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Sample records for fodder beet fields

  1. Fodder beets as a feedstock for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, W.

    1981-09-01

    Fodder beets have been shown to be an attractive feedstock for alcohol production, yielding sufficient sugar to produce approximately 1000 gallons of alcohol per acre. Resistance to diseases found in a given region would have to be evaluated. Storage tests have demonstrated that beets can be stored long enough to make them of interest as a feedstock for alcohol production. Further testing is required to evaluate techniques for reducing sugar losses due to sprouting, respiration, and molding.

  2. Nutrient digestibility in sheep fed diets containing Roundup Ready or conventional fodder beet, sugar beet, and beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Hartnell, G F; Hvelplund, T; Weisbjerg, M R

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this digestibility assessment was to determine whether there are significant differences in the digestibility of Roundup Ready (glyphosate-tolerant) and conventional sugar beet, fodder beet, and beet pulp produced from sugar beet varieties when fed to sheep (seven wethers per treatment group). Three experiments were conducted in this assessment. Experiment 1 (35 wethers) compared one glyphosate-tolerant fodder beet variety with four conventional varieties, Exp. 2 (42 wethers) compared one glyphosate-tolerant sugar beet variety with five conventional varieties, and Exp. 3 (42 wethers) compared beet pulp derived from glyphosate-tolerant sugar beet with beet pulp from five European locations. The experimental phase consisted of a 2-wk preliminary period followed by a 1-wk collection period for Exp. 1 and 2, and a 1-wk preliminary period followed by a 1-wk digestibility collection period for Exp. 3. Diets were comprised of grass hay at 30, 30, and 20% of DM for Exp. 1, 2, and 3, respectively, with the balance being beet components. Urea and sodium sulfate were supplemented (8 and 2.9 g, respectively, for Exp. 1 and 2; and 6 g and 2.16 g, respectively, for Exp. 3) to supply sufficient dietary N and S. Each diet was fed to sheep (96 +/- 0.9 kg) in the three experiments to at or near maintenance energy levels. Treatment differences were considered significant at P < 0.05. Apparent digestibilities of DM, OM, CP, NDF, ADF, and DE for glyphosate-tolerant fodder and sugar beets did not differ from those for commercial fodder and sugar beets in Exp. 1 and 2. There were differences (P < 0.05) in DM, OM, CP, NDF, ADF, and DE digestibilities influenced by the different varieties of beet pulp in Exp. 3, but these were not unique to just the Roundup Ready sugar beet variety. Digestibilities and feeding values of Roundup Ready fodder beet, sugar beet, and beet pulp produced from Roundup Ready sugar beet varieties were not influenced by the introduction of the

  3. Effects of inoculum size on solid-phase fermentation of fodder beets for fuel ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1986-10-01

    This fuel ethanol study examined the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inoculum size on solid-phase fermentation of fodder beet pulp. A 5% inoculum (wt/wt) resulted in rapid yeast and ethanol (9.1% (vol/vol)) production. Higher inocula showed no advantages. Lower inocula resulted in lowered final yeast populations and increased fermentation times.

  4. Effects of sodium meta bisulfite on diffusion fermentation of fodder beets for fuel ethanol production. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors designed and tested a new process for converting fodder beets to ethanol: continuous diffusion-fermentation. This process utilizes the simultaneous diffusion-fermentation concept of the EX-FERM design; however, it overcomes the material handling problems inherent in that system by utilizing a counterflow tubular auger system. This process also eliminates the need for roller mills or presses and dryers which are required for alcohol recovery from solid phase fermentation. The latter is the only other currently feasible procedure for producing distillably worthwhile amounts of ethanol from fodder beets, sweet sorghum, and other similar feedstocks. Results on the use of sodium meta bisulfite (SMB) for contamination control with fermenting fodder beet cubes are reported.

  5. Continuous, farm-scale, solid-phase fermentation process for fuel ethanol and protein feed production from fodder beets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.; Dobbs, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel ethanol (95%) was produced from fodder beets in two farm-scale processes. In the first process, involving conventional submerged fermentation of the fodder beets in a mash, ethanol and a feed (PF) rich in protein, fat, and fiber were produced. Ethanol yields of 70 L/metric ton (17 gal/ton) were obtained; however, resulting beers had low ethanol concentrations )3-5% (v/v)). The high viscosity of medium and low sugar, beet mashes caused mixing problems which prevented any further increase of beet sugar in the mash. This severely limited the maximum attainable ethanol concentration during fermentation, thereby making the beer costly to distill into fuel ethanol and the process energy inefficient. In order to achieve distillably worthwhile ethanol concentrations of 8-10% (v/v), a solid phase fermentation process (continuous) was developed and tested. In preliminary trials, this system produced fermented pulp with over 8% (v/v) ethanol corresponding to an ethanol yield of 87 L/metric ton (21 gal/ton). Production costs with this novel process are $0.47/L ($1.77/gal) and the energy balance is 2.11. These preliminary cost estimates indicate that fodder beets are potentially competitive with corn as an ethanol feedstock. Additional research, however, is warranted to more precisely refine individual costs, energy balances and the actual value of the PF.

  6. A continuous, farm-scale, solid-phase fermentation process for fuel ethanol and protein feed production from fodder beets.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, W R; Westby, C A; Dobbs, T L

    1984-09-01

    Fuel ethanol (95%) was produced from fodder beets in two farm-scale processes. In the first process, involving conventional submerged fermentation of the fodder beets in a mash, ethanol and a feed (PF) rich in protein, fat, and fiber were produced. Ethanol yields of 70 L/metric ton (7 gal/ton) were obtained; however, resulting beers had low ethanol concentrations [3-5% (v/v)]. The high viscosity of medium and low sugar, beet mashes caused mixing problems which prevented any further increase of beet sugar in the mash. The severely limited the maximum attainable ethanol concentration during fermentation, thereby making the beer costly to distill into fuel ethanol and the process energy inefficient. In order to achieve distillably worthwhile ethanol concentrations of 8-10% (v/v), we developed and tested a solid-phase fermentation process (continuous). In preliminary trials, this system produced fermented pulp with over 8% (v/v) ethanol corresponding to an ethanol yield of 87 L/metric ton (21 gal/ton). Production costs with this novel process are $0.47/L ($1.77/gal) and the energy balance is 2.11. These preliminary cost estimates indicate that fodder beets are potentially competitive with corn as an ethanol feedstock. Additional research, however, is warranted to more precisely refine individual costs, energy balances and the actual value of the PF.

  7. Effect of sugar beet tubers as a partial replacer to green fodder on production performance and economics of lactating Surti buffaloes in lean period

    PubMed Central

    Sorathiya, L. M.; Patel, M. D.; Tyagi, K. K.; Fulsoundar, A. B.; Raval, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sugar beet tubers as a replacer to green fodder on production performance and economics of lactating Surti buffaloes. Materials and Methods: This trial was conducted at the Livestock Research Station, Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari. Twenty lactating Surti buffaloes in a changeover experimental design were selected to assess the effects of replacing green fodder with sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) tubers on production performance, economics of feeding sugar beet and blood biochemical profile. Half (50%) of the hybrid Napier was replaced with sliced sugar beet tubers in the ration of experimental animals. Results: Partial replacement of hybrid Napier with that of sugar beet tubers numerically improved dry matter intake, milk yield, 4% fat corrected milk and milk composition parameters such as fat, solid non-fat, protein and lactose, but not significantly. The blood parameters were in normal range and non-significant except that of glucose and triglycerides, which were increased in the sugar beet group. Replacing sugar beet tubers also proved to be cost-effective with improved net profit around Rs. 6.63/day. Conclusion: It can be concluded that 50% hybrid Napier fodder can be replaced with sugar beet tubers without any adverse effect on animal production performance, milk composition blood biochemical profile and economics of feeding. PMID:27046988

  8. Versatile synthesis of PHMB-stabilized silver nanoparticles and their significant stimulating effect on fodder beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Gusev, Alexander А; Kudrinsky, Alexey A; Zakharova, Olga V; Klimov, Alexey I; Zherebin, Pavel M; Lisichkin, George V; Vasyukova, Inna A; Denisov, Albert N; Krutyakov, Yurii A

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are well-known bactericidal agents. However, information about the influence of AgNPs on the morphometric parameters and biochemical status of most important agricultural crops is limited. The present study reports the influence of AgNPs stabilized with cationic polymer polyhexamethylene biguanide hydrochloride (PHMB) on growth, development, and biochemical status of fodder beet Beta vulgaris L. under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. PHMB-stabilized AgNPs were obtained via sodium borohydride reduction of silver nitrate in an aqueous solution. The average diameter of thus prepared AgNPs was 10 nm. It appears that the results of experiments with laboratory-grown beets in the nanosilver-containing medium, where germination of seeds and growth of roots were suppressed, do not correlate with the results of greenhouse experiments. The observed growth-stimulating action of PHMB-stabilized AgNPs can be explained by the change of activity of oxidases and, consequently, by the change of auxins amount in plant tissues. In beets grown in the presence of PHMB-stabilized AgNPs no negative deviations of biological parameters from normal values were registered. Furthermore, the SEM/EDS examination revealed no presence of silver in the tissues of the studied plants.

  9. Pollen dispersal in sugar beet production fields.

    PubMed

    Darmency, Henri; Klein, Etienne K; De Garanbé, Thierry Gestat; Gouyon, Pierre-Henri; Richard-Molard, Marc; Muchembled, Claude

    2009-04-01

    Pollen-mediated gene flow has important implications for biodiversity conservation and for breeders and farmers' activities. In sugar beet production fields, a few sugar beet bolters can produce pollen as well as be fertilized by wild and weed beet. Since the crop, the wild beets, and the weed beets are the same species and intercross freely, the question of pollen flow is an important issue to determine the potential dispersal of transgenes from field to field and to wild habitats. We report here an experiment to describe pollen dispersal from a small herbicide-resistant sugar beet source towards male sterile target plants located along radiating lines up to 1,200 m away. Individual dispersal functions were inferred from statistical analyses and compared. Pollen limitation, as expected in root-production fields, was confirmed at all the distances from the pollen source. The number of resistant seeds produced by bait plants best fitted a fat-tailed probability distribution curve of pollen grains (power-law) dependent on the distance from the pollen source. A literature survey confirmed that power-law function could fit in most cases. The b coefficient was lower than 2. The number of fertilized flowers by background (herbicide-susceptible) pollen grains was uniform across the whole field. Airborne pollen had a fertilization impact equivalent to that of one adjacent bolter. The individual dispersal function from different pollen sources can be integrated to provide the pollen cloud composition for a given target plant, thus allowing modeling of gene flow in a field, inter-fields in a small region, and also in seed-production area. Long-distance pollen flow is not negligible and could play an important role in rapid transgene dispersal from crop to wild and weed beets in the landscape. The removing of any bolting, herbicide-resistant sugar beet should be compulsory to prevent the occurrence of herbicide-resistant weed beet, thus preventing gene flow to wild

  10. Fermentation studies on extracts of beet

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Fodder beet juice and sugar beet juice were found to be good substrates for the production of ethanol. Two strains of flocculent yeast were selected to ferment fodder beet juice and sugar beet juice. Beet juice was found to have a high level of contaminating microorganisms. Elimination of these microorganisms from the beet juice before fermentation was an essential step if high fermentation efficiencies were to be achieved. Continuous fermentation of fodder beet juice and sugar beet juice provided higher fermenter productivities than rapid batch fermentation. Under New Zealand farming conditions, it is estimated that 4000 litres of ethanol per hectare could be produced on a nation-wide basis.

  11. Hybrid sugarbeets - fuel from fodder

    SciTech Connect

    Yarris, L.

    1980-05-01

    Plant geneticists at Utah University are exploring the possibility of developing a hybrid sugarbeet especially bred for use in making alcohol fuel. They are aiming at increasing sugar quantity in the beet without having to worry about the quality factors that affect sugar crystallization. A cross between European fodder beets and U.S. sugarbeets which would be resistant to curly top virus disease is envisaged.

  12. "We Were Beet Workers, and that Was All": Beet Field Laborers in the North Platte Valley, 1902-1930

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipp, Dustin

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of the men, women, and children who labored in the beet fields of the North Platte Valley changed significantly as the sugar beet industry went through a period of rapid expansion prior to 1920 and then reached a relatively stable plateau. During the period of expansion, laborers were attracted by promises of reasonable wages, good…

  13. Effects silver nanoparticles and magnetic field on growth of fodder maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Berahmand, Ali Asghar; Ghafariyan Panahi, Ali; Sahabi, Hossein; Feizi, Hassan; Rezvani Moghaddam, Parviz; Shahtahmassebi, Nasser; Fotovat, Amir; Karimpour, Hossein; Gallehgir, Omran

    2012-12-01

    Two experiments were done in 2008 and 2009 to study the effects of magnetic field and silver nanoparticles on fodder maize (Zea mays L.). These experiments were done with seven treatments based on a randomized complete block design in four replications. The treatments were as follows: magnetic field and silver nanoparticles + Kemira fertilizer (T1), magnetic field and silver nanoparticles + Humax fertilizer (T2), magnetic field and silver nanoparticles (T3), Kemira fertilizer (T4), Librel fertilizer (T5), Humax fertilizer (T6), and a control (T7). Results showed that fresh yield was higher in treatments T3 and T4. Treatments T3 and T4 had increased maize fresh yields of 35 and 17.5 % in comparison to the control, respectively. The dry matter yield of those plants exposed to magnetic field and silver nanoparticles was significantly higher than that from any of the other treatments. Magnetic field and silver nanoparticle treatments (T3 and T1) showed higher percentages for ears, and the lowest percentages were found in treatments T7 and T5. In general, the soil conditions for crop growth were more favorable in 2009 than in 2008, which caused the maize to respond better to treatments tested in the study; therefore, treatments had more significant effects on studied traits in 2008 than in 2009.

  14. Transgene escape in sugar beet production fields: data from six years farm scale monitoring.

    PubMed

    Darmency, Henri; Vigouroux, Yves; Gestat De Garambé, Thierry; Richard-Molard, Marc; Muchembled, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Concerns have been raised in Europe about the efficiency, sustainability, and environmental impact of the first genetically modified crops. The committees and regulators in charge of approving procedures have encouraged a field trial approach for safety assessment studies under current agronomic conditions. We describe the gene flow from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in a multi-year and multi-crop monitoring study on farmers' fields at two locations that has been carried out since 1995. We analyzed two sugar beet lines that have been genetically transformed for herbicide resistance. One sugar beet has resistance to glufosinate and the other to glyphosate. Large differences among lines, years and locations were observed. These differences provided a broad range of situations to estimate the risks. Sugar beet bolters produced the majority (86%) of the herbicide-resistant seeds harvested in the field. Direct pollen flow from sugar beet bolters to weed beets that were growing within the same field as well as in a neighboring field that was left fallow accounted for only 0.4% of the resistant seeds released over the years and locations. Descendants of the hybrids between the sugar beet and the weed beet produced the remaining 13.6% of resistant seeds. Herbicide-resistant seeds from the progeny of the weed beet were recorded up to 112 m away from the closest transgenic pollen donor. Indications were observed of non-randomness of the weed beet producing resistant progeny. We also analyzed pollen flow to male-sterile bait plants located within and outside of the sugar beet field. Herbicide-resistant pollen flow was recorded up to 277 m, and fitted with an inverse power regression. Using sugar beet varieties with no, or very low, sensitivity to bolting and destroying bolters are two necessary measures that could delay gene flow.

  15. Disease detection in sugar beet fields: a multi-temporal and multi-sensoral approach on different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlein, Anne-Katrin; Hillnhütter, Christian; Mewes, Thorsten; Scholz, Christine; Steiner, Ulrike; Dehne, Heinz-Willhelm; Oerke, Erich-Christian

    2009-09-01

    Depending on environmental factors fungal diseases of crops are often distributed heterogeneously in fields. Precision agriculture in plant protection implies a targeted fungicide application adjusted these field heterogeneities. Therefore an understanding of the spatial and temporal occurrence of pathogens is elementary. As shown in previous studies, remote sensing techniques can be used to detect and observe spectral anomalies in the field. In 2008, a sugar beet field site was observed at different growth stages of the crop using different remote sensing techniques. The experimental field site consisted of two treatments. One plot was sprayed with a fungicide to avoid fungal infections. In order to obtain sugar beet plants infected with foliar diseases the other plot was not sprayed. Remote sensing data were acquired from the high-resolution airborne hyperspectral imaging ROSIS in July 2008 at sugar beet growth stage 39 and from the HyMap sensor systems in August 2008 at sugar beet growth stage 45, respectively. Additionally hyperspectral signatures of diseased and non-diseased sugar beet plants were measured with a non-imaging hand held spectroradiometer at growth stage 49 in September. Ground truth data, in particular disease severity were collected at 50 sampling points in the field. Changes of reflection rates were related to disease severity increasing with time. Erysiphe betae causing powdery mildew was the most frequent leaf pathogen. A classification of healthy and diseased sugar beets in the field was possible by using hyperspectral vegetation indices calculated from canopy reflectance.

  16. Occurrence of plant parasitic nematodes (Tylenchina) in sugar beet fields in Fars province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, N; Kheiri, A; Pakniat, M

    2004-01-01

    On a survey of plant parasitic nematode fauna, belonging to the suborder Tylenchina, about 110 soil and root samples were collected from different sugar beet field in fars Province in Iran. The samples were washed and the nematodes were extracted by Centrifugal Flotation Technique according to the modified method by De Grisse, 1969. They were fixed and transferred to glycerine, then permanent slides were mounted. Morphological and morphometrical characters of collected species were carefully studied and the characters were compared with the original descriptions and differences were discussed. In this study 18 species belonging to 11 different genera of subordes Tylenchina were identified as follows. Boleodorus thylactus, Ditylenchus destructor, D. dipsaci Geocenamus brevidens, G. rugosus, Helicotylenchus digonicus, H. pseudorobustus, H. vulgaris, Heterodera filipjevi, H. schachtii, Pratylenchus neglectus, P. thornei, Psilenchus hilarulus, P. hilarus, Stictylus mucronatus, Tylenchorhynchus ventrosinatus, Tylenchus davainei and Zygotylenchus guevarai. The species of the genera Ditylenchus, Heterodera, Pratylenchus and Psilenchus were comparatively more distributed than the others. This investigation revealed that sugar beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachti) was found already in most sugar beet fields in this Province. Fathabod, Marvdasht and Tasuj-kwar were the most infested areas. Cysts collected from 100 gr. Of soil samples were 120 to 121 in number and the eggs and second stage larvae in each gr. of soil were 104.1 to 104.5 respectively.

  17. Seasonal OVOC fluxes from an agricultural field planted with sugar beet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, T. G.; Schade, G. W.

    2005-12-01

    Although agricultural crops are generally not strong isoprenoid emitters, they do emit a variety of other atmospherically significant species collectively known as oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), such as methanol, acetaldehyde, or various hexenal and hexenol compounds. Many OVOCs have longer atmospheric lifetimes than isoprenoid compounds and can affect the atmosphere's oxidative potential at higher elevations and far from sources. We performed selected OVOC flux measurements for select species above an agricultural field planted with sugar beets ( B. vulgaris) in northern Germany in 2004 to better understand the magnitude and controls over these OVOC emissions. Virtual disjunct eddy covariance was used to measure fluxes beginning immediately following seeding and continuing until past harvest. A commercial PTR-MS provided mixing ratios of methanol (m/z 33), acetaldehyde (m/z 45), acetone (m/z 59), and the sum of the isoprene oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone (m/z 71) while 3D wind velocities were measured using a Gill R3 sonic anemometer. Here, we compare the fluxes of methanol and acetone over the growth cycle of sugar beet to plant development as measured by the leaf area index. Methanol fluxes ranged from approximately -0.05 to 0.15 mg C m-2 h-1 (mixing ratios from ~1 to 15 ppbv) and showed a clear diurnal cycle after the sugar beets established a significant leaf area. Acetone fluxes ranged from approximately -0.2 to 0.2 mg C m-2 h-1 (mixing ratios from ~0.2 to 3 ppb). Higher specific emissions were found during earlier growth stages. Methanol flux correlated strongly with latent heat flux (or alternatively, with canopy conductance derived from the latent heat flux), while acetone flux did not. Acetone flux was small compared to methanol flux and sugar beet is likely not a significant acetone emitter. Weekly measurements of soil OVOC exchange using a flux chamber showed that the soil may have contributed significantly to the overall flux values

  18. Artificial infestations of transgenic cotton with beet armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and evaluation of insect mortality and damage under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cottons containing Bollgard(R), Bollgard II(R), and Widestrike(TM) traits along with nonBt cotton were grown during 2005-2009, to examine efficacy against beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hubner), and (BAW) in field performance using natural and artificial infestations. Damage and morta...

  19. Effects of sugar beet chitinase IV on root-associated fungal community of transgenic silver birch in a field trial.

    PubMed

    Pasonen, Hanna-Leena; Lu, Jinrong; Niskanen, Anna-Maija; Seppänen, Sanna-Kaisa; Rytkönen, Anna; Raunio, Janne; Pappinen, Ari; Kasanen, Risto; Timonen, Sari

    2009-10-01

    Heterogenous chitinases have been introduced in many plant species with the aim to increase the resistance of plants to fungal diseases. We studied the effects of the heterologous expression of sugar beet chitinase IV on the intensity of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) colonization and the structure of fungal communities in the field trial of 15 transgenic and 8 wild-type silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) genotypes. Fungal sequences were separated in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and identified by sequencing the ITS1 region to reveal the operational taxonomic units. ECM colonization was less intense in 7 out of 15 transgenic lines than in the corresponding non-transgenic control plants, but the slight decrease in overall ECM colonization in transgenic lines could not be related to sugar beet chitinase IV expression or total endochitinase activity. One transgenic line showing fairly weak sugar beet chitinase IV expression without significantly increased total endochitinase activity differed significantly from the non-transgenic controls in the structure of fungal community. Five sequences belonging to three different fungal genera (Hebeloma, Inocybe, Laccaria) were indicative of wild-type genotypes, and one sequence (Lactarius) indicated one transgenic line. In cluster analysis, the non-transgenic control grouped together with the transgenic lines indicating that genotype was a more important factor determining the structure of fungal communities than the transgenic status of the plants. With the tested birch lines, no clear evidence for the effect of the heterologous expression of sugar beet chitinase IV on ECM colonization or the structure of fungal community was found.

  20. Effects of simulated acidic rainfalls on yields of field-grown radishes and garden beets

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L S; Cunningham, E A; Lewin, K F

    1981-01-01

    The effects of small additions of simulated acidic rain on radishes and garden beets grown under standard agronomic practices was determined. Only the foliage of plants was sprayed with simulated rain. The composition of the simulated rainfall approximated that of rain falling in the Long Island, NY area. (ACR)

  1. Impact of glyphosate-resistant sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Don W

    2016-12-19

    Glyphosate-resistant (GR) sugar beet became commercially available to US sugar beet growers in 2008 and was rapidly adopted. Prior to the availability of GR sugar beet, growers would commonly make 3-5 herbicide applications. This often resulted in some crop injury, but was accepted to reduce the impact of weeds. In addition, non-GR sugar beet was cultivated 1-3 times and often followed by hand weeding. The introduction of GR sugar beet drastically reduced the complexity of weed management. Concerns about GR weeds in the United States also apply to sugar beet growers. Changes in weed management strategies will be required to keep this technology. Sugar beet is arguably one of the most suitable crops for GR technology because: (1) none of the herbicides registered for use in this crop was very effective without risking crop injury; (2) sugar beet cannot be grown in the same field year after year owing to disease concerns and thus requires a 3-4 year rotation; (3) pollen-mediated gene flow is negligible from the sugar beet crop because it is a biennial and harvested before it flowers; (4) the processing of harvested roots to extract the sucrose rapidly degrades the DNA in the extracted raw juice and subsequent refining so that no DNA is present in the finished sugar; (5) studies have shown that processed GR beet sugar is identical to non-GR beet sugar, as well as cane sugar. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Monitoring the spread of recombinant DNA from field plots with transgenic sugar beet plants by PCR and natural transformation of Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Meier, Petra; Wackernagel, Wilfried

    2003-06-01

    Previous studies had shown that recombinant DNA can be detected for several months in soil after the deposition of litter from transgenic (tg) plants. Here we show by PCR monitoring of field releases of tg sugar beet plants that during the growth of the plants the soil close to the plants and also plant material contains recombinant DNA, in the form of extracellular molecules. Surprisingly, the monitoring also revealed the presence of tg DNA in many field plots (30-70%) in which tg plants were never grown. These studies and the further monitoring during other tg sugar beet release experiments by PCR and a novel bioassay (measuring the transforming potential of recombinant DNA for Pseudomonas stutzeri) indicated that recombinant DNA was only detectable in the surface soil of field plots and their vicinity where flowering of the tg beet plants was allowed. Recombinant DNA was found in soil at a distance of 50 m from pollen-producing plants surrounded by a strip with hemp plants as a containment regime. It is concluded that recombinant DNA is deposited in soil during the growth of tg sugar beets and that a major mechanism of recombinant DNA spread in the environment is the dispersal of pollen which allows recombinant DNA to persist in the field plot for at least a year.

  3. Pulsed electric field-assisted modification of pectin from sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sen; Wang, Zhong-he

    2013-02-15

    This current work is concerned with the modification of sugar beet pulp (SBP) pectin assisted by pulsed electric filed (PEF) without solvent. Pectin-arachates with degree of esterification (DE) ranging from 49 to 84 were prepared in one-step modification. The results showed that the DE of pectin derivatives increased significantly with the PEF intensity from 18 to 30 kV cm((1) and total specific energy input from 124 to 345 J mL((1). Evidence of modification of pectin was provided by FT-IR, X-ray diffraction patterns and NMR spectra. Thermogravimetric investigation of modified pectin indicated a higher thermal stability than the untreated one. Results revealed that PEF technology is a promising method for industrial manufacture of pectin derivatives.

  4. NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling of Field-Grown Leaves from Sugar Beet Plants Harbouring Different Levels of Resistance to Cercospora Leaf Spot Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Okazaki, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Jun; Ikeda, Seishi

    2017-01-01

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) is one of the most serious leaf diseases for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) worldwide. The breeding of sugar beet cultivars with both high CLS resistance and high yield is a major challenge for breeders. In this study, we report the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic profiling of field-grown leaves for a subset of sugar beet genotypes harbouring different levels of CLS resistance. Leaves were collected from 12 sugar beet genotypes at four time points: seedling, early growth, root enlargement, and disease development stages. 1H-NMR spectra of foliar metabolites soluble in a deuterium-oxide (D2O)-based buffer were acquired and subjected to multivariate analyses. A principal component analysis (PCA) of the NMR data from the sugar beet leaves shows clear differences among the growth stages. At the later time points, the sugar and glycine betaine contents were increased, whereas the choline content was decreased. The relationship between the foliar metabolite profiles and resistance level to CLS was examined by combining partial least squares projection to latent structure (PLS) or orthogonal PLS (OPLS) analysis and univariate analyses. It was difficult to build a robust model for predicting precisely the disease severity indices (DSIs) of each genotype; however, GABA and Gln differentiated susceptible genotypes (genotypes with weak resistance) from resistant genotypes (genotypes with resistance greater than a moderate level) before inoculation tests. The results suggested that breeders might exclude susceptible genotypes from breeding programs based on foliar metabolites profiled without inoculation tests, which require an enormous amount of time and effort. PMID:28134762

  5. Synchronized oviposition triggered by migratory flight intensifies larval outbreaks of beet webworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beet webworm (BWW), Loxostege sticticalis L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a migrant species surviving in the belt zone of 36-54 degrees N, is one of the most destructive insect pests of crops and fodder plants in northern China. Flight capacity, preoviposition period (POP), period of first oviposi...

  6. Experimental sugar beet cultivars evaluated for rhizomania resistance and storability in Idaho, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious sugar beet production problems. To identify sugar beet cultivars with resistance to BNYVV and evaluate storability, 32 commercial cultivars were screened by growing them in a sugar beet field infested with B...

  7. Commercial sugar beet cultivars evaluated for rhizomania resistance and storability in Idaho, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious sugar beet production problems. To identify sugar beet cultivars with resistance to BNYVV and evaluate storability, 33 commercial cultivars were screened by growing them in a sugar beet field infested with B...

  8. Commercial sugar beet cultivars evaluated for rhizomania resistance and storability in Idaho, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious sugar beet production problems. To identify sugar beet cultivars with resistance to BNYVV and evaluate storability, 28 commercial cultivars were screened by growing them in a sugar beet field infested with B...

  9. Experimental sugar beet cultivars evaluated for rhizomania resistance and storability in Idaho, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious sugar beet production problems. To identify sugar beet cultivars with resistance to BNYVV and evaluate storability, 24 experimental cultivars were screened by growing them in a sugar beet field infested with...

  10. Commercial sugar beet cultivars evaluated for rhizomania resistance and storability in Idaho, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious sugar beet production problems. To identify sugar beet cultivars with resistance to BNYVV and evaluate storability, 28 commercial cultivars were screened by growing them in a sugar beet field infested with B...

  11. Experimental sugar beet cultivars evaluated for rhizomania resistance and storability in Idaho, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious sugar beet production problems. To identify sugar beet cultivars with resistance to BNYVV and evaluate storability, 30 experimental cultivars were screened by growing them in a sugar beet field infested with...

  12. Occurrence, sequence polymorphism and population structure of Circulifer tenellus virus 1 in a field population of the beet leafhopper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential of Circulifer tenellus virus 1 (CiTV1) as a surrogate marker to determine population structure of the beet leafhopper (BLH; Circulifer tenellus [Baker]) was assessed. Prevalence, incidence, and nucleotide sequence polymorphism of CiTV1 present in BLH adults collected from the southern...

  13. Field Evaluation of a Kudzu/Cottonseed Oil Formulation on the Persistence of the Beet Armyworm Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plant extract (kudzu) was tested as a UV protectant for SeMNPV, with and without the addition of an oil/emulsifier (cottonseed oil/lecithin) formulation. Aqueous and oil emulsion formulations of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), nucleopolyhedrovirus SeMNPV were applied to collards an...

  14. Genetic profiling of noncultivated bacteria from the rhizospheres of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) reveal field and annual variability but no effect of a transgenic herbicide resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmalenberger, Achim; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2003-01-01

    In this field study, we compared the bacterial communities inhabiting the rhizosphere of a transgenic, herbicide-resistant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) cultivar with those of its nonengineered counterpart, using a genetic profiling technique based on PCR amplifications of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). As a control for the plasticity of the bacterial community, we also analyzed the influence of herbicides, the field heterogeneity, and the annual variation. DNA was isolated from bacterial cell consortia that were directly collected from root material. PCR was carried out with primers that hybridized to evolutionarily conserved regions flanking variable regions 4 and 5 of the 16S rRNA gene. SSCP patterns of these PCR products were composed of approximately 50 distinguishable bands, as detected by silver staining of the gels after electrophoresis. Patterns of the replicates and the different treatments were highly similar, but digital image and similarity analyses revealed differences that corresponded to the positions of the replicates in the field. In addition, communities collected from sugar beet in two successive growing seasons could be distinguished. In contrast, no effect of the transgenic herbicide resistance was detectable. Sequencing of 24 dominant products of the SSCP profiles indicated the presence of bacteria from different phylogenetic groups, with Proteobacteria and members of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group being most abundant.

  15. Analysis and field evaluation of volatile blend emitted by calling virgin females of beet armyworm moth,Spodoptera exigua (Hübner).

    PubMed

    Tumlinson, J H; Mitchell, E R; Yu, H S

    1990-12-01

    The volatile blend emitted by calling virgin beet armyworm females was collected and analyzed by capillary gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Five compounds were detected and identified in this blend: (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate, (Z)-9-tetradecen-l-ol, (Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate (Z,Z)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate, and (Z)-l 1-hexadecenyl acetate. They were emitted in a ratio of 47.9 ∶4.0∶40.2 ∶6.5 ∶ 1.7, respectively. This five-component blend and several other blends with one or more components deleted were formulated on rubber septa to release the components in about the same ratios as the females. Field tests of these formulations in bucket traps indicated that a blend of (Z)-9 tetradecen-1-ol, (Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate, and (Z)-l 1-hexadecenyl acetate was most effective for trapping beet armyworm males and that (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate actually decreased trap captures. Blends that did not contain both (Z)-9-tetradecen-l-ol and (Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate were ineffective as trap baits.

  16. Ft. Collins Sugar Beet Germplasm Evaluated for Resistance to Rhizomania and Storability in Idaho, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet germplasm and commercial check cultivars were evaluated in a sprinkler-irrigated sugar beet field near Kimberly, ID where sugar beet was grown in 2009. The field trial relied on natural inoculum for rhizomania development. The seed was treated with clothianidin (2.1 oz a.i. per 100,000 ...

  17. Frequency distribution of mineral elements in samples of alfalfa and sugar beet leaves obtained from a common field in Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Kinnear, J.

    1982-07-01

    Baseline measurements were made of mineral composition of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.) from one field each in the Imperial Valley of California. The fields are in a geothermal area being developed for energy production, and the purpose of the investigation was to ascertain variablility within a relatively large number of samples from a common area, so that subsequent samplings could be made to satisfactorily detect whether there were changes resulting from the geothermal activity. Means, standard deviations, frequency distribution, correlations, cluster trees, and other statistics were examined for over 20 elements at each site.Most elements were normally distributed, but there was three- to fourfold range in the concentration for each.

  18. Beet Rust and Seedling Rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beet rust, caused by Uromyces betae, can cause pustules on most beet types, and can be a problem in various beet growing areas. Seedling rust, caused by Puccinia subnitens can cause lesions on young beets, primarily on cotyledons, and does not cause economic damage. This chapter describes the dise...

  19. Analysis and Modeling of spatio-temporal Patterns of Carbon and Water Fluxes in Production Fields of Winter Wheat and Sugar Beet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupisch, M.; Langensiepen, M.; van Wijk, M.; Stadler, A.; Ewert, F.

    2011-12-01

    Gas exchange of CO2 and water vapour are important processes that determine crop growth and yield. Understanding their spatio-temporal variability at field level is necessary for accurate simulation of crop growth in fields with heterogeneous growing conditions and for parameterizing soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models. Accordingly, relationships between the spatio-temporal patterns of assimilation and transpiration rates and environmental (e.g. soil) heterogeneity are of specific interest. A particular challenge refers then to the appropriate method of up-scaling of these relationships from the leaf to the canopy and field level. Therefore, gas-exchange (CO2 and water vapour) was measured at different points in winter wheat and sugar beet fieldsboth at leaf and at canopy level in a nearly biweekly cycle during the growing seasons 2010 and 2011. The measurements comprised also C/N-content of leaf, leaf area index, soil water content and soil nitrogen content. The results revealed a strong spatial heterogeneity of carbon and water canopy fluxes across the fields. While canopy measurements had a temporal variability with distinct diurnal and seasonal patterns, the temporal (and spatial) variability of leaf level photosynthesisand transpirationwas comparably small.Further analysis suggests that the observed spatial and seasonal variability of canopy measurements was mainly caused by field heterogeneity in LAI and less by gas exchange rates per unit leaf area. However, both crops differed in their response to drought stress: while wheat responded mainly through irreversible reduction in green leaf area, the canopy assimilation rate of sugar beets decreases only temporarily with no observed effects in LAI. The obtained datasets from both years are the basis for parameterizing a crop growth model with canopy assimilation and transpiration components and for developing appropriate up-scaling methods from leaf to field. Our results indicate that it is

  20. Nuclear and cytoplasmic genetic diversity in weed beet and sugar beet accessions compared to wild relatives: new insights into the genetic relationships within the Beta vulgaris complex species.

    PubMed

    Fénart, Stéphane; Arnaud, Jean-François; De Cauwer, Isabelle; Cuguen, Joël

    2008-05-01

    Hybridization between cultivated species and their wild relatives is now widely considered to be common. In the Beta vulgaris complex, the sugar beet seed multiplication areas have been the scene of inadvertent pollination of sugar beet seed bearers by wild ruderal pollen donors, generating a weedy form of beet which infests sugar beet fields in European countries. Up to now, investigations of evolutionary dynamics of genetic diversity within the B. vulgaris complex were addressed using few genetical markers and few accessions. In this study, we tackled this issue using a panel of complementary markers: five nuclear microsatellite loci, four mitochondrial minisatellite loci and one chloroplastic PCR-RFLP marker. We sampled 1,640 individuals that illustrate the actual distribution of inland ruderal beets of South Western France, weed beets and wild sea beets of northern France as well as the diversity of 35 contemporary European diploid cultivars. Nuclear genetic diversity in weed beets appeared to be as high as those of ruderal beets and sea beets, whereas the narrowness of cultivar accessions was confirmed. This genetic bottleneck in cultivars is even more important in the cytoplasmic genome as only one haplotype was found among all sugar beet cultivars. The large majority of weed beet populations also presented this unique cytoplasmic haplotype, as expected owing to their maternal cultivated origin. Nonetheless, various cytoplasmic haplotypes were found within three populations of weed beets, implying wild-to-weed seed flows. Finally, our findings gave new insights into the genetical relationships between the components of the B. vulgaris complex: (1) we found a very strong genetic divergence between wild sea beet and other relatives, which was unexpected given the recent evolutionary history and the full cross-compatibility of all taxa and (2) we definitely confirmed that the classification into cultivated, wild, ruderal and weed forms according to their

  1. The genome of the recently domesticated crop plant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dohm, Juliane C; Minoche, André E; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Zakrzewski, Falk; Tafer, Hakim; Rupp, Oliver; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Stracke, Ralf; Reinhardt, Richard; Goesmann, Alexander; Kraft, Thomas; Schulz, Britta; Stadler, Peter F; Schmidt, Thomas; Gabaldón, Toni; Lehrach, Hans; Weisshaar, Bernd; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2014-01-23

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) is an important crop of temperate climates which provides nearly 30% of the world's annual sugar production and is a source for bioethanol and animal feed. The species belongs to the order of Caryophylalles, is diploid with 2n = 18 chromosomes, has an estimated genome size of 714-758 megabases and shares an ancient genome triplication with other eudicot plants. Leafy beets have been cultivated since Roman times, but sugar beet is one of the most recently domesticated crops. It arose in the late eighteenth century when lines accumulating sugar in the storage root were selected from crosses made with chard and fodder beet. Here we present a reference genome sequence for sugar beet as the first non-rosid, non-asterid eudicot genome, advancing comparative genomics and phylogenetic reconstructions. The genome sequence comprises 567 megabases, of which 85% could be assigned to chromosomes. The assembly covers a large proportion of the repetitive sequence content that was estimated to be 63%. We predicted 27,421 protein-coding genes supported by transcript data and annotated them on the basis of sequence homology. Phylogenetic analyses provided evidence for the separation of Caryophyllales before the split of asterids and rosids, and revealed lineage-specific gene family expansions and losses. We sequenced spinach (Spinacia oleracea), another Caryophyllales species, and validated features that separate this clade from rosids and asterids. Intraspecific genomic variation was analysed based on the genome sequences of sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima; progenitor of all beet crops) and four additional sugar beet accessions. We identified seven million variant positions in the reference genome, and also large regions of low variability, indicating artificial selection. The sugar beet genome sequence enables the identification of genes affecting agronomically relevant traits, supports molecular breeding and maximizes the plant

  2. Characterization of resistance mechanisms to powdery mildew (Erysiphe betae) in beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Prats, Elena; Emeran, Amero A; Rubiales, Diego

    2009-04-01

    Beet powdery mildew incited by Erysiphe betae is a serious foliar fungal disease of worldwide distribution causing losses of up to 30%. In the present work, we searched for resistance in a germplasm collection of 184 genotypes of Beta vulgaris including fodder (51 genotypes), garden (60 genotypes), leaf (51 genotypes), and sugar (22 genotypes) beet types. Resistant genotypes were identified in the four beet types under study. In addition, mechanisms underlying resistance were dissected through histological studies. These revealed different resistance mechanisms acting at different fungal developmental stages, i.e., penetration resistance, early and late cell death, or posthaustorial resistance. Most genotypes were able to hamper fungal development at several stages. The later are interesting for breeding aiming to resistance durability. Furthermore, characterization of defense mechanisms will be useful for further cellular and molecular studies to unravel the bases of resistance in this species.

  3. First evidence of a binucleate Rhizoctonia as the causal agent of dry rot canker of sugar beet in Nebraska, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is the primary source of domestic sucrose in the United States. In 2011, a sugar beet field in Morrill County NE was noted with wilting and yellowing symptoms suggestive of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot (RCRR), an important disease of sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia s...

  4. Diversity of beet curly top Iran virus isolated from different hosts in Iran.

    PubMed

    Gharouni Kardani, Sara; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Zakiaghl, Mohammad; Mehrvar, Mohsen; Kraberger, Simona; Varsani, Arvind

    2013-06-01

    Beet curly top Iran virus (BCTIV) is a major pathogen of sugar beet in Iran. In order to study diversity of BCTIV, we sampled 68 plants in Iran during the summer of 2010 with curly top disease symptoms on beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.), sea beets (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima), and sugar beets (Beta vulgaris). Plant samples showing leaf curling, yellowing, and/or swelling of veins on the lower leaf surfaces were collected from various fields in Khorasan Razavi, Northern Khorasan (north-eastern Iran), East Azarbayejan, West Azarbayejan (north-western Iran), and Fars (southern Iran) provinces. Using rolling circle amplification coupled with restriction digests, cloning, and Sanger sequencing, we determined the genomes of nine new BCTIV isolates from bean, cowpea, tomato, sea beet, and sugar beet in Iran. Our analysis reveals ~11 % diversity amongst BCTIV isolates and we detect evidence of recombination within these genomes.

  5. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Kagami, Hiroyo; Kurata, Masayuki; Matsuhira, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Kazunori; Mikami, Tetsuo; Tamagake, Hideto; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    Creating transgenic plants is invaluable for the genetic analysis of sugar beet and will be increasingly important as sugar beet genomic technologies progress. A protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of sugar beet is described in this chapter. Our protocol is optimized for a sugar beet genotype that performs exceptionally well in tissue culture, including the steps of dedifferentiation, callus proliferation, and regeneration. Because of the infrequent occurrence of such a genotype in sugar beet populations, our protocol includes an in vitro propagation method for germplasm preservation. The starting materials for transgenic experiments are aseptic shoots grown from surface-sterilized seed balls. Callus is induced from leaf explants and subsequently infected with Agrobacterium. Plantlets are regenerated from transgenic callus and vernalized for flowering, if necessary. The efficiency of transformation was quite high; in our laboratory, the culture of only ten leaf explants, on average, generated one transgenic plant.

  6. The effects of foliar fertilization with iron sulfate in chlorotic leaves are limited to the treated area. A study with peach trees (Prunus persica L. Batsch) grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) grown in hydroponics.

    PubMed

    El-Jendoubi, Hamdi; Vázquez, Saúl; Calatayud, Angeles; Vavpetič, Primož; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Pelicon, Primož; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Morales, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    Crop Fe deficiency is a worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of foliar Fe applications in two species grown in different environments: peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) trees grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv. "Orbis") grown in hydroponics. The distal half of Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves was treated with Fe sulfate by dipping and using a brush in peach trees and sugar beet plants, respectively. The re-greening of the distal (Fe-treated) and basal (untreated) leaf areas was monitored, and the nutrient and photosynthetic pigment composition of the two areas were also determined. Leaves were also studied using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, low temperature-scanning electron microscopy microanalysis, scanning transmission ion microscopy-particle induced X-ray emission and Perls Fe staining. The distal, Fe-treated leaf parts of both species showed a significant increase in Fe concentrations (across the whole leaf volume) and marked re-greening, with significant increases in the concentrations of all photosynthetic pigments, as well as decreases in de-epoxidation of xanthophyll cycle carotenoids and increases in photochemical efficiency. In the basal, untreated leaf parts, Fe concentrations increased slightly, but little re-greening occurred. No changes in the concentrations of other nutrients were found. Foliar Fe fertilization was effective in re-greening treated leaf areas both in peach trees and sugar beet plants. Results indicate that the effects of foliar Fe-sulfate fertilization in Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves were minor outside the leaf surface treated, indicating that Fe mobility within the leaf is a major constraint for full fertilizer effectiveness in crops where Fe-deficiency is established and leaf chlorosis occurs.

  7. The effects of foliar fertilization with iron sulfate in chlorotic leaves are limited to the treated area. A study with peach trees (Prunus persica L. Batsch) grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) grown in hydroponics

    PubMed Central

    El-Jendoubi, Hamdi; Vázquez, Saúl; Calatayud, Ángeles; Vavpetič, Primož; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Pelicon, Primož; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Morales, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    Crop Fe deficiency is a worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of foliar Fe applications in two species grown in different environments: peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) trees grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv. “Orbis”) grown in hydroponics. The distal half of Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves was treated with Fe sulfate by dipping and using a brush in peach trees and sugar beet plants, respectively. The re-greening of the distal (Fe-treated) and basal (untreated) leaf areas was monitored, and the nutrient and photosynthetic pigment composition of the two areas were also determined. Leaves were also studied using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, low temperature-scanning electron microscopy microanalysis, scanning transmission ion microscopy-particle induced X-ray emission and Perls Fe staining. The distal, Fe-treated leaf parts of both species showed a significant increase in Fe concentrations (across the whole leaf volume) and marked re-greening, with significant increases in the concentrations of all photosynthetic pigments, as well as decreases in de-epoxidation of xanthophyll cycle carotenoids and increases in photochemical efficiency. In the basal, untreated leaf parts, Fe concentrations increased slightly, but little re-greening occurred. No changes in the concentrations of other nutrients were found. Foliar Fe fertilization was effective in re-greening treated leaf areas both in peach trees and sugar beet plants. Results indicate that the effects of foliar Fe-sulfate fertilization in Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves were minor outside the leaf surface treated, indicating that Fe mobility within the leaf is a major constraint for full fertilizer effectiveness in crops where Fe-deficiency is established and leaf chlorosis occurs. PMID:24478782

  8. Preparation of fodder dicalcium phosphate from phosphorous-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Teplov, Y.A.; Dmitrevskii, B.A.; Maksimenko, N.F.; Olifson, A.L.; Yarosh, E.B.

    1985-02-01

    Fodder dicalcium phosphate is produced in chemical plants by neutralization of electrothermal phosphoric acid with chalk, or by high-temperature defluorination of a mixture of phosphate raw material with phosphoric acid. The deficiencies of the first technology include the scarcity and high cost of phosphoric acid, and the disadvantages of the second include the high expenditure of energy and low concentration of useful substance in the product. This paper reports on studies which demonstrate the possibility of preparing fodder dicalcium phosphate from different types of phosphate raw material which is not inferior in quality to the product produced from expensive and scarce electrothermal phosphoric acid.

  9. Ft. Collins sugar beet germplasm evaluated for rhizomania and storage rot resistance in Idaho, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania caused by the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) is a worldwide problem that can lead to loss of tonnage and lower percent sucrose in the field. BNYVV can also reduce the storability of roots. To identify germplasm with resistance to these problems, 50 sugar beet germplasm lines de...

  10. Length of efficacy for control of curly top in sugar beet with seed foliar insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top in sugar beet caused by Beet curly top virus (BCTV) is an important yield limiting disease that can be reduced via neonicotinoid and pyrethroid insecticides. However the length of efficacy of these insecticides is poorly understood, so a series of field experiments was conducted with the ...

  11. Rhizoctonia root rot resistance in commercial sugar beet cultivars in Twin Falls County, ID, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot continues to be a concerning problem in sugar beet production areas. To investigate resistance to this disease in 26 commercial sugar beet cultivars, field studies were conducted with three Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 IIIB strains. Based on means for the 26 cultivars, surface ro...

  12. Rhizoctonia root rot resistance in experimental sugar beet cultivars in Twin Falls County, ID, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot continues to be a concerning problem in sugar beet production areas. To investigate resistance to this disease in 26 experimental sugar beet cultivars, field studies were conducted with three Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 IIIB strains. Based on means for the 26 cultivars, surface ...

  13. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis in sugar beet: identification of SNP markers associated to Fusarium resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium spp. cause severe damage in many agricultural crops including sugar beet. Sugar beet needs to be protected from these soil borne pathogens to guarantee an optimal sugar yield in the field. The genetic control is the key to overcoming this disease. Identification of single nucleotide polymor...

  14. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  15. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  16. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  17. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  18. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  19. Effect of sugar beet root aphid, Pemphigus fuscicornis (Homoptera: Pemphigidae), on sugar beet yield and quality in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, M

    2007-10-01

    Pemphigus fuscicornis (Koch) is a pest of sugar beet root in warm and dry regions of Iran. This belongs to the Middle East and south east of Asia fauna. Nymphs establish colonies in root sutures and feed heavily which cause wilting and yellowing in beet near harvest. This study was conducted to determine infestation indices, damage occurrence and the necessity for control measures of this pest. Nymph colonies were monitored in different experimental fields that were planted with commonly used monogerm variety Afshari and then five infested places were selected. Damaged root specimens were sampled from five foci and ranked for infestation, yield and sugar concentration. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in weight, sugar concentration and impurities between indices 1, 2, 3 and none infested beets. Only the sugar concentration of indices 4 showed significant differences with zero infested beets. In the other hand, no specimens were found with the highest population density index (indices 5). Therefore, the sugar beet root aphid populations did not reach to the level of economic damage in these experimental fields. Thus, the control measures such as chemical application and use of resistant varieties may be used when the colonies density increases to the indices four and five throughout the foci in such fields.

  20. Registration of sugar beet doubled haploid line KDH13 with resistance to beet curly top

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    KDH13 is a sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp vulgaris) doubled haploid line (PI 663862) released as a genetic stock by USDA-ARS in cooperation with the Beet Sugar Development Foundation, Denver, CO. KDH13 is resistant to beet curly top (BCT) caused by Beet curly top virus which is transmitted by the ...

  1. Construction and characterization of a sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) fosmid library.

    PubMed

    Lange, Cornelia; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Schulz, Britta; Weisshaar, Bernd; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2008-11-01

    A sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) fosmid library from the doubled haploid accession KWS2320 encompassing 115 200 independent clones was constructed and characterized. The average insert size of the fosmid library was determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis to be 39 kbp on average, thus representing 5.9-fold coverage of the sugar beet genome (758 Mbp). PCR screening of plate pools with primer pairs against nine sugar beet genes supported the insert size estimation. BLAST searches with 2951 fosmid end-sequences originating from 1510 clones (1536 clones attempted) revealed little contamination with organellar DNA (2.1% chloroplast DNA, 0.3% mitochondrial DNA). The sugar beet fosmid library will be integrated in the presently ongoing efforts to determine the sequence of the sugar beet genome. Fosmids will be publicly available in the format of plate pools and individual clones.

  2. Precision fertilization of Wyoming sugar beets: A case study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field Studies were conducted on a farm in northwest Wyoming to compare variable-rate fertilization (VRF) with uniform-rate fertilization (URF) of sugar beets. Results from this study failed to show an economic advantage from VRF compared to URF, implying producers should be very cautious to adopt VR...

  3. Land application of sugar beet by-products: effects on nitrogen mineralization and crop yields.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kuldip; Rosen, Carl J; Gupta, Satish C; McNearney, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Land application of food processing wastes has become an acceptable practice because of the nutrient value of the wastes and potential cost savings in their disposal. Spoiled beets and pulp are among the main by-products generated by the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing industry. Farmers commonly land apply these by-products at rates >224 Mg ha(-1) on a fresh weight basis. However, information on nutrient release in soils treated with these by-products and their subsequent impacts on crop yield is lacking. Field studies were conducted to determine the effects of sugar beet by-product application on N release and crop yields over two growing seasons. Treatments in the first year were two rates (224 and 448 Mg ha(-1) fresh weight) of pulp and spoiled beets and a nonfertilized control. In the second year after by-product application, the control treatment was fertilized with N fertilizer and an additional treatment was added as a nonfertilized control in buffer areas. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was grown in the year of by-product application and sugar beet in the subsequent year. By-product treatments caused a significant reduction in wheat grain yield compared with the control. This was due to a decline in N availability as a result of immobilization. Based on microplots receiving 15N labeled beets, wheat took up <1% of spoiled beet-N (approximately 4.7 kg ha(-1)) during the year of by-product application. In the second cropping year, sugar beet root yields were significantly higher in the fertilized control and by-product treatments than the nonfertilized control. The lack of significant difference in sugar beet yield between the fertilized control and by-product treatments was likely due to the greater availability of N in the second year. Labeled 15N data also showed that the sugar beet crop recovered a 17% of sugar beet-N, an equivalent of 86 kg N ha(-1), during the second cropping year. There was no difference in sugar beet root yield, N uptake, or

  4. 21 CFR 172.585 - Sugar beet extract flavor base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sugar beet extract flavor base. 172.585 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.585 Sugar beet extract flavor base. Sugar beet...) Sugar beet extract flavor base is the concentrated residue of soluble sugar beet extractives from...

  5. 7 CFR 1435.304 - Beet and cane sugar allotments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Beet and cane sugar allotments. 1435.304 Section 1435... For Sugar § 1435.304 Beet and cane sugar allotments. (a) The allotment for beet sugar will be 54.35... overall allotment quantity. (c) A sugar beet processor allocated a share of the beet sugar allotment...

  6. 7 CFR 1435.304 - Beet and cane sugar allotments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Beet and cane sugar allotments. 1435.304 Section 1435... For Sugar § 1435.304 Beet and cane sugar allotments. (a) The allotment for beet sugar will be 54.35... overall allotment quantity. (c) A sugar beet processor allocated a share of the beet sugar allotment...

  7. 7 CFR 1435.304 - Beet and cane sugar allotments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Beet and cane sugar allotments. 1435.304 Section 1435... For Sugar § 1435.304 Beet and cane sugar allotments. (a) The allotment for beet sugar will be 54.35... overall allotment quantity. (c) A sugar beet processor allocated a share of the beet sugar allotment...

  8. 7 CFR 1435.304 - Beet and cane sugar allotments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Beet and cane sugar allotments. 1435.304 Section 1435... For Sugar § 1435.304 Beet and cane sugar allotments. (a) The allotment for beet sugar will be 54.35... overall allotment quantity. (c) A sugar beet processor allocated a share of the beet sugar allotment...

  9. 7 CFR 1435.304 - Beet and cane sugar allotments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Beet and cane sugar allotments. 1435.304 Section 1435... For Sugar § 1435.304 Beet and cane sugar allotments. (a) The allotment for beet sugar will be 54.35... overall allotment quantity. (c) A sugar beet processor allocated a share of the beet sugar allotment...

  10. 29 CFR 780.815 - Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses, sugarcane, or maple sap. 780.815 Section 780.815 Labor Regulations... Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup... Quantities § 780.815 Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets,...

  11. 29 CFR 780.815 - Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses, sugarcane, or maple sap. 780.815 Section 780.815 Labor Regulations... Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup... Quantities § 780.815 Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets,...

  12. 29 CFR 780.815 - Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses, sugarcane, or maple sap. 780.815 Section 780.815 Labor Regulations... Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup... Quantities § 780.815 Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets,...

  13. 29 CFR 780.815 - Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses, sugarcane, or maple sap. 780.815 Section 780.815 Labor Regulations... Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup... Quantities § 780.815 Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets,...

  14. 29 CFR 780.815 - Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sugar beets, sugar-beet molasses, sugarcane, or maple sap. 780.815 Section 780.815 Labor Regulations... Cotton and Processing of Sugar Beets, Sugar-Beet Molasses, Sugarcane, or Maple Sap into Sugar or Syrup... Quantities § 780.815 Basic conditions of exemption; second part, processing of sugar beets,...

  15. Identification of yeasts present in sour fermented foods and fodders.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, Wouter J

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with rapid methods for identification of 50 yeast species frequently isolated from foods and fodders that underwent a lactic acid fermentation. However, many yeast species present in olive brine, alpechin, and other olive products were not treated. The methods required for identification include light microscopy, physiological growth tests (ID32C system of BioMérieux), assimilation of nitrate and of ethylamine as sole nitrogen sources, vitamin requirement, and maximum growth temperature. An identification key to treated yeast species is provided. In another table characteristics of all yeast species treated are listed.

  16. Plastid transformation in sugar beet: Beta vulgaris.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast biotechnology has assumed great importance in the past 20 years and, thanks to the numerous advantages as compared to conventional transgenic technologies, has been applied in an increasing number of plant species but still very much limited. Hence, it is of utmost importance to extend the range of species in which plastid transformation can be applied. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is an important industrial crop of the temperate zone in which chloroplast DNA is not transmitted trough pollen. Transformation of the sugar beet genome is performed in several research laboratories; conversely sugar beet plastome genetic transformation is far away from being considered a routine technique. We describe here a method to obtain transplastomic sugar beet plants trough biolistic transformation. The availability of sugar beet transplastomic plants should avoid the risk of gene flow between these cultivated genetic modified sugar beet plants and the wild-type plants or relative wild species.

  17. OMICS Technologies and Applications in Sugar Beet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongxue; Nan, Jingdong; Yu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet is a species of the Chenopodiaceae family. It is an important sugar crop that supplies approximately 35% of the sugar in the world. Sugar beet M14 line is a unique germplasm that contains genetic materials from Beta vulgaris L. and Beta corolliflora Zoss. And exhibits tolerance to salt stress. In this review, we have summarized OMICS technologies and applications in sugar beet including M14 for identification of novel genes, proteins related to biotic and abiotic stresses, apomixes and metabolites related to energy and food. An OMICS overview for the discovery of novel genes, proteins and metabolites in sugar beet has helped us understand the complex mechanisms underlying many processes such as apomixes, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. The knowledge gained is valuable for improving the tolerance of sugar beet and other crops to biotic and abiotic stresses as well as for enhancing the yield of sugar beet for energy and food production. PMID:27446130

  18. Beet curly top resistance in USDA-ARS Kimberly sugar beet germplasm, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top caused by Beet curly top virus is a widespread disease problem vectored by the beet leafhopper in semiarid sugar beet production areas. Host resistance is the primary defense against this problem, but resistance in commercial cultivars is only low to intermediate. In order to identify no...

  19. Beet curly top resistance in USDA-ARS Kimberly sugar beet germplasm lines, 2016

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top caused by Beet curly top virus is a widespread disease problem vectored by the beet leafhopper in semiarid sugar beet production areas. Host resistance is the primary defense against this problem, but resistance in commercial cultivars is only low to intermediate. In order to identify no...

  20. Beet curly top virus strains associated with sugar beet in Idaho, Oregon, and a survey collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top of sugar beet is a serious yield limiting disease in semi-arid production areas caused by Beet curly top virus (BCTV) and vectored by the beet leafhopper. The primary means of control for BCTV is host resistance, but effectiveness of resistance can vary with BCTV strain. BCTV variation w...

  1. Cs-137 concentration in reindeer and its fodder plants.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, K; Rahola, T

    1989-09-01

    Radionuclides, especially the long-lived 137Cs (physical half-life 30 years), are accumulated efficiently in the northern, subarctic, lichen-reindeer-man foodchain. Until the Chernobyl accident the fallout nuclides studied originated from nuclear weapons tests. After this accident some fresh fallout was deposited in Finnish Lapland. Lichens grow very slowly and collect nutrients very efficiently from air, rain and snow. During winter the basic fodder plants for reindeer are lichens and some winter-green plants, shrubs and dry leaves. During the bare-ground season, the reindeer eat various grasses, herbs and leaves etc. Lichens constitute 30-50 per cent of the entire vegetable mass consumed by the reindeer in a year. The highest 137Cs-concentration 2500 Bq/kg dry weight was found in lichen in the middle of the 1960s. In 1985 the concentration had decreased to about 240 Bq/kg dry weight. After the Chernobyl accident the 137Cs-concentration in lichen varied from 200 to 2000 Bq/kg dry weight in Finnish Lapland. In reindeer fodder plant samples collected in the 1980s before the Chernobyl accident the 137Cs-concentration varied from 5 to 970 Bq/kg dry weight. The highest 137Cs-concentration in reindeer meat, about 2500 Bq/kg fresh weight, was found in 1965 and thereafter decreased to about 300 Bq/kg fresh weight in the winter before the Chernobyl accident. After the accident the mean 137Cs-concentration in reindeer meat from the 1986-87 slaughtering period was 720 Bq/kg fresh weight and in 1987-88, 630 Bq/kg fresh weight.

  2. Variability in Phoma species affecting sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phoma betae can cause damage to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) at multiple growth stages. It has historically been an important seedling disease, but this is largely managed by ensuring clean seed for planting. The pathogen also can cause a root rot, a leaf spot, and rotting of beets during storage. In ...

  3. Postharvest Rhizopus rot on sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus species have been reported as a minor post-harvest rot on sugar beet, particularly under temperatures above 5 deg C. In 2010, Rhizopus was isolated from beets collected from Michigan storage piles in February at a low frequency. However, recent evidence from Michigan has found a high incide...

  4. Feasibility of converting a sugar beet plant to fuel ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Hammaker, G S; Pfost, H B; David, M L; Marino, M L

    1981-04-01

    This study was performed to assess the feasibility of producing fuel ethanol from sugar beets. Sugar beets are a major agricultural crop in the area and the beet sugar industry is a major employer. There have been some indications that increasing competition from imported sugar and fructose sugar produced from corn may lead to lower average sugar prices than have prevailed in the past. Fuel ethanol might provide an attractive alternative market for beets and ethanol production would continue to provide an industrial base for labor. Ethanol production from beets would utilize much of the same field and plant equipment as is now used for sugar. It is logical to examine the modification of an existing sugar plant from producing sugar to ethanol. The decision was made to use Great Western Sugar Company's plant at Mitchell as the example plant. This plant was selected primarily on the basis of its independence from other plants and the availability of relatively nearby beet acreage. The potential feedstocks assessed included sugar beets, corn, hybrid beets, and potatoes. Markets were assessed for ethanol and fermentation by-products saleability. Investment and operating costs were determined for each prospective plant. Plants were evaluated using a discounted cash flow technique to obtain data on full production costs. Environmental, health, safety, and socio-economic aspects of potential facilities were examined. Three consulting engineering firms and 3 engineering-construction firms are considered capable of providing the desired turn-key engineering design and construction services. It was concluded that the project is technically feasible. (DMC)

  5. 21 CFR 172.585 - Sugar beet extract flavor base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sugar beet extract flavor base. 172.585 Section... Related Substances § 172.585 Sugar beet extract flavor base. Sugar beet extract flavor base may be safely used in food in accordance with the provisions of this section. (a) Sugar beet extract flavor base...

  6. Microbiological counts during beet sugar extraction.

    PubMed

    Robles-Gancedo, S; López-Díaz, T M; Otero, A

    2009-06-01

    In order to discover the main microbial populations present throughout the process of beet sugar extraction and to identify the steps where possible control measures could be implemented, four Spanish beet sugar extraction factories were investigated. Eighteen stages were sampled at each factory and analyzed for several microbial groups and physicochemical parameters. Beets, cossettes, and diffusion juices were the most contaminated samples during beet sugar extraction, and mesophiles, thermophiles, and yeasts were the most numerous microbiota. Differences in contamination among factories and among stages of the sugar extraction process were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Beets and cossettes showed high numbers of mesophiles and lactic acid bacteria, with gum-forming bacteria and yeasts being at levels of >6 log CFU/g. Diffusion juices were highly contaminated with aerobic mesophiles, lactic acid bacteria, and thermophiles. Beet-washing water, equipment, and air were also important sources of contamination; in contrast, diffusion water showed moderate levels of microorganisms due to the acid treatment performed. Gum-forming bacteria, which are present at high levels from the first step of the extraction, survive the diffusion process and remain in the diffusion juice, where they may produce "gums" responsible for obstruction of filters. Thermophiles were present, although at levels lower than expected in most samples. Other microbial groups, particularly yeasts, may also contribute to the destruction of sugar. No biocides were used during the beet sugar extraction in the factories investigated.

  7. Long distance pollen-mediated gene flow at a landscape level: the weed beet as a case study.

    PubMed

    Fénart, Stéphane; Austerlitz, Frédéric; Cuguen, Joël; Arnaud, Jean-François

    2007-09-01

    Gene flow is a crucial parameter that can affect the organization of genetic diversity in plant species. It has important implications in terms of conservation of genetic resources and of gene exchanges between crop to wild relatives and within crop species complex. In the Beta vulgaris complex, hybridization between crop and wild beets in seed production areas is well documented and the role of the ensuing hybrids, weed beets, as bridges towards wild forms in sugar beet production areas have been shown. Indeed, in contrast to cultivated beets that are bi-annual, weed beets can bolt, flower and reproduce in the same crop season. Nonetheless, the extent of pollen gene dispersal through weedy lineages remains unknown. In this study, the focus is directed towards weed-to-weed gene flow, and we report the results of a pollen-dispersal analysis within an agricultural landscape composed of five sugar beet fields with different levels of infestation by weed beets. Our results, based on paternity analysis of 3240 progenies from 135 maternal plants using 10 microsatellite loci, clearly demonstrate that even if weedy plants are mostly pollinated by individuals from the same field, some mating events occur between weed beets situated several kilometres apart (up to 9.6 km), with rates of interfield-detected paternities ranging from 11.3% to 17.5%. Moreover, we show that pollen flow appears to be more restricted when individuals are aggregated as most mating events occurred only for short-distance classes. The best-fit dispersal curves were fat-tailed geometric functions for populations exhibiting low densities of weed beets and thin-tailed Weibull function for fields with weed beet high densities. Thus, weed beet populations characterized by low density with geographically isolated individuals may be difficult to detect but are likely to act as pollen traps for pollen emitted by close and remote fields. Hence, it appears evident that interfield pollen-mediated gene flow

  8. Organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticide residues in fodder and milk samples along Musi river belt, India

    PubMed Central

    Kotinagu, Korrapati; Krishnaiah, Nelapati

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to find the organochlorine pesticide (OCP) and organophosphorus pesticide (OPP) residues in fodder and milk samples along Musi river belt, India. Materials and Methods: Fodder and milk samples collected from the six zones of Musi river belt, Hyderabad India were analyzed by gas chromatography with electron capture detector for OCP residues and pulsated flame photometric detector for the presence of OPP residues. Results: The gas chromatographic analysis of fodder samples of Zone 5 of Musi river showed the residues of dicofol at concentration of 0.07±0.0007 (0.071-0.077). Among organophosphorus compounds, dimetheoate was present in milk samples collected from Zone 6 at a level of 0.13±0.006 (0.111-0.167). The residues of OCPs, OPPs and cyclodies were below the detection limit in the remaining fodder and milk samples collected from Musi river belt in the present study. Conclusion: The results indicate that the pesticide residues in fodder and milk samples were well below the maximum residue level (MRL) values, whereas dicofol in fodder and dimethoate in milk were slightly above the MRL values specified by EU and CODEX. PMID:27047132

  9. Remote sensing of canopy dynamics and biochemical variables estimation of fodder crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Suchit K.; Das, S. K.; Rai, A. K.

    2010-04-01

    Non-destructive monitoring and diagnosis of plant nitrogen (N) concentration status is necessary for precision in N management. Leaf -N and chlorophyll (Chl) concentration of fodder crops are important indicators of plant N status. Studies were conducted to determine the relationship between canopy hyperspectral reflectance (325 to 1075 nm) and Chl or N concentration in field grown fodder crops [bajra (Pennisetum typhoides, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) in Kharif season and oat (Avena sativa) in Rabi season] without and with recommended dose of nitrogen of different crops. Nitrogen fertilizer application mainly affected leaf reflectance at 575 and 623 nm in sorghum, 565 and 657 nm in bajra and 563 and 716 nm in oat. The reflectance ratio at R581/R397 (R2=0.46**) and R619/R462 nm (R2=0.79***) had the highest correlation with sorghum and bajra leaf N concentration respectively with greatest R2 values. However in oat single reflectance at R542 (R2=0.53**) had the highest correlation with leaf N concentration. Similarly, sorghum, bajra and oat leaf Chl concentration were highly correlated with R677/R527 (R2=0.63**), R688/R409 (R2=0.71***) and R695 (R2=0.56** ), respectively. A linear relationship was found between sorghum leaf N and a simple ratio at R581/R397 (Intercept=8.85, slope=-2.64, R2=0.44). Bajra leaf N concentration was associated closely with ratio of R619/ R462, (R2= 0.78***). Oat leaf N concentration could be best estimate through single reflectance at R695 (Slope=-0.48, Intercept=0.15; R2=0.56). Similarly sorghum, bajra and oat leaf Chl could be best-estimated using reflectance ratio of R677/R527, R615/R411 and R695, respectively. Thus our results suggest that spectral reflectance measurements hold promise for the assessment of some physiological parameter at the leaf level real time monitoring of sorghum and bajra N status and N fertilizer management.

  10. Role of bioinoculants and organic fertilizers in fodder production and quality of leguminous tree species.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Seema; Sharma, Satyawati; Vasudevan, Padma

    2011-01-01

    The comparative effect of dual inoculation of native N fixer (Rhizobium) and AM fungi consortia with different organic fertilizers (vermicompost and farm yard manure) on fodder production and quality of two leguminous tree species (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam) de. Wit. and Sesbania sesban (L.) Merr.) in silvopastoral system and their impact on the fodder production of un-inoculated Panicum maximum Jacq. under cut and carry system. After three years of plantation maximum tree survival was in L. leucocephala in all the treatments in comparison to S. sesban while fodder production was more in S. sesban for initial two years and in third year it accelerated in L. leucocephala. Dual inoculation with vermicompost significantly improved fodder production, fodder quality and rhizosphere microflora in L. leucocephala but in S. sesban dual inoculation was at par with single inoculation of N fixer, AM fungi and control (without inoculation). The grass production was higher with L. leucocephala for two years while in third year it was more with S. sesban. The association of Rhizobium with AM fungi in L. leucocephala was better than in S. sesban.

  11. Selenium Supplementation Affects Physiological and Biochemical Processes to Improve Fodder Yield and Quality of Maize (Zea mays L.) under Water Deficit Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Fahim; Naeem, Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad Y.; Tahir, Muhammad N.; Zulfiqar, Bilal; Salahuddin, Muhammad; Shabbir, Rana N.; Aslam, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is one of the most complex challenges that pose serious threats to livelihoods of poor people who rely heavily on agriculture and livestock particularly in climate-sensitive developing countries of the world. The negative effects of water scarcity, due to climate change, are not limited to productivity food crops but have far-reaching consequences on livestock feed production systems. Selenium (Se) is considered essential for animal health and has also been reported to counteract various abiotic stresses in plants, however, understanding of Se regulated mechanisms for improving nutritional status of fodder crops remains elusive. We report the effects of exogenous selenium supply on physiological and biochemical processes that may influence green fodder yield and quality of maize (Zea mays L.) under drought stress conditions. The plants were grown in lysimeter tanks under natural conditions and were subjected to normal (100% field capacity) and water stress (60% field capacity) conditions. Foliar spray of Se was carried out before the start of tasseling stage (65 days after sowing) and was repeated after 1 week, whereas, water spray was used as a control. Drought stress markedly reduced the water status, pigments and green fodder yield and resulted in low forage quality in water stressed maize plants. Nevertheless, exogenous Se application at 40 mg L-1 resulted in less negative leaf water potential (41%) and enhanced relative water contents (30%), total chlorophyll (53%), carotenoid contents (60%), accumulation of total free amino acids (40%) and activities of superoxide dismutase (53%), catalase (30%), peroxidase (27%), and ascorbate peroxidase (27%) with respect to control under water deficit conditions. Consequently, Se regulated processes improved fodder yield (15%) and increased crude protein (47%), fiber (10%), nitrogen free extract (10%) and Se content (36%) but did not affect crude ash content in water stressed maize plants. We propose that Se

  12. Selenium Supplementation Affects Physiological and Biochemical Processes to Improve Fodder Yield and Quality of Maize (Zea mays L.) under Water Deficit Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Fahim; Naeem, Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad Y; Tahir, Muhammad N; Zulfiqar, Bilal; Salahuddin, Muhammad; Shabbir, Rana N; Aslam, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is one of the most complex challenges that pose serious threats to livelihoods of poor people who rely heavily on agriculture and livestock particularly in climate-sensitive developing countries of the world. The negative effects of water scarcity, due to climate change, are not limited to productivity food crops but have far-reaching consequences on livestock feed production systems. Selenium (Se) is considered essential for animal health and has also been reported to counteract various abiotic stresses in plants, however, understanding of Se regulated mechanisms for improving nutritional status of fodder crops remains elusive. We report the effects of exogenous selenium supply on physiological and biochemical processes that may influence green fodder yield and quality of maize (Zea mays L.) under drought stress conditions. The plants were grown in lysimeter tanks under natural conditions and were subjected to normal (100% field capacity) and water stress (60% field capacity) conditions. Foliar spray of Se was carried out before the start of tasseling stage (65 days after sowing) and was repeated after 1 week, whereas, water spray was used as a control. Drought stress markedly reduced the water status, pigments and green fodder yield and resulted in low forage quality in water stressed maize plants. Nevertheless, exogenous Se application at 40 mg L(-1) resulted in less negative leaf water potential (41%) and enhanced relative water contents (30%), total chlorophyll (53%), carotenoid contents (60%), accumulation of total free amino acids (40%) and activities of superoxide dismutase (53%), catalase (30%), peroxidase (27%), and ascorbate peroxidase (27%) with respect to control under water deficit conditions. Consequently, Se regulated processes improved fodder yield (15%) and increased crude protein (47%), fiber (10%), nitrogen free extract (10%) and Se content (36%) but did not affect crude ash content in water stressed maize plants. We propose that

  13. Utilization of pectin extracted sugar beet pulp for composite application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) is the residue left after beet sugar extraction. SBP contains ~25% pectin and is an important source for pectin. However, sugar beet pectin does not have good gel-forming properties and complete extraction of pectin is not typically performed due to the low quality of the galac...

  14. Management of severe curly top in sugar beet with insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top caused by Curtovirus species is a widespread disease problem vectored by the beet leafhopper in semiarid sugar beet production areas. The insecticide seed treatment Poncho Beta has proven to be effective in controlling curly top in sugar beet, but was only evaluated under light to moderat...

  15. 21 CFR 172.585 - Sugar beet extract flavor base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sugar beet extract flavor base. 172.585 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.585 Sugar beet extract flavor base. Sugar beet extract flavor base may be safely used in food in accordance with the provisions of...

  16. 21 CFR 172.585 - Sugar beet extract flavor base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sugar beet extract flavor base. 172.585 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.585 Sugar beet extract flavor base. Sugar beet extract flavor base may be safely used in food in accordance with the provisions of...

  17. 21 CFR 172.585 - Sugar beet extract flavor base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sugar beet extract flavor base. 172.585 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.585 Sugar beet extract flavor base. Sugar beet extract flavor base may be safely used in food in accordance with the provisions of...

  18. Energy beets: an undiscovered crop for the Southeastern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy beets (Beta vulgaris), which are sugar beets grown for non-food sources, are a potential winter cash crop for growers in the southeastern U.S. that are planted in the autumn and harvested in the spring, complementing current summer crop rotations. The end-product from energy beets will be in...

  19. Fusarium stalk blight and rot in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium stalk blight of sugar beet can cause reductions or complete loss of seed production. The causal agent is Fusarium oxysporum. In addition, Fusarium solani has been demonstrated to cause a rot of sugar beet seed stalk, and other species have been reported associated with sugar beet fruit, but...

  20. Genetic transformation of the sugar beet plastome.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Wang, Yongxin; Stevanato, Piergiorgio; Arcioni, Sergio; Bellucci, Michele

    2009-02-01

    It is very important for the application of chloroplast engineering to extend the range of species in which this technology can be achieved. Here, we describe the development of a chloroplast transformation system for the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris, Sugar Beet Group) by biolistic bombardment of leaf petioles. Homoplasmic plastid-transformed plants of breeding line Z025 were obtained. Transformation was achieved using a vector that targets genes to the rrn16/rps12 intergenic region of the sugar beet plastome, employing the aadA gene as a selectable marker against spectinomycin and the gfp gene for visual screening of plastid transformants. gfp gene transcription and protein expression were shown in transplastomic plants. Detection of GFP in Comassie blue-stained gels suggested high GFP levels. Microscopy revealed GFP fluorescence within the chloroplasts. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering the sugar beet chloroplast genome; this technology provides new opportunities for the genetic improvement of this crop and for social acceptance of genetically modified sugar beet plants.

  1. Production of ethyl alcohol from sugar beets

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.H.; Doney, D.L.; Orien, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    Various methods of processing sugar beets prior to fermentation of EtOH were compared. Water slurries of whole beets, expressed juice, and industrially produced diffusion juice were fermented readily by Saccharomyces cerevisiae without the addition of nutrient supplements. Yields of alcohol in both the slurries and juices were 43-47%. Heating the slurries or juices to boiling for 1 min often increased the yield of alcohol and the vigor of the fermentation; however, some yields of greater than 46% were obtained in unheated expressed juice. Difficulty in processing slurries of homogenized or ground whole beets, together with the restriction on the concentration of sugar in the slurry imposed by dilution with water, would probably favor some method of separating the beet tissues from the juice prior to fermentation in an industrial process. Alcohol yields of 4 cultivars varying in sugar content ranged from 38.4 to 46.0% of sugar and 18.0 to 26.1 gallon of alcohol per ton of fresh beets.

  2. First report of the stubby root nematode Paratrichodorus allius on sugar beet in Minnesota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stubby root nematodes (Paratrichodorus and Trichodorus) are migratory ectoparasites that feed on roots, transmit tobraviruses, and cause significant crop loss. In June 2015, three soil samples from a sugar beet field near Felton (Clay County), MN were submitted to the Nematology Laboratory at North ...

  3. Modeling sugar content of farmer-managed sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured or estimated leaf and root physical and chemical traits of spatio-temporally heterogeneous field-grown sugar beet throughout its ontogeny during three growing seasons. The objective was to quantify the impact of temporal changes in these traits on root sugar content [S(R); g 100g**-1 roo...

  4. A Colletotrichum sp. causing root rot in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fall of 2014 sugar beets were observed in a field in Washington State with shallow, dark, firm lesions on the surface. When examined under magnification, minute black “dots” were observed on the surface of the lesions. Isolations were made from the lesions and a Colletotrichum species was consist...

  5. Experimental Sugar Beet Cultivars Evaluated for Resistance Bacterial Root Rot in Idaho, 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial root rot of sugar beet caused by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum is a disease problem recently described in the United States. To ameliorate the impact of bacterial root rot on sucrose loss in the field, storage piles, and factories, a study was conducted to identify resistan...

  6. Project 722: Seedling diseases of sugar beet – diversity and host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In five years of testing, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium spp. were commonly isolated from infected field-isolated diseased sugar beet seedlings. Which fungus is more commonly isolated from seedlings has varied over the seasons. For example, R. solani was the most frequently isolated pathogen in 201...

  7. Sodium Absorption by Intact Sugar Beet Plants

    PubMed Central

    El-Sheikh, Adel M; Ulrich, Albert

    1971-01-01

    Sodium absorption by intact sugar beet plants (Beta vulgaris) was found to be mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms when uptake was studied over a wide range of Na and K concentrations. The first mechanism operates at low Na concentrations (<1 milliequivalent per liter); presence of K completely blocks this mechanism for Na. The second mechanism operates at high Na concentrations (>1 milliequivalent per liter), transporting Na as well as K; but apparently this mechanism is not active for Na absorption in young sugar beet plants up to the 10-leaf stage. PMID:16657872

  8. [Yeast irrigation enhances the nutritional content in hydroponic green maize fodder].

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Torres, Martha H; Palacios Espinosa, Alejandro; Palacios, Oskar A; Choix, Francisco J; Ascencio Valle, Felipe de Jesús; López Aguilar, David R; Espinoza Villavicencio, José Luis; de Luna de la Peña, Rafael; Guillen Trujillo, Ariel; Avila Serrano, Narciso Y; Ortega Pérez, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of irrigation with yeasts (Debaryomyces hansenii var. Fabry, Yarowia lipolytica YIBCS002, Yarowia lipolytica var. BCS and Candida pseudointermedia) on the final nutritional content of hydroponic green maize fodder (Zea Zea mays L.), applied at different fodder growth stages (1. seed-seedling stage, 2. seedling-plant 20cm, 3. during all the culture). Irrespective of the fodder growth stages at which they were applied, all yeasts tested enhanced the content of raw protein, lipids, ash, moisture and energy. The percentage of electrolytes (Na, K, Cl, sulphates, Ca and Mg) showed different responses depending on the kind of yeast applied; D. hansenii exhibited the highest increment in all electrolytes, except for phosphorous. We conclude that the addition of yeasts belonging to the genera Debaryomyces, Candida and Yarowia to the irrigation solution of hydroponic systems enhances the nutrient content of green fodder. This kind of irrigation can be applied to generate high commercial value cultures in limited spaces.

  9. Probiotic preparation reduces the faecal water genotoxicity in chickens fed with aflatoxin B1 contaminated fodder.

    PubMed

    Slizewska, Katarzyna; Nowak, Adriana; Libudzisz, Zdzislawa; Blasiak, Janusz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of a probiotic preparation on the genotoxicity of faecal water of broiler chickens fed with a fodder contaminated with aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) at 1 or 5mg per kg. Human blood lymphocytes were exposed to chicken's faecal water samples and DNA damage was measured using the comet assay. Genotoxicity of faecal water did not depend on the AFB(1) concentration in the fodder. The mean DNA damage, measured as the percentage of DNA in the tail of the comets, for chickens fed with fodder with AFB(1) at 1 mg/kg was 16.80±0.66, at 5 mg/kg - 16.73±1.51 and in the controls - 12.79±0.66. The supplementation of fodder with the probiotic preparation decreased the extent of DNA damage to 10.02±0.39 for 1 mg/kg AFB(1) and to 11.89±0.72 for 5 mg/kg.

  10. Molecular and Morpho-Physiological Characterization of Sea, Ruderal and Cultivated Beets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta vulgaris genetic resources are essential for broadening genetic base of sugar beet and developing cultivars adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Wild beets (sea beets, B. vulgaris spp. maritima and their naturalized introgressions with cultivated beets known as ruderal beets) harbor su...

  11. 75 FR 29969 - Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... deregulate sugar beet event H7-1 (referred to in the lawsuit as Roundup Ready sugar beet), pursuant to the... include continued regulation of Roundup Ready sugar beets, deregulating Roundup Ready sugar beets, deregulating Roundup Ready sugar beets in part with geographic restrictions, or deregulating Roundup...

  12. Land application of sugar beet by-products: effects on runoff and percolating water quality.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kuldip; Rosen, Carl J; Gupta, Satish C; McNearney, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Water quality concerns, including greater potential for nutrient transport to surface waters resulting in eutrophication and nutrient leaching to ground water, exist when agricultural or food processing industry wastes and by-products are land applied. Plot- and field-scale studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of sugar beet by-products on NO3-N and P losses and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in runoff and NO3-N concentrations in percolating waters. In the runoff plot study, treatments in the first year included two rates (224 and 448 Mg ha(-1) fresh weight) of pulp and spoiled beets and a nonfertilized control. In the second year, no by-products were applied on the treated plots, the control treatment was fertilized with N fertilizer, and an additional treatment was added as a nonfertilized control in buffer areas. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was grown in the year of by-product application and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in the following year. In the percolation field study, the treatments were the control, pulp (224 Mg ha(-)(1)), and spoiled beets (224 Mg ha(-1)). Results from the runoff plot showed that both by-products caused immobilization of soil inorganic N and thus reduced NO3-N losses in runoff and soil waters during the first growing season. There was some risk of NO3-N exceeding the drinking water limit of 10 mg L(-1), especially between the period of wheat harvest and soil freezing in fall when pulp was applied at 448 Mg ha(-1). The field-scale study showed that by-product application at 224 Mg ha(-1) did not result in increased ground water NO3-N concentrations. Application of spoiled beets at both rates caused significantly higher BODs in runoff in the first year of application. The concentrations of total and soluble reactive P (SRP) were also higher from both rates of spoiled beet application and from the higher application rate of pulp during the 2-yr study period. These high BODs and total P and SRP concentrations in runoff waters

  13. Extraction and characterization of sugar beet polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar Beet Pulp (SBP), contains 65 to 80% (dry weight) of potentially valuable polysaccharides. We separated SBP into three fractions. The first fraction, extracted under acid conditions, was labeled pectin, the second was comprised of two sub fractions solubilized under alkaline conditions and wa...

  14. Rhizoctonia seedling disease on sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia seedling damping-off can cause losses in sugar beet as well as providing inoculum for later root rot. The disease is caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The pathogen has several subgroups, anastomosis groups (AG), of which AG-4 has historically been associated with damping-off, while AG-2-2 is...

  15. Beta maritima: the Origin of Beets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Along the undisturbed shores, especially of the Mediterranean Sea and the European North Atlantic Ocean, is a widespread plant called Beta maritima (Beta vulgaris subspecies maritima) by the botanists, or more commonly sea beet. Nothing for the inexperienced observer's eye distinguishes it from surr...

  16. Forest biomass flow for fuel wood, fodder and timber security among tribal communities of Jharkhand.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Quli, S M S; Rai, R; Ali, Angrej; Gangoo, S A

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated extraction and consumption pattern of fuel wood, fodder and timber and forest biomass flow for fuel wood, fodder and timber security among tribal communities in Bundu block of Ranchi district in Jharkhand (India). The study is based on personal interviews of the selected respondents through structured interview schedule, personal observations and participatory rural appraisal tools i.e. key informant interviews and focus group discussions carried out in the sample villages, using multi-stage random sampling technique. The study revealed that the total extraction of fuel wood from different sources in villages was 2978.40 tons annum(-1), at the rate of 0.68 tons per capita annum(-1), which was mostly consumed in cooking followed by cottage industries, heating, community functions and others. The average fodder requirement per household was around 47.77 kg day(-1) with a total requirement of 14227.34 tons annum(-1). The average timber requirement per household was computed to be 0.346 m3 annum(-1) accounting for a total timber demand of 282.49 m3 annum(-1), which is mostly utilized in housing, followed by agricultural implements, rural furniture, carts and carriages, fencing, cattle shed/ store house and others. Forest biomass is the major source of fuel wood, fodder and timber for the primitive societies of the area contributing 1533.28 tons annum(-1) (51.48%) of the total fuel wood requirement, 6971.55 tons annum(-1) (49.00%) of the total fodder requirement and 136.36 m3 annum(-1) (48.27%) of the total timber requirement. The forest biomass is exposed to enormous pressure for securing the needs by the aboriginal people, posing great threat to biodiversity and environment of the region. Therefore, forest biomass conservation through intervention of alternative avenues is imperative to keep pace with the current development and future challenges in the area.

  17. Improved fodder tree management in the agroforestry systems of central and western Nepal

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    Ten, three year old, fodder tree species were evaluated at four on-station and three on-farm sites in Nepal. Ficus semicordata (Buchattam. ex Sm.) growth was found to be significantly higher than the rest in diameter and dry foliage weight values. Species were significantly different in height, diameter, and foliage and wood growth. Sites were significantly different in total height growth only. On-farm species evaluation indicated that A. lakoocha and F. semicordata had significantly higher growth. Allometric regression equations were developed to predict foliage, total wood, and total biomass yield of F. semicordata, and B. variegata. Individual-tree models were developed. For B. variegata, diameter at 50 cm. and for F. semicordata, crown diameter and height gave the best fitted equations. Regression equations for three sites did not differ significantly. Therefore, data were pooled and a common model was estimated for each species. In on-farm regression models, height and crown diameter were the best predictors for F. semicordata and dbh gave the best fit for B. variegata. The models for the two species were used to construct regional fodder and fuelwood biomass tables. An improved crop-livestock-fodder agroforestry system was designed for a village in Nepal. Linear programming was used to demonstrate the use of a tool to optimize land allocation maximizing net returns while satisfying the supply of minimum needs of food, fodder, and fuelwood. The optimal solution indicated that, by improving the returns to labor and by applying more compost, the village should be able to increase the annual net farm returns from NRs. 2.94 million to NRs. 3.85 million. The food, fodder and fuelwood production levels were shown to increase by 17%, 130%, and 537% respectively. The labor and compost requirements were up by 138% and 59% respectively, over the five year period. The soil loss through run-off was estimated to decrease by about 15% over the same period.

  18. Yield of glyphosate-resistant sugar beets and efficiency of weed management systems with glyphosate and conventional herbicides under German and Polish crop production.

    PubMed

    Nichterlein, Henrike; Matzk, Anja; Kordas, Leszek; Kraus, Josef; Stibbe, Carsten

    2013-08-01

    In sugar beet production, weed control is one of the most important and most expensive practices to ensure yield. Since glyphosate-resistant sugar beets are not yet approved for cultivation in the EU, little commercial experience exists with these sugar beets in Europe. Experimental field trials were conducted at five environments (Germany, Poland, 2010, 2011) to compare the effects of glyphosate with the effects of conventional weed control programs on the development of weeds, weed control efficiency and yield. The results show that the glyphosate weed control programs compared to the conventional methods decreased not only the number of herbicide applications but equally in magnitude decreased the dosage of active ingredients. The results also showed effective weed control with glyphosate when the weed covering was greater and sugar beets had a later growth stage of four true leaves. Glyphosate-resistant sugar beets applied with the glyphosate herbicide two or three times had an increase in white sugar yield from 4 to 18 % in comparison to the high dosage conventional herbicide systems. In summary, under glyphosate management sugar beets can positively contribute to the increasingly demanding requirements regarding efficient sugar beet cultivation and to the demands by society and politics to reduce the use of chemical plant protection products in the environment.

  19. Proteome analysis of sugar beet leaves under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Hajheidari, Mohsen; Abdollahian-Noghabi, Mohammad; Askari, Hossein; Heidari, Manzar; Sadeghian, Seyed Y; Ober, Eric S; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2005-03-01

    Drought is one of the major factors limiting the yield of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The identification of candidate genes for marker-assisted selection (MAS) could greatly improve the efficiency of breeding for increased drought tolerance. Drought-induced changes in the proteome could highlight important genes. Two genotypes of sugar beet (7112 and 7219-P.69) differing in genetic background were cultivated in the field. A line-source sprinkler irrigation system was used to apply irrigated and water deficit treatments beginning at the four-leaf stage. At 157 days after sowing, leaf samples were collected from well-watered and drought-stressed plants for protein extraction and to measure shoot biomass and leaf relative water content. Changes induced in leaf proteins were studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and quantitatively analyzed using image analysis software. Out of more than 500 protein spots reproducibly detected and analyzed, 79 spots showed significant changes under drought. Some proteins showed genotype-specific patterns of up- or downregulation in response to drought. Twenty protein spots were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), leading to identification of Rubisco and 11 other proteins involved in redox regulation, oxidative stress, signal transduction, and chaperone activities. Some of these proteins could contribute a physiological advantage under drought, making them potential targets for MAS.

  20. Metamitron-resistant Chenopodium album from sugar beet: cross-resistance profile.

    PubMed

    Mechant, E; Bulcke, R

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, in several of the Belgian sugar beet growing regions, farmers have been confronted with unsatisfactory control of fat hen (Chenopodium album L.). Greenhouse bioassays conducted on reference C. album populations and on "suspected" populations from sugar beet fields where poor fat hen control had been observed, revealed that all "suspected" populations were resistant to metamitron, a key herbicide in the modern low rate weed control programs in sugar beet. These metamitron-resistant biotypes were all cross-resistant to atrazine. Since cross-resistance, particularly negative cross-resistance or reversed resistance, is known to play a major role in resistance management, other herbicides used in sugar beet and/or in rotational crops were tested to determine the cross-resistance profile of metamitron-resistant biotypes. Greenhouse bioassays were conducted using herbicides from different chemical families representing different modes of action. Cross-resistance was found for metribuzin, lenacil and chloridazon, all HRAC Group C1 herbicides that inhibit photosynthesis at PS II. The metamitron-resistant C. album populations examined showed negative cross-resistance to S-metolachlor (HRAC Group K3: inhibition of cell division), prosuifocarb (Group N: lipid synthesis, not AC-Case, inhibition), aclonifen and clomazone (both Group F3: inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis).

  1. Leuconostoc spp. Associated with Root Rot in Sugar Beet and Their Interaction with Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Strausbaugh, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is an important disease problem in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and also shown to be associated with Leuconostoc spp. Initial Leuconostoc studies were conducted with only a few isolates and the relationship of Leuconostoc with R. solani is poorly understood; therefore, a more thorough investigation was conducted. In total, 203 Leuconostoc isolates were collected from recently harvested sugar beet roots in southern Idaho and southeastern Oregon during 2010 and 2012: 88 and 85% Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 6 and 15% L. pseudomesenteroides, 2 and 0% L. kimchi, and 4 and 0% unrecognized Leuconostoc spp., respectively. Based on 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, haplotype 11 (L. mesenteroides isolates) comprised 68 to 70% of the isolates in both years. In pathogenicity field studies with commercial sugar beet 'B-7', all Leuconostoc isolates caused more rot (P < 0.0001; α = 0.05) when combined with R. solani than when inoculated alone in both years. Also, 46 of the 52 combination treatments over the 2 years had significantly more rot (P < 0.0001; α = 0.05) than the fungal check. The data support the conclusion that a synergistic interaction leads to more rot when both Leuconostoc spp. and R. solani are present in sugar beet roots.

  2. The origin and evolution of weed beets: consequences for the breeding and release of herbicide-resistant transgenic sugar beets.

    PubMed

    Boudry, P; Mörchen, M; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Vernet, P; Van Dijk, H

    1993-12-01

    Populations of weed beets have expanded into European sugar beet production areas since the 1970s, thereby forming a serious new weed problem for this crop. We sampled seeds in different French populations and studied mitochondrial DNA, chloroplast DNA and life-cycle variability. Given the maternal inheritance of the mitochondrial and chloroplastic genomes and the nuclear determinism of the annual habit, we were able to determine the maternal origin and evolution of these weed beet populations. Our study shows that they carry the dominant allele "B" for annual habit at high frequency. The main cytoplasmic DNA type found in northern weed beet populations is the cytoplasmic male-sterile type characteristic of sugar beets. We were able to determine that these populations arise from seeds originating from the accidental pollinations of cultivated beets by adventitious beets in the seed production area, which have been transported to the regions where sugar beets are cultivated. These seeds are supposedly the origin of the weed forms and a frequently disturbed cultivated environment has selected for annual habit and early flowering genotypes. We discuss the consequences of the weed beet populations for the breeding, seed production and release of herbicide-resistant transgenic sugar beets.

  3. Transcript profiles uncover temporal and stress-induced changes of metabolic pathways in germinating sugar beet seeds

    PubMed Central

    Pestsova, Elena; Meinhard, Juliane; Menze, Andreas; Fischer, Uwe; Windhövel, Andrea; Westhoff, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background With a cultivation area of 1.75 Mio ha and sugar yield of 16.7 Mio tons in 2006, sugar beet is a crop of great economic importance in Europe. The productivity of sugar beet is determined significantly by seed vigour and field emergence potential; however, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these traits. Both traits exhibit large variations within sugar beet germplasm that have been difficult to ascribe to either environmental or genetic causes. Among potential targets for trait improvement, an enhancement of stress tolerance is considered because of the high negative influence of environmental stresses on trait parameters. Extending our knowledge of genetic and molecular determinants of sugar beet germination, stress response and adaptation mechanisms would facilitate the detection of new targets for breeding crop with an enhanced field emergence potential. Results To gain insight into the sugar beet germination we initiated an analysis of gene expression in a well emerging sugar beet hybrid showing high germination potential under various environmental conditions. A total of 2,784 ESTs representing 2,251 'unigenes' was generated from dry mature and germinating seeds. Analysis of the temporal expression of these genes during germination under non-stress conditions uncovered drastic transcriptional changes accompanying a shift from quiescent to metabolically active stages of the plant life cycle. Assay of germination under stressful conditions revealed 157 genes showing significantly different expression patterns in response to stress. As deduced from transcriptome data, stress adaptation mechanisms included an alteration in reserve mobilization pathways, an accumulation of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine, late embryogenesis abundant proteins and detoxification enzymes. The observed transcriptional changes are supposed to be regulated by ABA-dependent signal transduction pathway. Conclusion This study provides an important step

  4. Discrimination of genetically modified sugar beets based on terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Li, Zhi; Yin, Xianhua; Hu, Fangrong; Hu, Cong

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this paper was to apply terahertz (THz) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics techniques for discrimination of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM sugar beets. In this paper, the THz spectra of 84 sugar beet samples (36 GM sugar beets and 48 non-GM ones) were obtained by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1.2 THz. Three chemometrics methods, principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis (DA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS), were employed to classify sugar beet samples into two groups: genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The DPLS method yielded the best classification result, and the percentages of successful classification for GM and non-GM sugar beets were both 100%. Results of the present study demonstrate the usefulness of THz spectroscopy together with chemometrics methods as a powerful tool to distinguish GM and non-GM sugar beets.

  5. Discrimination of genetically modified sugar beets based on terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Li, Zhi; Yin, Xianhua; Hu, Fangrong; Hu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to apply terahertz (THz) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics techniques for discrimination of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM sugar beets. In this paper, the THz spectra of 84 sugar beet samples (36 GM sugar beets and 48 non-GM ones) were obtained by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1.2 THz. Three chemometrics methods, principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis (DA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS), were employed to classify sugar beet samples into two groups: genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The DPLS method yielded the best classification result, and the percentages of successful classification for GM and non-GM sugar beets were both 100%. Results of the present study demonstrate the usefulness of THz spectroscopy together with chemometrics methods as a powerful tool to distinguish GM and non-GM sugar beets.

  6. Developments in beet and cane sugar extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, C.; Schwartzberg, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the various types of extractors used in the extraction of sugar from beet and sugar cane. The types of extractors described are as follows:- Countercurrent Screw - Conveyor Extractors, (Tower Extractors, Slope Extractors), Countercurrent Drag Chain Extractors, Multistage Cross-Flow Extractors, Trommel Extractors, Multistage Scroll Extractors, Diffustion Batteries. Reduced capital costs and power expenditures and slightly higher cane sugar yields can be obtained by combined milking and diffusion extraction as opposed to multi-stage milling. The mechanical reliability of the machinery is emphasized and special attention is given to extraction procedures. Nowadays the trend in beet and cane sugar extraction is toward the use of larger and larger units which helps minimize labor and capital costs per unit of product.

  7. Improving the properties of fodder potato protein concentrate by enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Miedzianka, J; Pęksa, A; Pokora, M; Rytel, E; Tajner-Czopek, A; Kita, A

    2014-09-15

    Protein hydrolysates of profitable properties were prepared from the fodder potato protein concentrate. The hydrolysis process was performed with the use of commercial available enzyme (Alcalase) over a 2 and 4 h incubation period. Chemical and amino acid composition as well as functional properties of resultant hydrolysates were determined. A 2 h long process occurred profitable to obtain preparations of well balanced amino acid composition as well as proved functional properties. The industrial preparation, modified within proteolytic enzyme, totally soluble (average 98%), was characterised by fivefold higher oil holding capacity (average 5.4 cm(3)/g) and much better foam capacity (more than 150%) as compared to the material underwent modification (13.00%, 2.1 cm(3)/g and 5.33%, respectively). Presented results suggested potential use of fodder potato protein not destined directly for food purposes as the suitable product for preparations characterised by high nutritive value and functional properties.

  8. Direct fermentation of fodder maize, chicory fructans and perennial ryegrass to hydrogen using mixed microflora.

    PubMed

    Kyazze, G; Dinsdale, R; Hawkes, F R; Guwy, A J; Premier, G C; Donnison, I S

    2008-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility of producing hydrogen by direct fermentation of fodder maize, chicory fructooligosaccharides and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in batch culture (pH 5.2-5.3, 35 degrees C, heat-treated anaerobically digested sludge inoculum). Gas was produced from each substrate and contained up to 50-80% hydrogen during the peak periods of gas production with the remainder carbon dioxide. Hydrogen yields obtained were 62.4+/-6.1mL/g dry matter added for fodder maize, 218+/-28mL/g chicory fructooligosaccharides added, 75.6+/-8.8mL H(2)/g dry matter added for wilted perennial ryegrass and 21.8+/-8mL H(2)/g dry matter added for fresh perennial ryegrass. Butyrate, acetate and ethanol were the main soluble fermentation products. Hydrogen yields of 392-501m(3)/hectare of perennial ryegrass per year and 1060-1309m(3)/hectare of fodder maize per year can be obtained based on the UK annual yield per hectare of these crops. These results significantly extend the range of substrates that can be used for hydrogen production without pre-treatment.

  9. Sugar beet ( L.) growth reduction caused by hydrochar is related to nitrogen supply.

    PubMed

    Gajić, Ana; Koch, Heinz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization allows rapid conversion of biomass into a carbon-rich, lignite-like product (hydrochar). It is assumed to have beneficial effects on soil properties and plant growth, but detailed studies are lacking, especially in the field. The objective of our study was to investigate the effect of hydrochar incorporated into arable soils on soil mineral nitrogen (N) content and sugar beet growth. In 2010-2011, a field and a pot trial were conducted. Hydrochars (field: 10 Mg ha; pot: equivalent to 30 Mg ha) processed from sugar beet pulp (HSP) and beer draff (HBD) were tested against an untreated control. As a second factor, mineral nitrogen (N) fertilizer level (field: 0, 50, 100, 150 kg N ha; pot: 0, 100, 200 mg N kg soil) was varied. In both trials, hydrochars reduced initial sugar beet growth, especially when hydrochar with a high C/N ratio (38, HSP) was combined with a low N fertilizer level; high N supply partly compensated for the reduced seedling growth. Without N fertilization, no extractable N was present at the end of the pot trial in the HSP treatment, whereas in HBD even more N was extracted than in the control. This suggests remineralization of previously immobilized N when hydrochar with a low C/N ratio was applied (16, HBD). In the field, beet yield was equal at the high N fertilizer level in HSP and at all N levels in HBD treatment. Our results suggest that hydrochar can decrease plant-available N due to N immobilization. Other potential causes for the observed early growth reduction need to be studied more in detail.

  10. Effect of seed stimulation on germination and sugar beet yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prośba-Białczyk, U.; Szajsner, H.; Grzyś, E.; Demczuk, A.; Sacała, E.; Bąk, K.

    2013-03-01

    Germination and sugar beet yield after seed stimulation were investigated. The seeds came from the energ'hill technology and were subject to laser irradiation. The experiments were conducted in the laboratory and field conditions. Lengthening of germinal roots and hypocotyls was observed. A positive effect of the stimulation on the morphological features was observed for the Eh seeds and laser irradiation applied in a three-fold dose. The energ'hill seeds exhibited a significantly higher content of carotenoids in seedlings and an increase in the content of chlorophylls. Laser light irradiation favourably modified the ratio of chlorophyll a to b. The leaves and roots of plants developed from the energ'hill and irradiated seeds were characterized by higher dry matter content thanin non-stimulated seeds. Seed stimulation had a positive influence on yielding and the saccharose content.

  11. Endosperm: food for humankind and fodder for scientific discoveries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Berger, Frédéric

    2012-07-01

    The endosperm is an essential constituent of seeds in flowering plants. It originates from a fertilization event parallel to the fertilization that gives rise to the embryo. The endosperm nurtures embryo development and, in some species including cereals, stores the seed reserves and represents a major source of food for humankind. Endosperm biology is characterized by specific features, including idiosyncratic cellular controls of cell division and epigenetic controls associated with parental genomic imprinting. This review attempts a comprehensive summary of our current knowledge of endosperm development and highlights recent advances in this field.

  12. Analyzing the genomes of wild and cultivated beets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet is an important crop plant that accounts for roughly 25% of the world's sugar production per year. We have previously shown that sugar beet has a quite narrow genetic base, presumably due to a domestication bottleneck. To increase the crop ´s stress tolerance, the introduction of desirabl...

  13. Root rot in sugar beet piles at harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet root rots are not only a concern because of reduced yields, but can also be associated with losses in storage. Our primary sugar beet root rot disease problem in the Amalgamated production area is Rhizoctonia root rot. However, this rot frequently only penetrates a short distance past t...

  14. Enzymatic degradation studies of pectin and cellulose from red beets.

    PubMed

    Dongowski, G

    2001-10-01

    The influence of structural features of the cell wall polysaccharides pectin and cellulose on the enzymatic degradation of red beet was evaluated. Alcohol-insoluble substances and acetone-insoluble residues were prepared from red beets and characterized with respect to the content of dietary fibre, pectin fractions, neutral saccharide composition and water absorption. The high-methylated and high-acetylated pectin component was partly soluble in water and in EDTA. Pectin was hardly extractable from alcohol-insoluble substances as well as from red beets. Isolated pectin could not be completely degraded by pectolytic enzymes. After de-acetylation, the pectic acid from red beets was degradable in a similar rate like citrus pectic acid. From alcohol-insoluble substances, several cellulose and lignin fractions were prepared and analysed. A cellulose preparation from red beets was intensely degraded by cellulases with high activities as shown by the release of reducing end-groups, viscosity and scanning electron microscopy. Cell wall preparations from red beets were able to bind high amounts of water. A decrease in water absorption during enzymatic action or changes in viscosity and flow behaviour are sensitive markers for decomposition or depolymerization processes. Furthermore, an inhibitor of microbial enzymes was isolated from red beets and acetone-insoluble residues. The main reason for the poor enzymatic liquefaction or maceration of red beets by pectolytic and cellulolytic enzymes is the high degree of acetylation of the pectin component.

  15. Rhizoctonia seedling damping-off in sugar beet in Michigan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important seedling pathogen of sugar beet, causing damping-off following seedling emergence. Anastomosis group (AG)-4 has been the primary seedling pathogen reported on sugar beet, however, recent screening has found high incidence of infection by AG-2-2. Isolations of R. so...

  16. Fusarium Wilt and Yellows of Sugar Beet and Dry Bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Central High Plains (Colorado, Nebraska and Wyoming) is among the largest producer of dry edible beans and sugar beets in the United States. Sugar beet is an important cash crop in northeastern Colorado with approximately 30,000 acres planted and 944,000 tons harvested in 2012. Approximately 250...

  17. Initial assessment of energy beets in the Southeast Coastal Plain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy beets as a non-food biofuel feedstock can help the U.S. achieve its renewable fuel goals, but with current emphasis on cellulosic feedstocks, there has been minimal research and development effort for energy beets in commercial bioconversion operations. Research was initiated to examine and ...

  18. Biosynthetic origin of geosmin in red beets (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lu, Guiping; Edwards, Charles G; Fellman, John K; Mattinson, D Scott; Navazio, John

    2003-02-12

    Geosmin provides the characteristic but sometimes undesirable "earthy" flavor to red table beets. To date, it is not known whether geosmin is a byproduct of beet metabolism or synthesized by soil-borne microorganisms and taken up by the beets during maturation. Analysis of mature beet roots revealed that peels contained 6 times the amount of geosmin compared to the bodies and cores. Sterilized beet seeds were aseptically grown in a basal medium prior to analysis for the presence of geosmin. Using a headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSPME) method, the relative recovery of geosmin from beet seedling extracts was 72.0 +/- 4.2% with (-)-menthone as the internal standard. The presence of geosmin in aseptically grown beet seedlings was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using authentic geosmin as the standard. During aseptic growth, the concentration of geosmin in seedlings remained constant for up to 5 months but increased at 6 months. Geosmin added to the growth medium was not absorbed by the seedlings. These studies support the conclusion that red beets are capable of endogenous synthesis of geosmin.

  19. [Molecular genetic investigation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)].

    PubMed

    Butorina, A K; Kornienko, A V

    2011-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are reviewed as a basis for the development of genomics of this species. The methods used to study structural and functional genomics are considered. The results and their application to increase the efficiency of sugar beet breeding are discussed.

  20. The origin of metamitron resistant Chenopodium album populations in sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Aper, J; De Riek, J; De Cauwer, B; Bulcke, R; Reheul, D

    2012-01-01

    Chenopodium album L. is a major weed in spring-planted crops in the temperate regions of the world. Since 2000, farmers have reported an unsatisfactory control of this weed in sugar beet fields in Belgium, France and The Netherlands. Frequently, the surviving C. album plants are resistant to metamitron, a key herbicide in this crop. Metamitron resistance in C. album is caused by a Ser264 to Gly mutation in the psbA gene on the chloroplast genome, which prevents binding of metamitron to its target site. This mutation causes also resistance to other herbicides with a similar mode of action, like metribuzin -applied in potato- and atrazine in particular. Atrazine has been applied very frequently in maize in the 1970s and the 1980s, but is now banned in Europe due to environmental reasons. The persistent use of atrazine in maize confronted Belgian and other European farmers in the early 1980s with atrazine resistant C. album with the same Ser264 to Gly mutation. The problems with atrazine resistant C. album disappeared when other herbicides were applied in maize. Unfortunately, this is not the case for metamitron resistant C. album in sugar beet, because no replacement herbicide is readily available. The history of atrazine use in maize brought up a question concerning the origin of the current metamitron resistant C. album populations. Have these populations been selected locally by regular use of metamitron in sugar beet or did the selection occur earlier by atrazine use when maize was grown in the same fields? This would have serious implications regarding the reversibility of herbicide resistance. Therefore, soil samples were collected on 16 fields with different histories: five fields with an organic management over 25 years, two fields with a history of atrazine resistant C. album, five fields with metamitron resistant C. album in sugar beet and four fields which were under permanent grassland for 10 years, preceded by a regular rotation in which sugar beet was a

  1. Identification of unknown sterile fungi as Rhizoctonia zeae and potential for biological control for fungal root diseases of sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several soilborne diseases routinely damage sugar beet in production areas of the Central High Plains, and it is becoming more common to find fields infested simultaneously with multiple pathogens. Due to a shortage of available fungicides for effective management of multiple diseases, alternative ...

  2. Evaluation of Rhizoctonia zeae as a potential biological control option for fungal root diseases of sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several common root diseases routinely damage sugar beet in Nebraska and other production areas of the Central High Plains, and it is becoming more common to find fields infested simultaneously with multiple pathogens. Due to the lack of available chemicals for economic management of soilborne dise...

  3. Glyphosate and fungicide effects on Cercospora leaf spot in four glyphosate-resistant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for improved management of Cercospora leaf spot [CLS (Cercospora beticola)] using the herbicide glyphosate in glyphosate-resistant sugar beet varieties was investigated. Controlled field experiments were conducted in 2008 and 2009 to determine if glyphosate and glyphosate-fungicide co...

  4. First report of strobilurin resistance in Cercospora beticola in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) in Michigan and Nebraska, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) caused by Cercospora beticola Sacc. is the most important foliar disease of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) worldwide. CLS is controlled mainly with fungicides, including strobilurins (FRAC group 11). Resistance to strobilurins in C. beticola has not been reported in the field ...

  5. The role of sugar beet pulp polysaccharides in the sustainability of the sugar beet industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet pulp was sequentially extracted with a microwave heating source under pressure to produce pectin, alkaline soluble polysaccharides and cellulose, which was converted into carboxymethyl-cellulose. The solution physical-chemical properties of these polysaccharides were compared to those obt...

  6. Influence of harvest timing, fungicides, and Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus on sugar beet storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rots in sugar beet storage can lead to million dollar losses because of reduced sucrose recovery. Thus, studies were conducted to establish better chemical control options and a better understanding of the fungi involved in the rot complex. A water check and three fungicides (Mertect, Propuls...

  7. Study of the production of ethanol from sugar beets for use as a motor fuel. Final report, February 1, 1980-April 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, H W

    1981-04-27

    This study was performed to assess the feasibility of producing fuel ethanol from sugar beets. Sugar beets are a major agricultural crop in the area and the beet sugar industry is a major employer. There have been some indications that increasing competition from imported sugar and fructose sugar produced from corn may lead to lower average sugar prices than have prevailed in the past. Fuel ethanol might provide an attractive alternative market for beets and ethanol production would continue to provide an industrial base for labor. Ethanol production from beets would utilize much of the same field and plant equipment as is now used for sugar. It is logical to examine the modification of an existing sugar plant from producing sugar to ethanol. The decision was made to use Great Western Sugar Company's plant at Mitchell as the example plant. This plant was selected primarily on the basis of its independence from other plants and the availability of relatively nearby beet acreage. The potential feedstocks assessed included sugar beets, corn, hybrid beets, and potatoes. Markets were assessed for ethanol and fermentation by-products saleability. Investment and operating costs were determined for each prospective plant. Plants were evaluated using a discounted cash flow technique to obtain data on full production costs. Environmental, health, safety, and socio-economic aspects of potential facilities were examined. Three consulting engineering firms and 3 engineering-construction firms are considered capable of providing the desired turn-key engineering design and construction services. It was concluded that the project is technically feasible. (DMC)

  8. Beta vulgaris L. serine proteinase inhibitor gene expression correlates to insect pest resistance in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyzing genes that can be used for improving sugar beet resistance to the sugar beet root maggot (SBRM, Tetanops myopaeformis Roder), one of the most destructive insect pests of sugar beet in North America, was a major goal in our investigation. We report on the expression patterns of a sugar beet...

  9. Control of curly top in sugar beet with seed and foliar insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top in sugar beet is a serious widespread problem that is caused by Beet curly top virus and other closely species and vectored by the beet leafhopper. In order to find a means of reducing curly top in sugar beet, 15 combinations of insecticide seed (Poncho, Poncho Beta, and Poncho Votivo) an...

  10. Kimberly sugar beet germplasm evaluated for rhizomania and storage rot resistance in Idaho, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) and storage losses are serious sugar beet production problems. To identify sugar beet germplasm lines with resistance to BNYVV and storage rots, 11germplasm lines from the USDA-ARS Kimberly sugar beet program were screened. The lines wer...

  11. Milled industrial beet color kinetics and total soluble solid contents by image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Industrial beets are an emerging feedstock for biofuel and bioproducts industry in the US. Milling of industrial beets is the primary step in front end processing (FEP) for ethanol production. Milled beets undergo multiple pressings with water addition during raw beet juice extraction, and extracted...

  12. In vitro evaluation of different varieties of maize fodder for their methane generation potential and digestibility with goat rumen liquor

    PubMed Central

    Vaswani, Shalini; Kumar, Ravindra; Kumar, Vinod; Roy, Debashis; Kumar, Muneendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the methane generation potential and digestibility of different (normal and three high-quality protein maize [HQPM]) varieties of maize fodder with goat rumen liquor in vitro. Materials and Methods: Methane production potential and digestibility of different varieties of maize fodder were tested in in vitro gas production test. Seven varieties of maize, four normal (HTHM 5101, DHM 117, HM 5, and Shaktiman/900 M Gold), and three high-quality protein (HQPM 5, HQPM 7, and HQPM 9/Vivek) were grown in different plots under the same environmental and agro-climatic conditions. Fodders were harvested at 45-50 days of sowing, and the representative samples of fodder from different varieties of maize were collected for analysis. Dried and grinded form of these maize fodder varieties was tested for gas, methane, and digestibility using goat rumen microflora in in vitro gas syringes. Results: Gas production (ml/g dry matter [DM]) was highest for HM5 variety (97.66, whereas lowest for HQPM 9 variety (64.22). Gas production (ml/g degraded DM [DDM]) and methane (%) were statistically similar in different varieties of maize fodder. The methane production expressed as ml/g DM and ml/g DDM was significantly (p<0.05) highest for HM 5 (14.22 and 26.62) and lowest for DHM 117 variety (7.47 and 14.13). The in vitro DM digestibility (%) and in vitro organic matter digestibility (%) varied from 47.48 (HQPM 5) to 52.05 (HQPM 9) and 50.03 (HQPM 7) to 54.22 (HM 5), respectively. Conclusion: The present study concluded that DHM 117 maize variety fodder has lowest methane generation potential and incorporating it in the dietary regime of ruminants may contribute to lower methane production. PMID:27956770

  13. Impact of presowing laser irradiation of seeds on sugar beet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacała, E.; Demczuk, A.; Grzyś, E.; Prośba-Białczyk, U.; Szajsner, H.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the experiment was to establish the influence of biostimulation on the sugar beet seeds. The seeds came from the specialized breeding program energ'hill or were irradiated by the laser in two doses. The impact of the biostimulation was analyzed by determining the nitrate reductase activity and the nitrate, chlorophyll and carotenoids contents in leaves, as well as, the dry matter and sugar concentration in mature roots. The field experiment was established for two sugar beet cultivars. Biostimulation by irradiation and a special seed breeding program energ'hill had a positive influence on some examined parameters (particularly on nitrate reductase activity in Ruveta and in numerous cases on photosynthetic pigments in both cultivars). Regarding the dry matter accumulation and sugar concentration this impact was more favourable for Tiziana than for Ruveta cultivar.

  14. Assessment of change in soil water content properties irrigated with industrial sugar beet wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Sayyed Hassan; Najafi, Payam; Amini, Hussein

    2007-05-15

    In this research the effect of industrial sugar beet wastewater has been assessed on the soil water content properties in summer 2005. The evaluated parameters were the soil water content points such as Saturation Percent (SP), Field Capacity (FC), Permanent Wilting Point (PWP), gravitational water and Total Available Water (TAW). The pilot design was fully randomized with three replications and three treatments. The three treatments were: 1-normal water, 2-industrial sugar beet wastewater (50%) and normal water (50%) and 3-sugar beet wastewater (100%). The experiments have been carried out in the field, in 21 columns with the diameter 110 mm and the height of 400 mm. The soil was irrigated using surface irrigation method for 12 events with a constant volume and period. Based on the result, the SP, FC and PWP initial value were 46.5, 35 and 15%, respectively for all the treatments. At the end of the period, the values changed to 47, 36.6 and 17.5% for T2. They are also increased significantly to 48.5, 37 and 18.7% for T3 at the end of the period. The increasing of soil Organic Matter (OM) during the period is expected to be the main factor for this change. The result shows that although the FC and PWP parameters are increased during the period but TAW decreased significantly from the 20 to 18.5%. The other effects of wastewater on soil and leached water quality should be evaluated too.

  15. [Rapid determination of beet sugar content using near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Ren, Jian; Zheng, Xi-Qun; Zhao, Li-Ying; Li, Mao-Mao

    2014-10-01

    In order to classify and set different prices on basis of difference of beet sugar content in the acquisition process and promote the development of beet sugar industry healthily, a fast, nondestructive, accurate method to detect sugar content of beet was determined by applying near infrared spectroscopy technology. Eight hundred twenty samples from 28 representative varieties of beet were collected as calibration set and 70 samples were chosen as prediction set. Then near infrared spectra of calibration set samples were collected by scanning, effective information was extracted from NIR spectroscopy, and the original spectroscopy data was optimized by data preprocessing methods appropriately. Then partial least square(PLS)regression was used to establish beet sugar quantitative prediction mathematical model. The performances of the models were evaluated by the root mean square of cross-validation (RMSECV), the coefficient of determination (R2) of the calibration model and the standard error of prediction (SEP), and the predicted results of these models were compared. Results show that the established mathematical model by using first derivative (FD) and standard normal variate transformation (SNV) coupled with partial least squares has good predictive ability. The R2 of calibration models of sugar content of beet is 0.908 3, and the RMSECV is 0.376 7. Using this model to forecast the prediction set including 70 samples, the correlation coefficient is 0.921 4 between predicted values and measured values, and the standard error of prediction (SEP) is 0.439, without significant difference (p > 0.05) between predicted values and measured values. These results demonstrated that NIRS can take advantage of simple, rapid, nondestructive and environmental detection method and could be applied to predict beet sugar content. This model owned high accuracy and can meet the precision need of determination of beet sugar content. This detection method could be used to classify

  16. Monitoring gene flow from transgenic sugar beet using cytoplasmic male-sterile bait plants.

    PubMed

    Saeglitz, C; Pohl, M; Bartsch, D

    2000-12-01

    One of the most discussed environmental effects associated with the use of transgenic plants is the flow of genes to plants in the environment. The flow of genes may occur through pollen since it is the reproductive system that is designed for gene movement. Pollen-mediated gene escape is hard to control in mating plants. Pollen from a wind pollinator can move over distances of more than 1000 m. To investigate the efficiency of transgenic pollen movement under realistic environmental conditions, the use of bait plants might be an effective tool. In this study, cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) sugar beets were tested with regard to their potential for monitoring transgene flow. As the pollen source, transgenic sugar beets were used that express recombinant DNA encoding viral (beet necrotic yellow vein virus) resistance, and antibiotic (kanamycin) and herbicide (glufosinate) tolerance genes. In a field trial, the effectiveness of a hemp (Cannabis sativa) stripe containment strategy was tested by measuring the frequency of pollinated CMS bait plants placed at different distances and directions from a transgenic pollen source. The results demonstrated the ineffectiveness of the containment strategy. Physiological and molecular tests confirmed the escape and production of transgenic offspring more than 200 m behind the hemp containment. Since absolute containment is unlikely to be effective, the CMS-bait plant detection system is a useful tool for other monitoring purposes.

  17. Bioremediation and fodder potentials of two Sargassum spp. in coastal waters of Shenzhen, South China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zonghe; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Jiang, Yuelu; Luo, Peng; Hu, Chaoqun

    2014-08-30

    In this study, the bioremediation potentials of two seaweeds (Sargassum hemiphyllum and S. henslowianum) against pollution in a coastal mariculture area of Shenzhen, South China, were investigated by comparing the growth, nutrient bioaccumulation capacity of plants from the seaweed bed (control site) with plants from the fish farm. Results indicated that both species are potential candidates for bioremediation in the fish farm areas in terms of their high growth rates and high bioaccumulation capacities on inorganic nutrients. Both Sargassum spp. contain high levels of crude protein (11.7-14.0%) and crude fat (2.2-2.7%), suggesting high nutritional values. The S. hemiphyllum may serve as a good aquaculture fodder with high nutritional compositions and low heavy metal contents. However, heavy metals (Cr, Pb and Cd) of S. henslowianum exceed the maximum allowable concentrations as aquatic feed, which restricts its fodder application. In general, the results of this study may contribute to the marine pollution bioremediation in the coastal areas of South China, especially in mariculture zones.

  18. Beet sugar refining applications: Hydrate freeze separation program: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    The beet sugar segment is the most energy intensive of the food products industry, consuming some 40 trillion Btu per year of primary fuel (the equivalent of over 13.5 million barrels a year of oil). It takes about 6700 Btu to refine 1 pound of sugar from beets. Changing factory operations to use freeze crystallization as outlined in this report and demonstrated in this program, the energy use in the industry can be reduced by about 40%. A project to accomplish full scale changes in a factory is projected to have a simple payback of just over 3 years. The sugar industry now loses about 15% of the sugar extracted from the beet. This sugar is lost in the molasses, the concentrated impurities that are extracted with sugar from the beet. One proposed use of this process described in this report is to recover a fraction of this sugar that is now lost. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Successful application of dextranase in sugar beet factories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dextranases are sometimes applied to hydrolyze dextran polysaccharide in sugar manufacture when bacterial deterioration of sugar beet has occurred. Unfortunately, dextranases only have a small market and low volume sales compared to many other industrial enzymes. Consequently, research and develop...

  20. Functional traits as indicators of fodder provision over a short time scale in species-rich grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Ansquer, Pauline; Duru, Michel; Theau, Jean Pierre; Cruz, Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Fodder provision in species-rich grasslands, i.e. herbage growth, proportion of leaf, and leaf and stem digestibility, is difficult to predict for short periods of time, such as between two defoliations or less. The value of two methods based on plant traits for evaluating these agronomic properties was examined. Methods One method is based on plant trait measurements on the plant community (leaf dry matter content, plant height, flowering date); the other is on vegetation composition expressed as plant functional types (acquisitive versus conservative PFTs) established by measuring leaf dry matter content on pure grass stands. The experiment consisted of 18 fields with three different defoliation regimes (combinations of cutting and grazing) and two levels of fertilization. To establish a growth curve over the first growth cycle, herbage was sampled about 10 times in spring. Key Results Coefficients of correlation between agronomic properties of the vegetation and its functional composition were higher when the latter was assessed through PFT and an indicator of the plant nutrient status (Ni) instead of measured plant traits. The date at which the ceiling yield occurred for the standing herbage mass or only the leaf component, which varied by up to 500 degree-days between treatments, and the leaf proportion, depended entirely on the PFT, and largely so for the leaf digestibility. The standing herbage mass at the time of ceiling yield depended only on Ni, or mainly so in the case of the daily herbage growth rate. Similar plant digestibility between plant communities was found at flowering time, although there were big differences in PFT composition. The shape of the growth curve was flatter when there was great functional diversity in the plant community. Conclusions The PFT composition and the Ni were more reliable than the plant functional traits measured in the field for evaluating herbage growth pattern and digestibility in spring. PMID

  1. Cloning of the coat protein gene from beet necrotic yellow vein virus and its expression in sugar beet hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, U; Commandeur, U; Frank, R; Landsmann, J; Koenig, R; Burgermeister, W

    1991-06-01

    Expression of the beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) coat protein (CP) gene in transgenic sugar beet hairy roots was accomplished as a step towards CP-mediated virus resistance. A cDNA for the CP gene and its 5' terminal untranslated leader sequence was prepared from BNYVV RNA, using two oligodeoxynucleotides to prime the synthesis of both strands. Second-strand synthesis and amplification of the cDNA were done by Taq DNA polymerase chain reactions. Run-off transcripts of the cloned cDNA sequence were obtained and translated in vitro, yielding immunoreactive CP. A binary vector construction containing the CP gene under the control of the 35S promoter of cauliflower mosaic virus was prepared and used for Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of sugar beet tissue. Stable integration and expression of the CP gene in sugar beet hairy roots was demonstrated by Southern, Northern, and Western blot analysis, respectively.

  2. Environmental implications of gene flow from sugar beet to wild beet--current status and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Detlef; Cuguen, Joel; Biancardi, Enrico; Sweet, Jeremy

    2003-01-01

    Gene flow via seed or pollen is a basic biological process in plant evolution. The ecological and genetic consequences of gene flow depend on the amount and direction of gene flow as well as on the fitness of hybrids. The assessment of potential risks of transgenic plants should take into account the fact that conventional crops can often cross with wild plants. The precautionary approach in risk management of genetically modified plants (GMPs) may make it necessary to monitor significant wild and weed populations that might be affected by transgene escape. Gene flow is hard to control in wind-pollinated plants like beet (Beta vulgaris). In addition, wild beet populations potentially can undergo evolutionary changes which might expand their geographical distribution. Unintended products of cultivated beets pollinated by wild beets are weed beets that bolt and flower during their first year of planting. Weed beets cause yield losses and can delay harvest. Wild beets are important plant genetic resources and the preservation of wild beet diversity in Europe has been considered in biosafety research. We present here the methodology and research approaches that can be used for monitoring the geographical distribution and diversity of Beta populations. It has recently been shown that a century of gene flow from Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris has not altered the genetic diversity of wild Beta vulgaris L. ssp. maritima (L.) Arcang. in the Italian sugar beet seed production area. Future research should focus on the potential evolution of transgenic wild beet populations in comparison to these baseline data. Two monitoring models are presented describing how endpoints can be measured: (1) "Pre-post" crop commercialization against today's baseline and (2) "Parallel" to crop commercialization against GMP free reference areas/ populations. Model 2 has the advantage of taking ongoing changes in genetic diversity and population dynamics into account. Model 1 is more applicable if

  3. [Physiological responses of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) to drought stress during vegetative development period under drip irrigation].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-yang; Geng, Qing-yun; Fei, Cong; Fan, Huai

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris cv. Beta 356) was subjected to drought stress during vegetative development by maintaining the soil water content in the 0-40 cm soil depth at 70%, 50% or 30% of field capacity to study the physiological traits of the leaves. Results showed that the compensation index was the highest in the 50% field capacity treatment. Malonaldehyde (MDA) content, relative conductivity, catalase (CAT) activity, and soluble sugar content began to increase 24 h after rehydration. Proline content began to increase 48 h after rehydration. In contrast, no compensation effect was observed in peroxidase (POD) activity after rehydration. Among the active oxygen scavenging enzymes, CAT was most sensitive to drought stress. Supplemental irrigation should be carried out promptly when the soil water content dropped to 50% of field capacity during vegetative development. Rehydration could promote self-repair functions in leaves, thus reducing the effects of drought on sugar beet yield and sugar content.

  4. Use of the GFP reporter as a vital marker for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, C L; Chen, D F; McCormac, A C; Scott, N W; Elliott, M C; Slater, A

    2001-02-01

    Molecular approaches to sugar beet improvement will benefit from an efficient transformation procedure that does not rely upon exploitation of selectable marker genes such as those which confer antibiotic or herbicide resistance upon the transgenic plants. The expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) signal has been investigated during a program of research that was designed to address the need to increase the speed and efficiency of selection of sugar beet transformants. It was envisaged that the GFP reporter could be used initially as a supplement to current selection regimes in order to help eliminate "escapes" and perhaps eventually as a replacement marker in order to avoid the public disquiet associated with antibiotic/herbicide-resistance genes in field-released crops. The sgfp-S65T gene has been modified to have a plant-compatible codon usage, and a serine to threonine mutation at position 65 for enhanced fluorescence under blue light. This gene, under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, was introduced into sugar beet via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Early gene expression in cocultivated sugar beet cultures was signified by green fluorescence several days after cocultivation. Stably transformed calli, which showed green fluorescence at a range of densities, were obtained at frequencies of 3-11% after transferring the inoculated cultures to selection media. Cocultivated shoot explants or embryogenic calli were regularly monitored under the microscope with blue light when they were transferred to media without selective agents. Green fluorescent shoots were obtained at frequencies of 2-5%. It was concluded that the sgfp-S65T gene can be used as a vital marker for noninvasive screening of cells and shoots for transformation, and that it has potential for the development of selectable marker-free transgenic sugar beet.

  5. Metal levels in fodder, milk, dairy products, and tissues sampled in ovine farms of Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Rosa; Sabia, Serena; D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Macchiato, Maria; Anastasio, Aniello; Ragosta, Maria; Paino, Salvatore

    2005-09-01

    We measured Cd, Cr, Hg, Mn, and Pb levels in samples of fodder, milk, dairy products, and tissues collected from 12 ovine farms in the regions of Campania and Calabria (Southern Italy). The areas in which the farms are located show different levels of anthropogenic pressure. The main purpose of this study is the identification and the analysis of relationships among metal concentrations observed in samples representative of different links in the food chain. Particularly, we apply univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical techniques to identify the correlation structure of our data set and to evaluate the influence of anthropogenic activity. We discuss the results, focusing the analysis on the spatial and the temporal patterns of metal concentrations.

  6. Tropical tannin-rich fodder intake modifies saliva-binding capacity in growing sheep.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Magaña, J J; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Hoste, H; Capetillo-Leal, C M

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the effect of feeding dietary tannins from Lysiloma latisiliquum fresh forage on the saliva tannin-binding capacity of hair sheep lambs without previous exposure to tannin-rich (TR) fodder. Twenty-four hair sheep lambs (13.6±3.04 kg LW) were fed a tannin-free diet at the beginning of the experimental period (from day 10 to 13). On day 14, lambs were distributed into three groups (n=8): control group (CG), fed with the tannin-free diet (from D10 to D112); tannin short-term group (TST), fed the basal diet and 650 g of L. latisiliquum forage (from D14 to D55); tannin long-term group (TLT), fed the basal diet and 650 g of L. latisiliquum forage (from D14 to D112). Saliva samples were collected from the mouth of each lamb in the morning before feeding time on D10 and D14 (baseline period), on D49 and D56 (period 1) and on D97 and D112 (period 2). The tannin binding response of salivary protein (∆% turbidity) was determined with the haze development test (HDT) using either tannic acid or L. latisiliquum forage acetone extract. A turbidity protein index (TPI) was calculated as (∆% turbidity/[salivary protein (mg)]). Differences in HDT and TPI in the different groups were compared by repeated measures ANOVA using Proc Mixed. All groups had similar ∆% turbidity throughout the experiment (P>0.05). At baseline and period 1, the TPI of the different groups was similar (P>0.05). On period 2 the TLT group showed higher TPI compared with CG (P<0.05). Meanwhile, CG and TST showed similar salivary TPI. The saliva of hair sheep lambs consuming TR L. latisiliquum fresh fodder (TLT group) increased their TPI compared with control lambs not exposed to tannins.

  7. A preliminary study on genotypic differences in transcript abundance of drought-responsive genes in sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Abazar; Ranji, Zabihallah; Griffiths, Zhoward; Ober, Eric S

    2007-10-15

    In this study, four sugar beet genotypes of differing responses to drought were selected from a field experiment conducted under well-watered and water-limited conditions in 2004. In addition, two candidate genes: 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin (2-cys prx) and Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase (NDPK), thought to be associated with drought tolerance, were chosen from a previous proteomics study in sugar beet. An expression analysis of the two drought-regulated genes using semi-quantitative reverse transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that there were genotypic differences in the transcript abundance of the candidate genes with the differences in the expression level of 2-cys prx being likely associated with the drought responses of the genotypes in a two-year field study. However, the expression analysis of the genes has to be investigated at different stages of the stress period on more genotypes.

  8. Management of curly top in sugar beet with seed and foliar insecticides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top in sugar beet can result in severe yield losses and is caused by Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV) and other closely related Curtovirus spp. which are vectored by the beet leafhopper. Neonicotinoid seed treatments (Cruiser, NipsIt, and Poncho) have been shown to be an effective suppleme...

  9. [Transposition of the maize transposable element dSpm in transgenic sugar beets].

    PubMed

    Kishchenko, E M; Komarnitskiĭ, I K; Kuchuk, N V

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic sugar beet plants carrying maize Spmn/dSpm transposable elements system have been constructed. Heterologous system of maize transposable elements Spm/dSpm was active in transgenic sugar beets that permits transposon-based gene tagging and obtaining of marker-free transgenic sugar beet.

  10. Estrogenicity of sugar beet by-products used as animal feeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A veterinarian observed a reduction in embryo transfer success rates on beef and dairy farms in Minnesota, which were both feeding sugar beet by-products. Beet tailings and pelleted post-extraction beet pulp, associated with the affected farms were analyzed for estrogenicity by E-Screen (proliferati...

  11. Interaction of Rhizoctonia solani and Rhizopus stolonifer Causing Root Rot of Sugar Beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, growers in Michigan and other sugar beet production areas of the United States have reported increasing incidence of root rot with little or no crown or foliar symptoms in sugar beet with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot. In addition, Rhizoctonia-resistant beets have been reported wit...

  12. 40 CFR 409.10 - Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the beet... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beet Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.10 Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory....

  13. Experimental investigations of beet pulp drying in superheated steam under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Urbaniec, K.; Malczewski, J.

    1997-10-01

    Beet pulp drying in superheated steam under pressure makes it possible to save energy in sugar factories. A new concept of a two-stage convective steam drier is presented. To obtain kinetic data on beet pulp drying, an experimental setup was built. Beet pulp samples were dried at steam pressure up to 4 bar and temperature up to 220 C.

  14. 40 CFR 409.10 - Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the beet... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beet Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.10 Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory....

  15. 40 CFR 409.10 - Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the beet... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beet Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.10 Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory....

  16. 40 CFR 409.10 - Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the beet... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beet Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.10 Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory....

  17. 40 CFR 409.10 - Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the beet... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SUGAR PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Beet Sugar Processing Subcategory § 409.10 Applicability; description of the beet sugar processing subcategory....

  18. Variability in Fusarium oxysporum from sugar beets in the United States – Final Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium yellows can cause significant reduction in root yield, sucrose percentage and juice purity in affected sugar beets. Research in our laboratory and others on variability in Fusarium oxysporum associated with sugar beets demonstrated that isolates that are pathogenic on sugar beet can be hig...

  19. Structural and Financial Characteristics of U.S. Sugar Beet Farms. Agricultural Economic Report Number 584.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauson, Annette L.; Hoff, Frederic L.

    This report analyzes production and financial characteristics of sugar beet producers in seven regions. Section 1 examines the structural characteristics of U.S. sugar beet producers. Sugar beet production; land use, tenure, irrigation, and livestock enterprises are considered. Section 2 discusses production costs, including cost estimates,…

  20. USDA-ARS Ft. Collins germplasm screened for resistance to Beet curly top, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) germplasm lines produced by the USDA-ARS Ft. Collins sugar beet program and two commercial check cultivars [SV2012RR (susceptible) and HM PM90 (resistant)] were screened for resistance to Beet curly top virus (BCTV). The curly top evaluation was conducted at the ...

  1. Beet curly top resistance in USDA-ARS plant introduction lines, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top caused by Beet curly top virus (BCTV) is a widespread disease problem vectored by the beet leafhopper in semiarid sugar beet production areas. Host resistance is the primary defense against this problem, but resistance in commercial cultivars is only low to intermediate. In order to iden...

  2. Ft. Collins sugar beet germplasm evaluated for rhizomania and storage rot resistance in Idaho, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty-seven sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) lines from the USDA-ARS Ft. Collins sugar beet program and four check cultivars were screened for resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), the causal agent of rhizomania, and storage rot. The rhizomania evaluation was conducted at the USDA-ARS...

  3. Evaluation of fungicide and biological treatments for control of fungal storage rots in sugar beet, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preventing sucrose losses in storage is important to the economic viability of the sugar beet industry. In an effort to establish additional measures for reducing sucrose losses in storage, ten fungicide and/or biological treatments were evaluated on sugar beet roots in a commercial sugar beet stor...

  4. Beet curly top resistance in germplasm from the USDA-ARS Ft. Collins program, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ninety-seven sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) germplasm lines from the USDA-ARS Ft. Collins sugar beet program, a resistant control germplasm (1996A008), and three commercial control cultivars [SV2012RR (susceptible), Monohikari (susceptible) and HM PM90 (resistant)] were screened for response to Beet ...

  5. Beet curly top resistance in USDA-ARS plant introduction lines, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top caused by Beet curly top virus (BCTV) is a widespread disease problem vectored by the beet leafhopper in semiarid sugar beet production areas. Host resistance is the primary defense against this problem, but resistance in commercial cultivars is only low to intermediate. In order to iden...

  6. Beet curly top resistance in USDA-ARS plant introduction lines, 2016

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top caused by Beet curly top virus (BCTV) is a widespread disease problem vectored by the beet leafhopper in semiarid sugar beet production areas. Host resistance is the primary defense against this problem, but resistance in commercial cultivars is only low to intermediate. In order to iden...

  7. Beet curly top resistance in USDA-ARS Kimberly germplasm lines, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top caused by Beet curly top virus is a widespread disease problem vectored by the beet leafhopper in semiarid sugar beet production areas. Host resistance is the primary defense against this problem, but resistance in commercial cultivars is only low to intermediate. In order to identify no...

  8. Efficient dsRNA-mediated transgenic resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus in sugar beets is not affected by other soilborne and aphid-transmitted viruses.

    PubMed

    Lennefors, Britt-Louise; van Roggen, Petra M; Yndgaard, Flemming; Savenkov, Eugene I; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-04-01

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) is one of the most devastating sugar beet diseases. Sugar beet plants engineered to express a 0.4 kb inverted repeat construct based on the BNYVV replicase gene accumulated the transgene mRNA to similar levels in leaves and roots, whereas accumulation of the transgene-homologous siRNA was more pronounced in roots. The roots expressed high levels of resistance to BNYVV transmitted by the vector, Polymyxa betae. Resistance to BNYVV was not decreased following co-infection of the plants with Beet soil borne virus and Beet virus Q that share the same vector with BNYVV. Similarly, co-infection with the aphid-transmitted Beet mild yellowing virus, Beet yellows virus (BYV), or with all of the aforementioned viruses did not affect the resistance to BNYVV, while they accumulated in roots. These viruses are common in most of the sugar beet growing areas in Europe and world wide. However, there was a competitive interaction between BYV and BMYV in sugar beet leaves, as infection with BYV decreased the titres of BMYV. Other interactions between the viruses studied were not observed. The results suggest that the engineered resistance to BNYVV expressed in the sugar beets of this study is efficient in roots and not readily compromised following infection of the plants with heterologous viruses.

  9. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-04-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g(-1) protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1-17.5 mg g(-1) SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load.

  10. Analytical characterization of beet root vacuole membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, F.; Branton, D.

    1980-10-01

    Vacuoles from beet root (Beta vulgaris L. var. esculenta Gurke) isolated by a mechanical procedure were osmotically lysed to separate the membrane and sap components for analysis. Approximately 62% of the vacuole proteins, 70% of the nondialyzable carbohydrates and almost all of the phospholipids and sterols were recovered in the membrane fraction. The vacuole membrane had a phospholipid:protein ratio of 0.68 and a sterol:phospholipid ratio of 0.21. Seventeen complex polar lipids including phosphatides ad glycolipids have been tentatively identified. Phosphatidylcholine (54%) and phosphatidylethanolamine (24%) were the most prominant phosphoglycerides besides phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid (1, 4, 5, and 12%, respectively. A putative sulfoglycoside and two major ceramide glycoside-like lipids, resembling those of animal lysosomes, were identified by thin-layer chromatography. High-resolution SDS-acrylamide gel electrophoresis of the polypeptides from the vacuole revealed 15 major bands with apparent molecular weights ranging from 91,000 to 12,000. Selective elution experiments delineated those polypeptides that were peripheral membrane proteins or sap proteins adsorbed to the membrane, and those that exhibited hydrophobic interaction with the lipid core. Lectin labeling results indicated that most of the polypeptides from the membrane and from the sap were glycoproteins probably of the high-mannose type characteristic of lysosomal enzymes that have undergone several stages of posttranslational modification.

  11. Fungal secretomes enhance sugar beet pulp hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kracher, Daniel; Oros, Damir; Yao, Wanying; Preims, Marita; Rezic, Iva; Haltrich, Dietmar; Rezic, Tonci; Ludwig, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulose makes enzymatic hydrolysis of plant biomass for the production of second generation biofuels a major challenge. This work investigates an efficient and economic approach for the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp (SBP), which is a difficult to degrade, hemicellulose-rich by-product of the table sugar industry. Three fungal strains were grown on different substrates and the production of various extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes involved in pectin, hemicellulose, and cellulose breakdown were monitored. In a second step, the ability of the culture supernatants to hydrolyze thermally pretreated SBP was tested in batch experiments. The supernatant of Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-borne facultative plant pathogen, was found to have the highest hydrolytic activity on SBP and was selected for further hydrolyzation experiments. A low enzyme load of 0.2 mg g–1 protein from the culture supernatant was sufficient to hydrolyze a large fraction of the pectin and hemicelluloses present in SBP. The addition of Trichoderma reesei cellulase (1–17.5 mg g–1 SBP) resulted in almost complete hydrolyzation of cellulose. It was found that the combination of pectinolytic, hemicellulolytic, and cellulolytic activities works synergistically on the complex SBP composite, and a combination of these hydrolytic enzymes is required to achieve a high degree of enzymatic SBP hydrolysis with a low enzyme load. PMID:24677771

  12. 21 CFR 173.320 - Chemicals for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-sugar and beet-sugar mills. 173.320 Section 173.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...-sugar and beet-sugar mills. Agents for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills may... microorganisms in cane-sugar and/or beet-sugar mills as specified in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) They...

  13. High level fructan accumulation in a transgenic sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Sévenier, R; Hall, R D; van der Meer, I M; Hakkert, H J; van Tunen, A J; Koops, A J

    1998-09-01

    We have transformed sugar beet into a crop that produces fructans. The gene encoding 1-sucrose:sucrose fructosyl transferase (1-SST), which was isolated from Helianthus tuberosus, was introduced into sugar beet. In H. tuberosus, 1-SST mediates the first steps in fructan synthesis through the conversion of sucrose (GF) into low molecular weight fructans GF2, GF3, and GF4. In the taproot of sugar beet transformed with the 1-sst gene, the stored sucrose is almost totally converted into low molecular weight fructans. In contrast, 1-sst expression in the leaves resulted in only low levels of fructans. Despite the storage carbohydrate having been altered, the expression of the 1-sst gene did not have any visible effect on phenotype and did not affect the growth rate of the taproot as observed under greenhouse conditions.

  14. Metabolism of Red Beet Slices I. Effects of Washing 1

    PubMed Central

    Reed, D. J.; Kolattukudy, P. E.

    1966-01-01

    The changes in relative participation of pathways of glucose catabolism in red beet slices during washing have been examined using specifically 14C labeled glucoses. Washing of these slices brings about an increase in participation of the pentose phosphate pathway. The composition of the washing medium influences slightly the extent of change in pathway participation. The activity level of certain enzymes participating in the initial stages of glucose catabolism has been measured in fresh and washed beet slices. Fresh slices which barely metabolized gluconate were found to have very little 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity. Washing brings about a dramatic increase in 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase activity and this increase was accompanied by a marked increase in the ability of the slices to metabolize gluconate. In red beet slices the TPNH generated via pentose phosphate pathway appears to be utilized for biosynthetic reductions rather than as respiratory substrate. PMID:16656302

  15. Sequence comparison and classification of beet luteovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, J R; Stevens, M; de Bruyne, E; Smith, H G; Bird, C; Hull, R

    1995-01-01

    Three distinct sequence groups were found among partial nucleotide sequences of 38 isolates of beet western yellows virus (BWYV) and beet mild yellowing virus (BMYV) from Europe, Iran and the USA. The first group contains both sugar beet and oilseed rape specific isolates, and the differentiating characteristic linked to this host range specificity are 2 single base pair changes in a 1,200 nucleotide region of the genome. It is proposed that the European BWYV strains that can be transferred at low frequency between rape and sugar beet belong to this group. Also belonging to this group are the published BWYV sequences of Veidt et al. and of the California BWYV-ST9 isolate. The second group contains mostly rape-derived isolates which have an intergenic region highly distinct from that of group-1 isolates but similar polymerase and coat protein regions. It is proposed that the rape-specific BWYV isolates which cannot be transmitted to sugar beet belong to this group. The third group contains mostly beet-specific isolates from Southern Europe and Iran, and may be adapted to the Mediterranean climate and flora. It is distinct from groups 1 and 2 in all three genome regions investigated and its polymerase and intergenic regions are as much related to those of potato leafroll virus (PLRV) and curcurbit aphid borne yellows virus (CABYV) as they are to those of group-1 and group-2. On the basis of sequence similarities and established nomenclature it is proposed to use BWYV for groups 1 and 2 (BWYV-1 and BWYV-2 respectively) and to use BMYV for group-3 isolates, which are distinct enough from the other two groups to merit a separate nomenclature.

  16. [Generation of sugar beet transgenic plants expressing bar gene].

    PubMed

    Mishutkina, Ia V; Kamionskaia, A M; Skriabin, K G

    2010-01-01

    The parameters of transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA 105 for 5 domestic sorts and lines of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. var. saccharifera (Alef) Krass) were optimized. The system of transgenic tissue selection based on resistance to phosphinothricin, allowing to avoid the appearing of chimeric shoots among initial transformants was developed. The transgenic plants of sugar beet sorts Ramonskaya single seed 47, L'govskaya single seed 52 and RMS 73, and LBO 17 and LBO 19 lines expressing the gene of phosphinothricin acetyl transferase bar have been obtained. The resistance of these sorts and lines to the effect of phosphinothricin in vitro has been shown.

  17. Determination of sulfur and chlorine in fodder by X-ray fluorescence spectral analysis and comparison with other analytical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Rajčevič, Marija; Jačimović, Radojko; Budič, Bojan; Ponikvar, Maja

    2003-07-01

    Sulfur and chlorine are essential elements in the metabolic processes of ruminants, and correct planning strategy of ruminant nutrition should provide a sufficient content of S and Cl in the animal's body. S and Cl can be found in various types of animal fodder in the form of organic compounds and minerals. In this work, the Cl and S content in forage was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), and its performance was then compared in parallel analyses by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and potentiometric methods. The results were compared and critically evaluated in order to assess the performance and capability of the XRF technique in analysis of animal fodder.

  18. Low level of gene flow from cultivated beets (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) into Danish populations of sea beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. maritima (L.) Arcangeli).

    PubMed

    Andersen, N S; Siegismund, H R; Meyer, V; Jørgensen, R B

    2005-04-01

    Gene flow from sugar beets to sea beets occurs in the seed propagation areas in southern Europe. Some seed propagation also takes place in Denmark, but here the crop-wild gene flow has not been investigated. Hence, we studied gene flow to sea beet populations from sugar beet lines used in Danish seed propagation areas. A set of 12 Danish, two Swedish, one French, one Italian, one Dutch, and one Irish populations of sea beets, and four lines of sugar beet were analysed. To evaluate the genetic variation and gene flow, eight microsatellite loci were screened. This analysis revealed hybridization with cultivated beet in one of the sea beet populations from the centre of the Danish seed propagation area. Triploid hybrids found in this population were verified with flow cytometry. Possible hybrids or introgressed plants were also found in the French and Italian populations. However, individual assignment test using a Bayesian method provided 100% assignment success of diploid individuals into their correct subspecies of origin, and a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MC MC) approach revealed clear distinction of individuals into groups according to their subspecies of origin, with a zero level of genetic admixture among subspecies. This underlines that introgression beyond the first hybridization is not extensive. The overall pattern of genetic distance and structure showed that Danish and Swedish sea beet populations were closely related to each other, and they are both more closely related to the population from Ireland than to the populations from France, the Netherlands, and Italy.

  19. The Impact of Multi-Sensor Data Assimilation on Plant Parameter Retrieval and Yield Estimation for Sugar Beet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodrius, M.; Migdall, S.; Bach, H.; Hank, T.

    2015-04-01

    Yield Maps are a basic information source for site-specific farming. For sugar beet they are not available as in-situ measurements. This gap of information can be filled with Earth Observation (EO) data in combination with a plant growth model (PROMET) to improve farming and harvest management. The estimation of yield based on optical satellite imagery and crop growth modelling is more challenging for sugar beet than for other crop types since the plants' roots are harvested. These are not directly visible from EO. In this study, the impact of multi-sensor data assimilation on the yield estimation for sugar beet is evaluated. Yield and plant growth are modelled with PROMET. This multi-physics, raster-based model calculates photosynthesis and crop growth based on the physiological processes in the plant, including the distribution of biomass into the different plant organs (roots, stem, leaves and fruit) at different phenological stages. The crop variable used in the assimilation is the green (photosynthetically active) leaf area, which is derived as spatially heterogeneous input from optical satellite imagery with the radiative transfer model SLC (Soil-Leaf-Canopy). Leaf area index was retrieved from RapidEye, Landsat 8 OLI and Landsat 7 ETM+ data. It could be shown that the used methods are very suitable to derive plant parameters time-series with different sensors. The LAI retrievals from different sensors are quantitatively compared to each other. Results for sugar beet yield estimation are shown for a test-site in Southern Germany. The validation of the yield estimation for the years 2012 to 2014 shows that the approach reproduced the measured yield on field level with high accuracy. Finally, it is demonstrated through comparison of different spatial resolutions that small-scale in-field variety is modelled with adequate results at 20 m raster size, but the results could be improved by recalculating the assimilation at a finer spatial resolution of 5 m.

  20. Characterization of faecal microbial communities of dairy cows fed diets containing ensiled Moringa oleifera fodder

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiajie; Zeng, Bin; Chen, Zujing; Yan, Shijuan; Huang, Wenjie; Sun, Baoli; He, Qian; Chen, Xiaoyang; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Qingyan; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang

    2017-01-01

    Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) is a remarkable species with high nutritional value and good biomass production, which can be used as livestock fodder. In this study, we examined changes in the faecal microbiota of thirty dairy cows in response to alternative M. oleifera diets and their effects on nutrient digestion, milk traits and the faecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids. No differences in milk yield and constituents were found between the control and the M. oleifera alternative groups. Cows fed M. oleifera silage had lower dry matter digestibility, as well as the propionate and isovalerate concentrations in M. oleifera treated group. Using 16S rDNA gene sequencing, 1,299,556 paired-end reads were obtained. Clustering analysis revealed 13 phyla and 93 genera across all samples. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the co-dominant phyla. Ten taxa displayed a significant difference in response to the high M. oleifera diet. In addition, strong correlations between Akkermansia and Prevotella with milk yield and protein indicated that some bacterial groups could be used to improve milk traits. Our results provided an insight into the microbiome-associated responses to M. oleifera in livestock diets, and could aid the development of novel applications of M. oleifera. PMID:28134261

  1. Characterization of faecal microbial communities of dairy cows fed diets containing ensiled Moringa oleifera fodder.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiajie; Zeng, Bin; Chen, Zujing; Yan, Shijuan; Huang, Wenjie; Sun, Baoli; He, Qian; Chen, Xiaoyang; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Qingyan; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang

    2017-01-30

    Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera) is a remarkable species with high nutritional value and good biomass production, which can be used as livestock fodder. In this study, we examined changes in the faecal microbiota of thirty dairy cows in response to alternative M. oleifera diets and their effects on nutrient digestion, milk traits and the faecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids. No differences in milk yield and constituents were found between the control and the M. oleifera alternative groups. Cows fed M. oleifera silage had lower dry matter digestibility, as well as the propionate and isovalerate concentrations in M. oleifera treated group. Using 16S rDNA gene sequencing, 1,299,556 paired-end reads were obtained. Clustering analysis revealed 13 phyla and 93 genera across all samples. Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the co-dominant phyla. Ten taxa displayed a significant difference in response to the high M. oleifera diet. In addition, strong correlations between Akkermansia and Prevotella with milk yield and protein indicated that some bacterial groups could be used to improve milk traits. Our results provided an insight into the microbiome-associated responses to M. oleifera in livestock diets, and could aid the development of novel applications of M. oleifera.

  2. Biogas from sugar beet press pulp as substitute of fossil fuel in sugar beet factories.

    PubMed

    Brooks, L; Parravicini, V; Svardal, K; Kroiss, H; Prendl, L

    2008-01-01

    Sugar beet press pulp (SBP) accumulates as a by-product in sugar factories and it is generally silaged or dried to be used as animal food. Rising energy prices and the opening of the European Union sugar market has put pressure on the manufacturers to find alternatives for energy supply. The aim of this project was to develop a technology in the treatment of SBP that would lead to savings in energy consumption and would provide a more competitive sugar production from sugar beets. These goals were met by the anaerobic digestion of SBP for biogas production. Lab-scale experiments confirmed the suitability of SBP as substrate for anaerobic bacteria. Pilot-scale experiments focused on process optimization and procedures for a quick start up and operational control. Both single-stage and two-stage process configurations showed similar removal efficiency. A stable biogas production could be achieved in single-stage at a maximum volumetric loading rate of 10 kgCSB/(m(3) x d). Degradation efficiency was 75% for VS and 72% for COD. Average specific gas production reached 530 NL/kgCOD(SBP) or 610 NL/kgVS(SBP). (CH(4): 50 to 53%). The first large-scale biogas plant was put into operation during the sugar processing period 2007 at a Hungarian sugar factory. Digesting approximately 50% of the SBP (800 t/d, 22%TS), the biogas produced could substitute about 40% of the natural gas required for the thermal energy supply within the sugar processing.

  3. Effect of Terminalia arjuna bark powder on some diagnostic enzymes in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) ingesting arsenic contaminated water and fodder

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Subrat Kumar; Nayyar, Shashi; Jindal, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study investigated the effect of Terminalia arjuna bark powder on some diagnostic enzymes related to hepatic and muscle function in buffaloes ingesting arsenic contaminated water and fodder in an arsenic affected area. Materials and Methods: A total of 25 samples of tube well water, fodder and buffalo blood were collected through a survey from arsenic contaminated areas and 20 samples from the uncontaminated, i.e., control areas of Ludhiana district, Punjab for determination of arsenic concentration. A total of 30 buffaloes (selected from above 45 animals) were divided into three groups of 10 each on the basis of blood arsenic level, viz., control group: Clinically healthy buffaloes from the uncontaminated area with the blood arsenic level within the normal limit (0-0.05 ppm); Arsenic exposed group: Buffaloes exposed to arsenic through intake of contaminated water and fodder in the arsenic affected area with the blood arsenic level above the normal limit of 0-0.05 ppm; treatment group: Arsenic exposed buffaloes treated with T. arjuna bark powder orally at 42 mg/kg b.w. OD for 30 days. Single blood samples were collected from control and arsenic exposed groups. Blood samples from the treatment group were collected on 0, 15th, and 30th day of treatment along with one sample on the 45th day, i.e., after withdrawal of treatment. Activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and creatine kinase (CK) were assayed in plasma. Results: Significantly (p<0.05) higher arsenic concentration was observed in tube well water, fodder and buffalo blood samples collected from the arsenic contaminated area. A significant positive correlation was noticed between arsenic concentrations of tube well water, fodder and untreated buffalo blood samples, collected from the arsenic affected area. ALP, GGT, LDH, and CK activities were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the arsenic exposed buffaloes compared to control

  4. Rhizomania resistance in the Tandem® sugar beet variety.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania, caused by beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), is a major disease of sugarbeets world-wide. The ‘Holly’ resistance gene (Rz1) confers strong resistance to several BNYVV isolates and has been incorporated into most major sugarbeet breeding lines. However, the threat presented by resis...

  5. Identification of extensin protein associated with sugar beet pectin.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Alberto; Fishman, Marshall L; Fortis, Laurie L; Cooke, Peter H; Hotchkiss, Arland T

    2009-11-25

    Several studies have suggested that the emulsification properties associated with pectin obtained from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) are due to the presence of a protein-pectin complex. Nevertheless, the identity of the protein has remained elusive. Pectin, extracted from sugar beet pulp by microwave-assisted extraction, and a commercial sample were both subjected to protease digestion with trypsin. The resulting peptides were separated from the pectin solution by ultrafiltration using a 3 kDa molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) membrane and analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization with tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The partial sequences derived from the mass spectrometry analyses of the resulting tryptic peptides are found to be highly consistent with extensin protein matched from the B. vulgaris Genetic Index database and also correspond to previously reported extensin peptides found in sugar beet cell suspension cultures. Further attempts were made to disassociate the protein from pectin using 1 M NaCl and a 100 kDa MWCO membrane; however, no peptides were observed following trypsin digestion of the permeate solution. This evidence suggests the existence of a complex between the pectin and extensin that is not due to ionic interactions. Trypsin digestion of commercial sugar beet pectin also produced the peptide profile observed with the microwave-assisted extracted pectin sample. Atomic force microscopy established that the number of rod-like elements decreased following protease treatment compared to the untreated sample.

  6. The 'C869' sugar beet genome: a draft assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet 'C869' is a diploid, self-fertile, public germplasm release used extensively as the seed parent of recombinant inbred lines designed to genetically dissect agronomic, disease, domestication, and other traits. From the original release, three additional generations of inbreeding were done,...

  7. Rhizomania Resistance in the Tandem Sugar Beet Variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomania, caused by beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), is a major disease of sugarbeets world-wide. The ‘Holly’ resistance gene (Rz1) confers strong resistance to several BNYVV isolates and has been incorporated into most major sugarbeet breeding lines. However, the threat presented by resis...

  8. Reducing sucrose loss in sugar beet storage with fungicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rots in sugar beet storage can lead to multi-million dollar losses because of reduced sucrose recovery. Thus, studies were conducted to establish better chemical control options and a better understanding of the fungi involved in the rot complex. A water check and three fungicides (Mertect, Pro...

  9. Investigation of Copper Sorption by Sugar Beet Processing Lime Waste

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the western United States, sugar beet processing for sugar recovery generates a lime-based waste product (~250,000 Mg yr-1) that has little liming value in the region’s calcareous soils. This area has recently experienced an increase in dairy production, with dairi...

  10. Seedling diseases of sugar beet – diversity and host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seedling diseases cause loss of plant stand due to pre- and post-emergence damping-off and weakened plants due to root or hypocotyl infection. Several pathogens cause seedling disease of sugar beet, including Rhizoctonia solani, Aphanomyces cochlioides, Pythium species, and Fusarium species. Differe...

  11. Cowpea and Groundnut Haulms Fodder Trading and Its Lessons for Multidimensional Cowpea Improvement for Mixed Crop Livestock Systems in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Samireddypalle, Anandan; Boukar, Ousmane; Grings, Elaine; Fatokun, Christian A; Kodukula, Prasad; Devulapalli, Ravi; Okike, Iheanacho; Blümmel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cowpea is an important legume crop in Africa, valued highly for its grain and also haulms, which are a tradable commodity in fodder markets. Fodder market surveys in Northern Nigeria showed that groundnut haulms were priced higher than cowpea haulms, probably because of their superior nutritive value. The economic value of haulms has prompted cowpea breeders and livestock nutritionists to explore haulm fodder traits as additional selection and breeding criteria. Fifty cowpea genotypes cultivated across five locations in Nigeria in 2013 and 2014 were evaluated for food fodder traits. Significant (P < 0.05) genotypic dependent variations were observed in yields (kg/ha) of grains (537-1082) and haulms (1173-3368), though significant (P < 0.05) effects of location and year were observed. Grain and fodder yield had a tendency to be positively correlated (r = 0.26, P = 0.07). Haulms were analyzed for nitrogen (N), fiber fractions, in vitro digestibility, and metabolizable energy content. Highly significant variations were observed in all genotypic and livestock nutrition traits, although location and year had significant effects. Trade-offs between grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits were largely absent and haulm acid detergent lignin and grain yield were even inversely correlated (r = -0.28, P = 0.05), that is high grain yielders had decreased haulm lignin. However, haulm N and grain yield also tended to be negatively associated (r = -0.26, P = 0.07). Haulm fodder quality traits and haulm yield were mostly positively correlated (P < 0.05). Broad sense heritabilities for grain and fodder yield were 0.50 and 0.29, respectively, while heritability for haulm fodder quality traits ranged from 0.61 to 0.67, providing opportunities for concomitant increase in grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits. Selection of the 10 highest ranking genotypes for grain yield, haulm yield, haulm N, and haulm in vitro organic matter digestibility showed selection groups overlapping

  12. Cowpea and Groundnut Haulms Fodder Trading and Its Lessons for Multidimensional Cowpea Improvement for Mixed Crop Livestock Systems in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Samireddypalle, Anandan; Boukar, Ousmane; Grings, Elaine; Fatokun, Christian A.; Kodukula, Prasad; Devulapalli, Ravi; Okike, Iheanacho; Blümmel, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cowpea is an important legume crop in Africa, valued highly for its grain and also haulms, which are a tradable commodity in fodder markets. Fodder market surveys in Northern Nigeria showed that groundnut haulms were priced higher than cowpea haulms, probably because of their superior nutritive value. The economic value of haulms has prompted cowpea breeders and livestock nutritionists to explore haulm fodder traits as additional selection and breeding criteria. Fifty cowpea genotypes cultivated across five locations in Nigeria in 2013 and 2014 were evaluated for food fodder traits. Significant (P < 0.05) genotypic dependent variations were observed in yields (kg/ha) of grains (537–1082) and haulms (1173–3368), though significant (P < 0.05) effects of location and year were observed. Grain and fodder yield had a tendency to be positively correlated (r = 0.26, P = 0.07). Haulms were analyzed for nitrogen (N), fiber fractions, in vitro digestibility, and metabolizable energy content. Highly significant variations were observed in all genotypic and livestock nutrition traits, although location and year had significant effects. Trade-offs between grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits were largely absent and haulm acid detergent lignin and grain yield were even inversely correlated (r = -0.28, P = 0.05), that is high grain yielders had decreased haulm lignin. However, haulm N and grain yield also tended to be negatively associated (r = -0.26, P = 0.07). Haulm fodder quality traits and haulm yield were mostly positively correlated (P < 0.05). Broad sense heritabilities for grain and fodder yield were 0.50 and 0.29, respectively, while heritability for haulm fodder quality traits ranged from 0.61 to 0.67, providing opportunities for concomitant increase in grain yield and haulm fodder quality traits. Selection of the 10 highest ranking genotypes for grain yield, haulm yield, haulm N, and haulm in vitro organic matter digestibility showed selection groups

  13. Productivity and quality of sugar beet as affecting by sowing methods, weed control treatments and nitrogen fertilizer levels.

    PubMed

    Seadh, S E; Attia, A N; Said, E M; El-Maghraby, Samia S; Ibrahim, M E M

    2013-08-01

    Two field experiments were carried out at Kafr El-Hamam Research Station, Zagazig district, Sharkia Governorate, Agricultural Research Center, Egypt, during 2008/2009 and 2009/2010 seasons to study the effect of sowing methods (manual and mechanical), weed control treatments (one hoeing, Goltix 70 WG (metamitron), Goltix+one hoeing and two hoeing) and nitrogen fertilizer levels (60, 80 and 100 kg N/fed) on yield, its components and quality of sugar beet cv. Hanrike. The obtained results could be summarized as follows; Mechanical sowing method of sugar beet significantly surpassed the traditional sowing method in root and foliage fresh weights/plant, root/top ratio, root length and diameter, root, top and sugar yields/fed in both seasons. Sowing methods showed significant effect on TSS, sucrose and purity percentages in both seasons, except purity% in the second season. Controlling weeds by two hand hoeings significantly recorded the highest values of root, top and sugar yields/fed and its components and purity percentage in both seasons. However, the highest percentages of TSS and sucrose were achieved from controlling weed by one hand hoeing in both seasons. Fertilizing sugar beet plants with 100 kg N/fed significantly increased yields and its components and markedly recorded the highest values in both seasons. From the obtained, it can be concluded that sowing sugar beet using mechanical sowing method (planter machine), controlling weeds by hand hoeing and mineral fertilizing with 100 kg N/fed could be recommended in order to maximize its productivity and quality under the environmental conditions of Sharkia Governorate, Egypt.

  14. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes.

    PubMed

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement.

  15. Epigenomics and bolting tolerance in sugar beet genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hébrard, Claire; Peterson, Daniel G.; Willems, Glenda; Delaunay, Alain; Jesson, Béline; Lefèbvre, Marc; Barnes, Steve; Maury, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris altissima), bolting tolerance is an essential agronomic trait reflecting the bolting response of genotypes after vernalization. Genes involved in induction of sugar beet bolting have now been identified, and evidence suggests that epigenetic factors are involved in their control. Indeed, the time course and amplitude of DNA methylation variations in the shoot apical meristem have been shown to be critical in inducing sugar beet bolting, and a few functional targets of DNA methylation during vernalization have been identified. However, molecular mechanisms controlling bolting tolerance levels among genotypes are still poorly understood. Here, gene expression and DNA methylation profiles were compared in shoot apical meristems of three bolting-resistant and three bolting-sensitive genotypes after vernalization. Using Cot fractionation followed by 454 sequencing of the isolated low-copy DNA, 6231 contigs were obtained that were used along with public sugar beet DNA sequences to design custom Agilent microarrays for expression (56k) and methylation (244k) analyses. A total of 169 differentially expressed genes and 111 differentially methylated regions were identified between resistant and sensitive vernalized genotypes. Fourteen sequences were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated, with a negative correlation between their methylation and expression levels. Genes involved in cold perception, phytohormone signalling, and flowering induction were over-represented and collectively represent an integrative gene network from environmental perception to bolting induction. Altogether, the data suggest that the genotype-dependent control of DNA methylation and expression of an integrative gene network participate in bolting tolerance in sugar beet, opening up perspectives for crop improvement. PMID:26463996

  16. Effect of Fodder Tree Species with Condensed Tannin Contents on In vitro Methane Production.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Ernestina Gutiérrez; Medina, Leonardo Hernández; Benavides, Liliana Márquez; Caratachea, Aureliano Juárez; Razo, Guillermo Salas; Burgos, Armin Javier Ayala; Rodríguez, Ruy Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of fodder tree species (FTS) with condensed tannin contents: Cordia elaeagnoides, Platymiscium lasiocarpum, Vitex mollis, and Haematoxylon brasiletto, on in vitro methane (CH4) production at 24 h post incubation. The analysis was performed using the in vitro gas production technique, with three levels of inclusion/species: 600, 800, and 1,000 mg and with 4 replicates/species/level of inclusion. The substrate was incubated at 39°C, and the gas and CH4 production were recorded at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h post incubation. The data collected was analyzed through Pearson correlation, polinomial regression and fixed effects models. There were negative correlations between FTS-total gas volume (r = -0.40; p<0.001); FTS-volume of CH4 produced (r = -0.40; p<0.001) and between the inclusion level-volume of CH4 produced (r = -0.20; p<0.001). As well as a positive correlation between hours post incubation-total gas volume (r = 0.42; p<0.001) and between hours post incubation-volume of CH4 produced (r = 0.48; p<0.001). The FTS: C. elaeagnoides, V. mollis, and H. brasiletto have potential, in the three inclusion levels analyzed, to reduce CH4 emission on in vitro trials (>32.7%), taking into account the total CH4 production at 24 h of the forage used as reference (Avena sativa). It's suggested that C. elaeagnoides-according to its crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and condensed tannins content- is the best alternative within the FTS analyzed, for feeding ruminants and for the control of CH4 emissions during the dry season.

  17. Effect of Fodder Tree Species with Condensed Tannin Contents on In vitro Methane Production

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Ernestina Gutiérrez; Medina, Leonardo Hernández; Benavides, Liliana Márquez; Caratachea, Aureliano Juárez; Razo, Guillermo Salas; Burgos, Armin Javier Ayala; Rodríguez, Ruy Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of fodder tree species (FTS) with condensed tannin contents: Cordia elaeagnoides, Platymiscium lasiocarpum, Vitex mollis, and Haematoxylon brasiletto, on in vitro methane (CH4) production at 24 h post incubation. The analysis was performed using the in vitro gas production technique, with three levels of inclusion/species: 600, 800, and 1,000 mg and with 4 replicates/species/level of inclusion. The substrate was incubated at 39°C, and the gas and CH4 production were recorded at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h post incubation. The data collected was analyzed through Pearson correlation, polinomial regression and fixed effects models. There were negative correlations between FTS-total gas volume (r = −0.40; p<0.001); FTS-volume of CH4 produced (r = −0.40; p<0.001) and between the inclusion level-volume of CH4 produced (r = −0.20; p<0.001). As well as a positive correlation between hours post incubation-total gas volume (r = 0.42; p<0.001) and between hours post incubation-volume of CH4 produced (r = 0.48; p<0.001). The FTS: C. elaeagnoides, V. mollis, and H. brasiletto have potential, in the three inclusion levels analyzed, to reduce CH4 emission on in vitro trials (>32.7%), taking into account the total CH4 production at 24 h of the forage used as reference (Avena sativa). It’s suggested that C. elaeagnoides-according to its crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and condensed tannins content- is the best alternative within the FTS analyzed, for feeding ruminants and for the control of CH4 emissions during the dry season. PMID:26732330

  18. Differences between the rhizosphere microbiome of Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima-ancestor of all beet crops-and modern sugar beets.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Christin; Müller, Henry; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The structure and function of the plant microbiome is driven by plant species and prevailing environmental conditions. Effectuated by breeding efforts, modern crops diverge genetically and phenotypically from their wild relatives but little is known about consequences for the associated microbiota. Therefore, we studied bacterial rhizosphere communities associated with the wild beet B. vulgaris ssp. maritima grown in their natural habitat soil from coastal drift lines (CS) and modern sugar beets (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) cultivated in CS and potting soil (PS) under greenhouse conditions. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and pyrosequencing-based amplicon libraries revealed plant genotype- and soil-specific microbiomes. Wild beet plants harbor distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a more diverse bacterial community than the domesticated sugar beet plants. Although the rhizospheres of both plant genotypes were dominated by Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes, 37.5% of dominant OTUs were additionally detected in the wild beet rhizosphere. Analysis of the cultivable fraction confirmed these plant genotype-specific differences at functional level. The proportion of isolates displayed in vitro activity against phytopathogens was lower for wild beet (≤45.8%) than for sugar beet (≤57.5%). Conversely, active isolates from the wild beet exhibited stronger ability to cope with abiotic stresses. From all samples, active isolates of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila were frequently identified. In addition, soil type-specific impacts on the composition of bacterial communities were found: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were only detected in plants cultivated in CS; whereas Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria dominated in PS. Overall, in comparison to modern sugar beets, wild beets were associated with taxonomically and functionally distinct microbiomes.

  19. Differences between the rhizosphere microbiome of Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima—ancestor of all beet crops—and modern sugar beets

    PubMed Central

    Zachow, Christin; Müller, Henry; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The structure and function of the plant microbiome is driven by plant species and prevailing environmental conditions. Effectuated by breeding efforts, modern crops diverge genetically and phenotypically from their wild relatives but little is known about consequences for the associated microbiota. Therefore, we studied bacterial rhizosphere communities associated with the wild beet B. vulgaris ssp. maritima grown in their natural habitat soil from coastal drift lines (CS) and modern sugar beets (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) cultivated in CS and potting soil (PS) under greenhouse conditions. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and pyrosequencing-based amplicon libraries revealed plant genotype- and soil-specific microbiomes. Wild beet plants harbor distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a more diverse bacterial community than the domesticated sugar beet plants. Although the rhizospheres of both plant genotypes were dominated by Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes, 37.5% of dominant OTUs were additionally detected in the wild beet rhizosphere. Analysis of the cultivable fraction confirmed these plant genotype-specific differences at functional level. The proportion of isolates displayed in vitro activity against phytopathogens was lower for wild beet (≤45.8%) than for sugar beet (≤57.5%). Conversely, active isolates from the wild beet exhibited stronger ability to cope with abiotic stresses. From all samples, active isolates of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila were frequently identified. In addition, soil type-specific impacts on the composition of bacterial communities were found: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were only detected in plants cultivated in CS; whereas Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria dominated in PS. Overall, in comparison to modern sugar beets, wild beets were associated with taxonomically and functionally distinct microbiomes. PMID:25206350

  20. Foam formation in biogas plants caused by anaerobic digestion of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Lucie; Lehnig, Marcus; Schenk, Joachim; Zehnsdorf, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    The use of sugar beet in anaerobic digestion (AD) during biogas production can lead to process upsets such as excessive foaming in fermenters. In the present study, foam formation in sugar beet-fed digestates was studied in foaming tests. The increasing disintegration grade of sugar beet was observed to have a promoting effect on foaming in the digestate but did not affect the biogas yield. Chemical analysis of foam and digestate from sugar beet silage AD showed high concentrations of pectin, other carbohydrates and N-containing substances in the foam. Both pectin and sucrose showed little foaming in AD. Nevertheless, sucrose and calcium chloride had a promoting effect on foaming for pectin AD. Salts of divalent ions also enhanced the foam intensity in the case of sugar beet silage AD, whereas ammonium chloride and urea had a lessening effect on sugar beet-based foaming.

  1. Photoacoustic and optothermal studies of tomato ketchup adulterated by the red beet (Beta vulgaris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicanic, D.; Westra, E.; Seters, J.; van Houten, S.; Huberts, D.; Colić-Barić, I.; Cozijnsen, J.; Boshoven, H.

    2005-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy and optothermal window (OW) technique were used to explore their potential to detect red beet added as a colorant to tomato ketchup. The associated changes of colour resulting in the changes of absorbance (and hence of PA and OT signals) were monitored in the 500 nm region corresponding to the absorption maximum of lycopene. Both methods were shown capable of quantifying about 1% of red beet (by mass) in the mixture of ketchup and red beet.

  2. Maize supplementation of Pelibuey sheep in a silvopastoral system: fodder selection, nutrient intake and resilience against gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Retama-Flores, C; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Cámara-Sarmiento, R; Canul-Ku, H L

    2012-01-01

    This trial evaluated the effect of maize supplementation on the ingestive behavior, nutrient intake and the resilience against gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection of hair sheep in a silvopastoral system containing tropical grasses and legume trees. In addition, it attempted to determine the metabolic cost of the natural GIN infection in supplemented and non-supplemented animals. Twenty-nine 3-month-old lambs (male and female), raised nematode free, were allocated to four groups: I-NS (infected, not supplemented, n = 8), I-S (infected, supplemented with maize at 1.5% live weight (LW), n = 7), T-NS (treated with moxidectin 0.2 mg/kg LW every 28 days, and not supplemented, n = 7) and T-S (treated with moxidectin and supplemented with maize at 1.5% LW, n = 7). During the 70-day trial, fodder intake, fodder selection, LW change (LWC), red blood cell counts (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht) and eggs per gram of feces (EPG) were measured every 14 days. Supplement consumption was recorded daily. Metabolizable energy (ME) and protein (MP) consumption from the feeds were estimated. Maize supplementation helped to improve the resilience of hair sheep lambs against GIN infections. The I-S and T-NS groups showed similar LWC, RBC, Hb and Ht (P > 0.05) and both were higher than those in the I-NS group (P < 0.05). No difference was found in EPG between the I-NS and the I-S groups (P > 0.05). No effect of sex was observed in the different variables. Although all groups showed low dry matter intake (DMI) (< 2% LW), supplemented groups (T-S and I-S) showed higher total DMI (fodder + maize; P < 0.05), hence higher ME and MP intakes than the non-supplemented groups (T-NS and I-NS). All groups showed similar fodder selection patterns. The estimated metabolic cost of parasitism was ME = 0.70 MJ/day and MP = 9.2 g/day in the I-S animals. Meanwhile, the cost in the I-NS animals was ME = 1.46 MJ/day and MP = 12.71 g/day. Maize supplementation was an economically viable strategy

  3. Transgenic sugar beet tolerant to imidazolinone obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Kishchenko, E M; Komarnitskii, I K; Kuchuk, N V

    2011-01-01

    Sugar beet is highly sensitive to imidazolinone herbicides thus rotational restrictions exist. In order to develop imidazolinone tolerant sugar beets als gene from Arabidopsis thaliana encoding acetolactate synthase with S653N mutation was used for genetic transformation. Transgenic sugar beet plants were obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of aseptic seedlings using vacuum-infiltration. The efficiency of genetic transformation was 5.8%. RT-PCR analysis of obtained plants revealed accumulation of specific als transcript. The resistance to imidazolinone was proved for developed transgenic sugar beet plants in vitro and in greenhouse conditions after spraying with imazethapyr (Pursuit, BASF).

  4. Capture and use of solar radiation, water, and nitrogen by sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Jaggard, K W; Qi, A; Ober, E S

    2009-01-01

    Sugar beet is spring-sown for sugar production in most sugar beet-growing countries. It is grown as a vegetative crop and it accumulates yield (sugar) from very early in its growth cycle. As long as the sugar beet plants do not flower, the sugar accumulation period is indefinite and yield continues to increase. This paper reviews the success of the sugar beet crop in capturing and using solar radiation, water and mineral nitrogen resources. The prospects for improved resource capture and therefore increased sugar yield are also considered, particularly the potential to increase solar radiation interception in the future by sowing the crop in the autumn.

  5. Energy reduction in beet sugar processing by cossette liming

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, J.M.; Camirand, W.M.; Neumann, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    Under appropriate conditions of temperature and fresh Ca(OH)/sub 2/ application, demethylation occurs in the pectin in the cell walls of sugar beet cossettes, allowing Ca/sup 2 +/ to precipitate the pectin as calcium pectate. The calcium pectate will not degrade and pass into solution during subsequent hot extraction of sugar from the cossettes. This retention of pectin in the pulp was shown by 10 to 20% increases in solids weight in the pulp for a number of processing conditions. The toughened pulp produced by retention of calcium pectate allowed easier mechanical dewatering of the pulp which could save considerably on the heat normally required to dry the pulp for cattle feed. Beyond data reported in this paper, there are qualitative indications that the sugar juice extracted from limed cossettes is purer than standard juice, for pectin and colloidal materials remain in the pulp. Thus, much less purification of the juice with lime would be necessary than is required in standard beet-sugar processing, and the current 2% CaO used for purification may be cut almost in half. This represents another energy saving, for production of CaO at the factory is a major consumer of energy. These, along with other possible energy savings resulting from cossette liming (such as less water used for extraction, cold extraction, ion exchange of the purer juice), could produce an overall saving up to 20% of the energy currently used in beet-sugar processing. Some of these possibilities will be further investigated.

  6. Quaternary IPM (integrated pest management)--concept for the control of powdery mildew in sugar beets.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P F J; Verreet, A

    2008-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe betae (Vanha) Weltzien, may be assumed as an important leaf disease in sugar beet growing areas of central Europe. Although the causal agent is mainly adapted to arid climatic zones, the disease is appearing every year, where the extent of infection is mainly dependent on weather conditions and susceptibility of cultivar. The losses caused by powdery mildew seldom exceed 10% of sugar yield; moreover, losses are likely only under the condition that the epidemic onset occurs before end-August. Nevertheless, the epidemic onset varies in a wide range, as there are years with high incidence followed by growing periods without severe infection. Therefore, in order to have a flexible control of the disease, where the use of fungicides could be minimised to an essential amount, a quaternary IPM (Integrated Pest Management) -concept was developed. The development is based on epidemiological field studies (Germany, 1993-2004, n = 76) of sugar beet leaf diseases under variation of year, site and cultivar. Efficacy of fungicide treatment timing was assessed in relation to the epidemic development. Comparison of treatments comprised fungicide sprays carried out from disease initiation till later stages of the epidemic. Additionally, the assessments were performed in relation to an untreated and a healthy control--the latter was three times treated according to a treatment regime with three to four week intervals. The effect of different application timings was measured by the potential of disease and yield loss control. The quaternary concept combines the advantages of four elements in order to compensate the constraints of the single tools: The period without disease risk is determined by a so-called negative-prognosis (i). First symptoms appear in the period from mid-July till the beginning of September. If disease initiation cannot be excluded, field observations by a sample of 100 leaves are advised. The disease scores enable the appliance

  7. Contamination of soil, medicinal, and fodder plants with lead and cadmium present in mine-affected areas, Northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Nawab, Javed; Khan, Sardar; Shah, Mohammad Tahir; Qamar, Zahir; Din, Islamud; Mahmood, Qaisar; Gul, Nayab; Huang, Qing

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in the soil and plants (medicinal and fodder) grown in chromite mining-affected areas, Northern Pakistan. Soil and plant samples were collected and analyzed for Pb and Cd concentrations using atomic absorption spectrometer. Soil pollution load indices (PLIs) were greater than 2 for both Cd and Pb, indicating high level of contamination in the study area. Furthermore, Cd concentrations in the soil surrounding the mining sites exceeded the maximum allowable limit (MAL) (0.6 mg kg(-1)), while the concentrations of Pb were lower than the MAL (350 mg kg(-1)) set by State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) for agriculture soil. The concentrations of Cd and Pb were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the soil of the mining-contaminated sites as compared to the reference site, which can be attributed to the dispersion of toxic heavy metals, present in the bed rocks and waste of the mines. The concentrations of Pb and Cd in majority of medicinal and fodder plant species grown in surrounding areas of mines were higher than their MALs set by World Health Organization/Food Agriculture Organization (WHO/FAO) for herbal (10 and 0.3 mg kg(-1), respectively) and edible (0.3 and 0.2 mg kg(-1), respectively) plants. The high concentrations of Cd and Pb may cause contamination of the food chain and health risk.

  8. Resistance to curly top of sugar beet in germplasm developed at USDA-ARS Ft. Collins, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seventy-one sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) lines from the USDA-ARS Ft. Collins sugar beet program and three control lines were screened for resistance to Beet curly top virus (BCTV) in 2013. Commercial cultivars ‘Monohikari’ (susceptible), ‘HM PM90’ (resistant) and Betaseed line Beta G6040 (resista...

  9. 29 CFR 516.18 - Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or sugar beet services, who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section 7....18 Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are... cigar leaf tobacco, cotton, cottonseed, cotton ginning, sugar cane, sugar processing or sugar beets...

  10. 21 CFR 173.320 - Chemicals for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-sugar and beet-sugar mills. 173.320 Section 173.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills. Agents for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills may be safely used in accordance with the following conditions: (a) They...

  11. 29 CFR 516.18 - Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or sugar beet services, who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section 7....18 Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are... cigar leaf tobacco, cotton, cottonseed, cotton ginning, sugar cane, sugar processing or sugar beets...

  12. 21 CFR 173.320 - Chemicals for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-sugar and beet-sugar mills. 173.320 Section 173.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills. Agents for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills may be safely used in accordance with the following conditions: (a) They...

  13. 21 CFR 173.320 - Chemicals for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-sugar and beet-sugar mills. 173.320 Section 173.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills. Agents for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills may be safely used in accordance with the following conditions: (a) They...

  14. 29 CFR 516.18 - Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or sugar beet services, who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section 7....18 Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are... cigar leaf tobacco, cotton, cottonseed, cotton ginning, sugar cane, sugar processing or sugar beets...

  15. 29 CFR 516.18 - Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or sugar beet services, who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section 7....18 Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are... cigar leaf tobacco, cotton, cottonseed, cotton ginning, sugar cane, sugar processing or sugar beets...

  16. 21 CFR 173.320 - Chemicals for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-sugar and beet-sugar mills. 173.320 Section 173.320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills. Agents for controlling microorganisms in cane-sugar and beet-sugar mills may be safely used in accordance with the following conditions: (a) They...

  17. 29 CFR 516.18 - Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or sugar beet services, who are partially exempt from overtime pay requirements pursuant to section 7....18 Employees employed in certain tobacco, cotton, sugar cane or sugar beet services, who are... cigar leaf tobacco, cotton, cottonseed, cotton ginning, sugar cane, sugar processing or sugar beets...

  18. The identification of allergen proteins in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) pollen causing occupational allergy in greenhouses

    PubMed Central

    Luoto, Susanne; Lambert, Wietske; Blomqvist, Anna; Emanuelsson, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Background During production of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) seeds in greenhouses, workers frequently develop allergic symptoms. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize possible allergens in sugar beet pollen. Methods Sera from individuals at a local sugar beet seed producing company, having positive SPT and specific IgE to sugar beet pollen extract, were used for immunoblotting. Proteins in sugar beet pollen extracts were separated by 1- and 2-dimensional electrophoresis, and IgE-reactive proteins analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results A 14 kDa protein was identified as an allergen, since IgE-binding was inhibited by the well-characterized allergen Che a 2, profilin, from the related species Chenopodium album. The presence of 17 kDa and 14 kDa protein homologues to both the allergens Che a 1 and Che a 2 were detected in an extract from sugar beet pollen, and partial amino acid sequences were determined, using inclusion lists for tandem mass spectrometry based on homologous sequences. Conclusion Two occupational allergens were identified in sugar beet pollen showing sequence similarity with Chenopodium allergens. Sequence data were obtained by mass spectrometry (70 and 25%, respectively for Beta v 1 and Beta v 2), and can be used for cloning and recombinant expression of the allergens. As for treatment of Chenopodium pollinosis, immunotherapy with sugar beet pollen extracts may be feasible. PMID:18694503

  19. A nine-scaffold genome assembly of the nine chromosome sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the course of 20 months, we assembled a sugar beet genome (700 - 800 Mb) into a close representation of the nine haploid chromosomes of beet. This result was obtained by sequentially assembling sequences >40 kb in length, orienting these assemblies via optical mapping, and scaffolding with in v...

  20. Temperature, Moisture, and Fungicide Effects in Managing Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot of Sugar Beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 is the causal agent of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot in sugar beet. To assess the capacity at which other anastomosis groups (AGs) are able to infect sugar beet, 15 AGs and subgroups were tested for pathogenicity on resistant (FC708 CMS) and susceptible (Monohikari) seedl...

  1. Predict compositions and mechanical properties of sugar beet using hyperspectral scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose, soluble solids, and moisture content and mechanical properties are important quality/property attributes of sugar beet. In this study, hyperspectral scattering images for the spectral region of 500-1,000 nm were acquired from 398 beet slices, from which relative mean spectra were calculated...

  2. Identification of a SNP marker associated with WB242 nematode resistance in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beet-cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schmidt) is one of the major diseases of sugar beet. The identification of molecular markers associated to the nematode resistance would be helpful for developing resistant varieties. The aim of this study was the identification of SNP (Single Nucleotide ...

  3. Sugar Beet Resistance to Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot: Where does it fit in?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), Rhizoctonia root- or crown-rot is caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG-2-2). Seedling damping-off in sugar beet is caused by R. solani of both anastomosis groups, AG-2-2 and AG-4. Rhizoctonia solani subgroup AG-2-2 IV had been considered to be the primary cause of Rhi...

  4. Phoma species on beet: more cause disease than just Phoma betae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phoma can cause damage to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) at multiple growth stages. It has historically been an important seedling disease, but this is largely managed by ensuring clean seed for planting. The pathogen also can cause a root rot, a leaf spot, and rotting of beets during storage. In the Un...

  5. Storage rot in sugar beet: variable response over time and with different host germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is commonly stored in outdoor piles prior to processing for food and animal feed. While in storage the crop is subject to multiple post-harvest rots. In the Michigan growing region, little loss due to storage rots is observed until beets have been in storage for several mo...

  6. Pathogenicity, vegetative compatibility, and genetic diversity of verticillium dahliae isolates from sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt of sugar beet is a disease problem that has received very little attention in the literature, but has been reported to reduce sucrose production and purity. To improve our understanding of the disease, a survey of sugar beet plants with wilt symptoms in Idaho was conducted in 2007...

  7. Beet curly top resistance in USDA-ARS plant introductions, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Curly top caused by Curtovirus species is a widespread disease problem vectored by the beet leafhopper in semiarid sugar beet production areas. Host resistance is the primary defense against this problem but resistance in commercial cultivars is only low to intermediate. In order to identify novel s...

  8. Evaluation of genetic diversity and root traits of sea beet accessions of the Adriatic Sea coast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty nine sea beet [Beta vulgaris L. subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang.] accessions of the Adriatic coast were screened genetically and for their adaptive morpho-functional root traits in order to identify new sources of abiotic resistances for sugar beet breeding programs. Genetic diversity was evaluat...

  9. Rhizoctonia belly rot in cucumber fruit using Rhizoctonia solani isolated from sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumbers are grown in rotation with sugar beets in some areas in Michigan but their interaction with important diseases affecting sugar beets is not well known. Cucumbers are known to be primarily susceptible to Rhizoctonia solani AG-4, but little is known about their susceptibility to AG 2-2 isola...

  10. Insect resistance to sugar beet pests mediated by a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor transgene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We transformed sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) hairy roots and Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a Beta vulgaris root gene (BvSTI) that codes for a serine proteinase inhibitor. BvSTI is a root gene cloned from the F1016 breeding line that has moderate levels of resistance to the sugar beet root maggot ...

  11. Pathogenicity, vegetative compatibility, and genetic diversity in verticillium dahliae from sugar beet and historical strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt of sugar beet is a disease problem that has received very little attention in the literature, but has been reported to reduce sucrose production and purity. To improve our understanding of Verticillium wilt, a survey of sugar beet plants with wilt symptoms (leaves with yellow or n...

  12. Response of sugar beet recombinant inbred lines to post-harvest rot fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet is commonly stored in outdoor piles prior to processing. During this storage period the crop is subject to multiple post-harvest rots. Resistance to three post harvest rots was identified in two sugar beet germplasm in the 1970s, but there has been little work done on host resistance to p...

  13. Response of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) recombinant inbred lines to post-harvest rot fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is commonly stored in outdoor piles prior to processing for food and animal feed. During this storage period the crop is subject to multiple post-harvest rots. Resistance to three post harvest rots was identified in two sugar beet germplasm in the 1970s, but there has been...

  14. Evaluation of beet leafhopper transmitted virescence agent damage in the Columbia Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato purple top disease is caused by a phytoplasma known as Beet Leafhopper Transmitted Virescence Agent (BLTVA), which is vectored by the beet leafhopper (BLH, Circulifer tenellus Baker). Previous studies determined that BLTVA causes significant reduction in yield and tuber quality; however, dete...

  15. The influence of soil moisture and Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis and intraspecific group on the incidence of damping-off and the incidence and severity of Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (Rhizoctonia solani) reduces plant stands, sugar quality and yield in sugar beet. To evaluate the influence of R. solani anastomosis (AG) and intraspecific groups and soil moisture on disease incidence and severity, a field trial was established in Ridgetown, Ontario, ...

  16. East Europe Report: Economic and Industrial Affairs, No. 2416

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-28

    of insecticides (Pirimor 0.4 kg) 35. Harvest of beet cuts and transport 36. Harvest of beet roots and transport 37. Silaging of beet cuts, spreading...Grain maize 10. Edible peas 11. Fava beans 12. Winter rape 13. Poppies 14. Sugar beets 15. Fodder beets 16. Sugar beet seedlings 17. Sugar beet seed

  17. Beet western yellows virus infects the carnivorous plant Nepenthes mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Sissi; Biteau, Flore; Mignard, Benoit; Marais, Armelle; Candresse, Thierry; Theil, Sébastien; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Hehn, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Although poleroviruses are known to infect a broad range of higher plants, carnivorous plants have not yet been reported as hosts. Here, we describe the first polerovirus naturally infecting the pitcher plant Nepenthes mirabilis. The virus was identified through bioinformatic analysis of NGS transcriptome data. The complete viral genome sequence was assembled from overlapping PCR fragments and shown to share 91.1 % nucleotide sequence identity with the US isolate of beet western yellows virus (BWYV). Further analysis of other N. mirabilis plants revealed the presence of additional BWYV isolates differing by several insertion/deletion mutations in ORF5.

  18. Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid in garden beets (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Edward; Zhou, Haihong; Krasinska, Karolina M; Chien, Allis; Becker, Christopher H

    2006-05-01

    Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (L-Aze) is a toxic and teratogenic non-protein amino acid. In many species, including man, L-Aze is misincorporated into protein in place of proline, altering collagen, keratin, hemoglobin, and protein folding. In animal models of teratogenesis, it causes a wide range of malformations. The role of L-Aze in human disease has been unexplored, probably because the compound has not been associated with foods consumed by humans. Herein we report the presence of L-Aze in the garden or table beet (Beta vulgaris).

  19. Sugar beet production as influenced by water stress

    SciTech Connect

    Flack, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    Irrigation water supplies are becoming expensive and scarce in the western United States. As a water management tool, production functions indicating relationships between crop yields and evapotranspiration have been utilized. Models have been developed using this information. Transferability of these models is dependent upon understanding the moisture extraction characteristics for a given crop under a given set of climatic and soil conditions. Therefore, a wide range of water stress conditions must be produced. The objective of our research was to generate production function data for sugar beets (Beta vulgaris) as influenced by drought stress under irrigation.

  20. Energy use reduction potential in the beet sugar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, T.S.; Heist, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Process energy use data are presented for most of the forty operating beet sugar factories in the United States. Sixty percent of the processing capacity is in states that actively pursue cogeneration projects. Most of the present factories cogenerate steam and electricity for their own use. Fossil fuel boilers and low- to medium-pressure steam turbines are used exclusively for this purpose. Three alternative cogeneration technologies are evaluated, with economic feasibility found to depend on the price at which excess electricity can be sold.

  1. Energy use reduction potential in the beet sugar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, T.S.; Cleary, M.

    1985-01-01

    Process energy use data are presented for most of the forty operating beet sugar factories in the United States. Sixty percent of the processing capacity is in states that actively pursue cogeneration projects. Most of the present factories cogenerate steam and electricity for their own use. Fossil fuel boilers and low- to medium-pressure steam turbines are used exclusively for this purpose. Three alternative cogeneration technologies are evaluated, with economic feasibility found to depend on the price at which excess electricity can be sold.

  2. Fresh and preserved green fodder modify effects of urinary acidifiers on urine pH of horses.

    PubMed

    Goren, G; Fritz, J; Dillitzer, N; Hipp, B; Kienzle, E

    2014-04-01

    Hay stabilises urine pH in horses. It is unknown whether this is an effect of structure or of chemical composition. In this study, four ponies (230-384 kg body weight [BW]) were fed six different diets with either a structure or a composition similar to hay with and without acidifiers in a cross-over experimental design in amounts to maintain body weight with the following main compounds: Fresh grass (GRASS), alfalfa hay (ALF), grass cobs (COBS), grass silage (SIL), straw (STR) or extruded straw (STRe) for 2 to 10 days. Urine pH was measured in all trials, blood pH, blood base excess and bicarbonate as well as mineral balance were determined in GRASS, ALF, STR and STRe. In the trials with straw and extruded straw, urine pH decreased significantly (STR control: 7.8 ± 0.23, acidifier: 5.2 ± 0.38) when acidifiers were added, whereas in all other diets that were based on fresh or preserved green fodder, pH did not decrease below 7. Blood pH was similarly affected by diet and acidifiers. Acidifiers had little effect on the pre-prandial blood pH, only in diet STR there was a significant reduction in relation to control. Post-prandial blood pH was significantly reduced by acidifiers in all diets. Blood bicarbonate and base excess showed corresponding effects. Faecal and renal mineral excretion and apparent mineral digestibility were not systematically affected by diet or acidifiers except for chloride. Chloride added as inorganic chloride salt had an even better apparent digestibility than chloride originating from feed. Because only green plant material stabilised acid base balance, chlorophyll and its metabolites are discussed as potential mediators of the effect of green fodder on acid base balance.

  3. Determination of sucrose content in sugar beet by portable visible and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Leiqing; Zhu, Qibing; Lu, Renfu; McGrath, J Mitchell

    2015-01-15

    Visible and near-infrared spectra in interactance mode were acquired for intact and sliced beet samples, using two portable spectrometers for the spectral regions of 400-1100 nm and 900-1600 nm, respectively. Sucrose prediction models for intact and sliced beets were developed and then validated. The spectrometer for 400-1100 nm was able to predict the sucrose content with correlations of prediction (rp) of 0.80 and 0.88 and standard errors of prediction (SEPs) of 0.89% and 0.70%, for intact beets and beet slices, respectively. The spectrometer for 900-1600 nm had rp values of 0.74 and 0.88 and SEPs of 1.02% and 0.69% for intact beets and beet slices. These results showed the feasibility of using the portable spectrometer to predict the sucrose content of beet slices. Using simple correlation analysis, the study also identified important wavelengths that had strong correlation with the sucrose content.

  4. Plasma membrane ATPase of red beet forms a phosphorylated intermediate.

    PubMed

    Briskin, D P; Poole, R J

    1983-03-01

    When a plasma membrane-enriched fraction isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was incubated in the presence of 40 micromolar [gamma-(32)P] ATP, 40 micromolar MgSO(4) at pH 6.5, a rapidly turning over phosphorylated protein was formed. Phosphorylation of the protein was substrate-specific for ATP, sensitive to diethylstilbestrol and vanadate, but insensitive to azide. When the dephosphorylation reaction was specifically studied, KCl was found to increase the turnover of the phosphorylated protein consistent with its stimulatory effect upon plasma membrane ATPase. The protein-bound phosphate was found to be most stable at a pH between 2 and 3 and under cold temperature, suggesting that the protein phosphate bond was an acyl-phosphate. When the phosphorylated protein was analyzed with lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, a labeled polypeptide with a molecular weight of about 100,000 daltons was observed. Phosphorylation of this polypeptide was rapidly turning over and Mg-dependent. It is concluded that the phosphorylation observed represents a reaction intermediate of the red beet plasma membrane ATPase.

  5. Integrated hydrolyzation and fermentation of sugar beet pulp to bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Rezić, Tonči; Oros, Damir; Marković, Iva; Kracher, Daniel; Ludwig, Roland; Santek, Božidar

    2013-09-28

    Sugar beet pulp is an abundant industrial waste material that holds a great potential for bioethanol production owing to its high content of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectin. Its structural and chemical robustness limits the yield of fermentable sugars obtained by hydrolyzation and represents the main bottleneck for bioethanol production. Physical (ultrasound and thermal) pretreatment methods were tested and combined with enzymatic hydrolysis by cellulase and pectinase to evaluate the most efficient strategy. The optimized hydrolysis process was combined with a fermentation step using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for ethanol production in a single-tank bioreactor. Optimal sugar beet pulp conversion was achieved at a concentration of 60 g/l (39% of dry weight) and a bioreactor stirrer speed of 960 rpm. The maximum ethanol yield was 0.1 g ethanol/g of dry weight (0.25 g ethanol/g total sugar content), the efficiency of ethanol production was 49%, and the productivity of the bioprocess was 0.29 g/l·h, respectively.

  6. Biodegradable composites from sugar beet pulp and poly(lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Liu, LinShu; Fishman, Marshall L; Hicks, Kevin B; Liu, Cheng-Kung

    2005-11-16

    Sugar beet pulp and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) composites were prepared by compression-heating. The resultant thermoplastics had a lower density, but they had tensile strength similar to that of pure PLA specimens as well as the same geometric properties. Tensile properties depended on the initial water content of sugar beet pulp and the process by which composites were manufactured. In comparison with sugar beet pulp, the composite showed improved water resistance. This can be attributed to the hydrophobic character of PLA and pulp-matrix interactions. The composite thermoplastics showed suitable properties for potential use as lightweight construction materials.

  7. Post-harvest regulated gene expression and splicing efficiency in storage roots of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Rotthues, Alexander; Kappler, Jeannette; Lichtfuss, Anna; Kloos, Dorothee U; Stahl, Dietmar J; Hehl, Reinhard

    2008-05-01

    Sixteen post-harvest upregulated genes from sugar beet comprising five novel sequences were isolated by subtractive cloning. Transcription profiles covering a period of up to 49 days after harvest under controlled storage conditions and in field clamps are reported. Post-harvest induced genes are involved in wound response, pathogen defense, dehydration stress, and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. An early induction of a cationic peroxidase indicates a response to post-harvest damage. Wound response reactions may also involve genes required for cell division such as a regulator of chromatin condensation and a precursor of the growth stimulating peptide phytohormone phytosulfokine-alpha. Surprisingly, also three putative non-protein coding genes were isolated. Two of these genes show intron specific and storage temperature dependent splicing of a precursor mRNA. The temperature dependent splicing of an intron containing sugar beet mRNA is also maintained in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. The storage induced genes are integrated into a model that proposes the response to several post-harvest stress conditions. Temperature regulated splicing may be a mechanism to sense seasonal temperature changes.

  8. Preliming of sugar beet cossettes to reduce energy in sugar beet processing. Final technical report, August 1, 1978-January 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, J.M.

    1981-06-30

    In the United States, the beet sugar industry is the most intensive user of energy, per unit value of product shipped. Approximately 2.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu of energy are required per ton of beets processed. The increasing cost and scarcity of energy has made the industry very receptive to process changes which can reduce energy requirements for sugar production. A two-year project was undertaken to determine the feasibility of liming fresh sugar beet cossettes, prior to extraction, as a means of reducing energy consumption. Fresh Ca(OH)/sub 2/ was added to cossettes for 10 min prior to introduction into the diffuser (extractor). It was found that up to 3.5 x 10/sup 5/ Btu/ton of beets sliced could be saved in pulp drying and 0.45 x 10/sup 5/ Btu/ton could be saved in production of lime (13.5% and 1.7%, respectively, of current overall energy requirements of the beet-sugar process). Quality of raw juice from the diffuser was much better with limed cossettes than with control cossettes. Experimental thin juice was slightly higher in lime salts and lower in quality than controls. Liming of cossettes by dipping in a slurry of 2.6% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ gave better results than mixing of cossettes with dry Ca(OH)/sub 2/ and would be much easier to implement in an existing plant.

  9. Analysis of Mannitol, as Tracer of Bacterial Infections in Cane and Beet Sugar Factories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannitol, formed mainly by Leuconostoc mesenteroides bacteria, is a sensitive marker of sugarcane and sugarbeet deterioration that can predict multiple processing problems. The delivery of consignments of deteriorated sugarcane or sugar beets to factories can detrimentally affect multiple process u...

  10. Analysis of Mannitol, as Tracer of Bacterial Infections in Cane and Beet Sugar Factories

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannitol, formed mainly by Leuconostoc mesenteroides bacteria, is a sensitive marker of sugarcane and sugarbeet deterioration that can predict multiple processing problems. The delivery of consignments of deteriorated sugarcane or sugar beets to factories can detrimentally affect multiple process un...

  11. Percolation transition, stipulated by the generation of ice in the sugar-beet tissue. (in Ukrainian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, L. A.; Zabashta, Yu. F.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Kostyuk, A. I.

    The temperature dependence of sugar-beet parenchyma tissue dynamic shear modulus has been studied. The dynamic shear modulus investigation was performed employing low frequency reverse torsional pendulum at the temperature ranging from 200 to 280 K. Percolation transition (T_0 = 251 K), stipulated by the generation of ice in the sugar-beet tissue, is discovered. The quantity of ice in the sugar-beet at the temperatures lower than the percolation transition temperature was calculated on the dynamic shear modulus temperature dependence in terms of the percolation theory. It is concluded that this transition corresponds to the appearance of an infinite ice cluster. One can maintain that the sugar-beet survives above the percolation transition temperature.

  12. Airborne and ground-based remote sensing for the estimation of evapotranspiration and yield of bean, potato, and sugar beet crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, Harikishan

    The focus of this research was two-fold: (1) extend the reflectance-based crop coefficient approach to non-grain (potato and sugar beet), and vegetable crops (bean), and (2) develop vegetation index (VI)-yield statistical models for potato and sugar beet crops using high-resolution aerial multispectral imagery. Extensive crop biophysical sampling (leaf area index and aboveground dry biomass sampling) and canopy reflectance measurements formed the backbone of developing of canopy reflectance-based crop coefficients for bean, potato, and sugar beet crops in this study. Reflectance-based crop coefficient equations were developed for the study crops cultivated in Kimberly, Idaho, and subsequently used in water availability simulations in the plant root zone during 1998 and 1999 seasons. The simulated soil water profiles were compared with independent measurements of actual soil water profiles in the crop root zone in selected fields. It is concluded that the canopy reflectance-based crop coefficient technique can be successfully extended to non-grain crops as well. While the traditional basal crop coefficients generally expect uniform growth in a region the reflectance-based crop coefficients represent the actual crop growth pattern (in less than ideal water availability conditions) in individual fields. Literature on crop canopy interactions with sunlight states that there is a definite correspondence between leaf area index progression in the season and the final yield. In case of crops like potato and sugar beet, the yield is influenced not only on how early and how quickly the crop establishes its canopy but also on how long the plant stands on the ground in a healthy state. The integrated area under the crop growth curve has shown excellent correlations with hand-dug samples of potato and sugar beet crops in this research. Soil adjusted vegetation index-yield models were developed, and validated using multispectral aerial imagery. Estimated yield images were

  13. [The "crystals" in the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves].

    PubMed

    Semenova, G A; Romanova, A K

    2011-01-01

    Crystal containing cells widely distributed in plant tissues, though the origin of the crystals and their functions are still opened to question. Membrane vesicles in beet leaves are visible in electronic microscope. They originate in cytoplasm and penetrate into vacuole by pinocytosis with participation of tonoplast. In light microscope, vesicles are luminous likewise crystals in crystal cells. Such vesicles-"crystals" fulfill crystal cells also. The content of vesicles-"crystals" are electronic transparent at every path of leaf development. It was proposed that distinct vesicles-"crystals" in cytoplasm and vacuole and mass of them in crystal cells, vein bundles, and epidermal cells--all of them are lytic compartments. Later, obviously, true crystals are formed.

  14. An insensitive acetylcholinesterase confers resistance to methomyl in the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Byrne, F J; Toscano, N C

    2001-04-01

    Two forms of acetylcholinesterase were identified in field populations of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), collected from cotton in San Joaquin Valley, CA. Strains (BESS and BKRR) homogeneous for each variant were isolated and their relative susceptibilities to methomyl, chlorpyrifos, and chlorpyrifos-oxon assessed by topical application bioassay. In comparisons with a laboratory susceptible strain (DOW), BKRR and BESS expressed 68-fold and sevenfold resistance, respectively, to the carbamate methomyl. Neither strain was cross-resistant to chlorpyrifos or its oxygen analog (chlorpyrifos-oxon). In biochemical studies, the BKRR AChE enzyme was approximately 30-fold and sixfold more insensitive to methomyl and chlorpyrifos-oxon, respectively, compared with the DOW enzyme. The correlation between the toxicological and biochemical studies provides strong evidence that target-site insensitivity is an important mechanism of resistance to methomyl. The lack of significant cross-resistance to chlorpyrifos suggests that the insensitive AChE in these field populations was selected by methomyl alone and not by the organophosphate.

  15. Investigation of copper sorption by sugar beet processing lime waste.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, J A; Strawn, D G; Scheckel, K G

    2013-01-01

    In the western United States, sugar beet processing for sugar recovery generates a lime-based waste product (∼250,000 Mg yr) that has little liming value in the region's calcareous soils. This area has recently experienced an increase in dairy production, with dairies using copper (Cu)-based hoof baths to prevent hoof diseases. A concern exists regarding soil Cu accumulation because spent hoof baths may be disposed of in waste ponds, with pond waters being used for irrigation. The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of lime waste to sorb Cu. Lime waste was mixed with increasing Cu-containing solutions (up to 100,000 mg Cu kg lime waste) at various buffered pH values (pH 6, 7, 8, and 9) and shaken over various time periods (up to 30 d). Copper sorption phenomenon was quantified using sorption maximum fitting, and the sorption mechanism was investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Results showed that sorption onto lime waste increased with decreasing pH and that the maximum Cu sorption of ∼45,000 mg kg occurred at pH 6. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that Cu(OH) was the probable species present, although the precipitate existed as small multinuclear precipitates on the surface of the lime waste. Such structures may be precursors for larger surface precipitates that develop over longer incubation times. Findings suggest that sugar beet processing lime waste can viably sorb Cu from liquid waste streams, and thus it may have the ability to remove Cu from spent hoof baths.

  16. How far can sodium substitute for potassium in red beet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, G. V.; Wheeler, R. M.; Stutte, G. W.; Levine, L. H.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Sodium (Na) movement between plants and humans is one of the more critical aspects of bioregenerative systems of life support, which NASA is studying for the establishment of long-term bases on the Lunar or Martian surface. This study was conducted to determine the extent to which Na can replace potassium (K) in red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp vulgaris) without adversely affecting metabolic functions such as water relations, photosynthetic rates, and thus growth. Two cultivars, Ruby Queen and Klein Bol, were grown for 42 days at 1200 micromoles mol-1 CO2 in a growth chamber using a re-circulating nutrient film technique with 0%, 75%, 95%, and 98% Na substitution for K in a modified half-strength Hoagland solution. Total biomass of Ruby Queen was greatest at 95% Na substitution and equal at 0% and 98% Na substitution. For Klein Bol, there was a 75% reduction in total biomass at 98% Na substitution. Nearly 95% of the total plant K was replaced with Na at 98% Na substitution in both cultivars. Potassium concentrations in leaves decreased from 120 g kg-1 dwt in 0% Na substitution to 3.5 g kg-1 dwt at 98% Na substitution. Leaf chlorophyll concentration, photosynthetic rate, and osmotic potential were not affected in either cultivar by Na substitution for K. Leaf glycinebetaine levels were doubled at 75% Na substitution in Klein Bol, but decreased at higher levels of Na substitution. For Ruby Queen, glycinebetaine levels in leaf increased with the first increase of Na levels and were maintained at the higher Na levels. These results indicate that in some cultivars of red beet, 95% of the normal tissue K can be replaced by Na without a reduction in growth.

  17. Carboxylate metabolism in sugar beet plants grown with excess Zn.

    PubMed

    Sagardoy, R; Morales, F; Rellán-Álvarez, R; Abadía, A; Abadía, J; López-Millán, A F

    2011-05-01

    The effects of Zn excess on carboxylate metabolism were investigated in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plants grown hydroponically in a growth chamber. Root extracts of plants grown with 50 or 100μM Zn in the nutrient solution showed increases in several enzymatic activities related to organic acid metabolism, including citrate synthase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, when compared to activities in control root extracts. Root citric and malic acid concentrations increased in plants grown with 100μM Zn, but not in plants grown with 50μM Zn. In the xylem sap, plants grown with 50 and 100μM Zn showed increases in the concentrations of citrate and malate compared to the controls. Leaves of plants grown with 50 or 100μM Zn showed increases in the concentrations of citric and malic acid and in the activities of citrate synthase and fumarase. Leaf isocitrate dehydrogenase increased only in plants grown with 50μM Zn when compared to the controls. In plants grown with 300μM Zn, the only enzyme showing activity increases in root extracts was citrate synthase, whereas the activities of other enzymes decreased compared to the controls, and root citrate concentrations increased. In the 300μM Zn-grown plants, the xylem concentrations of citric and malic acids were higher than those of controls, whereas in leaf extracts the activity of fumarase increased markedly, and the leaf citric acid concentration was higher than in the controls. Based on our data, a metabolic model of the carboxylate metabolism in sugar beet plants grown under Zn excess is proposed.

  18. Direct prediction of bioethanol yield in sugar beet pulp using near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Magaña, C; Núñez-Sánchez, N; Fernández-Cabanás, V M; García, P; Serrano, A; Pérez-Marín, D; Pemán, J M; Alcalde, E

    2011-10-01

    Sugar beets are a raw material for the production of sugar and ethanol. The decision on which end product to pursue could be facilitated by fast and reliable means of predicting the potential ethanol yield from the beets. A Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopy-based approach was tested for the direct prediction of the potential bioethanol production from sugar beets. A modified partial least squares (MPLS) regression model was applied to 125 samples, ranging from 21.9 to 31.0 gL(-1) of bioethanol in sugar beet brei. The samples were analyzed in reflectance mode in a Direct Contact Food Analyser (DCFA) FOSS-NIRSystems 6500 monochromator, with standard error of cross validation (SECV), standard error of prediction (SEP), coefficient of determination (r(2)) and coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.51, 0.49, 0.91 and 1.9 gL(-1), respectively. The NIR technique allowed direct prediction of the ethanol yield from sugar beet brei (i.e. the product obtained after sawing beets with a proper machine) in less than 3 min.

  19. Proteomic Profiling of Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris) Leaves during Rhizomania Compatible Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Kimberly M.; Broccardo, Carolyn J.; Prenni, Jessica E.; Wintermantel, William M.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizomania, caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), severely impacts sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) production throughout the world, and is widely prevalent in most production regions. Initial efforts to characterize proteome changes focused primarily on identifying putative host factors that elicit resistant interactions with BNYVV, but as resistance breaking strains become more prevalent, effective disease control strategies will require the application of novel methods based on better understanding of disease susceptibility and symptom development. Herein, proteomic profiling was conducted on susceptible sugar beet, infected with two strains of BNYVV, to clarify the types of proteins prevalent during compatible virus-host plant interactions. Total protein was extracted from sugar beet leaf tissue infected with BNYVV, quantified, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. A total of 203 proteins were confidently identified, with a predominance of proteins associated with photosynthesis and energy, metabolism, and response to stimulus. Many proteins identified in this study are typically associated with systemic acquired resistance and general plant defense responses. These results expand on relatively limited proteomic data available for sugar beet and provide the ground work for additional studies focused on understanding the interaction of BNYVV with sugar beet. PMID:28250378

  20. Proteomic Profiling of Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris) Leaves during Rhizomania Compatible Interactions.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kimberly M; Broccardo, Carolyn J; Prenni, Jessica E; Wintermantel, William M

    2014-04-09

    Rhizomania, caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), severely impacts sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) production throughout the world, and is widely prevalent in most production regions. Initial efforts to characterize proteome changes focused primarily on identifying putative host factors that elicit resistant interactions with BNYVV, but as resistance breaking strains become more prevalent, effective disease control strategies will require the application of novel methods based on better understanding of disease susceptibility and symptom development. Herein, proteomic profiling was conducted on susceptible sugar beet, infected with two strains of BNYVV, to clarify the types of proteins prevalent during compatible virus-host plant interactions. Total protein was extracted from sugar beet leaf tissue infected with BNYVV, quantified, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. A total of 203 proteins were confidently identified, with a predominance of proteins associated with photosynthesis and energy, metabolism, and response to stimulus. Many proteins identified in this study are typically associated with systemic acquired resistance and general plant defense responses. These results expand on relatively limited proteomic data available for sugar beet and provide the ground work for additional studies focused on understanding the interaction of BNYVV with sugar beet.

  1. Transfer of nitrogen from a tropical legume tree to an associated fodder grass via root exudation and common mycelial networks.

    PubMed

    Jalonen, Riina; Nygren, Pekka; Sierra, Jorge

    2009-10-01

    Symbiotic dinitrogen fixation by legume trees represents a substantial N input in agroforestry systems, which may benefit the associated crops. Applying (15)N labelling, we studied N transfer via common mycelial networks (CMN) and root exudation from the legume tree Gliricidia sepium to the associated fodder grass Dichantium aristatum. The plants were grown in greenhouse in shared pots in full interaction (treatment FI) or with their root systems separated with a fine mesh that allowed N transfer via CMN only (treatment MY). Tree root exudation was measured separately with hydroponics. Nitrogen transfer estimates were based on the isotopic signature of N (delta(15)N) transferred from the donor. We obtained a range for estimates by calculating transfer with delta(15)N of tree roots and exudates. Nitrogen transfer was 3.7-14.0 and 0.7-2.5% of grass total N in treatments FI and MY, respectively. Root delta(15)N gave the lower and exudate delta(15)N the higher estimates. Transfer in FI probably occurred mainly via root exudation. Transfer in MY correlated negatively with grass root N concentration, implying that it was driven by source-sink relationships between the plants. The range of transfer estimates, depending on source delta(15)N applied, indicates the need of understanding the transfer mechanisms as a basis for reliable estimates.

  2. Assisted phytoremediation of mixed metal(loid)-polluted pyrite waste: effects of foliar and substrate IBA application on fodder radish.

    PubMed

    Vamerali, Teofilo; Bandiera, Marianna; Hartley, William; Carletti, Paolo; Mosca, Giuliano

    2011-06-01

    Exogenous application of plant-growth promoting substances may potentially improve phytoremediation of metal-polluted substrates by increasing shoot and root growth. In a pot-based study, fodder radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiformis Pers.) was grown in As-Zn-Cu-Co-Pb-contaminated pyrite waste, and treated with indolebutyric acid (IBA) either by foliar spraying (10 mgL(-1)), or by direct application of IBA to the substrate (0.1 and 1 mgkg(-1)) in association, or not, with foliar spraying. With the exception of foliar spraying, IBA reduced above-ground biomass, whilst direct application of IBA to the substrate surface reduced root biomass (-59%). Trace element concentrations were generally increased, but removals (mg per plant) greatly reduced with IBA application, together with greater metal leaching from the substrate. It is concluded that, in our case, IBA had a negative effect on plant growth and phytoextraction of trace elements, possibly due to unsuitable root indoleacetic acid concentration following soil IBA application, the direct chelating effect of IBA and the low microbial activity in the pyrite waste affecting its breakdown.

  3. Tillage as a tool to manage crop residue: impact on sugar beet production.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiel, Marie-Pierre; Chélin, Marie; Degrune, Florine; Parvin, Nargish; Bodson, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Crop residues and plant cover represent a pool of organic matter that can be used either to restore organic matter in soils, and therefore maintain soil fertility, or that can be valorized outside of the field (e.g. energy production). However, it is crucial that the exportation of residues is not done to the detriment of the system sustainability. Three long term experiments have been settled in the loamy region in Belgium. All of them are designed to study the effect of residues management by several tillage systems (conventional plowing versus reduced tillage) on the whole soil-water-plant system. SOLRESIDUS is a field experiment where we study the impact of crop residue management while in SOLCOUVERT and SOLCOUVERT-BIS, we study the impact of cover crop management. SOLRESIDUS was started in 2008. In this field, four contrasted crop residues managements are tested in order to contrast as much as possible the responses from the soil-water plant system. Two practices characterize the four modalities: soil tillage (ploughing at 25 cm depth or reduce tillage at 10 cm max) and residue management (exportation or restitution). SOLCOUVERT and SOLCOUVERT-BIS were started in 2012 and 2013 respectively. In those fields cover crop management is also diverse: destruction of the cover crop by winter ploughing, spring ploughing, strip tillage (with a chemical destruction if needed) or shallow tillage (with a decompaction before cover crop sowing). Although although the overall project aims at studying the impact of management on the whole soil-water-plant system, here we will only present the results concerning crop production (sugar beet) in SOLCOUVERT experiments. The presented data will include germination rate, crop development (biomass quantification and BBCH stages) weeds population, disease occurrence, pest occurrences, nitrogen uptake by plants, quality and quantity of harvested products.

  4. Investigation of the use of aerobic granules for the treatment of sugar beet processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kocaturk, Irem; Erguder, Tuba Hande

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of sugar beet processing wastewater in aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was examined in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen removal efficiency. The effect of sugar beet processing wastewater of high solid content, namely 2255 ± 250 mg/L total suspended solids (TSS), on granular sludge was also investigated. Aerobic granular SBR initially operated with the effluent of anaerobic digester treating sugar beet processing wastewater (Part I) achieved average removal efficiencies of 71 ± 30% total COD (tCOD), 90 ± 3% total ammonifiable nitrogen (TAN), 76 ± 24% soluble COD (sCOD) and 29 ± 4% of TSS. SBR was further operated with sugar beet processing wastewater (Part II), where the tCOD, TAN, sCOD and TSS removal efficiencies were 65 ± 5%, 61 ± 4%, 87 ± 1% and 58 ± 10%, respectively. This study indicated the applicability of aerobic granular SBRs for the treatment of both sugar beet processing wastewater and anaerobically digested processing wastewater. For higher solids removal, further treatment such as a sedimentation tank is required following the aerobic granular systems treating solid-rich wastewaters such as sugar beet processing wastewater. It was also revealed that the application of raw sugar beet processing wastewater slightly changed the aerobic granular sludge properties such as size, structure, colour, settleability and extracellular polymeric substance content, without any drastic and negative effect on treatment performance.

  5. Metagenomic Analysis of the Bacterial Community Associated with the Taproot of Sugar Beet

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Okubo, Takashi; Okazaki, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Megumi; Kakizaki, Kaori; Hanzawa, Eiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Asanome, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Ikeda, Seishi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed a metagenome of the bacterial community associated with the taproot of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in order to investigate the genes involved in plant growth-promoting traits (PGPTs), namely 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, indole acetic acid (IAA), N2 fixation, phosphate solubilization, pyrroloquinoline quinone, siderophores, and plant disease suppression as well as methanol, sucrose, and betaine utilization. The most frequently detected gene among the PGPT categories encoded β-1,3-glucanase (18 per 105 reads), which plays a role in the suppression of plant diseases. Genes involved in phosphate solubilization (e.g., for quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase), methanol utilization (e.g., for methanol dehydrogenase), siderophore production (e.g. isochorismate pyruvate lyase), and ACC deaminase were also abundant. These results suggested that such PGPTs are crucially involved in supporting the growth of sugar beet. In contrast, genes for IAA production (iaaM and ipdC) were less abundant (~1 per 105 reads). N2 fixation genes (nifHDK) were not detected; bacterial N2 -fixing activity was not observed in the 15N2 -feeding experiment. An analysis of nitrogen metabolism suggested that the sugar beet microbiome mainly utilized ammonium and nitroalkane as nitrogen sources. Thus, N2 fixation and IAA production did not appear to contribute to sugar beet growth. Taxonomic assignment of this metagenome revealed the high abundance of Mesorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Streptomyces, suggesting that these genera have ecologically important roles in the taproot of sugar beet. Bradyrhizobium-assigned reads in particular were found in almost all categories of dominant PGPTs with high abundance. The present study revealed the characteristic functional genes in the taproot-associated microbiome of sugar beet, and suggest the opportunity to select sugar beet growth-promoting bacteria. PMID:25740621

  6. Effect of Plant Age and Transplanting Damage on Sugar Beets infected by Heterodera schachtii

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Th. H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv. Monogerm C.S.F. 1971) seeds sown into Vineland fine sandy loam, infested with 15,500 H. schachtii juveniles/pot, showed little growth during an 11-week test in the greenhouse. Seedlings transplanted at 2, 4, and 6 weeks of age had 32, 30, and 31% less top weight and 71, 68, and 59% less root weight, respectively, compared to controls grown in nematode-free soil. Nematode reproduction in both direct-seeded and transplanted sugar beets was limited and related to root weight. Shoot/root ratios were increased by the nematodes in all nematode-infected beets compared to those grown in soil without nematodes. In contrast to seeding or transplanting sugar beets into nematode-infested Vineland fine sandy loam, an inoculation of Beverly fine sandy loam supporting 0 (seeds), 2-, 4-, and 6-week-old sugar beet seedlings with 7,400 juveniles/pot, followed by 11 weeks of growth in the growth-room, resulted in top weight losses of only 13, 3, 18, and 15% and losses in root weight of 44, 38, 36, and 38%, respectively. Nematode reproduction was high and all shoot/root ratios were increased by the nematode compared to the noninoculated controls. These experiments have shown that sugar beets sown into nematode-infested soil are damaged much more heavily by H. schachtii juveniles than seeds inoculated with the nematode immediately following sowing. Results indicate that an increase in tolerance of sugar beets to attack by H. schachtii does not occur beyond the first 2 weeks of growth and that transplanting damage lowers the tolerance of seedlings to nematode attack. PMID:19295846

  7. Sugar beet activities of the USDA-ARS East Lansing conducted in cooperation with Saginaw Valley Bean and Beet Farm during 2011 (including Project 905)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation and rating plots were planted at the Saginaw Valley Research & Extension Center in Frankenmuth, MI in 2011 that focused on Cercospora leaf spot performance, conducted in conjunction with Beet Sugar Development Foundation and including USDA-ARS cooperators. 263 breeding lines were tested i...

  8. Effect of replacing oat fodder with fresh and chopped oak leaves on in vitro rumen fermentation, digestibility and metabolizable energy

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, K.; Bhar, R.; Kannan, A.; Jadhav, R.V.; Singh, Birbal; Mal, and G.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of replacing oat fodder (OF) with fresh oak leaves (FOL) or chopped oak leaves (COL) on rumen fermentation and digestibility through in vitro gas production technique (IVGPT). Materials and Methods: Nine different diets were prepared by mixing OF with oak leaves (either FOL or COL) in different ratios (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100). The rations were evaluated through Hohenheim IVGPT with 200 mg substrate and 30 ml of buffered rumen liquor. All the syringes were incubated at 39°C for 24 h in buffered rumen liquor of cattle. After 24 h, the total gas production was recorded, and the contents were analyzed for in vitro methane production, protozoa no. and ammonia-N. Results: Chopping (p<0.01) reduced the tannin fractions as well as non-tannin phenol. Increase in levels of oak decreased total gas production, methane, organic matter (OM) digestibility, and metabolizable energy (ME) values. The polyphenol content of the substrate did not show any significant difference on the protozoal count. Conclusion: In vitro studies revealed that the addition of oak leaves reduced the methane production and ammonia nitrogen levels; however, it also decreased the OM digestibility and ME values linearly as the level of the oak leaves increased in the diet. Chopping was effective only at lower inclusion levels. Further studies, especially in vivo studies, are needed to explore the safe inclusion levels of oak leaves in the diet of ruminants. PMID:27047192

  9. A simple analytical method for dhurrin content evaluation in cyanogenic plants for their utilization in fodder and biofumigation.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Leoni, Onofrio; Malaguti, Lorena; Bernardi, Roberta; Lazzeri, Luca

    2011-08-10

    Cyanogenic plants have some potential as biocidal green manure crops in limiting several soilborne pests and pathogens. Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and Sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor subsp. sudanense (P.) Stapf), in fact, contain the cyanogenic glucoside p-hydroxy-(S)-mandelonitrile-β-D-glucoside (dhurrin) as a substrate of its secondary defensive system able to release hydrogen cyanide following tissue lesions due to biotic or abiotic factors. Given that dhurrin content is correlated with the biofumigant efficacy of the plants, a high dhurrin content could be a positive character for utilization of sorghum and Sudangrass as biocidal green manure plants. For chemical characterization of the available germplasm, a simple, safe, and accurate method is necessary. In this paper, a new method for dhurrin analysis, based on methanol extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography, is reported and discussed. The feasibility of this analytical procedure was tested by evaluating dhurrin level in roots and stems during cultivation of four different sorghum and Sudangrass varieties in agronomic trials performed in 2008 in the Po valley (Italy). The dhurrin content ranged from 0.16 ± 0.04 to 7.14 ± 0.32 mg g(-1) on dried matter (DM) in stems and from 1.38 ± 0.02 to 6.57 ± 0.09 mg g(-1) on DM in roots, showing statistical differences among the tested germplasms that could be linked to the efficacy of their utilization as biofumigant plants. The method also opens new perspectives for the characterization of sorgum plants as fodder, for which the presence of dhurrin is considered to be negative for its well-known toxicity.

  10. Import-export balance of nitrogen and phosphorus in food, fodder and fertilizers in the Baltic Sea drainage area.

    PubMed

    Asmala, Eero; Saikku, Laura; Vienonen, Sanna

    2011-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements for life, but in excess they contribute to aquatic eutrophication. The Baltic Sea is a brackish semi-enclosed sea that is heavily influenced by anthropogenic loading of nutrients, resulting in a major environmental problem, eutrophication. In this study, the nutrient balance of the food production and consumption system in seven countries in the Baltic Sea drainage area was quantified for the period 2002-2005. The food production and consumption system accumulates nutrients in the Baltic Sea drainage area, due to extensive imports to the system. The average annual net surplus of nutrients was 1,800,000 tons N and 320,000 tons P in 2002-2005, or annually 28 kg N and 5 kg P per capita. The average total annual import was 2,100,000 tons N and 340,000 tons P during 2002-2005. The largest imports to the system were fertilizers, totaling 1,700,000 tons N and 290,000 tons P. Traded nutrients in food and fodder amounted to a net annual surplus of 180,000 tons N and 25,000 tons P. The nutrient load to the Baltic Sea due to the food consumption and production system was 21% N and 6% P of the respective annual net inputs to the region. This study shows that large amounts of nutrients to Baltic Sea drainage area are inputs from outside the region, eventually contributing to eutrophication. To reduce the nutrient imports, fertilizers should be used more efficiently, nutrients should be recycled more efficiently inside the region, and food system should be guided toward low-nutrient intensive diets.

  11. E-Screen evaluation of sugar beet feedstuffs in a case of reduced embryo transfer efficiencies in cattle: the role of phytoestrogens and zearalenone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The E-Screen assay was used to evaluate the estrogenicity of sugar beet by-products obtained from a dairy farm experiencing low success rates of embryo transfer. The beet tailings had ~ 3 fold the estradiol equivalents of the pelleted beet pulp (3.9 and 1.2 µg estradiol equivalents or E2Eq/kg dry m...

  12. Environmental conditions that contribute to development and severity of Sugar Beet Fusarium Yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae: temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium yellows in sugar beet, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, continues to cause significant problems to sugar beet production by causing considerable reductions in root yield, sucrose percentage, and juice purity in affected sugar beets. Environment plays a critical role in pathogen i...

  13. The characterization of sugar beet pectin using the EcoSEC® GPC system coupled to multi-angle light scattering, quasi-elastic light scattering, and differential viscometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need to increase the use of low valued co-products derived from the processing of sugar beets has prompted the investigation of the structure of the pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp. The characterization of sugar beet pectin is essential as it has the potential to be used in the production ...

  14. Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Sugar Beet Pulp for Efficient Bioethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Berłowska, Joanna; Balcerek, Maria; Dziekońska-Kubczak, Urszula; Patelski, Piotr; Dziugan, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet pulp, a byproduct of sugar beet processing, can be used as a feedstock in second-generation ethanol production. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment, of the dosage of cellulase and hemicellulase enzyme preparations used, and of aeration on the release of fermentable sugars and ethanol yield during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of sugar beet pulp-based worts. Pressure-thermal pretreatment was applied to sugar beet pulp suspended in 2% w/w sulphuric acid solution at a ratio providing 12% dry matter. Enzymatic hydrolysis was conducted using Viscozyme and Ultraflo Max (Novozymes) enzyme preparations (0.015–0.02 mL/g dry matter). Two yeast strains were used for fermentation: Ethanol Red (S. cerevisiae) (1 g/L) and Pichia stipitis (0.5 g/L), applied sequentially. The results show that efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of sugar beet pulp was achieved. A 6 h interval for enzymatic activation between the application of enzyme preparations and inoculation with Ethanol Red further improved the fermentation performance, with the highest ethanol concentration reaching 26.9 ± 1.2 g/L and 86.5 ± 2.1% fermentation efficiency relative to the theoretical yield. PMID:27722169

  15. Taproot promoters cause tissue specific gene expression within the storage root of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, Heiko; Kloos, Dorothee U; Briess, Waltraud; Pflugmacher, Maike; Stahl, Dietmar J; Hehl, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    The storage root (taproot) of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) originates from hypocotyl and primary root and contains many different tissues such as central xylem, primary and secondary cambium, secondary xylem and phloem, and parenchyma. It was the aim of this work to characterize the promoters of three taproot-expressed genes with respect to their tissue specificity. To investigate this, promoters for the genes Tlp, His1-r, and Mll were cloned from sugar beet, linked to reporter genes and transformed into sugar beet and tobacco. Reporter gene expression analysis in transgenic sugar beet plants revealed that all three promoters are active in the storage root. Expression in storage root tissues is either restricted to the vascular zone (Tlp, His1-r) or is observed in the whole organ (Mll). The Mll gene is highly organ specific throughout different developmental stages of the sugar beet. In tobacco, the Tlp and Mll promoters drive reporter gene expression preferentially in hypocotyl and roots. The properties of the Mll promoter may be advantageous for the modification of sucrose metabolism in storage roots.

  16. Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Sugar Beet Pulp for Efficient Bioethanol Production.

    PubMed

    Berłowska, Joanna; Pielech-Przybylska, Katarzyna; Balcerek, Maria; Dziekońska-Kubczak, Urszula; Patelski, Piotr; Dziugan, Piotr; Kręgiel, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet pulp, a byproduct of sugar beet processing, can be used as a feedstock in second-generation ethanol production. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment, of the dosage of cellulase and hemicellulase enzyme preparations used, and of aeration on the release of fermentable sugars and ethanol yield during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of sugar beet pulp-based worts. Pressure-thermal pretreatment was applied to sugar beet pulp suspended in 2% w/w sulphuric acid solution at a ratio providing 12% dry matter. Enzymatic hydrolysis was conducted using Viscozyme and Ultraflo Max (Novozymes) enzyme preparations (0.015-0.02 mL/g dry matter). Two yeast strains were used for fermentation: Ethanol Red (S. cerevisiae) (1 g/L) and Pichia stipitis (0.5 g/L), applied sequentially. The results show that efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of sugar beet pulp was achieved. A 6 h interval for enzymatic activation between the application of enzyme preparations and inoculation with Ethanol Red further improved the fermentation performance, with the highest ethanol concentration reaching 26.9 ± 1.2 g/L and 86.5 ± 2.1% fermentation efficiency relative to the theoretical yield.

  17. Radioprotective activity of betalains from red beets in mice exposed to gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoling; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Zesheng

    2009-08-01

    We investigated the radioprotective activity of betalains from red beets in mice irradiated by a (60)Co gamma (gamma) ray (6.0 Gy, at a dose of 1.5 Gy min(-1)). Mice were randomly divided into five groups, namely the control group and four experimental groups which were given one of four concentrations of betalains from red beets (0, 5, 20 and 80 mg/kg, equivalent to betanin) for 30 days. The four experimental groups of mice were then exposed to the (60)Co gamma-rays and were given betalains from red beets for a further 3 days. The number of white blood cells, karyota of the femur and the number of micronuclei in polychromatophilic erythrocytes of bone marrow in mice were determined. The activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, malondialdehyde, spleen index and thymus index were also determined. The results indicate that the administration of betalains from red beets is radioprotective in mice irradiated by (60)Co in vivo. The underlying mechanism remains unclear but appears to be mediated by the antioxidant activity of the betalains from red beets and modulation of the immune system.

  18. Growth and photosynthetic efficiency promotion of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) by endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yingwu; Lou, Kai; Li, Chun

    2010-07-01

    Very little is known about the physiological interactions between plants and endophytic bacteria. We investigated the impact of three endophytic bacteria, Bacillus pumilus 2-1, Chryseobacterium indologene 2-2, and Acinetobacter johnsonii 3-1, on the photosynthetic capacity and growth of sugar beet. Endophyte-free plants were obtained first and infected with the bacteria. Measurements of total chlorophyll content revealed very significant differences between endophyte-free beet plants and some infected by endophytic bacteria. The maximum photochemical yield (Fv/Fm) was used to determine any photosynthetic effect on plants caused by biotic or abiotic factors. After 30 days of growth, there was significantly higher Fv/Fm for endophyte-infected than endophyte-free plants. The light response curves of beet showed that photosynthetic capacity was significantly increased in endophyte-infected plants. Photosynthesis of endophyte-free plants was saturated at 1,300 micromol m(-2) s(-1), whereas endophyte-infected plants were not saturated at the irradiance used. The effect seemed to be due to promotion of electron transport in the thylakoid membranes. Promotion of photosynthetic capacity in sugar beet was due to increased chlorophyll content, leading to a consequent increased carbohydrate synthesis. It is possible that the increased maximum yield of photosynthesis in sugar beet was promoted by phytohormones and produced by the bacteria.

  19. 76 FR 62339 - Domestic Sugar Program-2011-Crop Cane Sugar and Beet Sugar Marketing Allotments and Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation Domestic Sugar Program--2011-Crop Cane Sugar and Beet Sugar Marketing... marketing allotments and company allocations to sugarcane and sugar beet processors, which apply to all... establishing, adjusting, or suspending sugar marketing allotments in the Federal Register. FOR...

  20. Sugar beet breeding lines evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in Fort Collins, CO, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-nine beet sugar beet breeding lines (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service breeding program at Fort Collins, CO, were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (Rcrr) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. The...

  1. Registration of SR98 sugar beet germplasm with resistances to Rhizoctonia seedling and crown and root rot diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) germplasms SR98 (PI 655951) and SR98/2 (659754) are being released as potential pollinators or populations from which to select pollinators for hybrid seed production, and were developed by the USDA-ARS, at East Lansing, MI, in cooperation with the Beet Sugar Developmen...

  2. Metabolome profiling to understand the defense response to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) to Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 IIIB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot, caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn AG 2-2 IIIB, is an important disease of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The molecular processes that mediate sugar beet resistance to R. solani are largely unknown and identifying the metabolites associated with R. solani infection ma...

  3. Enzyme resistant carbohydrate based micro-scale materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp for food and pharmaceutical applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-based micro scale materials are increasingly used in functional food and pharmaceutical applications. The present study produced carbohydrate-based micro scale tubular materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp (SBP), a by-product of sugar beet processing. The isolated carbohydrates wer...

  4. Phloem unloading in developing leaves of sugar beet

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalstig, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological and transport data support a symplastic pathway for phloem unloading in developing leaves of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. Klein E, multigerm). The sulfhydryl inhibitor parachloromercuribenzene sulfonic acid (PCMBS) inhibited uptake of (/sup 14/C)-sucrose added to the free space of developing leaves, but did not affect import of (/sup 14/C)-sucrose during steady-state /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling of a source leaf. The passively-transported xenobiotic sugar, (/sup 14/C)-L-glucose did not readily enter mesophyll cells when supplied through the cut end of the petiole of a sink leaf as determined by whole leaf autoradiography. In contrast, (/sup 14/C)-L-glucose translocated through the phloem from a mature leaf, rapidly entered mesophyll cells, and was evenly distributed between mesophyll and veins. Autoradiographs of developing leaves following a pulse of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ to a source leaf revealed rapid passage of phloem translocated into progressively higher order veins as the leaf developed. Entry into V order veins occurred during the last stage of import through the phloem. Import into developing leaves was inhibited by glyphosate (N-phosphomethylglycine), a herbicide which inhibits the aromatic amino acid pathway and hence protein synthesis. Glyphosate also stopped net starch accumulation in sprayed mature leaves, but did not affect export of carbon from treated leaves during the time period that import into developed leaves was inhibited.

  5. Early iron deficiency stress response in leaves of sugar beet.

    PubMed Central

    Winder, T L; Nishio, J N

    1995-01-01

    Iron nutrient deficiency was investigated in leaves of hydroponically grown sugar beets (Beta vulgaris) to determine how ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) gene expression is affected when thylakoid components of photosynthesis are diminished. Rubisco polypeptide content was reduced by 60% in severely iron-stressed leaves, and the reduction was directly correlated to chlorophyll content. The concentration of Rubisco protein in iron-stressed leaves was found to be regulated by availability of mRNAs, and CO2 fixation by Rubisco was reduced from 45 mumol CO2 m-2 s-1 in extracts from iron-sufficient leaves to 20 mumol CO2 m-2 s-1 in extracts from severely stressed leaves. The rate of CO2 fixation was directly correlated to leaf chlorophyll content. Rubisco in iron-sufficient control leaves was 59% activated, whereas in severely stressed leaves grown under the same light, Rubisco was 43% activated. RNA synthesis was reduced by about 50% in iron-deficient leaves, but 16S and 25S rRNA and ctDNA were essentially unaffected by iron stress. PMID:7659749

  6. Evaluation of the impact of various agricultural practices on nitrate leaching under the root zone of potato and sugar beet using the STICS soil-crop model.

    PubMed

    Jégo, G; Martínez, M; Antigüedad, I; Launay, M; Sanchez-Pérez, J M; Justes, E

    2008-05-15

    The quaternary aquifer of Vitoria-Gasteiz (Basque Country, Northern Spain) is characterised by a shallow water table mainly fed by drainage water, and thus constitutes a vulnerable zone in regards to nitrate pollution. Field studies were performed with a potato crop in 1993 and a sugar beet crop in 2002 to evaluate their impact on nitrate leaching. The overall predictive quality of the STICS soil-crop model was first evaluated using field data and then the model was used to analyze dynamically the impacts of different crop management practices on nitrate leaching. The model was evaluated (i) on soil nitrate concentrations at different depths and (ii) on crop yields. The simulated values proved to be in satisfactory agreement with measured values. Nitrate leaching was more pronounced with the potato crop than with the sugar beet experiment due to i) greater precipitation, ii) lower N uptake of the potato crop due to shallow root depth, and iii) a shorter period of growth. The potato experiment showed that excessive irrigation could significantly increase nitrate leaching by increasing both drainage and nitrate concentrations. The different levels of N-fertilization examined in the sugar beet study had no notable effects on nitrate leaching due to its high N uptake capacity. Complementary virtual experiments were carried out using the STICS model. Our study confirmed that in vulnerable zones agricultural practices must be adjusted, that is to say: 1) N-fertilizer should not be applied in autumn before winter crops; 2) crops with low N uptake capacity (e.g. potatoes) should be avoided or should be preceded and followed by nitrogen catch crops or cover crops; 3) the nitrate concentration of irrigation water should be taken into account in calculation of the N-fertilization rate, and 4) N-fertilization must be precisely adjusted in particular for potato crops.

  7. 40 CFR 180.1127 - Biochemical pesticide plant floral volatile attractant compounds: cinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., sunflower, sweet potatoes, and wheat; the following vegetable crops—asparagus, beans (including forage hay..., mustard greens, turnip greens, kohlrabi), corn, fresh (field, sweet, pop, seed), corn fodder and forage..., parsley, parsnip, peas, peas with pods, peppers, potatoes, sugar beets, tomatoes; the following tree...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1127 - Biochemical pesticide plant floral volatile attractant compounds: cinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., sunflower, sweet potatoes, and wheat; the following vegetable crops—asparagus, beans (including forage hay..., mustard greens, turnip greens, kohlrabi), corn, fresh (field, sweet, pop, seed), corn fodder and forage..., parsley, parsnip, peas, peas with pods, peppers, potatoes, sugar beets, tomatoes; the following tree...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1127 - Biochemical pesticide plant floral volatile attractant compounds: cinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., sunflower, sweet potatoes, and wheat; the following vegetable crops—asparagus, beans (including forage hay..., mustard greens, turnip greens, kohlrabi), corn, fresh (field, sweet, pop, seed), corn fodder and forage..., parsley, parsnip, peas, peas with pods, peppers, potatoes, sugar beets, tomatoes; the following tree...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1127 - Biochemical pesticide plant floral volatile attractant compounds: cinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., sunflower, sweet potatoes, and wheat; the following vegetable crops—asparagus, beans (including forage hay..., mustard greens, turnip greens, kohlrabi), corn, fresh (field, sweet, pop, seed), corn fodder and forage..., parsley, parsnip, peas, peas with pods, peppers, potatoes, sugar beets, tomatoes; the following tree...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1127 - Biochemical pesticide plant floral volatile attractant compounds: cinnamaldehyde, cinnamyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., sunflower, sweet potatoes, and wheat; the following vegetable crops—asparagus, beans (including forage hay..., mustard greens, turnip greens, kohlrabi), corn, fresh (field, sweet, pop, seed), corn fodder and forage..., parsley, parsnip, peas, peas with pods, peppers, potatoes, sugar beets, tomatoes; the following tree...

  12. Effect of water quality on yield of sugar beet and sweet sorghum.

    PubMed

    Almodares, A; Sharif, M E

    2005-07-01

    To study the effects of quality of water on soil and plant, an experiment was conducted at Rudashat Drainage and Reclamation Experiment Station in 1999. Four irrigation water salinities (2, 5, 8 and 11 ds m(-1)) and two sugar crops (sugar beet and sweet sorghum) were used in this experiment. The results showed that under the same water quality, sweet sorghum used 2700 cubic meter per hectare less water than sugar beet. As the quality of irrigation water decreased, the soil salinity and exchangeable sodium percent increased which caused yield reduction for both plants. Sugar beet by accumulating Na and Cl in its leaves tolerated salinity but its usage as a forage crop caused some limitations, whereas sweet sorghum by not accumulating Na and Cl escape salinity and it can be used as a forage crop without any limitation.

  13. Decolorization of sugar syrups using commercial and sugar beet pulp based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Mudoga, H L; Yucel, H; Kincal, N S

    2008-06-01

    Sugar syrup decolorization was studied using two commercial and eight beet pulp based activated carbons. In an attempt to relate decolorizing performances to other characteristics, surface areas, pore volumes, bulk densities and ash contents of the carbons in the powdered form; pH and electrical conductivities of their suspensions and their color adsorption properties from iodine and molasses solution were determined. The color removal capabilities of all carbons were measured at 1/100 (w/w) dosage, and isotherms were determined on better samples. The two commercial activated carbons showed different decolorization efficiencies; which could be related to their physical and chemical properties. The decolorization efficiency of beet pulp carbon prepared at 750 degrees C and activated for 5h using CO2 was much better than the others and close to the better one of the commercial activated carbons used. It is evident that beet pulp is an inexpensive potential precursor for activated carbons for use in sugar refining.

  14. Data on milk dioxin contamination linked with the location of fodder croplands allow to hypothesize the origin of the pollution source in an Italian valley.

    PubMed

    Desiato, Rosanna; Bertolini, Silvia; Baioni, Elisa; Crescio, Maria Ines; Scortichini, Giampiero; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Sparagna, Bruno; Cuttica, Giancarlo; Ru, Giuseppe

    2014-11-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) have similar toxic, endocrine-disrupting, and carcinogenic activity. They are classified as persistent organic pollutants accumulating in the environment and the tissues of living organisms. High concentrations of PCDD/F and dl-PCB have been detected in bovine milk collected in a Piedmont valley (Northwestern Italy) since 2004. This geographic study describes the local distribution of pollution from PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs. Since their presence in animal products could be traced back to the ingestion of contaminated fodder, dioxin levels in cow milk were related to the distribution of fodder cropland parcels. Specifically, the aim of the study was to determine, through an exploratory approach, whether the contamination was consistent with one common point source of contamination or different scattered sources. Data for PCDD/F and dl-PCB concentrations in the bulk milk from 27 herds, sampled over a 4-year period (2004-2007), were matched to the georeferenced land parcels the dairy farmers used for growing fodder. Isopleth maps of dioxin concentrations were estimated with ordinary kriging. The highest level of pollution for both PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs was geographically juxtaposed: in both instances, the location of the local steel plant was within this extremely highly polluted area. The study results support the hypothesis for one common point source of contamination in the valley. The exploratory spatial analysis applied in this research may provide a valuable, novel approach to straightforward identification of a highly likely source of dioxin contamination of dairy products (even in the absence of top soil contamination data).

  15. Field performance of chitinase transgenic silver birches (Betula pendula): resistance to fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Pasonen, H-L; Seppänen, S-K; Degefu, Y; Rytkönen, A; von Weissenberg, K; Pappinen, A

    2004-08-01

    A field trial of 15 transgenic birch lines expressing a sugar beet chitinase IV gene and the corresponding controls was established in southern Finland to study the effects of the level of sugar beet chitinase IV expression on birch resistance to fungal diseases. The symptoms caused by natural infections of two fungal pathogens, Pyrenopeziza betulicola (leaf spot disease) and Melampsoridium betulinum (birch rust), were analysed in the field during a period of 3 years. The lines that had shown a high level of sugar beet chitinase IV mRNA accumulation in the greenhouse also showed high sugar beet chitinase IV expression after 3 years in the field. The level of sugar beet chitinase IV expression did not significantly improve the resistance of transgenic birches to leaf spot disease. Instead, some transgenic lines were significantly more susceptible to leaf spot than the controls. The level of sugar beet chitinase IV expression did have an improving effect on most parameters of birch rust; the groups of lines showing high or intermediate transgene expression were more resistant to birch rust than those showing low expression. This result indicates that the tested transformation may provide a tool for increasing the resistance of silver birch to birch rust.

  16. Leaf Phosphate Status, Photosynthesis, and Carbon Partitioning in Sugar Beet

    PubMed Central

    Rao, I. Madhusudana; Terry, Norman

    1989-01-01

    Sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L. cv F58-554H1) were cultured hydroponically for 2 weeks in growth chambers with two levels of orthophosphate (Pi) supplied in half strength Hoagland solution. Low-P plants were supplied with 1/20th of the Pi supplied to control plants. With low-P treatment, the acid soluble leaf phosphate and total leaf P decreased by about 88%. Low-P treatment had a much greater effect on leaf area than on photosynthesis. Low-P decreased total leaf area by 76%, dry weight per plant by 60%, and the rate of photosynthesis per area at light saturation by 35%. Low-P treatment significantly decreased the total extractable activity of phosphoglycerate kinase (by 18%) and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (by 16%), but did not decrease the total activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase (RuBPCase) and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase. Low-P treatment decreased the initial activities of three rate-limiting Calvin cycle enzymes, but had no effect on the initial activity of RuBPCase. Furthermore, low-P treatment significantly increased the total extractable activities of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (by 61%), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (by 53%), and transketolase (by 46%). The results suggest that low-P treatment affected photosynthetic rate through an effect on RuBP regeneration rather than through RuBPCase activity and that the changes in Calvin cycle enzymes with low-P resulted in an increased flow of carbon to starch. PMID:16666882

  17. Two-step enzymatic fingerprinting of sugar beet pectin.

    PubMed

    Remoroza, C; Broxterman, S; Gruppen, H; Schols, H A

    2014-08-08

    A two-step enzymatic fingerprinting method was introduced to analyze a highly methylesterified and acetylated sugar beet pectin having a degree of methylesterification (DM) of 62 and acetylation of 30. A cocktail of pectolytic enzymes, including endo-polygalacturonase II (endo-PGII) and pectin lyase (PL), was used for the first digestion. The endo-PGII and PL resistant pectin fragments were isolated and subjected to a second digestion using fungal pectin methylesterase and endo-PGII. After the two sequential digestions, 78% of the total GalA residues present in the parental pectin were recovered as mono- and oligomers, which were used to quantitatively describe the parental SBP. For this reason, the descriptive parameters degree of blockiness (DBabs), degree of hydrolysis by PG (DHPG) and degree of hydrolysis by PL (DHPL) were established for both digestions. The first digestion revealed the presence of short blocks of nonesterified GalA residues and blocks of partly methylesterified and acetylated GalA residues in the parental SBP, in addition to blocks of highly methylesterified and acetylated GalA residues. The second digestion revealed the presence of blocks of methylesterified, partly methylesterified and/or acetylated GalA residues in a sequence not to be degradable by neither endo-PGII nor by PL. The acetyl groups were present in an blockwise manner. Application of the method to two differently prepared DM 50 SBPs showed that the two pectins differ in the ratio of blocks of nonesterified and blocks of partly methylesterified and acetylated GalA residues.

  18. Cold-inhibited phloem translocation in sugar beet

    SciTech Connect

    Grusak, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental studies were undertaken on a simplified single source leaf-single sink leaf, or single source leaf-double sink leaf sugar beet system to investigate the responsive nature of the long-distance phloem translocation system to localized cooling perturbations on the source leaf petiole. Experiments were performed by using a steady state (/sup 14/C)-labelling system for the source leaf, and translocation into the sink leaf (leaves) was monitored with a Geiger-Mueller system. A specially designed Peltier apparatus enabled cooling of the source petiole to 1/sup 0/C (or other desired temperatures) at various positions on the petiole, over different lengths, and at different rates of cooling. Initial experiment were designed to test the predictions of a mathematical recovery model of translocation inhibited by cold. The results did not support the mathematical model, but did suggest that vascular anastomoses may be involved in the recovery response. Selective petiolar incision/excision experiments showed that anastomoses were capable of re-establishing translocation following a disruption of flow. Studies with two monitored sink levels suggested that the inhibition to slow-coolings was not due to reduced translocation through the cooled source petiole region, but rather, was due to a repartitioning of flow among the terminal sinks (sink leaves and hypocotyl/crown region above the heat-girdled root). This repartitioning occurred via a redirection of flow through the vascular connections in the crown region of the plant, and appeared to be promoted by rapid, physical signals originating from the cooled region of the petiole.

  19. Cultivar-specific seedling vigor and expression of a putative oxalate oxidase germin-like protein in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, Benildo G; McGrath, J Mitchell

    2003-06-01

    For genetic screening and breeding purposes, an in vitro germination system that reflects relative field emergence potential was used to screen for germination-enhancing and stress-induced genes from germinating seedlings from two varieties of sugar beet. Three full-length germin-like protein (GLP) gene classes were recovered from stress-germinated seedlings of a superior emerging variety. GLP gene expression, oxalate oxidase protein activity, the H(2)O(2) content of stressed seedlings, but not catalase activity, were induced by stress germination conditions (e.g. excess water, NaCl, mannitol, or oxalate) in a good emerging hybrid and were not induced in a poor emerging variety. Only one of the three germin-like protein genes ( BvGer165) was differentially regulated, and was induced only in the good emerger. Hydrogen peroxide promoted germination and partially compensated solute-depressed germination percentages. Unlike other solute recovery by hydrogen peroxide regimes, recovery in oxalic acid plus H(2)O(2) was cultivar-independent. A block in oxalate metabolism is postulated to contribute to lower germination under stress in the lower emerging variety. Selection for stress-induced germin expression, or for down-stream targets, presents the first direct target to enable breeding for improved field emergence of sugar beet.

  20. Insect Pests of Field Crops. MP-28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhardt, Chris C.

    This document addresses the principles of field crop insect control through biological, mechanical, and chemical processes. Identification, life history, damage, pesticides, pesticide use and environmental considerations are presented for the major pests of corn, alfalfa, beans, small grains, sugar beets, and potatoes. Each section is accompanied…

  1. Cloning and functional analyses of a gene from sugar beet up-regulated upon cyst nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Samuelian, Suren; Kleine, Michael; Ruyter-Spira, Carolien P; Klein-Lankhorst, René M; Jung, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The cDNA-AFLP technique was used to isolate sugar beet genes up-regulated upon infection with the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii. Hairy root cultures were obtained from resistant plants carrying a Beta procumbens translocation as well as from a non-resistant control. mRNA was isolated from hairy root clones and sugar beet plants infected or not with the beet cyst nematode and 8000 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were analysed. One TDF was found to be differentially expressed in both materials and was further investigated. Real-time PCR confirmed that this TDF is specifically up-regulated in resistant sugar beet upon nematode infection and its full-length cDNA was isolated. Sequence analysis suggests that the gene encodes a 317 amino acid polypeptide of unknown function. No homology to any sequence present in the public databases could be detected. To further elucidate its function in resistance to the beet cyst nematode, the cDNA was transformed into hairy roots of susceptible sugar beet under the control of the 35S promoter and hairy root clones were inoculated with nematodes. The number of developing females was significantly reduced in 12 out of 15 clones resulting from independent transgenic events suggesting that the gene can be used for inducing cyst nematode resistance in plants.

  2. Inducing effect of PGRs on small regulatory si/miRNA in resistance to sugar beet cyst nematode.

    PubMed

    Tsygankova, V A; Stefanovska, T R; Galkin, A P; Ponomarenko, S P; Blume, Ya B

    2012-01-01

    Sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii Schmidt is an economically important plant parasite of sugar beet in Ukraine. The pest control options are limited. Sugar beet cyst nematode resistant varieties are not available on the market. Carbamate and organophosphate pesticides have been banned due to the high toxicity. The problem is aggravated by continuously increasing of oilseed rape (which is suitable host for H. schachtii) growing area due to biofuel demands. Several studies' results indicate that PGRs have role in management of plant parasitic nematodes but for sugar beet it is not studied well. We had an objective- studying of the role of four compositional PGRs created based of avermectin in suppression of sugar beet cyst nematode population on sugar beet and oilseed rape caused by enhancing of endogenous si/miRNA complementary to H. schachtii mRNA. Laboratory study was conducted in 2011 with using method DOT-blot hybridization si/miRNA with mRNA and by testing inhibitory activity in cell free system protein biosynthesis. That was shown that application of the PGRs enhances sugar beet and oilseeds rape plant immune-protective properties and resistance against plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schochtii through enhancement of synthesis of small regulatory si/miRNA related (complementary) to an mRNA structure of the parasitic organisms. As a result, translation of mRNA of the nematode is blocked and causes the mortality of plant parasite juveniles.

  3. Sex pheromone of the Spanish population of the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Acín, Patricia; Rosell, Gloria; Guerrero, Angel; Quero, Carmen

    2010-07-01

    The pheromone composition of the Spanish population of the beet armyworm (BAW), Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was identified. Analysis of female gland extracts showed the presence of compounds Z9,E12-14:Ac (1), Z9-14:Ac (2), Z11-16:Ac (3), Z9,E12-14:OH (4), Z9-14:OH (5), and Z11-16:OH (6) in a ratio of 26:11:1:22:31:9. The amount of compound per gland ranged from 2.08 ng for 5 to 0.09 ng for 3. However, analysis of female volatiles by SPME revealed only the presence of compounds, 1, 2, 3, and 5 in a 34:40:4:22 ratio. In electroantennogram assays, compound 1 elicited the highest response, and the C14 acetates evoked higher electrophysiological responses than the corresponding alcohols or C16 isomers. In a wind tunnel, no behavioral difference was observed between formulations based on the gland extracts and female volatiles. In both cases, males responded as when virgin females were used as the attractant source. Compound 1 alone elicited upwind flight by males, but required the presence of compound 5 in a 80:20 to 40:60 ratio for full activity. Ternary mixtures of 1, 5 and the minor components did not improve the performance of the 1+5 blend in a 60:40 ratio. In the field, the mixture 1+5+3 in a 56:37:7 ratio was the most attractive formulation, and is expected to be useful in future pest control strategies.

  4. Sporamin-mediated resistance to beet cyst nematodes (Heterodera schachtii Schm.) is dependent on trypsin inhibitory activity in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Cai, Daguang; Thurau, Tim; Tian, Yanyan; Lange, Tina; Yeh, Kai-Wun; Jung, Christian

    2003-04-01

    Sporamin, a sweet potato tuberous storage protein, is a Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor. Its capability of conferring insect-resistance on transgenic tobacco and cauliflower has been confirmed. To test its potential as an anti-feedant for the beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schm.), the sporamin gene SpTI-1 was introduced into sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation. Twelve different hairy root clones expressing sporamin were selected for studying nematode development. Of these, 8 hairy root clones were found to show significant efficiency in inhibiting the growth and development of the female nematodes whereas 4 root clones did not show any inhibitory effects even though the SpTI-1 gene was regularly expressed in all of the tested hairy roots as revealed by northern and western analyses. Inhibition of nematode development correlated with trypsin inhibitor activity but not with the amount of sporamin expressed in hairy roots. These data demonstrate that the trypsin inhibitor activity is the critical factor for inhibiting growth and development of cyst nematodes in sugar beet hairy roots expressing the sporamin gene. Hence, the sweet potato sporamin can be used as a new and effective anti-feedant for controlling cyst nematodes offering an alternative strategy for establishing nematode resistance in crops.

  5. The measurement of mannitol in sugar beet factories to monitor deterioration and processing problems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet deterioration can still be a major technological constraint in processing. The major (but not sole) contributor to deterioration in many countries, particularly when warm and humid conditions prevail, is infection by hetero-fermentative Leuconostoc mesenteroides lactic acid bacteria. In...

  6. Machine vision analysis for industrial beet color change kinetics and total soluble solid content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A machine vision system (MVS) for the measurement of color change kinetics in crushed industrial beet to evaluate the total soluble solid content (°Brix) was developed in this study. It is expected that higher the °Brix faster the color change and modeling this color change kinetics helps in assessi...

  7. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain.

  8. Nucleic acid and protein elimination during the sugar manufacturing process of conventional and transgenic sugar beets.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Altenbuchner, J; Mattes, R

    1998-02-26

    The fate of cellular DNA during the standard purification steps of the sugar manufacturing process from conventional and transgenic sugar beets was determined. Indigenous nucleases of sugar beet cells were found to be active during the first extraction step (raw juice production) which was carried out at 70 degrees C. This and the consecutive steps of the manufacturing process were validated in terms of DNA degradation by competitive PCR of added external DNA. Each step of the process proved to be very efficient in the removal of nucleic acids. Taken together, the purification steps have the potential to reduce the amount of DNA by a factor of > 10(14), exceeding by far the total amount of DNA present in sugar beets. Furthermore, the gene products of the transgenes neomycin phosphotransferase and BNYVV (rhizomania virus) coat protein CP21 were shown to be removed during the purification steps, so that they could not be detected in the resulting white sugar. Thus, sugar obtained from conventional and transgenic beets is indistinguishable or substantially equivalent with respect to purity.

  9. Whole genome sequencing of sugarbeet and identification of differentially expressed genes regulating beet curly top resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of KDH13 doubled haploid line has been sequenced using Illumina HiSeq2000 NGS platform. This line (PI663862) was released by USDA-ARS as a genetic stock resistant to beet curly top. Sequencing of a standard paired end and a 2kb-insert mate-pair genomic libraries, constructed from a leaf ...

  10. Physico-chemical characterization of alkaline soluble polysaccharides from sugar beet pulp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have studied the global structure of microwave-assisted alkaline soluble polysaccharides (ASP) isolated from fresh sugar beet pulp. The objective was to minimize the disassembly and possibly the degradation of these polysaccharides during extraction. Prior to ASP microwave assisted-extraction (...

  11. Biodegradable composites from polyester and sugar beet pulp with antimicrobial coating for food packaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Totally biodegradable, double-layered antimicrobial composite Sheets were introduced for food packaging. The substrate layers of the sheets were prepared from poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and sugar beet pulp (SBP) or poly (butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and SBP by a twin-screw extruder. The ac...

  12. Physico-chemical characterization of a cellulosic fraction from sugar beet pulp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The residue of sugar beet pulp from which pectin and alkaline soluble polysaccharides have been removed by microwave assisted extraction (MAE) or conventional heat was treated with sodium monochloroacetate under alkaline pH to convert the residual cellulose present to carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC)....

  13. Global structure of microwave-assisted flash extracted sugar beet pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have studied the global structure of microwave assisted, flash extracted pectins isolated from fresh sugar beet pulp. The objective was to minimize the disassembly and possibly the degradation of pectin molecules during extraction. We have characterized these pectins by HPSEC with light scatter...

  14. Sugar beet pulp and poly(lactic acid) composites using methylene diphenyl diisocyanate as coupling agent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composites from sugar beet pulp (SBP) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were extruded in the presence of polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI). SBP particles were evenly distributed within the PLA matrix phase as revealed by confocal fluorescence microscopic analysis. The resultant composites w...

  15. Fractionation of sugar beet pulp by introducing ion-exchange groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) was chemically modified with the goal to utilize this method for the preparation of water-soluble polysaccharides. Yields of the trimethylammoniumhydroxypropylated (TMAHP) polysaccharide fractions prepared under vacuum in absence of NaOH or KOH, as well as their molar masses, w...

  16. Response of reproductive traits and longevity of beet webworm to temperature, and implications for migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a facultative long-distance migratory insect pest of crops in many regions between latitudes 36-55°N. Reproductive performance of L. sticticalis is very sensitive to thermal conditions, such that outbreaks of larvae are clos...

  17. Preparation and properties of water and glycerol-plasticized sugar beet pulp plastics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP), the residue from sugar extraction, was compounded and turned into thermoplastic composite materials. The compounding was performed using a common twin screw compounding extruder and water and glycerol were used as plasticizers. The plasticization of SBP utilized the water-solu...

  18. Functional differentiation of the sugar beet root system as indicator of developmental phase change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developmental phase transition in the plant root system has not been well characterized. In this study we compared the dynamics of sucrose accumulation with gene expression changes analyzed with cDNA-AFLP in the tap root system of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) during the first nine weeks after emerg...

  19. Investigating molecular interactions between beta-lactoglobulin and sugar beet pectin by multi-detection HPSEC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular interaction between beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and beta-sugar beet pectin (beta-SBP), both by direct mixing and by thermal treatment prior to mixing at pH 6.75 and low ionic strength (50 mM) was studied using High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC). The analysis of the hy...

  20. Fractionation of sugar beet pulp into pectin, cellulose, and arabinose by arabinases combined with ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Spangnuolo, M.; Crecchio, C.; Pizzigallo, M.D.R.; Ruggiero, P.

    1999-09-20

    Incubation of beet pulp with two arabinases ({alpha}-L-arabinofuranosidase and endo-arabinase), used singularly or in combination at different units of activity per gram of beet pulp, caused the hydrolysis of arabinasn, which produced a hydrolyzate consisting mainly of arabinose. Pectin and a residue enriched with cellulose were subsequently separated from the incubation mixture. The best enzymatic hydrolysis results were obtained when 100 U/g of beet pulp of each enzyme worked synergistically with yields of 100% arabinose and 91.7% pectin. These yields were higher than those obtained with traditional chemical hydrolysis. The pectin fraction showed a low content of neutral sugar content and the cellulose residue contained only a small amount of pentoses. Semicontinuous hydrolysis with enzyme recycling in an ultrafiltration unit was also carried out to separate arabinose, pectin, and cellulose from beet pulp in 7 cycles of hydrolysis followed by ultrafiltration. The yields of separation were similar to those obtained in batch experiments, with an enzyme consumption reduced by 3.5 times and some significant advantages over batch processes.

  1. Sugar Beets, Segregation, and Schools: Mexican Americans in a Northern Colorado Community, 1920-1960.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donato, Ruben

    2003-01-01

    What was unique about the Mexican American experience in Fort Collins (Colorado) was the extent to which the Great Western Sugar Company colonized Mexican workers. They lived in Mexican colonies, separate neighborhoods, or remote locations on sugar beet farms. In public schools, Mexican Americans were perceived as intellectually inferior and were…

  2. Effect of beet flour on films made from biological macromolecules: Native and modified plantain flour.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Tomy J; Guzmán, Romel; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Biological macromolecules such as starches of different amylaceous sources have been used in the formulation of edible films. However, there are few studies aimed at evaluating edible and intelligent films with response to pH changes from natural pigments, this despite the importance of these materials. In this context, films from native and modified plantain flour, plasticized with glycerol, with or without the addition of beet flour were developed. The chemical and structural composition of the flours, and its incidence on thickness, water solubility, contact angle, and mechanical and microstructural properties were evaluated, thus as its response to pH changes of the developed films. The observations showed that the incorporation of beet flour allowed to obtain intelligent films front to pH changes alkaline. Likewise, the betalains that were found in beet flour interacted more efficiently with the phosphated plantain flour, limiting well its immediate response to pH changes. In the same way, proteins and sugars of beet flour allowed to obtain more flexible films, due to the hydrogen bond interactions between these constituents and the plantain flours. This latter could justify the decrease of contact angle, and the increase on thickness and solubility of these films.

  3. Fruit and vegetable extracts as radiation protectants for the beet armyworm nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracts from 37 fruits and vegetables were tested as ultraviolet (UV) protectants for the nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Only one extract (black currant) provided almost complete protection following ultraviolet B/ultraviole...

  4. Study of sugar beet cyst nematode life cycle using plant tissue culture method.

    PubMed

    Shadmehr, Atena; Nouroozi, Payman; Garousi, Ghasemali; Ahmadi, Ali-Reza

    2007-09-01

    After optimization of sterilizing of cyst and larva second stage of Heterodera schachtii, possibility of using nematode on seedlings of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in in vitro conditions were studied using sterilized larvae of beet cyst nematode. For this purpose, non sterile cysts were extracted from infected soil and hatched into zinc chloride solution with concentration of 0.5 g L(-1). Then, for preparation of sterile second stage larvae, several sterilizing treatments were used. Mean comparisons were performed between sterilized live larvae number by Duncan's method. Results showed that 70% ethanol for 1 min followed by 2.5% hypochlorite sodium for 5 minutes and 0.1% hypochlorite sodium for 20 min were best treatments for disinfecting cysts and larvae, respectively. In parallel, two nematode susceptible sugar beet varieties were applied to produce seedlings in in vitro culture. PG(oB) medium containing different hormonal compositions was used for producing of hairy roots and inoculation of seedling with sterilized larvae. After nematode inoculation tests, daily observations were done by counting cysts and stained roots and larvae under stereomicroscope. Between 5-12 cysts formed on the roots of each seedling from two varieties 40 days after inoculation. As a result, it seems that this technique can be used for sugar beet germplasm evaluation to screen nematode resistant genotypes in in vitro controlled condition.

  5. Leuconostoc spp. associated with root rot in sugar beet and their interaction with rhizoctonia solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root and crown is an important disease problem in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and also shown to be associated with Leuconostoc. Since, the initial Leuconostoc studies were conducted with only a few isolates and the relationship of Leuconostoc with R. solani is poorly underst...

  6. Identification of differentially expressed genes induced by beet curly top virus infection in sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to beet curly top virus (BCTV) trait is crucial in Western USA. There is sparse public knowledge of genes regulating resistance. This research focused on gene expression profiling of resistance to the three BCTV strains: Cal/Logan (Cal), Worland (Wor), and severe. Differential gene exp...

  7. Influence of harvest timing, fungicides, and BNYVV on sugar beet storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rots in sugar beet storage can lead to multi-million dollar losses because of reduced sucrose recovery. Thus, studies were conducted to establish better chemical control options and a better understanding of the fungi involved in storage rot. A water check and three fungicides (Mertect at 0.0...

  8. High-throughput RAD-SNP genotyping for characterization of sugar beet genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput SNP genotyping provides a rapid way of developing resourceful set of markers for delineating the genetic architecture and for effective species discrimination. In the presented research, we demonstrate a set of 192 SNPs for effective genotyping in sugar beet using high-throughput mar...

  9. Polysaccharides isolated from sugar beet pulp by quaternization under acidic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet pulp was extracted and chemically modified under acidic conditions using glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride in the presence of trifuoroacetic (TFA), HCl or H3PO4. The goal was to find out how the type of acid used and quaternization could affect the yield of soluble polysaccharide, its mo...

  10. Beet Juice-Induced Green Fabrication of Plasmonic AgCl/Ag Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, green, and fast approach (complete within 5 min) was explored for the fabrication of hybrid AgCl/Ag plasmonic nanoparticles under microwave (MW) irradiation. In this method, beet juice served as a reducing reagent, which is an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce. I...

  11. Comparative infectivity of homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedroviruses against beet armyworm larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) were assayed to determine the most effective NPV against beet armyworm larvae, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)(SeMNPV). Included were three isolates from S. exigua, one isolate each from S. littoralis Boisduval, S. litura...

  12. Association mapping in multiple segregating populations of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Stich, Benjamin; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Heckenberger, Martin; Möhring, Jens; Schechert, Axel; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2008-11-01

    Association mapping in multiple segregating populations (AMMSP) combines high power to detect QTL in genome-wide approaches of linkage mapping with high mapping resolution of association mapping. The main objectives of this study were to (1) examine the applicability of AMMSP in a plant breeding context based on segregating populations of various size of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), (2) compare different biometric approaches for AMMSP, and (3) detect markers with significant main effect across locations for nine traits in sugar beet. We used 768 F(n) (n = 2, 3, 4) sugar beet genotypes which were randomly derived from 19 crosses among diploid elite sugar beet clones. For all nine traits, the genotypic and genotype x location interaction variances were highly significant (P < 0.01). Using a one-step AMMSP approach, the total number of significant (P < 0.05) marker-phenotype associations was 44. The identification of genome regions associated with the traits under consideration indicated that not only segregating populations derived from crosses of parental genotypes in a systematic manner could be used for AMMSP but also populations routinely derived in plant breeding programs from multiple, related crosses. Furthermore, our results suggest that data sets, whose size does not permit analysis by the one-step AMMSP approach, might be analyzed using the two-step approach based on adjusted entry means for each location without losing too much power for detection of marker-phenotype associations.

  13. Multi-trait association mapping in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Stich, Benjamin; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Schulz, Britta; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2008-10-01

    Association mapping promises to overcome the limitations of linkage mapping methods. The main objective of this study was to examine the applicability of multivariate association mapping with an empirical data set of sugar beet. A total of 111 diploid sugar beet inbreds was selected from the seed parent heterotic pool to represent a broad diversity with respect to sugar content (SC). The inbreds were genotyped with 26 simple sequence repeat markers chosen according to their map positions in proximity to previously identified quantitative trait loci for SC. For SC and beet yield (BY), the genotypic variances were highly significant (P < 0.01). Based on the global test of the bivariate mixed-model approach, four markers were significantly associated with SC, BY, or both at a false discovery rate of 0.025. All four markers were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with BY but only two with SC. The identification of markers associated with SC, BY, or both indicated that association mapping can be successfully applied in a sugar beet breeding context for detection of marker-phenotype associations. Furthermore, based on our results multivariate association mapping can be recommended as a promising tool to discriminate with a high mapping resolution between pleiotropy and linkage as reasons for co-localization of marker-phenotype associations for different traits.

  14. The America Society of Sugar Beet Technologist, advancing sugarbeet research for 75 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists (ASSBT) was created 75 years ago when a group of researchers that had been meeting informally as the Sugarbeet Roundtable adopted the constitution and by-laws that provided the basis for an organization that continues to foster the exchange of ideas a...

  15. The American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists advancing sugarbeet research for 75 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists (ASSBT) was created 75 years ago when a group of researchers that had been meeting informally as the Sugarbeet Roundtable adopted the constitution and by-laws that provided the basis for an organization that continues to foster the exchange of ideas a...

  16. Molecular markers for improving control of soil-borne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae (FOB) is an important pathogen of sugar beet worldwide causing leaf yellowing and vascular discoloration. The use of tolerant varieties is one of the most effective methods for managing this disease. In this study, a large germplasm collection,comprised of 29 sugar be...

  17. Physico-chemical characterization of protein associated polysaccharides extracted from sugar beet pulp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar Beet Pulp (SBP), contains 67 to 80% (dry weight) of potentially valuable polysaccharides. We have solubilized and separated polysaccharides from SBP into three fractions with steam assisted flash extraction (SAFE) employed to solubilize the first and second fractions. Pectin, the first fract...

  18. Yield potential of spring-harvested sugar beet depends on autumn planting time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar crops grown for biofuel production provide a source of simple sugars that can readily be made into advanced biofuels. In the mild climate of the southeastern USA, sugar beet can be grown as a winter crop, providing growers with an alternative crop. Experiments evaluated autumn planting dates...

  19. Ethanol fermentation of energy beets by self-flocculating and non-flocculating yeasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ningning; Steven Green, V; Ge, Xumeng; Savary, Brett J; Xu, Jianfeng

    2014-03-01

    Specialized varieties of sugar beets (Energy Beets™) are being developed for producing industrial sugars in Arkansas' Mississippi River Delta. To evaluate their suitability for producing regional fermentation feedstocks, we report initial cultivation trials and ethanol fermentation of raw beet juice and combined juice with pulp mash (JPM) liquefied with enzymes, comparing ethanol yields under different regimes by self-flocculating and non-flocculating yeasts. Nine varieties produced root yields averaging 115Mg/ha and 18.5% sucrose contents. Raw beet juice fermentation yielded ethanol up to 0.48g/g (sugar). JPM was directly fermented through either a sequential (SeqSF) or simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process. For both yeast types, SSF was a more efficient process than SeqSF, with ethanol yields up to 0.47g/g (sugar) and volumetric productivity up to 7.81g/L/h. These results indicate the self-flocculating yeast is suitable for developing efficient bioprocesses to ferment industrial sugar from energy beets.

  20. Assessment of strobilurin resistance in Cercospora beticola in on sugar beet in Michigan and Nebraska, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) caused by Cercospora beticola Sacc. is the most important foliar disease of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) worldwide. CLS is controlled mainly with fungicides, including strobilurins (FRAC group 11). Resistance to strobilurins in C. beticola was first identified in 2011 from s...

  1. Stalk rot of sugar beet caused by Fusarium solani on the Pacific coast.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium stalk blight can cause loss of seed production in sugar beet. The only known causal agent is Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. betae. In 2006, plants that had been grown as stecklings in Oregon and planted in the greenhouse in California for seed production showed symptoms of stalk blight. In add...

  2. Tea, coffee, and cocoa as ultraviolet radiation protectants for beet armyworm nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of 1% (wt/v) aqueous extracts of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), coffee (Coffea arabica L.) (Gentianales: Rubiaceae), green, and black tea (Camellia sinensis L.) (Ericales: Theaceae) provided excellent ultraviolet (UV) radiation protection for the beet armyworm, Spodo...

  3. Optimisation of ultrasonic-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds, antioxidants, and anthocyanins from sugar beet molasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingshun; Zhao, Yi; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-04-01

    Response surface methodology was used to optimise experimental conditions for ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of functional components from sugar beet molasses. The central composite design (CCD) was used for the optimisation of extraction parameters in terms of total phenolic contents, antioxidant activities and anthocyanins. Result suggested the optimal conditions obtained by RSM for UAE from sugar beet molasses were as follows: HCl concentration 1.55-1.72 mol/L, ethanol concentration 57-63% (v/v), extraction temperature 41-48 °C, and extraction time 66-73 min. In the optimal conditions, the experimental total phenolic contents were 17.36 mg GAE/100mL, antioxidant activity was 16.66 mg TE/g, and total anthocyanins were 31.81 mg/100g of the sugar beet molasses extract, which were well matched the predicted values. Teen compounds, i.e. gallic acid, vanillin, hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, catechin, delphinidin-3-O-rutinoside, delphinidin-3-O-glucuronide and ferulic acid were determined by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS in sugar beet molasses.

  4. Genetic Diversity and Physiological Performance of Portuguese Wild Beet (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima) from Three Contrasting Habitats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Isa C; Pinheiro, Carla; Ribeiro, Carla M; Veloso, Maria M; Simoes-Costa, Maria C; Evaristo, Isabel; Paulo, Octávio S; Ricardo, Cândido P

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of stress resilient sugar beets (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is an important breeding goal since this cash crop is susceptible to drought and salinity. The genetic diversity in cultivated sugar beets is low and the beet wild relatives are useful genetic resources for tolerance traits. Three wild beet populations (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima) from contrasting environments, Vaiamonte (VMT, dry inland hill), Comporta (CMP, marsh) and Oeiras (OEI, coastland), and one commercial sugar beet (Isella variety, SB), are compared. At the genetic level, the use of six microsatellite allowed to detect a total of seventy six alleles. It was observed that CMP population has the highest value concerning the effective number of alleles and of expected heterozygosity. By contrast, sugar beet has the lowest values for all the parameters considered. Loci analysis with STRUCTURE allows defining three genetic clusters, the sea beet (OEI and CMP), the inland ruderal beet (VMT) and the sugar beet (SB). A screening test for progressive drought and salinity effects demonstrated that: all populations were able to recover from severe stress; drought impact was higher than that from salinity; the impact on biomass (total, shoot, root) was population specific. The distinct strategies were also visible at physiological level. We evaluated the physiological responses of the populations under drought and salt stress, namely at initial stress stages, late stress stages, and early stress recovery. Multivariate analysis showed that the physiological performance can be used to discriminate between genotypes, with a strong contribution of leaf temperature and leaf osmotic adjustment. However, the separation achieved and the groups formed are dependent on the stress type, stress intensity and duration. Each of the wild beet populations evaluated is very rich in genetic terms (allelic richness) and exhibited physiological plasticity, i.e., the capacity to physiologically adjust to

  5. Genetic Diversity and Physiological Performance of Portuguese Wild Beet (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima) from Three Contrasting Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Isa C.; Pinheiro, Carla; Ribeiro, Carla M.; Veloso, Maria M.; Simoes-Costa, Maria C.; Evaristo, Isabel; Paulo, Octávio S.; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of stress resilient sugar beets (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is an important breeding goal since this cash crop is susceptible to drought and salinity. The genetic diversity in cultivated sugar beets is low and the beet wild relatives are useful genetic resources for tolerance traits. Three wild beet populations (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima) from contrasting environments, Vaiamonte (VMT, dry inland hill), Comporta (CMP, marsh) and Oeiras (OEI, coastland), and one commercial sugar beet (Isella variety, SB), are compared. At the genetic level, the use of six microsatellite allowed to detect a total of seventy six alleles. It was observed that CMP population has the highest value concerning the effective number of alleles and of expected heterozygosity. By contrast, sugar beet has the lowest values for all the parameters considered. Loci analysis with STRUCTURE allows defining three genetic clusters, the sea beet (OEI and CMP), the inland ruderal beet (VMT) and the sugar beet (SB). A screening test for progressive drought and salinity effects demonstrated that: all populations were able to recover from severe stress; drought impact was higher than that from salinity; the impact on biomass (total, shoot, root) was population specific. The distinct strategies were also visible at physiological level. We evaluated the physiological responses of the populations under drought and salt stress, namely at initial stress stages, late stress stages, and early stress recovery. Multivariate analysis showed that the physiological performance can be used to discriminate between genotypes, with a strong contribution of leaf temperature and leaf osmotic adjustment. However, the separation achieved and the groups formed are dependent on the stress type, stress intensity and duration. Each of the wild beet populations evaluated is very rich in genetic terms (allelic richness) and exhibited physiological plasticity, i.e., the capacity to physiologically adjust to

  6. Co-Digestion of Sugar Beet Silage Increases Biogas Yield from Fibrous Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Einfalt, Daniel; Kazda, Marian

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the easily degradable carbohydrates of the sugar beet silage (S) will improve the anaerobic digestion of grass silage (G) more profoundly compared to co-digestion of sugar beet silage with maize silage (M). M : S and G : S mixtures were tested in two continuous laboratory-scale AD experiments at volatile solid ratios of 1 : 0, 6 : 1, 3 : 1, and 1 : 3 at organic loading rates of 1.5 kgVS m−3 day−1. While the sugar beet effects in mixtures with maize silage were negligible, co-digestion with grass silage showed a beneficial performance. There, the specific methane production rate was 0.27 lN kg−1VS h−1at G : S ratio of 6 : 1 compared to G : S 1 : 0 with 0.14 lN kg−1VS h−1. In comparison to G : S 1 : 0, about 44% and 62% higher biogas yields were obtained at G : S 6 : 1 and 3 : 1, respectively. Also, the highest methane concentration was found in G : S at ratio of 1 : 3. Synergistic increase of methane yield was found in co-digestion in both experiments, but higher effect was realized in G : S, independently of the amount of sugar beet silage. The findings of this study emphasize the improvement of AD of grass silage by even low addition of sugar beet silage. PMID:27807538

  7. Co-Digestion of Sugar Beet Silage Increases Biogas Yield from Fibrous Substrates.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sharif; Einfalt, Daniel; Kazda, Marian

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the easily degradable carbohydrates of the sugar beet silage (S) will improve the anaerobic digestion of grass silage (G) more profoundly compared to co-digestion of sugar beet silage with maize silage (M). M : S and G : S mixtures were tested in two continuous laboratory-scale AD experiments at volatile solid ratios of 1 : 0, 6 : 1, 3 : 1, and 1 : 3 at organic loading rates of 1.5 kgVS m(-3) day(-1). While the sugar beet effects in mixtures with maize silage were negligible, co-digestion with grass silage showed a beneficial performance. There, the specific methane production rate was 0.27 lN kg(-1)VS h(-1)at G : S ratio of 6 : 1 compared to G : S 1 : 0 with 0.14 lN kg(-1)VS h(-1). In comparison to G : S 1 : 0, about 44% and 62% higher biogas yields were obtained at G : S 6 : 1 and 3 : 1, respectively. Also, the highest methane concentration was found in G : S at ratio of 1 : 3. Synergistic increase of methane yield was found in co-digestion in both experiments, but higher effect was realized in G : S, independently of the amount of sugar beet silage. The findings of this study emphasize the improvement of AD of grass silage by even low addition of sugar beet silage.

  8. Effect of Plant Age on the Quantity and Quality of Proteins Extracted from Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Leaves.

    PubMed

    Kiskini, Alexandra; Vissers, Anne; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Gruppen, Harry; Wierenga, Peter Alexander

    2016-11-09

    Effects of the developmental stage (e.g., young, mature, or senescent) of leaves on their chemical composition have been described in the literature. This study focuses on the variation in chemical composition and quantity and quality of proteins extracted from leaves due to variation in plant age (i.e., harvesting time), using leaves from sugar beets grown in a field (Rhino, Arrival) and in a greenhouse (Isabella). Within the same variety (Rhino, field; Arrival, field; Isabella, greenhouse) the protein content was similar for leaves from young and old plants (22 ± 1, 16 ± 1, and 10 ± 3% w/w db, respectively). Variation in final protein isolation yield was mostly due to variation in nitrogen extractability (28-56%), although no consistent correlation with plant age was found. A significant effect of plant age was observed on the quality (color) of the extracted protein, that is, brown (indicative of polyphenol oxidase activity) and yellow for extracts from old and young plants, respectively.

  9. Identification of saponins from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) by low and high-resolution HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk-Bator, Katarzyna; Błaszczyk, Alfred; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    We profiled triterpene saponins from the roots of sugar beet Beta vulgaris L. cultivars Huzar and Boryna using reversed-phase liquid chromatography combined with negative-ion electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry. We tentatively identified 26 triterpene saponins, including 17 that had not been detected previously in this plant species and 7 saponins that were tentatively identified as new compounds. All observed compounds were glycosides of five different aglycones, of which gypsogenin and norhederagenin are reported for the first time in sugar beet. Thirteen of the saponins detected in sugar beet roots were substituted with dioxolane-type (4 saponins) or acetal-type (9 saponins) dicarboxylic acids. Among the 26 detected saponins, we identified 2 groups of isomers distinguished using high-resolution mass measurements that were detected only in the Huzar cultivar of sugar beet.

  10. PGE2 induces oenocytoid cell lysis via a G protein-coupled receptor in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eicosanoids mediate cellular and humoral immune responses in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, including activation of prophenoloxidase (PPO). PPO activation begins with release of its inactive zymogen, PPO, from oenocytoids in response to prostaglandins (PGs). Based on the biomedical literatur...

  11. A sugar beet chlorophyll a/b binding protein promoter void of G-box like elements confers strong and leaf specific reporter gene expression in transgenic sugar beet

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Dietmar J; Kloos, Dorothee U; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    Background Modification of leaf traits in sugar beet requires a strong leaf specific promoter. With such a promoter, expression in taproots can be avoided which may otherwise take away available energy resources for sugar accumulation. Results Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was utilized to generate an enriched and equalized cDNA library for leaf expressed genes from sugar beet. Fourteen cDNA fragments corresponding to thirteen different genes were isolated. Northern blot analysis indicates the desired tissue specificity of these genes. The promoters for two chlorophyll a/b binding protein genes (Bvcab11 and Bvcab12) were isolated, linked to reporter genes, and transformed into sugar beet using promoter reporter gene fusions. Transient and transgenic analysis indicate that both promoters direct leaf specific gene expression. A bioinformatic analysis revealed that the Bvcab11 promoter is void of G-box like regulatory elements with a palindromic ACGT core sequence. The data indicate that the presence of a G-box element is not a prerequisite for leaf specific and light induced gene expression in sugar beet. Conclusions This work shows that SSH can be successfully employed for the identification and subsequent isolation of tissue specific sugar beet promoters. These promoters are shown to drive strong leaf specific gene expression in transgenic sugar beet. The application of these promoters for expressing resistance improving genes against foliar diseases is discussed. PMID:15579211

  12. An improved CARV process for bioethanol production from a mixture of sugar beet mash and potato mash.

    PubMed

    Yun, Min-Soo; Park, Jeung-yil; Arakane, Mitsuhiro; Shiroma, Riki; Ike, Masakazu; Tamiya, Seiji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tokuyasu, Ken

    2011-01-01

    A mixed mash of sugar beet roots and potato tubers with a sugar concentration of 23.7% w/v was used as a feedstock for bioethanol production. Enzymatic digestion successfully reduced the viscosity of the mixture, enabling subsequent heat pretreatment for liquefaction/sterilization. An energy-consuming thick juice preparation from sugar beet for concentration and sterilization was omitted in this new process.

  13. Bioavailability of oxalic acid from spinach, sugar beet fibre and a solution of sodium oxalate consumed by female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hanson, C F; Frankos, V H; Thompson, W O

    1989-03-01

    Oxalate bioavailability from sugar beet fibre (40 g), spinach (25 g) and a solution of sodium oxalate (182 mg) was tested in nine women using a triplicated 3 x 3 Latin square arrangement. Each test substance provided 120 mg oxalic acid. Throughout the study the volunteers consumed a control diet and the test substances were administered at breakfast on specified days. After an initial 2-day control period, oxalate was administered in three test periods that consisted of one test day followed by one control day. Urine collected during 24-hr periods was analysed daily for oxalate. Oxalate excretion did not differ among the five control days and was not increased significantly following the ingestion of sugar beet fibre by the volunteers. Oxalate excretion was greater (P less than 0.0001) for the mean of the spinach and sodium oxalate solution diets than for the mean of the sugar beet fibre and control diets. Oxalate bioavailability from sugar beet fibre was 0.7% compared with bioavailabilities of 4.5 and 6.2% for spinach and oxalate solutions, respectively. The low bioavailability of oxalate from sugar beet fibre may be attributable to its high ratio of minerals (calcium and magnesium) to oxalate, its complex fibre matrix or the loss of the soluble oxalate during processing of sugar beets.

  14. Applying Adaptive Agricultural Management & Industrial Ecology Principles to Produce Lower- Carbon Ethanol from California Energy Beets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiades, Anthy Maria

    The life cycle assessment of a proposed beet-to-ethanol pathway demonstrates how agricultural management and industrial ecology principles can be applied to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, minimize agrochemical inputs and waste, provide ecosystem services and yield a lower-carbon fuel from a highly land-use efficient, first-generation feedstock cultivated in California. Beets grown in California have unique potential as a biofuel feedstock. A mature agricultural product with well-developed supply chains, beet-sugar production in California has contracted over recent decades, leaving idle production capacity and forcing growers to seek other crops for use in rotation or find a new market for beets. California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) faces risk of steeply-rising compliance costs, as greenhouse gas reduction targets in the transportation sector were established assuming commercial volumes of lower-carbon fuels from second-generation feedstocks -- such as residues, waste, algae and cellulosic crops -- would be available by 2020. The expected shortfall of cellulosic ethanol has created an immediate need to develop lower-carbon fuels from readily available feedstocks using conventional conversion technologies. The life cycle carbon intensity of this ethanol pathway is less than 28 gCO2e/MJEthanol: a 72% reduction compared to gasoline and 19% lower than the most efficient corn ethanol pathway (34 gCO2e/MJ not including indirect land use change) approved under LCFS. The system relies primarily on waste-to-energy resources; nearly 18 gCO2e/MJ are avoided by using renewable heat and power generated from anaerobic digestion of fermentation stillage and gasification of orchard residues to meet 88% of the facility's steam demand. Co-products displace 2 gCO2e/MJ. Beet cultivation is the largest source of emissions, contributing 15 gCO 2e/MJ. The goal of the study is to explore opportunities to minimize carbon intensity of beet-ethanol and investigate the potential

  15. Pelleted beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn: 1. Effects on feed intake, chewing behavior, and milk production of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Voelker, J A; Allen, M S

    2003-11-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of dried, pelleted beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on intake, milk production, and chewing behavior were evaluated using eight ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in a duplicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Cows were 79 +/- 17 (mean +/- SD) d in milk at the beginning of the experiment. Experimental diets with 40% forage (corn silage and alfalfa silage) and 60% concentrate contained 0, 6.1, 12.1, or 24.3% beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on a dry matter basis. Diet concentrations of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and starch were 24.3 and 34.6% (0% beet pulp), 26.2 and 30.5% (6% beet pulp), 28.0 and 26.5% (12% beet pulp), and 31.6 and 18.4% (24% beet pulp), respectively. Increasing beet pulp in the diet caused a linear decrease in dry matter intake (DMI). Time spent eating per day and per kilogram of DMI increased, and sorting against NDF tended to increase, with added beet pulp. Substituting beet pulp for corn caused a quadratic response in milk fat yield, with the highest yield for the 6% beet pulp treatment. A tendency was detected for a similar quadratic response in 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield. Lower plasma insulin concentration may have resulted in lower body condition gain for cows fed diets with higher beet pulp concentration. Partial substitution of pelleted beet pulp for high-moisture corn decreased intake but also may have permitted greater fat-corrected milk yield.

  16. Study of some physiological changes in sugar beet cv. 7233 in the presence of sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii and an antagonistic sterile fungus StFCh1-1 in the rhizosphere condition.

    PubMed

    Jalali, A A Hojat; Ghasempour, H R; Sharifi, S

    2007-11-01

    In this study, several physiological parameters of inoculated sugar beet plants, with the beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, were evaluated in the presence of an antagonistic sterile fungus StFCh1-1 in the rhizosphere condition. The sugar beet plant used in this bioassay was a multigerm cultivar, 7233, which is sensitive to the beet cyst nematode and has been adapted to cultivate in temperate and cool regions of the sugar beet production areas of Iran. In this regard a potent bioassay was conducted in the sterile glass tubes (20 x 3 cm phi ) containing 30 g autoclaved soil and planted with a sterile germinated seed of sugar beet, totally in 24 tubes. The seedling of sugar beet plant at four leaves stages in two treatments (nematode and nematode + fungus) was inoculated with 50 disinfected beet cyst nematodes. As a standard procedure the bioassay composed of four treatments including: fungus, nematode, nematode + fungus and untreated control. Two months after nematodes' inoculation some physiological parameters of plants were measured including: total chlorophyll, potassium and biomass. The two treated plants with nematode and nematode plus fungus showed significant decrease in biomass and chlorophyll contents but treatment with fungus alone showed no significant differences in the biomass and chlorophyll content of plants in comparison with the control. The potassium content of shoots in the invaded sugar beet plants was lowest, but it was highest in the roots. These changes might be indication of adaptive osmoregulation or acclimation responses in plants due to the nematodes as bio-stressors through the increase of metabolites and solutes. Also, these results confirmed that in plants inoculated with nematode plus fungus, a few number of female of nematodes were developed due to the antagonistic effects of sterile fungus StFCh1-1. Meanwhile, the fungus didn't have any detrimental effect on biomass, chlorophyll content and potassium in leaves of sugar beet cv

  17. Sodium and proline accumulation as osmoregulators in tolerance of sugar beet genotypes to salinity.

    PubMed

    Pakniyat, H; Armion, M

    2007-11-15

    Twenty eight sugar beet genotypes were analysed for their tolerance at 3 NaCl levels (0, 3000 and 6000 mg NaCl kg(-1) soil) and Na+, K+, Na+/K+ and free proline were measured from the leaf samples. Results showed that increasing salinity level caused an increase in Na+, Na+/K+ and proline, but a decrease in K+ content of leaf samples (p < or = 0.01). As compared to non-tolerant genotypes, tolerant ones accumulated more Na+ and Na+/K+ and proline and less K+. It seems that Na+ and proline accumulation in shoots are effective mechanisms for osmotic pressure adjustment and plant tolerance to salinity, a mechanism commonly seen in sugar beet ancestors.

  18. Biolistic transformation of highly regenerative sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Ivic-Haymes, Snezana D; Smigocki, Ann C

    2005-03-01

    Leaves of greenhouse-grown sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plants that were first screened for high regeneration potential were transformed via particle bombardment with the uidA gene fused to the osmotin or proteinase inhibitor II gene promoter. Stably transformed calli were recovered as early as 7 weeks after bombardment and GUS-positive shoots regenerated 3 months after bombardment. The efficiency of transformation ranged from 0.9% to 3.7%, and stable integration of the uidA gene into the genome was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. The main advantages of direct bombardment of leaves to regenerate transformed sugar beet include (1) a readily available source of highly regenerative target tissue, (2) minimal tissue culture manipulation before and after bombardment, and (3) the overall rapid regeneration of transgenic shoots.

  19. Hyper sausage neuron: Recognition of transgenic sugar-beet based on terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Li, Zhi; Hu, Fangrong; Chen, Tao; Du, Yong; Xin, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for identification of terahertz (THz) spectral of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) based on Hyper Sausage Neuron (HSN), and THz transmittance spectra of some typical transgenic sugar-beet samples are investigated to demonstrate its feasibility. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to extract features of the spectrum data, and instead of the original spectrum data, the feature signals are fed into the HSN pattern recognition, a new multiple weights neural network (MWNN). The experimental result shows that the HSN model not only can correctly classify different types of transgenic sugar-beets, but also can reject identity non similar samples in the same type. The proposed approach provides a new effective method for detection and identification of GMOs by using THz spectroscopy.

  20. A study on cations and color removal from thin sugar juice by modified sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Tumen, Fikret

    2012-06-01

    This article describes the use of citric acid modified sugar beet pulp as new ion-exchanger sorbent for the removal of metal cations and colorants from thin juice. The results of batch adsorption runs concerning the effects of contact time, material dosage, temperature and pH drop were presented and discussed. Experimental data on the removal of metal cations showed that the sorption process was rapid and reached equilibrium in 60 min. Modified material in acidic form caused to a significant pH drop in thin juice, which could result with sucrose inversion. Uptake of metal cations increased with temperature whereas that of color decreased. Neutralised type modified product gave more satisfying results. After six successive contacts, 49.7%, 37.5% and 43.7% removals for Ca-Mg, K and color, respectively, were obtained by using neutralised form of modified sugar beet pulp.

  1. Optimization of production yield and functional properties of pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cheng; Wang, Yong; Wang, Li-jun; Li, Dong; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-06-05

    A central composite design was employed to determine the optimum extraction condition to obtain higher yield, better color attribute as well as better rheological and emulsifying properties in pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp (SBP). A second-order polynomial model was developed for predicting the yield of sugar beet pulp pectin (SBPP) based on the composite design. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to quantify the integral effect of three processing parameters (extraction temperature, time and pH) on yield, yield stress, color attribute (tint value) and emulsifying activity index (EAI). Through the frequency analysis it was found that the optimal temperature, time and pH value of the extraction were 93.7 °C, 3 h, and 1.21, respectively. The yield, yield stress and tint value of the SBPP extracted at the optimal condition were 24.45%, above 0.1 Pa and -6.0, respectively.

  2. [Epigenetic variation of the choriflowered--symflowered character in the symflowered sugar beet line SOAN-14].

    PubMed

    Iudanova, S S; Maletskaia, E I; Maletskiĭ, S I

    2012-07-01

    The effect of 5-azacytidine on the variation of the choriflowered (CF)-symflowered (SF) character in sugar beet was studied in several generations obtained via seed reproduction. The epimutagen (5-azacytidine) significantly reduced the number of flowers in glomerate inflorescences in the year of seed treatment and in the next generation (Az1), leading to the appearance of plants with single flowers in bract axils of a flower stalk. The CF character resulting from epimutagene treatment of sugar beet seeds (plants with genotype M(Z)M(Z) was inherited as a monohybrid character in both zygotic and apozygotic seed progenies. The proportion of the CF and SF phenotypes in the progenies was affected bythe chromatid number in the chromosomes (mixoploidy of the cell populations). Alleles of the Mm locus were found to affect the variation in phytomere organization of flower stalks.

  3. Betaine and beet molasses enhance L-lactic acid production by Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important chemical with various industrial applications, and it can be efficiently produced by fermentation, in which Bacillus coagulans strains present excellent performance. Betaine can promote lactic acid fermentation as an effective osmoprotectant. Here, positive effect of betaine on fermentation by B. coagulans is revealed. Betaine could enhance lactic acid production by protecting l-LDH activity and cell growth from osmotic inhibition, especially under high glucose concentrations and with poor organic nitrogen nutrients. The fermentation with 0.05 g/L betaine could produce 17.9% more lactic acid compared to the fermentation without betaine. Beet molasses, which is rich in sucrose and betaine, was utilized in a co-feeding fermentation and raised the productivity by 22%. The efficient lactic acid fermentation by B. coagulans is thus developed by using betaine and beet molasses.

  4. Concurrent Beet Juice and Carbohydrate Ingestion: Influence on Glucose Tolerance in Obese and Nonobese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Joseph W.; Binns, Scott E.; Davis, Janelle L.; Giordano, Gregory R.; Klochak, Anna L.; Paris, Hunter L.; Schweder, Melani M.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Scalzo, Rebecca L.

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are characterized by low nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Insulin sensitivity is improved with stimulation of NO generating pathways. Consumption of dietary nitrate (NO3−) increases NO formation, via NO3− reduction to nitrite (NO2−) by oral bacteria. We hypothesized that acute dietary nitrate (beet juice) ingestion improves insulin sensitivity in obese but not in nonobese adults. 12 nonobese (body mass index: 26.3 ± 0.8 kg/m2 (mean ± SE)) and 10 obese adults (34.0 ± 0.8 kg/m2) ingested beet juice, supplemented with 25 g of glucose (carbohydrate load: 75 g), with and without prior use of antibacterial mouthwash to inhibit NO3− reduction to NO2−. Blood glucose concentrations after beet juice and glucose ingestion were greater in obese compared with nonobese adults at 60 and 90 minutes (P = 0.004). Insulin sensitivity, as represented by the Matsuda Index (where higher values reflect greater insulin sensitivity), was lower in obese compared with nonobese adults (P = 0.009). Antibacterial mouthwash rinsing decreased insulin sensitivity in obese (5.7 ± 0.7 versus 4.9 ± 0.6) but not in nonobese (8.1 ± 1.0 versus 8.9 ± 0.9) adults (P = 0.048). In conclusion, insulin sensitivity was improved in obese but not in nonobese adults following coingestion of beet juice and glucose when oral bacteria nitrate reduction was not inhibited. Obese adults may benefit from ingestion of healthy nitrate-rich foods during meals. PMID:28203456

  5. Effect of Kimchi Fermentation on Oxalate Levels in Silver Beet (Beta vulgaris var. cicla).

    PubMed

    Wadamori, Yukiko; Vanhanen, Leo; Savage, Geoffrey P

    2014-04-23

    Total, soluble and insoluble oxalates were extracted and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) following the preparation of kimchi using silver beet (Beta vulgaris var. cicla) stems and leaves. As silver beet contains high oxalate concentrations and consumption of high levels can cause the development of kidney stones in some people, the reduction of oxalate during preparation and fermentation of kimchi was investigated. The silver beet stems and leaves were soaked in a 10% brine solution for 11 h and then washed in cold tap water. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the silver beet leaves were reduced by soaking in brine, from 4275.81 ± 165.48 mg/100 g to 3709.49 ± 216.51 mg/100 g fresh weight (FW). Fermenting the kimchi for 5 days at 19.3 ± 0.8 °C in 5 L ceramic jars with a water airtight seal resulted in a mean 38.50% reduction in total oxalate content and a mean 22.86% reduction in soluble oxalates. The total calcium content was essentially the same before and after the fermentation of the kimchi (mean 296.1 mg/100 g FW). The study showed that fermentation of kimchi significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the total oxalate concentration in the initial mix from 609.32 ± 15.69 to 374.71 ± 7.94 mg/100 g FW in the final mix which led to a 72.3% reduction in the amount of calcium bound to insoluble oxalate.

  6. Coupling Spore Traps and Quantitative PCR Assays for Detection of the Downy Mildew Pathogens of Spinach (Peronospora effusa) and Beet (P. schachtii)

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Steven J.; Anchieta, Amy; McRoberts, Neil; Koike, Steven T.; Subbarao, Krishna V.; Voglmayr, Hermann; Choi, Young-Joon; Thines, Marco; Martin, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Downy mildew of spinach (Spinacia oleracea), caused by Peronospora effusa, is a production constraint on production worldwide, including in California, where the majority of U.S. spinach is grown. The aim of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for detection of airborne inoculum of P. effusa in California. Among oomycete ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences examined for assay development, the highest nucleotide sequence identity was observed between rDNA sequences of P. effusa and P. schachtii, the cause of downy mildew on sugar beet and Swiss chard in the leaf beet group (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected between P. effusa and P. schachtii in the 18S rDNA regions for design of P. effusa- and P. schachtii-specific TaqMan probes and reverse primers. An allele-specific probe and primer amplification method was applied to determine the frequency of both P. effusa and P. schachtii rDNA target sequences in pooled DNA samples, enabling quantification of rDNA of P. effusa from impaction spore trap samples collected from spinach production fields. The rDNA copy numbers of P. effusa were, on average, ≈3,300-fold higher from trap samples collected near an infected field compared with those levels recorded at a site without a nearby spinach field. In combination with disease-conducive weather forecasting, application of the assays may be helpful to time fungicide applications for disease management. PMID:24964150

  7. Zinc and copper uptake by silver beet grown in secondary treated effluent.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jaya; Levitan, Jason; Oyama, Noraisha

    2008-05-01

    The study was conducted in a hydroponics set-up to determine the suitability of zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) contaminated wastewater as a growth medium for edible crops; to identify accumulation of Zn and Cu in different parts of the plants and to understand their effects on plant growth. Silver beet was found to produce adequate yields in the Zn (1.7 mg/L and 2.0mg/L) and Cu (0.35 mg/L and 1.1mg/L) spiked medium but not in the secondary treated domestic effluent. The plants grown in secondary treated effluent showed stunted growth and accumulated Zn and Cu to a high level in their shoots. In all other mediums Zn and Cu accumulated more in the roots. The stunted growth of silver beet in secondary treated wastewater and uptake of Zn in particular was considered to be due to the deficiency of nitrogen and other plant nutrients rather than the effect of heavy metals. The study also revealed that if there was adequate amount of macronutrients available for growth, silver beet could be grown in domestic effluent without the risk of Zn or Cu contamination to the undesired level through hydroponics.

  8. Progress towards the understanding and control of sugar beet rhizomania disease.

    PubMed

    McGrann, Graham R D; Grimmer, Michael K; Mutasa-Göttgens, Effie S; Stevens, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Rhizomania is a soil-borne disease that occurs throughout the major sugar beet growing regions of the world, causing severe yield losses in the absence of effective control measures. It is caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV), which is transmitted by the obligate root-infecting parasite Polymyxa betae. BNYVV has a multipartite RNA genome with all natural isolates containing four RNA species, although some isolates have a fifth RNA. The larger RNA1 and RNA2 contain the housekeeping genes of the virus and are always required for infection, whereas the smaller RNAs are involved in pathogenicity and vector transmission. RNA5-containing isolates are restricted to Asia and some parts of Europe, and these isolates tend to be more aggressive. With no acceptable pesticides available to restrict the vector, the control of rhizomania is now achieved almost exclusively through the use of resistant cultivars. A single dominant resistance gene, Rz1, has been used to manage the disease worldwide in recent years, although this gene confers only partial resistance. More recently, new variants of BNYVV have evolved (both with and without RNA5) that are able to cause significant yield penalties on resistant cultivars. These isolates are not yet widespread, but their appearance has resulted in accelerated searches for new sources of resistance to both the virus and the vector. Combined virus and vector resistance, achieved either by conventional or transgenic breeding, offers the sugar beet industry a new approach in its continuing struggle against rhizomania.

  9. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Cao, Hua; Cai, Yan-Fei; Wang, Ji-Hua; Qu, Su-Ping; Huang, Xing-Qi

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined in this study. The cpDNA was 149,637 bp in length, containing a pair of 24,439 bp inverted repeat regions (IR), which were separated by small and large single copy regions (SSC and LSC) of 17,701 and 83,057 bp, respectively. 53.4% of the sugar beet cpDNA consisted of gene coding regions (protein coding and RNA genes). The gene content and relative positions of 113 individual genes (79 protein encoding genes, 30 tRNA genes, 4 rRNA genes) were almost identical to those of tobacco cpDNA. The overall AT contents of the sugar beet cpDNA were 63.6% and in the LSC, SSC and IR regions were 65.9%, 70.8% and 57.8%, respectively. Fifteen genes contained one intron, while three genes had two introns.

  10. Antioxidant activity of processed table beets (Beta vulgaris var, conditiva) and green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Jiratanan, Thudnatkorn; Liu, Rui Hai

    2004-05-05

    It has been shown that thermal processing of tomatoes and sweet corn results in increased antioxidant activities despite the loss of vitamin C. Until now, it is unclear whether this positive effect of thermal processing occurs with all crop produce. Therefore, analysis of a root vegetable (beets) and of a legume (green beans) was undertaken to address this question. Antioxidant activity of beets processed under typical commercial processing conditions remained constant despite an 8% loss of vitamin C, a 60% loss of color, and 30% loss of dietary folate. There was a slight but significant 5% increase in phenolic content of processed beets. In contrast, vitamin C and dietary folate content of green beans remained constant, whereas a 32% reduction in phenolic compounds occurred after typical commercial processing conditions. The antioxidant activity of green beans was reduced by 20%. These findings along with previous works suggest that the effects of thermal processing vary with the respective produce crop type. It also reinforces the concept that optimal health benefits may be achieved when a wide variety of plant foods (fruits, vegetables and whole grains) and preparation methods are incorporated into the diet.

  11. Pyrolysis kinetics of blends of Yeni Celtek lignite and sugar beet pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Devrim, Y.G.

    2008-07-01

    Pyrolysis kinetics of the Yeni Celtek lignite/sugar beet pulp blends prepared at different ratios (100:0, 80:20, 60:40, 40:60, 20:80, and 0:100) were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis in the present study. All the experiments were carried out in nitrogen atmosphere under non-isothermal conditions with a heating rate range of 30 K/min in the pyrolysis temperature interval of 298-1,173 K. The Arrhenius model is applied to determine the kinetic parameters from TG/DTG curves. Apparent activation energies of the lignite and sugar beet pulp were calculated as 51.55 kJ/mol and 97.27 kJ/mol, respectively. Activation energies of the blends were also calculated and were found to vary between 54.87 and 74.83 kJ/mol. Effects of blending ratio of lignite to sugar beet pulp on kinetic parameters were investigated and the results were discussed.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of sugar beet root maggot (Tetanops myopaeformis) genes modulated by the Beta vulgaris host.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Smigocki, Ann C

    2016-10-03

    Sugar beet root maggot (SBRM, Tetanops myopaeformis von Röder) is a major but poorly understood insect pest of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The molecular mechanisms underlying plant defense responses are well documented, however, little information is available about complementary mechanisms for insect adaptive responses to overcome host resistance. To date, no studies have been published on SBRM gene expression profiling. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) generated more than 300 SBRM ESTs differentially expressed in the interaction of the pest with a moderately resistant (F1016) and a susceptible (F1010) sugar beet line. Blast2GO v. 3.2 search indicated that over 40% of the differentially expressed genes had known functions, primarily driven by fruit fly D. melanogaster genes. Expression patterns of 18 selected EST clones were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis predicted a dominance of metabolic and catalytic genes involved in the interaction of SBRM with its host. SBRM genes functioning during development, regulation, cellular process, signaling and under stress conditions were annotated. SBRM genes that were common or unique in response to resistant or susceptible interactions with the host were identified and their possible roles in insect responses to the host are discussed.

  13. Effect of Environment and Sugar Beet Genotype on Root Rot Development and Pathogen Profile During Storage.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Storage rots represent an economically important factor impairing the storability of sugar beet by increasing sucrose losses and invert sugar content. Understanding the development of disease management strategies, knowledge about major storage pathogens, and factors influencing their occurrence is crucial. In comprehensive storage trials conducted under controlled conditions, the effects of environment and genotype on rot development and associated quality changes were investigated. Prevalent species involved in rot development were identified by a newly developed microarray. The strongest effect on rot development was assigned to environment factors followed by genotypic effects. Despite large variation in rot severity (sample range 0 to 84%), the spectrum of microorganisms colonizing sugar beet remained fairly constant across all treatments with dominant species belonging to the fungal genera Botrytis, Fusarium, and Penicillium. The intensity of microbial tissue necrotization was strongly correlated with sucrose losses (R² = 0.79 to 0.91) and invert sugar accumulation (R² = 0.91 to 0.95). A storage rot resistance bioassay was developed that could successfully reproduce the genotype ranking observed in storage trials. Quantification of fungal biomass indicates that genetic resistance is based on a quantitative mechanism. Further work is required to understand the large environmental influence on rot development in sugar beet.

  14. Oral intake of beet extract provides protection against skin barrier impairment in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Ken-Ichi; Umemura, Kazuo

    2013-05-01

    The epidermis acts as a functional barrier against the external environment. Disturbances in the function of this barrier cause water loss and increase the chances of penetration by various irritable stimuli, leading to skin diseases such as dry skin, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. Ceramides are a critical natural element of the protective epidermal barrier. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the oral intake of beet (Beta vulgaris) extract, a natural product rich in glucosylceramide (GlcCer), may prevent disturbance in skin barrier function. When HR-1 hairless mice were fed a special diet (HR-AD), transepidermal water loss (TEWL) from the dorsal skin increased, with a compensatory increase in water intake after 5 weeks. Mice fed with HR-AD had dry skin with erythema and showed increased scratching behaviour. Histological examinations revealed a remarkable increase in the thickness of the skin at 8 weeks. Supplemental addition of beet extract, which contained GlcCer at a final concentration of 0.1%, significantly prevented an increase TEWL, water intake, cumulative scratching time, and epidermal thickness at 8 weeks. These results indicate that oral intake of beet extract shows potential for preventing skin diseases associated with impaired skin barrier function.

  15. Economic feasibility of the sugar beet-to-ethylene value chain.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Jeroen; Biesheuvel, Kees; De Kok, Ad; Pelt, Henk; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Spork, Ger; Tange, Jan; Wevers, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    As part of a long-term strategy toward renewable feedstock, a feasibility study into options for the production of bioethylene by integrating the sugar beet-to-ethanol-to-ethylene value chain. Seven business cases were studied and tested for actual economic feasibility of alternative sugar-to-ethanol-to-ethylene routes in comparison to fossil-fuel alternatives. An elaborate model was developed to assess the relevant operational and financial aspects of each business case. The calculations indicate that bioethylene from sugar beet is not commercially viable under current market conditions. In light of expected global energy and feedstock prices it is also reasonable to expect that this will not change in the near future. To consider biorenewable sources as starting material, they need to be low in cost (compared to sugar beets) and also require less capital and energy-intensive methods for the conversion to chemicals. In general, European sugar prices will be too high for many chemical applications. Future efforts for in sugar-to-chemicals routes should, therefore, focus on integrated process routes and process intensification and/or on products that contain a significant part of the original carbohydrate backbone.

  16. The influence of leaf photosynthetic efficiency and stomatal closure on canopy carbon uptake and evapotranspiration - a model study in wheat and sugar beet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schickling, A.; Graf, A.; Pieruschka, R.; Plückers, C.; Geiß, H.; Lai, I.-L.; Schween, J. H.; Erentok, K.; Schmidt, M.; Wahner, A.; Crewell, S.; Rascher, U.

    2010-09-01

    In this study two crop species, winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), were monitored over the course of five days during the entire season. We investigated the link of the main physiological leaf-level mechanisms, stomatal conductance and efficiency of photosynthetic energy conversion on canopy transpiration and photosynthetic CO2 uptake. The physiological status of 900 leaves of different plants in a natural canopy was characterized on the leaf level using chlorophyll fluorescence. Gas exchange measurements were performed at leaves of 12 individual plants of each species. Eddy covariance flux measurements provided information on CO2, water and energy fluxes on the field scale. The diurnal pattern of stomatal resistance on the leaf level was especially for sugar beet similar to the canopy resistance, which indicates that stomatal resistance may have a large impact on the bulk canopy resistance. The diurnal changes in canopy resistance appeared to have less effect on the evapotranspiration, which was mainly dependent on the amount of incoming radiation. The similar diurnal pattern of water use efficiency on the leaf level and on the canopy level during the day, underline the influence of physiological mechanisms of leaves on the canopy. The greatest difference between water use efficiency on leaf and canopy occurred in the morning, mainly due to an increase of stomatal resistance. Limitation of CO2 uptake occurred in the afternoon when water vapor pressure deficit increased. Maxima of net ecosystem productivity corresponded to the highest values of photosynthetic capacity of single leaves, which occurred before solar noon. Within the course of a few hours, photosynthetic efficiency and stomatal resistance of leaves varied and these variations were the reason for diurnal variations in the carbon fluxes of the whole field. During the seasonal development, the leaf area index was the main factor driving carbon and water exchange, when both

  17. Potential for evolutionary change in the seasonal timing of germination in sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima) mediated by seed dormancy.

    PubMed

    Wagmann, Kristen; Hautekèete, Nina-Coralie; Piquot, Yves; Van Dijk, Henk

    2010-07-01

    In sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima), germination occurs in autumn or spring and is mediated by dormancy which can be released by cold or dry periods. Environmental change such as current climate change may require evolutionary response in seasonal timing. Here, we explore the potential for such evolutionary change. Seed dormancy was studied in a composite population based on seeds from all over the species range in France together with several generations of reciprocal crosses. We found high, repeatable variability for dormancy rate among individuals under greenhouse conditions and confirmed its relevance for germination phenology in the field. Our data fitted best with an exclusively maternal determination of the dormancy phenotype. Narrow-sense heritability, h(2) approximately 0.5 in the composite population and approximately 0.4 in the original local populations, was such that rapid evolutionary change in the relative proportions of autumn and spring germination may be possible.

  18. Effects of beet pulp supplementation on growth performance, fecal moisture, serum hormones and litter performance in lactating sows.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pinyao; Zhang, Zhengfan; Kim, In Ho

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of beet pulp supplementation on growth performance, fecal moisture, serum hormones and litter performance in lactating sows. Ninety primiparous sows (Landrace × Yorkshire) were randomly allotted to one of three dietary treatments in a 21-day trial starting 3 days before parturition. The three dietary treatments were supplemented with 0, 10 and 20% beet pulp, respectively. Backfat loss and fecal moisture content were increased (P < 0.05), where cortisol and norepinephrine levels were decreased (P < 0.05) in sows fed beet pulp supplementation diets compared with control diet, but there was no difference between 10% and 20% beet pulp supplementation treatments. No effect was observed on bodyweight, average daily intake, weaning to estrus interval, epinephrine level in sows and litter weight, litter size, survivability in piglets among dietary treatments. Taken together, beet pulp supplementation has no significant effect of growth performance of lactating sows and piglets with decreased cortisol and norepinephrine levels in lactating sows, but it can increase fecal moisture content which is beneficial for sow feces excretion.

  19. Human urine and wood ash as plant nutrients for red beet (Beta vulgaris) cultivation: impacts on yield quality.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Surendra K; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Weisell, Janne; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2010-02-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of human urine and wood ash fertilization on the yield and quality of red beet by measuring the microbial, nutrient, and antioxidant (betanin) content of the roots. Red beets were fertilized with 133 kg of N/ha as mineral fertilizer, urine and ash, and only urine with no fertilizer as a control. The mineral-fertilized plants and urine- and ash-fertilized plants also received 89 kg of P/ha. Urine and ash and only urine fertilizer produced 1720 and 656 kg/ha more root biomass, respectively, versus what was obtained from the mineral fertilizer. Few fecal coliforms and coliphage were detected in mineral-fertilized and urine- and ash-fertilized red beet roots. The protein and betanin contents in red beet roots were similar in all treatments. In conclusion, this study revealed that urine with or without ash can increase the yield of red beet and furthermore the microbial quality and chemical quality were similar to the situation in mineral-fertilized products.

  20. Proteome analysis of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) elucidates constitutive adaptation during the first phase of salt stress.

    PubMed

    Wakeel, Abdul; Asif, Abdul R; Pitann, Britta; Schubert, Sven

    2011-04-15

    Salinity is one of the major stress factors responsible for growth reduction of most of the higher plants. In this study, the effect of salt stress on protein pattern in shoots and roots of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was examined. Sugar beet plants were grown in hydroponics under control and 125 mM salt treatments. A significant growth reduction of shoots and roots was observed. The changes in protein expression, caused by salinity, were monitored using two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis. Most of the detected proteins in sugar beet showed stability under salt stress. The statistical analysis of detected proteins showed that the expression of only six proteins from shoots and three proteins from roots were significantly altered. At this stage, the significantly changed protein expressions we detected could not be attributed to sugar beet adaptation under salt stress. However, unchanged membrane bound proteins under salt stress did reveal the constitutive adaptation of sugar beet to salt stress at the plasma membrane level.

  1. Identification and validation of a SNP marker linked to the gene HsBvm-1 for nematode resistance in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beet-cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schmidt) is one of the major pests of sugar beet. The identification of molecular markers associated with nematode resistance would be helpful for developing resistant varieties. The aim of this study was the identification of SNP (Single Nucleotide Polym...

  2. Mechanical Property Characterization of Plasticized Sugar Beet Pulp and Poly(lactic acid) Green Composites using Acoustic Emission and Confocal Microscopy.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorbitol and glycerol were used to plasticize sugar beet pulp-poly (lactic acid) green composites. The plasticizer was incorporated into sugar beet pulp (SBP)at 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40% w/w at low temperature and shear and then compounded with PLA using twin-screw extrusion and injection molding. The...

  3. Measurement of moisture, soluble solids, and sucrose content and mechanical properties in sugar beet using portable visible and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visible and near-infrared spectroscopy, coupled with partial least squares regression, was used to predict the moisture, soluble solids and sucrose content and mechanical properties of sugar beet. Interactance spectra were acquired from both intact and sliced beets, using two portable spectrometers ...

  4. Genome Sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Oat dwarf virus, Turnip curly top virus, and Wheat dwarf virus Identified in Leafhoppers

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Mehdi; Pouramini, Najmeh; Masumi, Hossain; Farkas, Kata; Kraberger, Simona

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Implementation of a vector-enabled metagenomics approach resulted in the identification of various geminiviruses. We identified the genome sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Turnip curly top viruses, Oat dwarf viruses, the first from Iran, and Wheat dwarf virus from leafhoppers feeding on beet, parsley, pumpkin, and turnip plants. PMID:28232449

  5. Genome Sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Oat dwarf virus, Turnip curly top virus, and Wheat dwarf virus Identified in Leafhoppers.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Mehdi; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Pouramini, Najmeh; Masumi, Hossain; Farkas, Kata; Kraberger, Simona; Varsani, Arvind

    2017-02-23

    Implementation of a vector-enabled metagenomics approach resulted in the identification of various geminiviruses. We identified the genome sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Turnip curly top viruses, Oat dwarf viruses, the first from Iran, and Wheat dwarf virus from leafhoppers feeding on beet, parsley, pumpkin, and turnip plants.

  6. Macronutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance, plasma indicators of protein metabolism and mineral absorption in horses fed a ration rich in sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Olsman, A F S; Huurdeman, C M; Jansen, W L; Haaksma, J; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M; Beynen, A C

    2004-10-01

    In a cross-over study with six mature horses, the effect of iso-energetic replacement of dietary glucose by beet pulp on macronutrient digestibility, nitrogen metabolism and mineral absorption was studied. The test ration contained 25% beet pulp in the total dietary dry matter. Beet pulp feeding significantly lowered crude fat and non-structural carbohydrate digestibility, but had no significant effect on digestibility of other macronutrients, faecal and urinary nitrogen excretion and the faecal to urinary nitrogen excretion quotient. However, on the beet pulp diet, plasma ammonia and creatinin concentrations were significantly lower than on the glucose diet. No diet effect on magnesium absorption was observed. It is suggested that dietary beet pulp stimulates the conversion of ammonia into urea.

  7. [Creation of transgenic sugar beet lines expressing insect pest resistance genes cry1C and cry2A].

    PubMed

    Litvin, D I; Sivura, V V; Kurilo, V V; Oleneva, V D; Emets, A I; Blium, Ia B

    2014-01-01

    Impact of insect pests makes a significant limitation of the sugar beet crop yield. Integration of cry-genes of Bacillus thuringiensis into plant genome is one of the promising strategies to ensure plant resistance. The aim of this work was to obtain sugar beet lines (based on the MM 1/2 line) transformed with cry2A and cry1Cgenes. We have optimized transformation protocol and direct plant let regeneration protocol from leaf explants using 1 mg/l benzylaminopurine as well as 0,25 mg/l benzylaminopurine and 0,1 mg/l indole-butyric acid. Consequently, transgenic sugar beet lines transformed with vector constructs pRD400-cry1C and pRD400-cry2A have been obtained. PCR analysis revealed integration of cry2A and cry1C into genome of transgenic lines and expression of these genes in leaf tissues was shown by reverse transcription PCR.

  8. Modified sugar beet pectin induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via an interaction with the neutral sugar side-chains.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Ellen G; Colquhoun, Ian J; Chau, Hoa K; Hotchkiss, Arland T; Waldron, Keith W; Morris, Victor J; Belshaw, Nigel J

    2016-01-20

    Pectins extracted from a variety of sources and modified with heat and/or pH have previously been shown to exhibit activity towards several cancer cell lines. However, the structural basis for the anti-cancer activity of modified pectin requires clarification. Sugar beet and citrus pectin extracts have been compared. Pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp only weakly affected the viability of colon cancer cells. Alkali treatment increased the anti-cancer effect of sugar beet pectin via an induction of apoptosis. Alkali treatment decreased the degree of esterification (DE) and increased the ratio of rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) to homogalacturonan. Low DE per se did not play a significant role in the anti-cancer activity. However, the enzymatic removal of galactose and, to a lesser extent, arabinose from the pectin decreased the effect on cancer cells indicating that the neutral sugar-containing RGI regions are important for pectin bioactivity.

  9. Technical and economic assessments of storage techniques for long-term retention of industrial-beet sugar for non-food industrial fermentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Ramirez, Juan Manuel

    Industrial beets may compete against corn grain as an important source of sugars for non-food industrial fermentations. However, dependable and energy-efficient systems for beet sugar storage and processing are necessary to help establish industrial beets as a viable sugar feedstock. Therefore, technical and economic aspects of beet sugar storage and processing were evaluated. First, sugar retention was evaluated in whole beets treated externally with either one of two antimicrobials or a senescence inhibitor and stored for 36 wk at different temperature and atmosphere combinations. Although surface treatment did not improve sugar retention, full retention was enabled by beet dehydration caused by ambient air at 25 °C and with a relative humidity of 37%. This insight led to the evaluation of sugar retention in ground-beet tissue ensiled for 8 wk at different combinations of acidic pH, moisture content (MC), and sugar:solids. Some combinations of pH ≤ 4.0 and MC ≤ 67.5% enabled retentions of at least 90%. Yeast fermentability was also evaluated in non-purified beet juice acidified to enable long-term storage and partially neutralized before fermentation. None of the salts synthesized through juice acidification and partial neutralization inhibited yeast fermentation at the levels evaluated in that work. Conversely, yeast fermentation rates significantly improved in the presence of ammonium salts, which appeared to compensate for nitrogen deficiencies. Capital and operating costs for production and storage of concentrated beet juice for an ethanol plant with a production capacity of 76 x 106 L y-1 were estimated on a dry-sugar basis as U.S. ¢34.0 kg-1 and ¢2.2 kg-1, respectively. Storage and processing techniques evaluated thus far prove that industrial beets are a technically-feasible sugar feedstock for ethanol production.

  10. Effects of pressed beet pulp silage inclusion in maize-based rations on performance of high-yielding dairy cows and parameters of rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Boguhn, J; Kluth, H; Bulang, M; Engelhard, T; Rodehutscord, M

    2010-01-01

    Beet pulp contains high amounts of pectins that can reduce the risk of rumen disorders compared to using feedstuffs high in starch. The objective was to study the effects of inclusion of ensiled pressed beet pulp in total mixed rations (TMR) for high-yielding dairy cows. Two TMR containing no or about 20% (on dry matter (DM) basis) beet pulp silage were used. The beet pulp silage mainly replaced maize silage and corn cob silage. The TMR were intentionally equal in the concentrations of energy and utilisable crude protein (CP) at the duodenum. TMR were fed to 39 and 40 dairy cows, respectively, for 118 days. The average daily milk yield was about 43 kg/day. No significant differences in milk yield and milk fat or milk protein content were detected. DM intake of cows was significantly reduced by the inclusion of beet pulp silage (23.0 v. 24.5 kg/day). However, a digestibility study, separately conducted with sheep, showed a significantly higher organic matter digestibility and metabolisable energy concentration for the TMR that contained beet pulp silage. In vitro gas production kinetics indicated that the intensity of fermentation was lower in the TMR that contained beet pulp silage. In vitro production of short-chain fatty acids, studied using a Rusitec, did not differ between the TMR. However, the inclusion of beet pulp silage in the ration caused a significant reduction in the efficiency of microbial CP synthesis in vitro. The amino acid profile of microbial protein remained unchanged. It was concluded that beet pulp silage has specific effects on ruminal fermentation that may depress feed intake of cows but improve digestibility. An inclusion of beet pulp silage of up to 20% of DM in rations for high-yielding dairy cows is possible without significant effects on milk yield and milk protein or milk fat.

  11. Pelleted beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn: 3. Effects on ruminal fermentation, pH, and microbial protein efficiency in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Voelker, J A; Allen, M S

    2003-11-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of dried, pelleted beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on ruminal fermentation, pH, and microbial efficiency were evaluated using eight ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in a duplicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Cows were 79 +/- 17 (mean +/- SD) DIM at the beginning of the experiment. Experimental diets with 40% forage (corn silage and alfalfa silage) and 60% concentrate contained 0, 6.1, 12.1, or 24.3% beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on a DM basis. Diet concentrations of NDF and starch were 24.3 and 34.6% (0% beet pulp), 26.2 and 30.5% (6% beet pulp), 28.0, and 26.5% (12% beet pulp), and 31.6 and 18.4% (24% beet pulp), respectively. Substituting beet pulp for corn did not affect daily mean or minimum ruminal pH but tended to reduce pH range. Ruminal acetate:propionate responded in a positive exponential relationship to added beet pulp. Rate of valerate absorption from the rumen was not affected by treatment. Substituting beet pulp for corn up to 24% of diet DM did not affect efficiency of ruminal microbial protein production, expressed as microbial N flow to the duodenum as a percentage of OM truly digested in the rumen. Microbial efficiency was not correlated to mean pH or daily minimum pH. While microbial efficiency was not directly related to concentration of beet pulp fed, it was positively correlated with passage rate of particulate matter, as represented by starch and indigestible NDF, probably due to reduced turnover of microbial protein in the rumen.

  12. Experimental determination of transfer coefficients of sup 137 Cs and sup 131 I from fodder into milk of cows and sheep after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, G.; Mueller, H.P.; Proehl, G.P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Propstmeier, G.; Roehrmoser, G.H.; Hofmann, P. )

    1989-12-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in April 1986, the transfer of {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs from feed to milk was studied under experimental and common agricultural conditions. From measurements in different dairy farms in Southern Bavaria, equilibrium transfer coefficients for cow's milk were calculated to be 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0015 to 0.005) for {sup 131}I and 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0025 to 0.004) for {sup 137}Cs. In feeding experiments with cows and sheep under more controlled conditions, milk transfer coefficients of 0.007 d L-1 (range 0.0055 to 0.0081) for {sup 131}I and 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0023 to 0.0053) for {sup 137}Cs were obtained for cows, while for sheep the {sup 137}Cs transfer coefficient was higher: 0.06 d L-1. The kinetics of the Cs transfer from fodder to cow's milk can be described by two exponential terms assuming biological half-lives in milk of 1-2 d and 10-20 d. The use of a fast component with 1.5 d and a fraction of 0.8, and a slow component with 15 d, gives a good approximation to the kinetics for all cows in this experiment.

  13. Copper removal from aqueous solutions by sugar beet pulp treated by NaOH and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Altundogan, H Soner; Arslan, N Ezgi; Tumen, Fikret

    2007-10-22

    Sugar beet pulp was converted into effective copper sorption material by treating subsequently with NaOH and citric acid. Compared with the untreated sugar beet pulp, the cation exchange capacity of the modified sugar beet pulp increased from 0.86 to 3.21 mequiv.g(-1). Swelling capacity and COD values of modified sugar beet pulp were found to be decreased in the ratio of 38% and 61%, respectively, compared to the corresponding values of native sugar beet pulp, meaning that modification causes stabilization. Sorption characteristics of the modified sugar beet pulp towards copper ions were studied with batch experiments. Pseudo-first, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle kinetic models were applied to the kinetic data and it was found that the sorption processes followed the pseudo-second-order rate kinetics with activation energy of 16.34 kJ mol(-1). The equilibration data fit best with the Langmuir isotherm the maximum copper sorption capacity of which is 119.43 mgg(-1). The mean free energy of copper sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich model and the Polanyi potential concept was found to be in the range of 10.91-11.95 kJ mol(-1) showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process is ion exchange. The negative values found for enthalpy change (-14.797 kJ mol(-1) over the range of 25-55 degrees C) and free energy change (-19.361 kJ mol(-1) for 25 degrees C) indicate that the sorption process is exothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  14. The effect of red beet (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) fiber on alimentary hypercholesterolemia and chemically induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bobek, P; Galbavý, S; Mariássyová, M

    2000-06-01

    The effect of diet supplemented with 5% and 15% cellulose or with 15% fiber isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) on the development of alimentary hypercholesterolemia and chemically induced colon carcinoma was studied in male Wistar rats. Hypercholesterolemia was induced by a diet containing 0.3% of cholesterol and colon carcinoma was induced by treatment with dimethylhydrazine (20 mg/kg, 12 doses applied s.c. in one-week intervals). Fibrous matter isolated from red beet contained 89% fiber, of which 9% was in water soluble form. Animals were killed 14 weeks after the application of dimethylhydrazine (i.e. 26 weeks after starting on the diets). Red beet fiber diet (and not the increased cellulose intake) caused a reduction of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels (by 30 and 40%, respectively) and a significant increase in the fraction of cholesterol carried in HDL. This diet induced also a significant decrease (almost by 30%) of cholesterol content in aorta. Higher cellulose content in the diet and even more so the administration of red beet fiber caused a significant reduction of conjugated dienes content in plasma, erythrocytes and in liver. Also observed were increases in the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in erythrocytes and in colon and activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase in liver. The presence of both higher cellulose content and red beet fiber in the diet significantly reduced the incidence of precancerous lesions--aberrant crypt foci--in the colon. The diet containing red beet fiber did not affect significantly the incidence of colon tumours although the number of animals bearing tumours was reduced by 30%.

  15. Chemical composition and protein enrichment of orange peels and sugar beet pulp after fermentation by two Trichoderma species.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, F; Zamiri, M J; Khorvash, M; Banihashemi, Z; Bayat, A R

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment aimed at increasing orange peel and sugar beet pulp protein content through solid-state fermentation by Trichoderma reesei and Trichoderma viride. In vitro digestibility and changes in the chemical composition of the fermented products were determined after seven days of fungal cultivation using gas production tests. The cultivation of T. reesei and T. viride on orange peels decreased neutral detergent soluble content (P<0.01) and increased cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents (P<0.01). Changes in fiber fractions were found to be more pronounced with T. viride. The cultivation of T. reesei and T. viride on sugar beet pulp increased neutral detergent soluble content (P<0.01) and decreased cellulose and hemicellulose contents (P<0.01). These changes were more pronounced with T. reesei. The cultivation of T. reesei or T. viride on orange peels or sugar beet pulp increased crude protein content (P<0.01) compared with the unfermented materials; however, the increase was more pronounced for orange peels fermented with T. viride when corrected for weight loss (P<0.05). After 24 and 48 h of incubation, significant decreases in cumulative gas production (P<0.01) were observed in fermented sugar beet pulp and orange peels compared with the unfermented materials. Fungal treatment of orange peels and sugar beet pulp reduced the digestibility of in vitro organic matter, metabolizable energy and average fermentation and gas production rates (P<0.01). The data showed that seven days of solid-state fermentation of orange peels and sugar beet pulp by T. reesei or T. viride can increase their crude protein content.

  16. Chemical composition and protein enrichment of orange peels and sugar beet pulp after fermentation by two Trichoderma species

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, F; Zamiri, M. J.; Khorvash, M; Banihashemi, Z; Bayat, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment aimed at increasing orange peel and sugar beet pulp protein content through solid-state fermentation by Trichoderma reesei and Trichoderma viride. In vitro digestibility and changes in the chemical composition of the fermented products were determined after seven days of fungal cultivation using gas production tests. The cultivation of T. reesei and T. viride on orange peels decreased neutral detergent soluble content (P<0.01) and increased cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents (P<0.01). Changes in fiber fractions were found to be more pronounced with T. viride. The cultivation of T. reesei and T. viride on sugar beet pulp increased neutral detergent soluble content (P<0.01) and decreased cellulose and hemicellulose contents (P<0.01). These changes were more pronounced with T. reesei. The cultivation of T. reesei or T. viride on orange peels or sugar beet pulp increased crude protein content (P<0.01) compared with the unfermented materials; however, the increase was more pronounced for orange peels fermented with T. viride when corrected for weight loss (P<0.05). After 24 and 48 h of incubation, significant decreases in cumulative gas production (P<0.01) were observed in fermented sugar beet pulp and orange peels compared with the unfermented materials. Fungal treatment of orange peels and sugar beet pulp reduced the digestibility of in vitro organic matter, metabolizable energy and average fermentation and gas production rates (P<0.01). The data showed that seven days of solid-state fermentation of orange peels and sugar beet pulp by T. reesei or T. viride can increase their crude protein content. PMID:27175146

  17. Beta vulgaris crop types: Genomic signatures of selection (GSS) using next generation sequencing of pooled samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta vulgaris crop types represent highly diverged populations with distinct phenotypes resulting from long-term selection. Differential end use in the crop types includes: leaf quality (chard/leaf beet), root enlargement and biomass, (table beet, fodder beet, sugar beet), and secondary metabolite a...

  18. Adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution by using carbonised beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Gülbeyi; Ciçek, Handan; Dursun, Arzu Y

    2005-10-17

    The beet pulp, a major low value by-product in sugar industry was used to prepare carbon for phenol adsorption. It was produced by carbonisation in N2 atmosphere at 600 degrees C for 1.5 h. The surface area of beet pulp carbon was measured as 47.5 m2g(-1) by using BET method. The adsorption studies of phenol from aqueous solution on beet pulp carbon (BPC) have been studied in the range of 25-500 mgdm(-3) initial phenol concentrations and at the temperatures of 25, 40 and 60 degrees C. The maximum phenol adsorption capacity was obtained as 89.5 mgg(-1)at the temperature of 60 degrees C at pH=6.0. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium and it was reported that experimental data fitted very well to Freundlich model, although they could be modelled by the Langmuir equation. Batch adsorption models, based on the assumption of the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order mechanism, were applied to examine the kinetics of the adsorption. The results showed that kinetic data were followed more closely the pseudo-second order model than the pseudo-first order. The thermodynamic parameters such as, equilibrium constant (K), Gibbs free energy changes (DeltaG degrees ), standard enthalpy change (DeltaH degrees ) and standard entropy change (DeltaS degrees ) had been determined. The results show that adsorption of phenol on BPC is an endothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  19. Synchronized Oviposition Triggered by Migratory Flight Intensifies Larval Outbreaks of Beet Webworm

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun Xia; Luo, Li Zhi; Jiang, Xing Fu; Sappington, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the reproductive consequences of insect migration is critical to understanding its ecological and evolutionary significance. However, many empirical studies are seemingly contradictory, making recognition of unifying themes elusive and controversial. The beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis L. is a long-range migratory pest of many crops in the northern temperate zone from 36°N to 55°N, with larval populations often exploding in regions receiving immigrants. In laboratory experiments, we examined (i) the reproductive costs of migratory flight by tethered flight, and (ii) the reproductive traits contributing to larval outbreaks of immigrant populations. Our results suggest that the beet webworm does not initiate migratory flight until the 2nd or 3rd night after emergence. Preoviposition period, lifetime fecundity, mating capacity, and egg hatch rate for adults that experienced prolonged flight after the 2nd night did not differ significantly from unflown moths, suggesting these traits are irrelevant to the severity of beet webworm outbreaks after migration. However, the period of first oviposition, a novel parameter developed in this paper measuring synchrony of first egg-laying by cohorts of post-migratory females, for moths flown on d 3 and 5 of adulthood was shorter than that of unflown moths, indicating a tightened time-window for onset of oviposition after migration. The resulting synchrony of egg-laying will serve to increase egg and subsequent larval densities. A dense population offers potential selective advantages to the individual larvae comprising it, whereas the effect from the human standpoint is intensification of damage by an outbreak population. The strategy of synchronized oviposition may be common in other migratory insect pests, such as locust and armyworm species, and warrants further study. PMID:22347494

  20. A male sterility-associated mitochondrial protein in wild beets causes pollen disruption in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayuki P; Shinada, Hiroshi; Onodera, Yasuyuki; Komaki, Chihiro; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2008-06-01

    In higher plants, male reproductive (pollen) development is known to be disrupted in a class of mitochondrial mutants termed cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) mutants. Despite the increase in knowledge regarding CMS-encoding genes and their expression, definitive evidence that CMS-associated proteins actually cause pollen disruption is not yet available in most cases. Here we compare the translation products of mitochondria between the normal fertile cytoplasm and the male-sterile I-12CMS(3) cytoplasm derived from wild beets. The results show a unique 12 kDa polypeptide that is present in the I-12CMS(3) mitochondria but is not detectable among the translation products of normal mitochondria. We also found that a mitochondrial open reading frame (named orf129) was uniquely transcribed in I-12CMS(3) and is large enough to encode the novel 12 kDa polypeptide. Antibodies against a GST-ORF129 fusion protein were raised to establish that this 12 kDa polypeptide is the product of orf129. ORF129 was shown to accumulate in flower mitochondria as well as in root and leaf mitochondria. As for the CMS-associated protein (PCF protein) in petunia, ORF129 is primarily present in the matrix and is loosely associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. The orf129 sequence was fused to a mitochondrial targeting pre-sequence, placed under the control of the Arabidopsis apetala3 promoter, and introduced into the tobacco nuclear genome. Transgenic expression of ORF129 resulted in male sterility, which provides clear supporting evidence that ORF129 is responsible for the male-sterile phenotype in sugar beet with wild beet cytoplasm.

  1. The B2 flowering time locus of beet encodes a zinc finger transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Dally, Nadine; Xiao, Ke; Holtgräwe, Daniela; Jung, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is a biennial root crop that grows vegetatively in the first year and starts shoot elongation (bolting) and flowering after exposure to cold temperatures over winter. Early bolting before winter is controlled by the dominant allele of the B locus. Recently, the BOLTING TIME CONTROL 1 (BTC1) gene has been cloned from this locus. BTC1 promotes early bolting through repression of the downstream bolting repressor B. vulgaris FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (BvFT1) and activation of the downstream floral activator BvFT2. We have identified a new bolting locus B2 acting epistatically to B. B2 houses a transcription factor which is diurnally regulated and acts like BTC1 upstream of BvFT1 and BvFT2. It was termed BvBBX19 according to its closest homolog from Arabidopsis thaliana. The encoded protein has two conserved domains with homology to zinc finger B-boxes. Ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutations within the second B-box caused up-regulation of BvFT1 and complete down-regulation of BvFT2. In Arabidopsis, the expression of FT is promoted by the B-box containing protein CONSTANS (CO). We performed a phylogenetic analysis with B-box genes from beet and A. thaliana but only BvCOL1 clustered with CO. However, BvCOL1 had been excluded as a CO ortholog by previous studies. Therefore, a new model for flowering induction in beet is proposed in which BTC1 and BvBBX19 complement each other and thus acquire a CO function to regulate their downstream targets BvFT1 and BvFT2. PMID:24965366

  2. Differential expression patterns of non-symbiotic hemoglobins in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Pin, Pierre A; Kraft, Thomas; Dohm, Juliane C; Minoche, André E; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Bülow, Leif

    2014-04-01

    Biennial sugar beet (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is a Caryophyllidae that has adapted its growth cycle to the seasonal temperature and daylength variation of temperate regions. This is the first time a holistic study of the expression pattern of non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) is being carried out in a member of this group and under two essential environmental conditions for flowering, namely vernalization and length of photoperiod. BvHb genes were identified by sequence homology searches against the latest draft of the sugar beet genome. Three nsHb genes (BvHb1.1, BvHb1.2 and BvHb2) and one truncated Hb gene (BvHb3) were found in the genome of sugar beet. Gene expression profiling of the nsHb genes was carried out by quantitative PCR in different organs and developmental stages, as well as during vernalization and under different photoperiods. BvHb1.1 and BvHb2 showed differential expression during vernalization as well as during long and short days. The high expression of BvHb2 indicates that it has an active role in the cell, maybe even taking over some BvHb1.2 functions, except during germination where BvHb1.2 together with BvHb1.1-both Class 1 nsHbs-are highly expressed. The unprecedented finding of a leader peptide at the N-terminus of BvHb1.1, for the first time in an nsHb from higher plants, together with its observed expression indicate that it may have a very specific role due to its suggested location in chloroplasts. Our findings open up new possibilities for research, breeding and engineering since Hbs could be more involved in plant development than previously was anticipated.

  3. DNA methylation of retrotransposons, DNA transposons and genes in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Falk; Schmidt, Martin; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Schmidt, Thomas

    2017-03-03

    The methylation of cytosines shapes the epigenetic landscape of plant genomes, coordinates transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, represses activity of transposable elements (TEs), affects gene expression, and, hence, can influence the phenotype. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris), an important crop that accounts for 30% of the worldwide sugar needs, has a relatively small genome size (758 Mbp) consisting of approximately 485 Mbp repetitive DNA (64%) in particular, satellite DNA, retrotransposons, and DNA transposons. Genome-wide cytosine methylation in the sugar beet genome was studied in leaves and leaf-derived callus with a focus on repetitive sequences, including retrotransposons and DNA transposons, the major groups of repetitive DNA sequences and compared with gene methylation. Genes showed a specific methylation pattern for CG, CHG (H=A, C, and T), and CHH sites, whereas the TE pattern differed, depending on the classes 1 (retrotransposons) and 2 (DNA transposons), respectively. Along genes and TEs, the CG and CHG methylation was higher than that of adjacent genomic regions. In contrast to the relatively low CHH methylation in retrotransposons and genes, the level of CHH methylation in DNA transposons was strongly increased, pointing toward a functional role of asymmetric methylation in DNA transposon silencing. Comparison of genome-wide DNA methylation between sugar beet leaves and callus revealed a differential methylation upon tissue culture. Potential epialleles were hypomethylated (lower methylation) at CG and CHG sites in retrotransposons and genes and hypermethylated (higher methylation) at CHH sites in DNA transposons of callus when compared to leaves. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of bacterial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) synthesis genes in hairy roots of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Menzel, G; Harloff, H-J; Jung, C

    2003-01-01

    Three genes from Ralstonia eutropha necessary for poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis were introduced into the hairy roots of sugar beet. Transformation of a vector construct harbouring the PHB genes, each fused to the coding region of the pea ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase plastid targeting sequence, resulted in 20 transgenic hairy-root clones, producing up to 55 mg high molecular PHB/g dry weight, as identified by gas chromatography, gel permeation chromatography and HPLC. Accumulation of PHB polymer in sugar beet root leucoplasts was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Thus, for the first time, plastidic PHB production was demonstrated for roots of a carbohydrate-storing crop plant.

  5. An Assessment of Urea-Formaldehyde Fertilizer on the Diversity of Bacterial Communities in Onion and Sugar Beet

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Seishi; Suzuki, Keijiro; Kawahara, Makoto; Noshiro, Masao; Takahashi, Naokazu

    2014-01-01

    The impact of a urea-formaldehyde (UF) fertilizer on bacterial diversity in onion bulbs and main roots of sugar beet were examined using a 16S rRNA gene clone library. The UF fertilizer markedly increased bacterial diversity in both plants. The results of principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) revealed that nearly 30% of the variance observed in bacterial diversity in both the onion and sugar beet was attributed to the fertilization conditions and also that the community structures in both plants shifted unidirectionally in response to the UF fertilizer. PMID:24882062

  6. The increase of the fertility of soils using the liquid organic fertilizers and fertilizers based on sugar-beet wastes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyborova, Oxana

    2010-05-01

    The fertility of soil is a capacity for ensuring plants by water, nutrients, air and capacity for making optimal conditions for growth and development of plants. The result of it is a yield. The main characteristic of fertility of soil is maintenance of humus. The humus is important part of organic matter. The supporting of soil fertility is impossible by traditional methods. The amount of receiving mineral fertilizers in agriculture will not increase in future, because mineral fertilizers are very expensive. The mineral fertilizers don't influence on maintenance of total amount of humus in soil and improve the circulation of nutrients. Every hectare of fields have to receive no less than 8-10 tons of organic fertilizers, therefore we will have self-supporting balance of humus and the fertility of soils will be increasing. Consequently we are looking for new types of organic materials and we include them in modern agro technologies. One of them is an organomineral fertilizer (lignitic materials). The humic chemicals in the form of lignitic materials of natrium, potassium and ammonium are permitted for using them in agriculture at the beginning of 1984. The Department of agriculture in Russian Federation considered the problem of using humic chemicals and made a decision to use them on the fields of our country, because the lignitic materials can restore the fertility of our fields. The lignitic materials increase the amount of spore-forming bacteria, mold fungi and actinomycete. Therefore the organic decomposition occurs more strongly, the processes of humification increase the speed and the amount of humus rises in the soil. The new forming humus has a high biological activity and it improves chemical and physical soil properties. The addition of lignitic materials in soil activates different groups of microorganisms, which influence on mobilization of nutrients and transformation from potential to effective fertility. The inclusion of humic fertilizers improves

  7. A high efficiency technique for the generation of transgenic sugar beets from stomatal guard cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, R D; Riksen-Bruinsma, T; Weyens, G J; Rosquin, I J; Denys, P N; Evans, I J; Lathouwers, J E; Lefèbvre, M P; Dunwell, J M; van Tunen, A; Krens, F A

    1996-09-01

    An optimized protocol has been developed for the efficient and rapid genetic modification of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). A polyethylene glycol-mediated DNA transformation technique could be applied to protoplast populations enriched specifically for a single totipotent cell type derived from stomatal guard cells, to achieve high transformation frequencies. Bialaphos resistance, conferred by the pat gene, produced a highly efficient selection system. The majority of plants were obtained within 8 to 9 weeks and were appropriate for plant breeding purposes. All were resistant to glufosinate-ammonium-based herbicides. Detailed genomic characterization has verified transgene integration, and progeny analysis showed Mendelian inheritance.

  8. Measuring agricultural sustainability in terms of efficiency: the case of Dutch sugar beet growers.

    PubMed

    De Koeijer, T J; Wossink, G A A; Struik, P C; Renkema, J A

    2002-09-01

    Sustainability embraces socio-economic and bio-ecological dimensions or attributes. This paper presents a conceptual framework for quantifying sustainability on the basis of efficiency theory commonly used in economics. The conceptual model is implemented using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). Sustainability is measured for a sample of Dutch sugar beet growers. The average technical efficiency was only 50%. A positive correlation was found between technical efficiency and sustainable efficiency. Differences in efficiency among farmers were persistent within and between years. We conclude that there is considerable scope for improving the sustainability of arable farming by better management.

  9. Beet yellow stunt virus in cells of Sonchus oleraceus L. and its relation to host mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Esau, K

    1979-10-15

    In Sonchus oleraceus L. (Asteraceae) infected with the beet yellow stunt virus (BYSV) the virions are found in phloem cells, including the sieve elements. In parenchymatous phloem cells, the virus is present mainly in the cytoplasm. In some parenchymatous cells, containing massive accumulations of virus, the flexuous rodlike virus particles are found partly inserted into mitochondrial cristae. The mitochondrial envelope is absent where virus is present in the cristae. A similar relation between virus and host mitochondria apparently has not been recorded for any other plant virus.

  10. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SB14 from rhizosphere alleviates Rhizoctonia damping-off disease on sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Elham; Safaie, Naser; Shams-Baksh, Masoud; Mahmoudi, Bagher

    2016-11-01

    The use of biocontrol strains recently has become a popular alternative to conventional chemical treatments. A set of bacteria isolated from sugar beet rhizosphere and from roots and shoots of apple and walnut were evaluated for their potential to control sugar beet seedling damping-off caused by R. solani AG-4 and AG2-2.The results of in vitro assays concluded that three isolates, SB6, SB14, SB15, obtained from rhizosphere of sugar beet and five isolates, AP2, AP4, AP6, AP7, AP8, obtained from shoots and roots of apple were the most effective antagonists that inhibited the mycelial growth of both R. solani isolates. Combination of several biochemical tests and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA and gyrBgenes revealed that eight efficient bacterial isolates could be assigned to the genus Bacillus and all could tolerate high temperatures and salt concentrations in their vegetative growth. The potential biocontrol activity of the eight bacterial antagonists were tested in greenhouse condition. The results indicated that four strains,B. amyloliquefaciens SB14, B. pumilus SB6,B. siamensis AP2 and B. siamensisAP8 exerted a significant influence on controlling of seedling damping-off and performed significantly better than others.However, the treatment of the seeds with bacteria was most effective when the isolate SB14 was used, which significantly controlled damping-off disease by 58% caused by R. solani AG-4 and by 52.5% caused by R. solani AG-2-2. This indicates that the use of beneficial bacterial native to the host plant may increase the success rate in screening biocontrols, because these microbes are likely to be better adapted to their host and its associated environmental conditions than are strains isolated from other plant species grown in different environmental conditions. We can infer from the results reported here that sugar beet plantsmay recruitbeneficial microbes to the rhizosphere to help them solve context-specific challenges.

  11. Development of real-time PCR method for the detection and the quantification of a new endogenous reference gene in sugar beet "Beta vulgaris L.": GMO application.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Maher; Alaya, Akram; Ali, Imen Ben Haj; Hafsa, Ahmed Ben; Nabi, Nesrine; Bérard, Aurélie; Romaniuk, Marcel; Skhiri, Fethia; Saïd, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : Here, we describe a new developed quantitative real-time PCR method for the detection and quantification of a new specific endogenous reference gene used in GMO analysis. The key requirement of this study was the identification of a new reference gene used for the differentiation of the four genomic sections of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) (Beta, Corrollinae, Nanae and Procumbentes) suitable for quantification of genetically modified sugar beet. A specific qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was designed to detect the sugar beet amplifying a region of the adenylate transporter (ant) gene only from the species of the genomic section I of the genus Beta (cultivated and wild relatives) and showing negative PCR results for 7 species of the 3 other sections, 8 related species and 20 non-sugar beet plants. The sensitivity of the assay was 15 haploid genome copies (HGC). A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) assay was also performed, having high linearity (R (2) > 0.994) over sugar beet standard concentrations ranging from 20,000 to 10 HGC of the sugar beet DNA per PCR. The QRT-PCR assay described in this study was specific and more sensitive for sugar beet quantification compared to the validated test previously reported in the European Reference Laboratory. This assay is suitable for GMO quantification in routine analysis from a wide variety of matrices.

  12. Increased Long-Flight Activity Triggered in Beet Armyworm by Larval Feeding on Diet Containing Cry1Ac Protoxin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xing Fu; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Sappington, Thomas W.; Luo, Li Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, a long-distance migratory insect pest, is not a direct target of transgenic Cry1Ac-expressing cotton in China, but nevertheless it has recently become an important pest. Migrants leaving their natal field arrive in other appropriate habitat far away in a short time, often followed by larval outbreaks. S. exigua has low susceptibility to Cry1Ac. However, our results from laboratory experiments identified (i) sublethal effects of Cry1Ac protoxin on larval development rate, larval and pupal weight, and adult lifetime fecundity, and (ii) increased long-flight behavior triggered by Cry1Ac which may contribute to larval outbreaks elsewhere. No significant differences in larval mortality, pupation rate, adult emergence rate, longevity, pre-oviposition period, or oviposition period were observed between controls and larvae fed on artificial diet incorporating a low concentration of Cry1Ac protoxin. The negative sublethal effects on some developmental and reproductive traits and lack of effect on others suggest they do not contribute to the observed severity of S. exigua outbreaks after feeding on Cry1Ac cotton. Interestingly, the percentage of long fliers increased significantly when larvae were reared on diet containing either of two low-dose treatments of Cry1Ac, suggesting a possible increased propensity to disperse long distances triggered by Cry1Ac. We hypothesize that negative effects on development and reproduction caused by Cry1Ac in the diet are offset by increased flight propensity triggered by the poor food conditions, thereby improving the chances of escaping adverse local conditions before oviposition. Increased long-flight propensity in turn may amplify the area damaged by outbreak populations. This phenomenon might be common in other migratory insect pests receiving sublethal doses

  13. Digestive Physiology and Nutritional Responses of Autographa gamma (L.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on Different Sugar Beet Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Bahram; Golikhajeh, Neshat; Rahimi Namin, Foroogh

    2016-01-01

    Digestive enzymatic activity and nutritional responses of Autographa gamma (L.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an important insect pest of sugar beet, on nine sugar beet cultivars (Peritra, Karolina, Paolita, Lenzier, Tiller, Ardabili, Persia, Rozier, and Dorothea) were studied. The highest proteolytic activity of fourth and fifth instar of A. gamma was in larvae fed on cultivar Persia. The highest amylolytic activity of fourth and fifth instar was observed in larvae fed on cultivars Rozier and Dorothea, respectively. The lowest proteolytic and amylolytic activities in fourth instar were observed on cultivar Tiller; whereas the lowest activities in fifth instar were detected on cultivars Karolina and Tiller, respectively. Larval weight in both larval instars (fourth and fifth) was the heaviest on cultivar Persia and the lightest on cultivar Karolina. Furthermore, weight gain of larvae was the highest on cultivar Persia and the lowest on cultivar Karolina. The results of this study suggest that cultivar Tiller was the most unsuitable host plant for feeding of A. gamma. PMID:27324581

  14. Effects of hydrothermal pretreatment of sugar beet pulp for methane production.

    PubMed

    Ziemiński, K; Romanowska, I; Kowalska-Wentel, M; Cyran, M

    2014-08-01

    The effect of Liquid Hot Water treatment conditions on the degree of sugar beet pulp (SBP) degradation was studied. The SBP was subjected to hydrothermal processing at temperatures ranging from 120 to 200 °C. The relationship between processing temperature and parameters of liquid and solid fractions of resulting hydrolysates as well as the efficiency of their methane fermentation was determined. The highest concentration of free glucose (3.29 mg ml(-1)) was observed when the hydrolysis was conducted at 160 °C (it was 4-fold higher than that after processing at 120 °C). Total acids and aldehydes concentrations in the liquid fractions were increased from 0.005 mg ml(-1) for the untreated SBP to 1.61 mg ml(-1) after its processing at 200 °C. Parameters of the hydrolysates obtained by the LHW treatment decided of the efficiency of methane fermentation. The highest cumulative methane yield (502.50 L CH₄ kg(-1)VS) was obtained from the sugar beet pulp hydrolysate produced at 160 °C.

  15. Physiological effects of extraction juices from apple, grape, and red beet pomaces in rats.

    PubMed

    Sembries, Sabine; Dongowski, Gerhard; Mehrländer, Katri; Will, Frank; Dietrich, Helmut

    2006-12-27

    In comparison to classical fruit juice processing, polyphenols and dietary fiber can be extracted from pomace by means of pectinases and cellulases. In the present study, rats were fed with such produced extraction juices from apples, grapes, and red beets as drinking fluids instead of water for 4 weeks to evaluate their physiological effects. In all test groups, the intake of extraction juices was greater as compared to control (water intake), resulting in a higher urine excretion. In the apple and grape group, pH values in feces was lower than control. Administration of extraction juices from apples increased fecal counts of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. More acetate and total short-chain fatty acids appeared in intestinal contents of the apple and red beet group. Furthermore, the intestinal contents of test groups contained higher concentrations of primary bile acids, cholesterol, and cholesterol metabolites but lower concentrations of secondary bile acids. The total amount of steroids excreted by these groups was also greater than control. Quercetin and isorhamnetin appeared in urine of rats fed extraction juices from apples and grapes; in urine of the former group, phloretin was found also. Administration of the extraction juices, enriched in secondary plant metabolites and dietary fiber, resulted in beneficial nutritional effects in rats.

  16. The turgor pressure in the sugar-beet tissue under low temperatures (in Ukrainian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, L. A.; Zabashta, Yu. F.; Fridman, A. Ya.

    The microscopic mechanism of water transference from a cell to the space between cells is investigated under low temperatures. The study is based on the data about the turgor pressure behaviour. This data is determined with the help of the method suggested by the authors of determining the turgor pressure by the shear modulus values. The theoretical basis of this method is given with the use of the nonlinear theory of elasticity. The shear modulus of the sugar--beet is measured under the temperatures 253< T < 290~K. The temperature interval is determined in which the shear modulus is equal to the turgor pressure. The osmos pressure in the sugar--beet tissue is evaluated theoretically. From comparing the theoretical osmos pressure and the experimental values of the turgor pressure the conclusion is drawn that water from a cell to the space between cells is moved by the active transport, a mechanism of this motion is suggested. In the authors' opinion this mechanism reveals the motion of the deformation solitons along the water chains which are within canals in walls of the plasmalemma.

  17. Kinetics of Remazol Black B adsorption onto carbon prepared from sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Arzu Y; Tepe, Ozlem; Uslu, Gülşad; Dursun, Gülbeyi; Saatci, Yusuf

    2013-04-01

    Dried sugar beet pulp, an agricultural solid waste, was used for the production of carbon. Carbonised beet pulp was tested in the adsorption of Remazol Black B dye, and adsorption studies with real textile wastewater were also performed. Batch kinetic studies showed that an equilibrium time of 180 min was needed for the adsorption. The maximum dye adsorption capacity was obtained as 80.0 mg g(-1) at the temperature of 25 °C at pH = 1.0. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium, and it was reported that experimental data fitted very well to the Langmuir model. Mass transfer and kinetic models were applied to the experimental data to examine the mechanisms of adsorption and potential rate-controlling steps. It was found that both external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion played an important role in the adsorption mechanisms of dye, and adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order type kinetic model. The thermodynamic analysis indicated that the sorption process was exothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  18. Sugar beet M14 glyoxalase I gene can enhance plant tolerance to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan; Ma, Chunquan; Pan, Yu; Gong, Shilong; Zhao, Chenxi; Chen, Sixue; Li, Haiying

    2013-05-01

    Glyoxalase I is the first enzyme of the glyoxalase system that can detoxify methylglyoxal, a cytotoxic compound increased rapidly under stress conditions. Here we report cloning and characterization of a glyoxalase I from sugar beet M14 line (an interspecific hybrid between a wild species Beta corolliflora Zoss and a cultivated species B. vulgaris L). The full-length gene BvM14-glyoxalase I has 1,449 bp in length with an open reading frame of 1,065 bp encoding 354 amino acids. Sequence analysis shows the conserved glyoxalase I domains, metal and glutathione binding sites and secondary structure (α-helixes and β-sheets). The BvM14-glyoxalase I gene was ubiquitously expressed in different tissues of sugar beet M14 line and up-regulated in response to salt, mannitol and oxidative stresses. Heterologous expression of BvM14-glyoxalase I could increase E. coli tolerance to methylglyoxal. Transgenic tobacco plants constitutively expressing BvM14-glyoxalase I were generated. Both leaf discs and seedlings showed significant tolerance to methylglyoxal, salt, mannitol and H2O2. These results suggest an important role of BvM14-glyoxalase I in cellular detoxification and tolerance to abiotic stresses.

  19. Responses of Sugar Beet Roots to Iron Deficiency. Changes in Carbon Assimilation and Oxygen Use1

    PubMed Central

    López-Millán, Ana Flor; Morales, Fermín; Andaluz, Sofía; Gogorcena, Yolanda; Abadía, Anunciación; Rivas, Javier De Las; Abadía, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Different root parts with or without increased iron-reducing activities have been studied in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient control sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. Monohil hybrid). The distal root parts of iron-deficient plants, 0 to 5 mm from the root apex, were capable to reduce Fe(III)-chelates and contained concentrations of flavins near 700 μm, two characteristics absent in the 5 to 10 mm sections of iron-deficient plants and the whole root of iron-sufficient plants. Flavin-containing root tips had large pools of carboxylic acids and high activities of enzymes involved in organic acid metabolism. In iron-deficient yellow root tips there was a large increase in carbon fixation associated to an increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity. Part of this carbon was used, through an increase in mitochondrial activity, to increase the capacity to produce reducing power, whereas another part was exported via xylem. Root respiration was increased by iron deficiency. In sugar beet iron-deficient roots flavins would provide a suitable link between the increased capacity to produce reduced nucleotides and the plasma membrane associated ferric chelate reductase enzyme(s). Iron-deficient roots had a large oxygen consumption rate in the presence of cyanide and hydroxisalycilic acid, suggesting that the ferric chelate reductase enzyme is able to reduce oxygen in the absence of Fe(III)-chelates. PMID:11027736

  20. Evidence for the presence of a sucrose carrier in immature sugar-beet roots

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoine, R.; Daie, J.; Wyse, R.

    1987-04-01

    Unlike in mature sugar-beet roots, sucrose is assumed to be hydrolyzed by a wall-bound invertase prior to uptake by immature roots. To test this hypothesis, they used a sucrose analog, 1'fluorosucrose which is recognized by the carrier but is a poor substrate for invertases. Asymmetrically labeled sucrose (/sup 3/H-fructose) 1'fluorosucrose (/sup 14/C-glucose) were applied at 10 mM (/sup 3/H//sup 14/C=1) to an attached source leaf. After 6 h, sugars from plant parts in the translocation path were separated on HPLC. /sup 14/C-1'fluorosucrose was translocated and accumulated in the root at a higher rate than /sup 3/H-sucrose due to greater metabolism of /sup 3/H-sucrose in the shoot (indicated by the presence of /sup 3/H in hexose fractions and loss of asymmetry). In the root 25% of the /sup 3/H-sucrose was hydrolyzed to hexoses whereas no /sup 14/C was detected in hexose fractions. The data indicate that despite high cell-wall invertase and cytoplasmic sucrose synthase activities, young sugar-beet roots import and store sucrose without hydrolysis. Therefore, the function of a group translocator at the tonoplast is unclear.

  1. Effects of zinc toxicity on sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plants grown in hydroponics.

    PubMed

    Sagardoy, R; Morales, F; López-Millán, A-F; Abadía, A; Abadía, J

    2009-05-01

    The effects of high Zn concentration were investigated in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plants grown in a controlled environment in hydroponics. High concentrations of Zn sulphate in the nutrient solution (50, 100 and 300 microm) decreased root and shoot fresh and dry mass, and increased root/shoot ratios, when compared to control conditions (1.2 microm Zn). Plants grown with excess Zn had inward-rolled leaf edges and a damaged and brownish root system, with short lateral roots. High Zn decreased N, Mg, K and Mn concentrations in all plant parts, whereas P and Ca concentrations increased, but only in shoots. Leaves of plants treated with 50 and 100 microm Zn developed symptoms of Fe deficiency, including decreases in Fe, chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations, increases in carotenoid/chlorophyll and chlorophyll a/b ratios and de-epoxidation of violaxanthin cycle pigments. Plants grown with 300 microm Zn had decreased photosystem II efficiency and further growth decreases but did not have leaf Fe deficiency symptoms. Leaf Zn concentrations of plants grown with excess Zn were high but fairly constant (230-260 microg.g(-1) dry weight), whereas total Zn uptake per plant decreased markedly with high Zn supply. These data indicate that sugar beet could be a good model to investigate Zn homeostasis mechanisms in plants, but is not an efficient species for Zn phytoremediation.

  2. Thermal Stabilization of Erwinia chrysanthemi Pectin Methylesterase A for Application in a Sugar Beet Pulp Biorefinery▿

    PubMed Central

    Chakiath, Chacko; Lyons, Margaret J.; Kozak, Robert E.; Laufer, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    Directed evolution approaches were used to construct a thermally stabilized variant of Erwinia chrysanthemi pectin methylesterase A. The final evolved enzyme has four amino acid substitutions that together confer a Tm value that is approximately 11°C greater than that of the wild-type enzyme, while maintaining near-wild-type kinetic properties. The specific activity, with saturating substrate, of the thermally stabilized enzyme is greater than that of the wild-type enzyme when both are operating at their respective optimal temperatures, 60°C and 50°C. The engineered enzyme may be useful for saccharification of biomass, such as sugar beet pulp, with relatively high pectin content. In particular, the engineered enzyme is able to function in biomass up to temperatures of 65°C without significant loss of activity. Specifically, the thermally stabilized enzyme facilitates the saccharification of sugar beet pulp by the commercial pectinase preparation Pectinex Ultra SPL. Added pectin methylesterase increases the initial rate of sugar production by approximately 50%. PMID:19820151

  3. Kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed cross-linking of feruloylated arabinan from sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz Abang; Arnous, Anis; Holck, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-11-09

    Ferulic acid (FA) groups esterified to the arabinan side chains of pectic polysaccharides can be oxidatively cross-linked in vitro by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalysis in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) to form ferulic acid dehydrodimers (diFAs). The present work investigated whether the kinetics of HRP catalyzed cross-linking of FA esterified to α-(1,5)-linked arabinans are affected by the length of the arabinan chains carrying the feruloyl substitutions. The kinetics of the HRP-catalyzed cross-linking of four sets of arabinan samples from sugar beet pulp, having different molecular weights and hence different degrees of polymerization, were monitored by the disappearance of FA absorbance at 316 nm. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis confirmed that the sugar beet arabinans were feruloyl-substituted, and HPLC analysis verified that the amounts of diFAs increased when FA levels decreased as a result of the enzymatic oxidation treatment with HRP and H(2)O(2). At equimolar levels of FA (0.0025-0.05 mM) in the arabinan samples, the initial rates of the HRP-catalyzed cross-linking of the longer chain arabinans were slower than those of the shorter chain arabinans. The lower initial rates may be the result of the slower movement of larger molecules coupled with steric phenomena, making the required initial reaction of two FAs on longer chain arabinans slower than on shorter arabinans.

  4. Thermal Stabilization of Erwinia chrysanthemi pectin methylesterase a for application in a sugar beet pulp biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Chakiath, Chacko; Lyons, Margaret J; Kozak, Robert E; Laufer, Craig S

    2009-12-01

    Directed evolution approaches were used to construct a thermally stabilized variant of Erwinia chrysanthemi pectin methylesterase A. The final evolved enzyme has four amino acid substitutions that together confer a T(m) value that is approximately 11 degrees C greater than that of the wild-type enzyme, while maintaining near-wild-type kinetic properties. The specific activity, with saturating substrate, of the thermally stabilized enzyme is greater than that of the wild-type enzyme when both are operating at their respective optimal temperatures, 60 degrees C and 50 degrees C. The engineered enzyme may be useful for saccharification of biomass, such as sugar beet pulp, with relatively high pectin content. In particular, the engineered enzyme is able to function in biomass up to temperatures of 65 degrees C without significant loss of activity. Specifically, the thermally stabilized enzyme facilitates the saccharification of sugar beet pulp by the commercial pectinase preparation Pectinex Ultra SPL. Added pectin methylesterase increases the initial rate of sugar production by approximately 50%.

  5. Effect of trimethyllead chloride on slowly activating (SV) channels in red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproots.

    PubMed

    Trela, Zenon; Burdach, Zbigniew; Przestalski, Stanisław; Karcz, Waldemar

    2012-12-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to examine the effect of trimethyllead chloride (Met(3)PbCl) on SV channel activity in red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproot vacuoles. It was found that in the control bath the macroscopic currents showed the typical slow activation and a strong outward rectification of the steady-state currents. An addition of Met(3)PbCl to the bath solution blocked, in a concentration-dependent manner, SV currents in red beet vacuoles. The time constant τ increased several times in the presence of 100 μM trimethyllead chloride at all voltages tested. When single channel properties were analyzed, only little channel activity could be recorded in the presence of 100 μM Met(3)PbCl. Trimethyllead chloride decreased significantly (by about one order of magnitude) the open probability of single channels. The recordings of single channel activity obtained in the presence and absence of Met(3)PbCl showed that organolead only slightly (by ca. 10%) decreased the unitary conductance of single channels. It was also found that Met(3)PbCl diminished significantly the number of SV channel openings, whereas it did not change the opening times of the channels. Taken together, these results suggest that Met(3)PbCl binding site is located outside the channel selectivity filter.

  6. Removal of phosphate from aqueous solution by biochar derived from anaerobically digested sugar beet tailings.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ying; Gao, Bin; Inyang, Mandu; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Cao, Xinde; Pullammanappallil, Pratap; Yang, Liuyan

    2011-06-15

    Biochar converted from agricultural residues or other carbon-rich wastes may provide new methods and materials for environmental management, particularly with respect to carbon sequestration and contaminant remediation. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the removal of phosphate from aqueous solution by biochar derived from anaerobically digested sugar beet tailings (DSTC). Batch adsorption kinetic and equilibrium isotherm experiments and post-adsorption characterizations using SEM-EDS, XRD, and FTIR suggested that colloidal and nano-sized MgO (periclase) particles on the biochar surface were the main adsorption sites for aqueous phosphate. Batch adsorption experiments also showed that both initial solution pH and coexisting anions could affect the adsorption of phosphate onto the DSTC biochar. Of the mathematical models used to describe the adsorption kinetics of phosphate removal by the biochar, the Ritchie N_th-order (N=1.14) model showed the best fit. Two heterogeneous isotherm models (Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich) fitted the experimental isotherm of phosphate adsorption onto the biochar better than the Langmuir adsorption model. Our results suggest that biochar converted from anaerobically digested sugar beet tailings is a promising alternative adsorbent, which can be used to reclaim phosphate from water or reduce phosphate leaching from fertilized soils. In addition, there is no need to regenerate the exhausted biochar because the phosphate-laden biochar contains abundance of valuable nutrients, which may be used as a slow-release fertilizer to enhance soil fertility and to sequester carbon.

  7. Pretreatment of Sugar Beet Pulp with Dilute Sulfurous Acid is Effective for Multipurpose Usage of Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Kharina, M; Emelyanov, V; Mokshina, N; Ibragimova, N; Gorshkova, T

    2016-05-01

    Sulfurous acid was used for pretreatment of sugar beet pulp (SBP) in order to achieve high efficiency of both extraction of carbohydrates and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids. The main advantage of sulfurous acid usage as pretreatment agent is the possibility of its regeneration. Application of sulfurous acid as hydrolyzing agent in relatively low concentrations (0.6-1.0 %) during a short period of time (10-20 min) and low solid to liquid ratio (1:3, 1:6) allowed effective extraction of carbohydrates from SBP and provided positive effect on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest obtained concentration of reducing substances (RS) in hydrolysates was 8.5 %; up to 33.6 % of all carbohydrates present in SBP could be extracted. The major obtained monosaccharides were arabinose and glucose (9.4 and 7.3 g/l, respectively). Pretreatment of SBP with sulfurous acid increased 4.6 times the yield of glucose during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of remaining solids with cellulase cocktail, as compared to the untreated SBP. Total yield of glucose during SBP pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis amounted to 89.4 % of the theoretical yield. The approach can be applied directly to the wet SBP. Hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp with sulfurous acid is recommended for obtaining of individual monosaccharides, as well as nutritional media.

  8. Stereoselective degradation of benalaxyl in tomato, tobacco, sugar beet, capsicum, and soil.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xu; Wang, Peng; Liu, Donghui; Lv, Chunguang; Lu, Yuele; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2008-02-01

    The stereoselective degradation of the racemic benalaxyl in vegetables such as tomato, tobacco, sugar beet, capsicum, and the soil has been investigated. The two enantiomers of benalaxyl in the matrix were extracted by organic solvent and determined by validated chiral high-performance liquid chromatography with a cellulose-tris-(3, 5-dimethylphenylcarbamate)-based chiral column. Rac-benalaxyl was fortified into the soil and foliar applied to vegetables. The assay method was linear over a range of concentrations (0.5-50 microg ml(-1)) and the mean recoveries in all the samples were more than 70% for the two enantiomers. The limit of detection for both enantiomers was 0.05 microg g(-1). The results in soil showed that R-(-)-enantiomer dissipated faster than S-(+)-enantiomer and the stereoselectivity might be caused by microorganisms. In tomato, tobacco, sugar, beet, and capsicum plants, there was significantly stereoselective metabolism. The preferential absorption and degradation of S-(+)-enantiomer resulted an enrichment of the R-(-)-enantiomer residue in all the vegetables.

  9. Effects of irrigation water qualities on biomass and sugar contents of sugar beet and sweet sorghum cultivars.

    PubMed

    Almodares, A; Sharif, M E

    2007-04-01

    An experiment involving four qualities of irrigation water two sugar beet and three sweet sorghum cultivars was conducted in a split plot design with four replications at Rudasht Drainage and Reclamation Experiment Station in 1999. The results showed salinity of water has an adverse effect on sugar beet and sweet sorghum biomass. Sweet sorghum cultivar SSV108 had the lowest biomass under all qualities of irrigation water Sweet sorghum cultivar Rio had the maximum biomass with water qualities of 2, 5, and 8 dS m(-1). Sugar beet cultivar 7233 had the maximum biomass with 11 dS m(-1). The effect of irrigation water quality was not significant for sugar characteristics such as brix, pol and purity. However, responses of cultivars on the above parameters were significant and sugar beet cultivars had higher brix, pol and purity and lower invert sugar and starch than sweet sorghum cultivars. In conclusion, sweet sorghum cultivars are not recommended to be irrigated with saline water of more than 8 dS m(-1) for sugar production. Under such condition, they may be suitable to be grown for forage purposes.

  10. Modified sugar beet pectin induces apoptosis of colon cancer cells via interaction with the neutral sugar side-chains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pectins extracted from a variety of sources and modified with heat and/or pH have previously been shown to exhibit activity towards several cancer cell lines. However, the structural basis for the anti-cancer activity of modified pectin requires clarification. Sugar beet and citrus pectin extracts h...

  11. High production of plant type levan in sugar beet transformed with timothy (Phleum pratense) 6-SFT genes.

    PubMed

    Matsuhira, Hiroaki; Tamura, Ken-ichi; Tamagake, Hideto; Sato, Yutaka; Anzai, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Midori

    2014-12-20

    Levan, a type of fructan, is an oligomer or polymer with mainly a β(2,6)-linked fructose chain attached to sucrose. We introduced two timothy genes, PpFT1 and PpFT2, coding for two homologous sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferases into sugar beet. Sugar beet produces a high concentration of sucrose, a starting substrate in fructan synthesis, in the root. Among transgenic T1 lines, we obtained sugar beet transformants that accumulated large amounts of β(2,6)-linked levans (about 20 to 75mgg(-1) FW) in the roots. The transformed sugar beet plants possessing PpFT1 or PpFT2 produced linear levans with different degrees of polymerization (DP). Namely, the PpFT1 transformants accumulated mainly high DP levans including those with DP>40, while the PpFT2 transformants accumulated levans with DP between 3 and 40. Chromatograms showed that PpFT2 produces pure β(2,6)-linked linear levans compared with fructans synthesized by PpFT1. These levans belong to the high DP class of plant fructans, but have much shorter DP than that of levans generally produced by microorganisms.

  12. Nitrogen fertilization rate affects feeding, larval performance, and oviposition preference of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, on cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) is one of the most critical chemical elements for plant and animal growth. Development and oviposition of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was studied in relation to varying nitrogen levels in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. The development of S. exig...

  13. Structural and thermal stability of beta-lactoglobulin as a result of interacting with sugar beet pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of interaction on the structure and stability of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) with beta-sugar beet pectin (beta-SBP) has been studied by circular dichroism (CD), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and steady-state as well as time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy at pH 6.75, and low ionic str...

  14. Tyrosine Hydroxylation in Betalain Pigment Biosynthesis Is Performed by Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Beets (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Sunnadeniya, Rasika; Bean, Alexander; Brown, Matthew; Akhavan, Neda; Hatlestad, Gregory; Gonzalez, Antonio; Symonds, V Vaughan; Lloyd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Yellow and red-violet betalain plant pigments are restricted to several families in the order Caryophyllales, where betacyanins play analogous biological roles to anthocyanins. The initial step in betalain biosynthesis is the hydroxylation of tyrosine to form L-DOPA. Using gene expression experiments in beets, yeast, and Arabidopsis, along with HPLC/MS analysis, the present study shows that two novel cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5, and the previously described CYP76AD1 can perform this initial step. Co-expressing these CYP450s with DOPA 4,5-dioxygenase in yeast, and overexpression of these CYP450s in yellow beets show that CYP76AD1 efficiently uses L-DOPA leading to red betacyanins while CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5 lack this activity. Furthermore, CYP76AD1 can complement yellow beetroots to red while CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5 cannot. Therefore CYP76AD1 uniquely performs the beet R locus function and beets appear to be genetically redundant for tyrosine hydroxylation. These new functional data and ancestral character state reconstructions indicate that tyrosine hydroxylation alone was the most likely ancestral function of the CYP76AD alpha and beta groups and the ability to convert L-DOPA to cyclo-DOPA evolved later in the alpha group.

  15. Tyrosine Hydroxylation in Betalain Pigment Biosynthesis Is Performed by Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Beets (Beta vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Sunnadeniya, Rasika; Bean, Alexander; Brown, Matthew; Akhavan, Neda; Hatlestad, Gregory; Gonzalez, Antonio; Symonds, V. Vaughan; Lloyd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Yellow and red-violet betalain plant pigments are restricted to several families in the order Caryophyllales, where betacyanins play analogous biological roles to anthocyanins. The initial step in betalain biosynthesis is the hydroxylation of tyrosine to form L-DOPA. Using gene expression experiments in beets, yeast, and Arabidopsis, along with HPLC/MS analysis, the present study shows that two novel cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5, and the previously described CYP76AD1 can perform this initial step. Co-expressing these CYP450s with DOPA 4,5-dioxygenase in yeast, and overexpression of these CYP450s in yellow beets show that CYP76AD1 efficiently uses L-DOPA leading to red betacyanins while CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5 lack this activity. Furthermore, CYP76AD1 can complement yellow beetroots to red while CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5 cannot. Therefore CYP76AD1 uniquely performs the beet R locus function and beets appear to be genetically redundant for tyrosine hydroxylation. These new functional data and ancestral character state reconstructions indicate that tyrosine hydroxylation alone was the most likely ancestral function of the CYP76AD alpha and beta groups and the ability to convert L-DOPA to cyclo-DOPA evolved later in the alpha group. PMID:26890886

  16. Dietary effects of cotton tissue expressing germin like protein on beet armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) growth, survival and pupation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cotton lines that ectopically express a cotton germin-like protein (ABP) were screened for resistance/tolerance factors to the beet armyworm (BAW) Spodoptera exigua (Hubner) via feeding assays. The number of BAW eggs that successfully hatched was not statistically different at 72 h observ...

  17. Beet juice utilization: Expeditious green synthesis of nobel metal nanoparticles (Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd) using microwaves

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal nanoparticles of Ag, Au, Pt, and Pd were prepared in aqueous solutions via a rapid microwave-assisted green method using beet juice, an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce, served as both a reducing and a capping reagent. The Ag nanoparticles with capping prepared by b...

  18. Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Gene Encoding for Ascorbate Peroxidase and Responsive to Salt Stress in Beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dunajska-Ordak, Kamila; Skorupa-Kłaput, Monika; Kurnik, Katarzyna; Tretyn, Andrzej; Tyburski, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    BvpAPX is a full-length cDNA-encoding peroxisomal ascorbate peroxidase isolated from leaves of salt-stressed beet (Beta vulgaris) plants. A high level of identity has been reported between the deduced amino acid sequence of BvpAPX and other known ascorbate peroxidases. The genomic sequence of BvpAPX revealed a gene composed of 5 exons and 4 introns. Several sequence motifs revealed in the 5'UTR region of the gene confer to BvpAPX a putative responsiveness to various abiotic stresses. We determined the effect of salt stress on BvpAPX expression in leaves of the cultivated beet varieties, Huzar and Janosik, and their wild salt-tolerant relative B. vulgaris ssp. maritima. Plants were subjected to salt stress during a 32-day culture period (long-term salt treatment). An alternative salinization protocol consisted of an 18-h incubation of detached beet leaves in media supplemented with toxic salt concentrations (short-term salt treatment). RT-Q-PCR analysis revealed that BvpAPX expression markedly increased in leaves of plants subjected to conditions of long-term treatment with salinity, whereas BvpAPX transcript levels remained unaffected in detached leaves during short-term salt treatment. In addition, several leaf redox system parameters, such as ascorbate peroxidase activity or ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and lipid hydroperoxide concentration, were determined in the leaves of beet plants subjected to salt stress conditions.

  19. Increased long-flight activity triggered in beet armyworm by larval feeding on diet containing Cry1Ac protoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, is not a direct target of transgenic cotton in China but nevertheless recently has become an important pest. In laboratory...

  20. Changes in the level and activation state of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase during aging of red beet slices.

    PubMed Central

    Papini, R; De Michelis, M I

    1997-01-01

    The effect of aging on the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) parenchyma discs was analyzed in PM purified by aqueous two-phase partitioning. Aging increased both the activity in the amount of immunodetectable H(+)-ATPase in the PM. The activity assayed at slightly alkaline pH values increased earlier and more strongly than that assayed at acidic pH values, so that the pH curve of the enzyme from aged beet discs was shifted toward more alkaline values. Aging decreased the stimulation of the PM H(+)-ATPase activity by controlled trypsin treatments or by lysophosphatidylcholine. After trypsin treatment the pH dependence of H(+)-ATPase from dormant or aged beet discs became equal. These results indicate that aging not only increases the level of H(+)-ATPase in the PM, but also determines its activation, most likely by modifying the interaction between the autoinhibitory carboxyl-terminal domain and the catalytic site. When the PM H(+)-ATPase activity was assayed at a slightly alkaline pH, the tyrosine modifier N-acetylimidazole inhibited the H(+)-ATPase in the PM from dormant beet discs much less than in the PM from aged discs, suggesting that modification of a tyrosine residue may be involved in the activation of the PM H(+)-ATPase induced by aging. The results are discussed with regard to aging-induced development of transmembrane transport activities. PMID:9232872

  1. Characterization of Fusarium secorum, a new species causing Fusarium yellowing decline of sugar beet in North Central USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study characterized a novel sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pathogen from the Red River Valley in north central USA, which was formally named Fusarium secorum. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of three loci (translation elongation factor1a, calmodulin, mitochondrial small subunit) and the morphol...

  2. Temperature effects on the interactions of sugar beet Fusarium yellows caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium yellows of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae, causes a significant reduction in root yield, sucrose percentage, and juice purity. The environmental or agronomic factors that contribute to development and severity of Fusarium yellows have not been desc...

  3. Egg hatch and survival and development of beet webworm (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae at different combinations of temperature and relative humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the role that temperature and humidity play in the population dynamics of the beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis L. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), egg hatchability, survival of 1st - 5th instars, survival of the complete larval stage, survival curves, and larval development rates were inve...

  4. Onset of oviposition triggers abrupt reduction in migratory flight behavior and flight muscle in the female beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flight and reproduction are usually considered as two life history traits that compete for resources in a migratory insect. The beet webworm, Loxostege sticticalis L., manages the costs of migratory flight and reproduction through a trade-off in timing of these two life history traits, where migrato...

  5. Identification, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of Cell Wall Related Genes in Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, a Food, Fodder, and Biofuel Crop

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Krishan M.; Thu, Sandi W.; Balasubramanian, Vimal K.; Cobos, Christopher J.; Disasa, Tesfaye; Mendu, Venugopal

    2016-01-01

    Biomass based alternative fuels offer a solution to the world's ever-increasing energy demand. With the ability to produce high biomass in marginal lands with low inputs, sorghum has a great potential to meet second-generation biofuel needs. Despite the sorghum crop importance in biofuel and fodder industry, there is no comprehensive information available on the cell wall related genes and gene families (biosynthetic and modification). It is important to identify the cell wall related genes to understand the cell wall biosynthetic process as well as to facilitate biomass manipulation. Genome-wide analysis using gene family specific Hidden Markov Model of conserved domains identified 520 genes distributed among 20 gene families related to biosynthesis/modification of various cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, and lignin. Chromosomal localization analysis of these genes revealed that about 65% of cell wall related genes were confined to four chromosomes (Chr. 1–4). Further, 56 tandem duplication events involving 169 genes were identified in these gene families which could be associated with expansion of genes within families in sorghum. Additionally, we also identified 137 Simple Sequence Repeats related to 112 genes and target sites for 10 miRNAs in some important families such as cellulose synthase, cellulose synthase-like, and laccases, etc. To gain further insight into potential functional roles, expression analysis of these gene families was performed using publically available data sets in various tissues and under abiotic stress conditions. Expression analysis showed tissue specificity as well as differential expression under abiotic stress conditions. Overall, our study provides a comprehensive information on cell wall related genes families in sorghum which offers a valuable resource to develop strategies for altering biomass composition by plant breeding and genetic engineering approaches. PMID:27630645

  6. Pelleted beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn: 2. Effects on digestion and ruminal digestion kinetics in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Voelker, J A; Allen, M S

    2003-11-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of dried, pelleted beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on digestion and ruminal digestion kinetics were evaluated using eight ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in a duplicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Cows were 79 +/- 17 (mean +/- SD) d in milk at the beginning of the experiment. Experimental diets with 40% forage (corn silage and alfalfa silage) and 60% concentrate contained 0, 6.1, 12.1, or 24.3% beet pulp substituted for high-moisture corn on a dry matter basis. Diet concentrations of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and starch were 24.3 and 34.6% (0% beet pulp), 26.2 and 30.5% (6% beet pulp), 28.0 and 26.5% (12% beet pulp), and 31.6 and 18.4% (24% beet pulp), respectively. Ruminal dry matter pool decreased and NDF turnover rate increased as dietary beet pulp content increased. Potentially digestible NDF was digested more extensively and at a faster rate in the rumen with increasing beet pulp, resulting in increased total tract NDF digestibility. Passage rates of potentially digestible NDF and of indigestible NDF were not affected by treatment. True ruminal digestibility of starch decreased with increasing beet pulp substitution. This was caused by a linear increase in starch passage rate, possibly because of increasing ruminal fill, and a linear decrease in digestion rate of starch in the rumen, possibly because of reduced amylolytic enzyme activity for lower-starch diets. Although true ruminal starch digestibility decreased when more beet pulp was fed, whole tract starch digestibility was not affected because of compensatory digestion of starch in the intestines. Due to more thorough digestion of fiber in diets containing more beet pulp, whole-tract digestibility of organic matter increased linearly, and intake of digestible organic matter was not affected. Partially replacing high-moisture corn with beet pulp in low-forage diets increased fiber digestibility without

  7. Unusual and typical features of a novel restorer-of-fertility gene of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Matsuhira, Hiroaki; Kagami, Hiroyo; Kurata, Masayuki; Kitazaki, Kazuyoshi; Matsunaga, Muneyuki; Hamaguchi, Yuko; Hagihara, Eiki; Ueda, Minoru; Harada, Michiyo; Muramatsu, Aki; Yui-Kurino, Rika; Taguchi, Kazunori; Tamagake, Hideto; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2012-12-01

    Male gametogenesis in plants can be impaired by an incompatibility between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, termed cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). A sterilizing factor resides in mitochondria, whereas a nuclear factor, Restorer-of-fertility (Rf), restores male fertility. Although a majority of plant Rf genes are thought to encode a family of RNA-binding proteins called pentatrico-peptide repeat (PPR) proteins, we isolated a novel type of Rf from sugar beet. Two BACs and one cosmid clone that constituted a 383-kbp contig covering the sugar beet Rf1 locus were sequenced. Of 41 genes borne by the contig, quadruplicated genes were found to be associated with specific transcripts in Rf1 flower buds. The quadruplicated genes encoded a protein resembling OMA1, a protein known from yeast and mammals to be involved in mitochondrial protein quality control. Construction of transgenic plants revealed that one of the four genes (bvORF20) was capable of restoring partial pollen fertility to CMS sugar beet; the level of restoration was comparable to that evaluated by a crossing experiment. However, the other genes lacked such a capability. A GFP-fusion experiment showed that bvORF20 encoded a mitochondrial protein. The corresponding gene was cloned from rf1rf1 sugar beet and sequenced, and a solitary gene that was similar but not identical to bvORF20 was found. Genetic features exhibited by sugar beet Rf1, such as gene clustering and copy-number variation between Rf1 and rf, were reminiscent of PPR-type Rf, suggesting that a common evolutionary mechanism(s) operates on plant Rfs irrespective of the translation product.

  8. Modification of gibberellin signalling (metabolism & signal transduction) in sugar beet: analysis of potential targets for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Mutasa-Gottgens, Effie; Qi, Aiming; Mathews, Ann; Thomas, Stephen; Phillips, Andrew; Hedden, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Sugar beet, Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris is a biennial long day plant with an obligate requirement for vernalization (prolonged exposure to low temperature). As a spring crop in temperate European climates, it is vulnerable to vernalization-induced premature bolting and flowering, resulting in reduced crop yield and quality. Gibberellins (GAs) play important roles in key physiological processes including stem elongation (bolting) and flowering and are, therefore, potential targets for controlling reproductive growth in sugar beet. We show that the BvGA20ox gene, which encodes an enzyme necessary for GA biosynthesis, was transcriptionally activated in apices of sugar beet plants after vernalization and that GA metabolism can be manipulated to delay bolting in vernalized plants. We demonstrate that down-regulation of GA responses by transformation with the Arabidopsis thaliana gai gene (which represses GA signalling), under its own promoter (pgai::gai) or deactivation of GA by over-expression of the Phaseolus coccineus (bean) GA2ox1 gene, which inactivates GA, increased the required post vernalization thermal time (an accurate and stable measure of physiological time), to bolt by approximately 300 degrees Cd. This resulted in agronomically significant bolting time delays of approximately 2 weeks and 3 weeks in the pgai::gai and 35S::PcGA2ox1 plants, respectively. Our data represent the first transgenic sugar beet model to (1) show that GA signalling can be used to improve crops by manipulation of the transition to reproductive growth; and (2) provide evidence that GA is required for seed set in sugar beet.

  9. Analysis of nematode-responsive promoters in sugar beet hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, K; Karimi, M; Gheysen, G

    2001-01-01

    One of the strategies to make crops resistant to the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii is the destruction of the feeding site or syncytium. This can be achieved by local expression of the cytotoxic barnase gene under control of a nematode-inducible plant promoter that is active in the syncytium. Expression of barnase outside the feeding site has to be neutralized by its inhibitor barstar driven from a constitutive promoter that is downregulated in the syncytium. Several promoters that are upregulated in feeding structures were identified using the promoter tagging strategy in Arabidopsis thaliana (Barthels et al., 1997) or by differential cDNA screening in tomato (Van der Eycken et al., 1996). Nematode downregulated promoters in Arabidopsis were described by Goddijn et al. (1993). Five nematode-induced promoters (ARM1, 1164, 728, 25 and Lemmi9) and four downregulated promoters (CaMV35S, the nopaline synthase promoter (nos) and the rooting loci promoters RolC and RolD) fused to the beta-glucuronidase (gus) reporter gene were introduced into sugar beet hairy roots by transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes to evaluate their expression pattern. All upregulated promoters were found to be active at the base of lateral roots. The 728 and 25 promoter were as well active in root tips. In the 25-gus lines GUS could also be detected in the vascular tissue, while the ARM1 promoter was also active in sugar beet callus. The Lemmi9 promoter and the 4 constitutive promoters were active in the entire root. The transgenic hairy roots were inoculated with Heterodera schachtii and at different time-points (4, 8, 15, 22 days after inoculation; dpi) GUS analysis was performed on the infected roots. For the ARM1, 1164 and 728 promoter the highest gus expression level in syncytia was observed at 8 dpi. In 4 days old syncytia of the 25-gus lines the intensity of the GUS signal was of the same extent as the non-specific vascular signal. In later stages it even disappeared from

  10. Survey of field soils for cercospora beticola by PCR and ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We surveyed several fields in the Lower Yellowstone River Valley (Eastern Montana and Western North Dakota) for Cercospora beticola, the causal agent of Cercospora leaf spot of sugar beet. We used both PCR based technique and ELISA for detection of C. beticola in soil. Soils were sampled from severa...

  11. [High-priority research directions in genetics, and the breeding of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) in the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Kornienko, A V; Podvigina, O A; Zhuzhzhalova, T P; Fedulova, T P; Bogomolov, M A; Oshevnev, V P; Butorina, A K

    2014-11-01

    High-priority research directions for the genetics and breeding of the sugar beet in the 21st century were developed with consideration of the available scientific achievements of domestic and foreign scholars. These directions unite the classical and molecular approaches to solving the problems of increasing the effectiveness of sugar beet breeding carried out on a genetic basis, and they correspond to the contemporary level of scientific research. Seven such directions are proposed.

  12. Phase separation induced molecular fractionation of gum arabic--sugar beet pectin systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Peng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Fan; Fang, Yapeng; Phillips, Glyn O; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Jiang, Fatang

    2013-10-15

    This paper investigates the phase separation and phase separation-induced fractionation of gum arabic (GA)/sugar beet pectin (SBP) mixed solutions. A phase diagram, including cloud and binodal curves, was established by visual observation and phase composition analysis. The deviation of the binodal curve from the cloud curve was a result of phase separation-induced fractionation of polydisperse GA and SBP molecules. Fractionation of GA increased the content of arabinogalactan-protein complex (AGP) from ca. 13% to 27%. The fractionated GA (FGA) showed improved emulsifying functionality, whereas the fractionated SBP (FSBP) had a reduced emulsifying functionality. The changes in emulsifying efficiency can be explained by interfacial adsorption behaviors at the oil-water interface as indicated by interfacial tension measurements.

  13. Stepwise ethanolic precipitation of sugar beet pectins from the acidic extract.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoming; Meng, Hecheng; Zhu, Siming; Tang, Qiang; Pan, Runquan; Yu, Shujuan

    2016-01-20

    A stepwise ethanol-precipitation (SEP) procedure was developed for the purification of sugar beet pectins (SBP) from a pectin-containing aqueous extract. Five fractions of different chemical and molecular characteristics were produced by stepwise elevating the alcohol concentration of the precipitation medium from 50% to 80% v/v. Comparison of chemical and macromolecular features between the obtained fractions indirectly suggested that the ability of pectin to solubilize in the ethanol-water binary mixture depended greatly on the polymer structure. Fractions rich in neutral sugars were precipitated at relatively high ethanol concentrations, probably due to the enhanced interactions generated between pectin side chains and solvent molecules. Furthermore, the obtained fractions displayed different surface activities. Results obtained in this work indicate that the SEP procedure is more selective with respect to pectin structural features and surface properties than the one-step ethanolic precipitation.

  14. Comparison of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sugar beet pulp: performance, dewaterability and foam control.

    PubMed

    Suhartini, Sri; Heaven, Sonia; Banks, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    Digestion of sugar beet pulp was assessed in relation to biogas and methane production, foaming potential, and digestate dewaterability. Four 4-litre working volume digesters were operated mesophilically (37±0.5 °C) and four thermophilically (55±0.5 °C) over three hydraulic retention times. Digesters were operated in duplicate at organic loading rates (OLR) of 4 and 5 g volatile solids l(-1) day(-1) without water addition. Thermophilic digestion gave higher biogas and methane productivity than mesophilic and was able to operate at the higher OLR, where mesophilic digestion showed signs of instability. Digestate dewaterability was assessed using capillary suction time and frozen image centrifugation. The occurrence of, or potential for, stable foam formation was assessed using a foaming potential test. Thermophilic operation allowed higher loadings to be applied without loss of performance, and gave a digestate with superior dewatering characteristics and very little foaming potential.

  15. Monitoring of thermophilic adaptation of mesophilic anaerobe fermentation of sugar beet pressed pulp.

    PubMed

    Tukacs-Hájos, Annamária; Pap, Bernadett; Maróti, Gergely; Szendefy, Judit; Szabó, Piroska; Rétfalvi, Tamás

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobe fermentation of sugar beet pressed pulp was investigated in pilot-scale digesters. Thermophilic adaptation of mesophilic culture was monitored using chemical analysis and metagenomic characterization of the sludge. Temperature adaptation was achieved by increasing the temperature gradually (2 °C day(-1)) and by greatly decreasing the OLR. During stable run, the OLR was increased gradually to 11.29 kg VS m(-3)d(-1) and biogas yield was 5% higher in the thermophilic reactor. VFA levels increased in the thermophilic reactor with increased OLR (acetic acid 646 mg L(-1), propionic acid 596 mg L(-1)), then VFA decreased and the operation was manageable beside the relative high tVFA (1300-2000 mg L(-1)). The effect of thermophilic adaptation on the microbial communities was studied using a sequencing-based metagenomic approach. Connections between physico-chemical parameters and populations of bacteria and methanogen archaea were revealed.

  16. Preparation and characterization of cellulose nanofibers from de-pectinated sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Wang, Li-jun; Li, Dong; Cheng, Yan-ling; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-02-15

    Cellulose nanofibers (diameter=10-70 nm) were produced using chemical treatments (alkali treatment and bleaching) and high pressure homogenization from de-pectinated sugar beet pulp (DSBP). Chemical analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that the chemical treatments greatly removed the hemicellulose and lignin from the DSBP and significantly increased the cellulose content. The crystallinity of the cellulose nanofibers increased from 35.67% to 69.62% after alkali treatment and bleaching. The thermal degradation temperature of DSBP cellulose nanofibers was 271.7 °C which was found to be 47.3 °C higher than that of the untreated DSBP. The DSBP cellulose nanofibers can be preferably used as reinforcement in the biocomposite material at high temperature.

  17. Release of ferulic acid and feruloylated oligosaccharides from sugar beet pulp by Streptomyces tendae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, P; Diez, N; Faulds, C B; Soliveri, J; Copa-Patiño, J L

    2007-05-01

    Given several promising industrial applications of ferulic acid, this study was designed to identify actinomycete strains able to release high levels of this acid from sugar beet pulp (SBP). Out of 47 strains tested, 37% were found to release free ferulic acid from the growth substrate. One strain, identified as Streptomyces tendae by 16S RNA gene sequencing, was capable of releasing 80% of the ferulic acid ester-linked to the pectin in SBP after 5 days of growth. These data suggest that some actinomycetes are able to release ferulic acid and feruloylated oligosaccharides from SBP. During growth on SBP, it seems that Streptomyces species solubilize and release feruloylated oligosaccharides by specific carbohydrase activities before de-esterification and release of free ferulic acid.

  18. Extraction, characterization and spontaneous emulsifying properties of pectin from sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sen; Yu, Shu-juan; Zheng, Xue-ling; Wang, Xiao-xi; Bao, Qing-Dan; Guo, Xiao-ming

    2013-10-15

    The effects of organic acid extractants on the yield and characteristics of pectin from sugar beet pulp were investigated with citric acid, malic acid and lactic acid at different pH (1.5 and 2.0) and time (1 h and 2 h). The results demonstrated that the yields of pectins were directly correlated with the decrease of pH and reaction time, and the optimum yield of 17.2% was obtained at pH 1.5 and 2 h. Furthermore, the acid type also affected the physicochemical characteristics of pectin, especially on the esterification degree (42-71), galacturonic acid content (60.2-77.8%), emulsion activity (35.2-40.1%) and emulsion stability (62.1-79.4%), and a relatively single pectin mainly consisted of homogalacturonan could be obtained under a suitable reaction condition, which was an excellent crude material for the production of emulsion activity.

  19. Improving the efficiency of enzyme utilization for sugar beet pulp hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Cheng, Yu-Shen; Yu, Chaowei; Zhang, Ruihong; Jenkins, Bryan M; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2012-11-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) is a carbohydrate-rich residue of table sugar processing. It shows promise as a feedstock for fermentable sugar and biofuel production via enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial fermentation. This research focused on the enzymatic hydrolysis of SBP and examined the effects of solid loading (2-10 %, dry basis), enzyme preparation, and enzyme recycle on the production of fermentable sugars. The enzyme partitioning to the solid and liquid phases during SBP enzymatic hydrolysis and loss during recycling were investigated using SDS-PAGE and Zymogram analysis. Without considering product inhibition, the cellulase added initially to the SBP hydrolysis lost only 6 % filter paper activity and negligible carboxymethyl cellulose activity upon multiple cycles of SBP hydrolysis. It was found that enzyme dosage can be reduced by 50 % while maintaining similar, and in some cases higher fermentable sugar yield. The removal of hydrolysis products will further improve enzymatic hydrolysis of SBP for biofuel production.

  20. In vitro fermentability of sugar beet pulp derived oligosaccharides using human and pig fecal inocula.

    PubMed

    Leijdekkers, Antonius G M; Aguirre, Marisol; Venema, Koen; Bosch, Guido; Gruppen, Harry; Schols, Henk A

    2014-02-05

    The in vitro fermentation characteristics of different classes of sugar beet pectic oligosaccharides (SBPOS) were studied using human and pig fecal inocula. The SBPOS consisted mainly of partially acetylated rhamnogalacturonan oligosaccharides and partially methyl-esterified/acetylated homogalacturonan oligosaccharides. Some SBPOS contained an unsaturated galacturonic acid residue at their non-reducing end. It was shown that SBPOS could be completely fermented by human and pig fecal microbiota, thereby producing butyrate yet mainly acetate and propionate as metabolites. The degradation of SBPOS by pig fecal microbiota was different and much slower compared to human fecal microbiota. In general, rhamnogalacturonan oligosaccharides were degraded slower than homogalacturonan oligosaccharides. Acetylation of rhamnogalacturonan oligosaccharides lowered the degradation rate by pig fecal microbiota but not by human fecal microbiota. No classic bifidogenic effect was shown for SBPOS using human fecal inoculum. However, several other potentially interesting modifications in the microbiota composition that can be associated with host health were observed, which are discussed.

  1. Hormonal control of endoreduplication in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) seedlings growing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lukaszewska, E; Virden, R; Sliwinska, E

    2012-01-01

    The effect on endoreduplication in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) seedlings of five plant hormones in MS medium, ethylene, 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), gibberellic acid (GA(3) ), kinetin and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), as well as a combination of kinetin and NAA at two different concentrations, was studied using flow cytometry. Analyses of DNA content in nuclei of the root, hypocotyl and cotyledons of seedlings growing in vitro were performed during their early development, starting from when the root was 0.5-1.0 cm long until expansion of the first pair of leaves. The proportions of nuclei with different DNA contents were established and the mean C-value calculated. The presence of exogenous plant hormones changed endoreduplication intensity, although to different extents, depending on the organ and developmental stage. Ethylene and NAA stimulated the process, while EBR and kinetin suppressed it and GA did not clearly affect it.

  2. Triterpene saponin content in the roots of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Mroczek, Agnieszka; Kapusta, Ireneusz; Janda, Bogdan; Janiszowska, Wirginia

    2012-12-19

    Triterpene saponins in the roots of Beta vulgaris cultivars Red Sphere, Rocket, and Wodan were profiled and quantitated using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI/MS/MS). Results obtained indicated that the roots of all three cultivars contained 11 saponins consisting of oleanolic acid or hederagenin aglycone and varying numbers of sugars, with the dominant triglycoside derivative of oleanolic acid. The relative proportions of derivatives of these two aglycones were similar in the three subspecies: cv. Red Sphere contained 99.1 and 0.9%; cv. Rocket, 98.2 and 1.8%; and Wodan 98.8 and 1.2% of oleanolic acid and hederagenin glycosides, respectively. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the occurrence, structure, and content of triterpenoid saponins in red beet.

  3. In-situ wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation at a sugar beet processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.L.; Fuller-Pratt, P.R.; Mielke, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    Groundwater monitoring data collected at the Western Sugar Company sugar beet processing plant, in Billings, Montana identified groundwater mounding and groundwater nitrogen concentration increases associated with lime slurry discharge to an on-site storage pile. The nitrogen impacts (primarily ammonia) likely originated through decomposition of organic matter in the slurry. Initially, Western Sugar considered constructing an expensive anaerobic and nitrification-denitrification wastewater treatment system. However, further investigation of the lime pile revealed that it was already serving as an efficient filter and anaerobic reactor. Comparisons of slurry application with other land application systems suggested that groundwater nitrogen impacts could be minimized through groundwater capture, re-application, and improved slurry management. The resultant system required little capitol and maintenance cost. The immediate effect was to substantially decrease the groundwater mound. Subsequent monitoring has demonstrated a gradual decline in nitrogen concentrations under the lime pile and a considerable concentration decrease downgradient of the groundwater recovery system.

  4. [Fruit set variation associated with apozygotic reproduction in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris l.)].

    PubMed

    Iudanova, S S; Maletskiĭ, S I; Pozniak, S I; Maletskaia, E I

    2011-05-01

    Fruit set upon apozygotic reproduction was studied for four years in the msSOAN-5 pollen-sterile inbred sugar beet line. The progenies obtained from pollen-sterile plants by apozygotic reproduction had both fruits with normal seeds and parthenocarpic fruits without seeds, which was not an occasional event. Growth conditions proved to strongly affect the fruit set and seed quality. For instance, water deficiency during early plant development increased the proportion ofparthenocarpic seeds. Waiter deficiency combined with a lower temperature during flowering additionally caused a substantial decrease in the total number of fruits. Under the same growth conditions, related accessions did not differ in seed productivity, but varied in the proportion of normal (with seeds) and parthenocarpic (without seeds) fruits.

  5. The use of sugar beet pulp lignin for the production of vanillin.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Aazam; Mizani, Maryam; Honarvar, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this work is to produce vanillin from sugar beet pulp by lignin oxidation and evaluate the effect of process parameters (temperature, partial pressure of oxygen, reaction time, CuSO4 as a catalyst) on the yield of vanillin. Purification and separation of vanillin from pressurized extract was carried out by organic solvent and crystallization. HPLC, FT-IR, H NMR, GC/MS and DSC methods were performed to approve the vanillin crystal. Results showed that production of vanillin was significantly affected by four parameters, and an optimal conditions for production of vanillin was found 4.3bar for an oxygen partial pressure under a temperature of 156°C and duration of time 30min without CuSO4, corresponding to 1439.3mg/100g vanillin. Thermal property of syntesis vanillin was coincide to DSC pure vanillin curve but there were differences in ΔH°f and ΔHc.

  6. An Assessment of the Diversity of Culturable Bacteria from Main Root of Sugar Beet

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kazuyuki; Iino, Takao; Kuroda, Yosuke; Taguchi, Kazunori; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Ohwada, Takuji; Tsurumaru, Hiroto; Okubo, Takashi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Ikeda, Seishi

    2014-01-01

    The partial sequences of the 16S rRNA genes of 531 bacteria isolated from the main root of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) were determined and subsequently grouped into 155 operational taxonomic units by clustering analysis (≥99% identity). The most abundant phylum was Proteobacteria (72.5–77.2%), followed by Actinobacteria (9.8–16.6%) and Bacteroidetes (4.3– 15.4%). Alphaproteobacteria (46.7–64.8%) was the most dominant class within Proteobacteria. Four strains belonging to Verrucomicrobia were also isolated. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Verrucomicrobia bacterial strains were closely related to Haloferula or Verrucomicrobium. PMID:24789987

  7. [Autosegregation of enzyme loci in agamospermous progenies of triploid plants of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)].

    PubMed

    Levites, E V; Kirikovich, S S

    2011-07-01

    The ratios of the phenotypic classes of glucosephosphate isomerase (GP12) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH1 and MDH2) were studied in agamospermous progenies of triploid sugar beet plants. The ratio of the phenotypic classes of these enzymes corresponds to the calculations based on the assumption of polyteny of chromosomes carrying alleles of the enzyme loci accompanied by the loss of extra copies of the alleles in the first division of a cell entering embryogenesis. An increase in the gene dosage due to polyteny leads to the appearance in the progeny with a definite frequency of alleles that were absent in the original parental plant. The notions of meiotic autosegregation and mitotic autosegregation characteristic of meiotic and mitotic agamospermy are introduced, as well as the term locus polygenotype characterizing not only the allelic composition and the number of chromosomes, but also the number of chromatids carrying alleles of the marker locus in the cell before its entry into embryogenesis.

  8. Effects of ensilage on storage and enzymatic degradability of sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yu, Chaowei; Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zhang, Ruihong; Jenkins, Bryan; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2011-01-01

    Ensiling was investigated for the long-term storage of Sugar Beet Pulp (SBP). Eight strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and a non-inoculated control were screened based on their ability to rapidly reduce pH, produce a large amount of lactic acid and inhibit undesirable fermentations. Lactobacillus brevis B-1836 (LAB #120), Lactobacillus fermentum NRRL B-4524 (LAB #137) and a non-inoculated control were selected for further research to determine the effects of LAB inoculation level and packing density on SBP silage quality and sugar yield upon enzymatic hydrolysis. Both SBP preservation and prevention of cellulose and hemicellulose loss were better when SBP was treated with LAB #137 compared to LAB #120 and the non-inoculated control. Additionally, the ensiling process was found to significantly improve the enzymatic digestibility of SBP by as much as 35%. The results suggest that ensiling may be a promising technology for SBP stabilization and pretreatment for bioconversion to products.

  9. Laccase mediated conjugation of heat treated β-lactoglobulin and sugar beet pectin.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jiyoung; Wicker, Louise

    2012-08-01

    Laccase, an oxidative enzyme, was used to catalyze the hetero and homo covalent conjugation between ferulic acid in sugar beet pectin (SBP) and tyrosine in heated β-lactoglobulin (H_BLG). The conjugation of SBP and H_BLG was confirmed by peak position using size exclusion chromatography, multi angle laser light scattering, refractive index, and UV detection. H_BLG, pre-treated with laccase, eluted at an earlier volume with greater UV280 absorbance than non-laccase treated dispersions. Tyrosine decreased in H_BLG that contained laccase treated SBP samples. Heat enhanced exposure of tyrosine in BLG and improved conjugation with SBP by laccase. H_BLG·SBP conjugates with laccase had improved solubility than laccase untreated dispersions at pH values near the isoelectric point of BLG.

  10. Developing precipitation modes for preventing the calcium-oxalate contamination of sugar beet pectins.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoming; Meng, Hecheng; Zhu, Siming; Tang, Qiang; Pan, Runquan; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-09-01

    Effects of precipitation modes on the co-precipitation of insoluble oxalates particles during the purification of sugar beet pectins (SBP) from the extract were investigated. It was observed that soluble oxalate ions formed insoluble oxalate salts with calcium and precipitated with pectins during ethanol precipitation as pH of the medium increased and the solvent changed from water to ethanol-water mixture. Comparison among the employed precipitation methods revealed that both the dialysis-ethanol-precipitation and metal precipitation effectively prevented the calcium-oxalate contamination of SBP. Emulsifying properties of DEPP, EPP and MPP were also studied. It was observed that DEPP performed better than the remainder with respect to emulsifying ability. Based on these results, we concluded that the dialysis-ethanolic-precipitation can be a suitable method for improving the purity as well as emulsifying properties of the resulting pectins.

  11. Removal of nitrate from aqueous solutions by activated carbon prepared from sugar beet bagasse.

    PubMed

    Demiral, Hakan; Gündüzoğlu, Gül

    2010-03-01

    In this study, activated carbons were prepared from sugar beet bagasse by chemical activation and the prepared activated carbons were used to remove nitrate from aqueous solutions. In chemical activation, ZnCl(2) was used as chemical agent. The effects of impregnation ratio and activation temperature were investigated. The produced activated carbons were characterized by measuring their porosities and pore size distributions. The microstructure of the activated carbons was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The maximum specific surface area of the activated carbon was about 1826m(2)/g at 700 degrees C and at an impregnation ratio of 3:1. The resulting activated carbon was used for removal of nitrate from aqueous solution. The effects of pH, temperature and contact time were investigated. Isotherm studies were carried out and the data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. Three simplified kinetic models were tested to investigate the adsorption mechanism.

  12. Analysis of the Transcriptome of the Infective Stage of the Beet Cyst Nematode, H. schachtii

    PubMed Central

    Fosu-Nyarko, John; Nicol, Paul; Naz, Fareeha; Gill, Reetinder; Jones, Michael G. K.

    2016-01-01

    The beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, is a major root pest that significantly impacts the yield of sugar beet, brassicas and related species. There has been limited molecular characterisation of this important plant pathogen: to identify target genes for its control the transcriptome of the pre-parasitic J2 stage of H. schachtii was sequenced using Roche GS FLX. Ninety seven percent of reads (i.e., 387,668) with an average PHRED score > 22 were assembled with CAP3 and CLC Genomics Workbench into 37,345 and 47,263 contigs, respectively. The transcripts were annotated by comparing with gene and genomic sequences of other nematodes and annotated proteins on public databases. The annotated transcripts were much more similar to sequences of Heterodera glycines than to those of Globodera pallida and root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). Analysis of these transcripts showed that a subset of 2,918 transcripts was common to free-living and plant parasitic nematodes suggesting that this subset is involved in general nematode metabolism and development. A set of 148 contigs and 183 singletons encoding putative homologues of effectors previously characterised for plant parasitic nematodes were also identified: these are known to be important for parasitism of host plants during migration through tissues or feeding from cells or are thought to be involved in evasion or modulation of host defences. In addition, the presence of sequences from a nematode virus is suggested. The sequencing and annotation of this transcriptome significantly adds to the genetic data available for H. schachtii, and identifies genes primed to undertake required roles in the critical pre-parasitic and early post-parasitic J2 stages. These data provide new information for identifying potential gene targets for future protection of susceptible crops against H. schachtii. PMID:26824923

  13. Iron deficiency enhances the levels of ascorbate, glutathione, and related enzymes in sugar beet roots.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Tatiana B; Abadía, Javier

    2003-06-01

    The effects of Fe deficiency stress on the levels of ascorbate and glutathione, and on the activities of the enzymes ferric chelate reductase, glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2), ascorbate free-radical reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11), have been investigated in sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) roots. Plasma membrane vesicles and cytosolic fractions were isolated from the roots of the plants grown in nutrient solutions in the absence or presence of Fe for two weeks. Plants responded to Fe deficiency not only with a 20-fold increase in root ferric chelate reductase activity, but also with moderately increased levels of the general reductants ascorbate (2-fold) and glutathione (1.6-fold). The enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in roots were also affected by Fe deficiency. Glutathione reductase activity was enhanced 1.4-fold with Fe deficiency, associated to an increased ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione, from 3.1 to 5.2. The plasma membrane fraction from iron-deficient roots showed 1.7-fold higher ascorbate free-radical reductase activity, whereas in the cytosolic fraction the enzyme activity was not affected by Fe deficiency. The activity of the cytosolic hemoprotein ascorbate peroxidase decreased approximately by 50% with Fe deprivation. These results show that sugar beet responds to Fe deficiency with metabolic changes affecting components of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in root cells. This suggests that the ascorbate-glutathione cycle would play certain roles in the general Fe deficiency stress responses in strategy I plants.

  14. Identification of amino acids of the beet necrotic yellow vein virus p25 protein required for induction of the resistance response in leaves of Beta vulgaris plants.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Soutaro; Miyanishi, Masaki; Andika, Ida Bagus; Kondo, Hideki; Tamada, Tetsuo

    2008-05-01

    The RNA3-encoded p25 protein of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) is responsible for the production of rhizomania symptoms of sugar beet roots (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris). Here, it was found that the presence of the p25 protein is also associated with the resistance response in rub-inoculated leaves of sugar beet and wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima) plants. The resistance phenotype displayed a range of symptoms from no visible lesions to necrotic or greyish lesions at the inoculation site, and only very low levels of virus and viral RNA accumulated. The susceptible phenotype showed large, bright yellow lesions and developed high levels of virus accumulation. In roots after Polymyxa betae vector inoculation, however, no drastic differences in virus and viral RNA accumulation levels were found between plants with susceptible and resistant phenotypes, except at an early stage of infection. There was a genotype-specific interaction between BNYVV strains and two selected wild beet lines (MR1 and MR2) and sugar beet cultivars. Sequence analysis of natural BNYVV isolates and site-directed mutagenesis of the p25 protein revealed that 3 aa residues at positions 68, 70 and 179 are important in determining the resistance phenotype, and that host-genotype specificity is controlled by single amino acid changes at position 68. The mechanism of the occurrence of resistance-breaking BNYVV strains is discussed.

  15. Gibberellic acid (GA3) enhance seed water uptake, germination and early seedling growth in sugar beet under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Muhammad; Rha, Eui Shik

    2007-02-15

    The study was carried out to assess whether water uptake could be improved in sugar beet seeds and salt tolerance at the germination and early seedling stage by soaking the seeds for 10 h in distilled water (control), 100, 150 and 200 mg L(-1) GA3. Electrical Conductivity (EC) values of the NaCl solution were 0.0 (control), 4.7, 9.4 and 14.1 dS n(-1) NaCl. Priming increased the final germination percentage and the germination rate (1/t 50, where t 50 is the time to 50% of germination) under saline condition. Water uptake of primed seeds also increased significantly with increasing concentration of GA3 as compared to control. Priming also alleviated the adverse effect of salt stress on sugar beet in terms of roots and shoots lengths and fresh weights of plants, roots and shoots.

  16. Process model and economic analysis of ethanol production from sugar beet raw juice as part of the cleaner production concept.

    PubMed

    Vučurović, Damjan G; Dodić, Siniša N; Popov, Stevan D; Dodić, Jelena M; Grahovac, Jovana A

    2012-01-01

    The batch fermentation process of sugar beet processing intermediates by free yeast cells is the most widely used method in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina for producing ethanol as fuel. In this study a process and cost model was developed for producing ethanol from raw juice. The model can be used to calculate capital investment costs, unit production costs and operating costs for a plant producing 44 million l of 99.6% pure ethanol annually. In the sensitivity analysis the influence of sugar beet and yeast price, as well as the influence of recycled biomass on process economics, ethanol production costs and project feasibility was examined. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that the raw material costs have a significant influence on the expenses for producing ethanol. Also, the optimal percentage of recycled biomass turned out to be in the range from 50% to 70%.

  17. PAFC fed by biogas produced by the anaerobic fermentation of the waste waters of a beet-sugar refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Ascoli, A.; Elias, G.; Bigoni, L.; Giachero, R.

    1996-10-01

    Beet-washing waters of a beet-sugar refinery carry a high COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand), and their conditioning to meet legal constraints before disposal considerably contributes to the operation costs of the refinery. Their fermentation in an anaerobic digestor could instead produce readily disposable non-polluting waters, fertilizers and biogas, useful to feed a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) heat and power generator system. A real refinery case is considered in this work, where the electrical characteristics V = V(I) of a laboratory PAFC stack, fueled with a dry simulated reforming gas (having the same H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} content as the biogas obtainable by the above said anaerobic digestion), are determined. The encouraging results show that a possible market niche for fuel cells, in the food-industry waste partial recovery and residual disposal, deserves attention.

  18. Hydrogen production from sugar beet juice using an integrated biohydrogen process of dark fermentation and microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Hafez, Hisham; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-12-01

    An integrated dark fermentation and microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) process was evaluated for hydrogen production from sugar beet juice. Different substrate to inoculum (S/X) ratios were tested for dark fermentation, and the maximum hydrogen yield was 13% of initial COD at the S/X ratio of 2 and 4 for dark fermentation. Hydrogen yield was 12% of initial COD in the MEC using fermentation liquid end products as substrate, and butyrate only accumulated in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production from the integrated biohydrogen process was 25% of initial COD (equivalent to 6 mol H2/mol hexoseadded), and the energy recovery from sugar beet juice was 57% using the combined biohydrogen.

  19. Isolation of pectin-enriched products from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. var. conditiva) wastes: composition and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Fissore, E N; Ponce, N M A; Matkovic, L; Stortz, C A; Rojas, A M; Gerschenson, L N

    2011-12-01

    The present work was dedicated to the development of an extraction process for red beet (Beta vulgaris L. var. conditiva) by-products that preserves the high molecular weight of the macromolecules with the primary aim of waste upgrading. Our study concerns the extraction of pectin-enriched products with potential thickening properties for their usage in food formulation, as well as with some healthy physiological effect, by using citrate buffer (pH = 5.2) either alone or with enzymes (hemicellulase or cellulase) active on cell wall polysaccharide networks. Considering that red beet tissue contains ferulic acid, which cross-links pectin macromolecules through arabinose residues to anchor them into the cell wall, an alkaline pretreatment was also evaluated in order to perform polysaccharide hydrolysis in the cell wall network to accomplish higher renderings. Chemical composition and yield, as well as the in vitro glucose retention exerted by the isolated fiber products were finally analyzed.

  20. Systemic Infection of Maize, Sorghum, Rice, and Beet Seedlings with Fumonisin-Producing and Nonproducing Fusarium verticillioides Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dastjerdi, Raana; Karlovsky, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Two fumonisin-nonproducing strains of Fusarium verticillioides and their fumonisin producing progenitors were tested for aggressiveness toward maize, sorghum, rice, and beetroot seedlings grown under greenhouse conditions. None of the plants showed obvious disease symptoms after root dip inoculation. Fungal biomass was determined by species-specific real-time PCR. No significant (P = 0.05) differences in systemic colonization were detected between the wild type strains and mutants not producing fumonisins. F. verticillioides was not detected in any of the non-inoculated control plants. The fungus grew from roots to the first two internodes/leaves of maize, rice and beet regardless of fumonisin production. The systemic growth of F. verticillioides in sorghum was limited. The results showed that fumonisin production was not required for the infection of roots of maize, rice and beet by F. verticillioides. PMID:26672472