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Sample records for folding model analysis

  1. Kinetic Analysis of Protein Folding Lattice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Zhou, Xin; Liaw, Chih Young; Koh, Chan Ghee

    Based on two-dimensional square lattice models of proteins, the relation between folding time and temperature is studied by Monte Carlo simulation. The results can be represented by a kinetic model with three states — random coil, molten globule, and native state. The folding process is composed of nonspecific collapse and final searching for the native state. At high temperature, it is easy to escape from local traps in the folding process. With decreasing temperature, because of the trapping in local traps, the final searching speed decreases. Then the folding shows chevron rollover. Through the analysis of the fitted parameters of the kinetic model, it is found that the main difference between the energy landscapes of the HP model and the Go model is that the number of local minima of the Go model is less than that of the HP model.

  2. The influence of modeling assumptions on the modal analysis of vocal fold structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Douglas D.; Mongeau, Luc

    2005-09-01

    Finite-element modal analysis studies of several vocal fold structural models were performed in vacuo under a variety of assumptions. The sensitivity of the vocal folds to changes in geometry and tissue properties was investigated. The Ritz method and the finite-element code ADINA were used to perform linear modal analysis of two-dimensional and three-dimensional models of the human vocal folds. The results allow for comparison and evaluation of various modeling approaches. In particular, the influence of geometrical constraints was shown to introduce errors of varying magnitude depending on the degree of anisotropy of the vocal fold tissue. [Research supported by the National Institute for Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

  3. Estimation of protein folding free energy barriers from calorimetric data by multi-model Bayesian analysis.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Athi N; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Muñoz, Victor; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2011-10-14

    The realization that folding free energy barriers can be small enough to result in significant population of the species at the barrier top has sprouted in several methods to estimate folding barriers from equilibrium experiments. Some of these approaches are based on fitting the experimental thermogram measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to a one-dimensional representation of the folding free-energy surface (FES). Different physical models have been used to represent the FES: (1) a Landau quartic polynomial as a function of the total enthalpy, which acts as an order parameter; (2) the projection onto a structural order parameter (i.e. number of native residues or native contacts) of the free energy of all the conformations generated by Ising-like statistical mechanical models; and (3) mean-field models that define conformational entropy and stabilization energy as functions of a continuous local order parameter. The fundamental question that emerges is how can we obtain robust, model-independent estimates of the thermodynamic folding barrier from the analysis of DSC experiments. Here we address this issue by comparing the performance of various FES models in interpreting the thermogram of a protein with a marginal folding barrier. We chose the small α-helical protein PDD, which folds-unfolds in microseconds crossing a free energy barrier previously estimated as ~1 RT. The fits of the PDD thermogram to the various models and assumptions produce FES with a consistently small free energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded ensembles. However, the fits vary in quality as well as in the estimated barrier. Applying Bayesian probabilistic analysis we rank the fit performance using a statistically rigorous criterion that leads to a global estimate of the folding barrier and its precision, which for PDD is 1.3 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1). This result confirms that PDD folds over a minor barrier consistent with the downhill folding regime. We have further

  4. Comprehensive, Population-Based Sensitivity Analysis of a Two-Mass Vocal Fold Model

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Daniel; Zañartu, Matías; Cook, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Previous vocal fold modeling studies have generally focused on generating detailed data regarding a narrow subset of possible model configurations. These studies can be interpreted to be the investigation of a single subject under one or more vocal conditions. In this study, a broad population-based sensitivity analysis is employed to examine the behavior of a virtual population of subjects and to identify trends between virtual individuals as opposed to investigating a single subject or model instance. Four different sensitivity analysis techniques were used in accomplishing this task. Influential relationships between model input parameters and model outputs were identified, and an exploration of the model’s parameter space was conducted. Results indicate that the behavior of the selected two-mass model is largely dominated by complex interactions, and that few input-output pairs have a consistent effect on the model. Results from the analysis can be used to increase the efficiency of optimization routines of reduced-order models used to investigate voice abnormalities. Results also demonstrate the types of challenges and difficulties to be expected when applying sensitivity analyses to more complex vocal fold models. Such challenges are discussed and recommendations are made for future studies. PMID:26845452

  5. Moho topography, ranges and folds of Tibet by analysis of global gravity models and GOCE data

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Hong; Shum, C.K.; Braitenberg, Carla; Lee, Sang Mook; Na, Sung -Ho; Choi, Kwang Sun; Hsu, Houtse; Park, Young-Sue; Lim, Mutaek

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the crustal structure is essential in geophysics, as it gives insight into the geohistory, tectonic environment, geohazard mitigation, etc. Here we present the latest advance on three-dimensional modeling representing the Tibetan Mohorovičić discontinuity (topography and ranges) and its deformation (fold), revealed by analyzing gravity data from GOCE mission. Our study shows noticeable advances in estimated Tibetan Moho model which is superior to the results using the earlier gravity models prior to GOCE. The higher quality gravity field of GOCE is reflected in the Moho solution: we find that the Moho is deeper than 65 km, which is twice the normal continental crust beneath most of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, while the deepest Moho, up to 82 km, is located in western Tibet. The amplitude of the Moho fold is estimated to be ranging from −9 km to 9 km with a standard deviation of ~2 km. The improved GOCE gravity derived Moho signals reveal a clear directionality of the Moho ranges and Moho fold structure, orthogonal to deformation rates observed by GPS. This geophysical feature, clearly more evident than the ones estimated using earlier gravity models, reveals that it is the result of the large compressional tectonic process. PMID:26114224

  6. Moho topography, ranges and folds of Tibet by analysis of global gravity models and GOCE data.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Hong; Shum, C K; Braitenberg, Carla; Lee, Sang Mook; Na, Sung-Ho; Choi, Kwang Sun; Hsu, Houtse; Park, Young-Sue; Lim, Mutaek

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the crustal structure is essential in geophysics, as it gives insight into the geohistory, tectonic environment, geohazard mitigation, etc. Here we present the latest advance on three-dimensional modeling representing the Tibetan Mohorovičić discontinuity (topography and ranges) and its deformation (fold), revealed by analyzing gravity data from GOCE mission. Our study shows noticeable advances in estimated Tibetan Moho model which is superior to the results using the earlier gravity models prior to GOCE. The higher quality gravity field of GOCE is reflected in the Moho solution: we find that the Moho is deeper than 65 km, which is twice the normal continental crust beneath most of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, while the deepest Moho, up to 82 km, is located in western Tibet. The amplitude of the Moho fold is estimated to be ranging from -9 km to 9 km with a standard deviation of ~2 km. The improved GOCE gravity derived Moho signals reveal a clear directionality of the Moho ranges and Moho fold structure, orthogonal to deformation rates observed by GPS. This geophysical feature, clearly more evident than the ones estimated using earlier gravity models, reveals that it is the result of the large compressional tectonic process. PMID:26114224

  7. Modelling of lateral fold growth and fold linkage: Applications to fold-and-thrust belt tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    We use a finite element model to investigate the three-dimensional fold growth and interference of two initially isolated fold segments. The most critical parameter, which controls the fold linkage mode, is the phase difference between the laterally growing fold hinge lines: 1) "Linear-linkage" yields a sub-cylindrical fold with a saddle at the location where the two initial folds linked. 2) "Oblique-linkage" produces a curved fold resembling a Type II refold structure. 3) "Oblique-no-linkage" results in two curved folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. 4) "Linear-no-linkage" yields a fold train of two separate sub-cylindrical folds with fold axes plunging in opposite directions. The transition from linkage to no-linkage occurs when the fold separation between the initially isolated folds is slightly larger than one half of the low-amplitude fold wavelength. The model results compare well with previously published plasticine analogue models and can be directly applied to the investigation of fold growth history in fold-and-thust belts. An excellent natural example of lateral fold linkage is described from the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The fold growth in this region is not controlled by major thrust faults but the shortening of the Paleozoic to Cenozoic passive margin sediments of the Arabian plate occurred mainly by detachment folding. The sub-cylindrical anticlines with hinge-parallel lengths of more than 50 km have not developed from single sub-cylindrical embryonic folds but they have merged from different fold segments that joined laterally during fold amplification and lateral fold growth. Linkage points are marked by geomorphological saddle points which are structurally the lowermost points of antiforms and points of principal curvatures with opposite sign. Linkage points can significantly influence the migration of mineral-rich fluids and hydrocarbons and are therefore of great economic importance.

  8. Direct application of a simple model to the quantitative analysis of experiments on an ultrafast folding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Eric

    2007-03-01

    A simple Ising-like statistical-mechanical model for protein folding (Henry and Eaton, Chem. Phys. 307, 163-185, 2004) is used to analyze a broad set of experimental data on the ultrafast folding villin subdomain. In this model each residue in the protein sequence can adopt one of two possible microscopic states corresponding to native and non-native conformations; model protein states are identified with distinct sequences of native/non-native residues. The folding properties of the protein are determined entirely by the map of inter-residue contacts in the native structure. To compute partition functions by complete enumeration of all protein states, only those states are included that contain at most two contiguous sequences of native residues. Native contacts are only permitted between residues lying in such contiguous sequences. The stability of any state of the chain is determined by the offsetting effects of the stabilizing native contacts and the destabilizing entropy losses associated with fixing residues in the native conformation and with closing loops of nonnative residues created by contacts between distinct native sequences. In a least-squares fitting analysis, the temperature-dependent populations predicted by the model for all the protein states, combined with a simple description of the spectroscopic properties of individual states, are used to model the results of spectroscopic and thermodynamic experiments. The model reproduces the temperature dependence of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, circular dichroism, and relaxation rates and amplitudes, as well as the effects of site-directed mutants on the folding rates and equilibrium constants.

  9. A parametric vocal fold model based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a parametric three-dimensional body-cover vocal fold model based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the human larynx. Major geometric features that are observed in the MRI images but missing in current vocal fold models are discussed, and their influence on vocal fold vibration is evaluated using eigenmode analysis. Proper boundary conditions for the model are also discussed. Based on control parameters corresponding to anatomic landmarks that can be easily measured, this model can be adapted toward a subject-specific vocal fold model for voice production research and clinical applications. PMID:27586774

  10. Experimental analysis of the characteristics of artificial vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Misun, Vojtech; Svancara, Pavel; Vasek, Martin

    2011-05-01

    Specialized literature presents a number of models describing the function of the vocal folds. In most of those models, an emphasis is placed on the air flowing through the glottis and, further, on the effect of the parameters of the air alone (its mass, speed, and so forth). The article focuses on the constructional definition of artificial vocal folds and their experimental analysis. The analysis is conducted for voiced source voice phonation and for the changing mean value of the subglottal pressure. The article further deals with the analysis of the pressure of the airflow through the vocal folds, which is cut (separated) into individual pulses by the vibrating vocal folds. The analysis results show that air pulse characteristics are relevant to voice generation, as they are produced by the flowing air and vibrating vocal folds. A number of artificial vocal folds have been constructed to date, and the aforementioned view of their phonation is confirmed by their analysis. The experiments have confirmed that man is able to consciously affect only two parameters of the source voice, that is, its fundamental frequency and voice intensity. The main forces acting on the vocal folds during phonation are as follows: subglottal air pressure and elastic and inertia forces of the vocal folds' structure. The correctness of the function of the artificial vocal folds is documented by the experimental verification of the spectra of several types of artificial vocal folds. PMID:20359864

  11. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  12. Structural analysis of kinetic folding intermediates for a TIM barrel protein, indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase, by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry and Gō model simulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenyu; Rao, Maithreyi K; Forsyth, William R; Finke, John M; Matthews, C Robert

    2007-11-23

    The structures of partially folded states appearing during the folding of a (betaalpha)(8) TIM barrel protein, the indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (sIGPS), was assessed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) and Gō model simulations. HX-MS analysis of the peptic peptides derived from the pulse-labeled product of the sub-millisecond folding reaction from the urea-denatured state revealed strong protection in the (betaalpha)(4) region, modest protection in the neighboring (betaalpha)(1-3) and (betaalpha)(5)beta(6) segments and no significant protection in the remaining N and C-terminal segments. These results demonstrate that this species is not a collapsed form of the unfolded state under native-favoring conditions nor is it the native state formed via fast-track folding. However, the striking contrast of these results with the strong protection observed in the (betaalpha)(2-5)beta(6) region after 5 s of folding demonstrates that these species represent kinetically distinct folding intermediates that are not identical as previously thought. A re-examination of the kinetic folding mechanism by chevron analysis of fluorescence data confirmed distinct roles for these two species: the burst-phase intermediate is predicted to be a misfolded, off-pathway intermediate, while the subsequent 5 s intermediate corresponds to an on-pathway equilibrium intermediate. Comparison with the predictions using a C(alpha) Gō model simulation of the kinetic folding reaction for sIGPS shows good agreement with the core of the structure offering protection against exchange in the on-pathway intermediate(s). Because the native-centric Gō model simulations do not explicitly include sequence-specific information, the simulation results support the hypothesis that the topology of TIM barrel proteins is a primary determinant of the folding free energy surface for the productive folding reaction. The early misfolding reaction must involve aspects of

  13. Regional structural analysis and velocity model (Vp) of the Chittagong-Myanmar Fold and Thrust Belt, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, P.; Hubbard, J.; Peterson, D. E.; Akhter, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Bangladesh sits on the seismically active Chittagong-Myanmar Fold and Thrust Belt (CMFB), a partially exposed accretionary prism associated with the India-Eurasia collision. Ground shaking due to local and regional earthquakes presents a potential hazard to Bangladesh, one of the most populated areas in the world. In order to constrain this hazard, we first investigate potential seismic sources (active faults), and second we analyze the material through which seismic energy propagates. To address potential earthquake sources, we focus on the Comilla Anticline, which is the frontal-most exposed structure of the CMFB as well as the most proximal to the capital city of Dhaka. We present several industry-acquired and depth-converted seismic reflection profiles, which exhibit an asymmetric detachment fold rising from a relatively deep décollement (5-6 km). Because there is no strong evidence for an associated emergent thrust, this actively growing fold may have low seismic potential. We place this work into a regional context by integrating previous research of CMFB structures to create a regional structural model, which reveals laterally varying wedge geometry. To address ground shaking, the second component of this work, we assess stacking velocities from our seismic reflection data in conjunction with sonic log velocities from several locations in Bangladesh. These data show varying velocity versus depth trends by region. Following similar, data-rich studies performed in the Los Angeles and adjacent basins, we use data and theory-driven fitting techniques to analyze depth-velocity trends for these different regions, and interpolate to create a laterally varying regional seismic velocity model. Velocities generally slow from east to west, consistent with the younging trend as we move from older, exhumed CMFB formations to recent and undeformed deposits.

  14. Predictive Computational Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Pierro, Miichele; Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter J.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    In vivo, the human genome folds into well-determined and conserved three-dimensional structures. The mechanism driving the folding process remains unknown. We report a theoretical model (MiChroM) for chromatin derived by using the maximum entropy principle. The proposed model allows Molecular Dynamics simulations of the genome using as input the classification of loci into chromatin types and the presence of binding sites of loop forming protein CTCF. The model was trained to reproduce the Hi-C map of chromosome 10 of human lymphoblastoid cells. With no additional tuning the model was able to predict accurately the Hi-C maps of chromosomes 1-22 for the same cell line. Simulations show unknotted chromosomes, phase separation of chromatin types and a preference of chromatin of type A to sit at the periphery of the chromosomes.

  15. Protein folding at atomic resolution: analysis of autonomously folding supersecondary structure motifs by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Sadqi, Mourad; de Alba, Eva; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The study of protein folding has been conventionally hampered by the assumption that all single-domain proteins fold by an all-or-none process (two-state folding) that makes it impossible to resolve folding mechanisms experimentally. Here we describe an experimental method for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding at atomic resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The method is specifically developed for the study of small proteins that fold autonomously into basic supersecondary structure motifs, and that do so in the sub-millisecond timescale (folding archetypes). From the NMR experiments we obtain hundreds of atomic unfolding curves that are subsequently analyzed leading to the determination of the characteristic network of folding interactions. The application of this approach to a comprehensive catalog of elementary folding archetypes holds the promise of becoming the first experimental approach capable of unraveling the basic rules connecting protein structure and folding mechanism. PMID:22987355

  16. Abstract folding space analysis based on helices

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiabin; Backofen, Rolf; Voß, Björn

    2012-01-01

    RNA has many pivotal functions especially in the regulation of gene expression by ncRNAs. Identification of their structure is an important requirement for understanding their function. Structure prediction alone is often insufficient for this task, due to algorithmic problems, parameter inaccuracies, and biological peculiarities. Among the latter, there are base modifications, cotranscriptional folding leading to folding traps, and conformational switching as in the case of riboswitches. All these require more in-depth analysis of the folding space. The major drawback, which all methods have to cope with, is the exponential growth of the folding space. Therefore, methods are often limited in the sequence length they can analyze, or they make use of heuristics, sampling, or abstraction. Our approach adopts the abstraction strategy and remedies some problems of existing methods. We introduce a position-specific abstraction based on helices that we term helix index shapes, or hishapes for short. Utilizing a dynamic programming framework, we have implemented this abstraction in the program RNAHeliCes. Furthermore, we developed two hishape-based methods, one for energy barrier estimation, called HiPath, and one for abstract structure comparison, termed HiTed. We demonstrate the superior performance of HiPath compared to other existing methods and the competitive accuracy of HiTed. RNAHeliCes, together with HiPath and HiTed, are available for download at http://www.cyanolab.de/software/RNAHeliCes.htm. PMID:23104999

  17. Modern Analysis of Protein Folding by Differential Scanning Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Naganathan, Athi N; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Muñoz, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a very powerful tool for investigating protein folding and stability because its experimental output reflects the energetics of all conformations that become minimally populated during thermal unfolding. Accordingly, analysis of DSC experiments with simple thermodynamic models has been key for developing our understanding of protein stability during the past five decades. The discovery of ultrafast folding proteins, which have naturally broad conformational ensembles and minimally cooperative unfolding, opens the possibility of probing the complete folding free energy landscape, including those conformations at the top of the barrier to folding, via DSC. Exploiting this opportunity requires high-quality experiments and the implementation of novel analytical methods based on statistical mechanics. Here, we cover the recent exciting developments in this front, describing the new analytical procedures in detail as well as providing experimental guidelines for performing such analysis.

  18. Hinge-migrated fold-scarp model based on an analysis of bed geometry: A study from the Mingyaole anticline, southern foreland of Chinese Tian Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Chen, Jie; Thompson, Jessica A.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Yang, Huili

    2015-09-01

    Fold scarps, a type of geomorphic scarp formed by folding mechanisms of hinge migration or limb rotation, serve to delineate both fault-bend characteristics and folding histories, which can, in turn, illuminate tectonic processes and seismic hazards associated with thrust systems. Because the subsurface geometry of folds is commonly difficult to determine, existing fold-scarp models, which rely on both the fold type and its causative fault geometries, remain uncertain with respect to the kinematic evolution of a given fold. In this paper, we develop a model to illustrate that, irrespective of specific fold type and subsurface geometries, fold-scarp growth in the mechanism of hinge migration can be successfully reconstructed based on analyses of bed geometry. This model reveals that the underlying bed dips and the ratio of hinge migration distance/hinge width control the fold-scarp shape and slope. During initial growth (ratio < 1), the scarp slope increases gradually with migration of the hinge. When the hinge totally exits from its original position (ratio > 1), the slope reaches a maximum, which solely depends on underlying bed dips. The scarp height, however, is independent of the hinge width and can be used to quantify folding magnitude. Application of our model to fold scarps in the Mingyaole anticline in the southern foreland of Chinese Tian Shan indicates that the modeled fold-scarp geometry can roughly match with field observations. The Mingyaole shortening rate is estimated to be ≥5.0 mm/a since ~15 ka, such that this single fold has accommodated about half of the regional convergence during the Holocene.

  19. A Canonical Biomechanical Vocal Fold Model

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The present article aimed at constructing a canonical geometry of the human vocal fold (VF) from subject-specific image slice data. A computer-aided design approach automated the model construction. A subject-specific geometry available in literature, three abstractions (which successively diminished in geometric detail) derived from it, and a widely used quasi two-dimensional VF model geometry were used to create computational models. The first three natural frequencies of the models were used to characterize their mechanical response. These frequencies were determined for a representative range of tissue biomechanical properties, accounting for underlying VF histology. Compared with the subject-specific geometry model (baseline), a higher degree of abstraction was found to always correspond to a larger deviation in model frequency (up to 50% in the relevant range of tissue biomechanical properties). The model we deemed canonical was optimally abstracted, in that it significantly simplified the VF geometry compared with the baseline geometry but can be recalibrated in a consistent manner to match the baseline response. Models providing only a marginally higher degree of abstraction were found to have significant deviation in predicted frequency response. The quasi two-dimensional model presented an extreme situation: it could not be recalibrated for its frequency response to match the subject-specific model. This deficiency was attributed to complex support conditions at anterior-posterior extremities of the VFs, accentuated by further issues introduced through the tissue biomechanical properties. In creating canonical models by leveraging advances in clinical imaging techniques, the automated design procedure makes VF modeling based on subject-specific geometry more realizable. PMID:22209063

  20. Fold assessment for comparative protein structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2007-11-01

    Accurate and automated assessment of both geometrical errors and incompleteness of comparative protein structure models is necessary for an adequate use of the models. Here, we describe a composite score for discriminating between models with the correct and incorrect fold. To find an accurate composite score, we designed and applied a genetic algorithm method that searched for a most informative subset of 21 input model features as well as their optimized nonlinear transformation into the composite score. The 21 input features included various statistical potential scores, stereochemistry quality descriptors, sequence alignment scores, geometrical descriptors, and measures of protein packing. The optimized composite score was found to depend on (1) a statistical potential z-score for residue accessibilities and distances, (2) model compactness, and (3) percentage sequence identity of the alignment used to build the model. The accuracy of the composite score was compared with the accuracy of assessment by single and combined features as well as by other commonly used assessment methods. The testing set was representative of models produced by automated comparative modeling on a genomic scale. The composite score performed better than any other tested score in terms of the maximum correct classification rate (i.e., 3.3% false positives and 2.5% false negatives) as well as the sensitivity and specificity across the whole range of thresholds. The composite score was implemented in our program MODELLER-8 and was used to assess models in the MODBASE database that contains comparative models for domains in approximately 1.3 million protein sequences.

  1. Kinematic Analysis of Fold-Thrust-Belt Using Integrated Analogue Sandbox Modeling and 3D Palinspatic Reconstructions in Babar-Selaru Area, Banda Sea Region, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapiie, Benyamin; Hadiana, Meli; Kurniawan, Ade; Daniel, Dicky; Danio, Harya; Fujimoto, Masamichi; Ohara, Michio; Alam Perdana, Lisnanda; Saputra, Afif

    2016-04-01

    Kinematic analysis of Babar-Selaru fold-thrust-belt is challenging and often difficult particularly in conducting seismic interpretation due to complex structural geometries. Resolving such as issue, in this study we proposed to use integrated seismic interpretation, analogue sandbox modeling and 3D palinspatic reconstructions. This paper is presented results of detail kinematic analysis for understanding tectonic evolution as well as mechanism of fold-thrust-belt in relation to their hydrocarbon prospect. Babar-Selaru Area is located within the collisional boundary between Australian continental margin and Banda Arc region of Indonesia. The area is characterized by complex deformation zone of fold-thrust-belt, involving Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary sequences of Australian continental margin. The age of deformation is ranging from 8-5 Ma. Seismic interpretations show two styles of faults developed in the area, which are thrust and normal faults system. The last deformation observed in the Babar Selaru area is controlled by south verging imbricated thin-skinned thrust fault system, with the staircase style of fault detachment. Although, both structural styles occurred in separated locations, they are formed not only in the same time but also related in time and space. Total extension is ranging from 1-3 % where average shortening is in the order of 35-38%. Sandbox modeling is an effective way to study and understand the style, pattern and geometry of the deformed sedimentary sequences in the study area. Based on comparison of five settings experiments (mainly different geological boundary condition) with more than 50 different modeling; deformation is particularly controlled by types and thickness of lithology package and detachment geometry. These two parameters were quite sensitive in generating different deformation style and pattern in Babar-Selaru fold-thrust-belt. Therefore, choosing the right combination of stratigraphy model and material setting are

  2. Domains in folding of model proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abkevich, V. I.; Gutin, A. M.; Shakhnovich, E. I.

    1995-01-01

    By means of Monte Carlo simulation, we investigated the equilibrium between folded and unfolded states of lattice model proteins. The amino acid sequences were designed to have pronounced energy minimum target conformations of different length and shape. For short fully compact (36-mer) proteins, the all-or-none transition from the unfolded state to the native state was observed. This was not always the case for longer proteins. Among 12 designed sequences with the native structure of a fully compact 48-mer, a simple all-or-none transition was observed in only three cases. For the other nine sequences, three states of behavior-the native, denatured, and intermediate states-were found. The contiguous part of the native structure (domain) was conserved in the intermediate state, whereas the remaining part was completely unfolded and structureless. These parts melted separately from each other. PMID:7549881

  3. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  4. Tectonic analysis of folds in the Colorado plateau of Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Structural mapping and analysis of folds in Phanerozoic rocks in northern Arizona, using LANDSAT-1 imagery, yielded information for a tectonic model useful in identifying regional fracture zones within the Colorado Plateau tectonic province. Since the monoclines within the province developed as a response to differential movements of basement blocks along high-angle faults, the monoclinal fold pattern records the position and trend of many elements of the regional fracture system. The Plateau is divided into a mosaic of complex, polyhedral crustal blocks whose steeply dipping faces correspond to major fracture zones. Zones of convergence and changes in the trend of the monoclinal traces reveal the corners of the blocks. Igneous (and salt) diapirs have been emplaced into many of the designated zones of crustal weakness. As loci of major fracturing, folding, and probably facies changes, the fractures exert control on the entrapment of oil and gas.

  5. Nonlinear Models for Protein Folding and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzeiro, L.

    Earlier a specific kinetic process for reproducible protein folding was proposed according to which the nascent chain is helical and the first step in in vivo protein folding is the bending of the initial helix at specific amino acid sites. Here the theoretical feasibility of this kinetic process is tested. To that end, two proteins, one belonging to the mainly α class and the other belonging to the α/β class, are selected and targeted molecular dynamics is applied to generate folding pathways for those two proteins, starting from two well defined initial conformations: a fully extended and a α-helical conformation. Not only are the native states closer to an initial helical structure for both proteins but also the pathways from the α-helical initial conformation to the native state have lower potential energy than the pathways that start from the fully extended conformation. For the α/β protein, 30% (40%) of the pathways from an initial α-helix (fully extended) structure lead to unentangled native folds, a success rate that can be increased to 85% by the introduction of a putative intermediate structure. These results lend support to the kinetic process proposed and open up a new direction in which to look for a solution to the protein folding problem. The chapter ends with a section that emphasizes the formal similarities between the dynamics quantum vibrational excited states in proteins and electrons in nonlinear lattices.

  6. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, Robert M.; Wright, David D.

    1995-01-01

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  7. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOEpatents

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  8. Vocal fold and ventricular fold vibration in period-doubling phonation: physiological description and aerodynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Lucie; Henrich, Nathalie; Pelorson, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Occurrences of period-doubling are found in human phonation, in particular for pathological and some singing phonations such as Sardinian A Tenore Bassu vocal performance. The combined vibration of the vocal folds and the ventricular folds has been observed during the production of such low pitch bass-type sound. The present study aims to characterize the physiological correlates of this acoustical production and to provide a better understanding of the physical interaction between ventricular fold vibration and vocal fold self-sustained oscillation. The vibratory properties of the vocal folds and the ventricular folds during phonation produced by a professional singer are analyzed by means of acoustical and electroglottographic signals and by synchronized glottal images obtained by high-speed cinematography. The periodic variation in glottal cycle duration and the effect of ventricular fold closing on glottal closing time are demonstrated. Using the detected glottal and ventricular areas, the aerodynamic behavior of the laryngeal system is simulated using a simplified physical modeling previously validated in vitro using a larynx replica. An estimate of the ventricular aperture extracted from the in vivo data allows a theoretical prediction of the glottal aperture. The in vivo measurements of the glottal aperture are then compared to the simulated estimations. PMID:21117769

  9. Glottal aerodynamics in compliant, life-sized vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Michael; Dowell, Grant; Krane, Michael

    2013-11-01

    This talk presents high-speed PIV measurements in compliant, life-sized models of the vocal folds. A clearer understanding of the fluid-structure interaction of voiced speech, how it produces sound, and how it varies with pathology is required to improve clinical diagnosis and treatment of vocal disorders. Physical models of the vocal folds can answer questions regarding the fundamental physics of speech, as well as the ability of clinical measures to detect the presence and extent of disorder. Flow fields were recorded in the supraglottal region of the models to estimate terms in the equations of fluid motion, and their relative importance. Experiments were conducted over a range of driving pressures with flow rates, given by a ball flowmeter, and subglottal pressures, given by a micro-manometer, reported for each case. Imaging of vocal fold motion, vector fields showing glottal jet behavior, and terms estimated by control volume analysis will be presented. The use of these results for a comparison with clinical measures, and for the estimation of aeroacoustic source strengths will be discussed. Acknowledge support from NIH R01 DC005642.

  10. A hierarchical protein folding scheme based on the building block folding model.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Nurit; Wainreb, Gilad; Inbar, Yuval; Tsai, Hui-Hsu; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Wolfson, Haim J; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    The building block protein folding model states that the native protein structure is the product of a combinatorial assembly of relatively structurally independent contiguous parts of the protein that possess a hydrophobic core, i.e., building blocks (BBs). According to this model, our group proposed a three-stage scheme for a feasible time-wise semi ab-intio protein structure prediction. Given a protein sequence, at the first stage of the prediction scheme, we propose cutting the sequence into structurally assigned BBs. Next, we perform a combinatorial assembly and attempt to predict the relative three-dimensional arrangement of the BBs. In the third stage, we refine and rank the assemblies. The scheme has proven to be very promising in reducing the complexity of the protein folding problem and gaining insight into the protein folding process. In this chapter, we describe the different stages of the scheme and discuss a possible application of the model to protein design. PMID:16957324

  11. Fault-related fold styles and progressions in fold-thrust belts: Insights from sandbox modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dan-Ping; Xu, Yan-Bo; Dong, Zhou-Bin; Qiu, Liang; Zhang, Sen; Wells, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Fault-related folds of variable structural styles and assemblages commonly coexist in orogenic belts with competent-incompetent interlayered sequences. Despite their commonality, the kinematic evolution of these structural styles and assemblages are often loosely constrained because multiple solutions exist in their structural progression during tectonic restoration. We use a sandbox modeling instrument with a particle image velocimetry monitor to test four designed sandbox models with multilayer competent-incompetent materials. Test results reveal that decollement folds initiate along selected incompetent layers with decreasing velocity difference and constant vorticity difference between the hanging wall and footwall of the initial fault tips. The decollement folds are progressively converted to fault-propagation folds and fault-bend folds through development of fault ramps breaking across competent layers and are followed by propagation into fault flats within an upper incompetent layer. Thick-skinned thrust is produced by initiating a decollement fault within the metamorphic basement. Progressive thrusting and uplifting of the thick-skinned thrust trigger initiation of the uppermost incompetent decollement with formation of a decollement fold and subsequent converting to fault-propagation and fault-bend folds, which combine together to form imbricate thrust. Breakouts at the base of the early formed fault ramps along the lowest incompetent layers, which may correspond to basement-cover contacts, domes the upmost decollement and imbricate thrusts to form passive roof duplexes and constitute the thin-skinned thrust belt. Structural styles and assemblages in each of tectonic stages are similar to that in the representative orogenic belts in the South China, Southern Appalachians, and Alpine orogenic belts.

  12. Modeling Protein Folding and Applying It to a Relevant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Allan; Goetze, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The different levels of protein structure that can be easily understood by creating a model that simulates protein folding, which can then be evaluated by applying it to a relevant activity, is presented. The materials required and the procedure for constructing a protein folding model are mentioned.

  13. Model experiments showing simultaneous development of folds and transcurrent faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Ashok Kumar

    1980-05-01

    Simultaneous development of noncylindrical folds and transcurrent fractures has been studied using model techniques. A plasticine model was compressed in one direction and an initial formation of folds was followed by the initiation of conjugate sets of transcurrent fractures. It was recorded that with progressive deformation the length of each fracture and the displacement along it increase steadily and the rate of displacement varies at different stages of deformation. Individual fold geometries vary along their hinge lines and these geometrical variations appear to be due to interference of folds with the transcurrent fractures. These interference effects also change the amount of rotation of fractures. Fold structures are different on either side of the fault plane. A natural example from the Bude area, England, shows similar geometrical features. The method of determining fault displacement by comparing the positions of fold hinge lines on either side of a fault is discussed in the light of the above results.

  14. Correlation between rate of folding, energy landscape, and topology in the folding of a model protein HP-36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Bagchi, Biman

    2003-03-01

    We explore the correlation between the energy landscape and topology in the folding of a model protein (chicken villin headpiece HP-36) by using a force-field which incorporates the effects of water through a hydropathy scale and the role of helical propensity of amino acids through a nonlocal harmonic potential. Each amino acid is represented by one side chain atom which is attached to the backbone Cα atom. Sizes and interactions of all the side chain residues are different and depend on the hydrophobicity of a particular amino acid, whereas helical propensities are incorporated in the interaction of Cα atoms. Simulations have been carried out by quenching from a fixed high temperature to two different low temperatures for many initial random configurations. The simulated structures resemble the real native state rather closely, with the root mean square deviation of the best structure being 4.5 Å. Moreover, the structure shows both the helices and bends at the appropriate positions of the model protein. The simplified model allows the study of energy landscape and also of the correlation between energy landscape with the dynamics of folding and topology. The initial part of folding is very fast, followed by two distinct slow stages, with the last stage being certainly the rate determining of the folding process. The initial fast dynamics is primarily due to hydrophobic collapse. The very slow last stage of folding is accompanied by a significant and sharp increase in the relative contact order parameter but relatively small decrease in energy. Analysis of the time dependence of the formation of the individual contact pairs show rich and complicated dynamics, where some contacts wait for a long time to form. This seems to suggest that the slow late stage folding is due to long range contact formation and also that the free energy barrier is entropic in origin. Results have been correlated with the theories of protein folding.

  15. Thermodynamics of downhill folding: multi-probe analysis of PDD, a protein that folds over a marginal free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Athi N; Muñoz, Victor

    2014-07-31

    Downhill folding proteins fold in microseconds by crossing a very low or no free energy barrier (<3 RT), and exhibit a complex unfolding behavior in equilibrium. Such unfolding complexity is due to the weak thermodynamic coupling that exists between the various structural segments of these proteins, and it is manifested in unfolding curves that differ depending on the structural probe employed to monitor the process. Probe-dependent unfolding has important practical implications because it permits one to investigate the folding energy landscape in detail using multiprobe thermodynamic experiments. This type of thermodynamic behavior has been investigated in depth on the protein BBL, an example of extreme (one-state) downhill folding in which there is no free energy barrier at any condition, including the denaturation midpoint. However, an open question is, to what extent is such thermodynamic behavior observed on less extreme downhill folders? Here we perform a multiprobe spectroscopic characterization of the microsecond folder PDD, a structural and functional homologue of BBL that folds within the downhill regime, but is not an example of one-state downhill folding; rather at the denaturation midpoint PDD folds by crossing an incipient free energy barrier. Model-free analysis of the unfolding curves from four different spectroscopic probes together with differential scanning calorimetry reveals a dispersion of ∼9 K in the apparent melting temperature and also marked differences in unfolding broadness (from ∼50 to ∼130 kJ mol(-1) when analyzed with a two-state model), confirming that such properties are also observed on less extreme downhill folders. We subsequently perform a global quantitative analysis of the unfolding data of PDD using the same ME statistical mechanical model that was used before for the BBL domain. The analysis shows that this simple model captures all of the features observed on the unfolding of PDD (i.e., the intensity and temperature

  16. Thermodynamics of downhill folding: multi-probe analysis of PDD, a protein that folds over a marginal free energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Naganathan, Athi N; Muñoz, Victor

    2014-07-31

    Downhill folding proteins fold in microseconds by crossing a very low or no free energy barrier (<3 RT), and exhibit a complex unfolding behavior in equilibrium. Such unfolding complexity is due to the weak thermodynamic coupling that exists between the various structural segments of these proteins, and it is manifested in unfolding curves that differ depending on the structural probe employed to monitor the process. Probe-dependent unfolding has important practical implications because it permits one to investigate the folding energy landscape in detail using multiprobe thermodynamic experiments. This type of thermodynamic behavior has been investigated in depth on the protein BBL, an example of extreme (one-state) downhill folding in which there is no free energy barrier at any condition, including the denaturation midpoint. However, an open question is, to what extent is such thermodynamic behavior observed on less extreme downhill folders? Here we perform a multiprobe spectroscopic characterization of the microsecond folder PDD, a structural and functional homologue of BBL that folds within the downhill regime, but is not an example of one-state downhill folding; rather at the denaturation midpoint PDD folds by crossing an incipient free energy barrier. Model-free analysis of the unfolding curves from four different spectroscopic probes together with differential scanning calorimetry reveals a dispersion of ∼9 K in the apparent melting temperature and also marked differences in unfolding broadness (from ∼50 to ∼130 kJ mol(-1) when analyzed with a two-state model), confirming that such properties are also observed on less extreme downhill folders. We subsequently perform a global quantitative analysis of the unfolding data of PDD using the same ME statistical mechanical model that was used before for the BBL domain. The analysis shows that this simple model captures all of the features observed on the unfolding of PDD (i.e., the intensity and temperature

  17. Material parameter computation for multi-layered vocal fold models.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bastian; Stingl, Michael; Leugering, Günter; Berry, David A; Döllinger, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Today, the prevention and treatment of voice disorders is an ever-increasing health concern. Since many occupations rely on verbal communication, vocal health is necessary just to maintain one's livelihood. Commonly applied models to study vocal fold vibrations and air flow distributions are self sustained physical models of the larynx composed of artificial silicone vocal folds. Choosing appropriate mechanical parameters for these vocal fold models while considering simplifications due to manufacturing restrictions is difficult but crucial for achieving realistic behavior. In the present work, a combination of experimental and numerical approaches to compute material parameters for synthetic vocal fold models is presented. The material parameters are derived from deformation behaviors of excised human larynges. The resulting deformations are used as reference displacements for a tracking functional to be optimized. Material optimization was applied to three-dimensional vocal fold models based on isotropic and transverse-isotropic material laws, considering both a layered model with homogeneous material properties on each layer and an inhomogeneous model. The best results exhibited a transversal-isotropic inhomogeneous (i.e., not producible) model. For the homogeneous model (three layers), the transversal-isotropic material parameters were also computed for each layer yielding deformations similar to the measured human vocal fold deformations.

  18. Criteria for folding in structure-based models of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołek, Karol; Cieplak, Marek

    2016-05-01

    In structure-based models of proteins, one often assumes that folding is accomplished when all contacts are established. This assumption may frequently lead to a conceptual problem that folding takes place in a temperature region of very low thermodynamic stability, especially when the contact map used is too sparse. We consider six different structure-based models and show that allowing for a small, but model-dependent, percentage of the native contacts not being established boosts the folding temperature substantially while affecting the time scales of folding only in a minor way. We also compare other properties of the six models. We show that the choice of the description of the backbone stiffness has a substantial effect on the values of characteristic temperatures that relate both to equilibrium and kinetic properties. Models without any backbone stiffness (like the self-organized polymer) are found to perform similar to those with the stiffness, including in the studies of stretching.

  19. Simulating the folding of HP-sequences with a minimalist model in an inhomogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Alas, S J; González-Pérez, P P

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of protein folding is a fundamental issue in the field of the computational molecular biology. The protein folding inside the cells is performed in a highly inhomogeneous, tortuous, and correlated environment. Therefore, it is important to include in the theoretical studies the medium where the protein folding is developed. In this work we present the combination of three models to mimic the protein folding inside of an inhomogeneous medium. The models used here are Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) in 2D square arrangement, Evolutionary Algorithms (EA), and the Dual Site Bond Model (DSBM). The DSBM model is used to simulate the environment where the HP beads are folded; in this case the medium is correlated and is fractal-like. The analysis of five benchmark HP sequences shows that the inhomogeneous space provided with a given correlation length and fractal dimension plays an important role for correct folding of these sequences, which does not occur in a homogeneous space.

  20. Simulating the folding of HP-sequences with a minimalist model in an inhomogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Alas, S J; González-Pérez, P P

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of protein folding is a fundamental issue in the field of the computational molecular biology. The protein folding inside the cells is performed in a highly inhomogeneous, tortuous, and correlated environment. Therefore, it is important to include in the theoretical studies the medium where the protein folding is developed. In this work we present the combination of three models to mimic the protein folding inside of an inhomogeneous medium. The models used here are Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) in 2D square arrangement, Evolutionary Algorithms (EA), and the Dual Site Bond Model (DSBM). The DSBM model is used to simulate the environment where the HP beads are folded; in this case the medium is correlated and is fractal-like. The analysis of five benchmark HP sequences shows that the inhomogeneous space provided with a given correlation length and fractal dimension plays an important role for correct folding of these sequences, which does not occur in a homogeneous space. PMID:27020756

  1. Persistent homology analysis of protein structure, flexibility and folding

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are the most important biomolecules for living organisms. The understanding of protein structure, function, dynamics and transport is one of most challenging tasks in biological science. In the present work, persistent homology is, for the first time, introduced for extracting molecular topological fingerprints (MTFs) based on the persistence of molecular topological invariants. MTFs are utilized for protein characterization, identification and classification. The method of slicing is proposed to track the geometric origin of protein topological invariants. Both all-atom and coarse-grained representations of MTFs are constructed. A new cutoff-like filtration is proposed to shed light on the optimal cutoff distance in elastic network models. Based on the correlation between protein compactness, rigidity and connectivity, we propose an accumulated bar length generated from persistent topological invariants for the quantitative modeling of protein flexibility. To this end, a correlation matrix based filtration is developed. This approach gives rise to an accurate prediction of the optimal characteristic distance used in protein B-factor analysis. Finally, MTFs are employed to characterize protein topological evolution during protein folding and quantitatively predict the protein folding stability. An excellent consistence between our persistent homology prediction and molecular dynamics simulation is found. This work reveals the topology-function relationship of proteins. PMID:24902720

  2. Effects of confinement and crowding on folding of model proteins.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, M; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-12-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations for a simple coarse-grained model of crambin placed inside of a softly repulsive sphere of radius R. The confinement makes folding at the optimal temperature slower and affects the folding scenarios, but both effects are not dramatic. The influence of crowding on folding are studied by placing several identical proteins within the sphere, denaturing them, and then by monitoring refolding. If the interactions between the proteins are dominated by the excluded volume effects, the net folding times are essentially like for a single protein. An introduction of inter-proteinic attractive contacts hinders folding when the strength of the attraction exceeds about a half of the value of the strength of the single protein contacts. The bigger the strength of the attraction, the more likely is the occurrence of aggregation and misfolding.

  3. Vibratory responses of synthetic, self-oscillating vocal fold models

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Preston R.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced responses of four self-oscillating synthetic vocal fold models are compared. All models were life-sized and fabricated using flexible silicone compounds with material properties comparable to those of human vocal fold tissue. Three of the models had two layers of different stiffness to represent the body–cover grouping of vocal fold tissue. Two of the two-layer models were based on the “M5” geometry [Scherer et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 1616–1630 (2001)], while the third was based on magnetic resonance imaging data. The fourth model included several layers, including a thin epithelial layer, an exceedingly flexible superficial lamina propria layer, a ligament layer that included an anteriorly–posteriorly oriented fiber to restrict vertical motion, and a body layer. Measurements were performed with these models in full larynx and hemilarynx configurations. Data included onset pressure, vibration frequency, glottal flow rate, maximum glottal width, and medial surface motion, the latter two of which were acquired using high-speed imaging techniques. The fourth, multi-layer model exhibited onset pressure, frequency, and medial surface motion traits that are comparable to published human vocal fold data. Importantly, the model featured an alternating convergent–divergent glottal profile and mucosal wave-like motion, characteristics which are important markers of human vocal fold vibration. PMID:23145623

  4. $\\cN$-FOLD SUPERSYMMETRY IN QUANTUM MECHANICAL MATRIX MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

    We formulate Ņ-fold supersymmetry in quantum mechanical matrix models. As an example, we construct general two-by-two Hermitian matrix two-fold supersymmetric quantum mechanical systems. We find that there are two inequivalent such systems, both of which are characterized by two arbitrary scalar functions, and one of which does not reduce to the scalar system. The obtained systems are all weakly quasi-solvable.

  5. Dynamically Scaled Glottal Flow Through Symmetrically Oscillating Vocal Fold Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, Lori; Baitinger, Andrew; Sherman, Erica; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy; Wei, Timothy

    2011-11-01

    Experimental results derived from DPIV measurements in a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The 10x scale vocal fold model is a new design that incorporates key features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. This includes coupling of down/upstream rocking as well as the oscillatory open/close motions. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data will be shown. In this talk, effects associated with paralysis of one vocal fold will be discussed. This talk provides the baseline fluid dynamics for the vocal fold paralysis study presented in Sherman, et al. Supported by the NIH.

  6. Velocity field measurements in oblique static divergent vocal fold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron

    2005-11-01

    During normal phonation, the vocal fold cycle is characterized by the glottal opening transitioning from a convergent to a divergent passage and then closing before the cycle is repeated. Under ordinary phonatory conditions, both vocal folds, which form the glottal passage, move in phase with each other, creating a time-varying symmetric opening. However, abnormal pathological conditions, such as unilateral paralysis, and polyps, can result in geometrical asymmetries between the vocal folds throughout the phonatory cycle. This study investigates pulsatile flow fields through 7.5 times life-size vocal fold models with included divergence angles of 5 to 30 degrees, and obliquities between the vocal folds of up to 15 degrees. Flow conditions were scaled to match physiological parameters. Data were taken at the anterior posterior mid-plane using phase-averaged Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Viscous flow phenomena including the Coanda effect, flow separation points, and jet "flapping" were investigated. The results are compared to previously reported work of flow through symmetric divergent vocal fold models.

  7. Thermodynamically important contacts in folding of model proteins.

    PubMed

    Scala, A; Dokholyan, N V; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E

    2001-03-01

    We introduce a quantity, the entropic susceptibility, that measures the thermodynamic importance-for the folding transition-of the contacts between amino acids in model proteins. Using this quantity, we find that only one equilibrium run of a computer simulation of a model protein is sufficient to select a subset of contacts that give rise to the peak in the specific heat observed at the folding transition. To illustrate the method, we identify thermodynamically important contacts in a model 46-mer. We show that only about 50% of all contacts present in the protein native state are responsible for the sharp peak in the specific heat at the folding transition temperature, while the remaining 50% of contacts do not affect the specific heat.

  8. Assessment of optimized Markov models in protein fold classification.

    PubMed

    Lampros, Christos; Simos, Thomas; Exarchos, Themis P; Exarchos, Konstantinos P; Papaloukas, Costas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2014-08-01

    Protein fold classification is a challenging task strongly associated with the determination of proteins' structure. In this work, we tested an optimization strategy on a Markov chain and a recently introduced Hidden Markov Model (HMM) with reduced state-space topology. The proteins with unknown structure were scored against both these models. Then the derived scores were optimized following a local optimization method. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the annotation of the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database were used for the evaluation of the proposed methodology. The results demonstrated that the fold classification accuracy of the optimized HMM was substantially higher compared to that of the Markov chain or the reduced state-space HMM approaches. The proposed methodology achieved an accuracy of 41.4% on fold classification, while Sequence Alignment and Modeling (SAM), which was used for comparison, reached an accuracy of 38%. PMID:25152041

  9. Statistical Mechanical Model for pH-Induced Protein Folding: Application to Apomyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Takuya; Sakuma, Yosuke; Maki, Kosuke

    2016-09-01

    Despite the major role of pH in protein folding and stability, a quantitative understanding of the pH-induced protein folding mechanism remains elusive. Two conventional models, the Monod-Wyman-Changeux and Linderstrøm-Lang smeared charge models, respectively, have been used to analyze the formation/disruption of specific native structures and fluctuating non-native states. However, there are only a few models that can represent the overall kinetic events of folding/unfolding independent of the properties of relevant molecular species, which has hampered the efforts to systematically analyze pH-induced folding. Here, we constructed a statistical mechanical model that incorporates the protonation mechanism of conventional models along with a combined manual search and least-squares fitting procedure, which was used to investigate the folding of horse apomyoglobin over a wide pH range (2.2-6.7), with a time window ranging from ∼40 μs to ∼100 s, using continuous-/stopped-flow fluorescence at 8 °C. Quantitative analysis assuming a five-state sequential scheme indicated that (1) pH-induced folding/unfolding is represented by both specific binding and Coulombic interactions; (2) kinetic folding/unfolding intermediates share kinetic mechanisms with the equilibrium intermediate, indicating their equivalence; and (3) native-like properties are acquired successively during folding by intermediates and in transition states. This model could also be applied to a variety of association/dissociation processes. PMID:27491483

  10. Modeling giant structural traps in the Perdido fold belt, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Trudgill, B.D.; Rowan, M.G.; Fiduk, J.C.; Weimer, P. )

    1996-01-01

    The Perdido fold belt in the Alaminos Canyon OCS protraction area contains some of the largest, untested structural traps within US waters. The overall structural geometry of the fold belt is relatively simple, although individual structures show a complex array of structural styles. Previous interpretations have modeled these structures as either growth fault-bend folds or salt-cored detachment folds. Structural interpretation of high quality 2D seismic data, combined with detailed analysis of the growth strata and both 2D and 3D restorations provides the necessary control to model these structures accurately. The 2D restorations show that the observed geometries of then folds and their growth strata are compatible with a detachment fold model. The folds developed due to gravitational gliding above, and at the basinward limit of, a thick layer of autochthonous salt. The growth strata indicate a relatively short period of folding and uplift during the late Oligocene to early Miocene. 3D restorations of an anomalous, dome-shaped structure suggest it formed due to interference between an elongate, NE-SW trending anticline and a NW-SE trending basement feature. The real test of our restorations, and the viability of the Perdido fold belt as a petroleum province remains to be tested by exploratory drilling.

  11. Detachment folds versus thrust-folds: numerical modelling and applications to the Swiss Jura Mountains and the Canadian Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, Florian; Bauville, Arthur; Epard, Jean-Luc; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Jura Mountains and the Foothills of the Canadian Rockies fold-and-thrust belts are classical examples of thin-skinned belts where folds develop over weak detachment horizons. They offer the possibility to observe and measure strain in folds. In these two belts, a large spectrum of fold geometries is expressed, from symmetric box-fold or pop-up structures to asymmetric thrust-related folds. In this study, we focus on the quantification and prediction of the brittle strain distribution in folds as a function of the fold geometry. Fold geometry is considered as a continuum between two end-member structural styles: symmetric detachment folds and asymmetric foreland-vergent thrust-folds. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of visco-plastic detachment folding. The models are used (1) to systematically examine the influence of different initial parameters on the resulting geometry and style of folding and (2) to quantify the local strain pattern through time. The different parameters tested are the following: presence and size of initial geometrical perturbation at the detachment-sediment interface, rheology of the detachment (frictional vs. viscous), additional detachment layer within the series and overbunden thickness. Results of single detachment layer models show that the asymmetry of folds is primarily controlled by the height of the initial geometrical perturbation, regardless to the rheology of the detachment (frictional vs. viscous). Additional detachment interlayer within the series decreases the brittle strain within the stiff layers and favours more rounded anticlines geometry. The models were then adapted to the Swiss Jura and the Canadian Foothills settings. Compared to field observations and cross-sections of existing fault-related anticlines, the proposed simulations agree with the first order geometry and the development of associated localized zones of brittle deformation.

  12. Influence of asymmetric stiffness on the structural and aerodynamic response of synthetic vocal fold models.

    PubMed

    Pickup, B A; Thomson, S L

    2009-10-16

    The influence of asymmetric vocal fold stiffness on voice production was evaluated using life-sized, self-oscillating vocal fold models with an idealized geometry based on the human vocal folds. The models were fabricated using flexible, materially-linear silicone compounds with Young's modulus values comparable to that of vocal fold tissue. The models included a two-layer design to simulate the vocal fold layered structure. The respective Young's moduli of elasticity of the "left" and "right" vocal fold models were varied to create asymmetric conditions. High-speed videokymography was used to measure maximum vocal fold excursion, vibration frequency, and left-right phase shift, all of which were significantly influenced by asymmetry. Onset pressure, a measure of vocal effort, increased with asymmetry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis showed significantly greater skewing of the glottal jet in the direction of the stiffer vocal fold model. Potential applications to various clinical conditions are mentioned, and suggestions for future related studies are presented.

  13. Influence of Asymmetric Stiffness on the Structural and Aerodynamic Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, B.A.; Thomson, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of asymmetric vocal fold stiffness on voice production was evaluated using life-sized, self-oscillating vocal fold models with an idealized geometry based on the human vocal folds. The models were fabricated using flexible, materially-linear silicone compounds with Young’s modulus values comparable to that of vocal fold tissue. The models included a two-layer design to simulate the vocal fold layered structure. The respective Young’s moduli of elasticity of the “left” and “right” vocal fold models were varied to create asymmetric conditions. High-speed videokymography was used to measure maximum vocal fold excursion, vibration frequency, and left-right phase shift, all of which were significantly influenced by asymmetry. Onset pressure, a measure of vocal effort, increased with asymmetry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis showed significantly greater skewing of the glottal jet in the direction of the stiffer vocal fold model. Potential applications to various clinical conditions are mentioned, and suggestions for future related studies are presented. PMID:19664777

  14. Numerical Modeling of Detachment Folding: a 2D Approach with Application to Incremental Coseismic Fold Growth in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Luther; Suppe, John; Graveleau, Fabien

    2010-05-01

    The actively growing Tungshih anticline located at the northern tip of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake rupture in western Taiwan provides a rare opportunity to study coseismic growth of a nascent fault-related fold. Good quality seismic data collected before the earthquake provides excellent control on the subsurface geometry and surface deformation has been characterized by surveying, accurate mapping by radar, and by surface DEM analysis of the overlying Daan River flood plain and adjacent level farm fields from photos taken before and the day after the event. Thus we have a very good idea of the geometry of the Tungshih anticline both prior to- and after the Chi-Chi earthquake. It is therefore an ideal structure in which to study the incremental or coseismic evolution of a fault-related fold. The Tungshih anticline is a 1 km wide low-amplitude detachment fold that experienced about 12 m of uplift 8 m of shortening during the Chi-Chi event. Surface folding of the back-limb dammed the overlying Daan river, causing it to change course and eventually cut down to near its pre-earthquake base-level. Seismic profiles of the fold show it to be broad, approximately parallel in form above a detachment in the Chinshui Shale, which is the fault of the northern Chi-Chi rupture. The post-Chi-Chi surface expression of the anticline as defined by folding of the old river-bed is box-shaped with a wide and flat-topped uplifted portion that is flanked by moderately dipping fore- and back-limbs, that underwent hinge migration on the back limb and limb rotation on the fore limb. Thickness-relief analysis of the fold indicates that of the 217 m total shortening consumed in the fold 20% was accomplished by pure shear and 80% in flexural-slip. Furthermore an additional 361 m of the slip passes through the anticline with a 115 m step in the Chinshui shale detachment, contributing additional volume to the fold core. These results suggest that the anticline could have grown in about 27 Chi

  15. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    PubMed Central

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Hee Choi, Seong; Bless, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method Twenty four 4-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to one of four experimental groups: Chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100 ng basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), chronic vocal fold scar treated with saline (sham treatment), and unscarred untreated control. Following tissue harvest, histological and immunohistochemical data were collected to confirm extracellular matrix alteration in the chronic scar group, and acoustic, aerodynamic and high speed digital imaging data were collected using an excised larynx setup in all groups. Phonation threshold pressure (Pth), glottal resistance (Rg), glottal efficiency (Eg), vibratory amplitude and vibratory area were employed as dependent variables. Results Chronically scarred vocal folds were characterized by elevated collagen I and III and reduced hyaluronic acid abundance. Phonation was achieved and data were collected from all control and bFGF treated larynges, however phonation was not achieved with 3 of 6 chronically scarred and 1 of 6 saline treated larynges. Compared to control, the chronic scar group was characterized by elevated Pth, reduced Eg, and intra-larynx vibratory amplitude and area asymmetry. The bFGF group was characterized by Pth below control group levels, Eg comparable to control, and vocal fold vibratory amplitude and area symmetry comparable to control. The sham group was characterized by Pth comparable to control, Eg superior to control, and vocal fold vibratory amplitude and area symmetry comparable to control. Conclusions The excised larynx model reported here demonstrated robust deterioration across phonatory indices under the scar condition and sensitivity to treatment induced change under the bFGF condition. The improvement observed under the sham condition may reflect

  16. Statistical mechanics of simple models of protein folding and design.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, V S; Grosberg, A Y; Tanaka, T

    1997-01-01

    It is now believed that the primary equilibrium aspects of simple models of protein folding are understood theoretically. However, current theories often resort to rather heavy mathematics to overcome some technical difficulties inherent in the problem or start from a phenomenological model. To this end, we take a new approach in this pedagogical review of the statistical mechanics of protein folding. The benefit of our approach is a drastic mathematical simplification of the theory, without resort to any new approximations or phenomenological prescriptions. Indeed, the results we obtain agree precisely with previous calculations. Because of this simplification, we are able to present here a thorough and self contained treatment of the problem. Topics discussed include the statistical mechanics of the random energy model (REM), tests of the validity of REM as a model for heteropolymer freezing, freezing transition of random sequences, phase diagram of designed ("minimally frustrated") sequences, and the degree to which errors in the interactions employed in simulations of either folding and design can still lead to correct folding behavior. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:9414231

  17. Mechanical Modeling and Computer Simulation of Protein Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Scott, Gregory E.; Denos, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, science education and modern technology are bridged to teach students at the high school and undergraduate levels about protein folding and to strengthen their model building skills. Students are guided from a textbook picture of a protein as a rigid crystal structure to a more realistic view: proteins are highly dynamic…

  18. Modal response of a computational vocal fold model with a substrate layer of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cameron L; Achuthan, Ajit; Erath, Byron D

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrates the effect of a substrate layer of adipose tissue on the modal response of the vocal folds, and hence, on the mechanics of voice production. Modal analysis is performed on the vocal fold structure with a lateral layer of adipose tissue. A finite element model is employed, and the first six mode shapes and modal frequencies are studied. The results show significant changes in modal frequencies and substantial variation in mode shapes depending on the strain rate of the adipose tissue. These findings highlight the importance of considering adipose tissue in computational vocal fold modeling.

  19. Kinematic modeling of folding above listric propagating thrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardozo, Nestor; Brandenburg, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a kinematic approach to simulate folds above listric propagating thrusts. The model is based on a pre-defined circular thrust geometry with a maximum central angle beyond which the thrust is planar, inclined shear above the circular thrust, and trishear in front of the thrust. Provided the trajectory of thrust propagation is established, the model can be run forward and backwards. We use this last feature to implement a global simulated annealing, inverse modeling strategy. This inverse modeling strategy is applied to synthetic folds as well as two real examples in offshore Venezuela and the Niger Delta toe-thrust system. These three examples illustrate the benefits of the algorithm, particularly in predicting the possible range of models that can fit the structures. Thrust geometry, depth to detachment level, and backlimb geometry have high impact in model parameters such as backlimb shear angle and fault slip; while forelimb geometry is critical to constrain parameters such as fault propagation to fault slip ratio and trishear angle. Steep to overturned beds in forelimb areas are often not imaged by seismic, so in the absence of additional well data, considering all possible thrust-fold geometries is critical for the modeling and whatever prediction (e.g. hydrocarbon trap integrity) is made from it.

  20. Local analysis near a folded saddle-node singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Martin; Wechselberger, Martin

    Folded saddle-nodes occur generically in one parameter families of singularly perturbed systems with two slow variables. We show that these folded singularities are the organizing centers for two main delay phenomena in singular perturbation problems: canards and delayed Hopf bifurcations. We combine techniques from geometric singular perturbation theory—the blow-up technique—and from delayed Hopf bifurcation theory—complex time path analysis—to analyze the flow near such folded saddle-nodes. In particular, we show the existence of canards as intersections of stable and unstable slow manifolds. To derive these canard results, we extend the singularly perturbed vector field into the complex domain and study it along elliptic paths. This enables us to extend the invariant slow manifolds beyond points where normal hyperbolicity is lost. Furthermore, we define a way-in/way-out function describing the maximal delay expected for generic solutions passing through a folded saddle-node singularity. Branch points associated with the change from a complex to a real eigenvalue structure in the variational equation along the critical (slow) manifold make our analysis significantly different from the classical delayed Hopf bifurcation analysis where these eigenvalues are complex only.

  1. Analogue models of melt-flow networks in folding migmatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraud, Joseph; Gardien, Véronique; Allemand, Pascal; Grandjean, Philippe

    2004-02-01

    We have modelled the formation and the layer-parallel shortening of layered (stromatic) migmatites. The model consists of thin superposed layers of partially molten microcrystalline wax. The melt (30 vol.%) has a negative buoyancy and a high viscosity contrast with its solid matrix. As soon as the shortening begins, melt-filled veins with high aspect ratios open along foliation. The melt is segregated into the veins, forming a stromatic layering. During incipient folding, crescent-shaped saddle reefs open at the hinges of open sinusoidal folds. Further shortening and melt-enhanced shear displacements on interlayer interfaces cause chevron folds to develop and the saddle reefs to become triangular. In comparison, a melt-free experiment shows only a few layer-parallel openings and no saddle reefs in chevron folds. On the basis of our experimental results, we propose that in migmatites: (1) mesoscale melt migration is a combination of flow in immobile veins and movements of veins as a whole; (2) the changes in the geometry of the mesoscale melt-flow network create the pressure gradients that drive melt migration; (3) the melt-flow network does not need to be fully interconnected to allow local expulsion; (4) melt expulsion is episodic because the temporal evolution of the network combines with the spatial heterogeneity of the deformation.

  2. Multiple-probe analysis of folding and unfolding pathways of human serum albumin. Evidence for a framework mechanism of folding.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Banerjee, Abhijit; Krishnakumar, Shyam Sundar; Rahaman, Obaidur; Panda, Dulal

    2004-05-01

    The changes in the far-UV CD signal, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and bilirubin absorbance showed that the guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced unfolding of a multidomain protein, human serum albumin (HSA), followed a two-state process. However, using environment sensitive Nile red fluorescence, the unfolding and folding pathways of HSA were found to follow a three-state process and an intermediate was detected in the range 0.25-1.5 m GdnHCl. The intermediate state displayed 45% higher fluorescence intensity than that of the native state. The increase in the Nile red fluorescence was found to be due to an increase in the quantum yield of the HSA-bound Nile red. Low concentrations of GdnHCl neither altered the binding affinity of Nile red to HSA nor induced the aggregation of HSA. In addition, the secondary structure of HSA was not perturbed during the first unfolding transition (<1.5 m GdnHCl); however, the secondary structure was completely lost during the second transition. The data together showed that the half maximal loss of the tertiary structure occurred at a lower GdnHCl concentration than the loss of the secondary structure. Further kinetic studies of the refolding process of HSA using multiple spectroscopic techniques showed that the folding occurred in two phases, a burst phase followed by a slow phase. An intermediate with native-like secondary structure but only a partial tertiary structure was found to form in the burst phase of refolding. Then, the intermediate slowly folded into the native state. An analysis of the refolding data suggested that the folding of HSA could be best explained by the framework model.

  3. The geometry and topology of natural sheath folds: a new tool for structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Holdsworth, R. E.

    2004-09-01

    Curvilinear sheath folds are classically depicted as displaying symmetrical geometries about two orthogonal mirror planes centred along the (X-Y) axial surface and the (X-Z) medial (culmination/depression) surface which bisects the fold nose. However, 10,000 geometric analyses of minor folds and fabrics formed during ductile thrusting in the Caledonides of northern Scotland reveals that major dome and basin sheath folds can display distinct and predictable asymmetries across both axial and medial surfaces. The strain is typically heterogeneous so that structural fabrics and younging evidence are preserved within sheath folds at varying stages of development. This allows an analysis of the evolution of such structures from 'tongue' folds to more extreme 'tubular' forms. Geometric relationships between measured orientations of fold hinges, axial planes, extension lineations and foliations are compared on fabric topology plots (FTPs), which provide an effective tool for monitoring planar and linear fabric rotations with increasing progressive non-coaxial deformation. They consistently display systematic variation from regions of lower to higher strain on passing from upper to lower fold limbs across major axial surfaces, and on crossing medial surfaces from short to long hinge-line segments. Axial and medial surfaces effectively therefore divide major sheath folds into quadrants with different amounts, senses and combinations of planar and linear fabric rotation within each domain. Such heterogeneous deformation implies that models of intense non-coaxial deformation uniformly affecting pre-existing folds may overestimate bulk displacement and shear strain. Variable fold hinge-line rotation about medial surfaces also provides an effective mechanism for the closure of major sheaths, which may otherwise project for unfeasible distances in the X direction. Bedding/cleavage intersections are developed at greater angles to the transport direction than fold hinges which they

  4. Deformational models of rifting and folding on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerdt, W. B.; Golombek, M. P.

    1988-05-01

    Features of presumed tectonic origin on Venus are reviewed, and lithospheric strength envelopes are derived based on laboratory measurements of the deformational properties of crustal and subcrustal rocks, extrapolated to conditions appropriate to Venus. Models for rifting and folding are developed that use this lithospheric structure and take into account both brittle and ductile yielding as well as finite elastic strength. For both rifting and folding, structures with characteristic widths and spacings are predicted whose size depends on the thickness of the lithosphere, density contrast, and elastic properties of the layer. Finally, the model predictions are compared with the widths and spacings of observed tectonic features, and it is concluded that they are consistent with a relatively strong mantle layer separated from a thin brittle surface layer by a ductile lower crust. These results allow constraints to be placed on the crustal thickness and thermal gradient on Venus.

  5. Geometric models of folding at Loch Monar, Scotland, using computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkinson, A. J.; Thiessen, R. L.

    1988-06-01

    Small-scale hand specimens were collected at Loch Monar, Scotland, one of the classic areas of fold interference patterns. From the analysis of these, the geometries of the F 1 and F 2 folds were derived. By computer simulation, the complex three-dimensional form of the fold interference shapes can then be reproduced very closely. F 2 fold shapes and motion directions derived from the small-scale structures, along with those derived from field observations of F 1 lineations deformed about F 2 folds, were then applied to an extrapolated pre-F 2 shape of the Loch Monar synform. This generated a map pattern strikingly similar to that mapped by Ramsay (1958). The geometric models provide useful information for mechanical hypotheses of the folding observed at Loch Monar. The simulation reveals an interesting problem that whereas many small-scale interference patterns reflect the map pattern of the major structure, there are exposures of interference patterns that do not. These are dome and basin (type 1) patterns found in an area where a major F 2 fold hinge crosses an F 1 fold hinge zone. By examining the deformed L 1 lineation patterns found in this area, along with the computed D 2 strain orientations and the field observations of F 2 fold geometries, we suggest that those patterns formed due to local variations in the displacement directions during the F 2 folding, perhaps due to the mechanical influence of relatively competent pegmatite veins on the small-scale F 2 folds. The very high D 2 strain has then amplified the dome and basin elements to very elongate cone and cylinder forms. This creates local type 1 patterns within a regional type 2 interference pattern structure.

  6. A rabbit vocal fold laser scarring model for testing lamina propria tissue engineering therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Ted; Du, Mindy; Xu, Chet C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis To develop a vocal fold scarring model using an ablative laser in the rabbit as a platform for testing bioengineered therapies for missing or damaged lamina propria. Study Design Prospective controlled animal study. Methods An optimal laser energy level was first determined by assessing the depths of vocal fold injury created by a Holmium:YAG laser at various energy levels on fresh cadaveric rabbit larynges. The selected energy level was then used to create controlled unilateral injuries in vocal folds of New Zealand white rabbits, with the contralateral folds serving as uninjured controls. After 4 weeks, the larynges were harvested and subjected to excised-larynx phonation with high-speed imaging and immunohistochemical staining for collagen types I and III, elastin, and hyaluronic acid (HA) with quantitative histological analysis. Results 1.8 joules produced full-thickness injury of the lamina propria without extensive muscle injury. After 4 weeks, the injured vocal folds vibrated with reduced amplitude (P = 0.036) in excised-larynx phonation compared to normal vocal folds. The injured vocal folds contained a higher relative density of collagen type I (P = 0.004), higher elastin (P = 0.022), and lower HA (P = 0.030) compared to normal controls. Collagen type III was unchanged. Conclusions With its potential for higher precision of injury, this laser vocal fold scarring model may serve as an alternative to scarring produced by cold instruments for studying the effects of vocal fold lamina propria bioengineered therapies. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:24715695

  7. Inflation model building with an accurate measure of e -folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongchitnan, Sirichai

    2016-08-01

    It has become standard practice to take the logarithmic growth of the scale factor as a measure of the amount of inflation, despite the well-known fact that this is only an approximation for the true amount of inflation required to solve the horizon and flatness problems. The aim of this work is to show how this approximation can be completely avoided using an alternative framework for inflation model building. We show that using the inverse Hubble radius, H =a H , as the key dynamical parameter, the correct number of e -folding arises naturally as a measure of inflation. As an application, we present an interesting model in which the entire inflationary dynamics can be solved analytically and exactly, and, in special cases, reduces to the familiar class of power-law models.

  8. Meta-analysis of published transcriptional and translational fold changes reveals a preference for low-fold inductions.

    PubMed

    Wren, Jonathan D; Conway, Tyrrell

    2006-01-01

    The goals of this study were to gain a better quantitative understanding of the dynamic range of transcriptional and translational response observed in biological systems and to examine the reporting of regulatory events for trends and biases. A straightforward pattern-matching routine extracted 3,408 independent observations regarding transcriptional fold-changes and 1,125 regarding translational fold-changes from over 15 million MEDLINE abstracts. Approximately 95% of reported changes were > or =2-fold. Further, the historical trend of reporting individual fold-changes is declining in favor of high-throughput methods for transcription but not translation. Where it was possible to compare the average fold-changes in transcription and translation for the same gene/product (203 examples), approximately 53% were a < or =2-fold difference, suggesting a loose tendency for the two to be coupled in magnitude. We found also that approximately three-fourths of reported regulatory events have been at the transcriptional level. The frequency distribution appears to be normally distributed and peaks near 2-fold, suggesting that nature selects for a low-energy solution to regulatory responses. Because high-throughput technologies ordinarily sacrifice measurement quality for quantity, this also suggests that many regulatory events may not be reliably detectable by such technologies. Text mining of regulatory events and responses provides additional information incorporable into microarray analysis, such as prior fold-change observations and flagging genes that are regulated post-transcription. All extracted regulation and response patterns can be downloaded at the following website: www.ou.edu/microarray/ oumcf/Meta_analysis.xls.

  9. A workflow for 3D model building in fold-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Hannah; Bond, Clare; Butler, Rob

    2016-04-01

    3D geological models can be used in fold-thrust belts for many purposes such as analysing geometric variation in folds, kinematic modelling to restore fold surfaces, generating strain distribution maps and predicting fracture network distribution. We present a workflow for 3D model building using outcrop bedding data, geological maps, Digital Terrain Models (DTM's), air photos and field photographs. We discuss the challenges of software limitations for 3D kinematic restoration and forward modelling in fold-thrust belt settings. We then discuss the sensitivity of model building approaches to the application of 3D geological models in fold-thrust belts for further analysis e.g. changes in along strike fold geometry, restoration using kinematic and geomechanical modelling, strain prediction and Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) modelling. To create 3D models geological maps and bedding data are digitised using Move software; digitised maps and data are then draped onto DTM's. A series of closely spaced cross section lines are selected; the orientation of these is calculated by determining the average orientation of bedding dip direction. Fault and horizon line intersections, along with bedding data from within a narrow margin of the section lines are projected onto each cross section. Field photographs and sketches are integrated into the cross sections to determine thrust angles at the surface. Horizon lines are then constructed using bedding data. Displacement profiles for thrusts are plotted to ensure thrust displacements are valid with respect to neighbouring cross section interpretations; any discrepancies are alleviated by making minor adjustments to horizon and thrust lines, while ensuring that resultant cross section geometries still adhere to bedding data and other field observations. Once the cross sections have been finalised, 3D surfaces are created using the horizon and thrust line interpretations on each cross section. The simple curvature of 3D surfaces

  10. Folding model calculations for 6He+12C elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, A. Ibraheem

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of the double folding model, we used the α+2n and di-triton configurations for the nuclear matter density of the 6He nucleus to generate the real part of the optical potential for the system 6He+12C. As an alternative, we also use the high energy approximation to generate the optical potential for the same system. The derived potentials are employed to analyze the elastic scattering differential cross section at energies of 38.3, 41.6 and 82.3 MeV/u. For the imaginary part of the potential we adopt the squared Woods-Saxon form. The obtained results are compared with the corresponding measured data as well as with available results in the literature. The calculated total reaction cross sections are investigated and compared with the optical limit Glauber model description.

  11. Modelling of shape memory polymer sheets that self-fold in response to localized heating.

    PubMed

    Mailen, Russell W; Liu, Ying; Dickey, Michael D; Zikry, Mohammed; Genzer, Jan

    2015-10-21

    We report a nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) of the thermo-mechanical shrinking and self-folding behavior of pre-strained polystyrene polymer sheets. Self-folding is useful for actuation, packaging, and remote deployment of flat surfaces that convert to 3D objects in response to a stimulus such as heat. The proposed FEA model accounts for the viscoelastic recovery of pre-strained polystyrene sheets in response to localized heating on the surface of the polymer. Herein, the heat results from the localized absorption of light by ink patterned on the surface of the sheet. This localized delivery of heat results in a temperature gradient through the thickness of the sheet, and thus a gradient of strain recovery, or shrinkage, develops causing the polymer sheet to fold. This process transforms a 2D pattern into a 3D shape through an origami-like behavior. The FEA predictions indicate that shrinking and folding are sensitive to the thermo-mechanical history of the polymer during pre-straining. The model also shows that shrinkage does not vary linearly through the thickness of the polymer during folding due to the accumulation of mass in the hinged region. Counterintuitively, the maximum shrinkage does not occur at the patterned surface. Rather, it occurs considerably below the top surface of the polymer. This investigation provides a fundamental understanding of shrinking, self-folding dynamics, and bending angles, and provides design guidelines for origami shapes and structures. PMID:26324954

  12. Initiation sites of protein folding by NMR analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Freund, S M; Wong, K B; Fersht, A R

    1996-01-01

    Detailed characterization of denatured states of proteins is necessary to understand the interactions that funnel the large number of possible conformations along fast routes for folding. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments based on the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) detect hydrogen atoms close in space and provide information about local structure. Here we present an NMR procedure that detects almost all sequential NOEs between amide hydrogen atoms (HN-HN NOE), including those in random coil regions in a protein, barnase, in urea solutions. A semi-quantitative analysis of these HN-HN NOEs identified partly structured regions that are in remarkable agreement with those found to form early on the reaction pathway. Our results strongly suggest that the folding of barnase initiates at the first helix and the beta-turn between the third and the fourth strands. This strategy of defining residual structure has also worked for cold-denatured barstar and guanidinium hydrochloride-denatured chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 and so should be generally applicable. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8855224

  13. Parameter Optimization for the Gaussian Model of Folded Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erman, Burak; Erkip, Albert

    2000-03-01

    Recently, we proposed an analytical model of protein folding (B. Erman, K. A. Dill, J. Chem. Phys, 112, 000, 2000) and showed that this model successfully approximates the known minimum energy configurations of two dimensional HP chains. All attractions (covalent and non-covalent) as well as repulsions were treated as if the monomer units interacted with each other through linear spring forces. Since the governing potential of the linear springs are derived from a Gaussian potential, the model is called the ''Gaussian Model''. The predicted conformations from the model for the hexamer and various 9mer sequences all lie on the square lattice, although the model does not contain information about the lattice structure. Results of predictions for chains with 20 or more monomers also agreed well with corresponding known minimum energy lattice structures. However, these predicted conformations did not lie exactly on the square lattice. In the present work, we treat the specific problem of optimizing the potentials (the strengths of the spring constants) so that the predictions are in better agreement with the known minimum energy structures.

  14. Simple off-lattice model to study the folding and aggregation of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combe, Nicolas; Frenkel, Daan

    We present a numerical study of a new protein model. This off-lattice model takes into account both the hydrogen bonds and the amino-acid interactions. It reproduces the folding of a small protein (peptide): morphological analysis of the conformations at low temperature shows two well-known substructures α-helix and β-sheet depending on the chosen sequence. The folding pathway in the scope of this model is studied through a free-energy analysis. We then study the aggregation of proteins. Proteins in the aggregate are mainly bound via hydrogen bonds. Performing a free-energy analysis we show that the addition of a peptide to such an aggregate is not favourable. We qualitatively reproduce the abnormal aggregation of proteins in prion diseases.

  15. Late stages in the development of folds as deduced from model experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Ashok Kumar

    1980-06-01

    A vein pattern around Bude, England, provides evidence that there has been a change in the direction of bulk extension during progressive development of folds. In the early history of fold development the direction of maximum extension was parallel to the axial surfaces of the folds and normal to the fold hinge whilst during the later stages of fold development the direction of maximum extension was along the fold hinge lines. An attempt has been made to understand the geometric evolution of such folds by performing experiments with plasticine models in the laboratory. Multilayer models were subjected to large deformation and late stages in the folding process have been observed. The experiments also show the effect of surfaces of décollment on fold geometry and the development of second order folds.

  16. Natural and forced asymmetries in flow through a vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drain, Bethany; Lambert, Lori; Krane, Michael; Wei, Timothy

    2012-11-01

    Much of the complexity and richness of voice production stems from asymmetries in flow through the vocal folds. There are naturally occurring asymmetries, such as the Coanda effect (i . e . deviation of the glottal jet from the centerline as air passes through the nominally symmetric vocal folds). There are also asymmetries which arise from disease or dysfunction of the vocal folds. This study uses DPIV measurements in a dynamically scaled-up human vocal fold model to compare the flow characteristics between symmetric versus asymmetric oscillations. For this study, asymmetries were introduced by running one vocal fold out of phase with the other. Three phase lags, 0 18 and 36, were examined over a range of frequencies corresponding to the physiological frequencies of 50-200 Hz. Control volume analysis was applied and time traces of terms from the conservation of linear momentum equation were generated. This allowed analysis of how differences in the glottal jet flow manifest themselves in the fluid pressure field. In addition, further examination of the Coanda effect in the context of fluid pressure will be discussed. Supported by NIH.

  17. 12C+12C fusion in a multichannel folding model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assunção, M.; Descouvemont, P.

    2016-01-01

    The 12C+12C fusion reaction is investigated using a folding potential in a multichannel approach involving the 12C(0+1, 2+, 0+2, 3-) states. The 12C densities (including transition densities) are taken from the RGM calculation of Kamimura. For the nucleon-nucleon interaction, we use the DDM3Y density-dependent interaction. Owing to the explicit presence of inelastic channels, the imaginary part of the optical potential only contains a short-range fusion contribution. The S-factor is then virtually insensitive to the precise value, and the model is free of any fitting parameter. From the coupled-channel system, we determine the elastic and fusion cross sections simultaneously. As elastic data are available around the Coulomb barrier, this simultaneous treatment offers a good test for the reliability of the model. In the fusion cross section, the role of the inelastic channels and, in particular of the 12C(0+1)+12C(0+2) channel involving the Hoyle state, is discussed.

  18. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K.; Cheong, S. A.

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with α helix and β hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein

  19. Folding analysis of the most complex Stevedore's protein knot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Iren; Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2016-01-01

    DehI is a homodimeric haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida that contains the most complex 61 Stevedore's protein knot within its folding topology. To examine how DehI attains such an intricate knotted topology we combined far-UV circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate its folding mechanism. Equilibrium unfolding of DehI by chemical denaturation indicated the presence of two highly populated folding intermediates, I and I'. While the two intermediates vary in secondary structure contents and tertiary packing according to CD and intrinsic fluorescence, respectively, their overall dimension and compactness are similar according to SAXS. Three single-tryptophan variants (W34, W53, and W196) were generated to probe non-cooperative unfolding events localized around the three fluorophores. Kinetic fluorescence measurements indicated that the transition from the intermediate I' to the unfolded state is rate limiting. Our multiparametric folding analyses suggest that DehI unfolds through a linear folding pathway with two distinct folding intermediates by initial hydrophobic collapse followed by nucleation condensation, and that knotting precedes the formation of secondary structures. PMID:27527519

  20. Modeling the Biomechanical Influence of Epilaryngeal Stricture on the Vocal Folds: A Low-Dimensional Model of Vocal-Ventricular Fold Coupling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moisik, Scott R.; Esling, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Physiological and phonetic studies suggest that, at moderate levels of epilaryngeal stricture, the ventricular folds impinge upon the vocal folds and influence their dynamical behavior, which is thought to be responsible for constricted laryngeal sounds. In this work, the authors examine this hypothesis through biomechanical modeling.…

  1. Folding model description of reactions with exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Awad A.; Hassanain, M. A.; Mokhtar, S. R.; Zaki, M. A.; Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.; Farid, M. El-Azab

    2012-08-15

    Microscopic folding calculations based upon the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction and the nuclearmatter densities of the interacting nuclei have been carried out to explain recently measured experimental data of the {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn elastic scattering cross section at four different laboratory energies near the Coulomb barrier. The extracted reaction cross sections are also considered.

  2. Lost in folding space? Comparing four variants of the thermodynamic model for RNA secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many bioinformatics tools for RNA secondary structure analysis are based on a thermodynamic model of RNA folding. They predict a single, "optimal" structure by free energy minimization, they enumerate near-optimal structures, they compute base pair probabilities and dot plots, representative structures of different abstract shapes, or Boltzmann probabilities of structures and shapes. Although all programs refer to the same physical model, they implement it with considerable variation for different tasks, and little is known about the effects of heuristic assumptions and model simplifications used by the programs on the outcome of the analysis. Results We extract four different models of the thermodynamic folding space which underlie the programs RNAFOLD, RNASHAPES, and RNASUBOPT. Their differences lie within the details of the energy model and the granularity of the folding space. We implement probabilistic shape analysis for all models, and introduce the shape probability shift as a robust measure of model similarity. Using four data sets derived from experimentally solved structures, we provide a quantitative evaluation of the model differences. Conclusions We find that search space granularity affects the computed shape probabilities less than the over- or underapproximation of free energy by a simplified energy model. Still, the approximations perform similar enough to implementations of the full model to justify their continued use in settings where computational constraints call for simpler algorithms. On the side, we observe that the rarely used level 2 shapes, which predict the complete arrangement of helices, multiloops, internal loops and bulges, include the "true" shape in a rather small number of predicted high probability shapes. This calls for an investigation of new strategies to extract high probability members from the (very large) level 2 shape space of an RNA sequence. We provide implementations of all four models, written in a

  3. A framework for describing topological frustration in models of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Norcross, Todd S; Yeates, Todd O

    2006-09-22

    In a natively folded protein of moderate or larger size, the protein backbone may weave through itself in complex ways, raising questions about what sequence of events might have to occur in order for the protein to reach its native configuration from the unfolded state. A mathematical framework is presented here for describing the notion of a topological folding barrier, which occurs when a protein chain must pass through a hole or opening, formed by other regions of the protein structure. Different folding pathways encounter different numbers of such barriers and therefore different degrees of frustration. A dynamic programming algorithm finds the optimal theoretical folding path and minimal degree of frustration for a protein based on its natively folded configuration. Calculations over a database of protein structures provide insights into questions such as whether the path of minimal frustration might tend to favor folding from one or from many sites of folding nucleation, or whether proteins favor folding around the N terminus, thereby providing support for the hypothesis that proteins fold co-translationally. The computational methods are applied to a multi-disulfide bonded protein, with computational findings that are consistent with the experimentally observed folding pathway. Attention is drawn to certain complex protein folds for which the computational method suggests there may be a preferred site of nucleation or where folding is likely to proceed through a relatively well-defined pathway or intermediate. The computational analyses lead to testable models for protein folding. PMID:16930616

  4. The topomer-sampling model of protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Debe, Derek A.; Carlson, Matt J.; Goddard, William A.

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, a protein cannot sample all of its conformations (e.g., ≈3100 ≈ 1048 for a 100 residue protein) on an in vivo folding timescale (<1 s). To investigate how the conformational dynamics of a protein can accommodate subsecond folding time scales, we introduce the concept of the native topomer, which is the set of all structures similar to the native structure (obtainable from the native structure through local backbone coordinate transformations that do not disrupt the covalent bonding of the peptide backbone). We have developed a computational procedure for estimating the number of distinct topomers required to span all conformations (compact and semicompact) for a polypeptide of a given length. For 100 residues, we find ≈3 × 107 distinct topomers. Based on the distance calculated between different topomers, we estimate that a 100-residue polypeptide diffusively samples one topomer every ≈3 ns. Hence, a 100-residue protein can find its native topomer by random sampling in just ≈100 ms. These results suggest that subsecond folding of modest-sized, single-domain proteins can be accomplished by a two-stage process of (i) topomer diffusion: random, diffusive sampling of the 3 × 107 distinct topomers to find the native topomer (≈0.1 s), followed by (ii) intratopomer ordering: nonrandom, local conformational rearrangements within the native topomer to settle into the precise native state. PMID:10077555

  5. Markov State Models and tICA Reveal a Nonnative Folding Nucleus in Simulations of NuG2.

    PubMed

    Schwantes, Christian R; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2016-04-26

    After reanalyzing simulations of NuG2-a designed mutant of protein G-generated by Lindorff-Larsen et al. with time structure-based independent components analysis and Markov state models as well as performing 1.5 ms of additional sampling on Folding@home, we found an intermediate with a register-shift in one of the β-sheets that was visited along a minor folding pathway. The minor folding pathway was initiated by the register-shifted sheet, which is composed of solely nonnative contacts, suggesting that for some peptides, nonnative contacts can lead to productive folding events. To confirm this experimentally, we suggest a mutational strategy for stabilizing the register shift, as well as an infrared experiment that could observe the nonnative folding nucleus.

  6. Right- and left-handed three-helix proteins. I. Experimental and simulation analysis of differences in folding and structure.

    PubMed

    Glyakina, Anna V; Pereyaslavets, Leonid B; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2013-09-01

    Despite the large number of publications on three-helix protein folding, there is no study devoted to the influence of handedness on the rate of three-helix protein folding. From the experimental studies, we make a conclusion that the left-handed three-helix proteins fold faster than the right-handed ones. What may explain this difference? An important question arising in this paper is whether the modeling of protein folding can catch the difference between the protein folding rates of proteins with similar structures but with different folding mechanisms. To answer this question, the folding of eight three-helix proteins (four right-handed and four left-handed), which are similar in size, was modeled using the Monte Carlo and dynamic programming methods. The studies allowed us to determine the orders of folding of the secondary-structure elements in these domains and amino acid residues which are important for the folding. The obtained data are in good correlation with each other and with the experimental data. Structural analysis of these proteins demonstrated that the left-handed domains have a lesser number of contacts per residue and a smaller radius of cross section than the right-handed domains. This may be one of the explanations of the observed fact. The same tendency is observed for the large dataset consisting of 332 three-helix proteins (238 right- and 94 left-handed). From our analysis, we found that the left-handed three-helix proteins have some less-dense packing that should result in faster folding for some proteins as compared to the case of right-handed proteins.

  7. Constraints on bed scale fracture chronology with a FEM mechanical model of folding: The case of Split Mountain (Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, W.; Guiton, M. L. E.; Leroy, Y. M.; Daniel, J.-M.; Callot, J.-P.

    2012-11-01

    A technique is presented for improving the structural analysis of natural fractures development in large scale fold structures. A 3D restoration of a fold provides the external displacement loading conditions to solve, by the finite element method, the forward mechanical problem of an idealized rock material with a stress-strain relationship based on the activation of pervasive fracture sets. In this elasto-plasticity constitutive law, any activated fracture set contributes to the total plastic strain by either an opening or a sliding mode of rock failure. Inherited versus syn-folding fracture sets development can be studied using this mechanical model. The workflow of this methodology was applied to the Weber sandstone formation deformed by forced folding at Split Mountain Anticline, Utah for which the different fracture sets were created and developed successively during the Sevier and the syn-folding Laramide orogenic phases. The field observations at the top stratigraphic surface of the Weber sandstone lead to classify the fracture sets into a pre-fold WNW-ESE fracture set, and a NE-SW fracture set post-dating the former. The development and relative chronology of the fracture sets are discussed based on the geomechanical modeling results. Starting with a 3D restoration of the Split Mountain Anticline, three fold-fracture development models were generated, alternately assuming that the WNW-ESE fracture set is either present or absent prior to folding process. Depending on the initial fracture configuration, the calculated fracture patterns are markedly different, showing that assuming a WNW-ESE joint set to predate the fold best correlates with field observations. This study is a first step addressing the complex problem of identification of fold-related fracturing events using an elementary concept of rock mechanics. When tight to complementary field observations, including petrography, diagenesis and burial history, the approach can be used to better

  8. Geometry of human vocal folds and glottal channel for mathematical and biomechanical modeling of voice production.

    PubMed

    Sidlof, Petr; Svec, Jan G; Horácek, Jaromír; Veselý, Jan; Klepácek, Ivo; Havlík, Radan

    2008-01-01

    Current models of the vocal folds derive their shape from approximate information rather than from exactly measured data. The objective of this study was to obtain detailed measurements on the geometry of human vocal folds and the glottal channel in phonatory position. A non-destructive casting methodology was developed to capture the vocal fold shape from excised human larynges on both medial and superior surfaces. Two female larynges, each in two different phonatory configurations corresponding to low and high fundamental frequency of the vocal fold vibrations, were measured. A coordinate measuring machine was used to digitize the casts yielding 3D computer models of the vocal fold shape. The coronal sections were located in the models, extracted and fitted by piecewise-defined cubic functions allowing a mathematical expression of the 2D shape of the glottal channel. Left-right differences between the cross-sectional shapes of the vocal folds were found in both the larynges. PMID:18289553

  9. FRankenstein becomes a cyborg: the automatic recombination and realignment of fold recognition models in CASP6.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Jan; Gajda, Michal J; Cymerman, Iwona A; Kurowski, Michal A; Pawlowski, Marcin; Boniecki, Michal; Obarska, Agnieszka; Papaj, Grzegorz; Sroczynska-Obuchowicz, Paulina; Tkaczuk, Karolina L; Sniezynska, Paulina; Sasin, Joanna M; Augustyn, Anna; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Feder, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    In the course of CASP6, we generated models for all targets using a new version of the "FRankenstein's monster approach." Previously (in CASP5) we were able to build many very accurate full-atom models by selection and recombination of well-folded fragments obtained from crude fold recognition (FR) results, followed by optimization of the sequence-structure fit and assessment of alternative alignments on the structural level. This procedure was however very arduous, as most of the steps required extensive visual and manual input from the human modeler. Now, we have automated the most tedious steps, such as superposition of alternative models, extraction of best-scoring fragments, and construction of a hybrid "monster" structure, as well as generation of alternative alignments in the regions that remain poorly scored in the refined hybrid model. We have also included the ROSETTA method to construct those parts of the target for which no reasonable structures were generated by FR methods (such as long insertions and terminal extensions). The analysis of successes and failures of the current version of the FRankenstein approach in modeling of CASP6 targets reveals that the considerably streamlined and automated method performs almost as well as the initial, mostly manual version, which suggests that it may be a useful tool for accurate protein structure prediction even in the hands of nonexperts.

  10. Irregular vocal fold dynamics incited by asymmetric fluid loading in a model of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, David; Erath, Byron D.; Zanartu, Matias; Peterson, Sean D.

    2011-11-01

    Voiced speech is produced by dynamic fluid-structure interactions in the larynx. Traditionally, reduced order models of speech have relied upon simplified inviscid flow solvers to prescribe the fluid loadings that drive vocal fold motion, neglecting viscous flow effects that occur naturally in voiced speech. Viscous phenomena, such as skewing of the intraglottal jet, have the most pronounced effect on voiced speech in cases of vocal fold paralysis where one vocal fold loses some, or all, muscular control. The impact of asymmetric intraglottal flow in pathological speech is captured in a reduced order two-mass model of speech by coupling a boundary-layer estimation of the asymmetric pressures with asymmetric tissue parameters that are representative of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Nonlinear analysis identifies the emergence of irregular and chaotic vocal fold dynamics at values representative of pathological speech conditions.

  11. Modelling of Folding Patterns in Flat Membranes and Cylinders by Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Taketoshi

    This paper describes folding methods of thin flat sheets as well as cylindrical shells by modelling folding patterns through Japanese traditional Origami technique. New folding patterns have been devised in thin flat squared or circular membrane by modifying so called Miura-Ori in Japan (one node with 4 folding lines). Some folding patterns in cylindrical shells have newly been developed including spiral configurations. Devised foldable cylindrical shells were made by using polymer sheets, and it has been assured that they can be folded quite well. The devised models will make it possible to construct foldable/deployable space structures as well as to manufacture foldable industrial products and living goods, e. g., bottles for soft drinks.

  12. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-06-01

    We consider the problem of determining the three-dimensional folding of a protein given its one-dimensional amino acid sequence. We use the HP model for protein folding proposed by Dill, which models protein as a chain of amino acid residues that are either hydrophobic or polar, and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant initial driving force for the protein folding. Hart and Istrail gave approximation algorithms for folding proteins on the cubic lattice under HP model. In this paper, we examine the choice of a lattice by considering its algorithmic and geometric implications and argue that triangular lattice is a more reasonable choice. We present a set of folding rules for a triangular lattice and analyze the approximation ratio which they achieve. In addition, we introduce a generalization of the HP model to account for residues having different levels of hydrophobicity. After describing the biological foundation for this generalization, we show that in the new model we are able to achieve similar constant factor approximation guarantees on the triangular lattice as were achieved in the standard HP model. While the structures derived from our folding rules are probably still far from biological reality, we hope that having a set of folding rules with different properties will yield more interesting folds when combined.

  13. Comments on single-mass models of vocal fold vibration

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Richard S.; Howe, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for single-mass oscillation in the vocal tract are examined critically. There are two areas that distinguish single-mass models: in the sophistication of the air flow modeling near the oscillator and whether or not oscillation depends on acoustic feedback. Two recent models that do not depend on acoustic feedback are examined in detail. One model that depends on changing flow separation points is extended with approximate calculations. PMID:21117717

  14. The influence of material anisotropy on vibration at onset in a three-dimensional vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Although vocal folds are known to be anisotropic, the influence of material anisotropy on vocal fold vibration remains largely unknown. Using a linear stability analysis, phonation onset characteristics were investigated in a three-dimensional anisotropic vocal fold model. The results showed that isotropic models had a tendency to vibrate in a swing-like motion, with vibration primarily along the superior-inferior direction. Anterior-posterior (AP) out-of-phase motion was also observed and large vocal fold vibration was confined to the middle third region along the AP length. In contrast, increasing anisotropy or increasing AP-transverse stiffness ratio suppressed this swing-like motion and allowed the vocal fold to vibrate in a more wave-like motion with strong medial-lateral motion over the entire medial surface. Increasing anisotropy also suppressed the AP out-of-phase motion, allowing the vocal fold to vibrate in phase along the entire AP length. Results also showed that such improvement in vibration pattern was the most effective with large anisotropy in the cover layer alone. These numerical predictions were consistent with previous experimental observations using self-oscillating physical models. It was further hypothesized that these differences may facilitate complete glottal closure in finite-amplitude vibration of anisotropic models as observed in recent experiments. PMID:24606284

  15. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics of denaturation and renaturation of barstar in the folding transition zone.

    PubMed Central

    Shastry, M. C.; Agashe, V. R.; Udgaonkar, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The fluorescence-monitored kinetics of folding and unfolding of barstar by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) in the folding transition zone, at pH 7, 25 degrees C, have been quantitatively analyzed using a 3-state mechanism: U(S)<-->UF<-->N. U(S) and UF are slow-refolding and fast-refolding unfolded forms of barstar, and N is the native protein. U(S) and UF probably differ in possessing trans and cis conformations, respectively, of the Tyr 47-Pro 48 bond. The 3-state model could be used because the kinetics of folding and unfolding of barstar show 2 phases, a fast phase and a slow phase, and because the relative amplitudes of the 2 phases depend only on the final refolding conditions and not on the initial conditions. Analysis of the observed kinetics according to the 3-state model yields the values of the 4 microscopic rate constants that describe the transitions between the 3 states at different concentrations of GdnHCl. The value of the equilibrium unfolded ratio U(S):UF (K21) and the values of the rate constants of the U(S)-->UF and UF-->U(S) reactions, k12 and k21, respectively, are shown to be independent of the concentration of GdnHCl. K21 has a value of 2.1 +/- 0.1, and k12 and k21 have values of 5.3 x 10(-3) s-1 and 11.2 x 10(-3) s-1, respectively. Double-jump experiments that monitor reactions that are silent to fluorescence monitoring were used to confirm the values of K21, k12, and k21 obtained from the 3-state analysis and thereby the validity of the 3-state model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7833803

  16. The effect of material properties on growth rates of folding and boudinage: Experiments with wax models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neurath, C.; Smith, R. B.

    The growth of unstable structures was studied experimentally in layered wax models. The rheological properties of the two wax types were determined independently by a series of cylinder compression tests. Both waxes enhibited (1) a non-Newtonian stress vs strain-rate relationship (2) strain softening and (3) temperature-dependent viscosity. The stress-strain-rate relationships approximated a power-law, with stress exponents of 5 for the microcrystalline wax and 1.8 for paraffin wax. Blocks of paraffin with a single embedded layer of microcrystalline wax were deformed in two-dimensional pure shear with the layer oriented either parallel to the compressive strain axis so that it shortened and folded, or perpendicular to that axis so that it would stretch and boundinage would form. The growth rates of tiny initial disturbances were measured. The growth rates for folding and boudinage were much higher than could be accounted for by theories assuming Newtonian material properties. Theories taking non-Newtonian behaviour into account (Smith, R. B. 1975. Bull. geol. Soc. Am.86, 1601-1609; Fletcher, R. C. 1974. Am. J. Sci.274, 1029-1043) better describe the folding growth rates. Boudinage, however, grew almost three times faster than would be predicted even by existing non-Newtonian theory. A possible reason for this discrepancy is that the waxes do not exhibit steady-state creep as assumed in the theory. We, therefore, extend the theory to include strain-softening. The crucial step in this theory is the use of a scalar measure of the deformation as a state variable in the constitutive law. In this way the isotropic manifestation of strain-softening can be taken into account. The analysis shows that strain-softening can lead to greatly increased boudinage growth rates while having little influence on the growth rates of folds, which is in agreement with the experiments.

  17. Mathematics, Thermodynamics, and Modeling to Address Ten Common Misconceptions about Protein Structure, Folding, and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative…

  18. A New Heuristic Algorithm for Protein Folding in the HP Model.

    PubMed

    Traykov, Metodi; Angelov, Slav; Yanev, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    This article presents an efficient heuristic for protein folding. The protein folding problem is to predict the compact three-dimensional structure of a protein based on its amino acid sequence. The focus is on an original integer programming model derived from a platform used for Contact Map Overlap problem.

  19. Using Kinetic Network Models To Probe Non-Native Salt-Bridge Effects on α-Helix Folding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangfeng; Voelz, Vincent A

    2016-02-11

    Salt-bridge interactions play an important role in stabilizing many protein structures, and have been shown to be designable features for protein design. In this work, we study the effects of non-native salt bridges on the folding of a soluble alanine-based peptide (Fs peptide) using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations performed on the Folding@home distributed computing platform. Using Markov State Models, we show how non-native salt-bridges affect the folding kinetics of Fs peptide by perturbing specific conformational states. Furthermore, we present methods for the automatic detection and analysis of such states. These results provide insight into helix folding mechanisms and useful information to guide simulation-based computational protein design.

  20. Influence of numerical model decisions on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, Timothy E.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Computational vocal fold models are often used to study the physics of voice production. In this paper the sensitivity of predicted vocal fold flow-induced vibration and resulting airflow patterns to several modeling selections is explored. The location of contact lines used to prevent mesh collapse and assumptions of symmetry were found to influence airflow patterns. However, these variables had relatively little effect on the vibratory response of the vocal fold model itself. Model motion was very sensitive to Poisson’s ratio. The importance of these parameter sensitivities in the context of vocal fold modeling is discussed. PMID:23794762

  1. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  2. Analysis of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene Nanoribbons with Folded Racket Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borum, Andy; Plaut, Raymond; Dillard, David

    2011-10-01

    When carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons become long, they may self-fold and form tennis racket-like shapes. This phenomenon is analyzed in two ways by treating a nanotube or nanoribbon as an elastica. First, an approach from adhesion science is used, in which the two sides of the racket handle are assumed to be straight and bonded together with constant or no separation. New analytical results are obtained involving the shape, bending energy, and adhesion energy of the self-folded structures. These relations show that the dimensions of the racket loop are proportional to the square root of the flexural rigidity. The second analysis uses the Lennard-Jones potential to model the van der Waals forces between the two sides of the racket. A nanoribbon is considered, and the interatomic forces are integrated along the length and across the width of the nanoribbon. The resulting integro-differential equations are solved using the finite difference method. The racket handle is found to be in compression and the separation between the two sides of the racket handle decreases in the direction of the racket loop. The results for the Lennard-Jones model approximately satisfy the relationship between the dimensions and the flexural rigidity found using the adhesion model.

  3. Folding style controlled by intermediate decollement thickness change in the Lurestan region (NW of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt), using analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzipour Saein, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The basal and intermediate decollements play an important role in structural style of fold-and-thrust belts. The decollement units, or different mechanical stratigraphy within the rock units, are not uniform throughout the ZFTB and show a strong spatial variation. The Lurestan region with varied thickness of the intermediate decollement in its northern and southern parts is one of the most important parts of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, regarding its hydrocarbon exploration-extraction projects. Thickness variation of the intermediate decollement in different parts of the Lurestan region allows us to address its role on folding style. Based on scaled analogue modeling, this study outlines the impact of thickness and facies variation of sedimentary rocks in the northern and southern parts of this region on folding style. Two models simulated the mechanical stratigraphy and its consequent different folding styles of the northern and southern parts of the region. In the models, only thickness of the intermediate decollement (thick and thin) for the northern and southern parts of the Lurestan region was varied. Detached minor folds above the intermediate decollement were created in response to the presence of the thicker intermediate decollement, northern part of the study area, which consequently deformed complexly and disharmonically folded, in contrast to polyharmonic folding style in the section, compared to polyharmonic folding style in the southern part, where thin intermediate decollement exists. The model results documented that thickness variation of intermediate decollement levels could explain complex and different folding styles in natural examples which must be taken into account for hydrocarbon exploration throughout these areas.

  4. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  5. The IntFOLD server: an integrated web resource for protein fold recognition, 3D model quality assessment, intrinsic disorder prediction, domain prediction and ligand binding site prediction.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel B; Buenavista, Maria T; Tetchner, Stuart J; McGuffin, Liam J

    2011-07-01

    The IntFOLD server is a novel independent server that integrates several cutting edge methods for the prediction of structure and function from sequence. Our guiding principles behind the server development were as follows: (i) to provide a simple unified resource that makes our prediction software accessible to all and (ii) to produce integrated output for predictions that can be easily interpreted. The output for predictions is presented as a simple table that summarizes all results graphically via plots and annotated 3D models. The raw machine readable data files for each set of predictions are also provided for developers, which comply with the Critical Assessment of Methods for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) data standards. The server comprises an integrated suite of five novel methods: nFOLD4, for tertiary structure prediction; ModFOLD 3.0, for model quality assessment; DISOclust 2.0, for disorder prediction; DomFOLD 2.0 for domain prediction; and FunFOLD 1.0, for ligand binding site prediction. Predictions from the IntFOLD server were found to be competitive in several categories in the recent CASP9 experiment. The IntFOLD server is available at the following web site: http://www.reading.ac.uk/bioinf/IntFOLD/.

  6. Functional analysis of propeptide as an intramolecular chaperone for in vivo folding of subtilisin nattokinase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan; Liu, Hui; Bao, Wei; Weng, Meizhi; Chen, Wei; Cai, Yongjun; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2010-12-01

    Here, we show that during in vivo folding of the precursor, the propeptide of subtilisin nattokinase functions as an intramolecular chaperone (IMC) that organises the in vivo folding of the subtilisin domain. Two residues belonging to β-strands formed by conserved regions of the IMC are crucial for the folding of the subtilisin domain through direct interactions. An identical protease can fold into different conformations in vivo due to the action of a mutated IMC, resulting in different kinetic parameters. Some interfacial changes involving conserved regions, even those induced by the subtilisin domain, blocked subtilisin folding and altered its conformation. Insight into the interaction between the subtilisin and IMC domains is provided by a three-dimensional structural model.

  7. Non-stationary Bayesian estimation of parameters from a body cover model of the vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Hadwin, Paul J; Galindo, Gabriel E; Daun, Kyle J; Zañartu, Matías; Erath, Byron D; Cataldo, Edson; Peterson, Sean D

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of reduced-order vocal fold models into clinically useful tools for subject-specific diagnosis and treatment hinges upon successfully and accurately representing an individual patient in the modeling framework. This, in turn, requires inference of model parameters from clinical measurements in order to tune a model to the given individual. Bayesian analysis is a powerful tool for estimating model parameter probabilities based upon a set of observed data. In this work, a Bayesian particle filter sampling technique capable of estimating time-varying model parameters, as occur in complex vocal gestures, is introduced. The technique is compared with time-invariant Bayesian estimation and least squares methods for determining both stationary and non-stationary parameters. The current technique accurately estimates the time-varying unknown model parameter and maintains tight credibility bounds. The credibility bounds are particularly relevant from a clinical perspective, as they provide insight into the confidence a clinician should have in the model predictions. PMID:27250162

  8. Efficient traversal of beta-sheet protein folding pathways using ensemble models.

    PubMed

    Shenker, Solomon; O'Donnell, Charles W; Devadas, Srinivas; Berger, Bonnie; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2011-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can now predict ms-timescale folding processes of small proteins; however, this presently requires hundreds of thousands of CPU hours and is primarily applicable to short peptides with few long-range interactions. Larger and slower-folding proteins, such as many with extended β-sheet structure, would require orders of magnitude more time and computing resources. Furthermore, when the objective is to determine only which folding events are necessary and limiting, atomistic detail MD simulations can prove unnecessary. Here, we introduce the program tFolder as an efficient method for modelling the folding process of large β-sheet proteins using sequence data alone. To do so, we extend existing ensemble β-sheet prediction techniques, which permitted only a fixed anti-parallel β-barrel shape, with a method that predicts arbitrary β-strand/β-strand orientations and strand-order permutations. By accounting for all partial and final structural states, we can then model the transition from random coil to native state as a Markov process, using a master equation to simulate population dynamics of folding over time. Thus, all putative folding pathways can be energetically scored, including which transitions present the greatest barriers. Since correct folding pathway prediction is likely determined by the accuracy of contact prediction, we demonstrate the accuracy of tFolder to be comparable with state-of-the-art methods designed specifically for the contact prediction problem alone. We validate our method for dynamics prediction by applying it to the folding pathway of the well-studied Protein G. With relatively very little computation time, tFolder is able to reveal critical features of the folding pathways which were only previously observed through time-consuming MD simulations and experimental studies. Such a result greatly expands the number of proteins whose folding pathways can be studied, while the algorithmic integration of

  9. Folding behaviors of lattice model proteins with three kinds of contact potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Meng; Wang, Jun; Tang, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2003-06-01

    The interaction potentials between the amino acids are very important in the study of protein folding and design. In this work, the folding behaviors of lattice model protein chains are studied using three kinds of contact potentials between the beads. For these three cases, a number of sequences are designed using the Z-score method, and then their folding behaviors are obtained via Monte Carlo simulations for different sizes of the chains. It is found that the proper weakening of hydrophobicity may speed up the folding and the elimination of the mixing interaction terms may deteriorate the foldability. The different features of the foldability are discussed by comparing the characteristics of the energy landscapes of these model chains. The formations of various contacts are also analyzed, which provide us with some microscopic information on the model systems and interaction potentials.

  10. Simulating the peptide folding kinetic related spectra based on the Markov State Model.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Zhuang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Optical spectroscopic tools are used to monitor protein folding/unfolding dynamics after a fast triggering such as the laser induced temperature jump. These techniques provide new opportunities for comparison between theory and simulations and atom-level understanding protein folding mechanism. However, the direct comparison still face two main challenges: a gap between folding relevant timescales (microseconds or above) and length of molecular dynamics simulations (typically tens to hundreds of nanoseconds), and difficulty in directly calculating spectroscopic observables from simulation configurations. Markov State Model (MSM) approach is one of the most powerful means which can increase simulations timescale up to microsecond or even millisecond. We address progress on modeling infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic signals of temperature jump induced unfolding dynamics for a few small proteins. The harmoniousness between experiment and theoretical can both improve our understanding of protein folding mechanisms and provide direct validation of those theoretical models. PMID:24446363

  11. TrishearCreator: A tool for the kinematic simulation and strain analysis of trishear fault-propagation folding with growth strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun; Yin, Hongwei; Zhu, Lili

    2012-12-01

    TrishearCreator is a platform independent web program constructed in Flash, which enables fold modeling, numerical simulation of trishear fault-propagation folding and strain analysis, etc. In the program, various types of original strata, such as folds and inclined strata can be easily constructed via adjusting shape parameters. In the simulation of trishear fault-propagation folding, growth strata and strain ellipses are calculated and displayed simultaneously. This web-based program is easy to use. Model parameters are changed by simple mouse actions, which have the advantage of speed and simplicity. And it gives an instant visual appreciation of the effect of changing the parameters that are used to construct the initial configuration of the model and the fold-propagation folding. These data can be exported to a text file, and be shared with other geologists to replay the kinematic evolution of structures using the program.

  12. Protein folding dynamics: the diffusion-collision model and experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, M.; Weaver, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The diffusion-collision model of protein folding is assessed. A description is given of the qualitative aspects and quantitative results of the diffusion-collision model and their relation to available experimental data. We consider alternative mechanisms for folding and point out their relationship to the diffusion-collision model. We show that the diffusion-collision model is supported by a growing body of experimental and theoretical evidence, and we outline future directions for developing the model and its applications. PMID:8003983

  13. Biomechanical modeling of the three-dimensional aspects of human vocal fold dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Anxiong; Lohscheller, Jörg; Berry, David A.; Becker, Stefan; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Voigt, Daniel; Döllinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Human voice originates from the three-dimensional (3D) oscillations of the vocal folds. In previous studies, biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been predicted by optimizing the parameters of simple two-mass-models to fit its dynamics to the high-speed imaging data from the clinic. However, only lateral and longitudinal displacements of the vocal folds were considered. To extend previous studies, a 3D mass-spring, cover-model is developed, which predicts the 3D vibrations of the entire medial surface of the vocal fold. The model consists of five mass planes arranged in vertical direction. Each plane contains five longitudinal, mass-spring, coupled oscillators. Feasibility of the model is assessed using a large body of dynamical data previously obtained from excised human larynx experiments, in vivo canine larynx experiments, physical models, and numerical models. Typical model output was found to be similar to existing findings. The resulting model enables visualization of the 3D dynamics of the human vocal folds during phonation for both symmetric and asymmetric vibrations. PMID:20136223

  14. Statistical mechanical modeling of RNA folding: from free energy landscape to tertiary structural prediction

    PubMed Central

    CAO, Song; CHEN, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the success of computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structure, the problem of predicting RNA tertiary structure folding remains. Low-resolution structural models show promise as they allow for rigorous statistical mechanical computation for the conformational entropies, free energies, and the coarse-grained structures of tertiary folds. Molecular dynamics refinement of coarse-grained structures leads to all-atom 3D structures. Modeling based on statistical mechanics principles also has the unique advantage of predicting the full free energy landscape, including local minima and the global free energy minimum. The energy landscapes combined with the 3D structures form the basis for quantitative predictions of RNA functions. In this chapter, we present an overview of statistical mechanical models for RNA folding and then focus on a recently developed RNA statistical mechanical model -- the Vfold model. The main emphasis is placed on the physics underpinning the models, the computational strategies, and the connections to RNA biology. PMID:27293312

  15. Analysis of curved folds and fault/fold terminations in the southern Upper Magdalena Valley of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Giovanny; Rico, John; Bayona, German; Montes, Camilo; Rosero, Alexis; Sierra, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    We use surface and subsurface fold and fault geometries to document curved geometry of folds, along-strike termination of faults/folds and the change of dip of regional faults in four structural areas in the southern part of the Upper Magdalena Valley Basin. In La Cañada area, strike-slip deformation is dominant and cuts former compressional structures; faults and folds of this area end northward abruptly near Rio Paez. To the north of Paez River is the La Hocha area that includes the Tesalia Syncline and La Hocha Anticline, two curved folds that plunge at the same latitude. The southern domain of La Hocha Anticline is asymmetric and bounded by faults in both flanks, whereas the symmetry of the northern domain is related to subsurface fault bending. Paleomagnetic components uncovered in Jurassic rocks suggest a clockwise rotation of 15.2 ± 11.4 in the southern domain, and 31.7 ± 14.4 in the northern domain. The Iquira Area, North of La Hocha, the internal structure is controlled by east-verging faults that end abruptly to the north of this area. The northernmost area is the Upar area that includes fault systems with opposite vergence; west-verging faults at the east of this area decapitate east-verging faults and folds. Paleomagnetic data, geologic mapping and regional structural cross-sections suggest that: (1) pre-existing basement structure controls the curved geometry of La Hocha Anticline; (2) along-strike changes in structural style between adjacent areas and along-strike termination of faults and folds are related to the location of northwest-striking transverse structures in the subsurface; and (3) at least two deformation phases are documented: an Eocene-Oligocene phase associated with the growth of folds along detachment levels within Mesozoic rocks; and a late Miocene phase associated with transpressive faulting along the Chusma and San Jacinto faults. The latter event drove clockwise rotation of the La Hocha Anticline.

  16. Folding behavior of ribosomal protein S6 studied by modified Go¯ -like model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Zhang, J.; Wang, J.; Li, W. F.; Wang, W.

    2007-03-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that, although topology is the determinant factor in protein folding, especially for small single-domain proteins, energetic factors also play an important role in the folding process. The ribosomal protein S6 has been subjected to intensive studies. A radical change of the transition state in its circular permutants has been observed, which is believed to be caused by a biased distribution of contact energies. Since the simplistic topology-only Gō -like model is not able to reproduce such an observation, we modify the model by introducing variable contact energies between residues based on their physicochemical properties. The modified Gō -like model can successfully reproduce the Φ -value distributions, folding nucleus, and folding pathways of both the wild-type and circular permutants of S6. Furthermore, by comparing the results of the modified and the simplistic models, we find that the hydrophobic effect constructs the major force that balances the loop entropies. This may indicate that nature maintains the folding cooperativity of this protein by carefully arranging the location of hydrophobic residues in the sequence. Our study reveals a strategy or mechanism used by nature to get out of the dilemma when the native structure, possibly required by biological function, conflicts with folding cooperativity. Finally, the possible relationship between such a design of nature and amyloidosis is also discussed.

  17. Using Innovative Acoustic Analysis to Predict the Postoperative Outcomes of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yung-An; Chen, Wei-Chen; Ke, Hsiang-Chun; Lin, Wen-Yang; Yang, Hsing-Rong; Shie, Dung-Yun; Tsai, Ming-Hsui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Autologous fat injection laryngoplasty is ineffective for some patients with iatrogenic vocal fold paralysis, and additional laryngeal framework surgery is often required. An acoustically measurable outcome predictor for lipoinjection laryngoplasty would assist phonosurgeons in formulating treatment strategies. Methods. Seventeen thyroid surgery patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis participated in this study. All subjects underwent lipoinjection laryngoplasty to treat postsurgery vocal hoarseness. After treatment, patients were assigned to success and failure groups on the basis of voice improvement. Linear prediction analysis was used to construct a new voice quality indicator, the number of irregular peaks (NIrrP). It compared with the measures used in the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP), such as jitter (frequency perturbation) and shimmer (perturbation of amplitude). Results. By comparing the [i] vowel produced by patients before the lipoinjection laryngoplasty (AUC = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.78–0.99), NIrrP was shown to be a more accurate predictor of long-term surgical outcomes than jitter (AUC = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.47–0.91) and shimmer (AUC = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.37–0.85), as identified by the receiver operating characteristic curve. Conclusions. NIrrP measured using the LP model could be a more accurate outcome predictor than the parameters used in the MDVP. PMID:27738634

  18. Asymptotic distribution of motifs in a stochastic context-free grammar model of RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Poznanović, Svetlana; Heitsch, Christine E

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the distribution of RNA secondary structures given by the Knudsen-Hein stochastic context-free grammar used in the prediction program Pfold. Our main theorem gives relations between the expected number of these motifs--independent of the grammar probabilities. These relations are a consequence of proving that the distribution of base pairs, of helices, and of different types of loops is asymptotically Gaussian in this model of RNA folding. Proof techniques use singularity analysis of probability generating functions. We also demonstrate that these asymptotic results capture well the expected number of RNA base pairs in native ribosomal structures, and certain other aspects of their predicted secondary structures. In particular, we find that the predicted structures largely satisfy the expected relations, although the native structures do not.

  19. Asymptotic distribution of motifs in a stochastic context-free grammar model of RNA folding

    PubMed Central

    Poznanović, Svetlana; Heitsch, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the distribution of RNA secondary structures given by the Knudsen-Hein stochastic context-free grammar used in the prediction program Pfold. Our main theorem gives relations between the expected number of these motifs — independent of the grammar probabilities. These relations are a consequence of proving that the distibution of base pairs, of helices, and of different types of loops is asympotically Gaussian in this model of RNA folding. Proof techniques use singularity analysis of probability generating functions. We also demonstrate that these asymptotic results capture well the expected number of RNA base pairs in native ribosomal structures, and certain other aspects of their predicted secondary structures. In particular, we find that the predicted structures largely satisfy the expected relations, although the native structures do not. PMID:24384698

  20. Modeling of wind gap formation and development of sedimentary basins during fold growth: application to the Zagros Fold Belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collignon, Marine; Yamato, Philippe; Castelltort, Sébastien; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Mountain building and landscape evolution are controlled by the interactions between river dynamics and tectonic forces. Such interactions have been largely studied but a quantitative evaluation of tectonic/geomorphic feedbacks remains required for understanding sediments routing within orogens and fold-and-thrust belts. Here, we employ numerical simulations to assess the conditions of uplift and river incision necessary to deflect an antecedent drainage network during the growth of one or several folds. We propose that a partitioning of the river network into internal (endorheic) and longitudinal drainage arises as a result of lithological differences within the deforming crustal sedimentary cover. We show with examples from the Zagros Fold Belt (ZFB) that drainage patterns can be linked to the incision ratio R between successive lithological layers, corresponding to the ratio between their relative erodibilities or incision coefficients. Transverse drainage networks develop for uplift rates smaller than 0.8 mm.yr-1 and -10 < R < 10. Intermediate drainage network are obtained for uplift rates up to 2 mm.yr-1 and incision ratios of 20. Parallel drainage networks and formation of sedimentary basins occur for large values of incision ratio (R >20) and uplift rates between 1 and 2 mm.yr-1. These results have implications for predicting the distribution of sediment depocenters in fold-and-thrust belts, which can be of direct economic interest for hydrocarbon exploration.

  1. Mutational analysis of the BPTI folding pathway: I. Effects of aromatic-->leucine substitutions on the distribution of folding intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J. X.; Goldenberg, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    The roles of aromatic residues in determining the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) were analyzed mutationally by examining the distribution of disulfide-bonded intermediates that accumulated during the refolding of protein variants in which tyrosine or phenylalanine residues were individually replaced with leucine. The eight substitutions examined all caused significant changes in the intermediate distribution. In some cases, the major effect was to decrease the accumulation of intermediates containing two of the three disulfides found in the native protein, without affecting the distribution of earlier intermediates. Other substitutions, however, led to much more random distributions of the intermediates containing only one disulfide. These results indicate that the individual residues making up the hydrophobic core of the native protein make clearly distinguishable contributions to conformation and stability early in folding: The early distribution of intermediates does not appear to be determined by a general hydrophobic collapse. The effects of the substitutions were generally consistent with the structures of the major intermediates determined by NMR studies of analogs, confirming that the distribution of disulfide-bonded species is determined by stabilizing interactions within the ordered regions of the intermediates. The plasticity of the BPTI folding pathway implied by these results can be described using conformational funnels to illustrate the degree to which conformational entropy is lost at different stages in the folding of the wild-type and mutant proteins. PMID:9232656

  2. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Onuchic, José N.; Schug, Alexander

    2015-12-28

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein’s functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  3. Investigating the Three-dimensional Flow Separation Induced by a Model Vocal Fold Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Kelley C.; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The fluid-structure energy exchange process for normal speech has been studied extensively, but it is not well understood for pathological conditions. Polyps and nodules, which are geometric abnormalities that form on the medial surface of the vocal folds, can disrupt vocal fold dynamics and thus can have devastating consequences on a patient's ability to communicate. Our laboratory has reported particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within an investigation of a model polyp located on the medial surface of an in vitro driven vocal fold model, which show that such a geometric abnormality considerably disrupts the glottal jet behavior. This flow field adjustment is a likely reason for the severe degradation of the vocal quality in patients with polyps. A more complete understanding of the formation and propagation of vortical structures from a geometric protuberance, such as a vocal fold polyp, and the resulting influence on the aerodynamic loadings that drive the vocal fold dynamics, is necessary for advancing the treatment of this pathological condition. The present investigation concerns the three-dimensional flow separation induced by a wall-mounted prolate hemispheroid with a 2:1 aspect ratio in cross flow, i.e. a model vocal fold polyp, using an oil-film visualization technique. Unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation and its impact of the wall pressure loading are examined using skin friction line visualization and wall pressure measurements. PMID:24513707

  4. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Schug, Alexander; Onuchic, José N.

    2015-12-01

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein's functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  5. Modeling of the transient responses of the vocal fold lamina propria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W

    2009-01-01

    The human voice is produced by flow-induced self-sustained oscillation of the vocal fold lamina propria. The mechanical properties of vocal fold tissues are important for understanding phonation, including the time-dependent and transient changes in fundamental frequency (F(0)). Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on a group of specimens of the vocal fold lamina propria, including the superficial layer (vocal fold cover) (5 male, 5 female) and the deeper layers (vocal ligament) (6 male, 6 female). Results showed that the vocal fold lamina propria, like many other soft tissues, exhibits both elastic and viscous behavior. Specifically, the transient mechanical responses of cyclic stress relaxation and creep were observed. A three-network constitutive model composed of a hyperelastic equilibrium network in parallel with two viscoplastic time-dependent networks proves effective in characterizing the cyclic stress relaxation and creep behavior. For male vocal folds at a stretch of 1.4, significantly higher peak stress was found in the vocal ligament than in the vocal fold cover. Also, the male vocal ligament was significantly stiffer than the female vocal ligament. Our findings may help explain the mechanisms of some widely observed transient phenomena in F(0) regulation during phonation, such as the global declination in F(0) during the production of declarative sentences, and local F(0) changes such as overshoot and undershoot.

  6. Modeling coupled aerodynamics and vocal fold dynamics using immersed boundary methods.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Comer; Zhai, Guangnian; Scherer, Ronald

    2006-11-01

    The penalty immersed boundary (PIB) method, originally introduced by Peskin (1972) to model the function of the mammalian heart, is tested as a fluid-structure interaction model of the closely coupled dynamics of the vocal folds and aerodynamics in phonation. Two-dimensional vocal folds are simulated with material properties chosen to result in self-oscillation and volume flows in physiological frequency ranges. Properties of the glottal flow field, including vorticity, are studied in conjunction with the dynamic vocal fold motion. The results of using the PIB method to model self-oscillating vocal folds for the case of 8 cm H20 as the transglottal pressure gradient are described. The volume flow at 8 cm H20, the transglottal pressure, and vortex dynamics associated with the self-oscillating model are shown. Volume flow is also given for 2, 4, and 12 cm H2O, illustrating the robustness of the model to a range of transglottal pressures. The results indicate that the PIB method applied to modeling phonation has good potential for the study of the interdependence of aerodynamics and vocal fold motion.

  7. Numerical Models of Folding on Europa, and the Mystery of Europa's Surface Area Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Michael T.; McKinnon, W. B.

    2009-09-01

    Europa's surface is dominated by extensional tectonic features. While contractional features have been identified (e.g., folds, convergence bands, and even take-up across sheared double ridges), it is unclear whether the sum of such convergence can match the amount of surface extension represented by dilational bands alone (of order 5%) (see Kattenhorn and Hurford, in Europa, in press). Dombard and McKinnon used a semi-analytical model to examine the growth of folds on Europa and found that Astypalaea-like folds can form with a thermal gradient of 20 K/km (high) and 2% contraction (low) for reasonable strain rates, but generally only for low surface temperatures (i.e., high latitudes). We revisit folding of an ice lithosphere using the finite element code Tekton; the "Astypalaea” problem is especially appropriate as surface strain appears low and localized brittle faulting minimal. Initial benchmark simulations using a constant lithospheric strength with depth (as required by the semi-analytic model) gives results consistent with previous work, with only modestly smaller instability growth rates. Employing the more realistic strength profile of Beeman et al., however, suppresses fold growth rates, a known result from terrestrial studies. In these cases forming Astypalaea-like folds requires 10% lithospheric contraction for thermal gradients of 20 K/km, or 5% contraction for thermal gradients of 30 K/km. In the absence of high thermal gradients contraction results in near-uniform thickening of the lithosphere, and large local strains may be accommodated without producing large-amplitude deformation. These models support a hypothesis that large contractional strains can be "hidden” in long-wavelength, low-amplitude folds, but the large compressive stresses necessary (of order 10 MPa) are problematic. We are presently exploring whether such "cryptic compression” is possible in the presence of strain weakening (Bland and McKinnon, submitted) and whether a

  8. Redesigning of anti-c-Met single chain Fv antibody for the cytoplasmic folding and its structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Edwardraja, Selvakumar; Neelamegam, Rameshkumar; Ramadoss, Vijayaraj; Venkatesan, Subramanian; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2010-06-15

    Typically, single chain Fv antibodies are unable to fold properly under a reducing cytoplasm because of the reduction of disulfide bonds. The inability to fold limits both the production of the functional scFvs and their targeting against antigens, which are generally executed in a reducing cytoplasm. In this study, the target scFv CDR was grafted with stable human consensus framework sequences, which enabled the generation of a foldable scFv in a reducing cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. Additionally, the structural features affecting the folding efficiency of the engineered scFv were identified by analyzing the predicted structure. An anti-c-Met scFv, which was a cytoplasmic non-foldable protein, was redesigned as the model system. This study confirmed that the engineered anti-c-Met scFv was folded into its native form in the cytoplasm of E. coli BL21(DE3) without a significant loss in the specific binding activity against c-Met antigen. The structures of the wild-type anti-c-Met scFv and the engineered scFv were predicted using homology modeling. A comparative analysis based on the sequence and structure showed that the hydrophobicity of 12 solvent exposed residues decreased, and two newly formed salt bridges might have improved the folding efficiency of the engineered scFv under the reducing condition.

  9. Experimental study of the aeroacoustic-aeroelastic behavior of model vocal folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Elizabeth; Camarena, Ernesto; Krane, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The effect of vocal fold body stiffness and bilateral asymmetry was studied using a life-size physical model of the human airway using interchangeable silicone rubber models of the human vocal folds. The two layer vocal fold models are comprised of an inner body layer and an outside cover layer. The following measures were used to assess the effect of body stiffness and asymmetry: radiated sound power, phonation threshold pressure and aeroacoustic source strengths. Results obtained from the human airway model compared favorably with behavior observed in human subjects. Furthermore, the results reveal that the asymmetric cases required a higher subglottal pressure to initiate phonation and radiated less intense sound, in comparison to the symmetrical configuration.

  10. Effect of inferior surface angle on the self-oscillation of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Simeon L.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Geometry of the human vocal folds strongly influences their oscillatory motion. While the effect of intraglottal geometry on phonation has been widely investigated, the study of the geometry of the inferior surface of the vocal folds has been limited. In this study the way in which the inferior vocal fold surface angle affects vocal fold vibration was explored using a two-dimensional, self-oscillating finite element vocal fold model. The geometry was parameterized to create models with five different inferior surface angles. Four of the five models exhibited self-sustained oscillations. Comparisons of model motion showed increased vertical displacement and decreased glottal width amplitude with decreasing inferior surface angle. In addition, glottal width and air flow rate waveforms changed as the inferior surface angle was varied. Structural, rather than aerodynamic, effects are shown to be the cause of the changes in model response as the inferior surface angle was varied. Supporting data including glottal pressure distribution, average intraglottal pressure, energy transfer, and flow separation point locations are discussed, and suggestions for future research are given. PMID:22559379

  11. Lattice and off-lattice side chain models of protein folding: Linear time structure prediction better than 86% of optimal

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.; Istrail, S.

    1996-08-09

    This paper considers the protein structure prediction problem for lattice and off-lattice protein folding models that explicitly represent side chains. Lattice models of proteins have proven extremely useful tools for reasoning about protein folding in unrestricted continuous space through analogy. This paper provides the first illustration of how rigorous algorithmic analyses of lattice models can lead to rigorous algorithmic analyses of off-lattice models. The authors consider two side chain models: a lattice model that generalizes the HP model (Dill 85) to explicitly represent side chains on the cubic lattice, and a new off-lattice model, the HP Tangent Spheres Side Chain model (HP-TSSC), that generalizes this model further by representing the backbone and side chains of proteins with tangent spheres. They describe algorithms for both of these models with mathematically guaranteed error bounds. In particular, the authors describe a linear time performance guaranteed approximation algorithm for the HP side chain model that constructs conformations whose energy is better than 865 of optimal in a face centered cubic lattice, and they demonstrate how this provides a 70% performance guarantee for the HP-TSSC model. This is the first algorithm in the literature for off-lattice protein structure prediction that has a rigorous performance guarantee. The analysis of the HP-TSSC model builds off of the work of Dancik and Hannenhalli who have developed a 16/30 approximation algorithm for the HP model on the hexagonal close packed lattice. Further, the analysis provides a mathematical methodology for transferring performance guarantees on lattices to off-lattice models. These results partially answer the open question of Karplus et al. concerning the complexity of protein folding models that include side chains.

  12. Insights into the damage zones in fault-bend folds from geomechanical models and field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Hou, Guiting; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the rock mass deformation and stress states, the fracture development and distribution are critical to a range of endeavors including oil and gas exploration and development, and geothermal reservoir characterization and management. Geomechanical modeling can be used to simulate the forming processes of faults and folds, and predict the onset of failure and the type and abundance of deformation features along with the orientations and magnitudes of stresses. This approach enables the development of forward models that incorporate realistic mechanical stratigraphy (e.g., the bed thickness, bedding planes and competence contrasts), include faults and bedding-slip surfaces as frictional sliding interfaces, reproduce the geometry of the fold structures, and allow tracking strain and stress through the whole deformation process. In this present study, we combine field observations and finite element models to calibrate the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds, and discuss the mechanical controls (e.g., the slip displacement, ramp cutoff angle, frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults) that are able to influence the development and distribution of fractures during fault-bend folding. A linear relationship between the slip displacement and the fracture damage zone, the ramp cutoff angle and the fracture damage zone, and the frictional coefficient of interlayers and faults and the fracture damage zone was established respectively based on the geomechanical modeling results. These mechanical controls mentioned above altogether contribute to influence and control the development and distribution of fractures in the fault-bend folds.

  13. A Turing Reaction-Diffusion Model for Human Cortical Folding Patterns and Cortical Pattern Malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdal, Monica K.; Striegel, Deborah A.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling and understanding cortical folding pattern formation is important for quantifying cortical development. We present a biomathematical model for cortical folding pattern formation in the human brain and apply this model to study diseases involving cortical pattern malformations associated with neural migration disorders. Polymicrogyria is a cortical malformation disease resulting in an excessive number of small gyri. Our mathematical model uses a Turing reaction-diffusion system to model cortical folding. The lateral ventricle (LV) and ventricular zone (VZ) of the brain are critical components in the formation of cortical patterning. In early cortical development the shape of the LV can be modeled with a prolate spheroid and the VZ with a prolate spheroid surface. We use our model to study how global cortex characteristics, such as size and shape of the LV, affect cortical pattern formation. We demonstrate increasing domain scale can increase the number of gyri and sulci formed. Changes in LV shape can account for sulcus directionality. By incorporating LV size and shape, our model is able to elucidate which parameters can lead to excessive cortical folding.

  14. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency (F[subscript 0]) during anterior-posterior stretching. Method: Three materially linear and 3 materially nonlinear models were…

  15. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  16. Synthetic, Multi-Layer, Self-Oscillating Vocal Fold Model Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Preston R.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Sound for the human voice is produced via flow-induced vocal fold vibration. The vocal folds consist of several layers of tissue, each with differing material properties 1. Normal voice production relies on healthy tissue and vocal folds, and occurs as a result of complex coupling between aerodynamic, structural dynamic, and acoustic physical phenomena. Voice disorders affect up to 7.5 million annually in the United States alone 2 and often result in significant financial, social, and other quality-of-life difficulties. Understanding the physics of voice production has the potential to significantly benefit voice care, including clinical prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of voice disorders. Existing methods for studying voice production include in vivo experimentation using human and animal subjects, in vitro experimentation using excised larynges and synthetic models, and computational modeling. Owing to hazardous and difficult instrument access, in vivo experiments are severely limited in scope. Excised larynx experiments have the benefit of anatomical and some physiological realism, but parametric studies involving geometric and material property variables are limited. Further, they are typically only able to be vibrated for relatively short periods of time (typically on the order of minutes). Overcoming some of the limitations of excised larynx experiments, synthetic vocal fold models are emerging as a complementary tool for studying voice production. Synthetic models can be fabricated with systematic changes to geometry and material properties, allowing for the study of healthy and unhealthy human phonatory aerodynamics, structural dynamics, and acoustics. For example, they have been used to study left-right vocal fold asymmetry 3,4, clinical instrument development 5, laryngeal aerodynamics 6-9, vocal fold contact pressure 10, and subglottal acoustics 11 (a more comprehensive list can be found in Kniesburges et al. 12) Existing synthetic vocal fold models

  17. Synthetic, multi-layer, self-oscillating vocal fold model fabrication.

    PubMed

    Murray, Preston R; Thomson, Scott L

    2011-01-01

    Sound for the human voice is produced via flow-induced vocal fold vibration. The vocal folds consist of several layers of tissue, each with differing material properties. Normal voice production relies on healthy tissue and vocal folds, and occurs as a result of complex coupling between aerodynamic, structural dynamic, and acoustic physical phenomena. Voice disorders affect up to 7.5 million annually in the United States alone and often result in significant financial, social, and other quality-of-life difficulties. Understanding the physics of voice production has the potential to significantly benefit voice care, including clinical prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of voice disorders. Existing methods for studying voice production include in vivo experimentation using human and animal subjects, in vitro experimentation using excised larynges and synthetic models, and computational modeling. Owing to hazardous and difficult instrument access, in vivo experiments are severely limited in scope. Excised larynx experiments have the benefit of anatomical and some physiological realism, but parametric studies involving geometric and material property variables are limited. Further, they are typically only able to be vibrated for relatively short periods of time (typically on the order of minutes). Overcoming some of the limitations of excised larynx experiments, synthetic vocal fold models are emerging as a complementary tool for studying voice production. Synthetic models can be fabricated with systematic changes to geometry and material properties, allowing for the study of healthy and unhealthy human phonatory aerodynamics, structural dynamics, and acoustics. For example, they have been used to study left-right vocal fold asymmetry, clinical instrument development, laryngeal aerodynamics, vocal fold contact pressure, and subglottal acoustics (a more comprehensive list can be found in Kniesburges et al.) Existing synthetic vocal fold models, however, have either

  18. Effect of Hsp70 Chaperone on the Folding and Misfolding of Polypeptides Modeling an Elongating Protein Chain

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Neşe; Rajagopalan, Senapathy; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    Virtually nothing is known about the interaction of co-translationally active chaperones with nascent polypeptides and the resulting effects on peptide conformation and folding. We have explored this issue by NMR analysis of apomyoglobin N-terminal fragments of increasing length, taken as models for different stages of protein biosynthesis, in the absence and presence of the substrate binding domain of Escherichia coli Hsp70, DnaK-β. The incomplete polypeptides misfold and self-associate under refolding conditions. In the presence of DnaK-β, however, formation of the original self-associated species is completely or partially prevented. Chaperone interaction with incomplete protein chains promotes a globally unfolded dynamic DnaK-β-bound state, which becomes folding-competent only upon incorporation of the residues corresponding to the C-terminal H helix. The chaperone does not bind the full-length protein at equilibrium. However, its presence strongly disfavors the kinetic accessibility of misfolding side-routes available to the full-length chain. This work supports the role of DnaK as a “holder” for incomplete N-terminal polypeptides. However, as the chain approaches its full-length status, the tendency to intramolecularly bury non-polar surface efficiently out-competes chaperone binding. Under these conditions, DnaK serves as a “folding enhancer” by supporting folding of a population of otherwise folding-incompetent full-length protein chains. PMID:16309705

  19. Designability and cooperative folding in a four-letter hydrophobic-polar model of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Guang; Tang, Lei-Han

    2006-11-01

    The two-letter hydrophobic-polar (HP) model of Lau and Dill [Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] has been widely used in theoretical studies of protein folding due to its conceptual and computational simplicity. Despite its success in elucidating various aspects of the sequence-structure relationship, thermodynamic behavior of the model is not in agreement with a sharp two-state folding transition of many single-domain proteins. To gain a better understanding of this discrepancy, we consider an extension of the HP model by including an “antiferromagnetic” (AF) interaction in the contact potential that favors amino acid residues with complementary attributes. With an enlarged four-letter alphabet, the density of states on the low energy side can be significantly decreased. Computational studies of the four-letter HP model are performed on 36-mer sequences on a square lattice. It is found that the designability of folded structures in the extended model exhibits strong correlation with that of the two-letter HP model, while the AF interaction alone selects a very different class of structures that resembles the Greek key motif for beta sheets. A procedure is introduced to select sequences which have the largest energy gap to the native state. Based on density of states and specific heat calculations in the full configuration space, we show that the optimized sequence is able to fold nearly as cooperatively as a corresponding Gō model.

  20. Characterization of the vocal fold vertical stiffness in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Liran; Dembinski, Doug; Gutmark, Ephraim; Khosla, Sid

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Characterizing the vertical stiffness gradient that exists between the superior and inferior aspects of the medial surface of the vocal fold. Characterization of this stiffness gradient could elucidate the mechanism behind the divergent glottal shape observed during closing. Study Design Basic science. Methods Indentation testing of the folds was done in a canine model. Stress-strain curves are generated using a customized load-cell and the differential Young's modulus is calculated as a function of strain. Results Results from 11 larynges show that stress increases as a function of strain more rapidly in the inferior aspect of the fold. The calculations for local Young's modulus show that at high strain values a stiffness gradient is formed between the superior and inferior aspects of the fold. Conclusions For small strain values, which are observed at low subglottal pressures, the stiffness of the tissue is similar in both the superior and inferior aspects of the vocal fold. Consequently, the lateral force that is applied by the glottal flow at both aspects results in almost identical displacements, yielding no divergence angle. Conversely, at higher strain values, which are measured in high subglottal pressure, the inferior aspect of the vocal fold is much stiffer than the superior edge; thus any lateral force that is applied at both aspects will result in a much greater displacement of the superior edge, yielding a large divergence angle. The increased stiffness observed at the inferior edge could be due to the proximity of the conus elasticus. PMID:24495431

  1. An investigation of jet trajectory in flow through scaled vocal fold models with asymmetric glottal passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2006-11-01

    Pulsatile two-dimensional flow through asymmetric static divergent models of the human vocal folds is investigated. Included glottal divergence angles are varied between 10° and 30°, with asymmetry angles between the vocal fold pairs ranging from 5° to 15°. The model glottal configurations represent asymmetries that arise during a phonatory cycle due to voice disorders. The flow is scaled to physiological values of Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers. Data are acquired in the anterior posterior mid-plane of the vocal fold models using phase-averaged Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) acquired at ten discrete locations in a phonatory cycle. Glottal jet stability arising from the vocal fold asymmetries is investigated and compared to previously reported work for symmetric vocal fold passages. Jet stability is enhanced with an increase in the included divergence angle, and the glottal asymmetry. Concurrently, the bi-modal jet trajectory and flow unsteadiness diminishes. Consistent with previous findings, the flow attachment due to the Coanda effect occurs when the acceleration of the forcing function is zero.

  2. Mathematics, thermodynamics, and modeling to address ten common misconceptions about protein structure, folding, and stability.

    PubMed

    Robic, Srebrenka

    2010-01-01

    To fully understand the roles proteins play in cellular processes, students need to grasp complex ideas about protein structure, folding, and stability. Our current understanding of these topics is based on mathematical models and experimental data. However, protein structure, folding, and stability are often introduced as descriptive, qualitative phenomena in undergraduate classes. In the process of learning about these topics, students often form incorrect ideas. For example, by learning about protein folding in the context of protein synthesis, students may come to an incorrect conclusion that once synthesized on the ribosome, a protein spends its entire cellular life time in its fully folded native confirmation. This is clearly not true; proteins are dynamic structures that undergo both local fluctuations and global unfolding events. To prevent and address such misconceptions, basic concepts of protein science can be introduced in the context of simple mathematical models and hands-on explorations of publicly available data sets. Ten common misconceptions about proteins are presented, along with suggestions for using equations, models, sequence, structure, and thermodynamic data to help students gain a deeper understanding of basic concepts relating to protein structure, folding, and stability.

  3. Characterization of vocal fold scar formation, prophylaxis and treatment using animal models

    PubMed Central

    Bless, Diane M.; Welham, Nathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review This article reviews recent literature on animal models used to study the pathogenesis, detection, prevention and treatment of vocal fold scarring. Animal work is critical to studying vocal fold scarring because it is the only way to conduct systematic research on the biomechanical properties of the layered structure of the vocal fold lamina propria, and therefore develop reliable prevention and treatment strategies for this complex clinical problem. Recent findings During the period of review, critical anatomic, physiologic and wound healing characteristics, which may serve as the bases for selection of a certain species to help answer a specific question, have been described in mouse, rat, rabbit, ferret and canine models. A number of different strategies for prophylaxis and chronic scar treatment in animals show promise for clinical application. The pathways of scar formation and methods for quantifying treatment-induced change have become better defined. Summary Recent animal vocal fold scarring studies have enriched and confirmed earlier work indicating that restoring pliability to the scarred vocal fold mucosa is challenging but achievable. Differences between animal models and differences in outcome measurements across studies necessitate considering each study individually to obtain guidance for future research. With increased standardization of measurement techniques it may be possible to make more inter-study comparisons. PMID:20962643

  4. Design of a rotamer library for coarse-grained models in protein-folding simulations.

    PubMed

    Larriva, María; Rey, Antonio

    2014-01-27

    Rotamer libraries usually contain geometric information to trace an amino acid side chain, atom by atom, onto a protein backbone. These libraries have been widely used in protein design, structure refinement and prediction, homology modeling, and X-ray and NMR structure validation. However, they usually present too much information and are not always fully compatible with the coarse-grained models of the protein geometry that are frequently used to tackle the protein-folding problem through molecular simulation. In this work, we introduce a new backbone-dependent rotamer library for side chains compatible with low-resolution models in polypeptide chains. We have dispensed with an atomic description of proteins, representing each amino acid side chain by its geometric center (or centroid). The resulting rotamers have been estimated from a statistical analysis of a large structural database consisting of high-resolution X-ray protein structures. As additional information, each rotamer includes the frequency with which it has been found during the statistical analysis. More importantly, the library has been designed with a careful control to ensure that the vast majority of side chains in protein structures (at least 95% of residues) are properly represented. We have tested our library using an independent set of proteins, and our results support a good correlation between the reconstructed centroids from our rotamer library and those in the experimental structures. This new library can serve to improve the definition of side chain centroids in coarse-grained models, avoiding at the same time an excessive additional complexity in a geometric model for the polypeptide chain.

  5. Statistical mechanics of a correlated energy landscape model for protein folding funnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Steven S.; Wang, Jin; Wolynes, Peter G.

    1997-02-01

    In heteropolymers, energetic correlations exist due to polymeric constraints and the locality of interactions. Pair correlations in conjunction with the a priori specification of the existence of a particularly low energy state provide a method of introducing the aspect of minimal frustration to the energy landscapes of random heteropolymers. The resulting funneled landscape exhibits both a phase transition from a molten globule to a folded state, and the heteropolymeric glass transition in the globular state. We model the folding transition in the self-averaging regime, which together with a simple theory of collapse allows us to depict folding as a double-well free energy surface in terms of suitable reaction coordinates. Observed trends in barrier positions and heights with protein sequence length and thermodynamic conditions are discussed within the context of the model. We also discuss the new physics which arises from the introduction of explicitly cooperative many-body interactions, as might arise from sidechain packing and nonadditive hydrophobic forces.

  6. Frequency Response of Synthetic Vocal Fold Models with Linear and Nonlinear Material Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Stephanie M.; Thomson, Scott L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Simeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to create synthetic vocal fold models with nonlinear stress-strain properties and to investigate the effect of linear versus nonlinear material properties on fundamental frequency during anterior-posterior stretching. Method Three materially linear and three materially nonlinear models were created and stretched up to 10 mm in 1 mm increments. Phonation onset pressure (Pon) and fundamental frequency (F0) at Pon were recorded for each length. Measurements were repeated as the models were relaxed in 1 mm increments back to their resting lengths, and tensile tests were conducted to determine the stress-strain responses of linear versus nonlinear models. Results Nonlinear models demonstrated a more substantial frequency response than did linear models and a more predictable pattern of F0 increase with respect to increasing length (although range was inconsistent across models). Pon generally increased with increasing vocal fold length for nonlinear models, whereas for linear models, Pon decreased with increasing length. Conclusions Nonlinear synthetic models appear to more accurately represent the human vocal folds than linear models, especially with respect to F0 response. PMID:22271874

  7. Simplified Protein Models: Predicting Folding Pathways and Structure Using Amino Acid Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Aashish N.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the ability of simultaneously determining a protein’s folding pathway and structure using a properly formulated model without prior knowledge of the native structure. Our model employs a natural coordinate system for describing proteins and a search strategy inspired by the observation that real proteins fold in a sequential fashion by incrementally stabilizing nativelike substructures or “foldons.” Comparable folding pathways and structures are obtained for the twelve proteins recently studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations [K. Lindorff-Larsen, S. Piana, R. O. Dror, D. E. Shaw, Science 334, 517 (2011)], with our calculations running several orders of magnitude faster. We find that nativelike propensities in the unfolded state do not necessarily determine the order of structure formation, a departure from a major conclusion of the molecular dynamics study. Instead, our results support a more expansive view wherein intrinsic local structural propensities may be enhanced or overridden in the folding process by environmental context. The success of our search strategy validates it as an expedient mechanism for folding both in silico and in vivo.

  8. Simplified protein models can rival all atom simulations in predicting folding pathways and structure

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Aashish N.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of simultaneously determining a protein’s folding pathway and structure using a properly formulated model without prior knowledge of the native structure. Our model employs a natural coordinate system for describing proteins and a search strategy inspired by the observation that real proteins fold in a sequential fashion by incrementally stabilizing native-like substructures or "foldons". Comparable folding pathways and structures are obtained for the twelve proteins recently studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations [K. Lindorff-Larsen, S. Piana, R.O. Dror, D. E. Shaw, Science 334, 517 (2011)], with our calculations running several orders of magnitude faster. We find that native-like propensities in the unfolded state do not necessarily determine the order of structure formation, a departure from a major conclusion of the MD study. Instead, our results support a more expansive view wherein intrinsic local structural propensities may be enhanced or overridden in the folding process by environmental context. The success of our search strategy validates it as an expedient mechanism for folding both in silico and in vivo. PMID:23889448

  9. Modeling epigenome folding: formation and dynamics of topologically associated chromatin domains

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Daniel; Carrivain, Pascal; Cavalli, Giacomo; Vaillant, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Genomes of eukaryotes are partitioned into domains of functionally distinct chromatin states. These domains are stably inherited across many cell generations and can be remodeled in response to developmental and external cues, hence contributing to the robustness and plasticity of expression patterns and cell phenotypes. Remarkably, recent studies indicate that these 1D epigenomic domains tend to fold into 3D topologically associated domains forming specialized nuclear chromatin compartments. However, the general mechanisms behind such compartmentalization including the contribution of epigenetic regulation remain unclear. Here, we address the question of the coupling between chromatin folding and epigenome. Using polymer physics, we analyze the properties of a block copolymer model that accounts for local epigenomic information. Considering copolymers build from the epigenomic landscape of Drosophila, we observe a very good agreement with the folding patterns observed in chromosome conformation capture experiments. Moreover, this model provides a physical basis for the existence of multistability in epigenome folding at sub-chromosomal scale. We show how experiments are fully consistent with multistable conformations where topologically associated domains of the same epigenomic state interact dynamically with each other. Our approach provides a general framework to improve our understanding of chromatin folding during cell cycle and differentiation and its relation to epigenetics. PMID:25092923

  10. Three-Dimensional Flow Separation Induced by a Model Vocal Fold Polyp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Kelley C.; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    The fluid-structure energy exchange process for normal speech has been studied extensively, but it is not well understood for pathological conditions. Polyps and nodules, which are geometric abnormalities that form on the medial surface of the vocal folds, can disrupt vocal fold dynamics and thus can have devastating consequences on a patient's ability to communicate. A recent in-vitro investigation of a model polyp in a driven vocal fold apparatus demonstrated that such a geometric abnormality considerably disrupts the glottal jet behavior and that this flow field adjustment was a likely reason for the severe degradation of the vocal quality in patients. Understanding of the formation and propagation of vortical structures from a geometric protuberance, and their subsequent impact on the aerodynamic loadings that drive vocal fold dynamic, is a critical component in advancing the treatment of this pathological condition. The present investigation concerns the three-dimensional flow separation induced by a wall-mounted prolate hemispheroid with a 2:1 aspect ratio in cross flow, i.e. a model vocal fold polyp. Unsteady three-dimensional flow separation and its impact of the wall pressure loading are examined using skin friction line visualization and wall pressure measurements. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-1236351 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  11. Influence of subglottic stenosis on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Simeon L.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of subglottic stenosis on vocal fold vibration is investigated. An idealized stenosis is defined, parameterized, and incorporated into a two-dimensional, fully-coupled finite element model of the vocal folds and laryngeal airway. Flow-induced responses of the vocal fold model to varying severities of stenosis are compared. The model vibration was not appreciably affected by stenosis severities of up to 60% occlusion. Model vibration was altered by stenosis severities of 90% or greater, evidenced by decreased superior model displacement, glottal width amplitude, and flow rate amplitude. Predictions of vibration frequency and maximum flow declination rate were also altered by high stenosis severities. The observed changes became more pronounced with increasing stenosis severity and inlet pressure, and the trends correlated well with flow resistance calculations. Flow visualization was used to characterize subglottal flow patterns in the space between the stenosis and the vocal folds. Underlying mechanisms for the observed changes, possible implications for human voice production, and suggestions for future work are discussed. PMID:23503699

  12. Influence of subglottic stenosis on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Simeon L; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-04-01

    The effect of subglottic stenosis on vocal fold vibration is investigated. An idealized stenosis is defined, parameterized, and incorporated into a two-dimensional, fully-coupled finite element model of the vocal folds and laryngeal airway. Flow-induced responses of the vocal fold model to varying severities of stenosis are compared. The model vibration was not appreciably affected by stenosis severities of up to 60% occlusion. Model vibration was altered by stenosis severities of 90% or greater, evidenced by decreased superior model displacement, glottal width amplitude, and flow rate amplitude. Predictions of vibration frequency and maximum flow declination rate were also altered by high stenosis severities. The observed changes became more pronounced with increasing stenosis severity and inlet pressure, and the trends correlated well with flow resistance calculations. Flow visualization was used to characterize subglottal flow patterns in the space between the stenosis and the vocal folds. Underlying mechanisms for the observed changes, possible implications for human voice production, and suggestions for future work are discussed.

  13. Influence of subglottic stenosis on the flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Simeon L.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2013-04-01

    The effect of subglottic stenosis on vocal fold vibration is investigated. An idealized stenosis is defined, parameterized, and incorporated into a two-dimensional, fully coupled finite element model of the vocal folds and laryngeal airway. Flow-induced responses of the vocal fold model to varying severities of stenosis are compared. The model vibration was not appreciably affected by stenosis severities of up to 60% occlusion. Model vibration was altered by stenosis severities of 90% or greater, evidenced by decreased superior model displacement, glottal width amplitude, and flow rate amplitude. Predictions of vibration frequency and maximum flow declination rate were also altered by high stenosis severities. The observed changes became more pronounced with increasing stenosis severity and inlet pressure, and the trends correlated well with flow resistance calculations. Flow visualization was used to characterize subglottal flow patterns in the space between the stenosis and the vocal folds. Underlying mechanisms for the observed changes, possible implications for human voice production, and suggestions for future work are discussed.

  14. The Fold Analysis Challenge: A virtual globe-based educational resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, Declan G.; Dordevic, Mladen M.; Karabinos, Paul; Tewksbury, Barbara J.; Whitmeyer, Steven J.

    2016-04-01

    We present an undergraduate structural geology laboratory exercise using the Google Earth virtual globe with COLLADA models, optionally including an interactive stereographic projection and JavaScript controls. The learning resource challenges students to identify bedding traces and estimate bedding orientation at several locations on a fold, to fit the fold axis and axial plane to stereographic projection data, and to fit a doubly-plunging fold model to the large-scale structure. The chosen fold is the Sheep Mountain Anticline, a Laramide uplift in the Big Horn Basin of Wyoming. We take an education research-based approach, guiding students through three levels of difficulty. The exercise aims to counter common student misconceptions and stumbling blocks regarding penetrative structures. It can be used in preparation for an in-person field trip, for post-trip reinforcement, or as a virtual field experience in an online-only course. Our KML scripts can be easily transferred to other fold structures around the globe.

  15. Accurate Estimation of Protein Folding and Unfolding Times: Beyond Markov State Models.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ernesto; Adelman, Joshua L; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Because standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are unable to access time scales of interest in complex biomolecular systems, it is common to "stitch together" information from multiple shorter trajectories using approximate Markov state model (MSM) analysis. However, MSMs may require significant tuning and can yield biased results. Here, by analyzing some of the longest protein MD data sets available (>100 μs per protein), we show that estimators constructed based on exact non-Markovian (NM) principles can yield significantly improved mean first-passage times (MFPTs) for protein folding and unfolding. In some cases, MSM bias of more than an order of magnitude can be corrected when identical trajectory data are reanalyzed by non-Markovian approaches. The NM analysis includes "history" information, higher order time correlations compared to MSMs, that is available in every MD trajectory. The NM strategy is insensitive to fine details of the states used and works well when a fine time-discretization (i.e., small "lag time") is used. PMID:27340835

  16. Protein folding in hydrophobic-polar lattice model: a flexible ant-colony optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Jing; Li, Yun

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a flexible ant colony (FAC) algorithm for solving protein folding problems based on the hydrophobic-polar square lattice model. Collaborations of novel pheromone and heuristic strategies in the proposed algorithm make it more effective in predicting structures of proteins compared with other state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:18537736

  17. Three-dimensional flow patterns in a scaled, physical vocal fold model with a unilateral polyp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seawright, Angela; Erath, Byron; Plesniak, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Trauma to the vocal folds often causes the formation of polyps; affecting the efficiency of speech and making voice rough and breathy. The change in flow characteristics due to a unilateral polyp positioned on the medial surface of a 7.5 times life-size physical vocal fold model was investigated. Previously reported phase-averaged intraglottal particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigations in a coronal plane indicated significant variations in the flow behavior on different anterior offset planes relative to the polyp. Flow three-dimensionality was investigated by resolving the temporal evolution of the flow with laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Data were acquired superior to the glottal exit. Physiological values of Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers were matched. Results were compared to velocity fields generated by healthy vocal fold motion. The glottal jet trajectory, flow separation points, and the velocity distribution along the vocal fold walls were influenced. Thus, a polyp significantly disturbs and modifies the airflow through the vocal folds, which has implications on both the fluid-structure energy exchange and the sound production.

  18. Geomechanical modeling of stress and strain evolution during contractional fault-related folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.

    2012-11-01

    Understanding stress states and rock mass deformation deep underground is critical to a range of endeavors including oil and gas exploration and production, geothermal reservoir characterization and management, and subsurface disposal of CO2. Geomechanical modeling can predict the onset of failure and the type and abundance of deformation features along with the orientations and magnitudes of stresses. This approach enables development of forward models that incorporate realistic mechanical stratigraphy (e.g., including competence contrasts, bed thicknesses, and bedding planes), include faults and bedding-slip surfaces as frictional sliding interfaces, reproduce the overall geometry of the fold structures of interest, and allow tracking of stress and strain through the deformation history. Use of inelastic constitutive relationships (e.g., elastic-plastic behavior) allows permanent strains to develop in response to the applied loads. This ability to capture permanent deformation is superior to linear elastic models, which are often used for numerical convenience, but are incapable of modeling permanent deformation or predicting permanent deformation processes such as faulting, fracturing, and pore collapse. Finite element modeling results compared with field examples of a natural contractional fault-related fold show that well-designed geomechanical modeling can match overall fold geometries and be applied to stress, fracture, and subseismic fault prediction in geologic structures. Geomechanical modeling of this type allows stress and strain histories to be obtained throughout the model domain.

  19. Automatic prone to supine haustral fold matching in CT colonography using a Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, Thomas; Roth, Holger; Hu, Mingxing; Boone, Darren; Slabaugh, Greg; Punwani, Shonit; Halligan, Steve; Hawkes, David

    2011-01-01

    CT colonography is routinely performed with the patient prone and supine to differentiate fixed colonic pathology from mobile faecal residue. We propose a novel method to automatically establish correspondence. Haustral folds are detected using a graph cut method applied to a surface curvature-based metric, where image patches are generated using endoluminal CT colonography surface rendering. The intensity difference between image pairs, along with additional neighbourhood information to enforce geometric constraints, are used with a Markov Random Field (MRF) model to estimate the fold labelling assignment. The method achieved fold matching accuracy of 83.1% and 88.5% with and without local colonic collapse. Moreover, it improves an existing surface-based registration algorithm, decreasing mean registration error from 9.7mm to 7.7mm in cases exhibiting collapse.

  20. Quantitative analysis of vocal fold vibration during register change by high-speed digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, Masanobu; Kobayashi, Noriko; Hirose, Hajime; Tayama, Niro; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Sakakibara, Ken-Ichi; Nito, Takaharu; Kakurai, Shin'ichi; Kumada, Chieko; Wada, Mamiko; Niimi, Seiji

    2002-05-01

    The physiological study of prosody is indispensable in terms not only of the physiological interest but also of the evaluation and treatment for pathological cases of prosody. In free talk, the changes of vocal fold vibration are found frequently and these phenomena are very important prosodic events. To analyze quantitatively the vocal fold vibration at the register change as the model of prosodic event, our high-speed digital imaging system was used at a rate of 4500 images of 256-256 pixels per second. Four healthy Japanese adults (2 males and 2 females) were served as subjects. Tasks were sustained phonation containing register changes. Two major categories (Category A and B) were found in the ways of changing of vocal fold vibrations at the register change. In Category A, changes were very smooth in terms of the vocal fold vibration. In Category B, changes were not so smooth with some additional events at the register change, such as the anterior-posterior phase difference of the vibration, the abduction of the vocal folds, or the interruption of the phonation. The number of the subtypes for Category B is thought to increase if more subjects with a wider range of variety are analyzed. For the study of prosody, our high-speed digital imaging system is a very powerful tool by which physiological information can be obtained.

  1. Folding of proteins with an all-atom Go-model.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Zhang, J; Qin, M; Liu, F; Wang, W

    2008-06-21

    The Go-like potential at a residual level has been successfully applied to the folding of proteins in many previous works. However, taking into consideration more detailed structural information in the atomic level, the definition of contacts used in these traditional Go-models may not be suitable for all-atom simulations. Here, in this work, we develop a rational definition of contacts considering the screening effect in the crowded intramolecular environment. In such a scheme, a large amount of screened atom pairs are excluded and the number of contacts is decreased compared to the case of the traditional definition. These contacts defined by such a new definition are compatible with the all-atom representation of protein structures. To verify the rationality of the new definition of contacts, the folding of proteins CI2 and SH3 is simulated by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. A high folding cooperativity and good correlation of the simulated Phi-values with those obtained experimentally, especially for CI2, are found. This suggests that the all-atom Go-model is improved compared to the traditional Go-model. Based on the comparison of the Phi-values, the roles of side chains in the folding are discussed, and it is concluded that the side-chain structures are more important for local contacts in determining the transition state structures. Moreover, the relations between side chain and backbone orderings are also discussed.

  2. Periodic Folding of Viscous Sheets: A Model for Subducted Slabs at the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, N. M.

    2004-12-01

    A sheet of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface undergoes regular periodic folding. This instability is easily observed in the home kitchen with cake batter or honey, and may occur in the earth when subducted lithosphere impinges on the core-mantle boundary. Using a numerical model for a 2-D thin sheet that deforms by combined bending and stretching with negligible inertia, I determine how the folding frequency depends on the height of fall L, the sheet's initial thickness H0, the volume flux per unit length q, and the fluid's viscosity μ and anomalous density δ ρ . Two distinct folding modes are possible. When buoyancy is weak, ``viscous'' folding occurs with a frequency proportional to fV = q/L H1, where H1 (≤ H0) is the thickness of the portion of the sheet that folds. When buoyancy is strong, ``gravitational'' folding occurs with a frequency proportional to fG = (δ ρ g q3/μ H15)1/4. The bifurcation from viscous to gravitational folding occurs sharply at a critical value (= 3.9) of the parameter fG/f_V that measures the importance of buoyancy. In both modes, the instability generates a multilayered ``sandwich'' of strongly folded sheet material and intercalated ambient fluid. In the earth, such a structure is likely to be associated with complex seismic anisotropy. I will also present results of a numerical study of the closely related phenomenon of 3-D coiling of a viscous filament. While not directly relevant to subduction, this phenomenon is important in many engineering contexts and has been observed to occur in falling lava streams. Coiling can occur in viscous and gravitational modes analogous to those of 2-D folding, and also in an ``inertial'' mode in which viscous forces are balanced by rotational inertia. Coiling is multivalued in the gravitational-inertial transition regime, where three distinct frequencies are possible for the same values of the flow rate and fall height.

  3. Generic framework for mining cellular automata models on protein-folding simulations.

    PubMed

    Diaz, N; Tischer, I

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata model identification is an important way of building simplified simulation models. In this study, we describe a generic architectural framework to ease the development process of new metaheuristic-based algorithms for cellular automata model identification in protein-folding trajectories. Our framework was developed by a methodology based on design patterns that allow an improved experience for new algorithms development. The usefulness of the proposed framework is demonstrated by the implementation of four algorithms, able to obtain extremely precise cellular automata models of the protein-folding process with a protein contact map representation. Dynamic rules obtained by the proposed approach are discussed, and future use for the new tool is outlined. PMID:27323045

  4. Overturned folds in ice sheets: Insights from a kinematic model of traveling sticky patches and comparisons with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, Michael J.; Creyts, Timothy T.

    2016-05-01

    Overturned folds are observed in regions of the Greenland ice sheet where driving stress is highly variable. Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain these folds: freezing subglacial water, traveling basal slippery patches, and englacial rheological contrasts. Here we explore how traveling basal sticky patches can produce overturned folds. Transitions from low to high stress cause a tradeoff in ice flow between basal slip and internal deformation that deflects ice stratigraphy vertically. If these transitions move, the slip-deformation tradeoff can produce large folds. Those folds record the integrated effects of time-varying basal slip. To understand how dynamic changes in basal slip influence ice sheet stratigraphy, we develop a kinematic model of ice flow in a moving reference frame that follows a single traveling sticky patch. The ice flow field forms a vortex when viewed in the moving reference frame, and this vortex traps ice above the traveling patch and produces overturned folds. Sticky patches that travel downstream faster produce larger overturned folds. We use the model as an interpretive tool to infer properties of basal slip from three example folds. Our model suggests that the sticky patches underneath these folds propagated downstream at rates between one half and the full ice velocity. The regional flow regime for the smaller two folds requires substantial internal deformation whereas the regime for the largest fold requires substantially more basal slip. The distribution and character of stratigraphic folds reflect the evolution and propagation of individual sticky patches and their effects on ice sheet flow.

  5. Influence of Embedded Fibers and an Epithelium Layer on the Glottal Closure Pattern in a Physical Vocal Fold Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xuan, Yue; Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the possible structural and material property features that may facilitate complete glottal closure in an otherwise isotropic physical vocal fold model. Method: Seven vocal fold models with different structural features were used in this study. An isotropic model was used as the baseline model, and…

  6. Viroporins, Examples of the Two-Stage Membrane Protein Folding Model

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Gil, Luis; Mingarro, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    Viroporins are small, α-helical, hydrophobic virus encoded proteins, engineered to form homo-oligomeric hydrophilic pores in the host membrane. Viroporins participate in multiple steps of the viral life cycle, from entry to budding. As any other membrane protein, viroporins have to find the way to bury their hydrophobic regions into the lipid bilayer. Once within the membrane, the hydrophobic helices of viroporins interact with each other to form higher ordered structures required to correctly perform their porating activities. This two-step process resembles the two-stage model proposed for membrane protein folding by Engelman and Poppot. In this review we use the membrane protein folding model as a leading thread to analyze the mechanism and forces behind the membrane insertion and folding of viroporins. We start by describing the transmembrane segment architecture of viroporins, including the number and sequence characteristics of their membrane-spanning domains. Next, we connect the differences found among viroporin families to their viral genome organization, and finalize focusing on the pathways used by viroporins in their way to the membrane and on the transmembrane helix-helix interactions required to achieve proper folding and assembly. PMID:26131957

  7. Viroporins, Examples of the Two-Stage Membrane Protein Folding Model.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Gil, Luis; Mingarro, Ismael

    2015-07-01

    Viroporins are small, α-helical, hydrophobic virus encoded proteins, engineered to form homo-oligomeric hydrophilic pores in the host membrane. Viroporins participate in multiple steps of the viral life cycle, from entry to budding. As any other membrane protein, viroporins have to find the way to bury their hydrophobic regions into the lipid bilayer. Once within the membrane, the hydrophobic helices of viroporins interact with each other to form higher ordered structures required to correctly perform their porating activities. This two-step process resembles the two-stage model proposed for membrane protein folding by Engelman and Poppot. In this review we use the membrane protein folding model as a leading thread to analyze the mechanism and forces behind the membrane insertion and folding of viroporins. We start by describing the transmembrane segment architecture of viroporins, including the number and sequence characteristics of their membrane-spanning domains. Next, we connect the differences found among viroporin families to their viral genome organization, and finalize focusing on the pathways used by viroporins in their way to the membrane and on the transmembrane helix-helix interactions required to achieve proper folding and assembly. PMID:26131957

  8. The earliest events in protein folding: Helix dynamics in proteins and model peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Williams, S.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    The earliest events in protein folding are critically important in determining the folding pathway, but have proved difficult to study by conventional approaches. We have developed new rapid initiation methods and structure-specific probes to interrogate the earliest events of protein folding. Our focus is the pathways. Folding or unfolding reactions are initiated on a fast timescale (10 ns) using a laser induced temperature jump (15 C) and probed with time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. We obtained the kinetics of the helix-coil transition for a model 21-residue peptide. The observed rate constant k{sub obs} = k{sub f} + k{sub u} for reversible kinetics; from the observed rate (6 x 10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and the equilibrium constant favoring folding of 7.5 at 27 C, we calculate a folding lifetime of 180 ns and an unfolding lifetime of 1.4 {mu}s. The {open_quotes}molten globule{close_quotes} form of apomyoglobin (horse, pH*3, 0.15M NaCl) shows similar kinetics for helix that is unconstrained by tertiary structure (helix with an unusually low Amide I frequency, near 1633 cm{sup -1}). In {open_quotes}native{close_quotes} apomyoglobin (horse, pH*5.3, 10 mM NaCl) two very different rates (45 ns and 70 {mu}s) are observed and we infer that a third occurs on a timescales inaccessible to our experiment (> 1 ms). We suggest that the slower processes are due to helix formation that is rate-limited by the formation of tertiary structure.

  9. Note: Network random walk model of two-state protein folding: Test of the theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Murphy, Ronan D.; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel

    2013-01-01

    We study two-state protein folding in the framework of a toy model of protein dynamics. This model has an important advantage: it allows for an analytical solution for the sum of folding and unfolding rate constants [A. M. Berezhkovskii, F. Tofoleanu, and N.-V. Buchete, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 2370 (2011), 10.1021/ct200281d] and hence for the reactive flux at equilibrium. We use the model to test the Kramers-type formula for the reactive flux, which was derived assuming that the protein dynamics is described by a Markov random walk on a network of complex connectivity [A. Berezhkovskii, G. Hummer, and A. Szabo, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 205102 (2009), 10.1063/1.3139063]. It is shown that the Kramers-type formula leads to the same result for the reactive flux as the sum of the rate constants.

  10. Superimposed folding and thrusting by two phases of mutually orthogonal or oblique shortening in analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongling; Koyi, Hemin A.; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz

    2016-02-01

    Orogens may suffer more than one phase shortening resulting in superposition of structures of different generations. Superimposition of orthogonal or oblique shortening is studied using sandbox and centrifuge modelling. Results of sand models show that in orthogonal superimposition, the two resulting structural trends are approximately orthogonal to each other. In oblique superimposition, structures trend obliquely to each other in the relatively thin areas of the model (foreland), and mutually orthogonal in areas where the model is thickened during the first phase of shortening (i.e. the hinterland). Thrusts formed during the first shortening phase may be reactivated during the later shortening phase. Spacing of the later phase structures is not as wide as expected, considering they across the pre-existing thickened wedge. Superposition of structures results in formation of type 1 fold interference pattern. Bedding is curved outwards both in the dome and basin structures. Folded layers are dipping and plunging outwards in a dome, while they are dipping and plunging inwards in a basin. In the areas between two adjacent domes or basins (i.e. where an anticline is superimposed by a syncline or a syncline is superimposed by an anticline), bedding is curved inwards, and the anticlines plunge inwards and the synclines outwards. The latter feature could be helpful to determine the age relationship for type 2 fold interference pattern. In tectonic regions where multiple phases of shortening have occurred, the orogenic-scale dome-and-basin and arrowhead-shaped interference patterns are commonly formed, as in the models. However, in some areas, the fold interference pattern might be modified by a later phase of thrusting. Similar to models results, superimposition of two and/or even more deformation phases may not be recorded by structures all over the tectonic area.

  11. Multimodality pH imaging in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Pagel, Mark M.; Robey, Ian F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2013-03-01

    Upregulate levels of expression and activity of membrane H+ ion pumps in cancer cells drives the extracellular pH (pHe,) to values lower than normal. Furthermore, disregulated pH is indicative of the changes in glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells and has been shown to facilitate extracellular tissue remodeling during metastasis Therefore, measurement of pHe could be a useful cancer biomarker for diagnostic and therapy monitoring evaluation. Multimodality in-vivo imaging of pHe in tumorous tissue in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFWC) model is described. A custom-made plastic window chamber structure was developed that is compatible with both imaging optical and MR imaging modalities and provides a model system for continuous study of the same tissue microenvironment on multiple imaging platforms over a 3-week period. For optical imaging of pHe, SNARF-1 carboxylic acid is injected intravenously into a SCID mouse with an implanted tumor. A ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence signal captured on a confocal microscope reveals the pHe of the tissue visible within the window chamber. This imaging method was used in a preliminary study to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as a potential drug treatment to reverse tissue acidosis. For MR imaging of pHe the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was used as an alternative way of measuring pHe in a DSFWC model. ULTRAVIST®, a FDA approved x-ray/CT contrast agent has been shown to have a CEST effect that is pH dependent. A ratiometric analysis of water saturation at 5.6 and 4.2 ppm chemical shift provides a means to estimate the local pHe.

  12. Multimodality pH imaging in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber model

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Pagel, Mark M.; Robey, Ian F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Upregulate levels of expression and activity of membrane H+ ion pumps in cancer cells drives the extracellular pH (pHe,) to values lower than normal. Furthermore, disregulated pH is indicative of the changes in glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells and has been shown to facilitate extracellular tissue remodeling during metastasis Therefore, measurement of pHe could be a useful cancer biomarker for diagnostic and therapy monitoring evaluation. Multimodality in-vivo imaging of pHe in tumorous tissue in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFWC) model is described. A custom-made plastic window chamber structure was developed that is compatible with both imaging optical and MR imaging modalities and provides a model system for continuous study of the same tissue microenvironment on multiple imaging platforms over a 3-week period. For optical imaging of pHe, SNARF-1 carboxylic acid is injected intravenously into a SCID mouse with an implanted tumor. A ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence signal captured on a confocal microscope reveals the pHe of the tissue visible within the window chamber. This imaging method was used in a preliminary study to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as a potential drug treatment to reverse tissue acidosis. For MR imaging of pHe the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was used as an alternative way of measuring pHe in a DSFWC model. ULTRAVIST®, a FDA approved x-ray/CT contrast agent has been shown to have a CEST effect that is pH dependent. A ratiometric analysis of water saturation at 5.6 and 4.2 ppm chemical shift provides a means to estimate the local pHe.

  13. A Synthetic Self-Oscillating Vocal Fold Model Platform for Studying Augmentation Injection

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Preston R.; Thomson, Scott L.; Smith, Marshall E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Design and evaluate a platform for studying the mechanical effects of augmentation injections using synthetic self-oscillating vocal fold models. Study Design Basic science. Methods Life-sized, synthetic, multi-layer, self-oscillating vocal fold models were created that simulated bowing via volumetric reduction of the body layer relative to that of a normal, unbowed model. Material properties of the layers were unchanged. Models with varying degrees of bowing were created and paired with normal models. Following initial acquisition of data (onset pressure, vibration frequency, flow rate, and high-speed image sequences), bowed models were injected with silicone that had material properties similar to those used in augmentation procedures. Three different silicone injection quantities were tested: sufficient to close the glottal gap, insufficient to close the glottal gap, and excess silicone to create convex bowing of the bowed model. The above-mentioned metrics were again taken and compared. Pre- and post-injection high-speed image sequences were acquired using a hemilarynx setup, from which medial surface dynamics were quantified. Results The models vibrated with mucosal wave-like motion and at onset pressures and frequencies typical of human phonation. The models successfully exhibited various degrees of bowing which were then mitigated by injecting filler material. The models showed general pre- to post-injection decreases in onset pressure, flow rate, and open quotient, and a corresponding increase in vibration frequency. Conclusion The model may be useful in further explorations of the mechanical consequences of augmentation injections. PMID:24476985

  14. Miniaturization in voltammetry: ultratrace element analysis and speciation with twenty-fold sample size reduction.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, D; Laglera, L M; Caprara, S

    2014-10-01

    Voltammetric techniques have emerged as powerful methods for the determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace elements without any preconcentration in several research fields. Nevertheless, large sample volumes are typically required (10 mL), which strongly limits their application and/or the precision of the results. In this work, we report a 20-fold reduction in sample size for trace and ultratrace elemental determination and speciation by conventional voltammetric instrumentation, introducing the lowest amount of sample (0.5 mL) in which ultratrace detection has been performed up to now. This goal was achieved by a careful design of a new sample holder. Reliable, validated results were obtained for the determination of trace/ultratrace elements in rainwater (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb) and seawater (Cu). Moreover, copper speciation in seawater samples was consistently determined by competitive ligand equilibration-cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV). The proposed apparatus showed several advantages: (1) 20-fold reduction in sample volume (the sample size is lowered from 120 to 6 mL for the CLE-CSV procedure); (2) decrease in analysis time due to the reduction in purging time up to 2.5 fold; (3) 20-fold drop in reagent consumption. Moreover, the analytical performances were not affected: similar detection capabilities, precision and accuracy were obtained. Application to sample of limited availability (e.g. porewaters, snow, rainwater, open ocean water, biological samples) and to the description of high resolution temporal trends may be easily foreseen.

  15. Study of extracellular matrix in vocal fold biomechanics using a two-phase model.

    PubMed

    Miri, Amir K; Li, Nicole Y K; Avazmohammadi, Reza; Thibeault, Susan L; Mongrain, Rosaire; Mongeau, Luc

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the vocal fold tissue consists primarily of fibrous and interstitial proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of selective enzymatic digestion of two ECM proteins, namely elastin and versican, on the elasticity of rabbit vocal fold tissue. Quasi-static, sinusoidal, uniaxial tensile tests were performed. The data were analyzed within the framework of a model of the ECM as a two-phase composite material consisting of collagen fibrils as the reinforcing fibers and noncollagenous ECM proteins as the matrix. To validate the two-phase model, the regression parameters for the fibers' volume fraction and shear modulus in a different animal model were compared with corresponding published data. The proposed model was then used to analyze rabbit vocal fold tissues. The mean value and the standard deviation of the fiber volume fraction were found to be 8.49 ± 3.75 % for the control samples (n = 4), 0.59 ± 1.13 % after elastin removal (n = 4), and 8.22 ± 1.06 % after versican removal (n = 4). The results suggest that elastin removal may lead to a reduction in tissue stiffness, through counteracting the reinforcement of collagen fibrils. PMID:24792897

  16. Study of extracellular matrix in vocal fold biomechanics using a two-phase model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nicole Y. K.; Avazmohammadi, Reza; Thibeault, Susan L.; Mongrain, Rosaire; Mongeau, Luc

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the vocal fold tissue consists primarily of fibrous and interstitial proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of selective enzymatic digestion of two ECM proteins, namely elastin and versican, on the elasticity of rabbit vocal fold tissue. Quasi-static, sinusoidal, uniaxial tensile tests were performed. The data were analyzed within the framework of a model of the ECM as a two-phase composite material consisting of collagen fibrils as the reinforcing fibers and noncollagenous ECM proteins as the matrix. To validate the two-phase model, the regression parameters for the fibers’ volume fraction and shear modulus in a different animal model were compared with corresponding published data. The proposed model was then used to analyze rabbit vocal fold tissues. The mean value and the standard deviation of the fiber volume fraction were found to be 8.49 ±3.75% for the control samples (n =4), 0.59 ±1.13 % after elastin removal (n =4), and 8.22 ±1.06% after versican removal (n =4). The results suggest that elastin removal may lead to a reduction in tissue stiffness, through counteracting the reinforcement of collagen fibrils. PMID:24792897

  17. Intermediate decollement activation in response to the basal friction variation and its effect on folding style in the Zagros fold-thrust belt, an analogue modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzipour-Saein, Ali; Koyi, Hemin

    2016-09-01

    Although the role of various basal and intermediate decollement levels on structural style is well documented individually in many folded terrains, the interaction between basal and intermediate decollements is poorly constrained. This study uses results of two scaled sand-box models shortened from one end to study the variation in structural development in response to varying basal friction and its consequent interaction with intermediate decollement horizons. Two models with similar incompetent intermediate decollement, but with different basal friction (with and without a thick basal decollement), were prepared analogous for the eastern and the western parts of the Razak basement fault in the Fars Region of the eastern part of the Zagros fold thrust belt (ZFTB). Combined results of scaled models with geological observations are used to argue that the basal decollement friction characteristics govern propagation of deformation front. In addition, model results, analogues to north-south direction, show that deformation complexity and disharmonic folding exist in the section where the intermediate decollement has been activated in response to the shortening without the basal decollement (throughout the western part of the Razak basement fault where less thickness of the Hormuz series as the basal decollement has been documented compared to its eastern part). In other words, the complexity in deformation is less portrayed along sections where basal friction beneath the model decreases (e.g. the eastern part of the Razak basement fault). We argue here that, in addition to other parameters (not presented in this study) interaction of intermediate decollement levels with basal decollement friction characteristics could explain decoupling between structures within the sedimentary column of the Fars Region of the eastern part of the Zagros fold thrust belt.

  18. Polymer models of the hierarchical folding of the Hox-B chromosomal locus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annunziatella, Carlo; Chiariello, Andrea M.; Bianco, Simona; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-10-01

    As revealed by novel technologies, chromosomes in the nucleus of mammalian cells have a complex spatial organization that serves vital functional purposes. Here we use models from polymer physics to identify the mechanisms that control their three-dimensional spatial organization. In particular, we investigate a model of the Hox-B locus, an important genomic region involved in embryo development, to expose the principles regulating chromatin folding and its complex behaviors in mouse embryonic stem cells. We reconstruct with high accuracy the pairwise contact matrix of the Hox-B locus as derived by Hi-C experiments and investigate its hierarchical folding dynamics. We trace back the observed behaviors to general scaling properties of polymer physics.

  19. Differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hnizdo, V. )

    1994-08-01

    The differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering, attention to which has been called recently by Beene, Horen, and Satchler [Phys. Rev. C 48, 3128 (1993)], were pointed out already some time ago by contrasting the rules of equal deformation lengths and equal normalized multipole moments for the optical potential and the underlying nucleon distribution of the excited nucleus.

  20. Double Folding Potential of Different Interaction Models for 16O + 12C Elastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Sh.; Bondok, I.; Abdelmoatmed, M.

    2016-08-01

    The elastic scattering angular distributions for 16O + 12C nuclear system have been analyzed using double folding potential of different interaction models: CDM3Y1, CDM3Y6, DDM3Y1 and BDM3Y1. We have extracted the renormalization factor N r for the different concerned interaction models. Potential created by BDM3Y1 model of interaction has the shallowest depth which reflects the necessity to use higher renormalization factor. The experimental angular distributions for 16O + 12C nuclear system in the energy range 115.9-230 MeV exhibited unmistakable refractive features and rainbow phenomenon.

  1. A Self-Folding Hydrogel In Vitro Model for Ductal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Hye Rin; Serbo, Janna V; Korangath, Preethi; Sukumar, Saraswati; Romer, Lewis H; Gracias, David H

    2016-04-01

    A significant challenge in oncology is the need to develop in vitro models that accurately mimic the complex microenvironment within and around normal and diseased tissues. Here, we describe a self-folding approach to create curved hydrogel microstructures that more accurately mimic the geometry of ducts and acini within the mammary glands, as compared to existing three-dimensional block-like models or flat dishes. The microstructures are composed of photopatterned bilayers of poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), a hydrogel widely used in tissue engineering. The PEGDA bilayers of dissimilar molecular weights spontaneously curve when released from the underlying substrate due to differential swelling ratios. The photopatterns can be altered via AutoCAD-designed photomasks so that a variety of ductal and acinar mimetic structures can be mass-produced. In addition, by co-polymerizing methacrylated gelatin (methagel) with PEGDA, microstructures with increased cell adherence are synthesized. Biocompatibility and versatility of our approach is highlighted by culturing either SUM159 cells, which were seeded postfabrication, or MDA-MB-231 cells, which were encapsulated in hydrogels; cell viability is verified over 9 and 15 days, respectively. We believe that self-folding processes and associated tubular, curved, and folded constructs like the ones demonstrated here can facilitate the design of more accurate in vitro models for investigating ductal carcinoma.

  2. A Self-Folding Hydrogel In Vitro Model for Ductal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Hye Rin; Serbo, Janna V; Korangath, Preethi; Sukumar, Saraswati; Romer, Lewis H; Gracias, David H

    2016-04-01

    A significant challenge in oncology is the need to develop in vitro models that accurately mimic the complex microenvironment within and around normal and diseased tissues. Here, we describe a self-folding approach to create curved hydrogel microstructures that more accurately mimic the geometry of ducts and acini within the mammary glands, as compared to existing three-dimensional block-like models or flat dishes. The microstructures are composed of photopatterned bilayers of poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), a hydrogel widely used in tissue engineering. The PEGDA bilayers of dissimilar molecular weights spontaneously curve when released from the underlying substrate due to differential swelling ratios. The photopatterns can be altered via AutoCAD-designed photomasks so that a variety of ductal and acinar mimetic structures can be mass-produced. In addition, by co-polymerizing methacrylated gelatin (methagel) with PEGDA, microstructures with increased cell adherence are synthesized. Biocompatibility and versatility of our approach is highlighted by culturing either SUM159 cells, which were seeded postfabrication, or MDA-MB-231 cells, which were encapsulated in hydrogels; cell viability is verified over 9 and 15 days, respectively. We believe that self-folding processes and associated tubular, curved, and folded constructs like the ones demonstrated here can facilitate the design of more accurate in vitro models for investigating ductal carcinoma. PMID:26831041

  3. Characterizing liquid redistribution in a biphasic vibrating vocal fold using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kvit, Anton A.; Devine, Erin E.; Vamos, Andrew C.; Tao, Chao; Jiang, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Vocal fold tissue is biphasic and consists of a solid extracellular matric skeleton swelled with interstitial fluid. Interactions between the liquid and solid impact the material properties and stress response of the tissue. The objective of this study was to model the movement of liquid during vocal fold vibration and estimate the volume of liquid accumulation and stress experienced by the tissue near the anterior-posterior midline, where benign lesions are observed to form. METHODS A three-dimensional biphasic finite element model of a single vocal fold was built to solve for the liquid velocity, pore pressure, and von Mises stress during and just after vibration using the commercial finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics (Version 4.3a, 2013, Structural Mechanics and Subsurface Flow Modules). Vibration was induced by applying direct-load pressures to the subglottal and intraglottal surfaces. Pressure ranges, frequency and material parameters were chosen based on those reported in the literature. Post-processing included liquid velocity, pore pressure and von Mises stress calculations, as well as the frequency-stress and amplitude-stress relationships. RESULTS Resulting time-averaged velocity vectors during vibration indicated liquid movement towards the midline of the fold, as upwards movement in the inferior-superior direction. Pore pressure and von Misses stresses were higher in this region just following vibration. A linear relationship was found between the amplitude and pore pressure, while a nonlinear relationship was found between the frequency and pore pressure. CONCLUSIONS While this study had certain computational simplifications, it is the first biphasic finite element model to employ a realistic geometry and demonstrated the ability to characterize liquid movement due to vibration. Results indicate that there is a significant amount of liquid that accumulates at the midline, however the role of this accumulation still requires

  4. A three-dimensional statistical mechanical model of folding double-stranded chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2001-05-01

    Based on a graphical representation of intrachain contacts, we have developed a new three-dimensional model for the statistical mechanics of double-stranded chain molecules. The theory has been tested and validated for the cubic lattice chain conformations. The statistical mechanical model can be applied to the equilibrium folding thermodynamics of a large class of chain molecules, including protein β-hairpin conformations and RNA secondary structures. The application of a previously developed two-dimensional model to RNA secondary structure folding thermodynamics generally overestimates the breadth of the melting curves [S-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 646 (2000)], suggesting an underestimation for the sharpness of the conformational transitions. In this work, we show that the new three-dimensional model gives much sharper melting curves than the two-dimensional model. We believe that the new three-dimensional model may give much improved predictions for the thermodynamic properties of RNA conformational changes than the previous two-dimensional model.

  5. A three-dimensional model of vocal fold abduction/adduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Eric J.; Titze, Ingo R.; Alipour, Fariborz

    2004-04-01

    A three-dimensional biomechanical model of tissue deformation was developed to simulate dynamic vocal fold abduction and adduction. The model was made of 1721 nearly incompressible finite elements. The cricoarytenoid joint was modeled as a rocking-sliding motion, similar to two concentric cylinders. The vocal ligament and the thyroarytenoid muscle's fiber characteristics were implemented as a fiber-gel composite made of an isotropic ground substance imbedded with fibers. These fibers had contractile and/or passive nonlinear stress-strain characteristics. The verification of the model was made by comparing the range and speed of motion to published vocal fold kinematic data. The model simulated abduction to a maximum glottal angle of about 31°. Using the posterior-cricoarytenoid muscle, the model produced an angular abduction speed of 405° per second. The system mechanics seemed to favor abduction over adduction in both peak speed and response time, even when all intrinsic muscle properties were kept identical. The model also verified the notion that the vocalis and muscularis portions of the thyroarytenoid muscle play significantly different roles in posturing, with the muscularis portion having the larger effect on arytenoid movement. Other insights into the mechanisms of abduction/adduction were given.

  6. 3D Fault modeling of the active Chittagong-Myanmar fold belt, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. E.; Hubbard, J.; Akhter, S. H.; Shamim, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Chittagong-Myanmar fold belt (CMFB), located in eastern Bangladesh, eastern India and western Myanmar, accommodates east-west shortening at the India-Burma plate boundary. Oblique subduction of the Indian Plate beneath the Burma Plate since the Eocene has led to the development of a large accretionary prism complex, creating a series of north-south trending folds. A continuous sediment record from ~55 Ma to the present has been deposited in the Bengal Basin by the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna rivers, providing an opportunity to learn about the history of tectonic deformation and activity in this fold-and-thrust belt. Surface mapping indicates that the fold-and-thrust belt is characterized by extensive N-S-trending anticlines and synclines in a belt ~150-200 km wide. Seismic reflection profiles from the Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh, indicate that the anticlines mapped at the surface narrow with depth and extend to ~3.0 seconds TWTT (two-way travel time), or ~6.0 km. The folds of Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts are characterized by doubly plunging box-shaped en-echelon anticlines separated by wide synclines. The seismic data suggest that some of these anticlines are cored by thrust fault ramps that extend to a large-scale décollement that dips gently to the east. Other anticlines may be the result of detachment folding from the same décollement. The décollement likely deepens to the east and intersects with the northerly-trending, oblique-slip Kaladan fault. The CMFB region is bounded to the north by the north-dipping Dauki fault and the Shillong Plateau. The tectonic transition from a wide band of E-W shortening in the south to a narrow zone of N-S shortening along the Dauki fault is poorly understood. We integrate surface and subsurface datasets, including topography, geological maps, seismicity, and industry seismic reflection profiles, into a 3D modeling environment and construct initial 3D surfaces of the major faults in this

  7. Influence of supraglottal structures on the glottal jet exiting a two-layer synthetic, self-oscillating vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Drechsel, James S.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    A synthetic two-layer, self-oscillating, life-size vocal fold model was used to study the influence of the vocal tract and false folds on the glottal jet. The model vibrated at frequencies, pressures, flow rates, and amplitudes consistent with human phonation, although some differences in behavior between the model and the human vocal folds are noted. High-speed images of model motion and flow visualization were acquired. Phase-locked ensemble-averaged glottal jet velocity measurements using particle image velocimetry (PIV) were acquired with and without an idealized vocal tract, with and without false folds. PIV data were obtained with varying degrees of lateral asymmetric model positioning. Glottal jet velocity magnitudes were consistent with those measured using excised larynges. A starting vortex was observed in all test cases. The false folds interfered with the starting vortex, and in some cases vortex shedding from the false folds was observed. In asymmetric cases without false folds, the glottal jet tended to skew toward the nearest wall; with the false folds, the opposite trend was observed. rms velocity calculations showed the jet shear layer and laminar core. The rms velocities were higher in the vocal tract cases compared to the open jet and false fold cases. PMID:18537394

  8. Flow-induced vibratory response of idealized versus magnetic resonance imaging-based synthetic vocal fold models.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Brian A; Thomson, Scott L

    2010-09-01

    Recent vocal fold vibration studies have used models defined using idealized geometry. Although these models exhibit important similarities with human vocal fold vibration, some aspects of their motion are less than realistic. In this report it is demonstrated that more realistic motion may be obtained when using geometry derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The dynamic response of both idealized and MRI-based synthetic vocal fold models are presented. MRI-based model improvements include evidence of mucosal wave-like motion and less vertical movement. Limitations of the MRI-based model are discussed and suggestions for further synthetic model development are offered.

  9. Folding of small knotted proteins: Insights from a mean field coarse-grained model

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, Saeed; Potestio, Raffaello

    2015-12-28

    A small but relevant number of proteins whose native structure is known features nontrivial topology, i.e., they are knotted. Understanding the process of folding from a swollen unknotted state to the biologically relevant native conformation is, for these proteins, particularly difficult, due to their rate-limiting topological entanglement. To shed some light into this conundrum, we introduced a structure-based coarse-grained model of the protein, where the information about the folded conformation is encoded in bonded angular interactions only, which do not favor the formation of native contacts. A stochastic search scheme in parameter space is employed to identify a set of interactions that maximizes the probability to attain the knotted state. The optimal knotting pathways of the two smallest knotted proteins, obtained through this approach, are consistent with the results derived by means of coarse-grained as well as full atomistic simulations.

  10. Folding paper swans, modeling lives: the ritual of Filipina eldercare in Israel.

    PubMed

    Mazuz, Keren

    2013-06-01

    This article examines the practices of folding paper swans by Filipina migrants employed as live-in caregivers for elderly, dying patients in Israel. These practices create a microsystem model of adjustment through precise, small-scale, and repetitive movements. This microsystem synchronizes a tripartite process: the swan's process of construction, the patient's process of decay, and the caregiver's process of self-creation. In the short term, the microsystem is sustained, but in the long term, the microsystem contains within it the seeds of its own self-destruction, as the patient eventually dies, the caregiver is reassigned to another patient or deported, and the swans are gifted. Therefore, the swan folding expands both medical anthropology understanding of caregiving as a ritual and the phenomenology of global caregivers who use immediately accessible materials-paper and glue-as an imaginative tool for ordering their daily experiences as dislocated and marginalized workers.

  11. Molecular-beacon-based tricomponent probe for SNP analysis in folded nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Camha; Grimes, Jeffrey; Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2011-11-11

    Hybridization probes are often inefficient in the analysis of single-stranded DNA or RNA that are folded in stable secondary structures. A molecular beacon (MB) probe is a short DNA hairpin with a fluorophore and a quencher attached to opposite sides of the oligonucleotide. The probe is widely used in real-time analysis of specific DNA and RNA sequences. This study demonstrates how a conventional MB probe can be used for the analysis of nucleic acids that form very stable (T(m) > 80 °C) hairpin structures. Here we demonstrate that the MB probe is not efficient in direct analysis of secondary structure-folded analytes, whereas a MB-based tricomponent probe is suitable for these purposes. The tricomponent probe takes advantage of two oligonucleotide adaptor strands f and m. Each adaptor strand contains a fragment complementary to the analyte and a fragment complementary to a MB probe. In the presence of a specific analyte, the two adaptor strands hybridize to the analyte and the MB probe, thus forming a quadripartite complex. DNA strand f binds to the analyte with high affinity and unwinds its secondary structure. Strand m forms a stable complex only with the fully complementary analyte. The MB probe fluorescently reports the formation of the quadripartite associate. It was demonstrated that the DNA analytes folded in hairpin structures with stems containing 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, or 13 base pairs can be detected in real time with the limit of detection (LOD) lying in the nanomolar range. The stability of the stem region in the DNA analyte did not affect the LOD. Analytes containing single base substitutions in the stem or in the loop positions were discriminated from the fully complementary DNA at room temperature. The tricomponent probe promises to simplify nucleic acid analysis at ambient temperatures in such applications as in vivo RNA monitoring, detection of pathogens, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping by DNA microarrays.

  12. Entropy-Driven Folding of an RNA Helical Junction: An Isothermal Titration Calorimetric Analysis of the Hammerhead Ribozyme†

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, Peter J.; Takach, Jennifer C.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Helical junctions are extremely common motifs in naturally occurring RNAs, but little is known about the thermodynamics that drive their folding. Studies of junction folding face several challenges: non-two-state folding behavior, superposition of secondary and tertiary structural energetics, and drastically opposing enthalpic and entropic contributions to folding. Here we describe a thermodynamic dissection of the folding of the hammerhead ribozyme, a three-way RNA helical junction, by using isothermal titration calorimetry of bimolecular RNA constructs. By using this method, we show that tertiary folding of the hammerhead core occurs with a highly unfavorable enthalpy change, and is therefore entropically driven. Furthermore, the enthalpies and heat capacities of core folding are the same whether supported by monovalent or divalent ions. These properties appear to be general to the core sequence of bimolecular hammerhead constructs. We present a model for the ion-induced folding of the hammerhead core that is similar to those advanced for the folding of much larger RNAs, involving ion-induced collapse to a structured, non-native state accompanied by rearrangement of core residues to produce the native fold. In agreement with previous enzymological and structural studies, our thermodynamic data suggest that the hammerhead structure is stabilized in vitro predominantly by diffusely bound ions. Our approach addresses several significant challenges that accompany the study of junction folding, and should prove useful in defining the thermodynamic determinants of stability in these important RNA motifs. PMID:15134461

  13. Brane brick models, toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds and 2d (0,2) quivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; Lee, Sangmin; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2016-02-01

    We introduce brane brick models, a novel type of Type IIA brane configurations consisting of D4-branes ending on an NS5-brane. Brane brick models are T-dual to D1-branes over singular toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds. They fully encode the infinite class of 2 d (generically) {N}=(0,2) gauge theories on the worldvolume of the D1-branes and streamline their connection to the probed geometries. For this purpose, we also introduce new combinatorial procedures for deriving the Calabi-Yau associated to a given gauge theory and vice versa.

  14. Control of syntectonic erosion and sedimentation on kinematic evolution of a multidecollement fold and thrust zone: Analogue modeling of folding in the southern subandean of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, Romain; Callot, Jean-Paul; Ballard, Jean-François; Fraisse, Guillaume; Mengus, Jean-Marie; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2016-08-01

    Several analogue modeling studies have been conducted during the past fifteen years with the aim to discuss the effects of sedimentation and erosion on Foreland Fold and Thrust Belt, among which a few have analyzed these processes at kilometric scale (Malavieille et al., 1993; Nalpas et al., 1999; Barrier et al., 2002; Pichot and Nalpas, 2009). The influence of syn-deformation sedimentation and erosion on the structural evolution of FFTB has been clearly demonstrated. Here, we propose to go further in this approach by the study of a more complex system with a double decollement level. The natural study case is the Bolivian sub-Andean thrust and fold belt, which present all the required criteria, such as the double decollement level. A set of analogue models performed under a CT-scan have been used to test the influence of several parameters on a fold and thrust belt system, among which: (i) the spatial variation of the sediment input, (ii) the spatial variation of the erosion rate, (iii) the relative distribution of sedimentation between foreland and hinterland. These experiments led to the following observations: 1. The upper decollement level acts as a decoupling level in case of increased sedimentation rate: it results in the verticalization of the shallower part (above the upper decollement level), while the deeper parts are not impacted. 2. Similarly, the increase of the erosion rate involves the uplift of the deeper part (below the upper decollement level), whereas the shallower parts are not impacted. 3. A high sedimentation rate in the foreland involves a fault and fold vergence reversal, followed by a back-thrusting of the shallower part. 4. A high sedimentation rate in the hinterland favours thrust development toward the foreland in the shallower parts.

  15. Altered vocal fold kinematics in synthetic self-oscillating models that employ adipose tissue as a lateral boundary condition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Hiba; Erath, Byron D.

    2015-11-01

    The vocal folds play a major role in human communication by initiating voiced sound production. During voiced speech, the vocal folds are set into sustained vibrations. Synthetic self-oscillating vocal fold models are regularly employed to gain insight into flow-structure interactions governing the phonation process. Commonly, a fixed boundary condition is applied to the lateral, anterior, and posterior sides of the synthetic vocal fold models. However, physiological observations reveal the presence of adipose tissue on the lateral surface between the thyroid cartilage and the vocal folds. The goal of this study is to investigate the influence of including this substrate layer of adipose tissue on the dynamics of phonation. For a more realistic representation of the human vocal folds, synthetic multi-layer vocal fold models have been fabricated and tested while including a soft lateral layer representative of adipose tissue. Phonation parameters have been collected and are compared to those of the standard vocal fold models. Results show that vocal fold kinematics are affected by adding the adipose tissue layer as a new boundary condition.

  16. Deformation Analysis of Curved Folds in the Southern Upper Magdalena Valley. Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, G.; Bayona, G. A.; Silva, C.; Rapalini, A.; Trindade, R.

    2008-12-01

    In the Upper Magdalena Valley of Colombia there are folds with changes in the strike of their axes (e.g La Hocha Anticline), the origin of which was studied by integrating field, paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy data. Two structural domains were defined: the northern is a symmetrical fold and has a strike N10W, whereas the southern is an asymmetrical fold and has a N30E strike. The principal fault is the San Jacinto Fault, which is a reverse fault with slikensides indicating also a horizontal component of displacement. In the hanging wall of the San Jacinto Fault Mesozoic rocks crops out forming an anticline, whereas in the footwall Cenozoic rocks with vertical and locally overturned beds are exposed. Four magnetic components were isolated, being the low coercivity/temperature component similar to the present field. A characteristic component isolated in Cretaceous and Cenozoic rocks is a pre-fold but post-Oligocene component (n=5, D=0.8, I=2.4, K=62.33, a95=9.8). Two characteristic components were isolated in Jurassic rocks. The directions of the first are similar between domains (north domain: n=10 D=20.7 I=35.6 K=13 a95=12.5; south domain: n=6 D=12 I=28.9 K=16 a95=9.5), suggesting no relationship between strike changes and declination variation. The other component has negative inclination (n=2 D=13.8 I=-27.1 K=61.42 a95=11.8) indicating a mean paleolatitude of 14.4S in Jurassic time. Paleomagnetic data suggest that the curved fold is controlled by the geometry of the paleobasin and support the northward translation of accreted terranes along the Western margin of South America during the Jurassic. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analysis in Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks document three magnetic fabrics: (1) Undeformed fabrics are located in the back limb of La Hocha Anticline; (2) tectonics fabrics are associated to reverse fault planes in the north and south domains and indicated a relationship between the anisotropy ellipsoid with the local stress

  17. Modeling and experimental verification of a fan-folded vibration energy harvester for leadless pacemakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. H.; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies energy harvesting from heartbeat vibrations for powering leadless pacemakers. Unlike traditional pacemakers, leadless pacemakers are implanted inside the heart and the pacemaker is in direct contact with the myocardium. A leadless pacemaker is in the shape of a cylinder. Thus, in order to utilize the available 3-dimensional space for the energy harvester, we choose a fan-folded 3D energy harvester. The proposed device consists of several piezoelectric beams stacked on top of each other. The volume of the energy harvester is 1 cm3 and its dimensions are 2 cm × 0.5 cm × 1 cm. Although high natural frequency is generally a major concern with micro-scale energy harvesters, by utilizing the fan-folded geometry and adding tip mass and link mass to the configuration, we reduced the natural frequency to the desired range. This fan-folded design makes it possible to generate more than 10 μ W of power per cubic centimeter. The proposed device is compatible with Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Although the proposed device is a linear energy harvester, it is relatively insensitive to the heart rate. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the device are calculated analytically. The accuracy of the analytical model is verified by experimental investigations. We use a closed loop shaker system to precisely replicate heartbeat vibrations in vitro.

  18. Fold and fabric relationships in temporally and spatially evolving slump systems: A multi-cell flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. Ian; Marco, Shmuel

    2014-06-01

    Folds generated in ductile metamorphic terranes and within unlithified sediments affected by slumping are geometrically identical to one another, and distinguishing the origin of such folds in ancient lithified rocks is therefore challenging. Foliation is observed to lie broadly parallel to the axial planes of tectonic folds, whilst it is frequently regarded as absent in slump folds. The presence of foliation is therefore often considered as a reliable criterion for distinguishing tectonic folds from those created during slumping. To test this assertion, we have examined a series of well exposed slump folds within the late Pleistocene Lisan Formation of the Dead Sea Basin. These slumps contain a number of different foliation types, including an axial-planar grain-shape fabric and a crenulation cleavage formed via microfolding of bedding laminae. Folds also contain a spaced disjunctive foliation characterised by extensional displacements across shear fractures. This spaced foliation fans around recumbent fold hinges, with kinematics reversing across the axial plane indicating a flexural shear fold mechanism. Overall, the spaced foliation is penecontemporaneous with each individual slump where it occurs, although in detail it is pre, syn or post the local folds. The identification of foliations within undoubted slump folds indicates that the presence or absence of foliation is not in itself a robust criterion to distinguish tectonic from soft-sediment folds. Extensional shear fractures displaying a range of temporal relationships with slump folds suggests that traditional single-cell flow models, where extension is focussed at the head and contraction in the lower toe of the slump, are a gross simplification. We therefore propose a new multi-cell flow model involving coeval second-order flow cells that interact with neighbouring cells during translation of the slump.

  19. An ISO-surface folding analysis method applied to premature neonatal brain development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Carranza, Claudia E.; Rousseau, Francois; Iordanova, Bistra; Glenn, Orit; Vigneron, Daniel; Barkovich, James; Studholme, Colin

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we describe the application of folding measures to tracking in vivo cortical brain development in premature neonatal brain anatomy. The outer gray matter and the gray-white matter interface surfaces were extracted from semi-interactively segmented high-resolution T1 MRI data. Nine curvature- and geometric descriptor-based folding measures were applied to six premature infants, aged 28-37 weeks, using a direct voxelwise iso-surface representation. We have shown that using such an approach it is feasible to extract meaningful surfaces of adequate quality from typical clinically acquired neonatal MRI data. We have shown that most of the folding measures, including a new proposed measure, are sensitive to changes in age and therefore applicable in developing a model that tracks development in premature infants. For the first time gyrification measures have been computed on the gray-white matter interface and on cases whose age is representative of a period of intense brain development.

  20. Structurally induced errors in paleomagnetic analysis of fold and thrust belts: Types, causes and detection techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Paleomagnetic vectors are unique kinematics indicators allowing for the real understanding of the lateral transference of deformation processes and they are essential for a real 3D understanding of fold and thrust belts. The association with the bedding surface gives the only 3D reference system able to unambiguously relate the deformed and undeformed stages and their implications are, until now, relatively unexplored in structural geology. However paleomagnetic data are sometimes, misinterpreted or ignored due to the lack of reliability of some databases, where a geometric control of errors seems evident from the structural point of view. An analysis of the implicit assumptions in paleomagnetic studies of fold and thrust belts reveals three possible sources of error with an intrinsic structural (geometric) control: Assumption 1) The laboratory procedures are able to completely isolate of the original paleomagnetic vectors When this fails, the subsequent overlapped paleomagnetic directions (eg. primary record and the recent overprint) will display both declination and inclination errors, that will be controlled by the fold axis orientation, the degree of flank rotation (dip), the primary magnetic polarity as well as the degree of vector overlapping. Assumption 2) The rigid-body behavior during deformation and the absence of rock volume changes. When the rock volume undergoes active internal deformation during folding or shearing, the deformed paleomagnetic vectors will display again declination and inclination errors, but both polarities will behave similarly. In this case the errors will depend on the relation between the primary field orientation and the deformation tensor, which in fact, can be reduced to the orientation and magnitude of the shear in most cases. Assumption 3) The bedding correction is able to restore the bedding-vector couple to the ancient (paleo)geographical reference system. This restoration may fail in complex deformation zones affected by

  1. High fold computer disk storage DATABASE for fast extended analysis of γ-rays events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stézowski, O.; Finck, Ch.; Prévost, D.

    1999-03-01

    Recently spectacular technical developments have been achieved to increase the resolving power of large γ-ray spectrometers. With these new eyes, physicists are able to study the intricate nature of atomic nuclei. Concurrently more and more complex multidimensional analyses are needed to investigate very weak phenomena. In this article, we first present a software (DATABASE) allowing high fold coincidences γ-rays events to be stored on hard disk. Then, a non-conventional method of analysis, anti-gating procedure, is described. Two physical examples are given to explain how it can be used and Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to test the validity of this method.

  2. Communication: Role of explicit water models in the helix folding/unfolding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Barducci, Alessandro; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-09-01

    In the last years, it has become evident that computer simulations can assume a relevant role in modelling protein dynamical motions for their ability to provide a full atomistic image of the processes under investigation. The ability of the current protein force-fields in reproducing the correct thermodynamics and kinetics systems behaviour is thus an essential ingredient to improve our understanding of many relevant biological functionalities. In this work, employing the last developments of the metadynamics framework, we compare the ability of state-of-the-art all-atom empirical functions and water models to consistently reproduce the folding and unfolding of a helix turn motif in a model peptide. This theoretical study puts in evidence that the choice of the water models can influence the thermodynamic and the kinetics of the system under investigation, and for this reason cannot be considered trivial.

  3. A cortical folding model incorporating stress-dependent growth explains gyral wavelengths and stress patterns in the developing brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayly, P. V.; Okamoto, R. J.; Xu, G.; Shi, Y.; Taber, L. A.

    2013-02-01

    In humans and many other mammals, the cortex (the outer layer of the brain) folds during development. The mechanics of folding are not well understood; leading explanations are either incomplete or at odds with physical measurements. We propose a mathematical model in which (i) folding is driven by tangential expansion of the cortex and (ii) deeper layers grow in response to the resulting stress. In this model the wavelength of cortical folds depends predictably on the rate of cortical growth relative to the rate of stress-induced growth. We show analytically and in simulations that faster cortical expansion leads to shorter gyral wavelengths; slower cortical expansion leads to long wavelengths or even smooth (lissencephalic) surfaces. No inner or outer (skull) constraint is needed to produce folding, but initial shape and mechanical heterogeneity influence the final shape. The proposed model predicts patterns of stress in the tissue that are consistent with experimental observations.

  4. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Phuc, Nguyen Hoang; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-09-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic 12C+12C and 16O+12C scattering at the refractive energies, where the Airy structure of the nuclear rainbow has been well established. The RT was found to affect significantly the real nucleus-nucleus optical potential at small internuclear distances, giving a potential strength close to that implied by the realistic optical model description of the Airy oscillation.

  5. Asymmetric airflow and vibration induced by the Coanda effect in a symmetric model of the vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chao; Zhang, Yu; Hottinger, Daniel G; Jiang, Jack J

    2007-10-01

    A model constructed from Navier-Stokes equations and a two-mass vocal fold description is proposed in this study. The composite model not only has the capability to describe the aerodynamics in a vibratory glottis but also can be used to study the vocal fold vibration under the driving of the complex airflow in the glottis. Numerical simulations show that this model can predict self-oscillations of the coupled glottal aerodynamics and vocal fold system. The Coanda effect could occur in the vibratory glottis even though the vocal folds have left-right symmetric prephonatory shape and tissue properties. The Coanda effect causes the asymmetric flow in the glottis and the difference in the driving force on the left and right vocal folds. The different pressures applied to the left and right vocal folds induce their displacement asymmetry. By using various lung pressures (0.6-2.0 kPa) to drive the composite model, it was found that the asymmetry of the vocal fold displacement is increased from 1.87% to 11.2%. These simulation results provide numerical evidence for the presence of asymmetric flow in the vibratory glottis; moreover, they indicate that glottal aerodynamics is an important factor in inducing the asymmetric vibration of the vocal folds. PMID:17902863

  6. Biophysical Analysis of the MHR Motif in Folding and Domain Swapping of the HIV Capsid Protein C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Rebeca; Fuertes, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Neira, José Luis; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) depends on the function, in virion morphogenesis and other stages of the viral cycle, of a highly conserved structural element, the major homology region (MHR), within the carboxyterminal domain (CTD) of the capsid protein. In a modified CTD dimer, MHR is swapped between monomers. While no evidence for MHR swapping has been provided by structural models of retroviral capsids, it is unknown whether it may occur transiently along the virus assembly pathway. Whatever the case, the MHR-swapped dimer does provide a novel target for the development of anti-HIV drugs based on the concept of trapping a nonnative capsid protein conformation. We have carried out a thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of the domain-swapped CTD dimer in solution. The analysis includes a dissection of the role of conserved MHR residues and other amino acids at the dimerization interface in CTD folding, stability, and dimerization by domain swapping. The results revealed some energetic hotspots at the domain-swapped interface. In addition, many MHR residues that are not in the protein hydrophobic core were nevertheless found to be critical for folding and stability of the CTD monomer, which may dramatically slow down the swapping reaction. Conservation of MHR residues in retroviruses did not correlate with their contribution to domain swapping, but it did correlate with their importance for stable CTD folding. Because folding is required for capsid protein function, this remarkable MHR-mediated conformational stabilization of CTD may help to explain the functional roles of MHR not only during immature capsid assembly but in other processes associated with retrovirus infection. This energetic dissection of the dimerization interface in MHR-swapped CTD may also facilitate the design of anti-HIV compounds that inhibit capsid assembly by conformational trapping of swapped CTD dimers. PMID:25606682

  7. A Model in which Hsp90 Targets Protein Folding Clefts: rationale for a New Approach to Neuroprotective Treatment of Protein Folding Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, William B.; Morishima, Yoshihiro; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Osawa, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    In an EBM Minireview published in 2010, we proposed that the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery played a major role in determining the selection of proteins that have undergone oxidative or other toxic damage for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (1). The proposal was based on a model in which the Hsp90 chaperone machinery regulates signaling by modulating ligand binding clefts (2). The model provides a framework for thinking about the development of neuroprotective therapies for protein folding diseases like Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and the polyglutamine expansion disorders, such as Huntington’s disease (HD) and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Major aberrant proteins that misfold and accumulate in these diseases are ‘client’ proteins of the abundant and ubiquitous stress chaperone Hsp90 (3). These Hsp90 client proteins include tau (AD), α-synuclein (PD), huntingtin (HD) and the expanded glutamine androgen receptor (polyQ AR) (SBMA). In this minireview we update our model in which Hsp90 acts on protein folding clefts and show how it forms a rational basis for developing drugs that promote the targeted elimination of these aberrant proteins. PMID:24990484

  8. A replica exchange Monte Carlo algorithm for protein folding in the HP model

    PubMed Central

    Thachuk, Chris; Shmygelska, Alena; Hoos, Holger H

    2007-01-01

    Background The ab initio protein folding problem consists of predicting protein tertiary structure from a given amino acid sequence by minimizing an energy function; it is one of the most important and challenging problems in biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics. The ab initio protein folding problem is computationally challenging and has been shown to be NP MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaat0uy0HwzTfgDPnwy1egaryqtHrhAL1wy0L2yHvdaiqaacqWFneVtcqqGqbauaaa@3961@-hard even when conformations are restricted to a lattice. In this work, we implement and evaluate the replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) method, which has already been applied very successfully to more complex protein models and other optimization problems with complex energy landscapes, in combination with the highly effective pull move neighbourhood in two widely studied Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice models. Results We demonstrate that REMC is highly effective for solving instances of the square (2D) and cubic (3D) HP protein folding problem. When using the pull move neighbourhood, REMC outperforms current state-of-the-art algorithms for most benchmark instances. Additionally, we show that this new algorithm provides a larger ensemble of ground-state structures than the existing state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, it scales well with sequence length, and it finds significantly better conformations on long biological sequences and sequences with a provably unique ground-state structure, which is believed to be a characteristic of real proteins. We also present evidence that our REMC algorithm can fold sequences which exhibit significant interaction between termini in the hydrophobic core relatively easily. Conclusion We demonstrate that REMC utilizing the pull move neighbourhood

  9. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-12-01

    A long standing problem in molecular biology is to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein, given its amino acid sequence. A variety of simplifying models have been proposed abstracting only the {open_quotes}essential physical properties{close_quotes} of real proteins. In these models, the three dimensional space is often represented by a lattice. Residues which are adjacent in the primary sequence (i.e. covalently linked) must be placed at adjacent points in the lattice. A conformation of a protein is simply a self-avoiding walk along the lattice. The protein folding problem STRING-FOLD is that of finding a conformation of the protein sequence on the lattice such that the overall energy is minimized, for some reasonable definition of energy. This formulation leaves open the choices of a lattice and an energy function. Once these choices are made, one may then address the algorithmic complexity of optimizing the energy function for the lattice. For a variety of such simple models, this minimization problem is in fact NP-hard. In this paper, we consider the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) Model introduced by Dill. The HP model abstracts the problem by grouping the 20 amino acids into two classes: hydrophobic (or non-polar) residues and hydrophilic (or polar) residues. For concreteness, we will take our input to be a string from (H,P){sup +}, where P represents polar residues, and H represents hydrophobic residues. Dill et.al. survey the literature analyzing this model. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Assessing groundwater availability in a folded carbonate aquifer through the development of a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Salvo, Cristina; Romano, Emanuele; Guyennon, Nicolas; Bruna Petrangeli, Anna; Preziosi, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    The study of aquifer systems from a quantitative point of view is fundamental for adopting water management plans aiming at preserving water resources and reducing environmental risks related to groundwater level and discharge changes. This is also what the European Union Water Framework Directive (WFD, 2000/60/EC) states, holding the development of numerical models as a key aspect for groundwater management. The objective of this research is to i) define a methodology for modeling a complex hydrogeological structure in a structurally folded carbonate area and ii) estimate the concurrent effects of exploitation and climate changes on groundwater availability through the implementation of a 3D groundwater flow model. This study concerns the Monte Coscerno karst aquifer located in the Apennine chain in Central Italy in the Nera River Valley.This aquifer, is planned to be exploited in the near future for water supply. Negative trends of precipitation in Central Italy have been reported in relation to global climate changes, which are expected to affect the availability of recharge to carbonate aquifers throughout the region . A great concern is the combined impact of climate change and groundwater exploitation, hence scenarios are needed taking into account the effect of possible temperature and precipitation trends on recharge rates. Following a previous experience with model conceptualization and long-term simulation of groundwater flow, an integrated three-dimensional groundwater model has been developed for the Monte Coscerno aquifer. In a previous paper (Preziosi et al 2014) the spatial distribution of recharge to this aquifer was estimated through the Thornthwaite Mather model at a daily time step using as inputs past precipitation and temperature values (1951-2013) as well as soil and landscape properties. In this paper the numerical model development is described. On the basis of well logs from private consulting companies and literature cross sections the

  11. Mola Topography Supports Drape-Folding Models for Polygonal Terrain of Utopia Planitia, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, George E.; Buczkowski, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    One of the most important questions we ask about Mars is whether or not there have ever been large bodies of standing water on the surface. The polygonal terrains of Utopia and Acidalia Planitiae are located in the lowest parts of the northern lowlands, the most logical places for water to pond and sediments to accumulate. Showing that polygonal terrain is sedimentary in origin would represent strong evidence in favor of a northern ocean. A number of hypotheses for the origin of the giant martian polygons have been proposed, from the cooling of lava to frost wedging to the desiccation of wet sediments, but Pechman showed that none of these familiar processes could be scaled up to martian dimensions. Two models for polygon origin attempt to explain the scale of the martian polygons by postulating drape folding of a cover material, either sedimentary or volcanic, over an uneven, buried surface. The drape folding would produce bending stresses in the surface layers that increase the probability of Fracturing over drape anticlines and suppress the probability of fracturing over drape synclines. However, both models require an additional source of extensional strain to produce the total strain needed to produce the observed troughs.

  12. Three-dimensional biomechanical properties of human vocal folds: Parameter optimization of a numerical model to match in vitro dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Anxiong; Berry, David A.; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The human voice signal originates from the vibrations of the two vocal folds within the larynx. The interactions of several intrinsic laryngeal muscles adduct and shape the vocal folds to facilitate vibration in response to airflow. Three-dimensional vocal fold dynamics are extracted from in vitro hemilarynx experiments and fitted by a numerical three-dimensional-multi-mass-model (3DM) using an optimization procedure. In this work, the 3DM dynamics are optimized over 24 experimental data sets to estimate biomechanical vocal fold properties during phonation. Accuracy of the optimization is verified by low normalized error (0.13 ± 0.02), high correlation (83% ± 2%), and reproducible subglottal pressure values. The optimized, 3DM parameters yielded biomechanical variations in tissue properties along the vocal fold surface, including variations in both the local mass and stiffness of vocal folds. That is, both mass and stiffness increased along the superior-to-inferior direction. These variations were statistically analyzed under different experimental conditions (e.g., an increase in tension as a function of vocal fold elongation and an increase in stiffness and a decrease in mass as a function of glottal airflow). The study showed that physiologically relevant vocal fold tissue properties, which cannot be directly measured during in vivo human phonation, can be captured using this 3D-modeling technique. PMID:22352511

  13. Folding Beauties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Leah Wrenn

    2006-01-01

    This article has its genesis in an MAA mini-course on origami, where a way to get a parabola by folding paper was presented. This article discusses the methods and mathematics of other curves obtained by paper-folding.

  14. Activity, stability and folding analysis of the chitinase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia L A; Minchaca, Alexis Z; Mares, Rosa E; Ramos, Marco A

    2016-02-01

    Human amebiasis, caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, remains as a significant public health issue in developing countries. The life cycle of the parasite compromises two main stages, trophozoite and cyst, linked by two major events: encystation and excystation. Interestingly, the cyst stage has a chitin wall that helps the parasite to withstand harsh environmental conditions. Since the amebic chitinase, EhCHT1, has been recognized as a key player in both encystation and excystation, it is plausible to consider that specific inhibition could arrest the life cycle of the parasite and, thus, stop the infection. However, to selectively target EhCHT1 it is important to recognize its unique biochemical features to have the ability to control its cellular function. Hence, to gain further insights into the structure-function relationship, we conducted an experimental approach to examine the effects of pH, temperature, and denaturant concentration on the enzymatic activity and protein stability. Additionally, dependence on in vivo oxidative folding was further studied using a bacterial model. Our results attest the potential of EhCHT1 as a target for the design and development of new or improved anti-amebic therapeutics. Likewise, the potential of the oxidoreductase EhPDI, involved in oxidative folding of amebic proteins, was also confirmed.

  15. Strain and vorticity analysis using small-scale faults and associated drag folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Griera, Albert; Carreras, Jordi; Druguet, Elena; Evans, Lynn

    2007-12-01

    Small-scale faults with associated drag folds in brittle-ductile rocks can retain detailed information on the kinematics and amount of deformation the host rock experienced. Measured fault orientation ( α), drag angle ( β) and the ratio of the thickness of deflected layers at the fault ( L) and further away ( T) can be compared with α, β and L/ T values that are calculated with a simple analytical model. Using graphs or a numerical best-fit routine, one can then determine the kinematic vorticity number and initial fault orientation that best fits the data. The proposed method was successfully tested on both analogue experiments and numerical simulations with BASIL. Using this method, a kinematic vorticity number of one (dextral simple shear) and a minimum finite strain of 2.5-3.8 was obtained for a population of antithetic faults with associated drag folds in a case study area at Mas Rabassers de Dalt on Cap de Creus in the Variscan of the easternmost Pyrenees, Spain.

  16. Activity, stability and folding analysis of the chitinase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia L A; Minchaca, Alexis Z; Mares, Rosa E; Ramos, Marco A

    2016-02-01

    Human amebiasis, caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, remains as a significant public health issue in developing countries. The life cycle of the parasite compromises two main stages, trophozoite and cyst, linked by two major events: encystation and excystation. Interestingly, the cyst stage has a chitin wall that helps the parasite to withstand harsh environmental conditions. Since the amebic chitinase, EhCHT1, has been recognized as a key player in both encystation and excystation, it is plausible to consider that specific inhibition could arrest the life cycle of the parasite and, thus, stop the infection. However, to selectively target EhCHT1 it is important to recognize its unique biochemical features to have the ability to control its cellular function. Hence, to gain further insights into the structure-function relationship, we conducted an experimental approach to examine the effects of pH, temperature, and denaturant concentration on the enzymatic activity and protein stability. Additionally, dependence on in vivo oxidative folding was further studied using a bacterial model. Our results attest the potential of EhCHT1 as a target for the design and development of new or improved anti-amebic therapeutics. Likewise, the potential of the oxidoreductase EhPDI, involved in oxidative folding of amebic proteins, was also confirmed. PMID:26526675

  17. Extreme Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaine, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Our understanding of the mathematics and algorithms behind paper folding, and geometric folding in general, has increased dramatically over the past several years. These developments have found a surprisingly broad range of applications. In the art of origami, it has helped spur the technical origami revolution. In engineering and science, it has helped solve problems in areas such as manufacturing, robotics, graphics, and protein folding. On the recreational side, it has led to new kinds of folding puzzles and magic. I will give an overview of the mathematics and algorithms of folding, with a focus on new mathematics and sculpture.

  18. Wavelet Analysis on Symbolic Sequences and Two-Fold de Bruijn Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. Al.

    2016-07-01

    The concept of symbolic sequences play important role in study of complex systems. In the work we are interested in ultrametric structure of the set of cyclic sequences naturally arising in theory of dynamical systems. Aimed at construction of analytic and numerical methods for investigation of clusters we introduce operator language on the space of symbolic sequences and propose an approach based on wavelet analysis for study of the cluster hierarchy. The analytic power of the approach is demonstrated by derivation of a formula for counting of two-fold de Bruijn sequences, the extension of the notion of de Bruijn sequences. Possible advantages of the developed description is also discussed in context of applied problem of construction of efficient DNA sequence assembly algorithms.

  19. Global relativistic folding optical potential and the relativistic Green's function model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. V.; Vignote, J. R.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, R.; Meucci, A.; Giusti, C.; Udías, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Optical potentials provide critical input for calculations on a wide variety of nuclear reactions, in particular, for neutrino-nucleus reactions, which are of great interest in the light of the new neutrino oscillation experiments. We present the global relativistic folding optical potential (GRFOP) fits to elastic proton scattering data from 12C nucleus at energies between 20 and 1040 MeV. We estimate observables, such as the differential cross section, the analyzing power, and the spin rotation parameter, in elastic proton scattering within the relativistic impulse approximation. The new GRFOP potential is employed within the relativistic Green's function model for inclusive quasielastic electron scattering and for (anti)neutrino-nucleus scattering at MiniBooNE kinematics.

  20. Coupled wire model of symmetric Majorana surfaces of topological superconductors II: 32-fold periodic topological orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Sahoo, Sharmistha; Teo, Jeffrey

    We mimic the massless surface Majorana's of topological superconductors by coupled wire models in two spatial dimensions, and introduce many-body gapping interactions that preserve time reversal symmetry. Coupling with a Z2 gauge theory, the symmetric gapped surface generically carries a non-trivial GN topological order, where N is the number of Majorana species and GN is some SO(r)1 or SO(3)3 -like topological state. These form a 32-fold periodic class GN ≅GN + 32 , and a Z32 relative tensor product structure GN1⊗bGN2 ≅GN1 +N2 by anyon condensation. We present the anyon structures of these topological states, and understand the topological orders through bulk-boundary correspondence and the Wilson structures on a torus geometry.

  1. Folding of electrostatically charged beads-on-a-string as an experimental realization of a theoretical model in polymer science.

    PubMed

    Reches, Meital; Snyder, Phillip W; Whitesides, George M

    2009-10-20

    The "beads-on-a-string" model for folding of polymers is a cornerstone of theoretical polymer science. This communication describes a physical model of beads-on-a-string, based on the folding of flexible strings of electrostatically charged beads in two dimensions. The system comprises millimeter-scale Teflon and Nylon-6,6 (spherical or cylindrical) beads (approximately 6 mm in diameter) separated by smaller (approximately 3 mm) poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spherical beads, threaded on a flexible string. The smaller, uncharged beads define the distances between the larger beads, and control the flexibility of the string. During agitation of the sequence of beads on a planar, horizontal paper surface, tribocharging generates opposite electrostatic charges on the larger Nylon and Teflon beads, but leaves the smaller PMMA beads essentially uncharged; the resulting electrostatic interactions cause the string to fold. Examination and comparison of two models--one physical and one theoretical--may offer a new approach to understanding folding, collapse, and molecular recognition at an abstract level, with particular opportunity to explore the influence of the flexibility of the string and the shape of the beads on the pattern and rate of folding. The physical system is, thus, an analog computer, simulating the theoretical beads-on-a-string model in two dimensions; this system makes it possible to test hypotheses connecting "sequence" to "folding", rapidly and conveniently, while exploring nonlinearities and other complexities omitted from the theoretical model.

  2. Transient dynamic phenotypes as criteria for model discrimination: fold-change detection in Rhodobacter sphaeroides chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, Abdullah; Ingalls, Brian; Sontag, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    The chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides shares many similarities with that of Escherichia coli. It exhibits robust adaptation and has several homologues of the latter's chemotaxis proteins. Recent theoretical results have correctly predicted that the E. coli output behaviour is unchanged under scaling of its ligand input signal; this property is known as fold-change detection (FCD). In the light of recent experimental results suggesting that R. sphaeroides may also show FCD, we present theoretical assumptions on the R. sphaeroides chemosensory dynamics that can be shown to yield FCD behaviour. Furthermore, it is shown that these assumptions make FCD a property of this system that is robust to structural and parametric variations in the chemotaxis pathway, in agreement with experimental results. We construct and examine models of the full chemotaxis pathway that satisfy these assumptions and reproduce experimental time-series data from earlier studies. We then propose experiments in which models satisfying our theoretical assumptions predict robust FCD behaviour where earlier models do not. In this way, we illustrate how transient dynamic phenotypes such as FCD can be used for the purposes of discriminating between models that reproduce the same experimental time-series data.

  3. Transient dynamic phenotypes as criteria for model discrimination: fold-change detection in Rhodobacter sphaeroides chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, Abdullah; Ingalls, Brian; Sontag, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    The chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides shares many similarities with that of Escherichia coli. It exhibits robust adaptation and has several homologues of the latter's chemotaxis proteins. Recent theoretical results have correctly predicted that the E. coli output behaviour is unchanged under scaling of its ligand input signal; this property is known as fold-change detection (FCD). In the light of recent experimental results suggesting that R. sphaeroides may also show FCD, we present theoretical assumptions on the R. sphaeroides chemosensory dynamics that can be shown to yield FCD behaviour. Furthermore, it is shown that these assumptions make FCD a property of this system that is robust to structural and parametric variations in the chemotaxis pathway, in agreement with experimental results. We construct and examine models of the full chemotaxis pathway that satisfy these assumptions and reproduce experimental time-series data from earlier studies. We then propose experiments in which models satisfying our theoretical assumptions predict robust FCD behaviour where earlier models do not. In this way, we illustrate how transient dynamic phenotypes such as FCD can be used for the purposes of discriminating between models that reproduce the same experimental time-series data. PMID:23293140

  4. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis {11863} during Cycle 17.

  5. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis {10035} during Cycle 12.

  6. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Analysis, Proposal 12416, as Cycle 18.

  7. Histological Effect of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor on Chronic Vocal Fold Scarring in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Sohn, Jin-Ho; Bless, Diane M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Vocal fold scarring is one of the most challenging laryngeal disorders to treat and there are currently no consistently effective treatments available. Our previous studies have shown the therapeutic potential of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for vocal fold scarring. However, the histological effects of bFGF on scarred vocal fold have not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to examine the histological effects of bFGF on chronic vocal fold scarring. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into phosphate buffered saline (sham) and bFGF groups. Unilateral vocal fold stripping was performed and the drug was injected into the scarred vocal fold for each group 2 months postoperatively. Injections were performed weekly for 4 weeks. Two months after the last injection, larynges were harvested and histologically analyzed. Results A significant increase of hyaluronic acid was observed in the vocal fold of the bFGF group compared with that of the sham group. However, there was no remarkable change in collagen expression nor in vocal fold contraction. Conclusion Significant increase of hyaluronic acid by local bFGF injection was thought to contribute to the therapeutic effects on chronic vocal fold scarring. PMID:26976028

  8. Progress in fold recognition.

    PubMed

    Flöckner, H; Braxenthaler, M; Lackner, P; Jaritz, M; Ortner, M; Sippl, M J

    1995-11-01

    The prediction experiment reveals that fold recognition has become a powerful tool in structural biology. We applied our fold recognition technique to 13 target sequences. In two cases, replication terminating protein and prosequence of subtilisin, the predicted structures are very similar to the experimentally determined folds. For the first time, in a public blind test, the unknown structures of proteins have been predicted ahead of experiment to an accuracy approaching molecular detail. In two other cases the approximate folds have been predicted correctly. According to the assessors there were 12 recognizable folds among the target proteins. In our postprediction analysis we find that in 7 cases our fold recognition technique is successful. In several of the remaining cases the predicted folds have interesting features in common with the experimental results. We present our procedure, discuss the results, and comment on several fundamental and technical problems encountered in fold recognition.

  9. Microstructural Characterization of Vocal Folds toward a Strain-Energy Model of Collagen Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Amir K.; Heris, Hossein K.; Tripathy, Umakanta; Wiseman, Paul W.; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Collagen fibrils are believed to control the immediate deformation of soft tissues under biomechanical load. Most extracellular matrix proteins remain intact during frozen sectioning, which allows them to be scanned using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Collagen fibrils are distinguishable because of their helical shape. In the present study, the shape and organization of collagen fibrils in dissected porcine vocal folds were quantified using nonlinear laser scanning microscopy data at the micrometer scale and AFM data at the nanometer scale. Rope-shape collagen fibrils were observed. Geometric characteristics for the fibrils were fed to a hyperelastic model to predict the biomechanical response of the tissue. The model simulates the micrometer-scale unlocking behavior of collagen bundles when extended from their unloaded configuration. Force spectroscopy using AFM was used to estimate the stiffness of collagen fibrils (1 ± 0.5 MPa). The presence of rope-shape fibrils is postulated to change the slope of the force-deflection response near the onset of nonlinearity. The proposed model could ultimately be used to evaluate changes in elasticity of soft tissues that result from the collagen remodeling. PMID:23643604

  10. Self-oscillating Vocal Fold Model Mechanics: Healthy, Diseased, and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiubler, Elizabeth P.; Pollok, Lucas F. E.; Apostoli, Adam G.; Hancock, Adrienne B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Voice disorders have been estimated to have a substantial economic impact of 2.5 billion annually. Approximately 30% of people will suffer from a voice disorder at some point in their lives. Life-sized, self-oscillating, synthetic vocal fold (VF) models are fabricated to exhibit material properties representative of human VFs. These models are created both with and without a polyp-like structure, a pathology that has been shown to produce rich viscous flow structures not normally observed for healthy VFs during normal phonation. Pressure measurements are acquired upstream of the VFs and high-speed images are captured at varying flow rates during VF oscillation to facilitate an understanding of the characteristics of healthy and diseased VFs. The images are analyzed using a videokymography line-scan technique. Clinically-relevant parameters calculated from the volume-velocity output of a circumferentially-vented mask (Rothenberg mask) are compared to human data collected from two groups of males aged 18-30 and 60-80. This study extends the use of synthetic VF models by assessing their ability to replicate behaviors observed in human subject data to advance a means of investigating changes associated with normal, pathological, and the aging voice. Supported by the GWU Institute for Biomedical Engineering (GWIBE) and GWU Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  11. Improvements in Markov State Model Construction Reveal Many Non-Native Interactions in the Folding of NTL9

    PubMed Central

    Schwantes, Christian R.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2013-01-01

    Markov State Models (MSMs) provide an automated framework to investigate the dynamical properties of high-dimensional molecular simulations. These models can provide a human-comprehensible picture of the underlying process, and have been successfully used to study protein folding, protein aggregation, protein ligand binding, and other biophysical systems. The MSM requires the construction of a discrete state-space such that two points are in the same state if they can interconvert rapidly. In the following, we suggest an improved method, which utilizes second order Independent Components Analysis (also known as time-structure based Independent Components Analysis, or tICA), to construct the state-space. We apply this method to simulations of NTL9 (provided by Lindorff-Larsen et al. Science 2011), and show that the MSM is an improvement over previously built models using conventional distance metrics. Additionally, the resulting model provides insight into the role of non-native contacts by revealing many slow timescales associated with compact, non-native states. PMID:23750122

  12. Direct-numerical simulation of the glottal jet and vocal-fold dynamics in a three-dimensional laryngeal model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X.; Mittal, R.; Xue, Q.; Bielamowicz, S.

    2011-01-01

    An immersed-boundary method based flow solver coupled with a finite-element solid dynamics solver is employed in order to conduct direct-numerical simulations of phonatory dynamics in a three-dimensional model of the human larynx. The computed features of the glottal flow including mean and peak flow rates, and the open and skewness quotients are found to be within the normal physiological range. The flow-induced vibration pattern shows the classical “convergent-divergent” glottal shape, and the vibration amplitude is also found to be typical for human phonation. The vocal fold motion is analyzed through the method of empirical eigenfunctions and this analysis indicates a 1:1 modal entrainment between the “adduction-abduction” mode and the “mucosal wave” mode. The glottal jet is found to exhibit noticeable cycle-to-cycle asymmetric deflections and the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is examined. PMID:21786908

  13. The equilibrium properties and folding kinetics of an all-atom Go model of the Trp-cage.

    PubMed

    Linhananta, Apichart; Boer, Jesse; MacKay, Ian

    2005-03-15

    The ultrafast-folding 20-residue Trp-cage protein is quickly becoming a new benchmark for molecular dynamics studies. Already several all-atom simulations have probed its equilibrium and kinetic properties. In this work an all-atom Go model is used to accurately represent the side-chain packing and native atomic contacts of the Trp-cage. The model reproduces the hallmark thermodynamics cooperativity of small proteins. Folding simulations observe that in the fast-folding dominant pathway, partial alpha-helical structure forms before hydrophobic core collapse. In the slow-folding secondary pathway, partial core collapse occurs before helical structure. The slow-folding rate of the secondary pathway is attributed to the loss of side-chain rotational freedom, due to the early core collapse, which impedes the helix formation. A major finding is the observation of a low-temperature kinetic intermediate stabilized by a salt bridge between residues Asp-9 and Arg-16. Similar observations [R. Zhou, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 13280 (2003)] were reported in a recent study using an all-atom model of the Trp-cage in explicit water, in which the salt-bridge stabilized intermediate was hypothesized to be the origin of the ultrafast-folding mechanism. A theoretical mutation that eliminates the Asp-9-Arg-16 salt bridge, but leaves the residues intact, is performed. Folding simulations of the mutant Trp-cage observe a two-state free-energy landscape with no kinetic intermediate and a significant decrease in the folding rate, in support of the hypothesis.

  14. Evaluation of Synthetic Self-Oscillating Models of the Vocal Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubler, Elizabeth P.; Weiland, Kelley S.; Hancock, Adrienne B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 30% of people will suffer from a voice disorder at some point in their lives. The probability doubles for those who rely heavily on their voice, such as teachers and singers. Synthetic vocal fold (VF) models are fabricated and evaluated experimentally in a vocal tract simulator to replicate physiological conditions. Pressure measurements are acquired along the vocal tract and high-speed images are captured at varying flow rates during VF oscillation to facilitate understanding of the characteristics of healthy and damaged VFs. The images are analyzed using a videokymography line-scan technique that has been used to examine VF motion and mucosal wave dynamics in vivo. Clinically relevant parameters calculated from the volume-velocity output of a circumferentially-vented mask (Rothenberg mask) are compared to patient data. This study integrates speech science with engineering and flow physics to overcome current limitations of synthetic VF models to properly replicate normal phonation in order to advance the understanding of resulting flow features, progression of pathological conditions, and medical techniques. Supported by the GW Institute for Biomedical Engineering (GWIBE) and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  15. Can Local Probes Go Global? A Joint Experiment-Simulation Analysis of λ6-85 Folding.

    PubMed

    Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The process of protein folding is known to involve global motions in a cooperative affair; the structure of most of the protein sequences is gained or lost over a narrow range of temperature, denaturant, or pressure perturbations. At the same time, recent simulations and experiments reveal a complex structural landscape with a rich set of local motions and conformational changes. We couple experimental kinetic and thermodynamic measurements with specifically tailored analysis of simulation data to isolate local versus global folding probes. We find that local probes exhibit lower melting temperatures, smaller surface area changes, and faster kinetics compared to global ones. We also see that certain local probes of folding match the global behavior more closely than others. Our work highlights the importance of using multiple probes to fully characterize protein folding dynamics by theory and experiment. PMID:27101436

  16. Can Local Probes Go Global? A Joint Experiment-Simulation Analysis of λ6-85 Folding.

    PubMed

    Sukenik, Shahar; Pogorelov, Taras V; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The process of protein folding is known to involve global motions in a cooperative affair; the structure of most of the protein sequences is gained or lost over a narrow range of temperature, denaturant, or pressure perturbations. At the same time, recent simulations and experiments reveal a complex structural landscape with a rich set of local motions and conformational changes. We couple experimental kinetic and thermodynamic measurements with specifically tailored analysis of simulation data to isolate local versus global folding probes. We find that local probes exhibit lower melting temperatures, smaller surface area changes, and faster kinetics compared to global ones. We also see that certain local probes of folding match the global behavior more closely than others. Our work highlights the importance of using multiple probes to fully characterize protein folding dynamics by theory and experiment.

  17. Protein folding optimization based on 3D off-lattice model via an improved artificial bee colony algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai; Lin, Mu; Liu, Qiao; Li, Ya; Zhou, Changjun

    2015-10-01

    Protein folding is a fundamental topic in molecular biology. Conventional experimental techniques for protein structure identification or protein folding recognition require strict laboratory requirements and heavy operating burdens, which have largely limited their applications. Alternatively, computer-aided techniques have been developed to optimize protein structures or to predict the protein folding process. In this paper, we utilize a 3D off-lattice model to describe the original protein folding scheme as a simplified energy-optimal numerical problem, where all types of amino acid residues are binarized into hydrophobic and hydrophilic ones. We apply a balance-evolution artificial bee colony (BE-ABC) algorithm as the minimization solver, which is featured by the adaptive adjustment of search intensity to cater for the varying needs during the entire optimization process. In this work, we establish a benchmark case set with 13 real protein sequences from the Protein Data Bank database and evaluate the convergence performance of BE-ABC algorithm through strict comparisons with several state-of-the-art ABC variants in short-term numerical experiments. Besides that, our obtained best-so-far protein structures are compared to the ones in comprehensive previous literature. This study also provides preliminary insights into how artificial intelligence techniques can be applied to reveal the dynamics of protein folding. Graphical Abstract Protein folding optimization using 3D off-lattice model and advanced optimization techniques.

  18. Residue-specific analysis of frustration in the folding landscape of repeat beta/alpha protein apoflavodoxin.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Loren; Samiotakis, Antonios; Homouz, Dirar; Cheung, Margaret S; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2010-02-12

    Flavodoxin adopts the common repeat beta/alpha topology and folds in a complex kinetic reaction with intermediates. To better understand this reaction, we analyzed a set of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin variants with point mutations in most secondary structure elements by in vitro and in silico methods. By equilibrium unfolding experiments, we first revealed how different secondary structure elements contribute to overall protein resistance to heat and urea. Next, using stopped-flow mixing coupled with far-UV circular dichroism, we probed how individual residues affect the amount of structure formed in the experimentally detected burst-phase intermediate. Together with in silico folding route analysis of the same point-mutated variants and computation of growth in nucleation size during early folding, computer simulations suggested the presence of two competing folding nuclei at opposite sides of the central beta-strand 3 (i.e., at beta-strands 1 and 4), which cause early topological frustration (i.e., misfolding) in the folding landscape. Particularly, the extent of heterogeneity in folding nuclei growth correlates with the in vitro burst-phase circular dichroism amplitude. In addition, phi-value analysis (in vitro and in silico) of the overall folding barrier to apoflavodoxin's native state revealed that native-like interactions in most of the beta-strands must form in transition state. Our study reveals that an imbalanced competition between the two sides of apoflavodoxin's central beta-sheet directs initial misfolding, while proper alignment on both sides of beta-strand 3 is necessary for productive folding. PMID:19913555

  19. Liquid accumulation in vibrating vocal fold tissue: A simplified model based on a fluid-saturated porous solid theory

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Chao; Jiang, Jack J.; Czerwonka, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    The human vocal fold is treated as a continuous, transversally isotropic, porous solid saturated with liquid. A set of mathematical equations, based on the theory of fluid-saturated porous solids, is developed to formulate the vibration of the vocal fold tissue. As the fluid-saturated porous tissue model degenerates to the continuous elastic tissue model when the relative movement of liquid in the porous tissue is ignored, it can be considered a more general description of vocal fold tissue than the continuous, elastic model. Using the fluid-saturated porous tissue model, the vibration of a bunch of one-dimensional fibers in the vocal fold is analytically solved based on the small amplitude assumption. It is found that the vibration of the tissue will lead to the accumulation of excess liquid in the midmembranous vocal fold. The degree of liquid accumulation is positively proportional to the vibratory amplitude and frequency. The correspondence between the liquid distribution predicted by the porous tissue theory and the location of vocal nodules observed in clinical practice, provides theoretical evidence for the liquid accumulation hypothesis of vocal nodule formation (Jiang, Ph. D., dissertation, 1991, University of Iowa). PMID:19660905

  20. Strains and folds within thrust sheets: An analysis of the Heilam sheet, northwest Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M. W.; Coward, M. P.

    1982-10-01

    The changes of shape and orientation of fossil worm burrows have been used to carry out a detailed strain analysis of the Heilam thrust sheet in the Moine Thrust zone, northwest Scotland. The strains have been factorised into components of layer parallel shear ( γ1), layer normal shear ( γ2) and layer parallel shortening or elongation (√ λ). Variations in the γ1 shear are largely lithologically controlled. Some strain is due to flexural processes as the thrusts and overlying beds change dip over thrust ramps, or are tightened by later deformation, while there may also be a component of drag which increases towards the overlying thrust, this predating the shear due to flexure. A contoured map of the √ λ' values suggests that major folds within the thrust sheet developed as a result of stick or drag on the floor thrust prior to ramp climb. This led to differential movement in the transport direction causing layer parallel shortening accompanied, or followed by, buckling of the layers. A map showing layer normal shear strains, γ2, suggests that the Heilam sheet forms a major surge zone, the central part having moved further WNW than the northern and southern parts. This has led to components of lateral shear along parts of the sheet, especially in the north, producing curvature of the imbricate faults.

  1. Conformational analysis of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin associated with apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Casbarra, Annarita; Birolo, Leila; Infusini, Giuseppe; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Svensson, Malin; Pucci, Piero; Svanborg, Catharina; Marino, Gennaro

    2004-05-01

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and limited proteolysis experiments coupled to mass spectrometry analysis was used to depict the conformation in solution of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin, complexed to oleic acid, that induces apoptosis in tumor and immature cells. Although near- and far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopy were not able to discriminate between HAMLET and apo-alpha-lactalbumin, H/D exchange experiments clearly showed that they correspond to two distinct conformational states, with HAMLET incorporating a greater number of deuterium atoms than the apo and holo forms. Complementary proteolysis experiments revealed that HAMLET and apo are both accessible to proteases in the beta-domain but showed substantial differences in accessibility to proteases at specific sites. The overall results indicated that the conformational changes associated with the release of Ca2+ are not sufficient to induce the HAMLET conformation. Metal depletion might represent the first event to produce a partial unfolding in the beta-domain of alpha-lactalbumin, but some more unfolding is needed to generate the active conformation HAMLET, very likely allowing the protein to bind the C18:1 fatty acid moiety. On the basis of these data, a putative binding site of the oleic acid, which stabilizes the HAMLET conformation, is proposed.

  2. A Summary of Coupled, Uncoupled, and Hybrid Tectonic Models for the Yakima Fold Belt--Topical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Michele A.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize the range of opinions and supporting information expressed by the expert community regarding whether a coupled or uncoupled model, or a combination of both, best represents structures in the Yakima Fold Belt. This issue was assessed to have a high level of contention with up to moderate potential for impact on the hazard estimate. This report defines the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  3. RETRACTED: Design and analytical modeling of folded waveguide traveling wave tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Fareq

    2009-12-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the editors and author. The author has used without acknowledgement part of the PhD thesis by Yap Soon Tan, "Modeling of folded waveguide travelling wave", University of Liverpool, 2007, available from the British Library at http://ethos.bl.uk/ ILS catalogue number: 13826409. Shelfmark: DXN108794. One of the conditions of submission of a paper for publication is that authors declare explicitly that their work is original and has not appeared in a publication elsewhere. Re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and we apologize to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process. The author deeply regrets this and offers his sincere and unreserved apologies to the readers of the journal, and especially to Dr. Yap S. Tan, author of the above-mentioned thesis.

  4. Effect of subglottic stenosis on the flow-induced vibration of a self-oscillating computational vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Simeon L.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2010-11-01

    The subglottis plays an important role in voice production; however, in general the role of subglottal geometry in phonation is not well understood. This research focuses on studying how subglottic stenosis, or a narrowing of the airway below the vocal folds, affects the response of a self-oscillating computational vocal fold model. Methods are described for computational model development, including stenotic geometry definition from CT scan images, incorporation of the stenosis into a finite element fluid-structure interaction model, and parametric variation of the degree of stenosis severity. Results are presented for a normal (no stenosis) case and five cases of varying degrees of stenosis severity. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of vocal fold vibratory motion and of flow behavior for the six cases are made, including characterization of flow patterns in the subglottis, glottal width and flow rate time histories, vibration frequency, and airway resistance.

  5. Wavelet analysis of hemispheroid flow separation toward understanding human vocal fold pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesniak, Daniel H.; Carr, Ian A.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Physiological flows observed in human vocal fold pathologies, such as polyps and nodules, can be modeled by flow over a wall-mounted protuberance. The experimental investigation of flow separation over a surface-mounted hemispheroid was performed using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and measurements of surface pressure in a low-speed wind tunnel. This study builds on the hypothesis that the signatures of vortical structures associated with flow separation are imprinted on the surface pressure distributions. Wavelet decomposition methods in one- and two-dimensions were utilized to elucidate the flow behavior. First, a complex Gaussian wavelet was used for the reconstruction of surface pressure time series from static pressure measurements acquired from ports upstream, downstream, and on the surface of the hemispheroid. This was followed by the application of a novel continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) using a 2D-Ricker wavelet for coherent structure detection on instantaneous PIV-data. The goal of this study is to correlate phase shifts in surface pressure with Strouhal numbers associated with the vortex shedding. Ultimately, the wavelet-based analytical framework will be aimed at addressing pulsatile flows. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1236351, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  6. Quantitative analysis of single-molecule force spectroscopy on folded chromatin fibers.

    PubMed

    Meng, He; Andresen, Kurt; van Noort, John

    2015-04-20

    Single-molecule techniques allow for picoNewton manipulation and nanometer accuracy measurements of single chromatin fibers. However, the complexity of the data, the heterogeneity of the composition of individual fibers and the relatively large fluctuations in extension of the fibers complicate a structural interpretation of such force-extension curves. Here we introduce a statistical mechanics model that quantitatively describes the extension of individual fibers in response to force on a per nucleosome basis. Four nucleosome conformations can be distinguished when pulling a chromatin fiber apart. A novel, transient conformation is introduced that coexists with single wrapped nucleosomes between 3 and 7 pN. Comparison of force-extension curves between single nucleosomes and chromatin fibers shows that embedding nucleosomes in a fiber stabilizes the nucleosome by 10 kBT. Chromatin fibers with 20- and 50-bp linker DNA follow a different unfolding pathway. These results have implications for accessibility of DNA in fully folded and partially unwrapped chromatin fibers and are vital for understanding force unfolding experiments on nucleosome arrays. PMID:25779043

  7. Quantitative analysis of single-molecule force spectroscopy on folded chromatin fibers

    PubMed Central

    Meng, He; Andresen, Kurt; van Noort, John

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques allow for picoNewton manipulation and nanometer accuracy measurements of single chromatin fibers. However, the complexity of the data, the heterogeneity of the composition of individual fibers and the relatively large fluctuations in extension of the fibers complicate a structural interpretation of such force-extension curves. Here we introduce a statistical mechanics model that quantitatively describes the extension of individual fibers in response to force on a per nucleosome basis. Four nucleosome conformations can be distinguished when pulling a chromatin fiber apart. A novel, transient conformation is introduced that coexists with single wrapped nucleosomes between 3 and 7 pN. Comparison of force-extension curves between single nucleosomes and chromatin fibers shows that embedding nucleosomes in a fiber stabilizes the nucleosome by 10 kBT. Chromatin fibers with 20- and 50-bp linker DNA follow a different unfolding pathway. These results have implications for accessibility of DNA in fully folded and partially unwrapped chromatin fibers and are vital for understanding force unfolding experiments on nucleosome arrays. PMID:25779043

  8. Implementation of a 3d numerical model of a folded multilayer carbonate aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Salvo, Cristina; Guyennon, Nicolas; Romano, Emanuele; Bruna Petrangeli, Anna; Preziosi, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this research is to present a case study of the numerical model implementation of a complex carbonate, structurally folded aquifer, with a finite difference, porous equivalent model. The case study aquifer (which extends over 235 km2 in the Apennine chain, Central Italy) provides a long term average of 3.5 m3/s of good quality groundwater to the surface river network, sustaining the minimum vital flow, and it is planned to be exploited in the next years for public water supply. In the downstream part of the river in the study area, a "Site of Community Importance" include the Nera River for its valuable aquatic fauna. However, the possible negative effects of the foreseen exploitation on groundwater dependent ecosystems are a great concern and model grounded scenarios are needed. This multilayer aquifer was conceptualized as five hydrostratigraphic units: three main aquifers (the uppermost unconfined, the central and the deepest partly confined), are separated by two locally discontinuous aquitards. The Nera river cuts through the two upper aquifers and acts as the main natural sink for groundwater. An equivalent porous medium approach was chosen. The complex tectonic structure of the aquifer requires several steps in defining the conceptual model; the presence of strongly dipping layers with very heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity, results in different thicknesses of saturated portions. Aquifers can have both unconfined or confined zones; drying and rewetting must be allowed when considering recharge/discharge cycles. All these characteristics can be included in the conceptual and numerical model; however, being the number of flow and head target scarce, the over-parametrization of the model must be avoided. Following the principle of parsimony, three steady state numerical models were developed, starting from a simple model, and then adding complexity: 2D (single layer), QUASI -3D (with leackage term simulating flow through aquitards) and

  9. Fold-related-fracturing at the Livingstone River anticline (AB; Canada) by coupling field surveying and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, Florian; Epard, Jean-Luc; Bauville, Arthur; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Pana, Dinu; Kaus, Boris; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The interpretation of fold-related joints and faults is of primary importance in terms of fluids prospection (e.g. water, oil, gas, C02) since anticlines are potential structural trap while fracturing can strongly influence the storage capacity as well as the migration pathways. Located at the front of the Foothills of the Rocky Mountains in Alberta (Canada), the Livingstone Range (LRA) is analogous to hydrocarbon reservoir that occur elsewhere in the Foothills (Cooley et al., 2011). The Livingstone Range fold system is related to the development of the Livingstone thrust that cuts around 1000m up-section from a regional decollement in the Palliser Formation (Devonian) to another in the Fernie Formation (Jurassic). Our study focuses on the detailed structural investigation of the Livingstone River anticline (northern part of the LRA). It aims at characterizing the anticline geometry as well as the fracturing pattern (orientation, mode, infilling, spacing, trace length, density, and cross-cutting relationships) in order to propose a kinematic interpretation of the fold-related fracturing genesis. The study area is investigated at different scales by combining field surveys with remote sensing (HR-Digital Elevation Model, Ground-based LiDAR, Gigapixel photography) and thin-sections analyses. In a second step we performed finite difference 3D numerical simulations in order to compute the evolution of local principal stress orientation during folding. We compared the fracture (or plastic bands) distribution in the field with 1) a dynamic numerical model of detachment folding; and 2) an instantaneous numerical model based on the final fold geometry. Cooley, M.A., Price, R.A., Dixon, J.M., Kyser, T.K. 2011. Along-strike variations and internal details of chevron-style flexural slip thrust-propagation folds within the southern Livingstone Range anticlinorium, a paleo-hydrocarbon reservoir in southern Alberta Foothills, Canada. AAPG bulletin, 95 (11), 1821-1849.

  10. Determination of the elastic properties of rabbit vocal fold tissue using uniaxial tensile testing and a tailored finite element model.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Neda; Miri, Amir K; Mongeau, Luc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the effects of the specimen shape on the accuracy of mechanical properties determined from a shape-specific model generation strategy. Digital images of five rabbit vocal folds (VFs) in their initial undeformed conditions were used to build corresponding specific solid models. The displacement field of the VFs under uniaxial tensile test was then measured over the visible portion of the surface using digital image correlation. A three-dimensional finite element model was built, using ABAQUS, for each solid model, while imposing measured boundary conditions. An inverse-problem method was used, assuming a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic constitutive model. Unknown elastic properties were identified iteratively through an error minimization technique between simulated and measured force-time data. The longitudinal elastic moduli of the five rabbit VFs were calculated and compared to values from a simple analytical method and those obtained by approximating the cross-section as elliptical. The use of shape-specific models significantly reduced the standard deviation of the Young׳s moduli of the tested specimens. However, a non-parametric statistical analysis test, i.e., the Friedman test, yielded no statistically significant differences between the shape-specific method and the elliptic cylindrical finite element model. Considering the required procedures to reconstruct the shape-specific finite element model for each tissue specimen, it might be expedient to use the simpler method when large numbers of tissue specimens are to be compared regarding their Young׳s moduli. PMID:25173237

  11. Finite-difference, time-domain analysis of a folded acoustic transmission line.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Charles M

    2005-03-01

    Recently designed, modern versions of renais sance woodwind instruments such as the recorder and serpent use square cross sections and a folded acoustic transmission line. Conventional microwave techniques would expect that this bend would cause unwanted reflections and impedance discontinuities. This paper analyses the folded acoustic transmission line using finite-difference, time-domain techniques and shows that the discontinuity can be compensated with by the use of a manufacturable method. PMID:15857045

  12. Space-time evolution of a growth fold (Betic Cordillera, Spain). Evidences from 3D geometrical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Rojas, Ivan; Alfaro, Pedro; Estévez, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    We present a study that encompasses several software tools (iGIS©, ArcGIS©, Autocad©, etc.) and data (geological mapping, high resolution digital topographic data, high resolution aerial photographs, etc.) to create a detailed 3D geometric model of an active fault propagation growth fold. This 3D model clearly shows structural features of the analysed fold, as well as growth relationships and sedimentary patterns. The results obtained permit us to discuss the kinematics and structural evolution of the fold and the fault in time and space. The study fault propagation fold is the Crevillente syncline. This fold represents the northern limit of the Bajo Segura Basin, an intermontane basin in the Eastern Betic Cordillera (SE Spain) developed from upper Miocene on. 3D features of the Crevillente syncline, including growth pattern, indicate that limb rotation and, consequently, fault activity was higher during Messinian than during Tortonian; consequently, fault activity was also higher. From Pliocene on our data point that limb rotation and fault activity steadies or probably decreases. This in time evolution of the Crevillente syncline is not the same all along the structure; actually the 3D geometric model indicates that observed lateral heterogeneity is related to along strike variation of fault displacement.

  13. Folding analysis of the most complex Stevedore’s protein knot

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Iren; Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2016-01-01

    DehI is a homodimeric haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida that contains the most complex 61 Stevedore’s protein knot within its folding topology. To examine how DehI attains such an intricate knotted topology we combined far-UV circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate its folding mechanism. Equilibrium unfolding of DehI by chemical denaturation indicated the presence of two highly populated folding intermediates, I and I’. While the two intermediates vary in secondary structure contents and tertiary packing according to CD and intrinsic fluorescence, respectively, their overall dimension and compactness are similar according to SAXS. Three single-tryptophan variants (W34, W53, and W196) were generated to probe non-cooperative unfolding events localized around the three fluorophores. Kinetic fluorescence measurements indicated that the transition from the intermediate I’ to the unfolded state is rate limiting. Our multiparametric folding analyses suggest that DehI unfolds through a linear folding pathway with two distinct folding intermediates by initial hydrophobic collapse followed by nucleation condensation, and that knotting precedes the formation of secondary structures. PMID:27527519

  14. Gravity and tectonic model across the Sulaiman fold belt and the Chaman fault zone in western Pakistan and eastern Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadoon, Ishtiaq A. K.; Khurshid, Akbar

    1996-03-01

    Gravity data from the western boundary of the Indian subcontinent have been analysed to infer the gross crustal structure across the Indian/Afghan collision zone. Seismic reflection profiles reveal the gross structural (duplex) geometry of the Sulaiman fold belt. These data show that the wedge, which is 10 km thick at the deformation front, thickens northwestward to attain a tectonic thickness (thickness due to deformation) of about 20 km in the hinterland. Gravity modeling depicts the depth of the Moho between 33 and 35 km at the deformation front of the Sulaiman fold belt. The Moho depth shows an upward convexity along an E-W profile. It decreases northward with a gentle gradient of 1.1° (20 m/km) below the Sulaiman fold belt, and then deepens abruptly with a gradient of about 7.8° (136 m/km) across the Chaman fault zone, attaining a depth of about 57 km in eastern Afghanistan. The model suggests that the Sulaiman fold belt is underlain by transitional crust (15-27 km thick), in contrast to the continental crust (38 km thick) underneath the fold belt of the Himalayan collision zone in northern Pakistan. The about 57-km-thick crystalline crust in eastern Afghanistan may be due to: (1) underplating by crust of the Indian subcontinent; and (2) structural thickening within the Afghan block.

  15. Reconstructing folding energy landscapes from splitting probability analysis of single-molecule trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Ajay P.; Lambert, John; Woodside, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Structural self-assembly in biopolymers, such as proteins and nucleic acids, involves a diffusive search for the minimum-energy state in a conformational free-energy landscape. The likelihood of folding proceeding to completion, as a function of the reaction coordinate used to monitor the transition, can be described by the splitting probability, pfold(x). Pfold encodes information about the underlying energy landscape, and it is often used to judge the quality of the reaction coordinate. Here, we show how pfold can be used to reconstruct energy landscapes from single-molecule folding trajectories, using force spectroscopy measurements of single DNA hairpins. Calculating pfold(x) directly from trajectories of the molecular extension measured for hairpins fluctuating in equilibrium between folded and unfolded states, we inverted the result expected from diffusion over a 1D energy landscape to obtain the implied landscape profile. The results agreed well with the landscapes reconstructed by established methods, but, remarkably, without the need to deconvolve instrumental effects on the landscape, such as tether compliance. The same approach was also applied to hairpins with multistate folding pathways. The relative insensitivity of the method to the instrumental compliance was confirmed by simulations of folding measured with different tether stiffnesses. This work confirms that the molecular extension is a good reaction coordinate for these measurements, and validates a powerful yet simple method for reconstructing landscapes from single-molecule trajectories. PMID:26039984

  16. A bionic approach to mathematical modeling the fold geometry of deployable reflector antennas on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. M.; Liu, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    Inspired from biology, this study presents a method for designing the fold geometry of deployable reflectors. Since the space available inside rockets for transporting satellites with reflector antennas is typically cylindrical in shape, and its cross-sectional area is considerably smaller than the reflector antenna after deployment, the cross-sectional area of the folded reflector must be smaller than the available rocket interior space. Membrane reflectors in aerospace are a type of lightweight structure that can be packaged compactly. To design membrane reflectors from the perspective of deployment processes, bionic applications from morphological changes of plants are investigated. Creating biologically inspired reflectors, this paper deals with fold geometry of reflectors, which imitate flower buds. This study uses mathematical formulation to describe geometric profiles of flower buds. Based on the formulation, new designs for deployable membrane reflectors derived from bionics are proposed. Adjusting parameters in the formulation of these designs leads to decreases in reflector area before deployment.

  17. Effects of vocal fold epithelium removal on vibration in an excised human larynx model.

    PubMed

    Tse, Justin R; Zhang, Zhaoyan; Long, Jennifer L

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the impact of selective epithelial injury on phonation in an excised human larynx apparatus. With intact epithelium, the vocal folds exhibited a symmetrical vibration pattern with complete glottal closure during vibration. The epithelium was then enzymatically removed from one, then both vocal folds, which led to left-right asymmetric vibration and a decreased closed quotient. Although the mechanisms underlying these vibratory changes are unclear, these results demonstrate that some component of an intact surface layer may play an important role in achieving normal symmetric vibration and glottal closure.

  18. Relation of Structural and Vibratory Kinematics of the Vocal Folds to Two Acoustic Measures of Breathy Voice Based on Computational Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samlan, Robin A.; Story, Brad H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To relate vocal fold structure and kinematics to 2 acoustic measures: cepstral peak prominence (CPP) and the amplitude of the first harmonic relative to the second (H1-H2). Method: The authors used a computational, kinematic model of the medial surfaces of the vocal folds to specify features of vocal fold structure and vibration in a…

  19. Microscopic Description of the Exotic Nuclei Reactions by Using Folding model Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Awad A.; Hassanain, M. A.; Mokhtar, S. R.; El-Azab Farid, M.; Zaki, M. A.; Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.

    2011-10-27

    A microscopic folding approach based upon the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction and the nuclear matter densities of the interacting nuclei has been carried out to explain recently measured experimental data of the {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn elastic scattering reaction at four different laboratory energies near the Coulomb barrier. The corresponding reaction cross sections are also considered.

  20. The occurrence of the Coanda effect in pulsatile flow through static models of the human vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Erath, Byron D; Plesniak, Michael W

    2006-08-01

    Pulsatile flow through a one-sided diffuser and static divergent vocal-fold models is investigated to ascertain the relevance of viscous-driven flow asymmetries in the larynx. The models were 7.5 times real size, and the flow was scaled to match Reynolds and Strouhal numbers, as well as the translaryngeal pressure drop. The Reynolds number varied from 0-2000, for flow oscillation frequencies corresponding to 100 and 150 Hz life-size. Of particular interest was the development of glottal flow skewing by attachment to the bounding walls, or Coanda effect, in a pulsatile flow field, and its impact on speech. The vocal folds form a divergent passage during phases of the phonation cycle when viscous effects such as flow separation are important. It was found that for divergence angles of less than 20 degrees, the attachment of the flow to the vocal-fold walls occurred when the acceleration of the forcing function was zero, and the flow had reached maximum velocity. For a divergence angle of 40 degrees, the fully separated central jet never attached to the vocal-fold walls. Inferences are made regarding the impact of the Coanda effect on the sound source contribution in speech. PMID:16938987

  1. Effect of the thermostat in the molecular dynamics simulation on the folding of the model protein chignolin.

    PubMed

    Fuzo, Carlos A; Degrève, Léo

    2012-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the model protein chignolin with explicit solvent were carried out, in order to analyze the influence of the Berendsen thermostat on the evolution and folding of the peptide. The dependence of the peptide behavior on temperature was tested with the commonly employed thermostat scheme consisting of one thermostat for the protein and another for the solvent. The thermostat coupling time of the protein was increased to infinity, when the protein is not in direct contact with the thermal bath, a situation known as minimally invasive thermostat. In agreement with other works, it was observed that only in the last situation the instantaneous temperature of the model protein obeys a canonical distribution. As for the folding studies, it was shown that, in the applications of the commonly utilized thermostat schemes, the systems are trapped in local minima regions from which it has difficulty escaping. With the minimally invasive thermostat the time that the protein needs to fold was reduced by two to three times. These results show that the obstacles to the evolution of the extended peptide to the folded structure can be overcome when the temperature of the peptide is not directly controlled.

  2. Linking aptamer-ligand binding and expression platform folding in riboswitches: prospects for mechanistic modeling and design.

    PubMed

    Aboul-ela, Fareed; Huang, Wei; Abd Elrahman, Maaly; Boyapati, Vamsi; Li, Pan

    2015-01-01

    The power of riboswitches in regulation of bacterial metabolism derives from coupling of two characteristics: recognition and folding. Riboswitches contain aptamers, which function as biosensors. Upon detection of the signaling molecule, the riboswitch transduces the signal into a genetic decision. The genetic decision is coupled to refolding of the expression platform, which is distinct from, although overlapping with, the aptamer. Early biophysical studies of riboswitches focused on recognition of the ligand by the aptamer-an important consideration for drug design. A mechanistic understanding of ligand-induced riboswitch RNA folding can further enhance riboswitch ligand design, and inform efforts to tune and engineer riboswitches with novel properties. X-ray structures of aptamer/ligand complexes point to mechanisms through which the ligand brings together distal strand segments to form a P1 helix. Transcriptional riboswitches must detect the ligand and form this P1 helix within the timescale of transcription. Depending on the cell's metabolic state and cellular environmental conditions, the folding and genetic outcome may therefore be affected by kinetics of ligand binding, RNA folding, and transcriptional pausing, among other factors. Although some studies of isolated riboswitch aptamers found homogeneous, prefolded conformations, experimental, and theoretical studies point to functional and structural heterogeneity for nascent transcripts. Recently it has been shown that some riboswitch segments, containing the aptamer and partial expression platforms, can form binding-competent conformers that incorporate an incomplete aptamer secondary structure. Consideration of the free energy landscape for riboswitch RNA folding suggests models for how these conformers may act as transition states-facilitating rapid, ligand-mediated aptamer folding. PMID:26361734

  3. Thioredoxin from Escherichia coli as a Role Model of Molecular Recognition, Folding, Dynamics and Function.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego S; Delfino, Jose Maria; Santos, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) catalyzes redox reactions via the reversible oxidation of the conserved active center CGPC and it is involved in multiple biological processes, some of them linked to redox activity while others not. TRX is a globular, thermodynamically stable and monomeric alpha/beta protein with a structure characterized by a central beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices. In this review we discuss central aspects of folding, dynamics and function of Escherichia coli TRX (EcTRX), pointing to the characterization of the full-length protein and of relevant fragments. In addition, we focus on the critical role that the C-terminal alpha-helical element plays in a late event in the consolidation of the overall EcTRX fold. Furthermore, we address the characterization of internal molecular motions by NMR and molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Finally, we review important aspects of the relationship among structure, dynamics and enzymatic function of this key redox protein. PMID:26149400

  4. Proteomic analysis of a decellularized human vocal fold mucosa scaffold using 2D electrophoresis and high-resolution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Welham, Nathan V.; Chang, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.; Frey, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Natural biologic scaffolds for tissue engineering are commonly generated by decellularization of tissues and organs. Despite some preclinical and clinical success, in vivo scaffold remodeling and functional outcomes remain variable, presumably due to the influence of unidentified bioactive molecules on the scaffold-host interaction. Here, we used 2D electrophoresis and high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses to evaluate decellularization effectiveness and identify potentially bioactive protein remnants in a human vocal fold mucosa model. We noted proteome, phosphoproteome and O-glycoproteome depletion post-decellularization, and identified >200 unique protein species within the decellularized scaffold. Gene ontology-based enrichment analysis revealed a dominant set of functionally-related ontology terms associated with extracellular matrix assembly, organization, morphology and patterning, consistent with preservation of a tissue-specific niche for later cell seeding and infiltration. We further identified a subset of ontology terms associated with bioactive (some of which are antigenic) cellular proteins, despite histological and immunohistochemical data indicating complete decellularization. These findings demonstrate the value of mass spectrometry-based proteomics in identifying agents potentially responsible for variation in host response to engineered tissues derived from decellularized scaffolds. This work has implications for the manufacturing of biologic scaffolds from any tissue or organ, as well as for prediction and monitoring of the scaffold-host interaction in vivo. PMID:23102991

  5. Optimized Wang-Landau sampling of lattice polymers: ground state search and folding thermodynamics of HP model proteins.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P

    2012-08-14

    Coarse-grained (lattice-) models have a long tradition in aiding efforts to decipher the physical or biological complexity of proteins. Despite the simplicity of these models, however, numerical simulations are often computationally very demanding and the quest for efficient algorithms is as old as the models themselves. Expanding on our previous work [T. Wüst and D. P. Landau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 178101 (2009)], we present a complete picture of a Monte Carlo method based on Wang-Landau sampling in combination with efficient trial moves (pull, bond-rebridging, and pivot moves) which is particularly suited to the study of models such as the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model of protein folding. With this generic and fully blind Monte Carlo procedure, all currently known putative ground states for the most difficult benchmark HP sequences could be found. For most sequences we could also determine the entire energy density of states and, together with suitably designed structural observables, explore the thermodynamics and intricate folding behavior in the virtually inaccessible low-temperature regime. We analyze the differences between random and protein-like heteropolymers for sequence lengths up to 500 residues. Our approach is powerful both in terms of robustness and speed, yet flexible and simple enough for the study of many related problems in protein folding.

  6. The initial step of DNA hairpin folding: a kinetic analysis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Doose, Sören; Neuweiler, Hannes; Sauer, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Conformational fluctuations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides were studied in aqueous solution by monitoring contact-induced fluorescence quenching of the oxazine fluorophore MR121 by intrinsic guanosine residues (dG). We applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze kinetics of DNA hairpin folding. We first characterized the reporter system by investigating bimolecular quenching interactions between MR121 and guanosine monophosphate in aqueous solution estimating rate constants, efficiency and stability for formation of quenched complexes. We then studied the kinetics of complex formation between MR121 and dG residues site-specifically incorporated in DNA hairpins. To uncover the initial steps of DNA hairpin folding we investigated complex formation in ssDNA carrying one or two complementary base pairs (dC–dG pairs) that could hybridize to form a short stem. Our data show that incorporation of a single dC–dG pair leads to non-exponential decays for opening and closing kinetics and reduces rate constants by one to two orders of magnitude. We found positive activation enthalpies independent of the number of dC–dG pairs. These results imply that the rate limiting step of DNA hairpin folding is not determined by loop dynamics, or by mismatches in the stem, but rather by interactions between stem and loop nucleotides. PMID:16687657

  7. NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS SMOV as proposal 13555 {visit 5}.

  8. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  9. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G. E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de; Hummer, Gerhard E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de

    2014-09-21

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  10. Linear analysis of a W band groove-loaded folded waveguide traveling wave tube

    SciTech Connect

    He Jun; Wei Yanyu; Gong Yubin; Wang Wenxiang

    2010-11-15

    A linearized field theory of a groove-loaded folded waveguide traveling wave tube (FWTWT) is developed. The influence of groove dimensions and beam parameters on the linear gain and bandwidth of the device is investigated by numerical calculation. In addition, a comparison of the linear gain properties between the groove-loaded FWTWT and the conventional one is also carried out. It is indicated from the investigation that by the groove loading, the electric field that acts on the electron beam is enhanced, the electron beam gives more energy to wave, and the linear gain is raised.

  11. Investigating acoustic correlates of human vocal fold vibratory phase asymmetry through modeling and laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopya

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Zañartu, Matías; Quatieri, Thomas F.; Deliyski, Dimitar D.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Vocal fold vibratory asymmetry is often associated with inefficient sound production through its impact on source spectral tilt. This association is investigated in both a computational voice production model and a group of 47 human subjects. The model provides indirect control over the degree of left–right phase asymmetry within a nonlinear source–filter framework, and high-speed videoendoscopy provides in vivo measures of vocal fold vibratory asymmetry. Source spectral tilt measures are estimated from the inverse-filtered spectrum of the simulated and recorded radiated acoustic pressure. As expected, model simulations indicate that increasing left–right phase asymmetry induces steeper spectral tilt. Subject data, however, reveal that none of the vibratory asymmetry measures correlates with spectral tilt measures. Probing further into physiological correlates of spectral tilt that might be affected by asymmetry, the glottal area waveform is parameterized to obtain measures of the open phase (open/plateau quotient) and closing phase (speed/closing quotient). Subjects’ left–right phase asymmetry exhibits low, but statistically significant, correlations with speed quotient (r = 0.45) and closing quotient (r = −0.39). Results call for future studies into the effect of asymmetric vocal fold vibration on glottal airflow and the associated impact on voice source spectral properties and vocal efficiency. PMID:22225054

  12. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    PubMed

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-07-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution.

  13. Modeling the effects of a posterior glottal opening on vocal fold dynamics with implications for vocal hyperfunction.

    PubMed

    Zañartu, Matías; Galindo, Gabriel E; Erath, Byron D; Peterson, Sean D; Wodicka, George R; Hillman, Robert E

    2014-12-01

    Despite the frequent observation of a persistent opening in the posterior cartilaginous glottis in normal and pathological phonation, its influence on the self-sustained oscillations of the vocal folds is not well understood. The effects of a posterior gap on the vocal fold tissue dynamics and resulting acoustics were numerically investigated using a specially designed flow solver and a reduced-order model of human phonation. The inclusion of posterior gap areas of 0.03-0.1 cm(2) reduced the energy transfer from the fluid to the vocal folds by more than 42%-80% and the radiated sound pressure level by 6-14 dB, respectively. The model was used to simulate vocal hyperfucntion, i.e., patterns of vocal misuse/abuse associated with many of the most common voice disorders. In this first approximation, vocal hyperfunction was modeled by introducing a compensatory increase in lung air pressure to regain the vocal loudness level that was produced prior to introducing a large glottal gap. This resulted in a significant increase in maximum flow declination rate and amplitude of unsteady flow, thereby mimicking clinical studies. The amplitude of unsteady flow was found to be linearly correlated with collision forces, thus being an indicative measure of vocal hyperfunction. PMID:25480072

  14. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    PubMed

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-07-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution. PMID:17630830

  15. Accurate cortical tissue classification on MRI by modeling cortical folding patterns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hosung; Caldairou, Benoit; Hwang, Ji-Wook; Mansi, Tommaso; Hong, Seok-Jun; Bernasconi, Neda; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Accurate tissue classification is a crucial prerequisite to MRI morphometry. Automated methods based on intensity histograms constructed from the entire volume are challenged by regional intensity variations due to local radiofrequency artifacts as well as disparities in tissue composition, laminar architecture and folding patterns. Current work proposes a novel anatomy-driven method in which parcels conforming cortical folding were regionally extracted from the brain. Each parcel is subsequently classified using nonparametric mean shift clustering. Evaluation was carried out on manually labeled images from two datasets acquired at 3.0 Tesla (n = 15) and 1.5 Tesla (n = 20). In both datasets, we observed high tissue classification accuracy of the proposed method (Dice index >97.6% at 3.0 Tesla, and >89.2% at 1.5 Tesla). Moreover, our method consistently outperformed state-of-the-art classification routines available in SPM8 and FSL-FAST, as well as a recently proposed local classifier that partitions the brain into cubes. Contour-based analyses localized more accurate white matter-gray matter (GM) interface classification of the proposed framework compared to the other algorithms, particularly in central and occipital cortices that generally display bright GM due to their highly degree of myelination. Excellent accuracy was maintained, even in the absence of correction for intensity inhomogeneity. The presented anatomy-driven local classification algorithm may significantly improve cortical boundary definition, with possible benefits for morphometric inference and biomarker discovery.

  16. Accurate cortical tissue classification on MRI by modeling cortical folding patterns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hosung; Caldairou, Benoit; Hwang, Ji-Wook; Mansi, Tommaso; Hong, Seok-Jun; Bernasconi, Neda; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Accurate tissue classification is a crucial prerequisite to MRI morphometry. Automated methods based on intensity histograms constructed from the entire volume are challenged by regional intensity variations due to local radiofrequency artifacts as well as disparities in tissue composition, laminar architecture and folding patterns. Current work proposes a novel anatomy-driven method in which parcels conforming cortical folding were regionally extracted from the brain. Each parcel is subsequently classified using nonparametric mean shift clustering. Evaluation was carried out on manually labeled images from two datasets acquired at 3.0 Tesla (n = 15) and 1.5 Tesla (n = 20). In both datasets, we observed high tissue classification accuracy of the proposed method (Dice index >97.6% at 3.0 Tesla, and >89.2% at 1.5 Tesla). Moreover, our method consistently outperformed state-of-the-art classification routines available in SPM8 and FSL-FAST, as well as a recently proposed local classifier that partitions the brain into cubes. Contour-based analyses localized more accurate white matter-gray matter (GM) interface classification of the proposed framework compared to the other algorithms, particularly in central and occipital cortices that generally display bright GM due to their highly degree of myelination. Excellent accuracy was maintained, even in the absence of correction for intensity inhomogeneity. The presented anatomy-driven local classification algorithm may significantly improve cortical boundary definition, with possible benefits for morphometric inference and biomarker discovery. PMID:26037453

  17. Effect of Cohesion Uncertainty of Granular Materials on the Kinematics of Scaled Models of Fold-and-Thrust Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilfouroushan, F.; Pysklywec, R.; Cruden, S.

    2009-05-01

    Cohesionless or very low cohesion granular materials are widely used in analogue/physical models to simulate brittle rocks in the upper crust. Selection of materials with appropriate cohesion values in such models is important for the simulation of the dynamics of brittle rock deformation in nature. Uncertainties in the magnitude of cohesion (due to measurement errors, extrapolations at low normal stresses, or model setup) in laboratory experiments can possibly result in misinterpretation of the styles and mechanisms of deformation in natural fold-and thrust belts. We ran a series of 2-D numerical models to investigate systematically the effect of cohesion uncertainties on the evolution of models of fold-and-thrust belts. The analyses employ SOPALE, a geodynamic code based on the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method. Similar to analogue models, the material properties of sand and transparent silicone (PDMS) are used to simulate brittle and viscous behaviors of upper crustal rocks. The suite of scaled brittle and brittle-viscous numerical experiments have the same initial geometry but the cohesion value of the brittle layers is increased systematically from 0 to 100 Pa. The stress and strain distribution in different sets of models with different cohesion values are compared and analyzed. The kinematics and geometry of thrust wedges including the location and number of foreland- and hinterland- verging thrust faults, pop-up structures, tapers and topography are also explored and their sensitivity to cohesion value is discussed.

  18. Crucial stages of protein folding through a solvable model: predicting target sites for enzyme-inhibiting drugs.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, Cristian; Cecconi, Fabio; Flammini, Alessandro; Maritan, Amos

    2002-08-01

    An exactly solvable model based on the topology of a protein native state is applied to identify bottlenecks and key sites for the folding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease. The predicted sites are found to correlate well with clinical data on resistance to Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs. It has been observed that the effects of drug therapy are to induce multiple mutations on the protease. The sites where such mutations occur correlate well with those involved in folding bottlenecks identified through the deterministic procedure proposed in this study. The high statistical significance of the observed correlations suggests that the approach may be promisingly used in conjunction with traditional techniques to identify candidate locations for drug attacks.

  19. Thermodynamic features characterizing good and bad folding sequences obtained using a simplified off-lattice protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatori, A.; Ferkinghoff-Borg, J.; Tiana, G.; Broglia, R. A.

    2006-06-01

    The thermodynamics of the small SH3 protein domain is studied by means of a simplified model where each beadlike amino acid interacts with the others through a contact potential controlled by a 20×20 random matrix. Good folding sequences, characterized by a low native energy, display three main thermodynamical ensembles, namely, a coil-like ensemble, an unfolded globule, and a folded ensemble (plus two other states, frozen and random coils, populated only at extreme temperatures). Interestingly, the unfolded globule has some regions already structured. Poorly designed sequences, on the other hand, display a wide transition from the random coil to a frozen state. The comparison with the analytic theory of heteropolymers is discussed.

  20. QTL analysis of popping fold and the consistency of QTLs under two environments in popcorn.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ling; Dong, Yong-Bin; Niu, Su-Zhen

    2006-08-01

    Popping fold (PF) is the most important quality trait in popcorn. In this study, a total of 259 F2:3 families, derived from the cross between a dent corn inbred Dan232 and a popcorn inbred N04, were evaluated for their popping folds in replicated experiments under two environments. Of 613 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs screened, 183 pairs were selected to construct a genetic linkage map with the genetic distance of 1,762.2 cM (centimorgan) and on average 9.63 cM every marker. Quantative trait loci (QTL) were identified, and their genetic effects were estimated using CIM (composite interval mapping) method. The interactions among QTLs detected were calculated using MIM (multiple interval mapping) method. In all, 22 QTLs were detected, and only 5 of them were common under two environments. Contribution to phenotypic variation of a single QTL varied from 3.07% to 12.84%, and total contributions of all QTLs under two environments were 66.46% and 51.90%, respectively. Three QTLs (qPF-6-1, qPF-8-1 and qPF-1-3) with more than 10% contributions were observed. The additive effects were larger than dominant effects for most QTLs. The amount of QTLs showing additive, partially dominant, dominant and over-dominant effects were 4, 5, 0, 2 in spring sowing and 2, 5, 2, 2 in summer sowing, respectively. There were only 2.60% pairs of QTLs or maker intervals expressing AA, DA or DD interactions. PMID:16939007

  1. Folding 19 proteins to their native state and stability of large proteins from a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We develop an intermediate resolution model, where the backbone is modeled with atomic resolution but the side chain with a single bead, by extending our previous model (Proteins (2013) DOI: 10.1002/prot.24269) to properly include proline, preproline residues and backbone rigidity. Starting from random configurations, the model properly folds 19 proteins (including a mutant 2A3D sequence) into native states containing β sheet, α helix, and mixed α/β. As a further test, the stability of H-RAS (a 169 residue protein, critical in many signaling pathways) is investigated: The protein is stable, with excellent agreement with experimental B-factors. Despite that proteins containing only α helices fold to their native state at lower backbone rigidity, and other limitations, which we discuss thoroughly, the model provides a reliable description of the dynamics as compared with all atom simulations, but does not constrain secondary structures as it is typically the case in more coarse-grained models. Further implications are described.

  2. Role of the Closing Base Pair for d(GCA) Hairpin Stability: Free Energy Analysis and Folding Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2011-06-30

    Hairpin loops belong to the most important structural motifs in folded nucleic acids. The d(GNA) sequence in DNA can form very stable trinucleotide hairpin loops depending, however, strongly on the closing base pair. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) were employed to study hairpin folding of two DNA sequences, d(gcGCAgc) and d(cgGCAcg), with the same central loop motif but different closing base pairs starting from singlestranded structures. In both cases, conformations of the most populated conformational cluster at the lowest temperature showed close agreement with available experimental structures. For the loop sequence with the less stable G:C closing base pair, an alternative loop topology accumulated as second most populated conformational state indicating a possible loop structural heterogeneity. Comparative-free energy simulations on induced loop unfolding indicated higher stability of the loop with a C:G closing base pair by 3 kcal mol1 (compared to a G:C closing base pair) in very good agreement with experiment. The comparative energetic analysis of sampled unfolded, intermediate and folded conformational states identified electrostatic and packing interactions as the main contributions to the closing base pair dependence of the d(GCA) loop stability.

  3. Structural models of intrinsically disordered and calcium-bound folded states of a protein adapted for secretion

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Darragh P.; Hernandez, Belen; Durand, Dominique; Hourdel, Véronique; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Vachette, Patrice; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Ladant, Daniel; Brier, Sébastien; Chenal, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type I secretion systems, T1SS, to secrete virulence factors that contain calcium-binding Repeat-in-ToXin (RTX) motifs. Here, we present structural models of an RTX protein, RD, in both its intrinsically disordered calcium-free Apo-state and its folded calcium-bound Holo-state. Apo-RD behaves as a disordered polymer chain comprising several statistical elements that exhibit local rigidity with residual secondary structure. Holo-RD is a folded multi-domain protein with an anisometric shape. RTX motifs thus appear remarkably adapted to the structural and mechanistic constraints of the secretion process. In the low calcium environment of the bacterial cytosol, Apo-RD is an elongated disordered coil appropriately sized for transport through the narrow secretion machinery. The progressive folding of Holo-RD in the extracellular calcium-rich environment as it emerges form the T1SS may then favor its unidirectional export through the secretory channel. This process is relevant for hundreds of bacterial species producing virulent RTX proteins. PMID:26374675

  4. Alpine fold-and-thrust structures revealed: A 3D model from the Helvetic Zone (Säntis area, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Paola; Pfiffner, Adrian; Frehner, Marcel

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the geometrical relationships between folding and thrust faulting, a 3D model of the Helvetic fold-and-thrust belt in Eastern Switzerland is built from several cross-sections in the Säntis area, between Hoher Kasten and Wildhaus. Existing cross-sections from Schlatter (1941), Kempf (1966), and Pfiffner (2000; 2011) were partly redrawn and cross-checked for line length balancing. Additional cross-sections based on surface geology were newly constructed to fill areas with a low cross-section density and to solve geological problems. The interpolation of the formation interfaces and the thrusts between the cross-sections allowed generating six main surfaces corresponding to the base of the Öhrli and Betlis Limestones, the Helvetic Kieselkalk, the Schrattenkalk and Garschella Formations, and the Seewen Limestone. The main structural elements in the Säntis area, such as the Säntis Thrust or the Sax-Schwende Fault, are also implemented in the model. The 3D model highlights the shape of the main anticline-syncline pairs (e.g., Altmann-Wildseeli, Schafberg-Moor, Roslenfirst-Mutschen, etc...) and how these fold trains vary in amplitude and wavelength along strike. The model also clearly shows the lateral extension, the trend, and the variation in displacement of the principal faults. The reconstruction of 3D horizons allows the geologists investigating cross-sections along any given direction. The 3D model is useful to understand how the changes of the internal nappe structures, namely folds and thrust faults, change along strike. Such changes occur either across transverse faults or in a more gradual manner. The model can and will also be used as a base to perform retrodeformation and strain estimation. Shortening will be calculated using the base Schrattenkalk as the reference horizon. REFERENCES Pfiffner, O.A., 2000: Cross-sections in Funk, H., Habich, J.K., Hantke, R. & Pfiffner, O.A., 2000: Blatt 1115 Säntis - Geologischer Atlas der Schweiz 1

  5. Analysis of the pH-dependent thermodynamic stability, local motions, and microsecond folding kinetics of carbonmonoxycytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-09-15

    This paper analyzes the effect of pH on thermodynamic stability, low-frequency local motions and microsecond folding kinetics of carbonmonoxycytochrome c (Cyt-CO) all across the alkaline pH-unfolding transition of protein. Thermodynamic analysis of urea-induced unfolding transitions of Cyt-CO measured between pH 6 and pH 11.9 reveals that Cyt-CO is maximally stable at pH∼9.5. Dilution of unfolded Cyt-CO into refolding medium forms a native-like compact state (NCO-state), where Fe(2+)-CO interaction persists. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters measured for slow thermally-driven CO dissociation (NCO→N+CO) and association (N+CO→NCO) reactions between pH 6.5 and pH 13 reveal that the thermal-motions of M80-containing Ω-loop are decreased in subdenaturing limit of alkaline pH. Laser photolysis of Fe(2+)-CO bond in NCO-state triggers the microsecond folding (NCO→N). The microsecond kinetics measured all across the alkaline pH-unfolding transition of Cyt-CO produce rate rollover in the refolding limb of chevron plot, which suggests a glass transition of NCO en route to N. Between pH 7 and pH 11.9, the natural logarithm of the microsecond folding rate varies by < 1.5 units while the natural logarithm of apparent equilibrium constant varies by 11.8 units. This finding indicates that the pH-dependent ionic-interactions greatly affect the global stability of protein but have very small effect on folding kinetics. PMID:27424489

  6. Mitochondrial capture enriches mito-DNA 100 fold, enabling PCR-free mitogenomics biodiversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanlin; Wang, Xin; Xie, Lin; Tan, Meihua; Li, Zhenyu; Su, Xu; Zhang, Hao; Misof, Bernhard; Kjer, Karl M; Tang, Min; Niehuis, Oliver; Jiang, Hui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Biodiversity analyses based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms have developed by leaps and bounds in recent years. A PCR-free strategy, which can alleviate taxonomic bias, was considered as a promising approach to delivering reliable species compositions of targeted environments. The major impediment of such a method is the lack of appropriate mitochondrial DNA enrichment ways. Because mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) make up only a small proportion of total DNA, PCR-free methods will inevitably result in a huge excess of data (>99%). Furthermore, the massive volume of sequence data is highly demanding on computing resources. Here, we present a mitogenome enrichment pipeline via a gene capture chip that was designed by virtue of the mitogenome sequences of the 1000 Insect Transcriptome Evolution project (1KITE, www.1kite.org). A mock sample containing 49 species was used to evaluate the efficiency of the mitogenome capture method. We demonstrate that the proportion of mitochondrial DNA can be increased by approximately 100-fold (from the original 0.47% to 42.52%). Variation in phylogenetic distances of target taxa to the probe set could in principle result in bias in abundance. However, the frequencies of input taxa were largely maintained after capture (R(2) = 0.81). We suggest that our mitogenome capture approach coupled with PCR-free shotgun sequencing could provide ecological researchers an efficient NGS method to deliver reliable biodiversity assessment.

  7. Identification of folding intermediates of streblin, the most stable serine protease: biophysical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Reetesh; Tripathi, Pinki; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Caruso, Icaro P; Jagannadham, Medicherla V

    2014-01-01

    Streblin, a serine proteinase from plant Streblus asper, has been used to investigate the conformational changes induced by pH, temperature, and chaotropes. The near/far UV circular dichroism activities under fluorescence emission spectroscopy and 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) binding have been carried out to understand the unfolding of the protein in the presence of denaturants. Spectroscopic studies reveal that streblin belongs to the α+β class of proteins and exhibits stability towards chemical denaturants, guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). The pH-induced transition of this protein is noncooperative for transition phases between pH 0.5 and 2.5 (midpoint, 1.5) and pH 2.5 and 10.0 (midpoint, 6.5). At pH 1.0 or lower, the protein unfolds to form acid-unfolded state, and for pH 7.5 and above, protein turns into an alkaline denatured state characterized by the absence of ANS binding. At pH 2.0 (1 M GuHCl), streblin exists in a partially unfolded state with characteristics of a molten globule state. The protein is found to exhibit strong and predominant ANS binding. In total, six different intermediate states has been identified to show protein folding pathways. PMID:24108566

  8. High precision analysis of an embryonic extensional fault-related fold using 3D orthorectified virtual outcrops: The viewpoint importance in structural geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano; Corradetti, Amerigo; Billi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Image-based 3D modeling has recently opened the way to the use of virtual outcrop models in geology. An intriguing application of this method involves the production of orthorectified images of outcrops using almost any user-defined point of view, so that photorealistic cross-sections suitable for numerous geological purposes and measurements can be easily generated. These purposes include the accurate quantitative analysis of fault-fold relationships starting from imperfectly oriented and partly inaccessible real outcrops. We applied the method of image-based 3D modeling and orthorectification to a case study from the northern Apennines, Italy, where an incipient extensional fault affecting well-layered limestones is exposed on a 10-m-high barely accessible cliff. Through a few simple steps, we constructed a high-quality image-based 3D model of the outcrop. In the model, we made a series of measurements including fault and bedding attitudes, which allowed us to derive the bedding-fault intersection direction. We then used this direction as viewpoint to obtain a distortion-free photorealistic cross-section, on which we measured bed dips and thicknesses as well as fault stratigraphic separations. These measurements allowed us to identify a slight difference (i.e. only 0.5°) between the hangingwall and footwall cutoff angles. We show that the hangingwall strain required to compensate the upward-decreasing displacement of the fault was accommodated by this 0.5° rotation (i.e. folding) and coeval 0.8% thickening of strata in the hangingwall relatively to footwall strata. This evidence is consistent with trishear fault-propagation folding. Our results emphasize the viewpoint importance in structural geology and therefore the potential of using orthorectified virtual outcrops.

  9. Analyses of simulations of three-dimensional lattice proteins in comparison with a simplified statistical mechanical model of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Abe, H; Wako, H

    2006-07-01

    Folding and unfolding simulations of three-dimensional lattice proteins were analyzed using a simplified statistical mechanical model in which their amino acid sequences and native conformations were incorporated explicitly. Using this statistical mechanical model, under the assumption that only interactions between amino acid residues within a local structure in a native state are considered, the partition function of the system can be calculated for a given native conformation without any adjustable parameter. The simulations were carried out for two different native conformations, for each of which two foldable amino acid sequences were considered. The native and non-native contacts between amino acid residues occurring in the simulations were examined in detail and compared with the results derived from the theoretical model. The equilibrium thermodynamic quantities (free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and the probability of each amino acid residue being in the native state) at various temperatures obtained from the simulations and the theoretical model were also examined in order to characterize the folding processes that depend on the native conformations and the amino acid sequences. Finally, the free energy landscapes were discussed based on these analyses.

  10. Evolution of a fold-thrust belt deforming a unit with pre-existing linear asperities: Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burberry, Caroline M.; Swiatlowski, Jerlyn L.

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneity, whether geometric or rheologic, in crustal material undergoing compression affects the geometry of the structures produced. This study documents the thrust fault geometries produced when discrete linear asperities are introduced into an analog model, scaled to represent bulk upper crustal properties, and compressed. Varying obliquities of the asperities are used, relative to the imposed compression, and the resultant development of thrust fault traces and branch lines in map view is tracked. Once the model runs are completed, cross-sections are created and analyzed. The models show that asperities confined to the base layer promote the clustering of branch lines in the surface thrusts. Strong clustering in branch lines is also noted where several asperities are in close proximity or cross. Slight reverse-sense reactivation of asperities cut through the sedimentary sequence is noted in cross-section, where the asperity and the subsequent thrust belt interact. The model results are comparable to the situation in the Dinaric Alps, where pre-existing faults to the SW of the NE Adriatic Fault Zone contribute to the clustering of branch lines developed in the surface fold-thrust belt. These results can therefore be used to evaluate the evolution of other basement-involved fold-thrust belts worldwide.

  11. Can a continuum solvent model reproduce the free energy landscape of a β-hairpin folding in water?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ruhong; Berne, Bruce J.

    2002-01-01

    The folding free energy landscape of the C-terminal β-hairpin of protein G is explored using the surface-generalized Born (SGB) implicit solvent model, and the results are compared with the landscape from an earlier study with explicit solvent model. The OPLSAA force field is used for the β-hairpin in both implicit and explicit solvent simulations, and the conformational space sampling is carried out with a highly parallel replica-exchange method. Surprisingly, we find from exhaustive conformation space sampling that the free energy landscape from the implicit solvent model is quite different from that of the explicit solvent model. In the implicit solvent model some nonnative states are heavily overweighted, and more importantly, the lowest free energy state is no longer the native β-strand structure. An overly strong salt-bridge effect between charged residues (E42, D46, D47, E56, and K50) is found to be responsible for this behavior in the implicit solvent model. Despite this, we find that the OPLSAA/SGB energies of all the nonnative structures are higher than that of the native structure; thus the OPLSAA/SGB energy is still a good scoring function for structure prediction for this β-hairpin. Furthermore, the β-hairpin population at 282 K is found to be less than 40% from the implicit solvent model, which is much smaller than the 72% from the explicit solvent model and ≈80% from experiment. On the other hand, both implicit and explicit solvent simulations with the OPLSAA force field exhibit no meaningful helical content during the folding process, which is in contrast to some very recent studies using other force fields. PMID:12242327

  12. A new computational model for protein folding based on atomic solvation.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, H.; Scott, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    A new model for calculating the solvation energy of proteins is developed and tested for its ability to identify the native conformation as the global energy minimum among a group of thousands of computationally generated compact non-native conformations for a series of globular proteins. In the model (called the WZS model), solvation preferences for a set of 17 chemically derived molecular fragments of the 20 amino acids are learned by a training algorithm based on maximizing the solvation energy difference between native and non-native conformations for a training set of proteins. The performance of the WZS model confirms the success of this learning approach; the WZS model misrecognizes (as more stable than native) only 7 of 8,200 non-native structures. Possible applications of this model to the prediction of protein structure from sequence are discussed. PMID:7670381

  13. Folding patterns and shape optimization using SMA-based self-folding laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peraza-Hernandez, Edwin A.; Frei, Katherine R.; Hartl, Darren J.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2014-03-01

    Origami engineering, a discipline encompassing the creation of practical three-dimensional structures from two- dimensional entities via folding operations, has the potential to impact multiple fields of manufacturing and design. In some circumstances, it may be practical to have self-folding capabilities instead of creating folds by external manipulations (as in morphing structures in outer space or on the ocean floor). This paper considers the use of a self-folding laminate composite consisting of two outer layers of thermally actuated shape memory alloy (SMA) wire meshes separated by an inner compliant insulating layer. Methods for designing folding patterns and determining temperature fields to obtain desired shapes and behaviors are proposed. Sheets composed of the self-folding laminate are modeled via finite element analysis (FEA) and the proposed methods are implemented to test their capabilities. One method uses a previously developed and freely available software called Freeform Origami for folding pattern design. The second method entails the use of optimization to determine the localized activation temperatures required to obtain desired shapes or to perform specific functions. The proposed methods are demonstrated to be applicable for the design of folding patterns and determination of activation temperatures for the self-folding laminate by showing successful examples of their implementation. This exploratory study provides new tools that can be integrated into the design framework of self-folding origami structures.

  14. Network measures for protein folding state discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Fariselli, Piero; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fold using a two-state or multi-state kinetic mechanisms, but up to now there is not a first-principle model to explain this different behavior. We exploit the network properties of protein structures by introducing novel observables to address the problem of classifying the different types of folding kinetics. These observables display a plain physical meaning, in terms of vibrational modes, possible configurations compatible with the native protein structure, and folding cooperativity. The relevance of these observables is supported by a classification performance up to 90%, even with simple classifiers such as discriminant analysis. PMID:27464796

  15. Network measures for protein folding state discrimination.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, Giulia; Fariselli, Piero; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fold using a two-state or multi-state kinetic mechanisms, but up to now there is not a first-principle model to explain this different behavior. We exploit the network properties of protein structures by introducing novel observables to address the problem of classifying the different types of folding kinetics. These observables display a plain physical meaning, in terms of vibrational modes, possible configurations compatible with the native protein structure, and folding cooperativity. The relevance of these observables is supported by a classification performance up to 90%, even with simple classifiers such as discriminant analysis. PMID:27464796

  16. Hg(II) binding to a weakly associated coiled coil nucleates an encoded metalloprotein fold: a kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Farrer, Brian T; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2003-04-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of metal encapsulation by a de novo-designed protein is described. The kinetic mechanism of Hg(II) encapsulation in the three-stranded coiled coil formed by the peptide CH(3)CO-G LKALEEK CKALEEK LKALEEK G-NH(2) (Baby L9C) is derived by global analysis. The mechanism involves rapid initial collapse of two peptides by Hg(II) forming Hg(Baby L9C(-H))(2) with a linear thiolato Hg(II) bound to the cysteine sulfur atoms. Here, Baby L9C(-H) denotes Baby L9C with the cysteine thiol deprotonated. Addition of the third peptide, forming the three-stranded coiled coil, is the rate-determining step and results in an intermediate state involving two separate species. One of the species, termed the properly folded intermediate, undergoes rapid deprotonation of the third cysteine thiol, yielding the desired three-stranded coiled coil with an encapsulated trigonal thiolato Hg(II). The other species, termed the misfolded intermediate, rearranges in an experimentally distinguishable step to the properly folded intermediate. The order of the reaction involving the addition of the third peptide with respect to the concentration of Baby L9C indicates that addition of the third helix only occurs through reaction of Hg(Baby L9C(-H))(2) and Baby L9C that is unassociated with a coiled coil. Temperature dependence of the reaction afforded activation parameters for both the addition of the third helix (deltaH = 20(2) kcalmol; deltaS= 40(5) calmol K) and the rearrangement of the misfolded intermediate steps (deltaH = 23(2) kcalmol; deltaS= 27(5) calmol K). The mechanism is discussed with regard to metalloprotein folding and metalloprotein design.

  17. Microarray-driven validation of reference genes for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in a rat vocal fold model of mucosal injury

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhen; Ling, Changying; Yamashita, Masaru; Welham, Nathan V.

    2010-01-01

    Relative quantification by normalization against a stably expressed reference gene is a widely used data analysis method in microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) platforms; however, recent evidence suggests that many commonly utilized reference genes are unstable in certain experimental systems and situations. The primary aim of this study, therefore, was to screen and identify stably expressed reference genes in a well-established rat model of vocal fold mucosal injury. We selected and evaluated the expression stability of nine candidate reference genes. Ablim1, Sptbn1 and Wrnip1 were identified as stably expressed in a model-specific microarray dataset and were further validated as suitable reference genes in an independent qRT-PCR experiment using 2-ΔCT and pairwise comparison-based (geNorm) analyses. Parallel analysis of six commonly used reference genes identified Sdha as the only stably expressed candidate in this group. Sdha, Sptbn1 and the geometric mean of Sdha and Sptbn1 each provided accurate normalization of target gene Tgfb1; Gapdh, the least stable candidate gene in our dataset, provided inaccurate normalization and an invalid experimental result. The stable reference genes identified here are suitable for accurate normalization of target gene expression in vocal fold mucosal injury experiments. PMID:20670610

  18. Symmetric Fold/Super-Hopf Bursting, Chaos and Mixed-Mode Oscillations in Pernarowski Model of Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Haniyeh

    Pancreatic beta-cells produce insulin to regularize the blood glucose level. Bursting is important in beta cells due to its relation to the release of insulin. Pernarowski model is a simple polynomial model of beta-cell activities indicating bursting oscillations in these cells. This paper presents bursting behaviors of symmetric type in this model. In addition, it is shown that the current system exhibits the phenomenon of period doubling cascades of canards which is a route to chaos. Canards are also observed symmetrically near folds of slow manifold which results in a chaotic transition between n and n + 1 spikes symmetric bursting. Furthermore, mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) and combination of symmetric bursting together with MMOs are illustrated during the transition between symmetric bursting and continuous spiking.

  19. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {11891} during Cycle 17.

  20. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {12723} during Cycle 19.

  1. An investigation of asymmetric flow features in a scaled-up driven model of the human vocal folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2010-07-01

    Flow through a driven, 7.5 times life-size vocal fold model was investigated at corresponding life-size flow rates of Q mean = 89.1 ml/s, 159.4 ml/s, and 253.0 ml/s. The flow was scaled to match physiological values for Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers. The models were driven at a life-size frequency of 94 Hz. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) data were acquired in the anterior-posterior midplane of the glottis, and the unsteady transglottal pressure drop across the vocal folds was simultaneously measured. Flow and pressure data were obtained at four discrete instances during the closing phases of the phonatory cycle for which t/T open = 0.60, 0.70, 0.80, and 0.90. The glottal jet trajectory exhibited a bimodal distribution of flow attachment between the two medial surfaces of the glottis. Vortex shedding at the trailing edge separation point generated instabilities in the shear layer, which caused large oscillations in the glottal jet orientation downstream of the glottal exit. The development of the Coanda effect during the glottal cycle was found to have minimal impact on the transglottal pressure drop, suggesting that flow orientation does not directly influence the dipole sound source. The change in transglottal pressure drop as a result of jet trajectory was less than 2% for all three investigated flow rates.

  2. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Sarah A; Kim, Junhyong

    2014-11-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function-for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures.

  3. Models of single-molecule experiments with periodic perturbations reveal hidden dynamics in RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Qu, Xiaohui; Ma, Ao; Smith, Glenna J; Scherer, Norbert F; Dinner, Aaron R

    2009-05-28

    Traditionally, microscopic fluctuations of molecules have been probed by measuring responses of an ensemble to perturbations. Now, single-molecule experiments are capable of following fluctuations without introducing perturbations. However, dynamics not readily sampled at equilibrium should be accessible to nonequilibrium single-molecule measurements. In a recent study [Qu, X. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2008, 105, 6602-6607], the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between probes on the L18 loop and 3' terminus of the 260 nucleotide RNase P RNA from Bacillus stearothermophilus was found to exhibit complex kinetics that depended on the (periodically alternating) concentration of magnesium ions ([Mg2+]) in solution. Specifically, this time series was found to exhibit a quasi-periodic response to a square-wave pattern of [Mg2+] changes. Because these experiments directly probe only one of the many degrees of freedom in the macromolecule, models are needed to interpret these data. We find that Hidden Markov Models are inadequate for describing the nonequilibrium dynamics, but they serve as starting points for the construction of models in which a discrete observable degree of freedom is coupled to a continuously evolving (hidden) variable. Consideration of several models of this general form indicates that the quasi-periodic response in the nonequilibrium experiments results from the switching (back and forth) in positions of the minima of the effective potential for the hidden variable. This switching drives oscillation of that variable and synchronizes the population to the changing [Mg2+]. We set the models in the context of earlier theoretical and experimental studies and conclude that single-molecule experiments with periodic peturbations can indeed yield qualitatively new information beyond that obtained at equilibrium. PMID:19415919

  4. Performance analysis of optical wireless communication system based on two-fold turbo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Huang, Dexiu; Yuan, Xiuhua

    2005-11-01

    Optical wireless communication (OWC) is beginning to emerge in the telecommunications market as a strategy to meet last-mile demand owing to its unique combination of features. Turbo codes have an impressive near Shannon-limit error correcting performance. Twofold turbo codes have been recently introduced as the least complex member of the multifold turbo code family. In this paper, at first, we present the mathematical model of signal and optical wireless channel with fading and bit error rate model with scintillation, then we provide a new turbo code method to use in OWC system, we can obtain a better BER curse of OWC system with twofold turbo code than with common turbo code.

  5. An effective evolutionary algorithm for protein folding on 3D FCC HP model by lattice rotation and generalized move sets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteins are essential biological molecules which play vital roles in nearly all biological processes. It is the tertiary structure of a protein that determines its functions. Therefore the prediction of a protein's tertiary structure based on its primary amino acid sequence has long been the most important and challenging subject in biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics. In the past, the HP lattice model was one of the ab initio methods that many researchers used to forecast the protein structure. Although these kinds of simplified methods could not achieve high resolution, they provided a macrocosm-optimized protein structure. The model has been employed to investigate general principles of protein folding, and plays an important role in the prediction of protein structures. Methods In this paper, we present an improved evolutionary algorithm for the protein folding problem. We study the problem on the 3D FCC lattice HP model which has been widely used in previous research. Our focus is to develop evolutionary algorithms (EA) which are robust, easy to implement and can handle various energy functions. We propose to combine three different local search methods, including lattice rotation for crossover, K-site move for mutation, and generalized pull move; these form our key components to improve previous EA-based approaches. Results We have carried out experiments over several data sets which were used in previous research. The results of the experiments show that our approach is able to find optimal conformations which were not found by previous EA-based approaches. Conclusions We have investigated the geometric properties of the 3D FCC lattice and developed several local search techniques to improve traditional EA-based approaches to the protein folding problem. It is known that EA-based approaches are robust and can handle arbitrary energy functions. Our results further show that by extensive development of local searches, EA can also be very

  6. Wrinkle-to-fold transition in soft layers under equi-biaxial strain: A weakly nonlinear analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.

    2014-12-01

    Soft materials can experience a mechanical instability when subjected to a finite compression, developing wrinkles which may eventually evolve into folds or creases. The possibility to control the wrinkling network morphology has recently found several applications in many developing fields, such as scaffolds for biomaterials, stretchable electronics and surface micro-fabrication. Albeit much is known of the pattern initiation at the linear stability order, the nonlinear effects driving the pattern selection in soft materials are still unknown. This work aims at investigating the nature of the elastic bifurcation undertaken by a growing soft layer subjected to a equi-biaxial strain. Considering a skin effect at the free surface, the instability thresholds are found to be controlled by a characteristic length, defined by the ratio between capillary energy and bulk elasticity. For the first time, a weakly nonlinear analysis of the wrinkling instability is performed here using the multiple-scale perturbation method applied to the incremental theory in finite elasticity. The Ginzburg-Landau equations are derived for different superposing linear modes. This study proves that a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation drives the observed wrinkle-to-fold transition in swelling gels experiments, favoring the emergence of hexagonal creased patterns, albeit quasi-hexagonal patterns might later emerge because of an expected symmetry break. Moreover, if the surface energy is somewhat comparable to the bulk elastic energy, it has the same stabilizing effect as for fluid instabilities, driving the formation of stable wrinkles, as observed in elastic bi-layered materials.

  7. Protein folding of the HOP model: A parallel Wang—Landau study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, G.; Wüst, T.; Li, Y. W.; Landau, D. P.

    2015-09-01

    We propose a simple modification to the hydrophobic-polar (HP) protein model, by introducing a new type of monomer, “0”, with intermediate hydrophobicity of some amino acids between H and P. With the replica-exchange Wang-Landau sampling method, we investigate some widely studied HP sequences as well as their H0P counterparts and observe that the H0P sequences exhibit dramatically reduced ground state degeneracy and more significant transition signals at low temperature for some thermodynamic properties, such as the specific heat.

  8. Protein folding of the H0P model: A parallel Wang-Landau study

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Guangjie; Wuest, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P

    2015-01-01

    We propose a simple modication to the hydrophobic-polar (HP) protein model, by introducing a new type of monomer, "0", with intermediate hydrophobicity of some amino acids between H and P. With the replica-exchange Wang-Landau sampling method, we investigate some widely studied HP sequences as well as their H0P counterparts and observe that the H0P sequences exhibit dramatically reduced ground state degeneracy and more signicant transition signals at low temperature for some thermodynamic properties, such as the specific heat.

  9. Using COMSOL Multiphysics Software to Model Anisotropic Dielectric and Metamaterial Effects in Folded-Waveguide Traveling-Wave Tube Slow-Wave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starinshak, David P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic effects of conventional dielectrics, anisotropic dielectrics, and metamaterials were modeled in a terahertz-frequency folded-waveguide slow-wave circuit. Results of attempts to utilize these materials to increase efficiency are presented.

  10. Computational study of false vocal folds effects on unsteady airflows through static models of the human larynx.

    PubMed

    Farbos de Luzan, Charles; Chen, Jie; Mihaescu, Mihai; Khosla, Sid M; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2015-05-01

    Compressible large eddy simulation is employed to numerically investigate the laryngeal flow. Symmetric static models of the human larynx with a divergent glottis are considered, with the presence of false vocal folds (FVFs). The compressible study agrees well with that of the incompressible study. Due to the high enough Reynolds number, the flow is unsteady and develops asymmetric states downstream of the glottis. The glottal jet curvature decreases with the presence of FVFs or the ventricular folds. The gap between the FVFs stretches the flow structure and reduces the jet curvature. The presence of FVFs has a significant effect on the laryngeal flow resistance. The intra-glottal vortex structures are formed on the divergent wall of the glottis, immediately downstream of the separation point. The vortices are then convected downstream and characterized by a significant negative static pressure. The FVFs are a main factor in the generation of stronger vortices, and thus on the closure of the TVFs. The direct link between the FVFs geometry and the motion of the TVFs, and by extension to the voice production, is of interest for medical applications as well as future research works. The presence of the FVFs also changes the dominant frequencies in the velocity and pressure spectra. PMID:25835787

  11. Computational study of false vocal folds effects on unsteady airflows through static models of the human larynx.

    PubMed

    Farbos de Luzan, Charles; Chen, Jie; Mihaescu, Mihai; Khosla, Sid M; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2015-05-01

    Compressible large eddy simulation is employed to numerically investigate the laryngeal flow. Symmetric static models of the human larynx with a divergent glottis are considered, with the presence of false vocal folds (FVFs). The compressible study agrees well with that of the incompressible study. Due to the high enough Reynolds number, the flow is unsteady and develops asymmetric states downstream of the glottis. The glottal jet curvature decreases with the presence of FVFs or the ventricular folds. The gap between the FVFs stretches the flow structure and reduces the jet curvature. The presence of FVFs has a significant effect on the laryngeal flow resistance. The intra-glottal vortex structures are formed on the divergent wall of the glottis, immediately downstream of the separation point. The vortices are then convected downstream and characterized by a significant negative static pressure. The FVFs are a main factor in the generation of stronger vortices, and thus on the closure of the TVFs. The direct link between the FVFs geometry and the motion of the TVFs, and by extension to the voice production, is of interest for medical applications as well as future research works. The presence of the FVFs also changes the dominant frequencies in the velocity and pressure spectra.

  12. Computational study of false vocal folds effects on unsteady airflows through static models of the human larynx

    PubMed Central

    de Luzan, Charles Farbos; Chen, Jie; Mihaescu, Mihai; Khosla, Sid M.; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2016-01-01

    Compressible large eddy simulation is employed to numerically investigate the laryngeal flow. Symmetric static models of the human larynx with a divergent glottis are considered, with the presence of false vocal folds (FVFs). The compressible study agrees well with that of the incompressible study. Due to the high enough Reynolds number, the flow is unsteady and develops asymmetric states downstream of the glottis. The glottal jet curvature decreases with the presence of FVFs or the ventricular folds. The gap between the FVFs stretches the flow structure and reduces the jet curvature. The presence of FVFs has a significant effect on the laryngeal flow resistance. The intra-glottal vortex structures are formed on the divergent wall of the glottis, immediately downstream of the separation point. The vortices are then convected downstream and characterized by a significant negative static pressure. The FVFs are a main factor in the generation of stronger vortices, and thus on the closure of the TVFs. The direct link between the FVFs geometry and the motion of the TVFs, and by extension to the voice production, is of interest for medical applications as well as future research works. The presence of the FVFs also changes the dominant frequencies in the velocity and pressure spectra. PMID:25835787

  13. Single-Molecule Protein Folding: A Study of the Surface-Mediated Conformational Dynamics of a Model Amphipathic Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Joy; English, Douglas

    2004-03-01

    Most surface-active polypeptides, composed of 10-50 amino acids, are devoid of well-defined tertiary structure. The conformation of these proteins is greatly dependent upon their environment and may assume totally different characteristics in an aqueous environment, in a detergent micelle, or in an organic solvent. Most antimicrobial peptides are helix-forming and are activated upon interaction with a membrane-mimicking environment. We are seeking to physically characterize the mechanism of membrane-peptide interaction through studying a simple model peptide, MT-1. MT-1 was designed as a nonhomologous analogue of melittin, the principle component in bee venom. We are using single molecule spectroscopy to examine the induction of secondary structure upon interaction of MT-1 with various membrane-mimicking interfaces. Specifically, we monitor coil-to-helix transition through single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) to determine conformational distributions of folded and unfolded peptides at an interface. Studies with MT-1 will focus upon the biologically relevant issues of orientation, aggregation, and folding at surfaces using both ensemble and single molecule experiments.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of rosette and folding leaves in Chinese cabbage using high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengde; Li, Libin; Li, Huayin; Liu, Lifeng; Zhang, Yihui; Gao, Jianwei; Wang, Xiaowu

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we report the first use of RNA-sequencing to gain insight into the wide range of transcriptional events that are associated with leafy head development in Chinese cabbage. We generated 53.5 million sequence reads (90 bp in length) from the rosette and heading leaves. The sequence reads were aligned to the recently sequenced Chiifu genome and were analyzed to measure the gene expression levels, to detect alternative splicing events and novel transcripts, to determine the expression of single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to refine the annotated gene structures. The analysis of the global gene expression pattern suggests two important concepts, which govern leafy head formation. Firstly, some stimuli, such as carbohydrate levels, light intensity and endogenous hormones might play a critical role in regulating the leafy head formation. Secondly, the regulation of transcription factors, protein kinases and calcium may also be involved in this developmental process.

  15. New insights into chromatin folding and dynamics from multi-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Wilma

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of roughly 150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. We have developed a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs with 3-25 evenly spaced nucleosomes. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition, spacing, and numbers on long-range communication between regulatory proteins bound to the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We have extracted effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the mesoscale simulations and introduced the potentials in a larger scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable influence of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility. Small changes in the length of the DNA fragments linking successive nucleosomes introduce marked changes in the local interactions of the nucleosomes and in the spatial configurations of the fiber as a whole. The changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of longer chromatin constructs with 100-10,000 nucleosomes. We are investigating the extent to which the `local' interactions of regularly spaced nucleosomes contribute to the corresponding interactions in chains with mixed spacings as a step toward the treatment of fibers with nucleosomes positioned at the sites mapped at base-pair resolution on genomic sequences. Support of the work by USPHS R01 GM 34809 is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Chemical and Structural Analysis of an Antibody Folding Intermediate Trapped during Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human IgG Fc glycosylation modulates immunological effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis. Engineering of Fc glycans therefore enables fine-tuning of the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies. The N-linked glycans of Fc are typically complex-type, forming a network of noncovalent interactions along the protein surface of the Cγ2 domain. Here, we manipulate the mammalian glycan-processing pathway to trap IgG1 Fc at sequential stages of maturation, from oligomannose- to hybrid- to complex-type glycans, and show that the Fc is structurally stabilized following the transition of glycans from their hybrid- to complex-type state. X-ray crystallographic analysis of this hybrid-type intermediate reveals that N-linked glycans undergo conformational changes upon maturation, including a flip within the trimannosyl core. Our crystal structure of this intermediate reveals a molecular basis for antibody biogenesis and provides a template for the structure-guided engineering of the protein–glycan interface of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:23025485

  17. NMR analysis of partially folded states and persistent structure in the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase: implications for the equilibrium folding mechanism of a 29-kDa TIM barrel protein.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Ramakrishna; Wu, Ying; Matthews, C Robert

    2008-03-14

    Structural insights into the equilibrium folding mechanism of the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase (alpha TS) from Escherichia coli, a (beta alpha)(8) TIM barrel protein, were obtained with a pair of complementary nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques. The secondary structures of rare high-energy partially folded states were probed by native-state hydrogen-exchange NMR analysis of main-chain amide hydrogens. 2D heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR analysis of several (15)N-labeled nonpolar amino acids was used to probe the side chains involved in stabilizing a highly denatured intermediate that is devoid of secondary structure. The dynamic broadening of a subset of isoleucine and leucine side chains and the absence of protection against exchange showed that the highest energy folded state on the free-energy landscape is stabilized by a hydrophobic cluster lacking stable secondary structure. The core of this cluster, centered near the N-terminus of alpha TS, serves as a nucleus for the stabilization of what appears to be nonnative secondary structure in a marginally stable intermediate. The progressive decrease in protection against exchange from this nucleus toward both termini and from the N-termini to the C-termini of several beta-strands is best described by an ensemble of weakly coupled conformers. Comparison with previous data strongly suggests that this ensemble corresponds to a marginally stable off-pathway intermediate that arises in the first few milliseconds of folding and persists under equilibrium conditions. A second, more stable intermediate, which has an intact beta-barrel and a frayed alpha-helical shell, coexists with this marginally stable species. The conversion of the more stable intermediate to the native state of alpha TS entails the formation of a stable helical shell and completes the acquisition of the tertiary structure.

  18. Protein Folding and Structure Prediction from the Ground Up: The Atomistic Associative Memory, Water Mediated, Structure and Energy Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingchen; Lin, Xingcheng; Zheng, Weihua; Onuchic, José N; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-08-25

    The associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM) is a coarse-grained force field with transferable tertiary interactions that incorporates local in sequence energetic biases using bioinformatically derived structural information about peptide fragments with locally similar sequences that we call memories. The memory information from the protein data bank (PDB) database guides proper protein folding. The structural information about available sequences in the database varies in quality and can sometimes lead to frustrated free energy landscapes locally. One way out of this difficulty is to construct the input fragment memory information from all-atom simulations of portions of the complete polypeptide chain. In this paper, we investigate this approach first put forward by Kwac and Wolynes in a more complete way by studying the structure prediction capabilities of this approach for six α-helical proteins. This scheme which we call the atomistic associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AAWSEM) amounts to an ab initio protein structure prediction method that starts from the ground up without using bioinformatic input. The free energy profiles from AAWSEM show that atomistic fragment memories are sufficient to guide the correct folding when tertiary forces are included. AAWSEM combines the efficiency of coarse-grained simulations on the full protein level with the local structural accuracy achievable from all-atom simulations of only parts of a large protein. The results suggest that a hybrid use of atomistic fragment memory and database memory in structural predictions may well be optimal for many practical applications. PMID:27148634

  19. Protein Folding and Structure Prediction from the Ground Up: The Atomistic Associative Memory, Water Mediated, Structure and Energy Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingchen; Lin, Xingcheng; Zheng, Weihua; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM) is a coarse-grained force field with transferable tertiary interactions that incorporates local in sequence energetic biases using bioinformatically derived structural information about peptide fragments with locally similar sequence that we call memories. The memory information from the protein data bank (PDB) database guides proper protein folding. The structural information about available sequences in the database varies in quality and can sometimes lead to frustrated free energy landscapes locally. One way out of this difficulty is to construct the input fragment memory information from all-atom simulations of portions of the complete polypeptide chain. In this paper, we investigate this approach first put forward by Kwac and Wolynes in a more complete way by studying the structure prediction capabilities of this approach for six alpha-helical proteins. This scheme which we call the atomistic associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AAWSEM) amounts to an ab initio protein structure prediction method that starts from the ground-up without using bioinformatic input. The free energy profiles from AAWSEM show that atomistic fragment memories are sufficient to guide the correct folding when tertiary forces are included. AAWSEM combines the efficiency of coarse-grained simulations on the full protein level with the local structural accuracy achievable from all-atom simulations of only parts of a large protein. The results suggest that a hybrid use of atomistic fragment memory and database memory in structural predictions may well be optimal for many practical applications. PMID:27148634

  20. Modelling "reality" in tectonics: Simulation of the mechanical evolution of the Jura Mountains-Molasse Basin system, and routes to forward-inverse modelling of fold thrust belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindle, David; Kley, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate validation of any numerical model of any geological process comes when it can accurately forward model a case study from the geological record. However, as the example of the Jura-Molasse fold thrust belt demonstrates, geological information on even the most basic aspects of the present day state of such systems is highly incomplete and usually known only with large uncertainties. Fold thrust-belts are studied and understood by geologists in an iterative process of constructing their subsurface geometries and structures (folds, faults, bedding etc) based on limited subsurface information from boreholes, tunnels or seismic data where available, and surface information on outcrops of different layers and their dips. This data is usually processed through geometric models which involve conservation of line length of different beds over the length of an entire cross section. Constructing such sections is the art of cross section balancing. A balanced cross section can be easily restored to its pre-deformation state, assuming (usually) originally horizontal bedding to remove the effects of folding and faulting. Such a pre-deformation state can then form an initial condition for a forward mechanical model of the section. A mechanical model introduces new parameters into the system such as rock elasticity, cohesion, and frictional properties. However, a forward mechanical model can also potentially show the continuous evolution of a fold thrust belt, including dynamic quantities like stress. Moreover, a forward mechanical model, if correct in most aspects, should match in its final state, the present day geological cross section it is simulating. However, when attempting to achieve a match between geometric and mechanical models, it becomes clear that many more aspects of the geodynamic history of a fold thrust belt have to be taken into account. Erosion of the uppermost layers of an evolving thrust belt is the most obvious one of these. This can potentially

  1. COS NUV MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13128.

  2. A transgenic mouse model expressing an ERα folding biosensor reveals the effects of Bisphenol A on estrogen receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Thillai V.; Foygel, Kira; Massoud, Tarik F.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ERα) plays an important role in normal and abnormal physiology of the human reproductive system by interacting with the endogenous ligand estradiol (E2). However, other ligands, either analogous or dissimilar to E2, also bind to ERα. This may create unintentional activation of ER signaling in reproductive tissues that can lead to cancer development. We developed a transgenic mouse model that constitutively expresses a firefly luciferase (FLuc) split reporter complementation biosensor (NFLuc-ER-LBDG521T-CFLuc) to simultaneously evaluate the dynamics and potency of ligands that bind to ERα. We first validated this model using various ER ligands, including Raloxifene, Diethylstilbestrol, E2, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, by employing FLuc-based optical bioluminescence imaging of living mice. We then used the model to investigate the carcinogenic property of Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen, by long-term exposure at full and half environmental doses. We showed significant carcinogenic effects on female animals while revealing activated downstream ER signaling as measured by bioluminescence imaging. BPA induced tumor-like outgrowths in female transgenic mice, histopathologically confirmed to be neoplastic and epithelial in origin. This transgenic mouse model expressing an ERα folding-biosensor is useful in evaluation of estrogenic ligands and their downstream effects, and in studying environmental estrogen induced carcinogenesis in vivo. PMID:27721470

  3. Evolution of the Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts, Andes of Neuquén: Insights from structural analysis and apatite fission track dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Vera, E. A.; Mescua, J.; Folguera, A.; Becker, T. P.; Sagripanti, L.; Fennell, L.; Orts, D.; Ramos, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts are located in the western part of the Neuquén basin, an Andean retroarc basin of central-western Argentina. Both belts show evidence of tectonic inversion at the western part during Late Cretaceous times. The eastern part is dominated by late Miocene deformation which also partially reactivated the western structures. This work focuses on the study of the regional structure and the deformational event that shaped the relief of this part of the Andes. Based on new field work and structural data and previously published works a detailed map of the central part of the Neuquén basin is presented. Three regional structural cross sections were surveyed and balanced using the 2d Move™ software. In order to define a more accurate uplift history, new apatite fission track analyses were carried on selected structures. These data was used for new thermal history modeling of the inner part of the Agrio and Chos Malal fold and thrust belts. The results of the fission track analyses improve the knowledge of how these fold and thrust belts have grown trough time. Two main deformational events are defined in Late Cretaceous to Paleocene and Late Miocene times. Based on this regional structural analysis and the fission track data the precise location of the orogenic front for the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene times is reconstructed and it is proposed a structural evolution of this segment of the Andes. This new exhumation data show how the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene event was a continuous and uninterrupted deformational event.

  4. Formation of metastable RNA structures by sequential folding during transcription: time-resolved structural analysis of potato spindle tuber viroid (-)-stranded RNA by temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Repsilber, D; Wiese, S; Rachen, M; Schröder, A W; Riesner, D; Steger, G

    1999-01-01

    A model of functional elements critical for replication and infectivity of the potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) was proposed earlier: a thermodynamically metastable structure containing a specific hairpin (HP II) in the (-)-strand replication intermediate is essential for template activity during (+)-strand synthesis. We present here a detailed kinetic analysis on how PSTVd (-)-strands fold during synthesis by sequential folding into a variety of metastable structures that rearrange only slowly into the structure distribution of the thermodynamic equilibrium. Synthesis of PSTVd (-)-strands was performed by T7-RNA-polymerase; the rate of synthesis was varied by altering the concentration of nucleoside triphosphates to mimic the in vivo synthesis rate of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II. With dependence on rate and duration of the synthesis, the structure distributions were analyzed by temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Metastable structures are generated preferentially at low transcription rates--similar to in vivo rates--or at short transcription times at higher rates. Higher transcription rates or longer transcription times lead to metastable structures in low or undetectable amounts. Instead different structures do gradually appear having a more rod-like shape and higher thermodynamic stability, and the thermodynamically optimal rod-like structure dominates finally. It is concluded that viroids are able to use metastable as well as stable structures for their biological functions. PMID:10199573

  5. RNA secondary structures in a polymer-zeta model how foldings should be shaped for sparsification to establish a linear speedup.

    PubMed

    Jin, Emma Yu; Nebel, Markus E

    2016-02-01

    Various tools used to predict the secondary structure for a given RNA sequence are based on dynamic programming used to compute a conformation of minimum free energy. For structures without pseudoknots, a worst-case runtime proportional to n3, with n being the length of the sequence, results since a table of dimension n2 has to be filled in while a single entry gives rise to a linear computational effort. However, it was recently observed that reformulating the corresponding dynamic programming recursion together with the bookkeeping of potential folding alternatives (a technique called sparsification) may reduce the runtime to n2 on average, assuming that nucleotides of distance d form a hydrogen bond (i..e., are paired) with probability b/d(c) for some constants b > 0, c > 1. The latter is called the polymer-zeta model and plays a crucial role in speeding up the above mentioned algorithm. In this paper we discuss the application of the polymer-zeta property for the analysis of sparsification, showing that it must be applied conditionally on first and last positions to pair. Afterwards, we will investigate the combinatorics of RNA secondary structures assuming that the corresponding conditional probabilities behave according to a polymer-zeta probability model. We show that even if some of the structural parameters exhibit an almost realistic behavior on average, the expected shape of a folding in that model must be assumed to highly differ from those observed in nature. More precisely, we prove our polymer-zeta model to be appropriate for mRNA molecules but to fail in connection with almost every other family of RNA. Those findings explain the huge speedup of the dynamic programming algorithm observed empirically by Wexler et al. when applying sparsification in connection with mRNA data.

  6. RNA secondary structures in a polymer-zeta model how foldings should be shaped for sparsification to establish a linear speedup.

    PubMed

    Jin, Emma Yu; Nebel, Markus E

    2016-02-01

    Various tools used to predict the secondary structure for a given RNA sequence are based on dynamic programming used to compute a conformation of minimum free energy. For structures without pseudoknots, a worst-case runtime proportional to n3, with n being the length of the sequence, results since a table of dimension n2 has to be filled in while a single entry gives rise to a linear computational effort. However, it was recently observed that reformulating the corresponding dynamic programming recursion together with the bookkeeping of potential folding alternatives (a technique called sparsification) may reduce the runtime to n2 on average, assuming that nucleotides of distance d form a hydrogen bond (i..e., are paired) with probability b/d(c) for some constants b > 0, c > 1. The latter is called the polymer-zeta model and plays a crucial role in speeding up the above mentioned algorithm. In this paper we discuss the application of the polymer-zeta property for the analysis of sparsification, showing that it must be applied conditionally on first and last positions to pair. Afterwards, we will investigate the combinatorics of RNA secondary structures assuming that the corresponding conditional probabilities behave according to a polymer-zeta probability model. We show that even if some of the structural parameters exhibit an almost realistic behavior on average, the expected shape of a folding in that model must be assumed to highly differ from those observed in nature. More precisely, we prove our polymer-zeta model to be appropriate for mRNA molecules but to fail in connection with almost every other family of RNA. Those findings explain the huge speedup of the dynamic programming algorithm observed empirically by Wexler et al. when applying sparsification in connection with mRNA data. PMID:26001743

  7. [THE MODEL OF NUCLEOSOME STRUCTURE BASED ON THE LOCAL ROTATION OF THE NUCLEOHISTONE CHAIN, WHICH INDUCES ITS FOLDING].

    PubMed

    Priyatkina, T N

    2015-01-01

    An alternative model to the "double turn of DNA on the histone core" approach is forwarded based on the biochemical, cytological, and crystallographic data on the structural organization of the chromatin units--nucleosomes. The model assumes that the initial structure is a linear nucleohistone cord with a repeating symmetrical histone sequence. The compact (core) particle (a minimal nucleosome) is forming upon a stepwise rotation of DNA (kinks) at the centre and at two symmetrical sites into each repeating fragment stemming from the electrostatic binding of the lysine ε-NH2-groups with the followed one by one phosphates of the sugar-phosphate chain. As a result, we have a rhomboid structure composed of two counter-symmetrical DNA folds stabilized by histone-histone interactions. Based on disposable data, the histone sequence along nucleosome DNA is deduced. The following characteristics of the sequence are considered: continuity, non-overlapping, versatility, and dyadic symmetry in dispose of two every kind histone molecules and the sequence on the whole. The model is in agreement with a topology of nucleosome DNA, as well as the pattern of DNA-histone and histone-histone interactions in chromatin.

  8. [THE MODEL OF NUCLEOSOME STRUCTURE BASED ON THE LOCAL ROTATION OF THE NUCLEOHISTONE CHAIN, WHICH INDUCES ITS FOLDING].

    PubMed

    Priyatkina, T N

    2015-01-01

    An alternative model to the "double turn of DNA on the histone core" approach is forwarded based on the biochemical, cytological, and crystallographic data on the structural organization of the chromatin units--nucleosomes. The model assumes that the initial structure is a linear nucleohistone cord with a repeating symmetrical histone sequence. The compact (core) particle (a minimal nucleosome) is forming upon a stepwise rotation of DNA (kinks) at the centre and at two symmetrical sites into each repeating fragment stemming from the electrostatic binding of the lysine ε-NH2-groups with the followed one by one phosphates of the sugar-phosphate chain. As a result, we have a rhomboid structure composed of two counter-symmetrical DNA folds stabilized by histone-histone interactions. Based on disposable data, the histone sequence along nucleosome DNA is deduced. The following characteristics of the sequence are considered: continuity, non-overlapping, versatility, and dyadic symmetry in dispose of two every kind histone molecules and the sequence on the whole. The model is in agreement with a topology of nucleosome DNA, as well as the pattern of DNA-histone and histone-histone interactions in chromatin. PMID:26495705

  9. MicroRNA expression analysis of rosette and folding leaves in Chinese cabbage using high-throughput Solexa sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengde; Li, Huayin; Zhang, Yihui; Li, Jingjuan; Li, Libin; Liu, Lifeng; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Cuihua; Gao, Jianwei

    2013-12-15

    In this study, a global analysis of miRNA expression from rosette leaves (RLs) and folding leaves (FLs) of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) was conducted using high-throughput Solexa sequencing. In total, over 12 million clean reads were obtained from each library. Sequence analysis identified 64 conserved miRNA families in each leaf type and 104 and 95 novel miRNAs from RLs and FLs, respectively. Among these, 61 conserved miRNAs and 61 novel miRNAs were detected in both types of leaves. Furthermore, six conserved and 21 novel miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two libraries. Target gene annotation suggested that these differentially expressed miRNAs targeted transcription factors, F-box proteins, auxin and Ca(2+) signaling pathway proteins, protein kinases and other proteins that may function in governing leafy head formation. This study advanced our understanding of the important roles of miRNAs in regulating leafy head development in Chinese cabbage.

  10. The equilibrium properties and folding kinetics of an all-atom Go xAF model of the Trp-cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhananta, Apichart; Boer, Jesse; MacKay, Ian

    2005-03-01

    The ultrafast-folding 20-residue Trp-cage protein is quickly becoming a new benchmark for molecular dynamics studies. Already several all-atom simulations have probed its equilibrium and kinetic properties. In this work an all-atom Go ¯ model is used to accurately represent the side-chain packing and native atomic contacts of the Trp-cage. The model reproduces the hallmark thermodynamics cooperativity of small proteins. Folding simulations observe that in the fast-folding dominant pathway, partial α-helical structure forms before hydrophobic core collapse. In the slow-folding secondary pathway, partial core collapse occurs before helical structure. The slow-folding rate of the secondary pathway is attributed to the loss of side-chain rotational freedom, due to the early core collapse, which impedes the helix formation. A major finding is the observation of a low-temperature kinetic intermediate stabilized by a salt bridge between residues Asp-9 and Arg-16. Similar observations [R. Zhou, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 13280 (2003)] were reported in a recent study using an all-atom model of the Trp-cage in explicit water, in which the salt-bridge stabilized intermediate was hypothesized to be the origin of the ultrafast-folding mechanism. A theoretical mutation that eliminates the Asp-9-Arg-16 salt bridge, but leaves the residues intact, is performed. Folding simulations of the mutant Trp-cage observe a two-state free-energy landscape with no kinetic intermediate and a significant decrease in the folding rate, in support of the hypothesis.

  11. Nonlinear dynamic-based analysis of severe dysphonia in patients with vocal fold scar and sulcus vocalis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Hee; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.; Bless, Diane M.; Welham, Nathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The primary goal of this study was to evaluate a nonlinear dynamic approach to the acoustic analysis of dysphonia associated with vocal fold scar and sulcus vocalis. Study Design Case-control study. Methods Acoustic voice samples from scar/sulcus patients and age/sex-matched controls were analyzed using correlation dimension (D2) and phase plots, time-domain based perturbation indices (jitter, shimmer, signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]), and an auditory-perceptual rating scheme. Signal typing was performed to identify samples with bifurcations and aperiodicity. Results Type 2 and 3 acoustic signals were highly represented in the scar/sulcus patient group. When data were analyzed irrespective of signal type, all perceptual and acoustic indices successfully distinguished scar/sulcus patients from controls. Removal of type 2 and 3 signals eliminated the previously identified differences between experimental groups for all acoustic indices except D2. The strongest perceptual-acoustic correlation in our dataset was observed for SNR; the weakest correlation was observed for D2. Conclusions These findings suggest that D2 is inferior to time-domain based perturbation measures for the analysis of dysphonia associated with scar/sulcus; however, time-domain based algorithms are inherently susceptible to inflation under highly aperiodic (i.e., type 2 and 3) signal conditions. Auditory-perceptual analysis, unhindered by signal aperiodicity, is therefore a robust strategy for distinguishing scar/sulcus patient voices from normal voices. Future acoustic analysis research in this area should consider alternative (e.g., frequency- and quefrency-domain based) measures alongside additional nonlinear approaches. PMID:22516315

  12. Computational Modelling of Multi-folded Balloon Delivery Systems for Coronary Artery Stenting: Insights into Patient-Specific Stent Malapposition.

    PubMed

    Ragkousis, Georgios E; Curzen, Nick; Bressloff, Neil W

    2015-08-01

    Despite the clinical effectiveness of coronary artery stenting, percutaneous coronary intervention or "stenting" is not free of complications. Stent malapposition (SM) is a common feature of "stenting" particularly in challenging anatomy, such as that characterized by long, tortuous and bifurcated segments. SM is an important risk factor for stent thrombosis and recently it has been associated with longitudinal stent deformation. SM is the result of many factors including reference diameter, vessel tapering, the deployment pressure and the eccentric anatomy of the vessel. For the purpose of the present paper, virtual multi-folded balloon models have been developed for simulated deployment in both constant and varying diameter vessels under uniform pressure. The virtual balloons have been compared to available compliance charts to ensure realistic inflation response at nominal pressures. Thereafter, patient-specific simulations of stenting have been conducted aiming to reduce SM. Different scalar indicators, which allow a more global quantitative judgement of the mechanical performance of each delivery system, have been implemented. The results indicate that at constant pressure, the proposed balloon models can increase the minimum stent lumen area and thereby significantly decrease SM.

  13. Atomistic modeling of a KRT35/KRT85 keratin dimer: folding in aqueous solution and unfolding under tensile load.

    PubMed

    Duchstein, Patrick; Clark, Tim; Zahn, Dirk

    2015-09-14

    We present an atomistic model of a full KRT35/KRT85 dimer, a fundamental building block of human hair. For both monomers initial structures were generated using empirical tools based on homology considerations, followed by the formulation of a naiïve dimer model from docking the monomers in vacuum. Relaxation in aqueous solution was then explored from molecular dynamics simulation. Driven by hydrophobic segregation and protein-protein hydrogen bonding relaxation dynamics result in a folded dimer arrangement which shows a striking encounter of cystein groups. Our simulations hence suggests that (i) cystein groups in the coil regions of keratin are well suited to establish disulfide bonds between the two monomers that constitute the dimer, and (ii) the particularly large number of cystein groups in the head and tail regions promotes the connection of dimers to establish meso- to macroscale fibers. Moreover, we show the molecular mechanisms of elastic and plastic deformation under tensile load. Upon elongation beyond the elastic regime, unfolding was identified as the exposure of hydrophobic moieties and the breaking of protein-protein hydrogen bonds. Therein, the step-wise character of the series of unfolding events leads to a broad regime of constant force in response to further elongation.

  14. Heuristic-based tabu search algorithm for folding two-dimensional AB off-lattice model proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfa; Sun, Yuanyuan; Li, Gang; Song, Beibei; Huang, Weibo

    2013-12-01

    The protein structure prediction problem is a classical NP hard problem in bioinformatics. The lack of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. As one of the global optimization algorithms, tabu search (TS) algorithm has been successfully applied in many optimization problems. We define the new neighborhood conformation, tabu object and acceptance criteria of current conformation based on the original TS algorithm and put forward an improved TS algorithm. By integrating the heuristic initialization mechanism, the heuristic conformation updating mechanism, and the gradient method into the improved TS algorithm, a heuristic-based tabu search (HTS) algorithm is presented for predicting the two-dimensional (2D) protein folding structure in AB off-lattice model which consists of hydrophobic (A) and hydrophilic (B) monomers. The tabu search minimization leads to the basins of local minima, near which a local search mechanism is then proposed to further search for lower-energy conformations. To test the performance of the proposed algorithm, experiments are performed on four Fibonacci sequences and two real protein sequences. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has found the lowest-energy conformations so far for three shorter Fibonacci sequences and renewed the results for the longest one, as well as two real protein sequences, demonstrating that the HTS algorithm is quite promising in finding the ground states for AB off-lattice model proteins. PMID:24077543

  15. Development of highly non-cylindrical folds around rigid ellipsoidal inclusions in bulk simple shear regimes: natural examples and experimental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, F. G.; Cobbold, P. R.

    1995-04-01

    The three-dimensional development of strongly non-cylindrical folds around competent ellipsoidal inclusions in bulk simple shear regimes is studied in experiments and natural examples. Examples from the Continental Allochthonous Terrane of the Bragança Nappe Complex (NE Portugal) show rim folds and sheath folds associated with different parts of rigid ellipsoidal boudins. Experimental work has been carried out with models made from analogue materials (silicone putty and plasticine) and deformed in a simple shear machine. We have considered three different models to simulate natural examples, and the results show that fold morphology depends on the shape of the inclusion and position around the inclusion. Although the bulk deformation regime is layer parallel homogeneous simple shear, we can distinguish local deformation regimes responsible for the folding associated with different parts of the rigid body. Flow and strain patterns must therefore be complex around inclusions or populations of inclusions. Prolate to oblate strain ellipsoids can be expected in different positions close to the rigid inclusion. In our experiments, the competent inclusions do not rotate synthetically with the applied bulk simple shear (e.g. clockwise rotation of inclusion in dextral shear). Instead, they back-rotate, early in the shearing history, and keep this position throughout the experiment. This is the result of the size relationship between the inclusion and the finite width of the shear zone. The fold pattern around rigid inclusions may be used as a shear sense criterion.

  16. Direct dating of folding events by 40Ar/39Ar analysis of synkinematic muscovite from flexural-slip planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Zwingmann, Horst; Zhou, Liyun; Lo, Ching-hua; Viola, Giulio; Hao, Jinhua

    2016-02-01

    Timing of folding is usually dated indirectly, with limited isotopic dating studies reported in the literature. The present study investigated the timing of intracontinental, multi-stage folding in Upper Proterozoic sandstone, limestone, and marble near Beijing, North China, and adjacent regions. Detailed field investigations with microstructural, backscattered electron (BSE) images and electron microprobe analyses indicate that authigenic muscovite and sericite crystallized parallel to stretching lineations/striations or along thin flexural-slip surfaces, both developed during the complex deformation history of the study area, involving repeated compressional, extensional and strike-slip episodes. Muscovite/sericite separates from interlayer-slip surfaces along the limbs and from dilatant sites in the hinges of folded sandstones yield muscovite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of ∼158-159 Ma, whereas those from folded marble and limestone samples yield ages of 156 ± 1 Ma. Muscovite from thin flexural-slip planes on fold limbs and hinges yields ages within analytical error of ∼155-165 Ma. Further muscovite samples collected from extensionally folded limestone and strike-slip drag folds yield younger ages of 128-125 Ma with well-defined plateaus. To assess the potential influence of the detrital mica component of the host rock on the age data, two additional muscovite samples were investigated, one from a folded upper Proterozoic-Cambrian sandstone outside the Western Hills of Beijing and one from a folded sandstone sampled 20 cm from folding-related slip planes. Muscovite separates from these samples yield significantly older ages of 575 ± 2 Ma and 587 ± 2 Ma, suggesting that the timing of folding can be directly determined using the 40Ar/39Ar method. This approach enables the identification and dating of distinct deformation events that occur during multi-stage regional folding. 40Ar/39Ar dating can be used to constrain the timing of muscovite and sericite growth at

  17. Evolutionary optimization of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Debès, Cédric; Wang, Minglei; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Nature has shaped the make up of proteins since their appearance, [Formula: see text]3.8 billion years ago. However, the fundamental drivers of structural change responsible for the extraordinary diversity of proteins have yet to be elucidated. Here we explore if protein evolution affects folding speed. We estimated folding times for the present-day catalog of protein domains directly from their size-modified contact order. These values were mapped onto an evolutionary timeline of domain appearance derived from a phylogenomic analysis of protein domains in 989 fully-sequenced genomes. Our results show a clear overall increase of folding speed during evolution, with known ultra-fast downhill folders appearing rather late in the timeline. Remarkably, folding optimization depends on secondary structure. While alpha-folds showed a tendency to fold faster throughout evolution, beta-folds exhibited a trend of folding time increase during the last [Formula: see text]1.5 billion years that began during the "big bang" of domain combinations. As a consequence, these domain structures are on average slow folders today. Our results suggest that fast and efficient folding of domains shaped the universe of protein structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that optimization of the kinetic and thermodynamic accessibility of the native fold reduces protein aggregation propensities that hamper cellular functions. PMID:23341762

  18. Steric constraints as folding coadjuvant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarragó, M. E.; Rocha, Luiz F.; Dasilva, R. A.; Caliri, A.

    2003-03-01

    Through the analyses of the Miyazawa-Jernigan matrix it has been shown that the hydrophobic effect generates the dominant driving force for protein folding. By using both lattice and off-lattice models, it is shown that hydrophobic-type potentials are indeed efficient in inducing the chain through nativelike configurations, but they fail to provide sufficient stability so as to keep the chain in the native state. However, through comparative Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that hydrophobic potentials and steric constraints are two basic ingredients for the folding process. Specifically, it is shown that suitable pairwise steric constraints introduce strong changes on the configurational activity, whose main consequence is a huge increase in the overall stability condition of the native state; detailed analysis of the effects of steric constraints on the heat capacity and configurational activity are provided. The present results support the view that the folding problem of globular proteins can be approached as a process in which the mechanism to reach the native conformation and the requirements for the globule stability are uncoupled.

  19. Modeling the effect of codon translation rates on co-translational protein folding mechanisms of arbitrary complexity.

    PubMed

    Caniparoli, Luca; O'Brien, Edward P

    2015-04-14

    In a cell, the folding of a protein molecule into tertiary structure can begin while it is synthesized by the ribosome. The rate at which individual amino acids are incorporated into the elongating nascent chain has been shown to affect the likelihood that proteins will populate their folded state, indicating that co-translational protein folding is a far from equilibrium process. Developing a theoretical framework to accurately describe this process is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of how proteins acquire their functional conformation in living cells. Current state-of-the-art computational approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations, are very demanding in terms of the required computer resources, making the simulation of co-translational protein folding difficult. Here, we overcome this limitation by introducing an efficient approach that predicts the effects that variable codon translation rates have on co-translational folding pathways. Our approach is based on Markov chains. By using as an input a relatively small number of molecular dynamics simulations, it allows for the computation of the probability that a nascent protein is in any state as a function of the translation rate of individual codons along a mRNA's open reading frame. Due to its computational efficiency and favorable scalability with the complexity of the folding mechanism, this approach could enable proteome-wide computational studies of the influence of translation dynamics on co-translational folding. PMID:25877595

  20. Modeling the effect of codon translation rates on co-translational protein folding mechanisms of arbitrary complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniparoli, Luca; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2015-04-01

    In a cell, the folding of a protein molecule into tertiary structure can begin while it is synthesized by the ribosome. The rate at which individual amino acids are incorporated into the elongating nascent chain has been shown to affect the likelihood that proteins will populate their folded state, indicating that co-translational protein folding is a far from equilibrium process. Developing a theoretical framework to accurately describe this process is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of how proteins acquire their functional conformation in living cells. Current state-of-the-art computational approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations, are very demanding in terms of the required computer resources, making the simulation of co-translational protein folding difficult. Here, we overcome this limitation by introducing an efficient approach that predicts the effects that variable codon translation rates have on co-translational folding pathways. Our approach is based on Markov chains. By using as an input a relatively small number of molecular dynamics simulations, it allows for the computation of the probability that a nascent protein is in any state as a function of the translation rate of individual codons along a mRNA's open reading frame. Due to its computational efficiency and favorable scalability with the complexity of the folding mechanism, this approach could enable proteome-wide computational studies of the influence of translation dynamics on co-translational folding.

  1. Effect of decollement rheology and deformation rate on the structural development of fold thrust belts in sand box models and their implications for the Naga fold thrust belt (NE India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, B.; Dietl, C.

    2009-04-01

    Previous studies on decollement kinematics have shed light on the differing structures of fold thrust belt forming above lithologically different decollements, such as shales, carbonates and evaporites. Factors, affecting the decollement kinematics most are (1) rock rheology and (2) deformation rate. This study is intended to explain the deformation style of the Naga fold thrust belt (NFTB, NE India) with the aid of sand box modelling performed at a basal temperature of 50C and deformed at varying strain rates from 3*10-6 s-1 to 4*10-3 s-1. The models are made up (from bottom to top) of a 0.25 cm thick layer of temperature-sensitive PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), overlain by 1.75 cm of alternating black and yellow sand. The basal PDMS layer simulates a shale decollement. Decollements in the NFTB are generally developed in the Barail Shale of Oligocene age at 50C (the depth of the Barail Shale is about 2 km and the prevailing geothermal gradient is 25C/km). The sand layers simulate the brittlely behaving sandstones which prevail in the NFTB. All of the models were subjected to 35% compression, as the NFTB experienced similar shortening. The varying deformation velocities were chosen to model differing decollement rheologies. PDMS simulates shale decollement, which is mobile when overpressured and undergoes compression. The rheology of PDMS changes considerably with the applied temperature and strain rate. PDMS, although generally regarded as Newtonian, does behave non-Newtonian at strain rates of 10-3 s-1. The relation between decollement pore fluid overpressure with that of model strain rate, the material rheology, scaled body forces, density of the decollement in nature can be expressed as: λ = 1- [ V ηmodel / f Hmodel ρnatureg Hnature σ*] where λ = coeifficient of pore fluid overpressure in the decollement, V = the deformation velocity with which the models are deforming, ηmodel= viscosity of the decollement material, f = the co efficient of overpressure, and

  2. Early Events in RNA Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, D.; Lee, Namkyung; Woodson, Sarah A.; Klimov, Dk

    2001-10-01

    We describe a conceptual framework for understanding the way large RNA molecules fold based on the notion that their free-energy landscape is rugged. A key prediction of our theory is that RNA folding can be described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism (KPM). According to KPM a small fraction of molecules folds rapidly to the native state whereas the remaining fraction is kinetically trapped in a low free-energy non-native state. This model provides a unified description of the way RNA and proteins fold. Single-molecule experiments on Tetrahymena ribozyme, which directly validate our theory, are analyzed using KPM. We also describe the earliest events that occur on microsecond time scales in RNA folding. These must involve collapse of RNA molecules that are mediated by counterion-condensation. Estimates of time scales for the initial events in RNA folding are provided for the Tetrahymena ribozyme.

  3. Kinetic Intermediates in RNA Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrinkar, Patrick P.; Williamson, James R.

    1994-08-01

    The folding pathways of large, highly structured RNA molecules are largely unexplored. Insight into both the kinetics of folding and the presence of intermediates was provided in a study of the Mg2+-induced folding of the Tetrahymena ribozyme by hybridization of complementary oligodeoxynucleotide probes. This RNA folds via a complex mechanism involving both Mg2+-dependent and Mg2+-independent steps. A hierarchical model for the folding pathway is proposed in which formation of one helical domain (P4-P6) precedes that of a second helical domain (P3-P7). The overall rate-limiting step is formation of P3-P7, and takes place with an observed rate constant of 0.72 ± 0.14 minute-1. The folding mechanism of large RNAs appears similar to that of many multidomain proteins in that formation of independently stable substructures precedes their association into the final conformation.

  4. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  5. Distribution of protein folds in the three superkingdoms of life.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Y I; Brenner, S E; Bash, P A; Koonin, E V

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive protein-fold recognition procedure was developed on the basis of iterative database search using the PSI-BLAST program. A collection of 1193 position-dependent weight matrices that can be used as fold identifiers was produced. In the completely sequenced genomes, folds could be automatically identified for 20%-30% of the proteins, with 3%-6% more detectable by additional analysis of conserved motifs. The distribution of the most common folds is very similar in bacteria and archaea but distinct in eukaryotes. Within the bacteria, this distribution differs between parasitic and free-living species. In all analyzed genomes, the P-loop NTPases are the most abundant fold. In bacteria and archaea, the next most common folds are ferredoxin-like domains, TIM-barrels, and methyltransferases, whereas in eukaryotes, the second to fourth places belong to protein kinases, beta-propellers and TIM-barrels. The observed diversity of protein folds in different proteomes is approximately twice as high as it would be expected from a simple stochastic model describing a proteome as a finite sample from an infinite pool of proteins with an exponential distribution of the fold fractions. Distribution of the number of domains with different folds in one protein fits the geometric model, which is compatible with the evolution of multidomain proteins by random combination of domains. [Fold predictions for proteins from 14 proteomes are available on the World Wide Web at. The FIDs are available by anonymous ftp at the same location.

  6. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the conformational folding process of SS-reduced bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A using a selenoxide reagent with high oxidizing ability.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kenta; Kumakura, Fumio; Iwaoka, Michio

    2012-01-01

    Redox-coupled folding pathways of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) with four intramolecular disulfide (SS) bonds comprise three phases: (I) SS formation to generate partially oxidized intermediate ensembles with no rigid folded structure; (II) SS rearrangement from the three SS intermediate ensemble (3S) to the des intermediates having three native SS linkages; (III) final oxidation of the last native SS linkage to generate native RNase A. We previously demonstrated that DHS(ox), a water-soluble selenoxide reagent for rapid and quantitative SS formation, allows clear separation of the three folding phases. In this study, the main conformational folding phase (phase II) has been extensively analyzed at pH 8.0 under a wide range of temperatures (5-45 °C), and thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the four des intermediates were determined. The free-energy differences (ΔG) as a function of temperature suggested that the each SS linkage has different thermodynamic and kinetic roles in stability of the native structure. On the other hand, comparison of the rate constants and the activation energies for 3S → des with those reported for the conformational folding of SS-intact RNase A suggested that unfolded des species (desU) having three native SS linkages but not yet being folded are involved in very small amounts (<1%) in the 3S intermediate ensemble and the desU species would gain the native-like structures via X-Pro isomerization like SS-intact RNase A. It was revealed that DHS(ox) is useful for kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the conformational folding process on the oxidative folding pathways of SS-reduced proteins.

  7. Microfacies Analysis and Paleoenvironmental Interpretation of the Eocene Kohat Formation, Gumbat Section, Himalayan Fold and Thrust Belt, Northern Pakistan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Kamran

    2015-04-01

    A section of the Middle Eocene Kohat Formation has been measured and sampled systematically for the microfacies analysis and paleoenvironmental interpretation from the Gumbat Section, Kohat Basin, Himalayan Fold and Thrust Belt, Northern Pakistan. The section of Kohat Formation is 84 m thick in this area. A total number of 45 samples were collected from bottom to top in such a way that minor lithological variations were noticed and sampled. Out of these samples, 67 thin sections were made that were later on studied under the microscope for microfacies analysis and paleoenvironmental interpretation. Four microfacies and eight subfacies have been identified in the section. These microfacies and their subfacies are: Lime Mudstone Facies Benthic Foraminiferal Wackstone Facies This microfacies is further divided into five subfacies: Nummulites-Milliolid Wackestone Facies, Nummulites-Alveolina-Milliolid Wackestone Facies, Nummulites-Alveolina Wackestone Facies, Alveolinid Wackestone Facies, Nummulites-Coskinolina Wackestone Facies, Benthic Foraminiferal Packstone Facies This microfacies is again divided into three subfacies namely: Nummulites-Alveolina Packstone Facies, Milliolid-Peloid Packstone Facies and Nummulites-Assilina Packstone Facies. And Milliolid-Peloid Grainstone Facies. These microfacies indicate some interesting results about the paleoenvironments at the time of deposition of the Kohat Formation in this area. The larger benthic foraminifera of different groups have been used for the interpretation of paleoenvironments. These micro organisms show a great susceptibility to the minor changes in climate, depth zone and the nature of substrate. These can safely be used for the paleoenvironmental interpretation of any carbonate system deposited in the marine realm. On the basis of above mentioned microfacies, it can be concluded that the Kohat Formation in Gumbat area was deposited in low to moderate energy conditions, open marine, shallow shelf environments.

  8. Simulations of temporal patterns of oral airflow in men and women using a two-mass model of the vocal folds under dynamic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Jorge C.; Koenig, Laura L.

    2005-03-01

    In this study we use a low-dimensional laryngeal model to reproduce temporal variations in oral airflow produced by speakers in the vicinity of an abduction gesture. It attempts to characterize these temporal patterns in terms of biomechanical parameters such as glottal area, vocal fold stiffness, subglottal pressure, and gender differences in laryngeal dimensions. A two-mass model of the vocal folds coupled to a two-tube approximation of the vocal tract is fitted to oral airflow records measured in men and women during the production of /aha/ utterances, using the subglottal pressure, glottal width, and Q factor as control parameters. The results show that the model is capable of reproducing the airflow records with good approximation. A nonlinear damping characteristics is needed, to reproduce the flow variation at glottal abduction. Devoicing is achieved by the combined action of vocal fold abduction, the decrease of subglottal pressure, and the increase of vocal fold tension. In general, the female larynx has a more restricted region of vocal fold oscillation than the male one. This would explain the more frequent devoicing in glottal abduction-adduction gestures for /h/ in running speech by women, compared to men. .

  9. Comparative analysis of the folding dynamics and kinetics of an engineered knotted protein and its variants derived from HP0242 of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang-Wei; Liu, Yu-Nan; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Jackson, Sophie E.; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which a polypeptide chain thread itself spontaneously to attain a knotted conformation has been a major challenge in the field of protein folding. HP0242 is a homodimeric protein from Helicobacter pylori with intertwined helices to form a unique pseudo-knotted folding topology. A tandem HP0242 repeat has been constructed to become the first engineered trefoil-knotted protein. Its small size renders it a model system for computational analyses to examine its folding and knotting pathways. Here we report a multi-parametric study on the folding stability and kinetics of a library of HP0242 variants, including the trefoil-knotted tandem HP0242 repeat, using far-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Equilibrium chemical denaturation of HP0242 variants shows the presence of highly populated dimeric and structurally heterogeneous folding intermediates. Such equilibrium folding intermediates retain significant amount of helical structures except those at the N- and C-terminal regions in the native structure. Stopped-flow fluorescence measurements of HP0242 variants show that spontaneous refolding into knotted structures can be achieved within seconds, which is several orders of magnitude faster than previously observed for other knotted proteins. Nevertheless, the complex chevron plots indicate that HP0242 variants are prone to misfold into kinetic traps, leading to severely rolled-over refolding arms. The experimental observations are in general agreement with the previously reported molecular dynamics simulations. Based on our results, kinetic folding pathways are proposed to qualitatively describe the complex folding processes of HP0242 variants.

  10. Ab initio RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  11. Deformation of Fold-and-Thrust Belts above a Viscous Detachment: New Insights from Analogue Modelling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Carlos R.; Marques, Fernando O.

    2015-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies on fold-and-thrusts belts (FTB) have shown that, under Coulomb conditions, deformation of brittle thrust wedges above a dry frictional basal contact is characterized by dominant frontward vergent thrusts (forethrusts) with thrust spacing and taper angle being directly influenced by the basal strength (increase in basal strength leading to narrower thrust spacing and higher taper angles); whereas thrust wedges deformed above a weak viscous detachment, such as salt, show a more symmetric thrust style (no prevailing vergence of thrusting) with wider thrust spacing and shallower wedges. However, different deformation patterns can be found on this last group of thrust wedges both in nature and experimentally. Therefore we focused on the strength (friction) of the wedge basal contact, the basal detachment. We used a parallelepiped box with four fixed walls and one mobile that worked as a vertical piston drove by a computer controlled stepping motor. Fine dry sand was used as the analogue of brittle rocks and silicone putty (PDMS) with Newtonian behaviour as analogue of the weak viscous detachment. To investigate the strength of basal contact on thrust wedge deformation, two configurations were used: 1) a horizontal sand pack with a dry frictional basal contact; and 2) a horizontal sand pack above a horizontal PDMS layer, acting as a basal weak viscous contact. Results of the experiments show that: the model with a dry frictional basal detachment support the predictions for the Coulomb wedges, showing a narrow wedge with dominant frontward vergence of thrusting, close spacing between FTs and high taper angle. The model with a weak viscous frictional basal detachment show that: 1) forethrusts (FT) are dominant showing clearly an imbricate asymmetric geometry, with wider spaced thrusts than the dry frictional basal model; 2) after FT initiation, the movement on the thrust can last up to 15% model shortening, leading to great amount of

  12. Physical experiments of transpressional folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoff, Basil; Peterson, Karl

    1998-06-01

    In order to understand the process of folding in obliquely convergent settings, we formed folds within a shear box capable of creating homogeneous transpressional deformations. Folds were created in a single layer of stiff mixed plasticine and silicone that overlay a Newtonian silicone, for a variety of plate convergence angles. As small amplitude folds became visible, they were parallel to the long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse. With increasing deformation, the fold hinges rotated parallel with the long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse for all angles of convergence. This parallelism indicates that fold hinges, once formed, rotate with the horizontal strain ellipse rather than as material lines. The experiments highlight several interesting effects of transpression dynamics. The fold hinges initiate parallel to either ṡ1 or ṡ2 and are parallel to either S1 or S2 with increasing deformation. Neither infinitesimal strain (stress) nor finite strain is resolvable solely from fold geometry. Further, the net amount of contraction determined by folding across the zone was overestimated in all cases except pure contraction. This effect is obvious for the case of wrenching, where folding implies that the zone contracts if elongation parallel to the fold hinge is not considered. Therefore, attempts to balance cross-sections in transpressional zones will tend to overestimate contraction unless the wrench component of deformation is addressed. This result is validated by applying the modeling results in folding in central California adjacent to the San Andreas fault, where cross-section balancing indicates higher amounts of contraction than predicted by plate motion.

  13. Origin and evolution of protein fold designs inferred from phylogenomic analysis of CATH domain structures in proteomes.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Abbas; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The spatial arrangements of secondary structures in proteins, irrespective of their connectivity, depict the overall shape and organization of protein domains. These features have been used in the CATH and SCOP classifications to hierarchically partition fold space and define the architectural make up of proteins. Here we use phylogenomic methods and a census of CATH structures in hundreds of genomes to study the origin and diversification of protein architectures (A) and their associated topologies (T) and superfamilies (H). Phylogenies that describe the evolution of domain structures and proteomes were reconstructed from the structural census and used to generate timelines of domain discovery. Phylogenies of CATH domains at T and H levels of structural abstraction and associated chronologies revealed patterns of reductive evolution, the early rise of Archaea, three epochs in the evolution of the protein world, and patterns of structural sharing between superkingdoms. Phylogenies of proteomes confirmed the early appearance of Archaea. While these findings are in agreement with previous phylogenomic studies based on the SCOP classification, phylogenies unveiled sharing patterns between Archaea and Eukarya that are recent and can explain the canonical bacterial rooting typically recovered from sequence analysis. Phylogenies of CATH domains at A level uncovered general patterns of architectural origin and diversification. The tree of A structures showed that ancient structural designs such as the 3-layer (αβα) sandwich (3.40) or the orthogonal bundle (1.10) are comparatively simpler in their makeup and are involved in basic cellular functions. In contrast, modern structural designs such as prisms, propellers, 2-solenoid, super-roll, clam, trefoil and box are not widely distributed and were probably adopted to perform specialized functions. Our timelines therefore uncover a universal tendency towards protein structural complexity that is remarkable. PMID:23555236

  14. The protein folding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Francesco; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2004-03-01

    Networks are everywhere. The conformation space of a 20-residue antiparallel beta-sheet peptide [1], sampled by molecular dynamics simulations, is mapped to a network. Conformations are nodes of the network, and the transitions between them are links. As previously found for the World-Wide Web as well as for social and biological networks , the conformation space contains highly connected hubs like the native state which is the most populated free energy basin. Furthermore, the network shows a hierarchical modularity [2] which is consistent with the funnel mechanism of folding [3] and is not observed for a random heteropolymer lacking a native state. Here we show that the conformation space network describes the free energy landscape without requiring projections into arbitrarily chosen reaction coordinates. The network analysis provides a basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the folding transition state and the existence of multiple pathways. [1] P. Ferrara and A. Caflisch, Folding simulations of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet peptide, PNAS 97, 10780-10785 (2000). [2] Ravasz, E. and Barabási, A. L. Hierarchical organization in complex networks. Phys. Rev. E 67, 026112 (2003). [3] Dill, K. and Chan, H From Levinthal to pathways to funnels. Nature Struct. Biol. 4, 10-19 (1997)

  15. 3D-model of complex km-scale fold structures using laserscanning images: The Achensee region, western Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, H.; Gruber, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) are a fold-and-thrust belt built by Permomesozoic rocks. It was affected by Early Jurassic rifting prior to Late Creatceous stacking of thrust sheets. The inversion of Jurassic basins resulted in complex fold structures. One of the enigmatic areas is the Achensee region, where a major kilometric W-E trending anticline-syncline system (Montschein-anticline, Karwendel-syncline) is offset to the north east of lake Achensee (Guffert-anticline, Thiersee syncline). The anticlines and synclines west and east of the transfer zone are recumbent, but no thrust is visible. In the transfer zone, the axis of the anticline curves to a N-S orientation (Unnutz anticline), whereas the syncline evolves to a thrust with 5km offset in E-W cross section (Achental thrust) that superimposes Triassic on Cretaceous rocks. The 3D-model in this low-budget project was constructed to understand the kinematic evolution of the fold and thrust system. Input data were: (1) a tectonic map with a dense network of orientation data, (2) a map of the trace of bedding mapped from 1m resolution laserscanning images, (3) a DEM with approximately 30m resolution.(1) and (2) were prepared in a GIS system, and then imported into the Midland Valleys Move software. Our intention was to create a data-oriented model, to prevent any model-induced bias. Thrust planes were constructed using the intersection lines with the DEM. Bedding in folds was modelled by extruding the intersection lines with the DEM parallel to the fold axis. In both cases errors were introduced into the model as the DEM has not enough resolution. Orientation data are displayed as discs in 3D space. The 3D-model shows that the Achental thrust cuts progressively into deeper structural levels of the Unnutz anticline to the south, therefore the thrust dips shallower to the south than the fold axis. Therefore the Achental thrust superimposes pre-existing folds onto the footwall toward the north, as established

  16. Kinematic 3-D Retro-Modeling of an Orogenic Bend in the South Limón Fold-and-Thrust Belt, Eastern Costa Rica: Prediction of the Incremental Internal Strain Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Tanner, David C.; Winsemann, Jutta

    2016-10-01

    The South Limón fold-and-thrust belt, in the back-arc area of southern Costa Rica, is characterized by a 90° curvature of the strike of the thrust planes and is therefore a natural laboratory for the analysis of curved orogens. The analysis of curved fold-and-thrust belts is a challenge because of the varying structural orientations within the belt. Based on seismic reflection lines, we created a 3-D subsurface model containing three major thrust faults and three stratigraphic horizons. 3-D kinematic retro-deformation modeling was carried out to analyze the spatial evolution of the fold-and-thrust belt. The maximum amount of displacement on each of the faults is (from hinterland to foreland); thrust 1: 800 m; thrust 2: 600 m; thrust 3: 250 m. The model was restored sequentially to its pre-deformational state. The strain history of the stratigraphic horizons in the model was calculated at every step. This shows that the internal strain pattern has an abrupt change at the orogenic bend. Contractional strain occurs in the forelimbs of the hanging-wall anticlines, while a zone of dilative strain spreads from the anticline crests to the backlimbs. The modeling shows that a NNE-directed transport direction best explains the structural evolution of the bend. This would require a left-lateral strike-slip zone in the North to compensate for the movement and thereby decoupling the South Limón fold-and-thrust belt from northern Costa Rica. Therefore, our modeling supports the presence of the Trans-Isthmic fault system, at least during the Plio-Pleistocene.

  17. From static to dynamic: The need for structural ensembles and a predictive model of RNA folding and function

    PubMed Central

    Herschlag, Daniel; Allred, Benjamin E.; Gowrishankar, Seshadri

    2015-01-01

    To understand RNA, it is necessary to move beyond a descriptive categorization towards quantitative predictions of its molecular conformations and functional behavior. An incisive approach to understanding the function and folding of biological RNA systems involves characterizing small, simple components that are largely responsible for the behavior of complex systems including helix-junction-helix elements and tertiary motifs. State-of-the-art methods have permitted unprecedented insight into the conformational ensembles of these elements revealing, for example, that conformations of helix-junction-helix elements are confined to a small region of the ensemble, that this region is highly dependent on the junction’s topology, and that the correct alignment of tertiary motifs may be a rare conformation on the overall folding landscape. Further characterization of RNA components and continued development of experimental and computational methods with the goal of quantitatively predicting RNA folding and functional behavior will be critical to understanding biological RNA systems. PMID:25744941

  18. Predicting pore pressure in active fold-thrust systems: An empirical model for the deepwater Sabah foldbelt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzens-Schultz, Brent A.; Azbel, Konstantin

    2014-12-01

    Measurements related to mudrock (shale and siltstone) porosity such as acoustic velocity, density or electrical resistivity, have traditionally been used to predict pore pressures in extensional stress settings. The underlying assumption is that burial and vertical effective stress (VES), which is the overburden minus the pore pressure, controls the compaction of these rocks through porosity loss. The dataset presented here compares VES and acoustic velocity of similar composition mudrocks in both an extensional and a compressional stress setting. In the extensional stress environment, the mudrocks follow a typical compaction trend with a porosity loss and increase in acoustic velocity that can be related to VES. In an active fold-thrust belt, the compressive stresses further reduce the porosity and increase the acoustic velocity of the mudrocks. First a layer-parallel shortening compacts sediments beyond what is observed for the VES. This additional compaction is further enhanced near thrust faults and in anticlinal forelimbs, presumably due to additional shear stress in these areas. The mudrocks located in folds that are buried by additional sedimentation do not compact again until the tectonic compaction is overridden by enough new burial. After that, the mudrocks follow the observed extensional setting compaction trend. In the fold-thrust belt, the observed reduction in porosity by stresses other than burial leads to an under-prediction of pore pressure using traditional methods. To account for this, we present a correction that can be applied to the acoustic velocity (or porosity) using two parameters: (a) proximity to thrust faults and anticlinal forelimbs and (b) the amount of burial after fold formation. With these corrections, the extensional velocity-VES compaction trend can be used to accurately predict pore pressure within the active fold-thrust belt. The correction is calibrated with well data and is empirical. None-the-less, it is a first step toward

  19. Active folding and thrusting in North Africa: A framework for a seismotectonic model of the Atlas Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha; Maouche, Said; Timoulali, Youssef; Bouhadad, Youcef; Bouaziz, Samir

    2013-04-01

    Large earthquakes in the Atlas Mountains of North Africa are often generated on thrust or reverse faults. For inland faults, surface ruptures and long-term active tectonics appear as a thrust escarpment and fold-related faulting visible in the field and using remote sensing images, or measured using space-borne geodesy (GPS or INSAR). For coastal faults, major uplifts of late Quaternary marine terraces and folding with steplike morphology are exposed indicating the incremental development of coastal active deformation. We have investigated the similarities and differences between different active fault-related folding along the Africa - Eurasia convergent plate boundary. These active structures are seismogenic and the striking case studies are the 1960 Agadir (Mw 5.9), the 1954 Orleansville (Mw 6.7), the 1980 El Asnam (Mw 7.3), the 1992 Gafsa (Mw 5.3), the 1999 Ain Temouchent (Mw 6.0), and the 2003 Zemmouri (Mw 6.8) earthquakes. From paleoseismic investigations the El Asnam active fold shows 0.6 to 1.0 mm/yr uplift rate. West of Algiers on the Sahel anticline, the levelling of uplifted successive coastal benches and notches document the incremental folding uplift with ~ 0.84 - 1.2 mm/yr uplift rate in the last 120-140 ka. The relatively fast folding growth during late Pleistocene and Holocene in the Atlas Mountains attests for the significance of earthquake activity and the importance of convergent movements between Africa and Eurasia in the Western Mediterranean. This work is prepared in the framework of the UNESCO (SIDA) - IGCP Project 601 "Seismotectonics and Seismic Hazards in Africa".

  20. Folding superfunnel to describe cooperative folding of interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Smeller, László

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a generalization of the well-known folding funnel concept of proteins. In the funnel model the polypeptide chain is treated as an individual object not interacting with other proteins. Since biological systems are considerably crowded, protein-protein interaction is a fundamental feature during the life cycle of proteins. The folding superfunnel proposed here describes the folding process of interacting proteins in various situations. The first example discussed is the folding of the freshly synthesized protein with the aid of chaperones. Another important aspect of protein-protein interactions is the folding of the recently characterized intrinsically disordered proteins, where binding to target proteins plays a crucial role in the completion of the folding process. The third scenario where the folding superfunnel is used is the formation of aggregates from destabilized proteins, which is an important factor in case of several conformational diseases. The folding superfunnel constructed here with the minimal assumption about the interaction potential explains all three cases mentioned above. Proteins 2016; 84:1009-1016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Characterization of extracellular matrix proteins during wound healing in the lamina propria of vocal fold in a canine model: a long-term and consecutive study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Xu, Wen; Ling, Wei; Wang, Qi; Wu, Yan; Han, Demin

    2014-06-01

    The characterization of vocal fold wound healing can be reflected by the changes of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the lamina propria. Although the expression of ECM proteins after vocal fold injury has been widely studied, such observations have lacked time continuity and integrity of marker proteins. In this study, we observed the morphology of injured vocal folds in a canine model. We used immunofluorescence staining to evaluate the expression and distribution of ECM proteins, such as collagen, elastin, hyaluronic acid, decorin and fibronectin, from 15 days to 6 months after injury. The results showed that large amounts of ECM proteins were secreted 15-40 days after injury. Collagen and fibronectin secretion increased significantly, and were disorderly deposited. The secretion of decorin and elastin increased slightly, while hyaluronic acid decreased. The 15-40 day post-injury period may be the critical intervention stage in wound healing of vocal folds. From 3 to 6 months after injury, the secretion of ECM proteins declined. However, collagen and fibronectin secretion were still significantly higher than normal with irregular arrangement, while the secretion of elastin, hyaluronic acid and decorin decreased significantly at 6 months. This led to vocal fold inelasticity and stiffness, which required effective long-term interventions to treat scar formation.

  2. Pseudoknots in RNA folding landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kucharík, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The function of an RNA molecule is not only linked to its native structure, which is usually taken to be the ground state of its folding landscape, but also in many cases crucially depends on the details of the folding pathways such as stable folding intermediates or the timing of the folding process itself. To model and understand these processes, it is necessary to go beyond ground state structures. The study of rugged RNA folding landscapes holds the key to answer these questions. Efficient coarse-graining methods are required to reduce the intractably vast energy landscapes into condensed representations such as barrier trees or basin hopping graphs (BHG) that convey an approximate but comprehensive picture of the folding kinetics. So far, exact and heuristic coarse-graining methods have been mostly restricted to the pseudoknot-free secondary structures. Pseudoknots, which are common motifs and have been repeatedly hypothesized to play an important role in guiding folding trajectories, were usually excluded. Results: We generalize the BHG framework to include pseudoknotted RNA structures and systematically study the differences in predicted folding behavior depending on whether pseudoknotted structures are allowed to occur as folding intermediates or not. We observe that RNAs with pseudoknotted ground state structures tend to have more pseudoknotted folding intermediates than RNAs with pseudoknot-free ground state structures. The occurrence and influence of pseudoknotted intermediates on the folding pathway, however, appear to depend very strongly on the individual RNAs so that no general rule can be inferred. Availability and implementation: The algorithms described here are implemented in C++ as standalone programs. Its source code and Supplemental material can be freely downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/bhg.html. Contact: qin@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  3. Multidimensional theory of protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuhito; Sasai, Masaki

    2009-04-01

    Theory of multidimensional representation of free energy surface of protein folding is developed by adopting structural order parameters of multiple regions in protein as multiple coordinates. Various scenarios of folding are classified in terms of cooperativity within individual regions and interactions among multiple regions and thus obtained classification is used to analyze the folding process of several example proteins. Ribosomal protein S6, src-SH3 domain, CheY, barnase, and BBL domain are analyzed with the two-dimensional representation by using a structure-based Hamiltonian model. The extension to the higher dimensional representation leads to the finer description of the folding process. Barnase, NtrC, and an ankyrin repeat protein are examined with the three-dimensional representation. The multidimensional representation allows us to directly address questions on folding pathways, intermediates, and transition states.

  4. Timing analysis by model checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naydich, Dimitri; Guaspari, David

    2000-01-01

    The safety of modern avionics relies on high integrity software that can be verified to meet hard real-time requirements. The limits of verification technology therefore determine acceptable engineering practice. To simplify verification problems, safety-critical systems are commonly implemented under the severe constraints of a cyclic executive, which make design an expensive trial-and-error process highly intolerant of change. Important advances in analysis techniques, such as rate monotonic analysis (RMA), have provided a theoretical and practical basis for easing these onerous restrictions. But RMA and its kindred have two limitations: they apply only to verifying the requirement of schedulability (that tasks meet their deadlines) and they cannot be applied to many common programming paradigms. We address both these limitations by applying model checking, a technique with successful industrial applications in hardware design. Model checking algorithms analyze finite state machines, either by explicit state enumeration or by symbolic manipulation. Since quantitative timing properties involve a potentially unbounded state variable (a clock), our first problem is to construct a finite approximation that is conservative for the properties being analyzed-if the approximation satisfies the properties of interest, so does the infinite model. To reduce the potential for state space explosion we must further optimize this finite model. Experiments with some simple optimizations have yielded a hundred-fold efficiency improvement over published techniques.

  5. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bengal Basin with its prolific gas rich province provides needed energy to Bangladesh. Present energy situation demands more Hydrocarbon explorations. Only 'Semutang' is discovered in the high amplitude structures, where rest of are in the gentle to moderate structures of western part of Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt. But it has some major thrust faults which have strongly breached the reservoir zone. The major objectives of this research are interpretation of gas horizons and faults, then to perform velocity model, structural and property modeling to obtain reservoir properties. It is needed to properly identify the faults and reservoir heterogeneities. 3D modeling is widely used to reveal the subsurface structure in faulted zone where planning and development drilling is major challenge. Thirteen 2D seismic and six well logs have been used to identify six gas bearing horizons and a network of faults and to map the structure at reservoir level. Variance attributes were used to identify faults. Velocity model is performed for domain conversion. Synthetics were prepared from two wells where sonic and density logs are available. Well to seismic tie at reservoir zone shows good match with Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator on seismic section. Vsh, porosity, water saturation and permeability have been calculated and various cross plots among porosity logs have been shown. Structural modeling is used to make zone and layering accordance with minimum sand thickness. Fault model shows the possible fault network, those liable for several dry wells. Facies model have been constrained with Sequential Indicator Simulation method to show the facies distribution along the depth surfaces. Petrophysical models have been prepared with Sequential Gaussian Simulation to estimate petrophysical parameters away from the existing wells to other parts of the field and to observe heterogeneities in reservoir. Average porosity map for each gas zone were constructed. The outcomes of the research

  6. Towards a systematic classification of protein folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Bohr, Henrik

    1997-10-01

    A lattice model Hamiltonian is suggested for protein structures that can explain the division into structural fold classes during the folding process. Proteins are described by chains of secondary structure elements, with the hinges in between being the important degrees of freedom. The protein structures are given a unique name, which simultaneously represent a linear string of physical coupling constants describing hinge spin interactions. We have defined a metric and a precise distance measure between the fold classes. An automated procedure is constructed in which any protein structure in the usual protein data base coordinate format can be transformed into the proposed chain representation. Taking into account hydrophobic forces we have found a mechanism for the formation of domains with a unique fold containing predicted magic numbers \\{4,6,9,12,16,18,...\\} of secondary structures and multiples of these domains. It is shown that the same magic numbers are robust and occur as well for packing on other nonclosed packed lattices. We have performed a statistical analysis of available protein structures and found agreement with the predicted preferred abundances of proteins with a predicted magic number of secondary structures. Thermodynamic arguments for the increased abundance and a phase diagram for the folding scenario are given. This includes an intermediate high symmetry phase, the parent structures, between the molten globule and the native states. We have made an exhaustive enumeration of dense lattice animals on a cubic lattice for acceptance number Z=4 and Z=5 up to 36 vertices.

  7. The PE-PPE Domain in Mycobacterium Reveals a Serine α/β Hydrolase Fold and Function: An In-Silico Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Rafiya; Tanneeru, Karunakar; Guruprasad, Lalitha

    2011-01-01

    The PE and PPE proteins first reported in the genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv are now identified in all mycobacterial species. The PE-PPE domain (Pfam ID: PF08237) is a 225 amino acid residue conserved region located towards the C-terminus of some PE and PPE proteins and hypothetical proteins. Our in-silico sequence analysis revealed that this domain is present in all Mycobacteria, some Rhodococcus and Nocardia farcinica genomes. This domain comprises a pentapeptide sequence motif GxSxG/S at the N-terminus and conserved amino acid residues Ser, Asp and His that constitute a catalytic triad characteristic of lipase, esterase and cutinase activity. The fold prediction and comparative modeling of the 3-D structure of the PE-PPE domain revealed a “serine α/β hydrolase” structure with a central β-sheet flanked by α-helices on either side. The structure comprises a lid insertion with a closed structure conformation and has a solvent inaccessible active site. The oxyanion hole that stabilizes the negative charge on the tetrahedral intermediate has been identified. Our findings add to the growing list of serine hydrolases in mycobacterium, which are essential for the maintenance of their impermeable cell wall and virulence. These results provide the directions for the design of experiments to establish the function of PE and PPE proteins. PMID:21347309

  8. Atomic-level description of ubiquitin folding

    PubMed Central

    Piana, Stefano; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Shaw, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, in which proteins spontaneously and repeatedly fold and unfold, have recently been used to help elucidate the mechanistic principles that underlie the folding of fast-folding proteins. The extent to which the conclusions drawn from the analysis of such proteins, which fold on the microsecond timescale, apply to the millisecond or slower folding of naturally occurring proteins is, however, unclear. As a first attempt to address this outstanding issue, we examine here the folding of ubiquitin, a 76-residue-long protein found in all eukaryotes that is known experimentally to fold on a millisecond timescale. Ubiquitin folding has been the subject of many experimental studies, but its slow folding rate has made it difficult to observe and characterize the folding process through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Here we determine the mechanism, thermodynamics, and kinetics of ubiquitin folding through equilibrium atomistic simulations. The picture emerging from the simulations is in agreement with a view of ubiquitin folding suggested from previous experiments. Our findings related to the folding of ubiquitin are also consistent, for the most part, with the folding principles derived from the simulation of fast-folding proteins, suggesting that these principles may be applicable to a wider range of proteins. PMID:23503848

  9. Structural analysis of the Hasan-Robat marbles as traces of folded basement in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi, Alireza

    2015-11-01

    Cherty marbles of Hasan-Robat area, northwest of Isfahan, in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone of Iran preserves evidences of multiple deformational events. The Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone is the inner crystalline zone of the Zagros Orogen, which has been highly deformed and exhumed during continental collision between the Arabian Plate and Central Iran. The Hasan-Robat area is an example of the exposed Precambrian-Paleozoic basement rocks that stretched along two NW-SE-trending faults and located in the inner part of the HasanRobat positive flower strcuture. The Hasan-Robat marbles record a complex shortening and shearing history. This lead to the development of disharmonic ptygmatic folds with vertical to sub-vertical axes and some interference patterns of folding that may have been created from deformations during the Pan-African Orogeny and later phases. Based on this research, tectonic evolution of the Hasan-Robat area is interpreted as the product of three major geotectonic events that have been started after Precambrian to Quaternary: (1) old deformation phases (2) contractional movements and (3) strike-slip movements. Different sets and distributions of joints, faults and folds are confirmed with effect of several deformational stages of the area and formation of the flower structure.

  10. Tectonic evolution of the Lachlan Fold Belt, southeastern Australia: constraints from coupled numerical models of crustal deformation and surface erosion driven by subduction of the underlying mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jean; Pauselli, Cristina

    2004-04-01

    We have used a coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element (FE) model of crustal deformation driven by mantle/oceanic subduction to demonstrate that the tectonic evolution of the Lachlan Fold Belt (LFB) during the Mid-Palaeozoic (Late Ordovician to Early Carboniferous) can be linked to continuous subduction along a single subduction zone. This contrasts with most models proposed to date which assume that separate subduction zones were active beneath the western, central and eastern sections of the Lachlan Orogen. We demonstrate how the existing data on the structural, volcanic and erosional evolution of the Lachlan Fold Belt can be accounted for by our model. We focus particularly on the timing of fault movement in the various sectors of the orogen. We demonstrate that the presence of the weak basal decollement on which most of the Lachlan Fold Belt is constructed effectively decouples crustal structures from those in the underlying mantle. The patterns of faulting in the upper crust appears therefore to be controlled by lateral strength contrasts inherited from previous orogenic events rather than the location of one or several subduction zones. The model also predicts that the uplift and deep exhumation of the Wagga-Omeo Metamorphic Belt (WOMB) is associated with the advection of this terrane above the subduction point and is the only tectonic event that gives us direct constraints on the location of the subduction zone. We also discuss the implications of our model for the nature of the basement underlying the present-day orogen.

  11. Let Them Fold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Nicholas; Tobin, Alexander

    1972-01-01

    Directions are given for seven activities involving the folding of paper strips to illustrate geometric concepts. Properties of pentagons, triangles, hexagons, and Mobius bands resulting from the various foldings are discussed. (DT)

  12. Fast events in protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.; Callender, R.; Causgrove, T.; Dyer, R.; Williams, S.

    1996-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a molecular understanding of how proteins achieve their native three-dimensional (folded) structures. This requires the identification and characterization of intermediates in the protein folding process on all relevant timescales, from picoseconds to seconds. The short timescale events in protein folding have been entirely unknown. Prior to this work, state-of-the-art experimental approaches were limited to milliseconds or longer, when much of the folding process is already over. The gap between theory and experiment is enormous: current theoretical and computational methods cannot realistically model folding processes with lifetimes longer than one nanosecond. This unique approach to employ laser pump-probe techniques that combine novel methods of laser flash photolysis with time-resolved vibrational spectroscopic probes of protein transients. In this scheme, a short (picosecond to nanosecond) laser photolysis pulse was used to produce an instantaneous pH or temperature jump, thereby initiating a protein folding or unfolding reaction. Structure-specific, time-resolved vibrational probes were then used to identify and characterize protein folding intermediates.

  13. Comparison of alternative representations of hydraulic-conductivity anisotropy in folded fractured-sedimentary rock: Modeling groundwater flow in the Shenandoah Valley (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, R.M.; Voss, C.I.; Southworth, S.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical representation that explicitly represents the generalized three-dimensional anisotropy of folded fractured-sedimentary rocks in a groundwater model best reproduces the salient features of the flow system in the Shenandoah Valley, USA. This conclusion results from a comparison of four alternative representations of anisotropy in which the hydraulic-conductivity tensor represents the bedrock structure as (model A) anisotropic with variable strikes and dips, (model B) horizontally anisotropic with a uniform strike, (model C) horizontally anisotropic with variable strikes, and (model D) isotropic. Simulations using the US Geological Survey groundwater flow and transport model SUTRA are based on a representation of hydraulic conductivity that conforms to bedding planes in a three-dimensional structural model of the valley that duplicates the pattern of folded sedimentary rocks. In the most general representation, (model A), the directions of maximum and medium hydraulic conductivity conform to the strike and dip of bedding, respectively, while the minimum hydraulic-conductivity direction is perpendicular to bedding. Model A produced a physically realistic flow system that reflects the underlying bedrock structure, with a flow field that is significantly different from those produced by the other three models. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  14. An FFT-based method for modeling protein folding and binding under crowding: benchmarking on ellipsoidal and all-atom crowders.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2013-10-01

    It is now well recognized that macromolecular crowding can exert significant effects on protein folding and binding stability. In order to calculate such effects in direct simulations of proteins mixed with bystander macromolecules, the latter (referred to as crowders) are usually modeled as spheres and the proteins represented at a coarse-grained level. Our recently developed postprocessing approach allows the proteins to be represented at the all-atom level but, for computational efficiency, has only been implemented for spherical crowders. Modeling crowder molecules in cellular environments and in vitro experiments as spheres may distort their effects on protein stability. Here we present a new method that is capable for treating aspherical crowders. The idea, borrowed from protein-protein docking, is to calculate the excess chemical potential of the proteins in crowded solution by fast Fourier transform (FFT). As the first application, we studied the effects of ellipsoidal crowders on the folding and binding free energies of all-atom proteins, and found, in agreement with previous direct simulations with coarse-grained protein models, that the aspherical crowders exert greater stabilization effects than spherical crowders of the same volume. Moreover, as demonstrated here, the FFT-based method has the important property that its computational cost does not increase strongly even when the level of details in representing the crowders is increased all the way to all-atom, thus significantly accelerating realistic modeling of protein folding and binding in cell-like environments. PMID:24187527

  15. Improving protein fold recognition by random forest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recognizing the correct structural fold among known template protein structures for a target protein (i.e. fold recognition) is essential for template-based protein structure modeling. Since the fold recognition problem can be defined as a binary classification problem of predicting whether or not the unknown fold of a target protein is similar to an already known template protein structure in a library, machine learning methods have been effectively applied to tackle this problem. In our work, we developed RF-Fold that uses random forest - one of the most powerful and scalable machine learning classification methods - to recognize protein folds. Results RF-Fold consists of hundreds of decision trees that can be trained efficiently on very large datasets to make accurate predictions on a highly imbalanced dataset. We evaluated RF-Fold on the standard Lindahl's benchmark dataset comprised of 976 × 975 target-template protein pairs through cross-validation. Compared with 17 different fold recognition methods, the performance of RF-Fold is generally comparable to the best performance in fold recognition of different difficulty ranging from the easiest family level, the medium-hard superfamily level, and to the hardest fold level. Based on the top-one template protein ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate is 84.5%, 63.4%, and 40.8% at family, superfamily, and fold levels, respectively. Based on the top-five template protein folds ranked by RF-Fold, the correct recognition rate increases to 91.5%, 79.3% and 58.3% at family, superfamily, and fold levels. Conclusions The good performance achieved by the RF-Fold demonstrates the random forest's effectiveness for protein fold recognition. PMID:25350499

  16. PREFACE Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    In appropriate physiological milieux proteins spontaneously fold into their functional three-dimensional structures. The amino acid sequences of functional proteins contain all the information necessary to specify the folds. This remarkable observation has spawned research aimed at answering two major questions. (1) Of all the conceivable structures that a protein can adopt, why is the ensemble of native-like structures the most favorable? (2) What are the paths by which proteins manage to robustly and reproducibly fold into their native structures? Anfinsen's thermodynamic hypothesis has guided the pursuit of answers to the first question whereas Levinthal's paradox has influenced the development of models for protein folding dynamics. Decades of work have led to significant advances in the folding problem. Mean-field models have been developed to capture our current, coarse grain understanding of the driving forces for protein folding. These models are being used to predict three-dimensional protein structures from sequence and stability profiles as a function of thermodynamic and chemical perturbations. Impressive strides have also been made in the field of protein design, also known as the inverse folding problem, thereby testing our understanding of the determinants of the fold specificities of different sequences. Early work on protein folding pathways focused on the specific sequence of events that could lead to a simplification of the search process. However, unifying principles proved to be elusive. Proteins that show reversible two-state folding-unfolding transitions turned out to be a gift of natural selection. Focusing on these simple systems helped researchers to uncover general principles regarding the origins of cooperativity in protein folding thermodynamics and kinetics. On the theoretical front, concepts borrowed from polymer physics and the physics of spin glasses led to the development of a framework based on energy landscape theories. These

  17. Approach to the unfolding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch upon adenine dissociation using a coarse-grained elastic network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhua; Lv, Dashuai; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Wang, Cunxin; Su, Jiguo; Zhang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding mRNA segments that can regulate the gene expression via altering their structures in response to specific metabolite binding. We proposed a coarse-grained Gaussian network model (GNM) to examine the unfolding and folding dynamics of adenosine deaminase (add) A-riboswitch upon the adenine dissociation, in which the RNA is modeled by a nucleotide chain with interaction networks formed by connecting adjoining atomic contacts. It was shown that the adenine binding is critical to the folding of the add A-riboswitch while the removal of the ligand can result in drastic increase of the thermodynamic fluctuations especially in the junction regions between helix domains. Under the assumption that the native contacts with the highest thermodynamic fluctuations break first, the iterative GNM simulations showed that the unfolding process of the adenine-free add A-riboswitch starts with the denature of the terminal helix stem, followed by the loops and junctions involving ligand binding pocket, and then the central helix domains. Despite the simplified coarse-grained modeling, the unfolding dynamics and pathways are shown in close agreement with the results from atomic-level MD simulations and the NMR and single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Overall, the study demonstrates a new avenue to investigate the binding and folding dynamics of add A-riboswitch molecule which can be readily extended for other RNA molecules.

  18. Petroleum generation and migration in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt of Iraq: Results from a basin-modeling study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitman, J.K.; Steinshouer, D.; Lewan, M.D.

    2004-01-01

    A regional 3-D total petroleum-system model was developed to evaluate petroleum generation and migration histories in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt in Iraq. The modeling was undertaken in conjunction with Middle East petroleum assessment studies conducted by the USGS. Regional structure maps, isopach and facies maps, and thermal maturity data were used as input to the model. The oil-generation potential of Jurassic source-rocks, the principal known source of the petroleum in Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary reservoirs in these regions, was modeled using hydrous pyrolysis (Type II-S) kerogen kinetics. Results showed that oil generation in source rocks commenced in the Late Cretaceous in intrashelf basins, peak expulsion took place in the late Miocene and Pliocene when these depocenters had expanded along the Zagros foredeep trend, and generation ended in the Holocene when deposition in the foredeep ceased. The model indicates that, at present, the majority of Jurassic source rocks in Iraq have reached or exceeded peak oil generation and most rocks have completed oil generation and expulsion. Flow-path simulations demonstrate that virtually all oil and gas fields in the Mesopotamian Basin and Zagros fold belt overlie mature Jurassic source rocks (vertical migration dominated) and are situated on, or close to, modeled migration pathways. Fields closest to modeled pathways associated with source rocks in local intrashelf basins were charged earliest from Late Cretaceous through the middle Miocene, and other fields filled later when compression-related traps were being formed. Model results confirm petroleum migration along major, northwest-trending folds and faults, and oil migration loss at the surface.

  19. Structural analysis of the synaptic protein neuroligin and its beta-neurexin complex: determinants for folding and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fabrichny, Igor P; Leone, Philippe; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Comoletti, Davide; Miller, Meghan T; Taylor, Palmer; Bourne, Yves; Marchot, Pascale

    2007-12-20

    The neuroligins are postsynaptic cell adhesion proteins whose associations with presynaptic neurexins participate in synaptogenesis. Mutations in the neuroligin and neurexin genes appear to be associated with autism and mental retardation. The crystal structure of a neuroligin reveals features not found in its catalytically active relatives, such as the fully hydrophobic interface forming the functional neuroligin dimer; the conformations of surface loops surrounding the vestigial active center; the location of determinants that are critical for folding and processing; and the absence of a macromolecular dipole and presence of an electronegative, hydrophilic surface for neurexin binding. The structure of a beta-neurexin-neuroligin complex reveals the precise orientation of the bound neurexin and, despite a limited resolution, provides substantial information on the Ca2+-dependent interactions network involved in trans-synaptic neurexin-neuroligin association. These structures exemplify how an alpha/beta-hydrolase fold varies in surface topography to confer adhesion properties and provide templates for analyzing abnormal processing or recognition events associated with autism.

  20. Observation and analysis of in vivo vocal fold tissue instabilities produced by nonlinear source-filter coupling: A case studya

    PubMed Central

    Zañartu, Matías; Mehta, Daryush D.; Ho, Julio C.; Wodicka, George R.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Different source-related factors can lead to vocal fold instabilities and bifurcations referred to as voice breaks. Nonlinear coupling in phonation suggests that changes in acoustic loading can also be responsible for this unstable behavior. However, no in vivo visualization of tissue motion during these acoustically induced instabilities has been reported. Simultaneous recordings of laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy, acoustics, aerodynamics, electroglottography, and neck skin acceleration are obtained from a participant consistently exhibiting voice breaks during pitch glide maneuvers. Results suggest that acoustically induced and source-induced instabilities can be distinguished at the tissue level. Differences in vibratory patterns are described through kymography and phonovibrography; measures of glottal area, open∕speed quotient, and amplitude∕phase asymmetry; and empirical orthogonal function decomposition. Acoustically induced tissue instabilities appear abruptly and exhibit irregular vocal fold motion after the bifurcation point, whereas source-induced ones show a smoother transition. These observations are also reflected in the acoustic and acceleration signals. Added aperiodicity is observed after the acoustically induced break, and harmonic changes appear prior to the bifurcation for the source-induced break. Both types of breaks appear to be subcritical bifurcations due to the presence of hysteresis and amplitude changes after the frequency jumps. These results are consistent with previous studies and the nonlinear source-filter coupling theory. PMID:21303014

  1. Structural Analysis of the Synaptic Protein Neuroligin and Its β-Neurexin Complex: Determinants for Folding and Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Fabrichny, Igor P.; Leone, Philippe; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Comoletti, Davide; Miller, Meghan T.; Taylor, Palmer; Bourne, Yves; Marchot, Pascale

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The neuroligins are postsynaptic cell adhesion proteins whose associations with presynaptic neurexins participate in synaptogenesis. Mutations in the neuroligin and neurexin genes appear to be associated with autism and mental retardation. The crystal structure of a neuroligin reveals features not found in its catalytically active relatives, such as the fully hydrophobic interface forming the functional neuroligin dimer; the conformations of surface loops surrounding the vestigial active center; the location of determinants that are critical for folding and processing; and the absence of a macromolecular dipole and presence of an electronegative, hydrophilic surface for neurexin binding. The structure of a β-neurexin-neuroligin complex reveals the precise orientation of the bound neurexin and, despite a limited resolution, provides substantial information on the Ca2+-dependent interactions network involved in trans-synaptic neurexin-neuroligin association. These structures exemplify how an α/β-hydrolase fold varies in surface topography to confer adhesion properties and provide templates for analyzing abnormal processing or recognition events associated with autism. PMID:18093521

  2. Folding of synthetic homogeneous glycoproteins in the presence of a glycoprotein folding sensor enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dedola, Simone; Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plays a key role in recognizing folded and misfolded glycoproteins in the glycoprotein quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum. UGGT detects misfolded glycoproteins and re-glucosylates them as a tag for misfolded glycoproteins. A flexible model to reproduce in vitro folding of a glycoprotein in the presence of UGGT in a mixture containing correctly folded, folding intermediates, and misfolded glycoproteins is described. The data demonstrates that UGGT can re-glucosylate all intermediates in the in vitro folding experiments, thus indicating that UGGT inspects not only final folded products, but also the glycoprotein folding intermediates.

  3. Chevron folding patterns and heteroclinic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, Christopher J.; Chakhchoukh, Amine N.; Dodwell, Timothy J.; Kuske, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    We present a model of multilayer folding in which layers with bending stiffness EI are separated by a very stiff elastic medium of elasticity k2 and subject to a horizontal load P. By using a dynamical system analysis of the resulting fourth order equation, we show that as the end shortening per unit length E is increased, then if k2 is large there is a smooth transition from small amplitude sinusoidal solutions at moderate values of P to larger amplitude chevron folds, with straight limbs separated by regions of high curvature when P is large. The chevron solutions take the form of near heteroclinic connections in the phase-plane. By means of this analysis, values for P and the slope of the limbs are calculated in terms of E and k2.

  4. Extended optical model analyses of elastic scattering and fusion cross section data for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 208}Pb system at near-Coulomb-barrier energies using a folding potential

    SciTech Connect

    So, W. Y.; Udagawa, T.; Kim, K. S.; Hong, S. W.; Kim, B. T.

    2007-08-15

    Simultaneous {chi}{sup 2} analyses previously made for elastic scattering and fusion cross section data for the {sup 6}Li+{sup 208}Pb system are extended to the {sup 7}Li+{sup 208}Pb system at near-Coulomb-barrier energies based on the extended optical model approach, in which the polarization potential is decomposed into direct reaction (DR) and fusion parts. Use is made of the double folding potential as a bare potential. It is found that the experimental elastic scattering and fusion data are well reproduced without introducing any normalization factor for the double folding potential and that both the DR and fusion parts of the polarization potential determined from the {chi}{sup 2} analyses satisfy separately the dispersion relation. Further, we find that the real part of the fusion portion of the polarization potential is attractive while that of the DR part is repulsive except at energies far below the Coulomb barrier energy. A comparison is made of the present results with those obtained from the coupled discretized continuum channels calculations and a previous study based on the conventional optical model with a double folding potential. We also compare the present results for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 208}Pb system with the analysis previously made for the {sup 6}Li+{sup 208}Pb system.

  5. Numerical study of human vocal folds vibration using Immersed Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy; Krane, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The voice production procedure is a self-oscillating, fluid-structure interaction problem. In this study, the vocal folds vibration during phonation will be simulated by self-oscillated layered-structure vocal folds model, using Immersed Finite Element Method. With the numerical results, we will find out the vocal folds vibration pattern, and also show how the lung pressure, stiffness and geometry of vocal folds will affect the vocal folds vibration. With further analysis, we shall get better understanding of the dynamics of voice production. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

  6. Further Development of the FFT-based Method for Atomistic Modeling of Protein Folding and Binding under Crowding: Optimization of Accuracy and Speed.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2014-07-01

    Recently, we (Qin, S.; Zhou, H. X. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2013, 9, 4633-4643) developed the FFT-based method for Modeling Atomistic Proteins-crowder interactions, henceforth FMAP. Given its potential wide use for calculating effects of crowding on protein folding and binding free energies, here we aimed to optimize the accuracy and speed of FMAP. FMAP is based on expressing protein-crowder interactions as correlation functions and evaluating the latter via fast Fourier transform (FFT). The numerical accuracy of FFT improves as the grid spacing for discretizing space is reduced, but at increasing computational cost. We sought to speed up FMAP calculations by using a relatively coarse grid spacing of 0.6 Å and then correcting for discretization errors. This strategy was tested for different types of interactions (hard-core repulsion, nonpolar attraction, and electrostatic interaction) and over a wide range of protein-crowder systems. We were able to correct for the numerical errors on hard-core repulsion and nonpolar attraction by an 8% inflation of atomic hard-core radii and on electrostatic interaction by a 5% inflation of the magnitudes of protein atomic charges. The corrected results have higher accuracy and enjoy a speedup of more than 100-fold over those obtained using a fine grid spacing of 0.15 Å. With this optimization of accuracy and speed, FMAP may become a practical tool for realistic modeling of protein folding and binding in cell-like environments.

  7. Folding rates and low-entropy-loss routes of two-state proteins.

    PubMed

    Weikl, Thomas R; Dill, Ken A

    2003-06-01

    We develop a simple model for computing the rates and routes of folding of two-state proteins from the contact maps of their native structures. The model is based on the graph-theoretical concept of effective contact order (ECO). The model predicts that proteins fold by "zipping up" in a sequence of small-loop-closure events, depending on the native chain fold. Using a simple equation, with a few physical rate parameters, we obtain a good correlation with the folding rates of 24 two-state folding proteins. The model rationalizes data from Phi-value analysis that have been interpreted in terms of delocalized or polarized transition states. This model indicates how much of protein folding may take place in parallel, not along a single reaction coordinate or with a single transition state.

  8. Assessment of dysphonia due to benign vocal fold lesions by acoustic and aerodynamic indices: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, Giovanna; Baracca, Giovanna; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Forti, Stella

    2011-04-01

    The goal was to identify acoustic and aerodynamic indices that allow the discrimination of a benign organic dysphonic voice from a normal voice. Fifty-three patients affected by dysphonia caused by vocal folds benign lesions, and a control group were subjected to maximum phonation time (MPT) measurements, GRB perceptual evaluations and acoustic/aerodynamic tests. All analyzed variables except the airflow variation coefficient were significantly different between the two groups. The unique significant factors in the discrimination between healthy and dysphonic subjects were the aerodynamic indices of MPT and Glottal efficiency index, and the acoustic index Shimmer. These results show that a combination of three parameters can discriminate a voice deviance and highlight the importance of a multidimensional assessment for objective voice evaluation.

  9. Automatic colonic fold segmentation for computed tomography colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongbin; Barish, Matthew; Li, Lihong; Song, Bowen; Harrington, Donald; Pickhardt, Perry; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-03-01

    Human colon has complex structures mostly because of the haustral folds. Haustral folds are thin flat protrusions on the colon wall, which inherently attached on the colon wall. These structures may complicate the shape analysis for computer-aided detection of colonic polyps (CADpolyp); however, they can serve as solid reference during image interpretation in computed tomographic colonography (CTC). Therefore, in this study, based on a clear model of the haustral fold boundaries, we employ level set method to automatically segment the fold surfaces. We believe the segmented folds have the potential to significantly benefit various post-procedures in CTC, e.g., supine-prone registration, synchronized image interpretation, automatic polyp matching, CADpolyp, teniae coli extraction, etc. For the first time, with assistance from physician experts, we established the ground truth of haustral fold boundaries of 15 real patient data from two medical centers, based on which we evaluated our algorithm. The results demonstrated that about 92.7% of the folds are successfully detected. Furthermore, we explored the segmented area ratio (SAR), i.e., the ratio between the areas of the intersection and the union of the expert-drawn and the automatically-segmented folds, to measure the accuracy of the segmentation algorithm. The averaged result of SAR=86.2% shows a good match between the ground truth and our segmentation results.

  10. COS Side 2 NUV MAMA Fold Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacinski, John

    2013-10-01

    The performance of the MAMA microchannel plate can be monitored using a MAMA fold analysis procedure. The fold analysis provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of changes in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the COS MAMA Fold Analysis {13128} during Cycle 20.This proposal is an exact duplication of nominal COS MAMA Fold Analysis {proposal 13128, Cycle 20}. Any changes 13128 or subsequent cycle submissions should be reflected in this proposal and vice versa.

  11. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold distribution procedure. The fold distribution provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of change in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Distribution, Proposal 12778, as Cycle 19.

  12. STIS MAMA Fold Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The performance of MAMA microchannel plates can be monitored using a MAMA fold distribution procedure. The fold distribution provides a measurement of the distribution of charge cloud sizes incident upon the anode giving some measure of change in the pulse-height distribution of the MCP and, therefore, MCP gain. This proposal executes the same steps as the STIS MAMA Fold Distribution, Proposal 13149, as Cycle 20.

  13. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed

    Rosa, J C; De Oliveira, P S; Garratt, R; Beltramini, L; Resing, K; Roque-Barreira, M C; Greene, L J

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature.

  14. Analogue modeling of 3-D structural segmentation in fold-and-thrust belts: interactions between frictional and viscous provinces in foreland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borderie, Sandra; Graveleau, Fabien; Witt, César; Vendeville, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    Accretionary wedges are generally segmented both across and along strike because of diverse factors including tectonic and stratigraphic inheritance. In fold-and-thrust belts, along-strike stratigraphic changes in the foreland sequence are classically observed and cause a curvature of the deformation front. Although the parameters controlling this curvature are well documented, the structural interactions and mutual influences between adjacent provinces are much less analyzed. To investigate this question, we deformed analogue models in a compressional box equipped with digital cameras and a topographic measurement apparatus. Models where shortened above a basal frictional detachment (glass microbeads) and segmentation was tested by having a region in which we added an interbedded viscous level (silicone polymer) within the sedimentary cover (dry sand). By changing the number (2 or 3) and the relative width of the purely frictional and viscous provinces, our goal was to characterize geometrically and kinematically the interactions between the viscous and the purely frictional provinces. We used a commercial geomodeller to generate 3-D geometrical models. The results indicate that regardless of the relative width of the purely frictional vs. viscous provinces, the deformation style in the frictional province is not influenced by the presence of the adjacent viscous province. On the contrary, the structural style and the deformation kinematics in the viscous province is significantly impacted by the presence or absence of an adjacent purely frictional province. At first order, the deformation style in the viscous province depends on its width, and three structural styles can be defined along strike. Far from the frictional area, structures are primarily of salt-massif type, and they do not seem to be influenced by the frictional wedge province. Towards the frictional province, deformation changes gradually to a zone of purely forethrusts (foreland verging), and

  15. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  16. A galaxy of folds.

    PubMed

    Alva, Vikram; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas; Lupas, Andrei N; Söding, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein classification systems capture homologous relationships by grouping domains into families and superfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity. Superfamilies with similar 3D structures are further grouped into folds. In the absence of discernable sequence similarity, these structural similarities were long thought to have originated independently, by convergent evolution. However, the growth of databases and advances in sequence comparison methods have led to the discovery of many distant evolutionary relationships that transcend the boundaries of superfamilies and folds. To investigate the contributions of convergent versus divergent evolution in the origin of protein folds, we clustered representative domains of known structure by their sequence similarity, treating them as point masses in a virtual 2D space which attract or repel each other depending on their pairwise sequence similarities. As expected, families in the same superfamily form tight clusters. But often, superfamilies of the same fold are linked with each other, suggesting that the entire fold evolved from an ancient prototype. Strikingly, some links connect superfamilies with different folds. They arise from modular peptide fragments of between 20 and 40 residues that co-occur in the connected folds in disparate structural contexts. These may be descendants of an ancestral pool of peptide modules that evolved as cofactors in the RNA world and from which the first folded proteins arose by amplification and recombination. Our galaxy of folds summarizes, in a single image, most known and many yet undescribed homologous relationships between protein superfamilies, providing new insights into the evolution of protein domains. PMID:19937658

  17. From fold-related fracture population analysis to paleofluid flow reconstruction at basin-scale : a case study in the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, N.; Bellahsen, N.; Lacombe, O.; Emmanuel, L.; Pironon, J.

    2012-04-01

    While fluid flows associated with thin-skinned folded structures have been extensively studied, reconstructions of paleofluid systems associated with thick-skinned tectonics remain scarce. In addition, major thrusts are usually considered as the preferential channels for fluids: investigating the role of diffuse fracture sets as potential drains for fluids has received poor attention. In this work, we tentatively reconstruct the paleofluid system related to the Bighorn basin (Wyoming, USA), a Sevier-Laramide foreland basin affected by large basement uplifts during the Laramide thick-skinned tectonic event. Fracture pattern and related paleofluid flow were studied in selected folds within this basin. For this purpose, Oxygen, Carbon and Strontium isotopic studies were performed on host rocks as well as on pre-folding and on fold-related calcite veins; these studies were combined to fluid inclusion chemical and microthermometric analysis. The results suggest a strong control of fluid chemistry by the tectonic style: our work evidences migration of exotic hydrothermal fluids (temperatures of homogenisation of fluid inclusion reaching 140°C) in basement-cored, thrust-related folds, while in detachment folds, only intra-formational fluids were characterized.At the scale of the entire basin, the open paleofluid system reconstructed in basement-cored folds appears to be consistent, with oxygen isotopic signature ranging from -25‰ to -5‰ PDB. Indeed, the scattering of oxygen isotopic signatures in cemented veins shows different degree of mixing between local basinal fluids and exotic hydrothermal fluids remaining unequilibrated with surrounding limestones. Strontium isotopic analyses suggest that these exotic hydrothermal fluids are a mixing of meteoric fluids and basinal fluids that havemigrated in basement rocks, likely deeper than the basement/cover interface. The timing of the fast upward flow of these fluids through the cover is given by, and related to

  18. Multiscale tectonic analysis of the basement-involved Malargüe fold-and-thrust-belt, Northern Neuquén Basin, (Argentina).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branellec, Matthieu; Callot, Jean-Paul; Nivière, Bertrand; Aubourg, Charles; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2015-04-01

    The Malargüe fold-and-thrust-belt (MFTB), which is located in the northern part of the Neuquén basin (Argentina), is known as a basement-involved orogenic wedge. The results presented here aim to make the link between the macroscopic structure and the strain record at both mesoscopic and microscopic scales (i.e damage). The cross-sections we produced show that basement contraction is strongly controlled by the extensive structural inheritance localizing deep seated thrusts. The second part of this work is dedicated to mesoscopic strain pattern analysis recorded by fracture networks. Throughout the MFTB, we are able to describe the occurrence of four main fractures sets emplaced in several stress regime that are linked (1) to the inheritance and (2) to the well-known compression phases from pre-folding to syn-folding settings. Finally the third part of this work describes the microscopic damage measured by the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility. We evidence that there is no clear gradient of magnetic fabric intensity from foreland to hinterland, and that deformation is compartmentalized by structural inheritance and particularly by the localization of basement thrusts. This atypical pattern of magnetic fabrics succession reveals that the matrix damage is governed by the same strain distribution as those observed at macroscopic scale, thus providing a supplementary argument to consider the dynamics of the Andean system, at these latitudes, as singularly different from a classical Coulomb wedge propagation.

  19. New tectonic data from sw iberian variscan fold belt (ossa morena zone-southern portugal): implications for geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, F.; Marques, F.; Ribeiro, A.

    2003-04-01

    New detailed structural mapping of the Alvito-Viana key sector, in SW Ossa Morena Zone (Southern Iberian Variscan Fold Belt), revealed the following tectonic imbrication of units of unknown age (from bottom to top): Gneiss unit (composed mostly of quartz-feldspar orthogneisses); Marbles unit; Água de Peixe metapelites unit (micaschists and disperse interbedded bodies - boudins? - of marbles and amphibolites); and Monte das Pereiras metapelites unit (mainly comprising micaschists and metabasalts).These units were intruded, to the North and to the West, by two main igneous complexes: the granitoid Évora massif (EM, ca. 318Ma), and the dioritic/gabbroic Beja igneous complex (BIC, ca. 340Ma), respectively. The study of metamorphic and geometric overprint relationships, between several types of structures, at different scales, revealed a chronological succession of tectonometamorphic events, comprising: a) An early high pressure metamorphic event (D_n) producing eclogites (Fonseca, et al., 1993), and blueschists (Rosas et al., in prep.). b) A retrogressive event (Dn+1 and Dn+2), affecting the HP rocks in lower grade metamorphic conditions and refolding the previous tectonic fabrics. c) A thermal event (T_n), related with an early stage of the BIC intrusions, represented by the strong static recrystallisation of the previous tectonic fabrics. d) An episode (Dn+3) represented by the tectonic reactivation of the prevoius metamorphic layering inducing a top to the NNW sense of shear. e) A N-S folding of all previous structures and fabrics as a response to the space problems imposed by the late intrusion of the BIC igneous rocks. f) A thermal episode (n+1) responsible for a late strong static recrystallisation of all previously formed tectonic fabrics, as a consequence of the granitic EM intrusions. Interpretation of this sequence of events includes the recognition, during the Variscan evolution of the SW Ossa-Morena zone, of northwards oblique subduction and HP

  20. Radiation Fibrosis of the Vocal Fold: From Man to Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Michael M.; Kolachala, Vasantha; Berg, Eric; Muller, Susan; Creighton, Frances X.; Branski, Ryan C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To characterize fundamental late tissue effects in the human vocal fold following radiation therapy. To develop a murine model of radiation fibrosis to ultimately develop both treatment and prevention paradigms. Design Translational study using archived human and fresh murine irradiated vocal fold tissue. Methods 1) Irradiated vocal fold tissue from patients undergoing laryngectomy for loss of function from radiation fibrosis were identified from pathology archives. Histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and whole-genome microarray as well as real-time transcriptional analyses was performed. 2) Focused radiation to the head and neck was delivered to mice in a survival fashion. One month following radiation, vocal fold tissue was analyzed with histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR transcriptional analysis for selected markers of fibrosis. Results Human irradiated vocal folds demonstrated increased collagen transcription with increased deposition and disorganization of collagen in both the thyroarytenoid muscle and the superficial lamina propria. Fibronectin were increased in the superficial lamina propria. Laminin decreased in the thyroarytenoid muscle. Whole genome microarray analysis demonstrated increased transcription of markers for fibrosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, glycosaminoglycan production and apoptosis. Irradiated murine vocal folds demonstrated increases in collagen and fibronectin transcription and deposition in the lamina propria. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β increased in the lamina propria. Conclusion Human irradiated vocal folds demonstrate molecular changes leading to fibrosis that underlie loss of vocal fold pliability that occurs in patients following laryngeal irradiation. Irradiated murine tissue demonstrates similar findings, and this mouse model may have utility in creating prevention and treatment strategies for vocal fold radiation fibrosis. PMID:23242839

  1. Stem Cell Therapy in Injured Vocal Folds: A Three-Month Xenograft Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Bengt; Nagubothu, Srinivasa R; Nord, Christoffer; Cedervall, Jessica; Hultman, Isabell; Ährlund-Richter, Lars; Tolf, Anna; Hertegård, Stellan

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cell (hESC) therapy to injured rabbit vocal folds (VFs) induces human tissue generation with regained VF vibratory capacity. The aims of this study were to test the sustainability of such effect and to what extent derivatives of the transplanted hESCs are propagated in the VFs. The VFs of 14 New Zealand rabbits were injured by a localized resection. HESCs were transplanted to 22 VFs which were analyzed for persistence of hESCs after six weeks and after three months. At three months, the VFs were also analyzed for viscoelasticity, measured as dynamic viscosity and elastic modulus, for the lamina propria (Lp) thickness and relative content of collagen type I. Three months after hESC cell therapy, the dynamic viscosity and elastic modulus of the hESC treated VFs were similar to normal controls and lower than untreated VFs (p ≤ 0.011). A normalized VF architecture, reduction in collagen type I, and Lp thickness were found compared with untreated VFs (p ≤ 0.031). At three months, no derivatives of hESCs were detected. HESCs transplanted to injured rabbit VFs restored the vibratory characteristics of the VFs, with maintained restored function for three months without remaining hESCs or derivatives. PMID:26557696

  2. Stem Cell Therapy in Injured Vocal Folds: A Three-Month Xenograft Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Bengt; Nagubothu, Srinivasa R.; Nord, Christoffer; Cedervall, Jessica; Hultman, Isabell; Ährlund-Richter, Lars; Tolf, Anna; Hertegård, Stellan

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cell (hESC) therapy to injured rabbit vocal folds (VFs) induces human tissue generation with regained VF vibratory capacity. The aims of this study were to test the sustainability of such effect and to what extent derivatives of the transplanted hESCs are propagated in the VFs. The VFs of 14 New Zealand rabbits were injured by a localized resection. HESCs were transplanted to 22 VFs which were analyzed for persistence of hESCs after six weeks and after three months. At three months, the VFs were also analyzed for viscoelasticity, measured as dynamic viscosity and elastic modulus, for the lamina propria (Lp) thickness and relative content of collagen type I. Three months after hESC cell therapy, the dynamic viscosity and elastic modulus of the hESC treated VFs were similar to normal controls and lower than untreated VFs (p ≤ 0.011). A normalized VF architecture, reduction in collagen type I, and Lp thickness were found compared with untreated VFs (p ≤ 0.031). At three months, no derivatives of hESCs were detected. HESCs transplanted to injured rabbit VFs restored the vibratory characteristics of the VFs, with maintained restored function for three months without remaining hESCs or derivatives. PMID:26557696

  3. Mathematics Through Paper Folding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Alton T.

    This booklet is a revised edition of Donovan Johnson's "Paper Folding for the Mathematics Class" (ED 077 711). It begins with directions for folding basic constructions such as as a straight line, the line perpendicular to a given line passing through a given point, and the bisector of an angle. Subsequent chapters cover concepts related to…

  4. Folding by Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Paul; Damasceno, Pablo; Glotzer, Sharon

    2014-03-01

    A form of self-assembly, ``self-folding'' presents an alternative approach to the creation of reconfigurable, responsive materials with applications ranging from robotics to drug design. However, the complexity of interactions present in biological and engineered systems that undergo folding makes it challenging to isolate the main factors controlling their assembly and dis-assembly. Here we use computer simulations of simple, minimalistic self-foldable structures and investigate their stochastic folding process. By dynamically accessing all the states that lead to, or inhibit, successful folding, we show that the mechanisms by which general stochastic systems can achieve their ``native'' structures can be identified and used to design rules for optimized folding propensity. Research supported by the National Science Foundation, Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation Award # EFRI-1240264.

  5. Acoustooptical spectrum analysis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmody, M. J.

    1981-06-01

    A summary of Bragg deflection theory and various approaches to direct detection acoustooptic spectrum analysis (AOSA) modeling is presented. A suitable model is chosen and extended to include the effects of diffraction efficiency, transducer efficiency, irradiance profiles of incident laser illumination, aperture size of the Bragg cell, and the acoustic attenuation experienced by the acoustic wavetrain generated by the input r-f signal. A FORTRAN program is developed to model the AOSA and predict the output image plane intensity profiles. A second version of the program includes a time variable permitting dynamic simulation of the system response.

  6. Systematic comparison of barriers for heavy-ion fusion calculated on the basis of the double-folding model by employing two versions of nucleon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontchar, I. I.; Chushnyakova, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    A systematic calculation of barriers for heavy-ion fusion was performed on the basis of the double-folding model by employing two versions of an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction: M3Y interaction and Migdal interaction. The results of calculations by the Hartree-Fockmethod with the SKX coefficients were taken for nuclear densities. The calculations reveal that the fusion barrier is higher in the case of employing theMigdal interaction than in the case of employing the M3Y interaction. In view of this, the use of the Migdal interaction in describing heavy-ion fusion is questionable.

  7. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  8. Distinguishing between sequential and nonsequentially folded proteins: implications for folding and misfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Maizel, J. V.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here an algorithm for distinguishing sequential from nonsequentially folding proteins. Several experiments have recently suggested that most of the proteins that are synthesized in the eukaryotic cell may fold sequentially. This proposed folding mechanism in vivo is particularly advantageous to the organism. In the absence of chaperones, the probability that a sequentially folding protein will misfold is reduced significantly. The problem we address here is devising a procedure that would differentiate between the two types of folding patterns. Footprints of sequential folding may be found in structures where consecutive fragments of the chain interact with each other. In such cases, the folding complexity may be viewed as being lower. On the other hand, higher folding complexity suggests that at least a portion of the polypeptide backbone folds back upon itself to form three-dimensional (3D) interactions with noncontiguous portion(s) of the chain. Hence, we look at the mechanism of folding of the molecule via analysis of its complexity, that is, through the 3D interactions formed by contiguous segments on the polypeptide chain. To computationally splice the structure into consecutively interacting fragments, we either cut it into compact hydrophobic folding units or into a set of hypothetical, transient, highly populated, contiguous fragments ("building blocks" of the structure). In sequential folding, successive building blocks interact with each other from the amino to the carboxy terminus of the polypeptide chain. Consequently, the results of the parsing differentiate between sequentially vs. nonsequentially folded chains. The automated assessment of the folding complexity provides insight into both the likelihood of misfolding and the kinetic folding rate of the given protein. In terms of the funnel free energy landscape theory, a protein that truly follows the mechanism of sequential folding, in principle, encounters smoother free energy barriers

  9. Computational Modeling and Analysis of Phonation in a Diseased Larynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qian; Zheng, Xudong; Mittal, Rajat; Bielamowicz, Steven

    2009-11-01

    The goal of our current research is to study the fundamental biophysics of phonation in healthy and pathological larynges. We have developed a coupled flow-structure interaction solver to help gain insight into the fundamental biophysics underlying unilateral laryngeal paralysis. The solver models the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for the glottal aerodynamics and employs the classic two-mass model for the vocal folds. The effect of tension imbalance and subglottal pressure on the vocal fold dynamics is investigated. An analysis of the vibration modes as well as the frequency spectra and sound quality has been conducted. Results from these studies will be presented.

  10. How the genome folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  11. Folding pathways of prion and doppel.

    PubMed Central

    Settanni, Giovanni; Hoang, Trinh Xuan; Micheletti, Cristian; Maritan, Amos

    2002-01-01

    The relevance of various residue positions for the stability and the folding characteristics of the prion protein in its normal cellular form are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations of models exploiting the topology of the native state. These models allow for reproducing the experimentally validated two-state behavior of the normal prion isoform. Highly significant correlations are found between the most topologically relevant sites in our analysis and the single point mutations known to be associated with the arousal of the genetic forms of prion disease. Insight into the conformational change is provided by comparing the folding process of cellular prion and doppel that share a similar native state topology: the folding pathways of the former can be grouped in two main classes according to which tertiary structure contacts are formed first enroute to the native state. For the latter a single class of pathways leads to the native state again through a two-state process. Our results are consistent and supportive of the recent experimental findings that doppel lacks the scrapie isoform and that such remarkably different behavior involves residues in the region containing the two beta-strands and the intervening helix. PMID:12496120

  12. RNA 3D Structure Modeling by Combination of Template-Based Method ModeRNA, Template-Free Folding with SimRNA, and Refinement with QRNAS.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Pawel; Kasprzak, Joanna M; Kumar, Deepak; Magnus, Marcin; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-01-01

    RNA encompasses an essential part of all known forms of life. The functions of many RNA molecules are dependent on their ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is laborious and challenging, and therefore, the majority of known RNAs remain structurally uncharacterized. To address this problem, computational structure prediction methods were developed that either utilize information derived from known structures of other RNA molecules (by way of template-based modeling) or attempt to simulate the physical process of RNA structure formation (by way of template-free modeling). All computational methods suffer from various limitations that make theoretical models less reliable than high-resolution experimentally determined structures. This chapter provides a protocol for computational modeling of RNA 3D structure that overcomes major limitations by combining two complementary approaches: template-based modeling that is capable of predicting global architectures based on similarity to other molecules but often fails to predict local unique features, and template-free modeling that can predict the local folding, but is limited to modeling the structure of relatively small molecules. Here, we combine the use of a template-based method ModeRNA with a template-free method SimRNA. ModeRNA requires a sequence alignment of the target RNA sequence to be modeled with a template of the known structure; it generates a model that predicts the structure of a conserved core and provides a starting point for modeling of variable regions. SimRNA can be used to fold small RNAs (<80 nt) without any additional structural information, and to refold parts of models for larger RNAs that have a correctly modeled core. ModeRNA can be either downloaded, compiled and run locally or run through a web interface at http://genesilico.pl/modernaserver/ . SimRNA is currently available to download for local use as a precompiled

  13. RNA 3D Structure Modeling by Combination of Template-Based Method ModeRNA, Template-Free Folding with SimRNA, and Refinement with QRNAS.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Pawel; Kasprzak, Joanna M; Kumar, Deepak; Magnus, Marcin; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-01-01

    RNA encompasses an essential part of all known forms of life. The functions of many RNA molecules are dependent on their ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is laborious and challenging, and therefore, the majority of known RNAs remain structurally uncharacterized. To address this problem, computational structure prediction methods were developed that either utilize information derived from known structures of other RNA molecules (by way of template-based modeling) or attempt to simulate the physical process of RNA structure formation (by way of template-free modeling). All computational methods suffer from various limitations that make theoretical models less reliable than high-resolution experimentally determined structures. This chapter provides a protocol for computational modeling of RNA 3D structure that overcomes major limitations by combining two complementary approaches: template-based modeling that is capable of predicting global architectures based on similarity to other molecules but often fails to predict local unique features, and template-free modeling that can predict the local folding, but is limited to modeling the structure of relatively small molecules. Here, we combine the use of a template-based method ModeRNA with a template-free method SimRNA. ModeRNA requires a sequence alignment of the target RNA sequence to be modeled with a template of the known structure; it generates a model that predicts the structure of a conserved core and provides a starting point for modeling of variable regions. SimRNA can be used to fold small RNAs (<80 nt) without any additional structural information, and to refold parts of models for larger RNAs that have a correctly modeled core. ModeRNA can be either downloaded, compiled and run locally or run through a web interface at http://genesilico.pl/modernaserver/ . SimRNA is currently available to download for local use as a precompiled

  14. AIR Model Preflight Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) ER-2 preflight analysis, one of the first attempts to obtain a relatively complete measurement set of the high-altitude radiation level environment, is described in this paper. The primary thrust is to characterize the atmospheric radiation and to define dose levels at high-altitude flight. A secondary thrust is to develop and validate dosimetric techniques and monitoring devices for protecting aircrews. With a few chosen routes, we can measure the experimental results and validate the AIR model predictions. Eventually, as more measurements are made, we gain more understanding about the hazardous radiation environment and acquire more confidence in the prediction models.

  15. Geomorphology and fold growth, southern Tunisia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamadi, R.; Mercier, E.; Ouali, J.; van Vliet-Lanoë, B.; Mansy, J. L.; Launeau, P.; Rekis, F.

    2003-04-01

    At the northern edge of the Gafsa basin, a fold belt, the Metlaoui chain mostly rised from the Upper Miocene till today [1]. This region, endoreic since the Oligocene, is for lithologic and climate reasons a good laboratory to test various theories concerning fold growth. The origin of the fold belt is link to a main detachment level at the base of the Jurassic series (seismic profiles). The folding is facilitate with few strong calcareous beds by the dominance of soft lithologic series. This enhances the sliding along secondary detachment levels. Geomorphological, hydrological and chronological arguments prove that the folds mostly deformed as a "fault propagation fold" [2]. Furthermore, detailed field observations validate several features first observed by modelling of "fault propagation fold": 1) the stability of the roof of the fold, 2) the propagation of a knock-fold in front of the fold, disturbing the shape of pediments [3] and 3) the backward migration and extent of the backslope of the fold, in association with a backward migration of the depot centre of the syntectonic sedimentation. [1] Outtani, F., B. Addoum, E. Mercier, D. Frizon de Lamotte, J. Andrieux, Tectonophysics, 249, 233-248, 1995. [2] Suppe, J., and D.A. Medwedeff, , Eclogae geol. Helv., 83(3), 409-454, 1990. [3] Rafini S. and E. Mercier (2002). Sedimentary Geology, 146, 75-89

  16. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Cellular Epigenetic States: Stochasticity in Molecular Networks, Chromatin Folding in Cell Nuclei, and Tissue Pattern Formation of Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gursoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions.

  18. Folded supersymmetry with a twist

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; Pinner, David

    2016-03-30

    Folded supersymmetry (f-SUSY) stabilizes the weak scale against radiative corrections from the top sector via scalar partners whose gauge quantum numbers differ from their Standard Model counterparts. This non-trivial pairing of states can be realized in extra-dimensional theories with appropriate supersymmetry-breaking boundary conditions. We present a class of calculable f-SUSY models that are parametrized by a non-trivial twist in 5D boundary conditions and can accommodate the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Although the distinctive phenomenology associated with the novel folded states should provide strong evidence for this mechanism, the most stringent constraints are currently placed by conventional supersymmetry searches. Asmore » a result, these models remain minimally fine-tuned in light of LHC8 data and provide a range of both standard and exotic signatures accessible at LHC13.« less

  19. An evaluation of calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiesse) for cosmetic nasolabial fold correction: a meta-analysis and patient centric outcomes study.

    PubMed

    Fakhre, G Peter; Perdikis, Galen; Shaddix, Kyle K; Terkonda, Sarvam P; Waldorf, James C

    2009-11-01

    The use of calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiesse, BioForm Medical, San Mateo, California) for cosmetic soft tissue augmentation has increased significantly in recent years. Only a handful of authors have reported patient satisfaction data. A meta-analysis of published data was performed using a 5-point scale for patient satisfaction to allow data comparison across studies. A patient-centric outcomes study was also performed at our institution, using a blinded questionnaire. Five usable studies were identified for meta-analysis. Patient satisfaction was 4.16 of 5 in 324 patients at 3 to 6 months and 4.15 in 86 patients at 1 year. In our institutional patient-centric outcomes study, the early satisfaction rate was 3.7 of 5. At 1 year the rate was only 2.3 of 5. Calcium hydroxylapatite remains a viable option for augmentation of facial soft tissue structures. However, this report shows that further, accurate, large population outcomes assessments are absolutely required.

  20. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    PubMed

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins. PMID:26492945

  1. Noninvasive evaluation of the vascular response to transplantation of alginate encapsulated islets using the dorsal skin-fold model.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rahul; Arora, Rajan P; Alexander, Michael; White, Sean M; Lamb, Morgan W; Foster, Clarence E; Choi, Bernard; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2014-01-01

    Alginate encapsulation reduces the risk of transplant rejection by evading immune-mediated cell injury and rejection; however, poor vascular perfusion results in graft failure. Since existing imaging models are incapable of quantifying the vascular response to biomaterial implants after transplantation, in this study, we demonstrate the use of in vivo laser speckle imaging (LSI) and wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) to monitor the microvascular environment surrounding biomaterial implants. The vascular response to two islet-containing biomaterial encapsulation devices, alginate microcapsules and a high-guluronate alginate sheet, was studied and compared after implantation into the mouse dorsal window chamber (N = 4 per implant group). Images obtained over a 14-day period using LSI and WiFI were analyzed using algorithms to quantify blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density. Using our method, we were able to monitor the changes in the peri-implant microvasculature noninvasively without the use of fluorescent dyes. Significant changes in blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density were noted as early as the first week post-transplant. The dorsal window chamber model enables comparison of host responses to transplanted biomaterials. Future experiments will study the effect of changes in alginate composition on the vascular and immune responses. PMID:24176195

  2. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    PubMed

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins.

  3. Noninvasive evaluation of the vascular response to transplantation of alginate encapsulated islets using the dorsal skin-fold model

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Rahul; Arora, Rajan P.; Alexander, Michael; White, Sean M.; Lamb, Morgan W.; Foster, Clarence E.; Choi, Bernard; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Alginate encapsulation reduces the risk of transplant rejection by evading immune-mediated cell injury and rejection; however, poor vascular perfusion results in graft failure. Since existing imaging models are incapable of quantifying the vascular response to biomaterial implants after transplantation, in this study, we demonstrate the use of in vivo laser speckle imaging (LSI) and wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) to monitor the microvascular environment surrounding biomaterial implants. The vascular response to two islet-containing biomaterial encapsulation devices, alginate microcapsules and a high-guluronate alginate sheet, was studied and compared after implantation into the mouse dorsal window chamber (N = 4 per implant group). Images obtained over a 14-day period using LSI and WiFI were analyzed using algorithms to quantify blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density. Using our method, we were able to monitor the changes in the peri-implant microvasculature non-invasively without the use of fluorescent dyes. Significant changes in blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density were noted as early as the first week post-transplant. The dorsal window chamber model enables comparison of host responses to transplanted biomaterials. Future experiments will study the effect of changes in alginate composition on the vascular and immune responses. PMID:24176195

  4. Noninvasive evaluation of the vascular response to transplantation of alginate encapsulated islets using the dorsal skin-fold model.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rahul; Arora, Rajan P; Alexander, Michael; White, Sean M; Lamb, Morgan W; Foster, Clarence E; Choi, Bernard; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2014-01-01

    Alginate encapsulation reduces the risk of transplant rejection by evading immune-mediated cell injury and rejection; however, poor vascular perfusion results in graft failure. Since existing imaging models are incapable of quantifying the vascular response to biomaterial implants after transplantation, in this study, we demonstrate the use of in vivo laser speckle imaging (LSI) and wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) to monitor the microvascular environment surrounding biomaterial implants. The vascular response to two islet-containing biomaterial encapsulation devices, alginate microcapsules and a high-guluronate alginate sheet, was studied and compared after implantation into the mouse dorsal window chamber (N = 4 per implant group). Images obtained over a 14-day period using LSI and WiFI were analyzed using algorithms to quantify blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density. Using our method, we were able to monitor the changes in the peri-implant microvasculature noninvasively without the use of fluorescent dyes. Significant changes in blood flow, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and vascular density were noted as early as the first week post-transplant. The dorsal window chamber model enables comparison of host responses to transplanted biomaterials. Future experiments will study the effect of changes in alginate composition on the vascular and immune responses.

  5. Folding without charges

    PubMed Central

    Kurnik, Martin; Hedberg, Linda; Danielsson, Jens; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Surface charges of proteins have in several cases been found to function as “structural gatekeepers,” which avoid unwanted interactions by negative design, for example, in the control of protein aggregation and binding. The question is then if side-chain charges, due to their desolvation penalties, play a corresponding role in protein folding by avoiding competing, misfolded traps? To find out, we removed all 32 side-chain charges from the 101-residue protein S6 from Thermus thermophilus. The results show that the charge-depleted S6 variant not only retains its native structure and cooperative folding transition, but folds also faster than the wild-type protein. In addition, charge removal unleashes pronounced aggregation on longer timescales. S6 provides thus an example where the bias toward native contacts of a naturally evolved protein sequence is independent of charges, and point at a fundamental difference in the codes for folding and intermolecular interaction: specificity in folding is governed primarily by hydrophobic packing and hydrogen bonding, whereas solubility and binding relies critically on the interplay of side-chain charges. PMID:22454493

  6. New insight in the structural features of haloadaptation in α-amylases from halophilic Archaea following homology modeling strategy: folded and stable conformation maintained through low hydrophobicity and highly negative charged surface.

    PubMed

    Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Patron, Kevin; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-07-01

    Proteins from halophilic archaea, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded, active and stable at very high ionic strengths. Understanding the mechanism of haloadaptation is the first step toward engineering of halostable biomolecules. Amylases are one of the main enzymes used in industry. Yet, no three-dimensional structure has been experimentally resolved for α-amylases from halophilic archaea. In this study, homology structure modeling of α-amylases from the halophilic archaea Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula hispanica, and Halalkalicoccus jeotgali were performed. The resulting models were subjected to energy minimization, evaluation, and structural analysis. Calculations of the amino acid composition, salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were also performed and compared to a set of non-halophilic counterparts. It clearly appeared that haloarchaeal α-amylases exhibited lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil-forming regions. Furthermore, they could maintain a folded and stable conformation in high salt concentration through highly negative charged surface with over representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, and low hydrophobicity with increase of salt bridges and decrease in hydrophobic interactions on the protein surface. This study sheds some light on the stability of α-amylases from halophilic archaea and provides strong basis not only to understand haloadaptation mechanisms of proteins in microorganisms from hypersalines environments but also for biotechnological applications.

  7. Nonlinear dynamic mechanism of vocal tremor from voice analysis and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-09-01

    Nonlinear dynamic analysis and model simulations are used to study the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of vocal folds with vocal tremor, which can typically be characterized by low-frequency modulation and aperiodicity. Tremor voices from patients with disorders such as paresis, Parkinson's disease, hyperfunction, and adductor spasmodic dysphonia show low-dimensional characteristics, differing from random noise. Correlation dimension analysis statistically distinguishes tremor voices from normal voices. Furthermore, a nonlinear tremor model is proposed to study the vibrations of the vocal folds with vocal tremor. Fractal dimensions and positive Lyapunov exponents demonstrate the evidence of chaos in the tremor model, where amplitude and frequency play important roles in governing vocal fold dynamics. Nonlinear dynamic voice analysis and vocal fold modeling may provide a useful set of tools for understanding the dynamic mechanism of vocal tremor in patients with laryngeal diseases.

  8. Nonlinear dynamic mechanism of vocal tremor from voice analysis and model simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic analysis and model simulations are used to study the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of vocal folds with vocal tremor, which can typically be characterized by low frequency modulation and aperiodicity. Tremor voices from patients with disorders such as paresis, Parkinson's disease, hyperfunction, and adductor spasmodic dysphonia show low-dimensional characteristics, differing from random noise. Correlation dimension analysis statistically distinguishes tremor voices from normal voices. Furthermore, a nonlinear tremor model is proposed to study the vibrations of the vocal folds with vocal tremor. Fractal dimensions and positive Lyapunov exponents demonstrate the evidence of chaos in the tremor model, where amplitude and frequency play important roles in governing vocal fold dynamics. Nonlinear dynamic voice analysis and vocal fold modeling may provide a useful set of tools for understanding the dynamic mechanism of vocal tremor in patients with laryngeal diseases. PMID:22505778

  9. Sandbox modelling of sequential thrusting in a mechanically two-layered system and its implications in fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Puspendu; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-10-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts display multi-storied thrust sequences, characterizing a composite architecture of the thrust wedges. Despite dramatic progress in sandbox modelling over the last three decades, our understanding of such composite thrust-wedge mechanics is limited and demands a re-visit to the problem of sequential thrusting in mechanically layered systems. This study offers a new approach to sandbox modelling, designed with a two-layered sandpack simulating a mechanically weak Coulomb layer, resting coherently upon a stronger Coulomb layer. Our experimental models reproduce strikingly similar styles of the multi-storied frontal thrust sequences observed in natural fold-and- thrust belts. The upper weak horizon undergoes sequential thrusting at a high spatial frequency, forming numerous, closely spaced frontal thrusts, whereas the lower strong horizon produces widely spaced thrusts with progressive horizontal shortening. This contrasting thrust progression behaviour gives rise to composite thrust architecture in the layered sandpack. We show the evolution of such composite thrust sequences as a function of frictional strength (μb) at the basal detachment and thickness ratio (Tr) between the weak and strong layers. For any given values of Tr and μb, the two thrust sequences progress at different rates; the closely-spaced, upper thrust sequence advances forelandward at a faster rate than the widely-spaced, lower thrust sequence. Basal friction (μb) has little effects on the vergence of thrusts in the upper weak layer; they verge always towards foreland, irrespective of Tr values. But, the lower strong layer develops back-vergent thrusts when μb is low (∼0.36). In our experiments, closely spaced thrusts in the upper sequence experience intense reactivation due to their interaction with widely spaced thrusts in the lower sequence. The interaction eventually affects the wedge topography, leading to two distinct parts: inner and outer wedges

  10. SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-05

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and

  11. Solvent–amino acid interaction energies in three-dimensional-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of a model 27-mer protein: Folding thermodynamics and kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Kai; Prausnitz, John M.; Radke, Clayton J.

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid residue–solvent interactions are required for lattice Monte Carlo simulations of model proteins in water. In this study, we propose an interaction-energy scale that is based on the interaction scale by Miyazawa and Jernigan. It permits systematic variation of the amino acid–solvent interactions by introducing a contrast parameter for the hydrophobicity, Cs, and a mean attraction parameter for the amino acids, ω. Changes in the interaction energies strongly affect many protein properties. We present an optimized energy parameter set for best representing realistic behavior typical for many proteins (fast folding and high cooperativity for single chains). Our optimal parameters feature a much weaker hydrophobicity contrast and mean attraction than does the original interaction scale. The proposed interaction scale is designed for calculating the behavior of proteins in bulk and at interfaces as a function of solvent characteristics, as well as protein size and sequence. PMID:14739322

  12. The effect of foreland palaeo-uplift on deformation mechanism in the Wupoer fold-and-thrust belt, NE Pamir: Constraints from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyang; Cheng, Xiaogan; Chen, Hanlin; Ding, Weiwei; Lin, Xiubin; Wu, Lei; Li, Kang; Shi, Jun; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Palaeo-uplifts often exist in fold-and-thrust belts. However, their effects on the deformational process have not yet been well understood. To evaluate such effects, six analogue models were systematically run based on geological features of the Wupoer fold-and-thrust belt (FTB), NE Pamir, where the Wulagen palaeo-uplift with overlying gypsum bed has been clearly identified. Our analogue results demonstrated that the palaeo-uplift (its location and inhomogenous distribution), accompanied with overlying gypsum bed that serves as ductile décollement, plays a critical role in localizing the front thrust fault and shaping it into arc form. The results indicate that the front thrust fault slides along the ductile décollement (gypsum bed), and breaks through onto the surface at the region where the palaeo-uplift develops, forming a piggy-back basin in the hanging wall. It suggests that the palaeo-uplift with consequent topographic variation of the overlying ductile décollement localizes the breakthrough point of the front thrust fault. In addition, the results indicate that the front thrust fault (Pamir Front Thrust, PFT) initially broke through in the location where it develops the Wulagen palaeo-uplift and propagated aside. This resulted in the distance between the PFT and the basement-involved fault (Main Pamir Thrust, MPT) to decrease from the region with palaeo-uplift to the areas aside without palaeo-uplift, thereby forming the arc-shaped PFT in map view. The results of this study also provide a revised geological model, which emphasizes the effect of décollement layer on absorbing the slip along the PFT. Our results provide a new mechanical interpretation of the deformation of Wupoer FTB, NE Pamir.

  13. Objective Quantification of Pre-and Postphonosurgery Vocal Fold Vibratory Characteristics Using High-Speed Videoendoscopy and a Harmonic Waveform Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikuma, Takeshi; Kunduk, Melda; McWhorter, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The model-based quantitative analysis of high-speed videoendoscopy (HSV) data at a low frame rate of 2,000 frames per second was assessed for its clinical adequacy. Stepwise regression was employed to evaluate the HSV parameters using harmonic models and their relationships to the Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Also, the model-based HSV…

  14. Folds and Etudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "Folds" and "Etudes" which are images derived from anonymous typing exercises that he found in a used copy of "Touch Typing Made Simple". "Etudes" refers to the musical tradition of studies for a solo instrument, which is a typewriter. Typing exercises are repetitive attempts to type words and phrases…

  15. Modeling of aerodynamic interaction between vocal folds and vocal tract during production of a vowel-voiceless plosive-vowel sequence.

    PubMed

    Delebecque, Louis; Pelorson, Xavier; Beautemps, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The context of this study is the physical modeling of speech production. The objective is, by using a mechanical replica of the vocal tract, to test quantitatively an aerodynamic model of the interaction between the vocal folds and the vocal tract during the production of a vowel-voiceless plosive-vowel sequence. The first step is to realize acoustic and aerodynamic measurements on a speaker during the production of an /apa/ sequence. The aperture and width of the lips are also derived from a high-speed video recording of the subject's face. Theoretical models to describe the flow through the lips and the effect of an expansion of the supraglottal cavity are proposed and validated by comparison with measurements made using a self-oscillating replica of the phonatory system. Finally, using these models, numerical simulations of an /apa/ sequence are performed using the measured lip parameters as the only time-varying input parameters. The results of these simulations suggest that the realization of an occlusion of the vocal tract produces a passive increase in glottal area associated with a voice offset and that the expansion of the supraglottal cavity is responsible for the extension of the phonation up to 40 ms after closure of the lips.

  16. Local vs global motions in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Maisuradze, Gia G.; Liwo, Adam; Senet, Patrick; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2013-01-01

    It is of interest to know whether local fluctuations in a polypeptide chain play any role in the mechanism by which the chain folds to the native structure of a protein. This question is addressed by analyzing folding and non-folding trajectories of a protein; as an example, the analysis is applied to the 37-residue triple β-strand WW domain from the Formin binding protein 28 (FBP28) (PDB ID: 1E0L). Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories were generated with the coarse-grained united-residue force field, and one- and two-dimensional free-energy landscapes (FELs) along the backbone virtual-bond angle θ and backbone virtual-bond-dihedral angle γ of each residue, and principal components, respectively, were analyzed. The key residues involved in the folding of the FBP28 WW domain are elucidated by this analysis. The correlations between local and global motions are found. It is shown that most of the residues in the folding trajectories of the system studied here move in a concerted fashion, following the dynamics of the whole system. This demonstrates how the choice of a pathway has to involve concerted movements in order for this protein to fold. This finding also sheds light on the effectiveness of principal component analysis (PCA) for the description of the folding dynamics of the system studied. It is demonstrated that the FEL along the PCs, computed by considering only several critically-placed residues, can correctly describe the folding dynamics. PMID:23914144

  17. Coseismic fault-related fold model, growth structure, and the historic multisegment blind thrust earthquake on the basement-involved Yoro thrust, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Mueller, Karl; Sato, Hiroshi; Togo, Masami

    2007-03-01

    We use high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, boring transects, and mapping of fold scarps that deform late Quaternary and Holocene sediments to define the kinematic evolution, subsurface geometry, coseismic behavior, and fault slip rates for an active, basement-involved blind thrust system in central Japan. Coseismic fold scarps on the Yoro basement-involved fold are defined by narrow fold limbs and angular hinges on seismic profiles, suggesting that at least 3.9 km of fault slip is consumed by wedge thrust folding in the upper 10 km of the crust. The close coincidence and kinematic link between folded horizons and the underlying thrust geometry indicate that the Yoro basement-involved fold has accommodated slip at an average rate of 3.2 ± 0.1 mm/yr on a shallowly west dipping thrust fault since early Pleistocene time. Past large-magnitude earthquakes, including an historic M˜7.7 event in A.D. 1586 that occurred on the Yoro blind thrust, are shown to have produced discrete folding by curved hinge kink band migration above the eastward propagating tip of the wedge thrust. Coseismic fold scarps formed during the A.D. 1586 earthquake can be traced along the en echelon active folds that extend for at least 60 km, in spite of different styles of folding along the apparently hard-linked Nobi-Ise blind thrust system. We thus emphasize the importance of this multisegment earthquake rupture across these structures and the potential risk for similar future events in en echelon active fold and thrust belts.

  18. Model Analysis ToolKit

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Dylan R.

    2015-05-15

    MATK provides basic functionality to facilitate model analysis within the Python computational environment. Model analysis setup within MATK includes: - define parameters - define observations - define model (python function) - define samplesets (sets of parameter combinations) Currently supported functionality includes: - forward model runs - Latin-Hypercube sampling of parameters - multi-dimensional parameter studies - parallel execution of parameter samples - model calibration using internal Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - model calibration using lmfit package - model calibration using levmar package - Markov Chain Monte Carlo using pymc package MATK facilitates model analysis using: - scipy - calibration (scipy.optimize) - rpy2 - Python interface to R

  19. Mechanical stability model of progradational carbonate platform margins under tectonic loads: Deformation of Cretaceous carbonate platforms in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Juan; Suter, Max

    2015-02-01

    Shortening in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico) is localized along the margins of Cretaceous carbonate platforms and controlled by mechanical stratigraphy. The platform margins are deformed by imbricate series of thrust ramps, whereas the coeval basins and platform interiors are deformed by map-scale detachment folds. Here we present a finite element model to evaluate the influence of the boundary geometry and boundary conditions on the style of deformation observed at these basinward progradational platform margins. We calculate the stress distribution in a linearly elastic platform-basin transition zone under the action of horizontal tectonic stress, taking into account changes of rock mechanical properties across the platform margin, as well as their dependence on direction, and infer the resulting fracture patterns based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. Stress concentrations are predicted at the contacts between the massive rocks of the platform margin and the well-layered rocks of both, the platform interior and the adjacent basin. Brittle failure of the platform border can be mostly attributed to three effects: mechanical coupling between the carbonate platform and a substratum of moderate to low viscosity, variations in layering and texture that governed the mechanical properties of the involved carbonates as well as their dependence on direction, and the development of sharp domain boundary corners associated with progradational facies changes. In contrast, the dip of the basement and a possible taper of the overlying Upper Cretaceous shale toward the basin appear to have little influence on the mechanical failure of the platform margin.

  20. Peptide Folding: Many Routes to the Native State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roitberg, Adrian; Simmerling, Carlos

    2002-03-01

    Protein folding is only one example of an extremely complex kinetic process that is poorly understood due to experimental limitations. Several groups have published simulations of early folding stages in atomic detail, but kinetic processes are probabilistic in nature and single simulations may have little value. Clusters of computers can rapidly provide multiple data sets that can be combined to obtain greater insight. We have carried out the computational analog of temperature-jump protein folding. An ensemble of structures that represent the unfolded state is generated at 800K by molecular dynamics. Each structure was distributed to an individual node in the cluster, quenched to 298K and monitored during MD simulation. We have accumulated 2.3 microseconds of folding time in this way. While it is possible to perform this procedure using a single computer, perfect scaling is obtained with the cluster and the problem is solved far more quickly. We carried out a preliminary study on a nonapeptide fragment of influenza virus hemagluttinin using a Generalized Born aqueous solvation model. Under these conditions, the peptide has a high tendency to form a well-defined structure stabilized predominantly by backbone hydrogen bonds with a structure similar to that observed experimentally in the intact protein. Folding times of the ensemble of 188 unfolded structures varied from 2ps to over 100ns and at least three exponential curves are required to fit this data. Analysis of trajectories revealed four distinct folding pathways with kinetic properties that fit these individual curves, with two different pathways contributing to the slowest folding events. Folding time varies by an order of magnitude even on the same pathway. We obtained the important and potentially general result that folding kinetics depends strongly on the details of preparation of this ensemble. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such detailed analysis of protein folding landscapes has

  1. Sheath fold development around slip surfaces subject to general shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Senderak, Barbara; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    Sheath folds are cone-shaped structures, which typically develop in high-strain shear zones in a variety of geological settings. When observed in the cross-sections perpendicular to the shear direction, sheath folds display characteristic elliptical closed contours. The aspect ratio of the outermost closed contour is commonly used for the classification and quantitative analysis. Alsop and Holdsworth (2006) showed that the outermost aspect ratio observed in the natural sheath folds varies between 1 and 7. Previous work on sheath folds development around slip surfaces focused on simple shear deformation (Reber et al., 2013). The aspect ratio developing under such conditions exhibits values larger than the ones observed in nature. Therefore, we investigate sheath fold development around slip surfaces under general shear conditions, in which a shortening component acts in the direction parallel to the shearing plane and perpendicular to the simple shear direction. In our models, the out-of-plane shortening is accommodated by 1) extension in the shear direction only or by 2) uniform extension perpendicular to the shortening direction (dilation). On one hand, the pure shear deformation leads to a decrease of the aspect ratio of the outermost closed contour of the developed sheath folds. On the other hand, it also modifies the slip surface size and orientation, which promotes development of sheath folds with larger aspect ratios. The numerical simulations show that the latter effect is minor and, for the two tested scenarios, we generate sheath folds with the aspect ratios of the outermost ellipse that favourably compare to the range observed in nature.

  2. Operations and Modeling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The Reliability and Maintainability Analysis Tool (RMAT) provides NASA the capability to estimate reliability and maintainability (R&M) parameters and operational support requirements for proposed space vehicles based upon relationships established from both aircraft and Shuttle R&M data. RMAT has matured both in its underlying database and in its level of sophistication in extrapolating this historical data to satisfy proposed mission requirements, maintenance concepts and policies, and type of vehicle (i.e. ranging from aircraft like to shuttle like). However, a companion analyses tool, the Logistics Cost Model (LCM) has not reached the same level of maturity as RMAT due, in large part, to nonexistent or outdated cost estimating relationships and underlying cost databases, and it's almost exclusive dependence on Shuttle operations and logistics cost input parameters. As a result, the full capability of the RMAT/LCM suite of analysis tools to take a conceptual vehicle and derive its operations and support requirements along with the resulting operating and support costs has not been realized.

  3. Oxidative folding: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor

    2011-10-01

    Disulfide bond formation in proteins is an effective tool of both structure stabilization and redox regulation. The prokaryotic periplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotes were long considered as the only compartments for enzyme mediated formation of stable disulfide bonds. Recently, the mitochondrial intermembrane space has emerged as the third protein-oxidizing compartment. The classic view on the mechanism of oxidative folding in the endoplasmic reticulum has also been reshaped by new observations. Moreover, besides the structure stabilizing function, reversible disulfide bridge formation in some proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum, seems to play a regulatory role. This review briefly summarizes the present knowledge of the redox systems supporting oxidative folding, emphasizing recent developments. PMID:25962043

  4. Multiscale Modeling Methods for Analysis of Failure Modes in Foldcore Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, R.; Schatrow, P.; Klett, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents an homogenised core model suitable for use in the analysis of fuselage sandwich panels with folded composite cores under combined loading conditions. Within a multiscale numerical design process a failure criterion was derived for describing the macroscopic behaviour of folded cores under combined loading using a detailed foldcore micromodel. The multiscale modelling method was validated by simulation of combined compression/bending failure of foldcore sandwich panels.

  5. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  6. Model Analysis ToolKit

    2015-05-15

    MATK provides basic functionality to facilitate model analysis within the Python computational environment. Model analysis setup within MATK includes: - define parameters - define observations - define model (python function) - define samplesets (sets of parameter combinations) Currently supported functionality includes: - forward model runs - Latin-Hypercube sampling of parameters - multi-dimensional parameter studies - parallel execution of parameter samples - model calibration using internal Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm - model calibration using lmfit package - modelmore » calibration using levmar package - Markov Chain Monte Carlo using pymc package MATK facilitates model analysis using: - scipy - calibration (scipy.optimize) - rpy2 - Python interface to R« less

  7. Two parametric voice source models and their asymptotic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. S.; Sorokin, V. N.

    2014-05-01

    The paper studies the asymptotic behavior of the function for the area of the glottis near moments of its opening and closing for two mathematical voice source models. It is shown that in the first model, the asymptotics of the area function obeys a power law with an exponent of no less that 1. Detailed analysis makes it possible to refine these limits depending on the relative sizes of the intervals of a closed and open glottis. This work also studies another parametric model of the area of the glottis, which is based on a simplified physical-geometrical representation of vocal-fold vibration processes. This is a special variant of the well-known two-mass model and contains five parameters: the period of the main tone, equivalent masses on the lower and upper edge of vocal folds, the coefficient of elastic resistance of the lower vocal fold, and the delay time between openings of the upper and lower folds. It is established that the asymptotics of the obtained function for the area of the glottis obey a power law with an exponent of 1 both for opening and closing.

  8. Understanding the Folding-Function Tradeoff in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gosavi, Shachi

    2013-01-01

    When an amino-acid sequence cannot be optimized for both folding and function, folding can get compromised in favor of function. To understand this tradeoff better, we devise a novel method for extracting the “function-less” folding-motif of a protein fold from a set of structurally similar but functionally diverse proteins. We then obtain the β-trefoil folding-motif, and study its folding using structure-based models and molecular dynamics simulations. CompariA protein sequence serves two purpson with the folding of wild-type β-trefoil proteins shows that function affects folding in two ways: In the slower folding interleukin-1β, binding sites make the fold more complex, increase contact order and slow folding. In the faster folding hisactophilin, residues which could have been part of the folding-motif are used for function. This reduces the density of native contacts in functional regions and increases folding rate. The folding-motif helps identify subtle structural deviations which perturb folding. These may then be used for functional annotation. Further, the folding-motif could potentially be used as a first step in the sequence design of function-less scaffold proteins. Desired function can then be engineered into these scaffolds. PMID:23593437

  9. Insight into tectonically coupled sediment routing systems of the south Pyrenean fold-thrust belt via integration of field analysis with thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitchurch, A.; Allen, P.; Carter, A.; Duller, R.; Whittaker, A.

    2009-04-01

    The dynamic coupling between tectonics and surface processes is particularly evident in compressional mountain belts. Numerical models clearly demonstrate the fundamental control exerted by surface processes on orogen evolution, with recent studies emphasising the importance of sedimentation and mass redistribution in determining the style and timescale of landscape response to tectonic convergence. Efficient surface processes are shown to promote filling of well-developed foredeeps, fold-thrust belt exhumation and draping and slowing of frontal thrust propagation. However, these predicted relationships have proved harder to demonstrate in field and analytical studies. Here we attempt to better understand tectonic and surface process coupling and the importance of sediment mass transfer on orogenic development, using field and thermochronological analyses to reconstruct the complex evolution of the south-central Pyrenees. Trending east-west, the Pyrenees formed due to collision between the Iberian and European plates during the Late Cretaceous through Oligocene to early Miocene. Previous work demonstrates that the cessation of thrust front propagation is synchronous with the deposition of a thick piedmont of conglomerate over the foreland fold-thrust belt during the Oligocene. By integrating field observation with thermochronological analyses of detrital zircon fission track and U-Pb age dating of syn-orogenic strata, we can therefore reconstruct the long-term exhumational history of the Pyrenees in relation to the tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of its wedge-top and foreland basins. Results from our field and laboratory analyses support initiation of the Pyrenean orogeny during the Late Cretaceous, with the division of detrital zircon fission track ages into four basic tectonic events that have been previously described for the Pyrenean region: the main orogenic phase (- 50-30 Ma); the early orogenic phase (- 90-50 Ma); the opening of the Bay of Biscay (- 110

  10. Small scale folding observed in the NEEM ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Daniela; Llorens, Maria-Gema; Westhoff, Julien; Steinbach, Florian; Bons, Paul D.; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Griera, Albert; Weikusat, Ilka

    2015-04-01

    Disturbances on the centimeter scale in the layering of the NEEM ice core (North Greenland) can be mapped by means of visual stratigraphy as long as the ice does have a visual layering, such as, for example, cloudy bands. Different focal depths of the visual stratigraphy method allow, to a certain extent, a three dimensional view of the structures. In this study we present a structural analysis of the visible folds, discuss characteristics and frequency and present examples of typical fold structures. With this study we aim to quantify the potential impact of small scale folding on the integrity of climate proxy data. We also analyze the structures with regard to the stress environment under which they formed. The structures evolve from gentle waves at about 1700 m to overturned z-folds with increasing depth. Occasionally, the folding causes significant thickening of layers. Their shape indicates that they are passive features and are probably not initiated by rheology differences between layers. Layering is heavily disturbed and tracing of single layers is no longer possible below a depth of 2160 m. Lattice orientation distributions for the corresponding core sections were analyzed where available in addition to visual stratigraphy. The data show axial-plane parallel strings of grains with c.axis orientations that deviate from that of the matrix, which has more or less a single-maximum fabric at the depth where the folding occurs. We conclude from these data that folding is a consequence of deformation along localized shear planes and kink bands. The findings are compared with results from other deep ice cores. The observations presented are supplemented by microstructural modeling using a crystal plasticity code that reproduces deformation, applying a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), coupled with ELLE to include dynamic recrystallization processes. The model results reproduce the development of bands of grains with a tilted orientation relative to the single maximum

  11. Chaperonin-mediated Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Arthur L.

    2013-01-01

    We have been studying chaperonins these past twenty years through an initial discovery of an action in protein folding, analysis of structure, and elucidation of mechanism. Some of the highlights of these studies were presented recently upon sharing the honor of the 2013 Herbert Tabor Award with my early collaborator, Ulrich Hartl, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Boston. Here, some of the major findings are recounted, particularly recognizing my collaborators, describing how I met them and how our great times together propelled our thinking and experiments. PMID:23803606

  12. Folding and Finding RNA Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Moss, Walter N.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Optimal exploitation of the expanding database of sequences requires rapid finding and folding of RNAs. Methods are reviewed that automate folding and discovery of RNAs with algorithms that couple thermodynamics with chemical mapping, NMR, and/or sequence comparison. New functional noncoding RNAs in genome sequences can be found by combining sequence comparison with the assumption that functional noncoding RNAs will have more favorable folding free energies than other RNAs. When a new RNA is discovered, experiments and sequence comparison can restrict folding space so that secondary structure can be rapidly determined with the help of predicted free energies. In turn, secondary structure restricts folding in three dimensions, which allows modeling of three-dimensional structure. An example from a domain of a retrotransposon is described. Discovery of new RNAs and their structures will provide insights into evolution, biology, and design of therapeutics. Applications to studies of evolution are also reviewed. PMID:20685845

  13. Simultaneous Alignment and Folding of Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Waldispühl, Jérôme; O'Donnell, Charles W.; Will, Sebastian; Devadas, Srinivas; Backofen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Accurate comparative analysis tools for low-homology proteins remains a difficult challenge in computational biology, especially sequence alignment and consensus folding problems. We present partiFold-Align, the first algorithm for simultaneous alignment and consensus folding of unaligned protein sequences; the algorithm's complexity is polynomial in time and space. Algorithmically, partiFold-Align exploits sparsity in the set of super-secondary structure pairings and alignment candidates to achieve an effectively cubic running time for simultaneous pairwise alignment and folding. We demonstrate the efficacy of these techniques on transmembrane β-barrel proteins, an important yet difficult class of proteins with few known three-dimensional structures. Testing against structurally derived sequence alignments, partiFold-Align significantly outperforms state-of-the-art pairwise and multiple sequence alignment tools in the most difficult low-sequence homology case. It also improves secondary structure prediction where current approaches fail. Importantly, partiFold-Align requires no prior training. These general techniques are widely applicable to many more protein families (partiFold-Align is available at http://partifold.csail.mit.edu/). PMID:24766258

  14. Folding of Pollen Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katifori, Eleni; Alben, Silas; Cerda, Enrique; Nelson, David; Dumais, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    At dehiscence, which occurs when the anther reaches maturity and opens, pollen grains dehydrate and their volume is reduced. The pollen wall deforms to accommodate the volume loss, and the deformation pathway depends on the initial turgid pollen grain geometry and the mechanical properties of the pollen wall. We demonstrate, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, that the design of the apertures (areas on the pollen wall where the stretching and the bending modulus are reduced) is critical for controlling the folding pattern, and ensures the pollen grain viability. An excellent fit to the experiments is obtained using a discretized version of the theory of thin elastic shells.

  15. Sequencing and G-Quadruplex Folding of the Canine Proto-Oncogene KIT Promoter Region: Might Dog Be Used as a Model for Human Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Da Ros, Silvia; Zorzan, Eleonora; Giantin, Mery; Zorro Shahidian, Lara; Palumbo, Manlio; Dacasto, Mauro; Sissi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Downregulation of gene expression by induction of non-canonical DNA structures at promotorial level is a novel attractive anticancer strategy. In human, two guanine-rich sequences (h_kit1 and h_kit2) were identified in the promotorial region of oncogene KIT. Their stabilization into G-quadruplex structures can find applications in the treatment of leukemias, mastocytosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and lung carcinomas which are often associated to c-kit mis-regulation. Also the most common skin cancer in domestic dog, mast cell tumor, is linked to a mutation and/or to an over-expression of c-kit, thus supporting dog as an excellent animal model. In order to assess if the G-quadruplex mediated mechanism of regulation of c-kit expression is conserved among the two species, herein we cloned and sequenced the canine KIT promoter region and we compared it with the human one in terms of sequence and conformational equilibria in physiologically relevant conditions. Our results evidenced a general conserved promotorial sequence between the two species. As experimentally confirmed, this grants that the conformational features of the canine kit1 sequence are substantially shared with the human one. Conversely, two isoforms of the kit2 sequences were identified in the analyzed dog population. In comparison with the human counterpart, both of them showed an altered distribution among several folded conformations. PMID:25084283

  16. Quaternary association in beta-prism I2 fold plant lectins: insights from X-ray crystallography, modelling and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, Mamannamana

    2011-12-01

    Dimeric banana lectin and calsepa, tetrameric artocarpin and octameric heltuba are mannose-specific beta-prism I fold lectins of nearly the same tertiary structure. MD simulations on individual subunits and the oligomers provide insights into the changes in the structure brought about in the protomers on oligomerization, including swapping of the N-terminal stretch in one instance. The regions that undergo changes also tend to exhibit dynamic flexibility during MD simulations. The internal symmetries of individual oligomers are substantially retained during the calculations. Energy minimization and simulations were also carried out on models using all possible oligomers by employing the four different protomers. The unique dimerization pattern observed in calsepa could be traced to unique substitutions in a peptide stretch involved in dimerization. The impossibility of a specific mode of oligomerization involving a particular protomer is often expressed in terms of unacceptable steric contacts or dissociation of the oligomer during simulations. The calculations also led to a rationale for the observation of a heltuba tetramer in solution although the lectin exists as an octamer in the crystal, in addition to providing insights into relations among evolution, oligomerization and ligand binding.

  17. Zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and modeling of Cenozoic exhumation of the West Spitsbergen Fold Belt: a HeFTy task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Chris; Schneider, David; Majka, Jaroslaw; Lorenz, Henning; Kosminska, Karolina; Manecki, Maciej

    2015-04-01

    The West Spitsbergen Fold Belt (WSFB) is part of a ca. 55 Ma Eurekan deformation zone which trends N-S along the western margin of the Svalbard archipelago and is largely comprised of Meso- to Neoproterozoic metasediments and metavolcanics. (U-Th)/He thermochronometry is being conducted from three different regions within the fold belt to resolve the time-temperature history: Wedel Jarlsberg Land, Prins Karls Forland, and Sorkapp Land. Preliminary data obtained from Wedel Jarlsberg Land (amphibolite facies Eimfjellet Group and greenschist facies Sofiebogen Group) yield zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) ages indicative of Late Cretaceous to Early Paleogene cooling. It is apparent from the cooling ages that these Neoproterozoic rocks were >200°C before Eurekan deformation. Despite no clear trend between cooling age and grain size, the zircons exhibit a large range of eU values (51 to 826), viewed as a proxy for radiation damage, corresponding to a Gaussian distribution with age. Preliminary ZHe ages obtained from the Macnairrabbane unit of Prins Karls Forland suggests slightly younger cooling, as young as Late Eocene. HeFTy inversion models suggest the possibility that these rocks were at near-surface conditions through much of the Carboniferous and Permian as part of the Sorkapp-Hornsund High as a consequence of the Late Devonian Svalbardian Event. A moderate-temperature burial or heating event is therefore required to explain the Late Cretaceous /Early Paleogene ZHe cooling ages. With the current data, it is difficult to resolve whether this heating event was the result of pre-Eurekan sedimentation or syn-Eurekan over-thrusting. Nonetheless, the data strongly suggest fast cooling (and exhumation) through the He partial-retention zone during Eurekan tectonism, which may have commenced prior to 55 Ma. Similar thermochronometry results have been produced from Mesozoic rocks of the Sverdrup Basin exposed on Axel Heiberg and Ellesmere Islands of Canada; apatite fission-track and

  18. Functional analysis of the TFIID-specific yeast TAF4 (yTAF(II)48) reveals an unexpected organization of its histone-fold domain.

    PubMed

    Thuault, Sylvie; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Kirchner, Jay; Sanders, Steven; Werten, Sebastiaan; Romier, Christophe; Weil, P Anthony; Davidson, Irwin

    2002-11-22

    Yeast TFIID comprises the TATA binding protein and 14 TBP-associated factors (TAF(II)s), nine of which contain histone-fold domains (HFDs). The C-terminal region of the TFIID-specific yTAF4 (yTAF(II)48) containing the HFD shares strong sequence similarity with Drosophila (d)TAF4 (dTAF(II)110) and human TAF4 (hTAF(II)135). A structure/function analysis of yTAF4 demonstrates that the HFD, a short conserved C-terminal domain (CCTD), and the region separating them are all required for yTAF4 function. Temperature-sensitive mutations in the yTAF4 HFD alpha2 helix or the CCTD can be suppressed upon overexpression of yTAF12 (yTAF(II)68). Moreover, coexpression in Escherichia coli indicates direct yTAF4-yTAF12 heterodimerization optimally requires both the yTAF4 HFD and CCTD. The x-ray crystal structure of the orthologous hTAF4-hTAF12 histone-like heterodimer indicates that the alpha3 region within the predicted TAF4 HFD is unstructured and does not correspond to the bona fide alpha3 helix. Our functional and biochemical analysis of yTAF4, rather provides strong evidence that the HFD alpha3 helix of the TAF4 family lies within the CCTD. These results reveal an unexpected and novel HFD organization in which the alpha3 helix is separated from the alpha2 helix by an extended loop containing a conserved functional domain. PMID:12237303

  19. Folded onlap geometries: implications for recognition of syn-sedimentary folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas-Sainz, Antonio M.; Soto-Marín, Ruth; González, Ángel; José Villalaín, Juan

    2005-09-01

    Growth strata are usually analysed from geological maps, outcrop geometry or seismic sections. Many growth folds have been defined from geological maps, especially in areas where plunging structures allow the syn-tectonic sequence to be displayed at the surface. The geometrical arrangement of these syn-tectonic sequences can also be defined from the relationships between pre-growth and growth strata, as obtained from geological maps. In this paper, from theoretical models and natural examples from the southern Pyrenees, we argue that some cartographic patterns of strata associated with variably plunging folds, traditionally ascribed to syn-tectonic sedimentation with thinning of sedimentary units toward the anticlinal hinge zone, can be explained as completely post-sedimentary folds of sedimentary units lapping onto an inclined bedding surface, and linked to basin margin, or downlap geometries on the basin floor. We conclude that 3-D analysis of syn-tectonic structures, combining data from independent sources (i.e. geological maps and seismic reflection profiles) is essential to determine relationships between sedimentary units and structures.

  20. Quantification of a Helical Origami Fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Eric; Han, Xiaomin; Chen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    Origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, is traditionally viewed as an amusing pastime and medium of artistic expression. However, in recent years, origami has served as a source of inspiration for innovations in science and engineering. Here, we present the geometric and mechanical properties of a twisting origami fold. The origami structure created by the fold exhibits several interesting properties, including rigid foldibility, local bistability and finely tunable helical coiling, with control over pitch, radius and handedness of the helix. In addition, the pattern generated by the fold closely mimics the twist buckling patterns shown by thin materials, for example, a mobius strip. We use six parameters of the twisting origami pattern to generate a fully tunable graphical model of the fold. Finally, we present a mathematical model of the local bistability of the twisting origami fold. Our study elucidates the mechanisms behind the helical coiling and local bistability of the twisting origami fold, with potential applications in robotics and deployable structures. Acknowledgment to Branco Weiss Fellowship for funding.

  1. Estimation of vocal fold plane in 3D CT images for diagnosis of vocal fold abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hewavitharanage, Sajini; Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Thyagarajan, Dominic; Lau, Ken; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Vocal folds are the key body structures that are responsible for phonation and regulating air movement into and out of lungs. Various vocal fold disorders may seriously impact the quality of life. When diagnosing vocal fold disorders, CT of the neck is the commonly used imaging method. However, vocal folds do not align with the normal axial plane of a neck and the plane containing vocal cords and arytenoids does vary during phonation. It is therefore important to generate an algorithm for detecting the actual plane containing vocal folds. In this paper, we propose a method to automatically estimate the vocal fold plane using vertebral column and anterior commissure localization. Gray-level thresholding, connected component analysis, rule based segmentation and unsupervised k-means clustering were used in the proposed algorithm. The anterior commissure segmentation method achieved an accuracy of 85%, a good estimate of the expert assessment. PMID:26736949

  2. Adhesion and friction control localized folding in supported graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Arroyo, M.

    2013-05-01

    Graphene deposited on planar surfaces often exhibits sharp and localized folds delimiting seemingly planar regions, as a result of compressive stresses transmitted by the substrate. Such folds alter the electronic and chemical properties of graphene, and therefore, it is important to understand their emergence, to either suppress them or control their morphology. Here, we study the emergence of out-of-plane deformations in supported and laterally strained graphene with high-fidelity simulations and a simpler theoretical model. We characterize the onset of buckling and the nonlinear behavior after the instability in terms of the adhesion and frictional material parameters of the graphene-substrate interface. We find that localized folds evolve from a distributed wrinkling linear instability due to the nonlinearity in the van der Waals graphene-substrate interactions. We identify friction as a selection mechanism for the separation between folds, as the formation of far apart folds is penalized by the work of friction. Our systematic analysis is a first step towards strain engineering of supported graphene, and is applicable to other compressed thin elastic films weakly coupled to a substrate.

  3. Chemical, physical, and theoretical kinetics of an ultrafast folding protein.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Jan; Henry, Eric R; Cellmer, Troy; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A

    2008-12-01

    An extensive set of equilibrium and kinetic data is presented and analyzed for an ultrafast folding protein--the villin subdomain. The equilibrium data consist of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, and natural circular-dichroism spectrum as a function of temperature, and the kinetic data consist of time courses of the quantum yield from nanosecond-laser temperature-jump experiments. The data are well fit with three kinds of models--a three-state chemical-kinetics model, a physical-kinetics model, and an Ising-like theoretical model that considers 10(5) possible conformations (microstates). In both the physical-kinetics and theoretical models, folding is described as diffusion on a one-dimensional free-energy surface. In the physical-kinetics model the reaction coordinate is unspecified, whereas in the theoretical model, order parameters, either the fraction of native contacts or the number of native residues, are used as reaction coordinates. The validity of these two reaction coordinates is demonstrated from calculation of the splitting probability from the rate matrix of the master equation for all 10(5) microstates. The analysis of the data on site-directed mutants using the chemical-kinetics model provides information on the structure of the transition-state ensemble; the physical-kinetics model allows an estimate of the height of the free-energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded states; and the theoretical model provides a detailed picture of the free-energy surface and a residue-by-residue description of the evolution of the folded structure, yet contains many fewer adjustable parameters than either the chemical- or physical-kinetics models.

  4. Protein photo-folding and quantum folding theory.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liaofu

    2012-06-01

    The rates of protein folding with photon absorption or emission and the cross section of photon -protein inelastic scattering are calculated from quantum folding theory by use of a field-theoretical method. All protein photo-folding processes are compared with common protein folding without the interaction of photons (non-radiative folding). It is demonstrated that there exists a common factor (thermo-averaged overlap integral of the vibration wave function, TAOI) for protein folding and protein photo-folding. Based on this finding it is predicted that (i) the stimulated photo-folding rates and the photon-protein resonance Raman scattering sections show the same temperature dependence as protein folding; (ii) the spectral line of the electronic transition is broadened to a band that includes an abundant vibration spectrum without and with conformational transitions, and the width of each vibration spectral line is largely reduced. The particular form of the folding rate-temperature relation and the abundant spectral structure imply the existence of quantum tunneling between protein conformations in folding and photo-folding that demonstrates the quantum nature of the motion of the conformational-electronic system.

  5. [Surgery of benign vocal fold lesions].

    PubMed

    Olthoff, A

    2016-09-01

    Surgical treatment of benign vocal fold lesions can be indicated for clinical or functional reasons. The principles of phonosurgery have to be maintained in either case. The appropriate phonosurgical technique depends on the type of vocal fold lesion. Depending on the findings, phonosurgery aims to maintain or improve voice quality. The evaluation of clinical and functional results includes indirect laryngoscopy, videostroboscopy, and voice analysis. PMID:27552826

  6. Folded pendulum tiltmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuchao; Fan, Shuhua; Luo, Jun; Hsu, Houtse

    2002-05-01

    The application of the folded pendulum (FP) as a tiltmeter is proposed and some features of it have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. First, FP could have a quite low resonance frequency due to its mechanical structure. The period of our prototype FP is 6.2 s and the amplification factor is about 100. Second, FP is not sensitive to the environmental temperature variation but seriously affected by the temperature gradient. The experiment with a temperature gradient modulation shows that the static equilibrium position of the FP will change by 2.5 μrad if the temperature difference between the horizontal platform and the base of the FP is 0.1 °C. With a prototype FP, we have observed obvious tilt tides, and the calibration result shows that the resolution of the FP is about 1.2 nrad.

  7. Chemical, physical, and theoretical kinetics of an ultrafast folding protein

    PubMed Central

    Kubelka, Jan; Henry, Eric R.; Cellmer, Troy; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive set of equilibrium and kinetic data is presented and analyzed for an ultrafast folding protein—the villin subdomain. The equilibrium data consist of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, and natural circular-dichroism spectrum as a function of temperature, and the kinetic data consist of time courses of the quantum yield from nanosecond-laser temperature-jump experiments. The data are well fit with three kinds of models—a three-state chemical-kinetics model, a physical-kinetics model, and an Ising-like theoretical model that considers 105 possible conformations (microstates). In both the physical-kinetics and theoretical models, folding is described as diffusion on a one-dimensional free-energy surface. In the physical-kinetics model the reaction coordinate is unspecified, whereas in the theoretical model, order parameters, either the fraction of native contacts or the number of native residues, are used as reaction coordinates. The validity of these two reaction coordinates is demonstrated from calculation of the splitting probability from the rate matrix of the master equation for all 105 microstates. The analysis of the data on site-directed mutants using the chemical-kinetics model provides information on the structure of the transition-state ensemble; the physical-kinetics model allows an estimate of the height of the free-energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded states; and the theoretical model provides a detailed picture of the free-energy surface and a residue-by-residue description of the evolution of the folded structure, yet contains many fewer adjustable parameters than either the chemical- or physical-kinetics models. PMID:19033473

  8. Molecular Simulations of Cotranslational Protein Folding: Fragment Stabilities, Folding Cooperativity, and Trapping in the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Elcock, Adrian H

    2006-01-01

    Although molecular simulation methods have yielded valuable insights into mechanistic aspects of protein refolding in vitro, they have up to now not been used to model the folding of proteins as they are actually synthesized by the ribosome. To address this issue, we report here simulation studies of three model proteins: chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2), barnase, and Semliki forest virus protein (SFVP), and directly compare their folding during ribosome-mediated synthesis with their refolding from random, denatured conformations. To calibrate the methodology, simulations are first compared with in vitro data on the folding stabilities of N-terminal fragments of CI2 and barnase; the simulations reproduce the fact that both the stability and thermal folding cooperativity increase as fragments increase in length. Coupled simulations of synthesis and folding for the same two proteins are then described, showing that both fold essentially post-translationally, with mechanisms effectively identical to those for refolding. In both cases, confinement of the nascent polypeptide chain within the ribosome tunnel does not appear to promote significant formation of native structure during synthesis; there are however clear indications that the formation of structure within the nascent chain is sensitive to location within the ribosome tunnel, being subject to both gain and loss as the chain lengthens. Interestingly, simulations in which CI2 is artificially stabilized show a pronounced tendency to become trapped within the tunnel in partially folded conformations: non-cooperative folding, therefore, appears in the simulations to exert a detrimental effect on the rate at which fully folded conformations are formed. Finally, simulations of the two-domain protease module of SFVP, which experimentally folds cotranslationally, indicate that for multi-domain proteins, ribosome-mediated folding may follow different pathways from those taken during refolding. Taken together, these

  9. Canister Model, Systems Analysis

    1993-09-29

    This packges provides a computer simulation of a systems model for packaging nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel in canisters. The canister model calculates overall programmatic cost, number of canisters, and fuel and waste inventories for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (other initial conditions can be entered).

  10. In vivo photodynamic effects of phthalocyanines in a skin-fold observation chamber model: role of central metal ion and degree of sulfonation.

    PubMed

    van Leengoed, H L; van der Veen, N; Versteeg, A A; Ouellet, R; van Lier, J E; Star, W M

    1993-10-01

    Six sulfonated metallophthalocyanines, chelated with either aluminum or zinc and sulfonated to different degrees, were studied in vivo for their photodynamic activity in a rat skin-fold chamber model. The chamber, located on the back of female WAG/Rij rats, contained a syngeneic mammary carcinoma implanted into a layer of subcutaneous tissue. Twenty-four hours after intravenous administration of 2.5 mumol/kg of one of the dyes, the chambers received a treatment light dose of 600 J/cm2 with monochromatic light of 675 nm at a power density of 100 mW/cm2. During light delivery and up to a period of 7 days after treatment, vascular effects of tumor and normal tissue were scored. Tumor cell viability was determined by histology and by reimplantation of the chamber contents into the skin of the same animal, either 2 h after treatment or after the 7 day observation period. Vascular effects of both tumor and subcutaneous tissue were strongest with dyes with the lowest degree of sulfonation and decreased with increasing degree of sulfonation. Tumor regrowth did not occur with aluminum phthalocyanine mono- and disulfonate and with zinc phthalocyanine monosulfonate. With the protocol that was used, complete necrosis without recovery was only observed when reimplantation took place at the end of the 7 day follow-up period. Reimplantation 2 h after treatment always resulted in tumor regrowth. At this interval, the presence of viable tumor cells was confirmed histologically. In general tumor tissue vasculature was more susceptible to photodynamic damage than vasculature of the normal tissue. The effect on the circulation of both tumor and normal tissue increased with decreasing degree of sulfonation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Model-Based Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Anjali; Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Miller, Steven P.; Whalen, Mike W.

    2006-01-01

    System safety analysis techniques are well established and are used extensively during the design of safety-critical systems. Despite this, most of the techniques are highly subjective and dependent on the skill of the practitioner. Since these analyses are usually based on an informal system model, it is unlikely that they will be complete, consistent, and error free. In fact, the lack of precise models of the system architecture and its failure modes often forces the safety analysts to devote much of their effort to gathering architectural details about the system behavior from several sources and embedding this information in the safety artifacts such as the fault trees. This report describes Model-Based Safety Analysis, an approach in which the system and safety engineers share a common system model created using a model-based development process. By extending the system model with a fault model as well as relevant portions of the physical system to be controlled, automated support can be provided for much of the safety analysis. We believe that by using a common model for both system and safety engineering and automating parts of the safety analysis, we can both reduce the cost and improve the quality of the safety analysis. Here we present our vision of model-based safety analysis and discuss the advantages and challenges in making this approach practical.

  12. Effects of Folding on Metalloprotein Active Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Jay R.; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Leckner, Johan; Malmstrom, Bo G.; Gray, Harry B.

    1997-04-01

    Experimental data for the unfolding of cytochrome c and azurin by guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) are used to construct free-energy diagrams for the folding of the oxidized and reduced proteins. With cytochrome c, the driving force for folding the reduced protein is larger than that for the oxidized form. Both the oxidized and the reduced folded forms of yeast cytochrome c are less stable than the corresponding states of the horse protein. Due to the covalent attachment of the heme and its fixed tetragonal coordination geometry, cytochrome c folding can be described by a two-state model. A thermodynamic cycle leads to an expression for the difference in self-exchange reorganization energies for the folded and unfolded proteins. The reorganization energy for electron exchange in the folded protein is approximately 0.5 eV smaller than that for a heme in aqueous solution. The finding that reduced azurin unfolds at lower GuHCl concentrations than the oxidized protein suggests that the coordination structure of copper is different in oxidized and reduced unfolded states: it is likely that the geometry of CuI in the unfolded protein is linear or trigonal, whereas CuII prefers to be tetragonal. The evidence indicates that protein folding lowers the azurin reorganization energy by roughly 1.7 eV relative to an aqueous Cu(1,10-phenanthroline)2{}2+/+ reference system.

  13. A magnetization-transfer nuclear magnetic resonance study of the folding of staphylococcal nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, P.A.; Kautz, R.A.; Fox, R.O.; Dobson, C.M. )

    1989-01-10

    The equilibrium between alternative folded states of a globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease, has been investigated by using {sup 1}H NMR. Magnetization-transfer experiments have revealed the existence of a related structural heterogeneity of the unfolded state, and quantitative analysis of a series of these experiments has permitted the kinetics of folding and interconversion of the different states to be explored. A model based on cis/trans isomerism at the peptide bond preceding Pro-117 has been developed to account for the results. This model, recently supported by a protein-engineering experiment has been used to interpret the kinetic data, providing insight into the nature of the folding processes. The predominance of the cis-proline form in the folded state is shown to derive from a large favorable enthalpy term resulting from more effective overall folding interactions. The kinetics of folding and isomerization are shown to occur on similar time scales, such that more than one pathway between two states may be significant. It has been possible, however, to compare the direct folding and unfolding rates within the cis- and trans-proline-containing populations, with results suggesting that the specific stabilization of the cis peptide bond is effective only at a late stage in the folding process.

  14. Statistical properties of a folded elastic rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Deboeuf, Stéphanie; Boué, Laurent; Corson, Francis; Boudaoud, Arezki; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    2010-03-01

    A large variety of elastic structures naturally seem to be confined into environments too small to accommodate them; the geometry of folded structures span a wide range of length-scales. The elastic properties of these confined systems are further constrained by self-avoidance as well as by the dimensionality of both structures and container. To mimic crumpled paper, we devised an experimental setup to study the packing of a dimensional elastic object in 2D geometries: an elastic rod is folded at the center of a circular Hele-Shaw cell by a centripetal force. The initial configuration of the rod and the acceleration of the rotating disk allow to span different final folded configurations while the final rotation speed controls the packing intensity. Using image analysis we measure geometrical and mechanical properties of the folded configurations, focusing on length, curvature and energy distributions.

  15. CMS Analysis School Model

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, S.; Shipsey, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Bloom, K.; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J.; Klima, B.; Narain, M.; Palla, F.; Rolandi, G.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  16. CMS Analysis School Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S.; Shipsey, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Bloom, K.; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J.; Klima, B.; Narain, M.; Palla, F.; Rolandi, G.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.

    2014-06-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  17. Influence of the ventricular folds on a voice source with specified vocal fold motion1

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Richard S.; Howe, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The unsteady drag on the vocal folds is the major source of sound during voiced speech. The drag force is caused by vortex shedding from the vocal folds. The influence of the ventricular folds (i.e., the “false” vocal folds that protrude into the vocal tract a short distance downstream of the glottis) on the drag and the voice source are examined in this paper by means of a theoretical model involving vortex sheets in a two-dimensional geometry. The effect of the ventricular folds on the output acoustic pressure is found to be small when the movement of the vocal folds is prescribed. It is argued that the effect remains small when fluid-structure interactions account for vocal fold movement. These conclusions can be justified mathematically when the characteristic time scale for change in the velocity of the glottal jet is large compared to the time it takes for a vortex disturbance to be convected through the vocal fold and ventricular fold region. PMID:20329852

  18. Dew-driven folding of insect wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew; Beadles, Sam; Clement, Courtney; Hu, David

    2013-11-01

    Small insect wings fold into tacos when exposed to dewfall or fog for extended times. Such shapes are tightly held together and require great force or long evaporation times for the wings to unfold. In this experimental investigation, we use time-lapse and high-speed videography on a mosquito wing exposed to fog to characterize the folding process from a flat wing to a taco. We observe a taco is formed through a series of processes involving wing bending, unbending, and subsequent tight folding of the wing following the sliding of the drop off the wing. We use a simplified 2D model to determine the forces coalescing drops exert on the wing, and present folding-resistant design suggestions for micro-aerial vehicle wings.

  19. Protein folding in the ER.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major protein folding compartment for secreted, plasma membrane and organelle proteins. Each of these newly-synthesized polypeptides folds in a deterministic process, affected by the unique conditions that exist in the ER. An understanding of protein folding in the ER is a fundamental biomolecular challenge at two levels. The first level addresses how the amino acid sequence programs that polypeptide to efficiently arrive at a particular fold out of a multitude of alternatives, and how different sequences obtain similar folds. At the second level are the issues introduced by folding not in the cytosol, but in the ER, including the risk of aggregation in a molecularly crowded environment, accommodation of post-translational modifications and the compatibility with subsequent intracellular trafficking. This review discusses both the physicochemical and cell biological constraints of folding, which are the challenges that the ER molecular chaperones help overcome.

  20. Control of folding by gravity and matrix thickness: Implications for large-scale folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, S. M.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.; Burg, J.-P.

    2002-01-01

    We show that folding of a non-Newtonian layer resting on a homogeneous Newtonian matrix with finite thickness under influence of gravity can occur by three modes: (1) matrix-controlled folding, dependent on the effective viscosity contrast between layer and matrix, (2) gravity-controlled folding, dependent on the Argand number (the ratio of the stress caused by gravity to the stress caused by shortening), and (3) detachment folding, dependent on the ratio of matrix thickness to layer thickness. We construct a phase diagram that defines the transitions between each of the three folding modes. Our priority is transparency of the analytical derivations (e.g., thin-plate versus thick-plate approximations), which permits complete classification of the folding modes involving a minimum number of dimensionless parameters. Accuracy and sensitivity of the analytical results to model assumptions are investigated. In particular, depth dependence of matrix rheology is only important for folding over a narrow range of material parameters. In contrast, strong depth dependence of the viscosity of the folding layer limits applicability of ductile rheology and leads to a viscoelastic transition. Our theory is applied to estimate the effective thickness of the folded central Asian upper crust using the ratio of topographic wavelength to Moho depth. Phase diagrams based on geometrical parameters show that gravity does not significantly control folding in the Jura and the Zagros Mountains but does control folding in central Asia. Applicability conditions of viscous and thin sheet models for large-scale lithospheric deformation, derived in terms of the Argand number, have implications for the plate-like style of planetary tectonics.