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Intervention Adjuvant plasma exchange Outcome Composite of end-stage renal disease or death. Results We identified 9 trials including 387 patients. In a fixed-effects model the pooled relative risk of end-stage renal disease or death was 0.80 for patients treated with adjunctive plasma exchange compared to standard care alone (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.99; p=0.04). No significant heterogeneity was detected (p=0.5; I2=0%). The effect of plasma exchange did not differ significantly across the range of baseline serum creatinine values (p=0.7) or number of plasma exchange treatments (p=0.8). The relative risk for end-stage renal disease was 0.64 (95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.88; p=0.006) while the relative risk for death alone was 1.01 (95% confidence interval 0.71 to 1.4; p=0.9). Limitations Although the primary result was statistically significant, there is insufficient statistical information to reliable determine if plasma exchange reduces the composite of end-stage renal disease or death. Conclusions Plasma exchange may reduce the composite endpoint of end-stage renal disease or death in renal vasculitis. Further trials are required given the limited data available. PMID:21194817

  6. C3 deposits worsens the prognosis in type iii extracapillary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Agesta Martínez, Marina; Rabasco Ruiz, Cristina; Sánchez Sánchez, Rafael; Ortega Salas, Rosa; López Andreu, María; Aljama García, Pedro; Espinosa Hernández, Mario

    2017-10-05

    Type iii extracapillary glomerulonephritis (PEGN) is a common cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and it is usually associated with circulating anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). Recent evidence points to complement activation as an important factor in the pathogenesis of PEGN. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of C3 deposits in the prognosis of PEGN. All patients diagnosed of PEGN from 1995 to 2015 (n=72) were included in this study. Progression of renal disease in patients with positive staining for C3 by immunofluorescence was compared with those with negative staining. Mean follow up was 73 months. Progression to end-stage renal disease in relation to clinical and histological variables was analyzed. Positive staining for C3 was observed in 22 out of the 72 patients (30.5%). At the time of diagnosis, patients with C3 deposits had higher serum creatinine concentration than those without C3 staining (5.00 vs. 3.85mg/dl, P=0.050). Renal survival at 10 years was 36.9% in patients with positive C3 staining vs. 64.4% in patients with negative staining (P=0.005). Mortality at 10 years was higher in patients with C3 deposits than in patients without deposits (77 vs. 49.3%). Thus, our study shows that PEGN with deposits of C3 is associated with worse renal prognosis and greater mortality. These results would support the hypothesis that activation of the alternative pathway complement may play an important role in the generation of renal injury associated with PEGN. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-glomerular basement membrane crescentic glomerulonephritis: A report from India and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A.; Agrawal, V.; Kaul, A.; Verma, R.; Pandey, R.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease is an autoimmune disease that most commonly presents as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary involvement. It is characterized by the presence of antibodies directed to antigenic targets within glomerular and alveolar basement membranes. This study was performed to evaluate the clinicopathological features and outcome in anti-GBM crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN) at a tertiary care center in North India over a period of 9 years (January 2004 to December 2012). A diagnosis of anti-GBM CrGN was made in the presence of >50% crescents, linear deposits of IgG along GBM, and raised serum anti-GBM antibody titer. Of 215 cases of CrGN diagnosed during this period, 11 had anti-GBM CrGN. Anti-GBM CrGN was found at all ages but was most common in the third to fifth decade with no gender predilection (mean age 48 +/- 15 years, 13–67 years). Patients presented with a mean serum creatinine of 10.2 +/- 5.3 mg/dl and sub-nephrotic proteinuria. Pulmonary involvement was present in two patients. Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody was positive in two (2/11) elderly patients. Follow-up was available in four patients for a range of 30-270 (mean 99.5 ± 114.5) days, two remained dialysis dependent while two died due to uremia and sepsis. Our findings show that anti-GBM disease is a rare cause of CrGN in India, accounting for only 5% of patients. It usually presents as a renal-limited disease and is associated with a poor renal outcome. PMID:27795626

  8. Reclassification of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis: Identification of a new GN: C3GN

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    This review revises the reclassification of the membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) after the consensus conference that by 2015 reclassified all the glomerulonephritis basing on etiology and pathogenesis, instead of the histomorphological aspects. After reclassification, two types of MPGN are to date recognized: The immunocomplexes mediated MPGN and the complement mediated MPGN. The latter type is more extensively described in the review either because several of these entities are completely new or because the improved knowledge of the complement cascade allowed for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Overall the complement mediated MPGN are related to acquired or genetic cause. The presence of circulating auto antibodies is the principal acquired cause. Genetic wide association studies and family studies allowed to recognize genetic mutations of different types as causes of the complement dysregulation. The complement cascade is a complex phenomenon and activating factors and regulating factors should be distinguished. Genetic mutations causing abnormalities either in activating or in regulating factors have been described. The diagnosis of the complement mediated MPGN requires a complete study of all these different complement factors. As a consequence, new therapeutic approaches are becoming available. Indeed, in addition to a nonspecific treatment and to the immunosuppression that has the aim to block the auto antibodies production, the specific inhibition of complement activation is relatively new and may act either blocking the C5 convertase or the C3 convertase. The drugs acting on C3 convertase are still in different phases of clinical development and might represent drugs for the future. Overall the authors consider that one of the principal problems in finding new types of drugs are both the rarity of the disease and the consequent poor interest in the marketing and the lack of large international cooperative studies. PMID:27458560

  9. Platelets are not critical effector cells for the time course of murine passive crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, Bernd; Daniel, Christoph; Johnson, Richard J; Amann, Kerstin U; Hugo, Christian P M

    2013-01-01

    Although platelets are well-known effector cells of inflammatory renal disease, clinical studies were not able to establish platelet inhibition as an effective therapy. Our previous studies using Vasodilator stimulated Phosphoprotein- and P2Y1-deficient mice suggested some early, but no long-term effects of platelets in passive crescentic glomerulonephritis. To define the role of platelets for this disease model, passive crescentic glomerulonephritis was induced in 72 C57Bl/6 mice by intraperitoneal injection of sheep anti-rabbit glomerular basement membrane antibody on 2 consecutive days. Platelets were depleted using anti-glycoprotein Ibα antibodies (p0p3/p0p4) every 4th day. Mice treated with equal amounts of sterile Phosphate buffered solution or rat-IgG served as controls. Blood, urine, and tissues were harvested on days 3 and 28. Renal tissue sections were evaluated after immunostaining using (semi)quantitative and computer-assisted image analysis. Compared to controls, efficient depletion was achieved as indicated by a markedly prolonged bleeding time and a more than 90% reduction in platelet counts (800/nl vs. 42/nl; P < 0.001). Functional (creatinine-clearance and proteinuria) parameters demonstrated no significant differences between the groups. Neither parameters of renal injury (glomerulosclerosis and fibrosis) nor glomerular/tubulointerstitial matrix expansion (by collagen IV staining), glomerular capillary rarefaction (lectin staining), and the glomerular/tubulointerstitial proliferative response (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) demonstrated any differences between platelet-depleted mice and PBS- or rat-IgG-treated nephritic mice at any time point. Despite effective platelet inhibition/depletion, neither the short- nor long-term course of passive crescentic nephrotoxic nephritis was affected. These data indicate that platelets play a minor role during the time course of this disease model in the mouse.

  10. [Effect of Astragali and Angelica particle on proteinuria in Chinese patients with primary glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Peicheng; Yang, Xuejun; He, Liqun

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effect of the traditional Chinese herbs Astragali and Angelicae Sinensis (A & As) particle [contains Huangqi (Radix Astragali Mongolica), Danggui (Radix Angelicae Sinensis), Huzhanggeng (Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati) and Danshen (Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae)] on proteinuria in glomerulonephritis patients with stage 2 chronic kidney disease. A prospective, multi-center, and randomized controlled clinical trial was performed for 24 weeks. From March 2011 to April 2012, 158 patients from nine hospitals in China participated. They were randomized into the A & As group (79 cases, A & As particle 15.2 g/day) and losartan group (79 cases, losartan 50 mg/day). At each follow-up visit, clinical data including blood pressure, urinalysis, 24-h-urinary protein excretion, serum albumin and serum creatinine were collected. All 158 patients completed the follow-up. Proteinuria in the losartan group exhibited a biphasic time-dependent decline with a significant steady reduction from baseline to week 12 (P = 0.0014), and a platform level during the remaining 12-week follow-up (P > 0.05). In contrast, there was a continual significant decrease of proteinuria in the A & As group (P < 0.001). When compared with the losartan results, proteinuria in the A & As group from week 16 to week 24 was significantly reduced (P < 0.001). Stable eGFRs and blood pressure were also observed in both groups. Medication side effects were minimal and non-fatal. For Chinese glomerulonephritis patients with stage 2 chronic kidney disease, therapy with A & As particles may provide effective anti-proteinuria treatment.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12) deficiency attenuates experimental crescentic anti-GBM glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Abu P; Ma, Frank Y; Mulley, William R; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Tesch, Greg H

    2016-11-08

    MMP-12 (macrophage elastase) is an enzyme that can cleave various extracellular matrix proteins and is required for macrophage infiltration and pulmonary fibrosis in experimental emphysema. We have shown previously that MMP-12 is highly up-regulated in experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether MMP-12 is required for glomerular macrophage infiltration and crescent formation in anti-GBM glomerulonephritis. Accelerated anti-GBM disease was induced in groups of MMP-12 gene deficient mice (MMP-12-/-) and wild type C57BL/6 J (WT) controls, which were killed 12 days after injection of anti-GBM serum. WT and MMP-12-/- mice developed glomerular damage and glomerular tuft adhesions to Bowman's capsule. Both groups developed severe proteinuria. WT mice also developed significant loss of renal function and crescents in 22% of glomeruli, which were associated with macrophage infiltration and Bowman's capsule rupture. In contrast, MMP-12-/- mice were partially protected from renal function decline, crescent formation and Bowman's capsule rupture. This was associated with reduced macrophage infiltration in both glomeruli and the interstitium, and with reduced expression of CCL2, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA in MMP12-/- kidneys. In addition, KIM-1 mRNA levels were reduced in MMP-12-/- mice indicating less tubular damage. These data demonstrate that endogenous MMP-12 facilitates macrophage accumulation and activation in anti-GBM glomerulonephritis which is required for glomerular crescent formation, Bowman's capsule rupture, tubular damage and renal function decline. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Towards Dualband Megapixel QWIP Focal Plane Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Journal Article PREPRINT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Towards dualband megapixel QWIP focal plane arrays (PREPRINT) 5a...pixel quantum well infrared photodetector ( QWIP ) focal planes have been demonstrated with excellent imaging performance. The MWIR QWIP detector array...registered simultaneously readable dualband QWIP focal plane arrays. In this paper, we will discuss the performance in terms of quantum efficiency

  13. RF/Optical Demonstration: Focal Plane Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, D. J.; Chung, S.; Kovalik, J.; Gama, E.; Fernandez, M. M.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we describe the second-generation focal plane optical assembly employed in the RF/optical demonstration at DSS-13. This assembly receives reflected light from the two mirror segments mounted on the RF primary. The focal plane assembly contains a fast steering mirror (FSM) to stabilize the focal plane spot, a pupil camera to aid in aligning the two segments, and several additional cameras for receiving the optical signal prior to as well as after the FSM loop.

  14. Primary focal hyperhidrosis: diagnosis and management. .

    PubMed

    Wang, Rena; Solish, Nowell; Murray, Christian A

    2008-12-01

    Primary focal hyperhidrosis is a common and serious medical condition that causes considerable psychosocial morbidity. Diagnostic and effective management strategies can improve patients' quality of living dramatically.

  15. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  16. Focal properties of geodesic waveguide lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verber, C. M.; Vahey, D. W.; Wood, V. E.

    1976-01-01

    The focal properties of uncorrected geodesic lenses in ion-exchanged glass waveguides are reported. A 13.8-mm-focal-length lens resolved beams with an angular separation of 27.6 mrad, while a 28-mm-focal-length lens resolved beams with an angular separation of only 3.3 mrad. Intensity profiles of the focal region of the former lens revealed a 40-micron spot size when the input aperture was 5 mm, and a spot size of 7.7 microns when the aperture was reduced to 1 mm. This value is close to the diffraction-limited spot size of 5.7 microns.

  17. Smov Baseline Focal Plane Check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmozzi, Roberto

    1994-01-01

    This test will be executed during the period after the servicing mission and before the extension of the COSTAR assembly. Its purpose is to verify that the FOS, HRS, and FOC focal planes have not been altered by the activities performed by Story and the Astronauts during the servicing mission. A large unknown deviation in aperture position would severly impact subsequent COSTAR alignment activities. If this test reveals a deviation, we may be able to compensate for any offsets prior to the complex and delicate COSTAR alignment calibrations. This enhanced version of the Heptathlon is designed to verify course alignments and measure relative aperture positions to within a few arcsecs. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: ***This test uses pre-servicing parameters for HRS, FOS, and FOC and the Cycle 4 parameters for WFPC2.*** ***This test requires special alignment and special guide stars.** ***This test requires special commanding for telemetry setups.**

  18. Focal epithelial hyperplasia - an update.

    PubMed

    Said, Ahmed K; Leao, Jair C; Fedele, Stefano; Porter, Stephen R

    2013-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is an asymptomatic benign mucosal disease, which is mostly observed in specific groups in certain geographical regions. FEH is usually a disease of childhood and adolescence and is generally associated with people who live in poverty and of low socioeconomic status. Clinically, FEH is typically characterized by multiple, painless, soft, sessile papules, plaques or nodules, which may coalesce to give rise to larger lesions. Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially genotypes 13 and 32, have been associated and detected in the majority of FEH lesions. The clinical examination and social history often allow diagnosis, but histopathological examination of lesional tissue is usually required to confirm the exact diagnosis. FEH sometimes resolves spontaneously however, treatment is often indicated as a consequence of aesthetic effects or any interference with occlusion. There remains no specific therapy for FEH, although surgical removal, laser excision or possibly topical antiviral agents may be of benefit. There remains no evidence that FEH is potentially malignant.

  19. [Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis: a rare and fatal complication].

    PubMed

    Ghezala, Hassen Ben; Feriani, Najla

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative parietal complications can be exceptionally severe and serious threatening vital prognosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the skin and deep subcutaneous tissues, spreading along fascia and adipose tissue. It is mainly caused by group A streptococcus (streptococcus pyogenes) but also by other bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus, Clostridium perfringens or Bacteroides fragilis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a real surgical and medical emergency. We report, in this study, a very rare case of abdominal parietal gangrene occurring in a 75-year-old woman on the fifth day after surgery for an ovarian cyst. Evolution was marked by occurrence of a refractory septic shock with a rapidly fatal course on the third day of management.

  20. Review of the literature on necrotizing sialometaplasia and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Montes, Constantino; Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela; Salcido-García, Juan Francisco; Hernández-Flores, Florentino

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to report a case of necrotizing sialometaplasia with long-term follow-up. A case of necrotizing sialometaplasia in a 37-year-old man with clinical documentation on the progress during a 2-year follow-up is presented. Data from an extensive review of the literature including clinical, imagenologic, and microscopic features are provided. Information on diagnostic and prognostic factors is offered and comprehensibly discussed. The importance of identification and diagnosis of this entity during the review of the slides from the first biopsy is stressed and the exclusive performance of an incisional biopsy is debated. The presented clinical photographs reveal the clinical changes of the lesion from the beginning of the lesions up to 2 years follow-up, documenting the complete long-term clinical course and the healing process of this entity.

  1. Necrotizing lymphocytic folliculitis: the early lesion of acne necrotica (varioliformis).

    PubMed

    Kossard, S; Collins, A; McCrossin, I

    1987-05-01

    Skin biopsy specimens from four patients who had recurrent bouts of lesions conforming to the clinical description of acne necrotica were studied. The pathologic findings were dominated by lymphocytic inflammation around centrally placed follicles evolving to follicular necrosis that extended to the perifollicular epidermis and dermis. Early lesions showed the development of multiple individual necrotic keratinocytes within the follicular sheath and adjacent epidermis with lymphocytic exocytosis. Later lesions showed more intense necrosis and scale crust obscuring the central target but were still dominated by a peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. The early pathologic findings of acne necrotica (varioliformis) are represented by a necrotizing lymphocytic folliculitis and differ from the pattern seen in association with nonspecific excoriations, acute bacterial folliculitis, classic comedogenic acne, or acnitis.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Smeets, L; Bous, A; Heymans, O

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis of the lower limb. This medico-surgical emergency is a life-threatening invasive soft-tissue infection which primarily involves the fascia superficialis and rapidly extends along subcutaneous tissue with relative sparing of skin and underlying muscles. Clinical presentation includes fever, signs of systemic toxicity and pain out of proportion to clinical findings. Paucity of cutaneous findings early in the course of the disease makes diagnosis challenging. The confirmation of the diagnosis is often made after surgical debridement. Delay in diagnosis and/or treatment correlates with poor outcome, leading to sepsis and/or multiple organ failure. Radiologic studies including plain radiographs, CT-scan or MRI may help to diagnose necrotizing fasciitis. Prompt surgical debridement, intravenous antibiotics, fluids and electrolytes management and analgesia are mainstays of the therapy. Adjuvant treatments like clindamycin, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and intravenous immunoglobulins are discussed.

  3. Timing of catheter drainage in infected necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Janneke; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A; Dejong, Cornelis H; van Eijck, Casper H; Fockens, Paul; Besselink, Marc G

    2016-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastrointestinal indication for hospital admission, and infected pancreatic and/or extrapancreatic necrosis is a potentially lethal complication. Current standard treatment of infected necrosis is a step-up approach, consisting of catheter drainage followed, if necessary, by minimally invasive necrosectomy. International guidelines recommend postponing catheter drainage until the stage of 'walled-off necrosis' has been reached, a process that typically takes 4 weeks after onset of acute pancreatitis. This recommendation stems from the era of primary surgical necrosectomy. However, postponement of catheter drainage might not be necessary, and earlier detection and subsequent earlier drainage of infected necrosis could improve outcome. Strong data and consensus among international expert pancreatologists are lacking. Future clinical, preferably randomized, studies should focus on timing of catheter drainage in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In this Perspectives, we discuss challenges in the invasive treatment of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis, focusing on timing of catheter drainage.

  4. [A cervical necrotizing cellulitis revealing a Lemierre syndrome].

    PubMed

    Assouan, C; Salami, A; Anzouan-Kacou, E; Nguessan, N; Konan, E

    2016-06-01

    Lemierre syndrome is characterized by a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) following an oropharyngeal infection. We report a case of Lemierre syndrome that occurred in a context of angina and necrotizing cellulitis of the neck in a 45-year-old patient. The Doppler ultrasound exam of the neck vessels and a neck CT showed an IJV thrombophlebitis. No germ could be isolated in the samples (blood culture, pus). The treatment associated antibiotics, heparin and surgical debridement of the necrotic tissues with extraction of the thrombus after ligation and section of the IJV. The postoperative course was uneventful. Lemierre syndrome is a rare but serious disease. Its low incidence makes him a forgotten disease. It should be systematically suspected in any oropharyngeal infection with the presence of a large painful swelling of the neck. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Focal arteriolar insudation. A response of arterioles to chronic nonspecific irritation.

    PubMed Central

    Cuénoud, H. F.; Joris, I.; Langer, R. S.; Majno, G.

    1987-01-01

    The subcutaneous insertion of sterile, inert plastic pellets over the cremaster muscles of rats induces characteristic focal lesions of the arterioles at a distance from the pellets. These lesions appear with a delay of about 6 hours; by light microscopy they are characterized by a focal dilatation accompanied by endothelial damage and increased permeability. They are more severe if the pellets are loaded with histamine and are inhibited if the pellets are loaded with serotonin. Electron microscopy shows interendothelial gaps; the media is massively infiltrated with blood components and fibrin. The medial smooth muscle cells are stretched and at times necrotic; inflammatory cells are scarce. On the basis of these features the lesion was named focal arteriolar insudation (FAI). Although its pathogenesis is not yet clear, the data at hand suggest that it is caused by endogenous mediators affecting the smooth muscle cells and/or the endothelium. FAI appears to be a specific arteriolar response to chronic nonspecific irritation. Images Figure 7 Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:3296773

  6. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HASSANZADEH RAD, Afagh; AMINZADEH, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a specific type of encephalopathy. After viral infection, it can be diagnosed by bilateral symmetrical lesions predominantly observed in thalami & brainstem of infants & children. Although, it is commonly occurred in Japanese and Taiwanese population. The goal of this article is to report a rare case of ANEC in a 15 months old girl infant from Thaleghani Hospital, Ramian, Gorgan, northern Iran. PMID:28277560

  7. Necrotizing hepatitis in a domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Himmel, L; O'Connor, M; Premanandan, C

    2014-11-01

    An adult male domestic pigeon (Columba livia) was presented for necropsy following natural death after a period of chronic weight loss and severe intestinal ascariasis. Histopathologic examination of the liver found moderate to marked, multifocal necrotizing hepatitis with large, basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Transmission electron microscopy of affected hepatocytes demonstrated numerous intra- and perinuclear icosahedral virions arranged in a lattice structure, consistent with adenoviral infection.

  8. Perforating oesophageal carcinoma presenting as necrotizing fasciitis of the neck.

    PubMed

    Francque, S M; Van Laer, C; Struyf, N; Vermeulen, P; Corthouts, B; Jorens, P G

    2001-10-01

    A patient with a history of schizophrenia was admitted to our hospital in an already severe stage of necrotizing fasciitis of the neck, complicated with mediastinitis and gangrene. Later on, he also developed a vena cava superior syndrome and sepsis. In the few cases and small series described in the literature, necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is usually associated with surgery or trauma. Less frequently, an orodental or pharyngeal infection, often innocuous, is the underlying cause. None of these causes could be identified in our patient. Initially, on computer-assisted tomography (CT) scan, a tracheal rupture was suspected, but this diagnosis could not be confirmed on bronchoscopic examination. On gastroscopy, a stenotic oesophageal segment was discovered. Biopsy of this segment showed a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The patient died in sepsis. Autopsy confirmed the presence of a large proximal oesophageal tumour with perforation. As far as we know, no case of a necrotizing fasciitis of the neck caused by perforation of a formerly unknown oesophageal carcinoma has been reported. Even mediastinitis, with or without gangrene, is rarely associated with oesophageal cancer, and in the few cases reported it is always due to fistulization after surgery.

  9. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  10. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jie; Yao, Le; He, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Bin; Song, Zhen-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain. Accurate diagnosis is often hindered due to various presentations that differ from the typical signs of appendicitis, especially the position of the appendix. A delay in diagnosis or treatment may result in increased risks of complications, such as perforation, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis is extremely rare. We herein report a case of 50-year-old man presenting with an appendiceal abscess in local hospital. After ten days of conservative treatment with intravenous antibiotics, the patient complained about pain and swelling of the right lower limb and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a perforated appendix and gas and fluid collection extending from his retroperitoneal cavity to the subcutaneous layer of his right loin and right lower limb. He was transferred to our hospital and was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis. Emergency surgery including surgical debridement and appendectomy was performed. However, the patient died of severe sepsis and multiple organ failure two days after the operation. This case represents an unusual complication of a common disease and we should bear in mind that retroperitoneal inflammation and/or abscesses may cause necrotizing fasciitis through lumbar triangles.

  11. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: can we expect a favourable outcome?

    PubMed

    Panda, Naresh K; Simhadri, Sridhar; Sridhara, Suryanarayana Rao

    2004-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck is an uncommon, progressive, destructive soft tissue infection of mixed aerobic and anaerobic organisms, having high mortality if left untreated (22 to 100 per cent). This study makes an attempt to analyse various factors and management methods determining the overall prognosis. A retrospective analysis of all cases of necrotizing fasciitis involving the head and neck, with exclusion of those involving the eyelid and the scalp, was undertaken. Various parameters such as demography, aetiology, complications, management and outcome were studied. Males outnumbered the females with the latter having a greater risk of involvement after 60 years. Odontogenic infection was the primary source of infection. Anaerobes were cultured in seven out of 17 cases, with six others showing mixed Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. Anaemia was the most commonly associated illness, with diabetes affecting four out of 17 cases. Aggressive surgical debridement with triple antibiotic therapy was used in the management of necrotizing fasciitis with an overall mortality of 11.8 per cent. Patients having late referral, anaemia and one or other complication had increased duration of total hospital stay. Better results can be obtained with proper control of infection by early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement and triple antibiotic therapy, along with timely control of complications and associated illnesses.

  12. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: an unusual sequel of odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Subhashraj, Krishnaraj; Jayakumar, Naveen; Ravindran, Chinnasamy

    2008-12-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the fascial planes, which is less common in head and neck, because of the rarity and higher vascularity in the region. We reviewed five patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic infection managed at a teaching hospital at Chennai, India. There were four men and one woman, of whom four patients were diabetic and hypertensive, with a mean age of 53 years. Mandibular molars (periapical or pericoronal abscess) were found to be the source of infection in all of the cases. The treatment involved incision and drainage and debridement. Anti-microbial drugs were given for all the patients, which included cephalosporins, metronidazole and gentamycin. In four patients the wound healed by contracture and one patient required split skin grafting. Due to the smaller extent of the necrosis, better control of the systemic disease and small size of the sample, there was neither a major complication nor death. This paper reminds us that cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) remains one of the potential complications of long standing odontogenic infections in patients with immune-compromised status, particularly in lower dentition.

  13. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here.

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis of the extremities: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Espandar, Ramin; Sibdari, Siamak Yousef; Rafiee, Elham; Yazdanian, Shideh

    2011-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infection and is a necrosis of the fascia and surrounding tissues. Despite recent advances in its management, outcomes have not improved and mortality rate is still high. Between September 2007 and August 2009, we prospectively studied twenty-four histopathologically proven necrotizing fasciitis patients to assess the prognostic factors that indicate the outcome. Mortality rate was 20.8%. Twelve patients (50%) improved, while seven patients (29.2%) were complicated by limb loss. Mortality rates related to upper and lower limb involvement were similar (20% vs. 22.2%). The rates of gangrene and amputation in patients with diabetes mellitus were significantly higher than other comorbidities. Patients with gram-positive infections had significantly lower rates of amputation (15.4% vs. 54.5%, P = 0.04). Mean band cell count and serum potassium level were significantly higher in the nonsurvivors same as leukocyte count in the patients with gangrene, while serum sodium level was significantly lower in nonsurvivors. We conclude that hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and increased band cells in the peripheral blood of patients may be useful parameters in distinguishing life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis; hence, we recommended lower threshold to amputation during surgery for this group of patients.

  15. NetB and necrotic enteritis: the hole movable story.

    PubMed

    Rood, Julian I; Keyburn, Anthony L; Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the primary causative agent of avian necrotic enteritis. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of this economically important disease has been enhanced by the discovery of C. perfringens NetB toxin, which belongs to the α-haemolysin family of β-pore-forming toxins. In a chicken disease model, the analysis of an isogenic set of strains comprising the wild type, a netB mutant, and its complemented derivative, fulfilled molecular Koch's postulates and revealed that NetB was essential for disease. These results were consistent with epidemiological surveys, which generally found that there was a higher prevalence of netB carriage in C. perfringens isolates from diseased poultry compared to healthy birds. The netB gene has been shown to be located on large conjugative plasmids that are closely related to other toxin plasmids from C. perfringens, which has potential implications for the epidemiology of necrotic enteritis infections. The crystal structures of both monomeric NetB and the heptameric NetB pore have been determined, the latter revealed a central pore diameter of approximately 26 Å. Finally, it has been shown that vaccine preparations that include NetB can protect chickens against disease and a series of single amino acid substitution derivatives of NetB that have potential value for vaccine formulations have been isolated and analysed. It is likely that NetB will be an important antigen to include in an effective, commercially viable, necrotic enteritis vaccine.

  16. Urticaria associated with necrotic uterine leiomyomas infected with salmonella.

    PubMed

    Tachdjian, Raffi; Tourangeau, Louanne; Schneider, Jessica Lynn; Nel, Andre

    2010-08-01

    We describe a unique case of urticaria associated with a Salmonella infection of uterine leiomyomas. A 55-year-old woman with a known history of uterine leiomyomas and a chief complaint of recurrent small and coalescing urticarial lesions confined to the abdomen presented with an 18-year history of recurrent fever and flu-like symptoms associated with the urticaria. After confirming the presence of a leiomyoma containing necrotic tissue on the computed tomography scan, a hysterectomy was performed. A large, 11-cm intramural leiomyoma was removed, and a culture of the purulent content grew a previously untyped Salmonella. The urticaria resolved on removal of the necrotic tissue. Subsequent follow-up for more than 2 years shows no relapse of symptoms. Our patient harbored Salmonella bacteria in a necrotic uterine leiomyoma, where it was difficult to detect until the time of surgery. In patients presenting with localized urticaria of the abdomen, an infection in the pelvic and abdominal tissue should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  17. Proteomics and glomerulonephritis: A complementary approach in renal pathology for the identification of chronic kidney disease related markers.

    PubMed

    L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Smith, Andrew; Chinello, Clizia; Pagni, Fabio; Magni, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is one of the most common origins of chronic kidney disease and its careful evaluation is crucial for prognostic and therapeutic purposes, with the renal biopsy still playing a central role for the diagnosis. However, due to its invasiveness, it is not devoid of complications and many investigations have focused on identifying biomarkers for chronic kidney diseases using less-invasive and easy-to-collect samples, such as urine and blood. In this context, proteomics has played a crucial role in determining the molecular changes related to disease progression and early pathological glomerular modifications. Here, we report a review of selected literature for each GN, based on selected works published in the last 10 years, showing how these approaches have generated clinically relevant findings in the study of glomerulonephritis. We also describe several proteomic strategies, highlighting their technical advantages and limitations, future perspectives for proteomic applications in the study of GNs, and their possible application in routine practice.

  18. GABAergic networks jump-start focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Abnormally enhanced glutamatergic excitation is commonly believed to mark the onset of a focal seizure. This notion, however, is not supported by firm evidence, and it will be challenged here. A general reduction of unit firing has been indeed observed in association with low-voltage fast activity at the onset of seizures recorded during presurgical intracranial monitoring in patients with focal, drug-resistant epilepsies. Moreover, focal seizures in animal models start with increased γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneuronal activity that silences principal cells. In vitro studies have shown that synchronous activation of GABAA receptors occurs at seizure onset and causes sizeable elevations in extracellular potassium, thus facilitating neuronal recruitment and seizure progression. A paradoxical involvement of GABAergic networks is required for the initiation of focal seizures characterized by low-voltage fast activity, which represents the most common seizure-onset pattern in focal epilepsies. PMID:27061793

  19. Autoimmunity to the alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen in glomerulonephritis is triggered by ‘autoantigen complementarity’

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John; Preston, Gloria A.; Pressler, Barrak M.; Hewins, Peter; Brown, Michael; Roth, Aleeza; Alderman, Elizabeth; Bunch, Donna; Jennette, J. Charles; Cook, H. Terence; Falk, Ronald J.; Pusey, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    ‘Autoantigen complementarity’ is a theory proposing that the initiator of an autoimmune response is not necessarily the autoantigen or its molecular mimic, but may instead be a peptide that is ‘antisense/complementary’ to the autoantigen. We investigated whether such complementary proteins play a role in the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune glomerulonephritis. Experimental autoimmune glomerulonephritis, a model of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease, can be induced in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats by immunization with the α3 chain of type IV collagen. In this study, WKY rats were immunized with a complementary α3 peptide (c-α3-Gly) comprised of amino acids that ‘complement’ the well characterized epitope on α3(IV)NC1, pCol(24–38). Within 8 weeks post-immunization, these animals developed cresentic glomerulonephritis, similar to pCol(24–38)-immunized rats, while animals immunized with scrambled peptide were normal. Anti-idiotypic antibodies to epitopes from c-α3-Gly-immunized animals were shown to be specific for α3 protein, binding in a region containing sense pCol(24–38) sequence. Interestingly, anticomplementary α3 antibodies were identified in sera from patients with anti-GBM disease, suggesting a role for ‘autoantigen complementarity’ in immunopathogenesis of the human disease. This work supports the idea that autoimmune glomerulonephritis can be initiated through an immune response against a peptide that is anti-sense or complementary to the autoantigen. The implications of this discovery may be far reaching, and other autoimmune diseases could be due to responses to these once unsuspected ‘complementary’ antigens. PMID:25841937

  20. Focal brain inflammation and autism.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Asadi, Shahrzad; Patel, Arti B

    2013-04-09

    Increasing evidence indicates that brain inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by social and learning disabilities that affect as many as 1/80 children in the USA. There is still no definitive pathogenesis or reliable biomarkers for ASD, thus significantly curtailing the development of effective therapies. Many children with ASD regress at about age 3 years, often after a specific event such as reaction to vaccination, infection, stress or trauma implying some epigenetic triggers, and may constitute a distinct phenotype. ASD children respond disproportionally to stress and are also affected by food and skin allergies. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and together with neurotensin (NT) stimulates mast cells and microglia resulting in focal brain inflammation and neurotoxicity. NT is significantly increased in serum of ASD children along with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). NT stimulates mast cell secretion of mtDNA that is misconstrued as an innate pathogen triggering an auto-inflammatory response. The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene mutation, associated with the higher risk of ASD, which leads to hyper-active mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling that is crucial for cellular homeostasis. CRH, NT and environmental triggers could hyperstimulate the already activated mTOR, as well as stimulate mast cell and microglia activation and proliferation. The natural flavonoid luteolin inhibits mTOR, mast cells and microglia and could have a significant benefit in ASD.

  1. Focal liver lesions found incidentally

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, Abdullah A; Alshuhri, Abdullah H; Alonazi, Majed M; Mourad, Moustafa Mabrouk; Bramhall, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Incidentally found focal liver lesions are a common finding and a reason for referral to hepatobiliary service. They are often discovered in patients with history of liver cirrhosis, colorectal cancer, incidentally during work up for abdominal pain or in a trauma setting. Specific points should considered during history taking such as risk factors of liver cirrhosis; hepatitis, alcohol consumption, substance exposure or use of oral contraceptive pills and metabolic syndromes. Full blood count, liver function test and tumor markers can act as a guide to minimize the differential diagnosis and to categorize the degree of liver disease. Imaging should start with B-mode ultrasound. If available, contrast enhanced ultrasound is a feasible, safe, cost effective option and increases the ability to reach a diagnosis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography should be considered next. It is more accurate in diagnosis and better to study anatomy for possible operation. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance is the gold standard with the highest sensitivity. If doubt still remains, the options are biopsy or surgical excision. PMID:27028805

  2. Early vision and focal attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julesz, Bela

    1991-07-01

    At the thirty-year anniversary of the introduction of the technique of computer-generated random-dot stereograms and random-dot cinematograms into psychology, the impact of the technique on brain research and on the study of artificial intelligence is reviewed. The main finding-that stereoscopic depth perception (stereopsis), motion perception, and preattentive texture discrimination are basically bottom-up processes, which occur without the help of the top-down processes of cognition and semantic memory-greatly simplifies the study of these processes of early vision and permits the linking of human perception with monkey neurophysiology. Particularly interesting are the unexpected findings that stereopsis (assumed to be local) is a global process, while texture discrimination (assumed to be a global process, governed by statistics) is local, based on some conspicuous local features (textons). It is shown that the top-down process of "shape (depth) from shading" does not affect stereopsis, and some of the models of machine vision are evaluated. The asymmetry effect of human texture discrimination is discussed, together with recent nonlinear spatial filter models and a novel extension of the texton theory that can cope with the asymmetry problem. This didactic review attempts to introduce the physicist to the field of psychobiology and its problems-including metascientific problems of brain research, problems of scientific creativity, the state of artificial intelligence research (including connectionist neural networks) aimed at modeling brain activity, and the fundamental role of focal attention in mental events.

  3. Update on the treatment of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Maria; Gallo, Ester; Mella, Alberto; Pagani, Fabiola; Biancone, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) represents one of the most severe glomerular diseases, with frequent progression to end-stage renal disease and a high rate of recurrence in renal allografts (30%-50%). Recurrent FSGS portends a negative outcome, with the hazard ratio of graft failure being two-fold higher then that of other glomerulonephritis. Two patterns of clinical presentations are observed: Early recurrence, which is characterized by massive proteinuria within hours to days after implantation of the renal graft, and late recurrence, which occurs several months or years after the transplantation. Many clinical conditions have been recognized as risk factors for recurrence, including younger age, rapid progression of the disease to end-stage renal disease on native kidneys, and loss of previous renal allografts due to recurrence. However, much less is known about the incidence and risk factors of the so-called “de novo” type of FSGS, for which sufferers are transplanted patients without disease on native kidneys; but, rapid development of allograft failure is frequently observed. Management of both forms is challenging, and none of the approaches proposed to date have been demonstrated as consistently beneficial or effective. In the present review we report an update on the available therapeutic strategies for FSGS in renal transplantation within the context of a critical overview of the current literature. PMID:27011905

  4. Localization of the membrane attack complex (MAC) in experimental immune complex glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) as a mediator of renal tissue injury was evaluated in rats affected by bovine serum albumin (BSA)-induced immune complex glomerulonephritis. Immunofluorescence studies revealed concurrent deposits of IgG, BSA, C3, and the MAC along glomerular capillary walls, although the MAC manifested a more restricted distribution than that observed for immune complexes. Immunoelectron microscopic techniques were utilized to demonstrate immune complexes, C3, and the MAC within dense deposits in the subepithelial aspect of the basement membrane. Visceral epithelial foot processes were fused in areas overlying large dense deposits and exhibited intense staining for the MAC, lesser reactivity for C3 but IgG was absent from the foot process membranes. Smaller granular deposits of immune complexes, C3, and the MAC were observed in the subendothelial region of the lamina rara interna and the lamina densa. Immune complexes may activate the classical complement pathway causing diffuse injury to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), allowing subepithelial accumulation of complexes. These observations implicate the MAC as a mediator of GBM and juxtaposed podocyte membrane injury, thereby contributing to disruption of the glomerular filtration barrier. IgG and C3 were demonstrated within tubulointerstitial regions on the surface of collagen fibers in close proximity to the tubular basement membrane (TBM) of proximal convoluted tubules. Within the TBM, C3 localization was prominent with diminished reactivity for the MAC, but IgG was not detectable. The demonstration of C3 and scant MAC deposits in the TBM of nonimmunized control rats without evidence of interstitial IgG and C3 deposits suggests that both nonimmune and immune processes play a role in the pathogenesis of extraglomerular lesions. Evidence derived from these morphologic studies indicates that the MAC is associated with injury to the GBM, foot process membranes of visceral

  5. Lack of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Aggravates Murine Accelerated Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Heeringa, Peter; van Goor, Harry; Itoh-Lindstrom, Yoshie; Maeda, Nobuyo; Falk, Ronald J.; Assmann, Karel J. M.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Jennette, J. Charles

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) radicals generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) are involved in the regulation of vascular tone. In addition, NO radicals derived from eNOS inhibit platelet aggregation and leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium and, thus, may have anti-inflammatory effects. To study the role of eNOS in renal inflammation, the development of accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis was examined in mice lacking a functional gene for eNOS and compared with wild-type (WT) C57BL/B6j mice. WT C57BL/6j mice (n = 12) and eNOS knockout (−/−) mice (n = 12) were immunized intraperitoneally with sheep IgG (0.2 mg in complete Freund’s adjuvant). At day 6.5 after immunization, mice received a single i.v. injection of sheep anti-mouse GBM (1 mg in 200 μl PBS). Mice were sacrificed at day 1 and 10 after induction of the disease. All WT mice survived until day 10, whereas 1 eNOS−/− mouse died and 2 more became moribund, requiring sacrifice. At day 10, eNOS−/− mice had higher levels of blood urea nitrogen than WT mice (P < 0.02), although proteinuria was comparable. Immunofluorescence microscopy documented similar IgG deposition in both WT and eNOS−/− mice, but eNOS−/− mice had more extensive glomerular staining for fibrin at day 10 (P < 0.007). At day 10, light microscopy demonstrated that eNOS−/− mice had more severe glomerular thrombosis (P < 0.003) and influx of neutrophils (P < 0.006), but similar degrees of overall glomerular endocapillary hypercellularity and crescent formation. In conclusion, accelerated anti-GBM glomerulonephritis is severely aggravated in eNOS−/− mice, especially with respect to glomerular capillary thrombosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results indicate that NO radicals generated by eNOS play a protective role during renal inflammation. PMID:10702405

  6. Clinical spectrum and outcome of crescentic glomerulonephritis in children in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Deepak; Gulati, Sanjeev; Sharma, Raj K; Prasad, Narayan; Jain, Manoj; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Alok

    2008-03-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (CsGN) is an uncommon entity in children. This prospective study was conducted to evaluate the aetiology, clinical spectrum and outcome in children with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The single-centre prospective study comprised of 22 children with biopsy proven CsGN who had been referred to our institute over the period January 2000 to December 2005. These patients were subjected to detailed clinical and biochemical examinations. The diagnosis of underlying renal disease was based on various criteria, including the clinical picture, serology and histopathology. The patients received intravenous methyl prednisolone, oral steroid treatment, and oral cyclophosphamide with or without plasmapheresis. All patients received supportive care, including control of hypertension and oedema and supportive management of renal insufficiency. During this 5-year period, CsGN accounted for 5.1% of all biopsies done in children. The mean age was 12.27 years (range 4 years to 18 years). There were eight girls and 14 boys. The mean duration of symptoms prior to referral was 2.47 months (range 5 days to 21 months). Aetiology was immune complex in 19 cases, anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody disease in two cases and pauci-immune (Wegener's granulomatosis) in one case. The percentage of crescents ranged from 50% to 100% (mean 70.6%). Twenty-one out of 22 (95.5%) children in our series had hypertension at presentation that required treatment with antihypertensive medications. The serum creatinine level at presentation ranged from 1.5 mg/dl to 11.4 mg/dl (mean 5.5 mg/dl). Of the 22 children, two were lost to follow-up, while the mean follow-up period of the rest of the 20 children was 8.13 months (range 1 month to 43 months). At the last follow-up of the 22 children, ten had stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) and three had stage 4 CKD, while seven children had a calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of >60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) body

  7. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDIES OF HUMAN GLOMERULONEPHRITIS WITH FERRITIN-CONJUGATED ANTIBODY

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Giuseppe A.; Accinni, Lidia; Hsu, Konrad C.; Zabriskie, John B.; Seegal, Beatrice C.

    1966-01-01

    1. Kidney biopsies from 4 cases of severe acute glomerulonephritis were obtained 11 to 25 days after the onset of clinical manifestations of the disease. These tissues were treated with ferritin-conjugated antibodies to 7S γ-globulin, β1C, and Type 12 streptococcal products. Adjacent pieces of the biopsied material were treated with control ferritin-labeled antisera or with ferritin alone. As further controls, normal renal tissue and renal tissue from patients with other kidney diseases were treated with the same antisera. The 3 antisera to 7S γ-globulin, β1C and Type 12 streptococcus were specifically bound in electron-opaque foreign material in the following renal areas: (a) the lumen of glomerular capillaries; (b) medullary arteriolar walls (2 cases); (c) pinocytic vacuoles and absorption droplets of endothelial or mesangial cells; (d) canals between proliferating mesangial or endothelial cells which connect the capillary lumen with the deep mesangial region or with the endothelial side of the basement membrane; (e) basement membrane proper; (f) subendothelial and certain subepithelial deposits; and (g) Bowman's space. 2. None of the 3 ferritin-conjugated antisera listed above were bound to the nuclei of glomerular cells or to portions of the cytoplasm other than those specified. 3. Ferritin-conjugated antisera to pneumococcus Type II and vaccinia virus and ferritin alone were not bound to any structures in the glomerular tissue. 4. None of the ferritin-conjugated antisera bound to normal renal tissue or to kidney tissue from other renal disease. 5. The data obtained are compatible with the following working hypothesis: Antigen-antibody aggregates of Type 12 streptococcal products, γ-globulin, and complement are present in the circulating blood of patients with severe acute glomerulonephritis. Large amounts of the complexes are caught in the filtering system of the glomeruli. The inflammatory reactions seen in the glomerular structures result from the

  8. Expression of alternatively spliced fibronectin variants during remodeling in proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. L.; Torres, E. S.; Mitchell, R. J.; Peters, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) plays an important role in tissue remodeling during embryogenesis, wound repair, and vascular disease, and is thought to regulate cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation through specialized domains within the molecule. In addition, Fn can be alternatively spliced at three regions: extradomains EIIIA, EIIIB, and a variable segment V, potentially giving rise to functionally distinct variants of the molecule. We have previously shown a sequential expression of cellular Fn first by platelets, followed by macrophages, then mesangial cells in habu snake venom-induced proliferative glomerulonephritis (Am J Pathol 145: 585-597, 1994). These studies examined the cellular sources and glomerular localization of Fn in general but did not distinguish between the various alternatively spliced isoforms. In this study, we examine by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry the temporal expression and cellular sources of EIIIA, EIIIB, and V in a model of proliferation glomerulonephritis that has cell migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis as features of tissue remodeling. Macrophages were the first cells to express Fn mRNA showing an EIIIA+, EIIIB-, and V95+ pattern beginning at 8 hours after habu snake venom injection. Migrating mesangial cells at the margins of early lesions (8 and 24 hours) did not overexpress mRNA encoding these Fn variants, but immunofluorescence microscopy revealed V95 and EIIIA protein at the margins of lesions. EIIIB was absent in lesions at this time. At 48 hours and peaking at 72 hours after habu snake venom injection, mesangial cells in central aspects of glomerular lesions expressed abundant mRNA and protein for V95 and EIIIA. EIIIB mRNA and protein was slight in the mesangium at these times. Parietal epithelial cells, particularly adjacent to glomerular lesions, also expressed abundant mRNA and protein for all three variants throughout the course of the disease

  9. Genetics Home Reference: familial focal epilepsy with variable foci

    MedlinePlus

    ... familial focal epilepsy with variable foci familial focal epilepsy with variable foci Enable Javascript to view the ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial focal epilepsy with variable foci (FFEVF) is an uncommon form ...

  10. Mosaic focal plane for star sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, N. C.

    1981-02-01

    The basic principles of star sensors are reviewed with reference to the advantages of replacing photodiodes, image dissectors, and vidicons with mosaic charge transfer device (CTD) focal planes. The desirable characteristics of CTD focal planes include: high uniformity, high transfer effect, low dark current, low hot and cold spots, low dead space, low angular misalignment, high coplanarity, and high thermal stability. An implementation of a mosaic CTD array star sensor which achieves high angular position accuracy and frequency attitude update is presented. Two focal plane packaging concepts, the planar and vertical board packagings, are examined.

  11. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  12. A Review of Focal Reducer Interferometer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    searches. G.Courtes has also proposed a design for a focal reducer for the E.S.O. 3.6m. Ritchey -Chretien telescope (Fig. 4b). He uses a Schmidt camera...spaced components, with a modified Wynne camera design (Fig. 7). The instrument proposed used folded optics and would operate at the F/8 Ritchey Cretien ...G.Courtes for the 3.6m Ritchey Chretien telescope . a, telescope focal plane and field lens; b, collimator; c, camera. Figure 5 The focal reducer of A.B

  13. Do focal colors look particularly "colorful"?

    PubMed

    Witzel, Christoph; Franklin, Anna

    2014-04-01

    If the most typical red, yellow, green, and blue were particularly colorful (i.e., saturated), they would "jump out to the eye." This would explain why even fundamentally different languages have distinct color terms for these focal colors, and why unique hues play a prominent role in subjective color appearance. In this study, the subjective saturation of 10 colors around each of these focal colors was measured through a pairwise matching task. Results show that subjective saturation changes systematically across hues in a way that is strongly correlated to the visual gamut, and exponentially related to sensitivity but not to focal colors.

  14. Concurrent emphysematous pyelonephritis and thigh necrotizing fasciitis after intramuscular administration of diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi; Foroughi, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly progressive, life-threatening soft tissue infection. NF may result from any injury to the skin or from hematogenous spread. However, con-current emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh has not been reported. We report a case of emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh after intramuscular administration of diclofenac that improved with aggressive management including broad-spectrum antibiotics, nephrectomy and surgical intervention.

  15. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: an unusual complication of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Ashwani; Sabherwal, Anup; Puri, Rajeev; Jain, Pooja

    2006-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare microbial soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly spreading areas of necrosis and a high mortality rate. It may be of odontogenic or traumatic origin or may arise from insect bites, burns or surgical infections. We present a clinical case of an eight-year-old child with facial and cervical necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. The causes, diagnosis and management of necrotizing fasciitis are reviewed.

  16. Disseminated necrotizing myeloencephalitis: a herpes-associated neurological disease of horses.

    PubMed

    Little, P B; Thorsen, J

    1976-01-01

    Equine viral rhinopneumonitis type I virus was isolated from spinal cord and brain of a paraparetic horse with disseminated necrotizing myeloencephalitis. Necrotic arteriolitis,nonsuppurative necrotizing myeloencephalitis and Gasserian ganglioneuritis were present. On record were 12 more cases of horses with similar lesions. The horses had been ataxic or paretic for up to several weeks. A field survey indicated that 14 of 24 horses with acute myelitic signs developed them after recent exposure to respiratory disease.

  17. A Fatal Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by a Highly Virulent Escherichia coli Strain

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, André; Lin, Alex; Harel, Josée; Côté, Jean-Charles; Tremblay, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious disease characterized by the necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues and fascia. E. coli as the etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is a rare occurrence. A 66-year-old woman underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She rapidly developed necrotizing fasciitis which led to her death 68 hours following surgery. An E. coli strain was isolated from blood and fascia cultures. DNA microarray revealed the presence of 20 virulence genes. PMID:27366162

  18. Effects of pegylated interferon alpha-2a on hepatitis-C-virus-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tokio; Yamada, Takuji; Kimpara, Yuri; Fujita, Naoya; Goto, Kenji; Koyama, Norihisa

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to chronic liver disease, but it has also been associated with extrahepatic manifestations. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) is the most common renal disease associated with HCV. Although renal disease related to HCV in adults has been well studied, it has not been well studied in children because it is rare. A recent study found that antiviral therapy was effective for adult patients with HCV-associated MPGN. We report a 9-year-old girl with HCV-associated MPGN. Her HCV genotype was 1b, and her virus load was high. The first renal biopsy showed mesangial proliferation and partial double contours of the basement membrane on light microscopy and immunofluorescence staining with immunoglobulin (Ig) M, IgG, and C3. The patient was successfully treated with pegylated interferon (IFN) alpha-2a monotherapy. The antiviral therapy was generally well tolerated. After antiviral therapy, a sustained virological response-defined as negative HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) at least 24 weeks after antiviral treatment-was achieved, the proteinuria disappeared, and the second renal biopsy showed improvement.

  19. Volatile Organic Metabolites Identify Patients with Mesangial Proliferative Glomerulonephritis, IgA Nephropathy and Normal Controls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Feng, Yue; Wang, Mingao; Pi, Xin; Tong, Hongshuang; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Lin; Li, Enyou

    2015-01-01

    Urinary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analysis for kidney diseases has attracted a large amount of scientific interest recently, and urinary metabolite analysis has already been applied to many diseases. Urine was collected from 15 mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) patients, 21 IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients and 15 healthy controls. Solid phase microextraction–chromatography– mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was used to analyse the urinary metabolites. The statistical methods principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLSDA) were performed to process the final data. Five metabolites were significantly greater in the group of MsPGN patients than in the normal control group (P < 0.05) while three metabolites were found at increased levels in the group of IgAN patients compared with the normal controls (P < 0.05). In addition, five metabolites were significantly increased in the group of IgAN patients compared with the MsPGN patients (P < 0.05). These five metabolites may be specific biomarkers for distinguishing between MsPGN and IgAN. The analysis of urinary VOCs appears to have potential clinical applications as a diagnostic tool. PMID:26443483

  20. [A case of combination therapy with MMF and steroids for idiopathic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Mori, Yutaro; Ihara, Katsuhito; Yamaguchi, Wakaba; Fujii, Tetsuro; Toda, Takayuki; Nagata, Michio; Matsui, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old man diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome was administered steroid monotherapy. Urinary protein excretion was 2-3 g/day despite the therapy. Percutaneous renal biopsy revealed Type I idiopathic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (IMPGN). Although intravenous steroid therapy at the dose of 1,000 mg/day for 3 days was administered, proteinuria persisted at the level of 1 g/day. Renal dysfunction (cystatin C, 1.33 mg/L) was evident. Strong inflammation was suggested by occult blood (3+) and urinary (red blood cells: 30-50/high power field) sediment. We considered steroid monotherapy to be ineffective, and initiated combina-tion therapy with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and steroids. Consequently, urinary protein excretion moderately decreased to 0.34 g/day without adverse events or worsening of the renal function. The steroid quantity could be reduced without relapse. Subsequently, we were able to reduce the dose of MMF gradually, then terminated the medication. IMPGN is a rare disease with a poor renal prognosis. Recently, MMF therapies for IMPGN have been attempted, but there are few cases in Japan. Our case suggests that combination therapy with MMF and steroids is effective and safe for treating IMPGN.