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Sample records for fontana lake region

  1. Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Sergey; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Roebber, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We simulate the seasonal cycle of the Great Lakes' water temperature and lake ice using an idealized coupled lake-atmosphere-ice model. Under identical seasonally varying boundary conditions, this model exhibits more than one seasonally varying equilibrium solutions, which we associate with distinct regional climate regimes. Colder/warmer regimes are characterized by abundant/scarce amounts of wintertime ice and cooler/warmer summer temperatures, respectively. These regimes are also evident in the observations of the Great Lakes' climate variability over recent few decades, and are found to be most pronounced for Lake Superior, the deepest of the Great Lakes, consistent with model predictions. Multiple climate regimes of the Great Lakes also play a crucial role in the accelerated warming of the lakes relative to the surrounding land regions in response to larger-scale global warming. We discuss the physical origin and characteristics of multiple climate regimes over the lakes, as well as their implications for a longer-term regional climate variability.

  2. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere ... snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The ...

  3. Regional Lake quality patterns: Their relationship to lake conservation and management decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.A.; Hughes, R.M.; Larsen, D.P.; Paulsen, S.G.; Omernik, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    Understanding regional lake quality patterns is important to lake restoration. It puts specific lake conditions into perspective, provides a basis for establishing lake quality goals, identifies lakes most likely to benefit from restoration and forms a framework for assessing restoration success. Two techniques used to characterize regional lake quality patterns are discussed. Combining the two approaches provides an effective means to describe lake regions management goals and restoration success. Case examples illustrate the significant of regional lake quality to specific lake restoration projects.

  4. Great Lakes Region, State of Michigan, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-06-14

    STS040-77-045 (6 June 1991) --- This image, photographed on June 6, 1991, is an oblique view looking north-northeast and shows most of the Great Lakes region. Part of Columbia's cargo bay and the Spacelab Life Sciences (SLS-1) module are in the foreground. In the center of the image is Lake Michigan with Chicago clearly visible along the southwest shore. According to NASA photo experts studying the STS-40 imagery, this image shows several interesting meteorological phenomena. The difference in temperature between the warming land and the cold lake waters is illustrated by the low level clouds. The warming land surface results in rising air and the formation of clouds, while the lake waters are cold and result in the lakes remaining cloud free. Also visible is evidence of lake breezes developing around several of the lakes. This phenomena is also driven by the difference in temperature between the land and the water. Winds blowing off the lakes must travel 25 - 30 miles inland before it warms sufficiently to create clouds.

  5. Changes in Rongbuk lake and Imja lake in the Everest region of Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Doko, T.; Liu, C.; Ichinose, T.; Fukui, H.; Feng, Q.; Gou, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Himalaya holds the world record in terms of range and elevation. It is one of the most extensively glacierized regions in the world except the Polar Regions. The Himalaya is a region sensitive to climate change. Changes in the glacial regime are indicators of global climate changes. Since the second half of the last century, most Himalayan glaciers have melted due to climate change. These changes directly affected the changes of glacial lakes in the Himalayan region due to the glacier retreat. New glacial lakes are formed, and a number of them have expanded in the Everest region of the Himalayas. This paper focuses on the two glacial lakes which are Imja Lake, located at the southern slope, and Rongbuk Lake, located at the northern slope in the Mt. Everest region, Himalaya to present the spatio-temporal changes from 1976 to 2008. Topographical conditions between two lakes were different (Kruskal-Wallis test, p < 0.05). Rongbuk Lake was located at 623 m higher than Imja Lake, and radiation of Rongbuk Lake was higher than the Imja Lake. Although size of Imja Lake was larger than the Rongbuk Lake in 2008, the growth speed of Rongbuk Lake was accelerating since 2000 and exceeds Imja Lake in 2000-2008. This trend of expansion of Rongbuk Lake is anticipated to be continued in the 21st century. Rongbuk Lake would be the biggest potential risk of glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) at the Everest region of Himalaya in the future.

  6. Exotic scolytids of the Great Lakes region

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack

    2001-01-01

    There are at least 44 exotic species of Scolytidae established in North America north of Mexico, of which 16 species can be found in the Great Lakes region (see Table). Scolytids occupy many niches, but the two most common groups are the true bark beetles and the ambrosia beetles (Poland and Haack 1998). Adult bark beetles, as their name implies, construct galleries...

  7. Regional Monitoring of Acidic Lakes and Streams

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This asset provides data on the acid-base status of lakes and streams. Key chemical indicators measured include: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, Acid Neutralizing Capacity (ANC), pH, base cations, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total aluminum. TIME and LTM are part of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Long-term monitoring of the acid-base status (pH, ANC, SO4, NO3, NH4, DOC, base cations, Al) in lakes and streams. Monitoring is conducted in acid sensitive regions of the Eastern U.S.

  8. Regional Monitoring of Acidic Lakes and Streams

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This asset provides data on the acid-base status of lakes and streams. Key chemical indicators measured include: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, Acid Neutralizing Capacity (ANC), pH, base cations, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total aluminum. TIME and LTM are part of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Long-term monitoring of the acid-base status (pH, ANC, SO4, NO3, NH4, DOC, base cations, Al) in lakes and streams. Monitoring is conducted in acid sensitive regions of the Eastern U.S.

  9. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in California Region 18 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  10. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Tennessee Region 6 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  11. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Ohio Region 5 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  12. Lake States regional forest resources assessment: technical papers.

    Treesearch

    Henry H. Webster; J. Michael Vasievich

    1997-01-01

    Contains 21 technical working papers prepared for the Lake States regional forest resources assessment, Lake States Forestry Alliance 1995. They represent significant contributions from many individuals and organizations and form the technical background for the assessment.

  13. Influence of the African Great Lakes on the regional climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Wim; Davin, Edouard; Panitz, Hans-Jürgen; Demuzere, Matthias; Lhermitte, Stef; van Lipzig, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    Although the African Great Lakes are important regulators for the East-African climate, their influence on atmospheric dynamics and the regional hydrological cycle remains poorly understood. We aim to assess this impact by conducting a regional climate model simulation which resolves individual lakes and explicitly computes lake temperatures. The regional climate model COSMO-CLM, coupled to a state-of-the-art lake parameterization scheme and land surface model, is used to dynamically downscale the COSMO-CLM CORDEX-Africa evaluation simulation to 7 km grid spacing for the period 1999-2008. Evaluation of the model reveals good performance compared to both in-situ and satellite observations, especially for spatio-temporal variability of lake surface temperatures and precipitation. Model integrations indicate that the four major African Great Lakes almost double precipitation amounts over their surface relative to a simulation without lakes, but hardly exert any influence on precipitation beyond their shores. The largest lakes also cool their near-surface air, this time with pronounced downwind influence. The lake-induced cooling happens during daytime, when the lakes absorb incoming solar radiation and inhibit upward turbulent heat transport. At night, when this heat is released, the lakes warm the near-surface air. Furthermore, Lake Victoria has profound influence on atmospheric dynamics and stability as it induces cellular motion with over-lake convective inhibition during daytime, and the reversed pattern at night. Overall, this study shows the added value of resolving individual lakes and realistically representing lake surface temperatures for climate studies in this region. Thiery, W., Davin, E., Panitz, H.-J., Demuzere, M., Lhermitte, S., van Lipzig, N.P.M., The impact of the African Great Lakes on the regional climate, J. Climate (in review).

  14. The Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Noriyuki

    For the last couple of decades, the Great Lakes have undergone rapid surface warming. In particular, the magnitude of the summer surface-warming trends of the Great Lakes have been much greater than those of surrounding land (Austin and Colman, 2007). Among the Great Lakes, the deepest Lake Superior exhibited the strongest warming trend in its annual, as well as summer surface water temperature. We find that many aspects of this behavior can be explained in terms of the tendency of deep lakes to exhibit multiple regimes characterized, under the same seasonally varying forcing, by the warmer and colder seasonal cycles exhibiting different amounts of wintertime lake-ice cover and corresponding changes in the summertime lake-surface temperatures. In this thesis, we address the problem of the Great Lakes' warming using one-dimensional lake modeling to interpret diverse observations of the recent lake behavior. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  15. Establishing eutrophication assessment standards for four lake regions, China.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shouliang; Ma, Chunzi; Xi, Beidou; Su, Jing; Zan, Fengyu; Ji, Danfeng; He, Zhuoshi

    2013-10-01

    The trophic status assessment of lakes in different lake regions may provide important and fundamental information for lake trophic state classification and eutrophication control. In this study, a region-specific lake eutrophication assessment standard was established through a frequency distribution method based on chlorophyll-a concentration. The assessment standards under the oligotrophic state for lakes in the Eastern plain, Yungui Plateau, Northeast Plain and Mountain Mongolia-Xinjiang regions are total phosphorus of 0.068, 0.005, 0.011, 0.005 mg/L; total nitrogen of 1.00, 0.16, 0.37, 0.60 mg/L; Secchi depth of 0.60, 8.00, 1.55, 3.00 m; and COD(Mn) of 2.24, 1.00, 5.11, 4.00 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, a region-specific comprehensive trophic level index was developed to provide an understandable assessment method for the public. The results indicated that the frequency distribution analysis based on chlorophyll-a combined with trophic level index provided a useful metric for the assessment of the lake trophic status. In addition, the difference of eutrophication assessment standards in different lake regions was analyzed, which suggested that the sensitivities of algae to nutrients and the assessment standard of trophic status possessed significant regional differences for the four lake ecoregions. Lake eutrophication assessment standards would contribute to maximizing the effectiveness of future management strategies, to control and minimize lake eutrophication problems.

  16. Effects of lake trout refuges on lake whitefish and cisco in the Apostle Islands Region of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuccarino-Crowe , Chiara M.; Taylor, William W.; Hansen, Michael J.; Seider, Michael J.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Lake trout refuges in the Apostle Islands region of Lake Superior are analogous to the concept of marine protected areas. These refuges, established specifically for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and closed to most forms of recreational and commercial fishing, were implicated as one of several management actions leading to successful rehabilitation of Lake Superior lake trout. To investigate the potential significance of Gull Island Shoal and Devils Island Shoal refuges for populations of not only lake trout but also other fish species, relative abundances of lake trout, lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), and cisco (Coregonus artedi) were compared between areas sampled inside versus outside of refuge boundaries. During 1982–2010, lake trout relative abundance was higher and increased faster inside the refuges, where lake trout fishing was prohibited, than outside the refuges. Over the same period, lake whitefish relative abundance increased faster inside than outside the refuges. Both evaluations provided clear evidence that refuges protected these species. In contrast, trends in relative abundance of cisco, a prey item of lake trout, did not differ significantly between areas inside and outside the refuges. This result did not suggest indirect or cascading refuge effects due to changes in predator levels. Overall, this study highlights the potential of species-specific refuges to benefit other fish species beyond those that were the refuges' original target. Improved understanding of refuge effects on multiple species of Great Lakes fishes can be valuable for developing rationales for refuge establishment and predicting associated fish community-level effects.

  17. Potential Impacts of Climate Change in the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is projected to have substantial impacts in the Great Lakes region of the United States. One intent of this presentation is to introduce the Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center (GLISA), a recently-funded NOAA RISA center. The goals and unique organizational structure of GLISA will be described along with core activities that support impact and assessment studies in the region. Additionally, observed trends in temperature, precipitation including lake effect snowfall, and lake temperatures and ice cover will be summarized for the Great Lakes region, and vulnerabilities to, and potential impacts of, climate change will be surveyed for critical natural and human systems. These include forest ecosystems, water resources, traditional and specialized agriculture, and tourism/recreation. Impacts and vulnerabilities unique to the Great Lakes region are emphasized.

  18. Finger Lake Region, NY State, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the central portion of upstate New York, centers on the Finger Lakes. The large city on the shore of Lake Ontario, is Rochester. Although the city, being a business, educational and technical center, has no heavy industry, the outline of the city shows fairly well in the snow, but not as well as the outlines of industrial cities elsewhere in the world. The Finger Lakes are large linear lakes carved out by glaciers during the last ice age.

  19. Finger Lake Region, NY State, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-04-02

    This view of the central portion of upstate New York, centers on the Finger Lakes. The large city on the shore of Lake Ontario, is Rochester. Although the city, being a business, educational and technical center, has no heavy industry, the outline of the city shows fairly well in the snow, but not as well as the outlines of industrial cities elsewhere in the world. The Finger Lakes are large linear lakes carved out by glaciers during the last ice age.

  20. The effect of Sobradinho lake on the regional climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekhtiari, Nikoo; Volkhoz, Jan; Koch, Hagen

    2017-04-01

    We study the effects of the artificial Lake Sobradinho on the local near-surface and boundary layer atmospheric conditions in north-east Brazil. Using 3-month simulations of the regional climate model CCLM (i) with the lake and (ii) with the native vegetation cover as the replacement, the model outputs are compared with both surface and satellite data. The simulations indicate that the lake affects the near-surface air temperature of the surrounding area, as well as its humidity and wind patterns. We quantify how Sobradinho cools down the temperature of the surroundings during the day and warms up the air during the night. Humidity has been increased as a result of the presence of the lake and it can cause a Lake Breeze. Effect of the lake on humidity and temperature can also extend over areas near to the lake.

  1. Sample representativeness: A must for reliable regional lake condition estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.A.; Urquhart, N.S.; Welch, E.B.

    1999-05-15

    Reliable environmental resource estimates are essential to informed regional scale decisions regarding protection, restoration, and enhancement of natural resources. Reliable estimates depend on objective and representative sampling. Probability-based sampling meets these requirements and provides accuracy estimates. Non-probability-based sampling often is biased, thus less reliable, and potentially misleading. The authors compare results from a probability- and a non-probability-based Secchi transparency sampling of lakes in the northeastern geographic region of the United States and its three primary ecoregions. Results from these samplings are compared on the basis of sample representativeness relative to the regional lake population and subsequent reliability of lake condition estimates. Statistically derived sampling indicates the northeast lake population median lake size to be about 9.5 ({+-}2.3) ha and the Secchi disk transparency (SDT) to be about 2.4 ({+-}0.4) m. On the basis of judgment sampling estimates, the median SDT for lakes in the same area would be 4.2 m. However, only about 15% of the regional lake population based on statistically designed sampling estimates has a SDT {ge} 4.2 m. Estimate unreliability of this magnitude can have profound effects on lake management decisions. Thus, regional extrapolation of non-probability-based sampling results should be avoided.

  2. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Great Lakes Region 4 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  3. Wildlife in the Upper Great Lakes Region: a community profile.

    Treesearch

    Janine M. Benyus; Richard R. Buech; Mark D. Nelson

    1992-01-01

    Wildlife habitat data from seven Great Lakes National Forests were combined into a wildlife-habitat matrix named NORTHWOODS. The composite NORTHWOODS data base is summarized. Multiple queries of NORTHWOODS were used to profile the wildlife community of the Upper Great Lakes region.

  4. Eighteen Years of the Great Lakes Regional Counseling Psychology Conference: Revisiting the Need for Regional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Romero, Edward A.; Bowman, Sharon L.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2006-01-01

    The Great Lakes Regional Conference on Counseling Psychology is the only conference to continuously fulfill the 1987 mandate issued by Division 17 for regional counseling conferences. The rationale for regional conferences is reviewed, and the 18-year history of the Great Lakes Regional Conference is examined. The authors conclude by noting the…

  5. Eighteen Years of the Great Lakes Regional Counseling Psychology Conference: Revisiting the Need for Regional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Romero, Edward A.; Bowman, Sharon L.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2006-01-01

    The Great Lakes Regional Conference on Counseling Psychology is the only conference to continuously fulfill the 1987 mandate issued by Division 17 for regional counseling conferences. The rationale for regional conferences is reviewed, and the 18-year history of the Great Lakes Regional Conference is examined. The authors conclude by noting the…

  6. Methane efflux from the pelagic regions of four lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S. )

    1988-09-01

    Methane emission to the atmosphere was studied in the deepest, central (pelagic) regions of one freshwater and three meromictic, alkaline saline lakes. The range of methane emissions was 0.004 to 2.916 mmol/sq m/hr (n=41). Outward flux was dominated by bubble ebullition only in the freshwater lake. Diffusive gas exchange was the sole mechanism of transfer in the meromictic lakes, and flux from these lakes was equivalent to or lower than that from the freshwater lake during its periods of ebullition. A comparison of measured flux with flux calculated using a model of gas exchange in Mono Lake suggested that floating chambers provide reasonable estimates of the magnitude of methane emissions from diffusion-dominated systems. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The Effect of Lake Temperatures and Emissions on Ozone Exposure in the Western Great Lakes Region

    Treesearch

    Jerome D. Fast; Warren E. Heilman

    2003-01-01

    A meteorological-chemical model with a 12-km horizontal grid spacing was used to simulate the evolution of ozone over the western Great Lakes region during a 30-day period in the summer of 1999. Lake temperatures in the model were based on analyses derived from daily satellite measurements. The model performance was evaluated using operational surface and upper-air...

  8. Regional climate model performance in the Lake Victoria basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Karina; Chamberlain, Jill; Buontempo, Carlo; Bain, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    Lake Victoria, the second largest freshwater lake in the world, plays a crucial role in the hydrology of equatorial eastern Africa. Understanding how climate change may alter rainfall and evaporation patterns is thus of vital importance for the economic development and the livelihood of the region. Regional rainfall distribution appears, up to a large extent, to be controlled by local drivers which may be not well resolved in general circulation model simulations. We investigate the performance over the Lake Victoria basin of an ensemble of UK Met Office Hadley Centre regional climate model (HadRM3P) simulations at 50 km, driven by five members of the Hadley Centre global perturbed-physics ensemble (QUMP). This is part of the validation of an ensemble of simulations that has been used to assess the impacts of climate change over the continent over the period 1950-2099. We find that the regional climate model is able to simulate a lake/land breeze over Lake Victoria, which is a significant improvement over the driving global climate model and a vital step towards reproducing precipitation characteristics in the region. The local precipitation correlates well with large-scale processes in the Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean, which is in agreement with observations. We find that the spatial pattern of precipitation in the region and the diurnal cycle of convection is well represented although the amount of rainfall over the lake appears to be overestimated in most seasons. Reducing the observational uncertainty in precipitation over the lake through future field campaigns would enable this model bias to be better quantified. We conclude that increasing the spatial resolution of the model significantly improves its ability to simulate the current climate of the Lake Victoria basin. We suggest that, despite the higher computational costs, the inclusion of a model which allows two-way interactions between the lake and its surroundings should be seriously considered for

  9. Lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region and their influence during BAQS-Met 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, D. M. L.; Brook, J. R.; Levy, I.; Makar, P. A.; Zhang, J.; Taylor, P. A.

    2011-08-01

    Meteorological observations from the BAQS-Met field experiment during the summer months of 2007 were integrated and manually analyzed in order to identify and characterize lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region of North America, and assess their potential impact on air quality. Lake breezes occurred frequently, with one or more lake breezes identified on 90 % of study days. They affected all parts of the study region, including southwestern Ontario and nearby portions of southeast Lower Michigan and northern Ohio, with lake-breeze fronts occasionally penetrating from 100 km to over 200 km inland. Occurrence rates and penetration distances were found to be higher than previously reported in the literature. This comprehensive depiction of observed lake breezes allows an improved understanding of their influence on the transport, dispersion, and production of pollutants in this region. The observational analyses were compared with output from subsequent runs of a high-resolution numerical weather prediction model. The model accurately predicted lake breeze occurrence and type in a variety of synoptic wind regimes, but selected cases showed substantial differences in the detailed timing and location of lake-breeze fronts, and with the initiation of deep moist convection. Knowledge of such strengths and weaknesses aids in the interpretation of results from air quality models driven by this meteorological model.

  10. Forecasting Lake-Effect Precipitation in the Great Lakes Region Using NASA Enhanced-Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipullo, Michelle; Molthan, Andrew; Shafer, Jackie; Case, Jonathan; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Lake-effect precipitation is common in the Great Lakes region, particularly during the late fall and winter. The synoptic processes of lake-effect precipitation are well understood by operational forecasters, but individual forecast events still present a challenge. Locally run, high resolution models can assist the forecaster in identifying the onset and duration of precipitation, but model results are sensitive to initial conditions, particularly the assumed surface temperature of the Great Lakes. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has created a Great Lakes Surface Temperature (GLST) composite, which uses infrared estimates of water temperatures obtained from the MODIS instrument aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites, other coarser resolution infrared data when MODIS is not available, and ice cover maps produced by the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab (GLERL). This product has been implemented into the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS), used within forecast offices to run local, high resolution forecasts. The sensitivity of the model forecast to the GLST product was analyzed with a case study of the Lake Effect Storm Echinacea, which produced 10 to 12 inches of snowfall downwind of Lake Erie, and 8 to 18 inches downwind of Lake Ontario from 27-29 January 2010. This research compares a forecast using the default Great Lakes surface temperatures from the Real Time Global sea surface temperature (RTG SST), in the WRF-EMS model to the enhanced NASA SPoRT GLST product to study forecast impacts. Results from this case study show that the SPoRT GLST contained less ice cover over Lake Erie and generally cooler water temperatures over Lakes Erie and Ontario. Latent and sensible heat fluxes over Lake Ontario were decreased in the GLST product. The GLST product decreased the quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF), which can be correlated to the decrease in temperatures and heat

  11. Influence of Lake Malawi on regional climate from a double-nested regional climate model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Ismaïla; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, Frode

    2017-07-01

    We evaluate the performance of the regional climate model (RCM) RegCM4 coupled to a one dimensional lake model for Lake Malawi (also known as Lake Nyasa in Tanzania and Lago Niassa in Mozambique) in simulating the main characteristics of rainfall and near surface air temperature patterns over the region. We further investigate the impact of the lake on the simulated regional climate. Two RCM simulations, one with and one without Lake Malawi, are performed for the period 1992-2008 at a grid spacing of 10 km by nesting the model within a corresponding 25 km resolution run ("mother domain") encompassing all Southern Africa. The performance of the model in simulating the mean seasonal patterns of near surface air temperature and precipitation is good compared with previous applications of this model. The temperature biases are generally less than 2.5 °C, while the seasonal cycle of precipitation over the region matches observations well. Moreover, the one-dimensional lake model reproduces fairly well the geographical pattern of observed (from satellite measurements) lake surface temperature as well as its mean month-to-month evolution. The Malawi Lake-effects on the moisture and atmospheric circulation of the surrounding region result in an increase of water vapor mixing ratio due to increased evaporation in the presence of the lake, which combines with enhanced rising motions and low-level moisture convergence to yield a significant precipitation increase over the lake and neighboring areas during the whole austral summer rainy season.

  12. [Natural environment and schistosomiasis transmission in Poyang Lake region].

    PubMed

    Lv, Shang-Biao; Lin, Dan-Dan

    2014-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is closely related to natural environmental factors. The changes of environmental factors, such as temperature, hydrology, vegetation, soil etc., all impact the scope and extent of schistosomiasis transmission. Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake and one of the major endemic areas with schistosomiasis in China. With global warming, the implementation of the Three Gorges Dam operation, and the Poyang Lake Ecological Economic Planning, the natural environment in Poyang Lake area has been and will continue to change, especially, the water environment and climate environment, which are more closely related to the schistosomiasis transmission. These changes, to some extent, have affected and will continue to affect the prevalence and transmission of schistosomiasis. This article reviews the relationship between the natural environment and its changes and schistosomiasis transmission in the Poyang Lake region.

  13. Great Lakes nearshore-offshore: Distinct water quality regions

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared water quality of nearshore regions in the Laurentian Great Lakes to water quality in offshore regions. Sample sites for the nearshore region were from the US EPA National Coastal Condition Assessment and based on a criteria or sample-frame of within the 30-m depth co...

  14. Geography of Alaska Lake Districts: Identification, Description, and Analysis of Lake-Rich Regions of a Diverse and Dynamic State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arp, Christopher D.; Jones, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    Lakes are abundant landforms and important ecosystems in Alaska, but are unevenly distributed on the landscape with expansive lake-poor regions and several lake-rich regions. Such lake-rich areas are termed lake districts and have landscape characteristics that can be considered distinctive in similar respects to mountain ranges. In this report, we explore the nature of lake-rich areas by quantitatively identifying Alaska's lake districts, describing and comparing their physical characteristics, and analyzing how Alaska lake districts are naturally organized and correspond to climatic and geophysical characteristics, as well as studied and managed by people. We use a digital dataset (National Hydrography Dataset) of lakes greater than 1 hectare, which includes 409,040 individual lakes and represents 3.3 percent of the land-surface area of Alaska. The selection criteria we used to identify lake districts were (1) a lake area (termed limnetic ratio, in percent) greater than the mean for the State, and (2) a lake density (number of lakes per unit area) greater than the mean for the State using a pixel size scaled to the area of interest and number of lakes in the census. Pixels meeting these criteria were grouped and delineated and all groups greater than 1,000 square kilometers were identified as Alaska's lake districts. These lake districts were described according to lake size-frequency metrics, elevation distributions, geology, climate, and ecoregions to better understand their similarities and differences. We also looked at where lake research and relevant ecological monitoring has occurred in Alaska relative to lake districts and how lake district lands and waters are currently managed. We identified and delineated 20 lake districts in Alaska representing 16 percent of the State, but including 65 percent of lakes and 75 percent of lake area. The largest lake districts identified are the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Arctic Coastal Plain, and Iliamna lake districts with

  15. Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Salt Lake City, situated near the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake, is host to the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, which open Friday, February 8. Venues for five of the scheduled events are at city (indoor) locations, and five in mountain (outdoor) facilities. All ten can be found within the area contained in these images. Some of the outdoor events take place at Ogden, situated north of Salt Lake City and at Park City, located to the east. Salt Lake City is surrounded by mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere enhances the moisture content of winter storms. These factors, in combination with natural cloud seeding by salt crystals from the lake, are believed to result in greater snowfall in neighboring areas compared to more distant locales. In addition to the obvious difference in snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The distinctly different coloration between the northern and southern arms of the Great Salt Lake is the result of a rock-filled causeway built in 1953 to support a permanent railroad. The causeway has resulted in decreased circulation between the two arms and higher salinity on the northern side. The southern part of the lake includes the large Antelope Island, and at full resolution a bridge connecting it to the mainland can be discerned. These images are natural color views acquired on February 8, 2001 and June 16, 2001, respectively. Each image represents an area of about 220 kilometers x 285 kilometers. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team.

  16. Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Salt Lake City, situated near the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake, is host to the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, which open Friday, February 8. Venues for five of the scheduled events are at city (indoor) locations, and five in mountain (outdoor) facilities. All ten can be found within the area contained in these images. Some of the outdoor events take place at Ogden, situated north of Salt Lake City and at Park City, located to the east. Salt Lake City is surrounded by mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere enhances the moisture content of winter storms. These factors, in combination with natural cloud seeding by salt crystals from the lake, are believed to result in greater snowfall in neighboring areas compared to more distant locales. In addition to the obvious difference in snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The distinctly different coloration between the northern and southern arms of the Great Salt Lake is the result of a rock-filled causeway built in 1953 to support a permanent railroad. The causeway has resulted in decreased circulation between the two arms and higher salinity on the northern side. The southern part of the lake includes the large Antelope Island, and at full resolution a bridge connecting it to the mainland can be discerned. These images are natural color views acquired on February 8, 2001 and June 16, 2001, respectively. Each image represents an area of about 220 kilometers x 285 kilometers. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team.

  17. Influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on Regional Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, M.; Holman, K.; Zarrin, A.; Fluck, E.; Vavrus, S. J.; Bennington, V.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of the Laurentian Great Lakes on climate is assessed by comparing two decade-long simulations, with the lakes either included or excluded, using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model Version 4. The Great Lakes dampen the variability in near-surface air temperature across the surrounding region, while reducing the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and annual cycle of air temperature. The impacts of the Great Lakes on the regional surface energy budget include an increase (decrease) in turbulent fluxes during the cold (warm) season and an increase in surface downward shortwave radiation flux during summer due to diminished atmospheric moisture and convective cloud amount. Changes in the hydrologic budget due to the presence of the Great Lakes include increases in evaporation and precipitation during October-March and decreases during May-August, along with springtime reductions in snowmelt-related runoff. Circulation responses consist of a regionwide decrease in sea-level pressure in autumn-winter and an increase in summer, with enhanced ascent and descent in the two seasons, respectively. The most pronounced simulated impact of the Great Lakes on synoptic systems traversing the basin is a weakening of cold-season anticyclones.

  18. The Effect of Lake Temperatures and Emissions on Ozone Exposure in the Western Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D. ); Heilman, Warren E.

    2003-09-01

    A meteorological-chemical model with a 12-km horizontal grid spacing was used to simulate the evolution of ozone over the western Great Lakes region during a 30-day period in the summer of 1999. High ozone production rates were produced over the surface of the lakes as a result of stable atmospheric conditions that trapped ozone precursors within a shallow layer during the day. Simulations with lake temperatures derived from either satellite measurements or climatological values produced ozone mixing ratios over the lakes and around the lake shores that differed by as much as 50 ppb while differences over land were usually 10 ppb or less. Through another series of sensitivity studies that varied ozone precursor emissions, it was shown that a reduction of 50% NOx or VOC would lower the 60 ppb ozone exposure by up to 50 h per month in the remote forest regions over the northern Great Lakes. The implications of these results on future climate change and air quality in the region is discussed.

  19. Lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region and their influence during BAQS-Met 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, D. M. L.; Brook, J. R.; Levy, I.; Makar, P. A.; Zhang, J.; Taylor, P. A.

    2011-02-01

    Mesoscale observations from the BAQS-Met field experiment during the summer of 2007 were integrated and manually analyzed in order to identify and characterize lake breezes in the southern Great Lakes region of North America, and assess their potential impact on air quality. Lake breezes were found to occur on 90% of study days, often occurring in conditions previously thought to impede their development. They affected all parts of the study region, including southwestern Ontario and nearby portions of southeast Michigan and northern Ohio, occasionally penetrating inland from 100 km to over 200 km. Occurrence rates and penetration distances were found to be higher than previously reported in the literature. This more accurate depiction of observed lake breezes allows a better understanding of their influence on the production and transport of pollutants in this region. The observational analyses were compared with output from subsequent runs of a high-resolution numerical weather prediction model. The model accurately predicted lake breeze occurrence in a variety of synoptic wind regimes, but selected cases showed substantial differences in the detailed timing and location of lake-breeze fronts, and with the initiation of deep moist convection. Knowledge of such strengths and weaknesses will assist with interpretation of results from air quality modelling driven by this meteorological model.

  20. Reaching Regional and Local Learners via a Great Lakes MOOC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) took a regional approach to climate change education in a 4-week MOOC (Massive Open On-line Course) on the Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region launched in February 2015. Featuring a different season each week, this Great Lakes MOOC includes lectures about seasonal weather conditions, observed changes, and societal impacts of regional climate change, as well as actions with co-benefits to slow future climate change. To better connect with learners, CIMSS facilitated 21 discussion groups at public libraries around Wisconsin each week. Participants discussed climate change impacts in their communities as well as strategies to mitigate climate change. Not surprisingly, initial survey results show library participants were more committed, engaged, climate literate, and community minded. This session will share lessons learned and survey results from the Great Lakes MOOC which remains open and accessible on Coursera through February 2016 at https://www.coursera.org/course/greatlakesclimate.

  1. Historical land cover changes in the Great Lakes Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, K.L.; Davis, M.B.; Stearns, F.; Guntenspergen, G.; Walker, K.; Sisk, Thomas D.

    1999-01-01

    Two different methods of reconstructing historical vegetation change, drawing on General Land Office (GLO) surveys and fossil pollen deposits, are demonstrated by using data from the Great Lakes region. Both types of data are incorporated into landscape-scale analyses and presented through geographic information systems. Results from the two methods reinforce each other and allow reconstructions of past landscapes at different time scales. Changes to forests of the Great Lakes region during the last 150 years were far greater than the changes recorded over the preceding 1,000 years. Over the last 150 years, the total amount of forested land in the Great Lakes region declined by over 40%, and much of the remaining forest was converted to early successional forest types as a result of extensive logging. These results demonstrate the utility of using GLO survey data in conjunction with other data sources to reconstruct a generalized 'presettlement' condition and assess changes in landcover.

  2. Regionalization of precipitation characteristics in Iran's Lake Urmia basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazel, Nasim; Berndtsson, Ronny; Uvo, Cintia Bertacchi; Madani, Kaveh; Kløve, Bjørn

    2017-03-01

    Lake Urmia in northwest Iran, once one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world, has shrunk by almost 90% in area and 80% in volume during the last four decades. To improve the understanding of regional differences in water availability throughout the region and to refine the existing information on precipitation variability, this study investigated the spatial pattern of precipitation for the Lake Urmia basin. Daily rainfall time series from 122 precipitation stations with different record lengths were used to extract 15 statistical descriptors comprising 25th percentile, 75th percentile, and coefficient of variation for annual and seasonal total precipitation. Principal component analysis in association with cluster analysis identified three main homogeneous precipitation groups in the lake basin. The first sub-region (group 1) includes stations located in the center and southeast; the second sub-region (group 2) covers mostly northern and northeastern part of the basin, and the third sub-region (group 3) covers the western and southern edges of the basin. Results of principal component (PC) and clustering analyses showed that seasonal precipitation variation is the most important feature controlling the spatial pattern of precipitation in the lake basin. The 25th and 75th percentiles of winter and autumn are the most important variables controlling the spatial pattern of the first rotated principal component explaining about 32% of the total variance. Summer and spring precipitation variations are the most important variables in the second and third rotated principal components, respectively. Seasonal variation in precipitation amount and seasonality are explained by topography and influenced by the lake and westerly winds that are related to the strength of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Despite using incomplete time series with different lengths, the identified sub-regions are physically meaningful.

  3. 40 CFR 81.273 - Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake County Intrastate Air Quality... Quality Control Regions § 81.273 Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Lake County... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of California: Lake County. ...

  4. 40 CFR 81.273 - Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake County Intrastate Air Quality... Quality Control Regions § 81.273 Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Lake County... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of California: Lake County. ...

  5. 40 CFR 81.273 - Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake County Intrastate Air Quality... Quality Control Regions § 81.273 Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Lake County... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of California: Lake County. ...

  6. 40 CFR 81.273 - Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake County Intrastate Air Quality... Quality Control Regions § 81.273 Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Lake County... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of California: Lake County. ...

  7. 40 CFR 81.273 - Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake County Intrastate Air Quality... Quality Control Regions § 81.273 Lake County Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Lake County... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of California: Lake County. ...

  8. Geospatial analysis of lake and landscape interactions within the Toolik Lake region, North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Prasad A.

    The Arctic region of Alaska is experiencing severe impacts of climate change. The Arctic lakes ecosystems are bound to undergo alterations in its trophic structure and other chemical properties. However, landscape factors controlling the lake influxes were not studied till date. This research has examined the currently existing lake landscape interactions using Remote Sensing and GIS technology. The statistical modeling was carried out using Regression and CART methods. Remote sensing data was applied to derive the required landscape indices. Remote sensing in the Arctic Alaska faces many challenges including persistent cloud cover, low sun angle and limited snow free period. Tundra vegetation types are interspersed and intricate to classify unlike managed forest stands. Therefore, historical studies have remained underachieved with respect thematic accuracies. However, looking at vegetation communities at watershed level and the implementation of expert classification system achieved the accuracies up to 90%. The research has highlighted the probable role of interactions between vegetation root zones, nutrient availability within active zone, as well as importance of permafrost thawing. Multiple regression analyses and Classification Trees were developed to understand relationships between landscape factors with various chemical parameters as well as chlorophyll readings. Spatial properties of Shrubs and Riparian complexes such as complexity of individual patches at watershed level and within proximity of water channels were influential on Chlorophyll production of lakes. Till-age had significant impact on Total Nitrogen contents. Moreover, relatively young tills exhibited significantly positive correlation with concentration of various ions and conductivity of lakes. Similarly, density of patches of Heath complexes was found to be important with respect to Total Phosphorus contents in lakes. All the regression models developed in this study were significant at 95

  9. Relations between Meteorology and Ozone in the Lake Michigan Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Steven R.; Chang, Joseph C.

    1995-03-01

    The field program phase of the Lake Michigan Ozone Study (LMOS) took place during the summer of 1991. Observed ozone concentrations and weather variables have been analyzed for the Lake Michigan region and the eastern United States for four 1991 LMOS ozone episodes covering 21 days. It is found that all LMOS episodes are associated with large polluted regions with dimensions of 1000 2000 km, located on the western side of high pressure systems centered over the eastern United States. Consequently, the air coming into the LMOS region contains significant amounts of ozone, haze, and other pollutants advected along trajectories with anticyclonic curvature originating in upwind source regions from St. Louis, through the Ohio River valley, and into the northeast megalopolis. The local sources in the Gary-Chicago-Milwaukee region then add to this already polluted air mass, where concentrations are influenced by the strong stability of the boundary layer over Lake Michigan and the associated lake-land-breeze circulations. However, the magnitudes of ozone concentrations in the LMOS region are often quickly and significantly reduced by rain and by fronts, which are present in some portion of the domain during nearly all of the days that were studied. The portion of the urban ozone plume that is not influenced by rain and fronts is observed to be advected into rural areas at downwind distances of 100 200 km or more from Chicago, and often has concentrations higher than those in Chicago. Whether maximum concentrations are located on the western or the eastern shoreline of Lake Michigan depends on whether winds have an easterly or westerly component.

  10. Regional Photonics Initiative at the College of Lake County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulmes, Steven; Kellerhals, William

    2017-01-01

    The College of Lake County Regional Photonics Initiative project was motivated in part by the hiring of out-of-state technicians for local Photonics industry positions. Fifteen high paying employment opportunities during the recent recession could not be filled from the locally available workforce. Research on the current demand and future growth…

  11. Predicting exotic earthworm distribution in the northern Great Lakes region

    Treesearch

    Lindsey M. Shartell; Erik A. Lilleskov; Andrew J. Storer

    2013-01-01

    Identifying influences of earthworm invasion and distribution in the northern Great Lakes is an important step in predicting the potential extent and impact of earthworms across the region. The occurrence of earthworm signs, indicating presence in general, and middens, indicating presence of Lumbricus terrestris exclusively, in the Huron Mountains...

  12. [Ecological compensation standard in Dongting Lake region of returning cropland to lake based on emergy analysis].

    PubMed

    Mao, De-Hua; Hu, Guang-Wei; Liu, Hui-Jie; Li, Zheng-Zui; Li, Zhi-Long; Tan, Zi-Fang

    2014-02-01

    The annual emergy and currency value of the main ecological service value of returning cropland to lake in Dongting Lake region from 1999 to 2010 was calculated based on emergy analysis. The calculation method of ecological compensation standard was established by calculating annual total emergy of ecological service function increment since the starting year of returning cropland to lake, and the annual ecological compensation standard and compensation area were analyzed from 1999 to 2010. The results indicated that ecological compensation standard from 1999 to 2010 was 40.31-86.48 yuan x m(-2) with the mean of 57.33 yuan x m(-2). The ecological compensation standard presented an increase trend year by year due to the effect of eco-recovery of returning cropland to lake. The ecological compensation standard in the research area presented a swift and steady growth trend after 2005 mainly due to the intensive economy development of Hunan Province, suggesting the value of natural ecological resources would increase along with the development of society and economy. Appling the emergy analysis to research the ecological compensation standard could reveal the dynamics of annual ecological compensation standard, solve the abutment problem of matter flow, energy flow and economic flow, and overcome the subjective and arbitrary of environment economic methods. The empirical research of ecological compensation standard in Dongting Lake region showed that the emergy analysis was feasible and advanced.

  13. Regional variability among nonlinear chlorophyll-phosphorus relationships in lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filstrup, Christopher T.; Wagner, Tyler; Soranno, Patricia A.; Stanley, Emily H.; Stow, Craig A.; Webster, Katherine E.; Downing, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between chlorophyll a (Chl a) and total phosphorus (TP) is a fundamental relationship in lakes that reflects multiple aspects of ecosystem function and is also used in the regulation and management of inland waters. The exact form of this relationship has substantial implications on its meaning and its use. We assembled a spatially extensive data set to examine whether nonlinear models are a better fit for Chl a—TP relationships than traditional log-linear models, whether there were regional differences in the form of the relationships, and, if so, which regional factors were related to these differences. We analyzed a data set from 2105 temperate lakes across 35 ecoregions by fitting and comparing two different nonlinear models and one log-linear model. The two nonlinear models fit the data better than the log-linear model. In addition, the parameters for the best-fitting model varied among regions: the maximum and lower Chl aasymptotes were positively and negatively related to percent regional pasture land use, respectively, and the rate at which chlorophyll increased with TP was negatively related to percent regional wetland cover. Lakes in regions with more pasture fields had higher maximum chlorophyll concentrations at high TP concentrations but lower minimum chlorophyll concentrations at low TP concentrations. Lakes in regions with less wetland cover showed a steeper Chl a—TP relationship than wetland-rich regions. Interpretation of Chl a—TP relationships depends on regional differences, and theory and management based on a monolithic relationship may be inaccurate.

  14. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  15. Detection of critical LUCC indices and sensitive watershed regions related to lake algal blooms: a case study of Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-29

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non-uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake.

  16. Detection of Critical LUCC Indices and Sensitive Watershed Regions Related to Lake Algal Blooms: A Case Study of Taihu Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; Su, Zhihu; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China has suffered from severe eutrophication over the past 20 years which is partly due to significant land use/cover change (LUCC). There is an increasing need to detect the critical watershed region that significantly affects lake water degradation, which has great significance for environmental protection. However, previous studies have obtained conflicting results because of non–uniform lake indicators and inadequate time periods. To identify the sensitive LUCC indices and buffer distance regions, three lake divisions (Meiliang Lake, Zhushan Lake and Western Coastal region) and their watershed region within the Taihu Lake basin were chosen as study sites, the algal area was used as a uniform lake quality indicator and modeled with LUCC indices over the whole time series. Results showed that wetland (WL) and landscape index such as Shannon diversity index (SHDI) appeared to be sensitive LUCC indices when the buffer distance was less than 5 km, while agricultural land (AL) and landscape fragmentation (Ci) gradually became sensitive indices as buffer distances increased to more than 5 km. For the relationship between LUCC and lake algal area, LUCC of the WC region seems to have no significant effect on lake water quality. Conversely, LUCC within ML and ZS region influenced algal area of corresponding lake divisions greatly, while the most sensitive regions were found in 3 km to 5 km, rather than the whole catchment. These results will be beneficial for the further understanding of the relationship between LUCC and lake water quality, and will provide a practical basis for the identification of critical regions for lake. PMID:25642691

  17. Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Salt Lake City, situated near the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake, is host to the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, which open Friday, February 8. Venues for five of the scheduled events are at city (indoor) locations, and five in mountain (outdoor) facilities. All ten can be found within the area contained in these images. Some of the outdoor events take place at Ogden, situated north of Salt Lake City and at Park City, located to the east.

    Salt Lake City is surrounded by mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere enhances the moisture content of winter storms. These factors, in combination with natural cloud seeding by salt crystals from the lake, are believed to result in greater snowfall in neighboring areas compared to more distant locales.

    In addition to the obvious difference in snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The distinctly different coloration between the northern and southern arms of the Great Salt Lake is the result of a rock-filled causeway built in 1953 to support a permanent railroad. The causeway has resulted in decreased circulation between the two arms and higher salinity on the northern side. The southern part of the lake includes the large Antelope Island, and at full resolution a bridge connecting it to the mainland can be discerned.

    These images are natural color views acquired on February 8, 2001 and June 16, 2001, during Terra orbits 6093 and 7957, respectively. Each image represents an area of about 220 kilometers x 285 kilometers.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth

  18. Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Salt Lake City, situated near the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake, is host to the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, which open Friday, February 8. Venues for five of the scheduled events are at city (indoor) locations, and five in mountain (outdoor) facilities. All ten can be found within the area contained in these images. Some of the outdoor events take place at Ogden, situated north of Salt Lake City and at Park City, located to the east.

    Salt Lake City is surrounded by mountains including the Wasatch Range to the east, and the temperature difference between the Great Salt Lake and the overlying atmosphere enhances the moisture content of winter storms. These factors, in combination with natural cloud seeding by salt crystals from the lake, are believed to result in greater snowfall in neighboring areas compared to more distant locales.

    In addition to the obvious difference in snow cover between the winter and summer views, water color changes in parts of the Great Salt Lake are apparent in these images. The distinctly different coloration between the northern and southern arms of the Great Salt Lake is the result of a rock-filled causeway built in 1953 to support a permanent railroad. The causeway has resulted in decreased circulation between the two arms and higher salinity on the northern side. The southern part of the lake includes the large Antelope Island, and at full resolution a bridge connecting it to the mainland can be discerned.

    These images are natural color views acquired on February 8, 2001 and June 16, 2001, during Terra orbits 6093 and 7957, respectively. Each image represents an area of about 220 kilometers x 285 kilometers.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth

  19. Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Regional Transportation Study; Great Lakes Area Industries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Regional Transportation Study is an element of this planning process . The objective of the GL/SLS Regional Transportation Study is to develop an up-to-date...system performance and ability to process future cargo flows Evaluation of the performance and economic feasibility of improvements to increase the...section is organized as follows: Basic steelmaking processes Production centers in the U.S. and Canada The industry in the Great Lakes area. These

  20. Hydroxylated PCBs and other chlorinated phenolic compounds in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) blood plasma from the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Linda M; Muir, Derek C G; Whittle, D Mike; Backus, Sean; Norstrom, Ross J; Fisk, Aaron T

    2003-05-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in studies focusing on an emerging class of organic contaminants, hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) and chlorinated phenolic compounds (CPCs) in the environment, particularly in northern regions of Europe and Canada. Since information for fish from the Great Lakes are scarce, we determined the blood plasma concentrations of OH-PCB congeners, pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol (TCP), and 4-hydroxyheptachlorostyrene (4-OH-HpCS) for lake trout (Savelinus namaycush) collected from two of the Great Lakes, Lake Ontario and Lake Superior, and two regional lakes, Lake Champlain and Lake Opeongo. PCP was the dominant CPC in lake trout (105-658 pg/g of plasma). Detectable concentrations of 2,3,4,5-TCP and 4-OH-HpCS were found in all lake trout (2.6-101 and 0.4-27 pg/g, respectively). Highest concentrations were found in trout from Lake Ontario and Lake Superior. Sixteen OH-PCBs were quantified, with 4-OH-CB187 having the highest concentration in all samples (10-173 pg/g of plasma). Unexpectedly, highly chlorinated OH-PCBs such as 4'-OH-CB199 (mean 21.4 and 74.4 pg/g), 4,4'-diOH-CB202 (18.3 and 27.7 pg/g), and 4'-OH-CB208 (24.5 and 34.7 pg/g) were found in lake trout from Lake Ontario and Lake Superior, respectively. Future studies to delineate the sources and impacts of CPCs in the Great Lakes catchment are needed.

  1. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial area...

  2. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial area...

  3. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial area...

  4. Evaluation of regional climate simulations over the Great Lakes region driven by three global data sets

    Treesearch

    Shiyuan Zhong; Xiuping Li; Xindi Bian; Warren E. Heilman; L. Ruby Leung; William I. Jr. Gustafson

    2012-01-01

    The performance of regional climate simulations is evaluated for the Great Lakes region. Three 10-year (1990-1999) current-climate simulations are performed using the MM5 regional climate model (RCM) with 36-km horizontal resolution. The simulations employed identical configuration and physical parameterizations, but different lateral boundary conditions and sea-...

  5. On the representation of heavy lake-effect snow events for the Laurentian Great Lakes region in a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huziy, Oleksandr; Sushama, Laxmi; Duguay, Claude; Baijnath, Janine

    2017-04-01

    Lakes are important components of the climate system and can affect regional climate by modulating surface albedo, surface energy and moisture budgets. Therefore, they should be realistically represented in climate models. Many climate models are currently representing lakes interactively using 1D models. However, for large lakes such as the Laurentian Great Lakes, 3D models are required, as it is important to simulate the circulation patterns which can impact lake temperature as well as ice freeze/melt onset dates and fractional coverage, and by extent lake-effect snow as suggested by recent studies. The aim of this study is to compare lake-effect snow simulated by a regional climate model (CRCM5: Canadian Regional Climate Model, Version 5) with 1D and 3D models for the Great Lakes. In this investigation, two CRCM5 simulations at 10 km horizontal resolution are performed and analysed over the Great Lakes region for the 1979-2012 period. The first simulation (CRCM5_HL), where the Great Lakes are handled by a 1D lake model (Hostetler), is used as a base to represent the configuration of recent regional climate modelling studies. The second simulation (CRCM5_NEMO), where the Great Lakes are simulated by a 3D ocean model (NEMO), is used to assess the impact of representing circulation in large lakes. Preliminary results indicate improved 2-m air temperature directly over the Great Lakes in summer and lower ice cover for CRCM5_NEMO. Both the summer 2-m air temperature and lake ice cover are overestimated in CRCM5_HL. The lower ice cover in turn leads to greater snowfall generated during heavy lake-effect snow events in the case of CRCM5_NEMO. The impacts on lake-atmosphere interactions in the Laurentian Great Lakes region will be discussed by comparing turbulent heat and moisture fluxes as well as lake ice cover. Finally, some results and challenges on diagnosing heavy lake-effect snowfall from regional climate model simulations and observational datasets will be

  6. Use of a regional atmospheric model to simulate lake-atmosphere feedbacks associated with Pleistocene Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Giorgi, F.

    1992-01-01

    A regional model of the atmosphere (version 4 of the NCAR mesoscale model, MM4) was used to assess whether lake-effect precipitation was a significant component of the late-Pleistocene hydrologic budgets of Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville. Control simulations for January and July of 1979 were made using MM4, and the Pleistocene highstand surface areas of the lakes were added to the model and the simulations repeated. In the January simulations, 18% of the moisture added to the modeled atmosphere by Lake Lahontan returned to the Lahontan basin as precipitation, while 32% of the water evaporated from Lake Bonneville fell as precipitation over the Bonneville basin. In the July simulations, 7% of the moisture added to the modeled atmosphere by Lake Lahontan returned to the Lahontan basin as precipitation, and 4% of the water evaporated from Lake Bonneville fell as precipitation over the Bonneville basin. An additonal January simulation was made with the lake surface areas set at onehalf their highstand extents (the average surface area 20 to 15 ka BP). Results from this simulation were similar to the simulation with the highstand lakes, indicating lake-effect precipitation could have been a significant component of the hyrologic budgets of the lakes before and during the highstand period. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Lake states regional forest resources assessments: Technical papers. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, H.H.; Vasievich, J.M.

    1997-07-23

    Contains 21 technical working papers prepared for the Lake States regional forest resources assessment, Lake States Forestry Alliance 1995. They represent significant contributions from many individuals and organizations and form the technical background for the Assessment.

  8. Nitrogen deposition to lakes in national parks of the western Great Lakes region: Isotopic signatures, watershed retention, and algal shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, William O.; Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska; Stottlemyer, Robert; Toczydlowski, David; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Edlund, Mark B.; Almendinger, James E.; Strock, Kristin E.; VanderMeulen, David; Elias, Joan E.; Saros, Jasmine E.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a primary source of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to undisturbed watersheds of the Great Lakes region of the U.S., raising concerns over whether enhanced delivery over recent decades has affected lake ecosystems. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) has been measuring Nr deposition in this region for over 35 years. Here we explore the relationships among NADP-measured Nr deposition, nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N) in lake sediments, and the response of algal communities in 28 lakes situated in national parks of the western Great Lakes region of the U.S. We find that 36% of the lakes preserve a sediment δ15N record that is statistically correlated with some form of Nr deposition (total dissolved inorganic N, nitrate, or ammonium). Furthermore, measured long-term (since 1982) nitrogen biogeochemistry and inferred critical nitrogen loads suggest that watershed nitrogen retention and climate strongly affect whether sediment δ15N is related to Nr deposition in lake sediment records. Measurements of algal change over the last ~ 150 years suggest that Nr deposition, in-lake nutrient cycling, and watershed inputs are important factors affecting diatom community composition, in addition to direct climatic effects on lake physical limnology. The findings suggest that bulk sediment δ15N does reflect Nr deposition in some instances. In addition, this study highlights the interactive effects of Nr deposition and climate variability.

  9. Regional species pools control community saturation in lake phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Ptacnik, Robert; Andersen, Tom; Brettum, Pål; Lepistö, Liisa; Willén, Eva

    2010-12-22

    Recent research has highlighted that positive biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships hold for all groups of organisms, including microbes. Yet, we still lack understanding regarding the drivers of microbial diversity, in particular, whether diversity of microbial communities is a matter of local factors, or whether metacommunities are of similar importance to what is known from higher organisms. Here, we explore the driving forces behind spatial variability in lake phytoplankton diversity in Fennoscandia. While phytoplankton biovolume is best predicted by local phosphorus concentrations, phytoplankton diversity (measured as genus richness, G) only showed weak correlations with local concentrations of total phosphorus. By estimating spatial averages of total phosphorus concentrations on various scales from an independent, spatially representative lake survey, we found that close to 70 per cent of the variability in local phytoplankton diversity can be explained by regionally averaged phosphorus concentrations on a scale between 100 and 400 km. Thus, the data strongly indicate the existence of metacommunities on this scale. Furthermore, we show a strong dependency between lake productivity and spatial community turnover. Thus, regional productivity affects beta-diversity by controlling spatial community turnover, resulting in scale-dependent productivity-diversity relationships. As an illustration of the interaction between local and regional processes in shaping microbial diversity, our results offer both empirical support and a plausible mechanism for the existence of common scaling rules in both the macrobial and the microbial worlds. We argue that awareness of regional species pools in phytoplankton and other unicellular organisms may critically improve our understanding of ecosystems and their susceptibility to anthropogenic stressors.

  10. Local to regional emission sources affecting mercury fluxes to New York lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookman, Revital; Driscoll, Charles T.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Effler, Steven W.

    Lake-sediment records across the Northern Hemisphere show increases in atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic mercury (Hg) over the last 150 years. Most of the previous studies have examined remote lakes affected by the global atmospheric Hg reservoir. In this study, we present Hg flux records from lakes in an urban/suburban setting of central New York affected also by local and regional emissions. Sediment cores were collected from the Otisco and Skaneateles lakes from the Finger Lakes region, Cross Lake, a hypereutrophic lake on the Seneca River, and Glacial Lake, a small seepage lake with a watershed that corresponds with the lake area. Sediment accumulation rates and dates were established by 210Pb. The pre-anthropogenic regional atmospheric Hg flux was estimated to be 3.0 μg m -2 yr -1 from Glacial Lake, which receives exclusively direct atmospheric deposition. Mercury fluxes peaked during 1971-2001, and were 3 to more than 30 times greater than pre-industrial deposition. Land use change and urbanization in the Otisco and Cross watersheds during the last century likely enhanced sediment loads and Hg fluxes to the lakes. Skaneateles and Glacial lakes have low sediment accumulation rates, and thus are excellent indicators for atmospheric Hg deposition. In these lakes, we found strong correlations with emission records for the Great Lakes region that markedly increased in the early 1900s, and peaked during WWII and in the early 1970s. Declines in modern Hg fluxes are generally evident in the core records. However, the decrease in sediment Hg flux at Glacial Lake was interrupted and has increased since the early 1990s probably due to the operation of new local emission sources. Assuming the global Hg reservoir tripled since the pre-industrial period, the contribution of local and regional emission sources to central New York lakes was estimated to about 80% of the total atmospheric Hg deposition.

  11. Parametric distributions of regional lake chemistry: Fitted and derived

    SciTech Connect

    Small, M.J.; Sutton, M.C.; Milke, M.W. )

    1988-02-01

    Parametric probability distribution functions are determined for regional lake chemistry in four subregions of the Eastern Lake Survey (ELS) of the US EPA National Surface Water Survey. The subregions are the Adirondacks, northeastern Minnesota, northcentral Wisconsin, and the Southern Blue Ridge Province. ANC data are fit with a three-parameter lognormal distribution, and the distributions of pH and total base cations are derived from physically based relationships estimated for each region. The parametric distribution functions provide very good representations of observed data in each area, with the exception of northcentral Wisconsin, where bimodal ANC and base cation distributions are observed, suggesting the need for a mixture of distributions. The derived distributions of pH allow for interregional comparison, with unimodal pH distributions in unacidified areas and bimodal pH distributions in regions impacted by acid deposition. Future research of regional variations in water chemistry is proposed in the context of the correlation structure of large-scale spatial variations of soil and geologic properties.

  12. Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzel, Frederic

    2009-09-01

    The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRP's overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

  13. The reflectance and fluorescence properties of Adirondack mountain region lakes applied to the remote sensing of lake chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Vertucci, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study defines the feasibility of the remote monitoring of lake chemistry in the Adirondack Region of New York. The purpose of this thesis is to determine the relationship between the optical properties of lakes and their chemical constituents. The work is intended to derive useful relationships between lake chemistry and lake spectral properties so that lake chemistry can be estimated by remote means. Chemical constituents associated with lake acidification are of particular interest. Constituents of the water column which are known to directly affect lake optical properties (plant pigments, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and turbidity) correlated well with field reflectance measurements and allowed for a consistent prediction of the concentrations of these constituents using reflectance measurements. However, parameters associated with acidification (pH, alkalinity and aluminum concentrations) correlated poorly with reflectance measurements and no models for prediction of these constituents were possible. A relationship does exist between DOC and fluorescence intensity and also between lake pH, aluminum and DOC concentrations and spectral fluorescence and intensity. In the Adirondack Region, water column constituents which directly affect lake optical properties may e remotely estimated with reflectance measures while constituents correlated with DOC composition may be estimated by laser fluorsensing, including pH and aluminum.

  14. 40 CFR 81.67 - Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.67 Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Menominee-Escanaba (Michigan)-Marinette (Wisconsin) Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) and revised to consist of the territorial...

  15. Air pollution and environmental justice in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Bryan

    While it is true that air quality has steadily improved in the Great Lakes region, air pollution remains at unhealthy concentrations in many areas. Research suggests that vulnerable and susceptible groups in society -- e.g., minorities, the poor, children, and poorly educated -- are often disproportionately impacted by exposure to environmental hazards, including air pollution. This dissertation explores the relationship between exposure to ambient air pollution (interpolated concentrations of fine particulate matter, PM2.5) and sociodemographic factors (race, housing value, housing status, education, age, and population density) at the Census block-group level in the Great Lakes region of the United States. A relatively novel approach to quantitative environmental justice analysis, geographically weighted regression (GWR), is compared with a simplified approach: ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. While OLS creates one global model to describe the relationship between air pollution exposure and sociodemographic factors, GWR creates many local models (one at each Census block group) that account for local variations in this relationship by allowing the value of regression coefficients to vary over space, overcoming OLS's assumption of homogeneity and spatial independence. Results suggest that GWR can elucidate patterns of potential environmental injustices that OLS models may miss. In fact, GWR results show that the relationship between exposure to ambient air pollution and sociodemographic characteristics is non-stationary and can vary geographically and temporally throughout the Great Lakes region. This suggests that regulators may need to address environmental justice issues at the neighborhood level, while understanding that the severity of environmental injustices can change throughout the year.

  16. Water resources of the Lake Erie shore region in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, John William; Van Tuyl, Donald W.; White, Walter F.

    1952-01-01

    An abundant supply of water is available to the Lake Erie Shore region in Pennsylvania. Lake i£rie furnishes an almost inexhaustible supply of water of satisfactory chemical quality. Small quantities of water are available from small streams in the area and from the ground. A satisfactory water supply is one of the factors that affect the economic growth of a region. Cities and towns must have adequate amounts of pure water for human consumption. Industries must have suitable water ih sufficient quantities for all purposes. In order to assure. success and economy, the development of water resources should be based on adequate knowledge of the quantity and quality of the water. As a nation, we can not afford to run the risk of dissipating our resources, especially in times of national emergency, by building projects that are not founded on sound engineering and adequate water-resources information. The purpose of this report is to summarize and interpret all available water-resources information for the Lake Erie Shore region in Pennsylvania. The report will be useful for initial guidance in the location or expansion of water facilities for defense and nondefense industries and the municipalities upon which they are dependent. It will also be useful in evaluating the adequacy of the Geological Survey's part of the basic research necessary to plan the orderly development of the water resources of the Lake Erie Shore region. Most of the data contained inthis report have been obtained'by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Forests and Waters, the Pennsylvania Department of Internal Affairs, and the Pennsylvania State Planning Board, Department of Commerce. The Pennsylv~nia Department of Health furnished information on water pollution. The report was prepared in the Water Resources Division of the U. S. Geological Survey b:y John W. Mangan (Surface Water). Donald W. VanTuyl (Ground Water). and Walter F. White, Jr. (Quality of

  17. Bioremoval of heavy metals and nutrients from sewage plant by Anabaena oryzae and Cyanosarcina fontana.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Mustafa A; Issa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the growth of two species of cyanobacteria on wastewater isolated from sewage plant in Aswan, Egypt. We evaluated their efficiency for eliminating nitrogen, phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and heavy metals (Fe(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Mn(2+)). The growth of Cyanosarcina fontana has supported wastewater as a growth medium than Anabaena oryzae compared to standard medium. The nutrients concentration such as COD, NO3-N and PO4-P were decreased by the growth of A. oryzae and C. fontana in the wastewater after primary settling and centrate. However, the reduction of COD was less efficient than the other nutrients. The reduction percentage of COD, NO3-N and PO4-P reached 39.3, 84.1 and 90.7% as well as 54.6, 83.1, and 89.8%, in cultures of A. oryzae and C. fontana grown in the wastewater after primary settling, respectively. The reduction amounted to 10.1, 76.8, and 63.0% by A. oryzae and 43.2, 62.1, and 74.8% by C. fontana, grown in the centrate, respectively. Cyanobacteria species have the ability to accumulate the heavy metals from the wastewater to level far than the exceeding metal level in the water. Whereas, the heavy metals biosorption performance of C. fontana was higher in accumulating Fe(2+) (93.95%), Pb(2+) (81.21%), Cu(2+) (63.9%), and Mn(2+) (48.49%) compared to A. oryzae. The biosorption ability is dependent on the nature of the adsorbent studied and the type of wastewater treated. Therefore, removal of heavy metals and nutrients by the tested algae is strongly recommended as a powerful technique for the removal of pollutants from wastewater.

  18. Quantitative Development and Distribution of Zooplankton in Medium Lakes of the Kostanay Region (North Kazakhstan Region)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubakirova, Gulzhan A.; Syzdykov, Kuanysh N.; Kurzhykayev, Zhumagazy; Uskenov, Rashit B.; Narbayev, Serik; Begenova, Ainagul B.; Zhumakayeva, Aikumys N.; Sabdinova, Dinara K.; Akhmedinov, Serikbay N.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of water resources plays an important environmental and economic role, since it allows developing an effective program of regional development with regard to the environmental load. The hydro-chemical regime of lakes includes water temperature, content of biogenic elements, total mineralization, oxygen regime, and other parameters…

  19. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Souris Red Rainy Region 9 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  20. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in the Upper Portion of the Missouri Region 10 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  1. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Upper Colorado Region 14 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  2. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Upper Mississippi Region 7 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  3. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Great Basin Region 16 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  4. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Texas-Gulf Region 12 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  5. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Lower Mississippi Region 8 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  6. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Mid-Atlantic Region 2 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  7. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in North East Region 1 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  8. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Pacific Northwest Region 17 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  9. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Rio Grande Region 13 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  10. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in the Lower Portion of the Missouri Region 10 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  11. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Lower Colorado Region 15 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  12. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Arkansas White Red Region 11 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  13. Isotopic structure of Lake Whitefish in Lake Huron: Evidence for regional and local populations based on resource use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberts, Rebecca L.; Wissel, Bjorn; Simpson, Gavin L.; Crawford, Stephen S.; Stott, Wendylee; Hanner, Robert H.; Manzon, Richard G.; Wilson, Joanna Y.; Boreham, Douglas R.; Somers, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis is the most commercially valuable species in Lake Huron. The fishery for this species has historically been managed based on 25 management units (17 in Canada, 8 in the USA). However, congruence between the contemporary population structure of Lake Whitefish and management units is poorly understood. We used stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N), food web markers that reflect patterns in resource use (i.e., prey, location, habitat), to assess the population structure of spawning-phase Lake Whitefish collected from 32 sites (1,474 fish) across Lake Huron. We found large isotopic variation among fish from different sites (ranges: δ13C = 10.2‰, δ15N = 5.5‰) and variable niche size and levels of overlap (standard ellipse area = 1.0–4.3‰2). Lake Huron contained spawning-phase fish from four major isotopic clusters largely defined by extensive variation in δ13C, and the isotopic composition of fish sampled was spatially structured both within and between lake basins. Based on cluster compositions, we identified six putative regional groups, some of which represented sites of high diversity (three to four clusters) and others with less (one to two clusters). Analysis of isotopic values from Lake Whitefish collected from summer feeding locations and baseline prey items showed similar isotopic variation and established spatial linkage between spawning-phase and summer fish. Our results show that summer feeding location contributes strongly to the isotopic structure we observed in spawning-phase fish. One of the regional groups we identified in northern Georgian Bay is highly distinct based on isotopic composition and possibly ecologically unique within Lake Huron. Our findings are congruent with several previous studies using different markers (genetics, mark–recapture), and we conclude that current management units are generally too small and numerous to reflect the population structure of Lake Whitefish

  14. Regional Air Quality Partnerships - The Great Lakes challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hauge, E.R.

    1997-12-31

    Air pollution is a regional problem. The 1967 Clean Air Act Amendments (the Air Quality Act) divided the United States into air quality control regions (AQCRs) and required intergovernmental cooperation to deal with the problem. The 1977 Clean Air Act Amendments established a program to prevent significant deterioration of air quality in clean air areas, a major purpose of which is to preserve, protect, and enhance the air quality in nationally or regionally significant lands ({open_quotes}Class I areas{close_quotes}). Federal land managers (FLMs) are given an {open_quotes}affirmative responsibility{close_quotes} to protect Class I resources from adverse air pollution impacts. The National Park Service and other FLMs initiated air quality programs in response to the Clean Air Act mandates. However, the case-by-case permit review process is not necessarily the best way to deal with regional air pollution. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments refocussed on regional air pollution. The first regional air quality partnership (RAQP) was organized that same year. In 1991, the US-Canada Air Quality Agreement was signed, requiring cooperation on transboundary air pollution issues. Several additional RAQPs have been organized, including the first international partnership in New England and Atlantic Canada. Establishing a Great Lakes partnership is the biggest challenge to date.

  15. Landsat-based trend analysis of lake dynamics across northern permafrost regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nitze, Ingmar; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Arp, Christopher D.; Ulrich, Mathias; Federov, Alexander; Veremeeva, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Lakes are a ubiquitous landscape feature in northern permafrost regions. They have a strong impact on carbon, energy and water fluxes and can be quite responsive to climate change. The monitoring of lake change in northern high latitudes, at a sufficiently accurate spatial and temporal resolution, is crucial for understanding the underlying processes driving lake change. To date, lake change studies in permafrost regions were based on a variety of different sources, image acquisition periods and single snapshots, and localized analysis, which hinders the comparison of different regions. Here we present, a methodology based on machine-learning based classification of robust trends of multi-spectral indices of Landsat data (TM,ETM+, OLI) and object-based lake detection, to analyze and compare the individual, local and regional lake dynamics of four different study sites (Alaska North Slope, Western Alaska, Central Yakutia, Kolyma Lowland) in the northern permafrost zone from 1999 to 2014. Regional patterns of lake area change on the Alaska North Slope (-0.69%), Western Alaska (-2.82%), and Kolyma Lowland (-0.51%) largely include increases due to thermokarst lake expansion, but more dominant lake area losses due to catastrophic lake drainage events. In contrast, Central Yakutia showed a remarkable increase in lake area of 48.48%, likely resulting from warmer and wetter climate conditions over the latter half of the study period. Within all study regions, variability in lake dynamics was associated with differences in permafrost characteristics, landscape position (i.e. upland vs. lowland), and surface geology. With the global availability of Landsat data and a consistent methodology for processing the input data derived from robust trends of multi-spectral indices, we demonstrate a transferability, scalability and consistency of lake change analysis within the northern permafrost region.

  16. Forecasting the spread of invasive rainbow smelt in the Laurentian Great Lakes region of North America.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Silva, Norman; Olden, Julian D; Maxted, Jeffrey T; Hrabik, Thomas R; Vander Zanden, M Jake

    2006-12-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) have invaded many North American lakes, often resulting in the extirpation of native fish populations. Yet, their invasion is incipient and provides the rationale for identifying ecosystems likely to be invaded and where management and prevention efforts should be focused. To predict smelt presence and absence, we constructed a classification-tree model based on habitat data from 354 lakes in the native range for smelt in southern Maine. Maximum lake depth, lake area, and Secchi depth (surrogate measure of lake productivity) were the most important predictors. We then used our model to identify lakes vulnerable to invasion in three regions outside the smelt's native range: northern Maine (52 of 244 lakes in the non-native range), Ontario (4447 of 8110), and Wisconsin (553 of 5164). We further identified a subset of lakes with a strong potential for impact (potential-impact lakes) based on the presence of fish species that are affected by rainbow smelt. Ninety-four percent of vulnerable lakes in the non-native range in Maine are also potential-impact lakes, as are 94% and 58% of Ontario and Wisconsin's vulnerable lakes, respectively. Our modeling approach can be applied to other invaders and regions to identify invasion-prone ecosystems, thus aiding in the management of invasive species and the efficient allocation of invasive species mitigation and prevention resources.

  17. A Systematic Regional-scale Assessment of Lake Dynamics across the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Li, J.; Luo, J.; Kroll, C. N.; Yao, T.; Wu, Y.; Li, X.

    2008-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is home to the world's largest high-altitude lake group and has been experiencing significant climate change. Tibetan lakes have been impacted greatly, and in return they serve as a sensitive indicator of regional climate and water cycle variability. The paper provides a regional-scale systematic assessment of both paleo and recent lake changes across the plateau using geo-spatial information technologies. Knowledge of past lake dynamics is essential for us to better understand the current and inferred future lake changes. Since paleo lake shores have been extensively preserved on this remote plateau, paleo lake change since the late Pleistocene (~25 ka BP) can be inferred from paleo shorelines visible in high-resolution satellite imagery with the assistance of digital elevation models. We have recovered the paleo lake extent for more than 650 major contemporary lakes, and found that they have evolved from 173 larger paleo lakes that have shrunk so significantly that more than two-thirds of the original lake area has disappeared. The total water loss due to this lake shrinkage is estimated to be more than 2,900 km3. The recovered paleo lake shrinkage exhibits a strong spatial pattern across the plateau, and corresponds with Quaternary glacial changes in a drainage-basin-based analysis. More recent lake dynamics over the past 30 years can be observed by employing long-archived Landsat satellite data, and only minor changes have been found in most areas. It has been found that glacial dynamics play an important role in detected paleo as well as recent lake changes, and will continue to play a critical role in Tibetan lake dynamics in the near future.

  18. A revision of hominin fossil teeth from Fontana Ranuccio (Middle Pleistocene, Anagni, Frosinone, Italy).

    PubMed

    Rubini, Mauro; Cerroni, Vittorio; Festa, Giulia; Sardella, Raffaele; Zaio, Paola

    2014-12-01

    The Fontana Ranuccio hominin teeth (FR, Latium, Italy) are dated to the Middle Pleistocene. In previous studies these teeth were classified as two lower (left and right) second molars, one lower left central incisor and a badly worn incisor crown, the exact position of which could not be determined. In 2012 these remains were acquired by the Anthropological Service of S.B.A.L. (Italian Ministry of Culture) and for this reason re-analysed. In a thorough revision we have reassessed them both morphologically and dimensionally as two lower (left and right) first molars, one lower left lateral incisor and a possible upper left canine. The comparison with penecontemporaneous and diachronic samples shows that the Fontana Ranuccio teeth are morphologically similar to Atapuerca-Sima de los Huesos, Arago XIII and Neanderthal samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rehabilitation of lake trout in the Apostle Islands region of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dryer, William R.; King, George R.

    1968-01-01

    Marked success of rehabilitation of lake trout in Lake Superior has been due principally to the control of the sea lamprey and closure of the lake trout fishery in 1962 and large-scale plantings of yearling lake trout in 1959-66. After the sea lamprey became established in the late 1940s, spawning stocks of lake trout began to decrease and were almost nonexistent by 1960-61. After control of the sea lamprey and closure of the commercial fishery for lake trout in 1962, the abundance of spawning stocks began to rise and reached the highest levels on record in 1964-66. Successful spawning in 1964 and 1965 was demonstrated by catches of age-0 lake trout in 1965 and 1966, the first evidence of natural reproduction since 1959. Plantings of hatchery-reared lake trout in Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior began in 1952. The percentage of hatchery-reared fish in catches of juvenile lake trout increased almost steadily from 1953 to 1965 (when nearly all were of hatchery origin). The abundance of juvenile fish increased from 1959 to 1962 and remained nearly constant in 1962-66. The success of lake trout plantings was highest in 1959-61 but generally declined after 1961; the success of the plantings was inversely related to the abundance of older lake trout. Annual increments of growth of hatchery-reared lake trout varied from 1.1 to 5.0 inches after planting. The average lengths of fish of identical age-groups varied according to gear of capture, depth of water, and season. More than 65% of the season's growth of age-III lake trout took place after September. The findings indicate that the present rate of stocking lake trout may be higher than necessary to maintain optimum abundance.

  20. Birth Outcomes across Three Rural-Urban Typologies in the Finger Lakes Region of New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strutz, Kelly L.; Dozier, Ann M.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Glantz, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study is a descriptive, population-based analysis of birth outcomes in the New York State Finger Lakes region designed to determine whether perinatal outcomes differed across 3 rural typologies. Methods: Hospital birth data for the Finger Lakes region from 2006 to 2007 were used to identify births classified as low birthweight (LBW),…

  1. Birth Outcomes across Three Rural-Urban Typologies in the Finger Lakes Region of New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strutz, Kelly L.; Dozier, Ann M.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Glantz, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study is a descriptive, population-based analysis of birth outcomes in the New York State Finger Lakes region designed to determine whether perinatal outcomes differed across 3 rural typologies. Methods: Hospital birth data for the Finger Lakes region from 2006 to 2007 were used to identify births classified as low birthweight (LBW),…

  2. 40 CFR 81.67 - Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.67 Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  3. 40 CFR 81.67 - Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.67 Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  4. 40 CFR 81.67 - Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.67 Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  5. 40 CFR 81.67 - Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.67 Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  6. Identifying Watershed Regions Sensitive to Soil Erosion and Contributing to Lake Eutrophication—A Case Study in the Taihu Lake Basin (China)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; He, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Taihu Lake in China is suffering from severe eutrophication partly due to non-point pollution from the watershed. There is an increasing need to identify the regions within the watershed that most contribute to lake water degradation. The selection of appropriate temporal scales and lake indicators is important to identify sensitive watershed regions. This study selected three eutrophic lake areas, including Meiliang Bay (ML), Zhushan Bay (ZS), and the Western Coastal region (WC), as well as multiple buffer zones next to the lake boundary as the study sites. Soil erosion intensity was designated as a watershed indicator, and the lake algae area was designated as a lake quality indicator. The sensitive watershed region was identified based on the relationship between these two indicators among different lake divisions for a temporal sequence from 2000 to 2012. The results show that the relationship between soil erosion modulus and lake quality varied among different lake areas. Soil erosion from the two bay areas was more closely correlated with water quality than soil erosion from the WC region. This was most apparent at distances of 5 km to 10 km from the lake, where the r2 was as high as 0.764. Results indicate that soil erosion could be used as an indicator for identifying key watershed protection areas. Different lake areas need to be considered separately due to differences in geographical features, land use, and the corresponding effects on lake water quality. PMID:26712772

  7. Identifying Watershed Regions Sensitive to Soil Erosion and Contributing to Lake Eutrophication--A Case Study in the Taihu Lake Basin (China).

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Ma, Ronghua; He, Bin

    2015-12-24

    Taihu Lake in China is suffering from severe eutrophication partly due to non-point pollution from the watershed. There is an increasing need to identify the regions within the watershed that most contribute to lake water degradation. The selection of appropriate temporal scales and lake indicators is important to identify sensitive watershed regions. This study selected three eutrophic lake areas, including Meiliang Bay (ML), Zhushan Bay (ZS), and the Western Coastal region (WC), as well as multiple buffer zones next to the lake boundary as the study sites. Soil erosion intensity was designated as a watershed indicator, and the lake algae area was designated as a lake quality indicator. The sensitive watershed region was identified based on the relationship between these two indicators among different lake divisions for a temporal sequence from 2000 to 2012. The results show that the relationship between soil erosion modulus and lake quality varied among different lake areas. Soil erosion from the two bay areas was more closely correlated with water quality than soil erosion from the WC region. This was most apparent at distances of 5 km to 10 km from the lake, where the r² was as high as 0.764. Results indicate that soil erosion could be used as an indicator for identifying key watershed protection areas. Different lake areas need to be considered separately due to differences in geographical features, land use, and the corresponding effects on lake water quality.

  8. Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations over the Great Lakes Region Driven by Three Global Data Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Shiyuan; Li, Xiuping; Bian, Xindi; Heilman, Warren E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Gustafson, William I.

    2012-06-27

    The performance of regional climate simulations is evaluated for the Great Lakes region. Three 10-year (1990–1999) current-climate simulations are performed using the MM5 regional climate model (RCM) with 36-km horizontal resolution. The simulations employed identical configuration and physical parameterizations, but different lateral boundary conditions and sea-surface temperatures derived from the NCEP Global Reanalysis and output from the CCSM3 and GISS general circulation models (GCMs). The simulation results are compared to the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). The three RCM simulations appeared to be more accurate in winter and least accurate in summer, and more accurate aloft than near the surface. The reanalysis-constrained simulation adequately captured the spatial distribution and seasonal cycle of the observed surface-air temperature and precipitation, but it produced consistently across all seasons a cold bias that is generally larger over the lakes than over land and a wet bias due to an overestimation of nonconvective precipitation. The simulated seasonal cycle of moisture–flux convergence over the region was in very good agreement with NARR. The two GCM-driven runs adequately simulated the spatial and seasonal variation of temperature, but overestimated cold-season precipitation and underestimated summer precipitation, reversing the observed annual precipitation cycle. The GISS-driven run failed to simulate the prevailing low-level flow and moisture convergence patterns. All three RCM simulations successfully captured the impact of the Great Lakes on the region's climate, especially on winter precipitation, a significant improvement over coarse-resolution GCM simulations over the region.

  9. Mercury contamination in the Laurentian Great Lakes region: introduction and overview.

    PubMed

    Wiener, James G; Evers, David C; Gay, David A; Morrison, Heather A; Williams, Kathryn A

    2012-02-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes region of North America contains substantial aquatic resources and mercury-contaminated landscapes, fish, and wildlife. This special issue emanated from a bi-national synthesis of data from monitoring programs and case studies of mercury in the region, here defined as including the Great Lakes, the eight U.S. states bordering the Great Lakes, the province of Ontario, and Lake Champlain. We provide a retrospective overview of the regional mercury problem and summarize new findings from the synthesis papers and case studies that follow. Papers in this issue examine the chronology of mercury accumulation in lakes, the importance of wet and dry atmospheric deposition and evasion to regional mercury budgets, the influence of land-water linkages on mercury contamination of surface waters, the bioaccumulation of methylmercury in aquatic foods webs; and ecological and health risks associated with methylmercury in a regionally important prey fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. How much acidification has occurred in Adirondack region lakes (New York, USA) since preindustrial times

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, B.F.; Smol, J.P.; Kingston, J.C.; Charles, D.F.; Birks, H.J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Preindustrial and present-day lake water pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), total monomeric aluminum Al(sub m), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were inferred from the species composition of diatom and chrysophyte microfossils in the tops (present-day inferences) and bottoms (pre-1850 inferences) of sediment cores collected from a statistically selected set of Adirondack lakes. Results from the study lakes were extrapolated to a predefined target population of 675 low-alkalinity Adirondack region lakes. Estimates of preindustrial to present-day changes in lake water chemistry show that approximately 25-35% of the target population has acidified. The magnitude of acidification was greatest in the low-alkalinity lakes of the southwestern Adirondacks, an area with little geological ability to neutralize acidic deposition and receives the highest annual average rainfall in the region. The authors estimate that approximately 80% of the target population lakes with present-day measured pH = or < 5.2 and 30-45% of lakes with pH between 5.2 and 6.0 have undergone large declines in pH and ANC, and concomitant increases in Al(sub m). Estimated changes in (DOC) were small and show no consistent pattern in the acidified lakes. The study provides the first statistically based regional evaluation of the extent of lake acidification in the Adirondacks.

  11. The Oligochaeta (Annelida, Clitellata) of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes region: An update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Douglas R.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    2003-01-01

    An updated oligochaete species list for the Great Lakes region is provided. The list was developed through the reexamination of the taxa reported in a previous report in 1980, addition of new taxa or records collected from the region since 1980, and an update of taxonomy commensurate with systematic and nomenclatural changes over the intervening years since the last review. The authors found 74 papers mentioning Great Lakes oligochaete species. The majority of these papers were published in the 1980s. The literature review and additional collections resulted in 15 species being added to the previous list. Nine taxa were removed from the previous list due to misidentification, synonymies, level of identification, or inability to confirm the identity. Based on this review, 101 species of Oligochaeta are now known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes watershed. Of these, 95 species are known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes proper, with an additional 6 species recorded from the inland waters of the watershed. The greatest diversity of oligochaete species was found in the inland waters of the region (81) followed by Lake Huron (72), Lake Ontario (65), Lake Erie (64), Lake Superior (63), Lake Michigan (62), St. Marys River (60), Niagara River (49), Saginaw Bay (44), St. Clair River (37), Lake St. Clair (36), St. Lawrence River (27), and the Detroit River (21). Three species are suspected of being introduced, Branchiura sowerbyi, Gianius aquaedulcisand Ripistes parasita, and two are believed to be endemic, Thalassodrilus hallae andTeneridrilus flexus.

  12. "The Effect of Alternative Representations of Lake Temperatures and Ice on WRF Regional Climate Simulations"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lakes can play a significant role in regional climate, modulating inland extremes in temperature and enhancing precipitation. Representing these effects becomes more important as regional climate modeling (RCM) efforts focus on simulating smaller scales. When using the Weathe...

  13. "The Effect of Alternative Representations of Lake Temperatures and Ice on WRF Regional Climate Simulations"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lakes can play a significant role in regional climate, modulating inland extremes in temperature and enhancing precipitation. Representing these effects becomes more important as regional climate modeling (RCM) efforts focus on simulating smaller scales. When using the Weathe...

  14. Dynamical Downscaling over the Great Lakes Basin of North America using the WRF Regional Climate Model: The impact of the Great Lakes system on regional greenhouse warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gula, J.; Peltier, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we investigate the regional climate changes to be expected over the Great Lakes Basin of North America during the next century. Large freshwater systems, such as the Great Lakes, play a key role in determining the climate of their basins and adjacent regions by air mass modification through the exchange of heat and moisture with the atmosphere. Even systems as extensive as the Great Lakes are unresolved in coarse resolution global climate simulations but may be accurately captured in finer-mesh regional simulations by dynamical downscaling. Historical (1979-2001) and future (2050-2060 and 2090-2100) conditions are simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) forced by CCSM3 global simulations. Our analyses are based upon the IPCC SRES A2 and A1B emissions scenarios. A two-step nesting procedure is employed for the purpose of downscaling, in which the first nested WRF model is of North American continental scale at 30 km resolution, whereas the innermost domain at 10 km resolution covers the Great Lakes Basin and the Canadian Province of Ontario. The differences in extreme temperature and precipitation events delivered by the different scales of simulation are discussed. As the WRF model does not currently have an explicit lake component, lake ice and lake surface temperature need to be prescribed in the model. A first set of simulations is performed using climatological 1979-2001) data for lake ice and lake surface temperature. A second set is performed using outputs from the freshwater lake model "FLake" (Mironov, D. V., 2008, COSMO Technical Report, No. 11, Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach am Main, Germany) forced by atmospheric fields from the global simulations. A third set is performed using an interactive coupling of the lake model FLake with the regional model WRF. Changes in surface temperatures and ice cover, and especially ice-out dates, for the Great Lakes under future atmospheric conditions are discussed. The trends in

  15. A coupled regional climate model for the Lake Victoria basin of East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yi; Semazzi, Fredrick H. M.; Xie, Lian; Ogallo, Laban J.

    2004-01-01

    A nested coupled model has been developed to investigate the two-way interactions between the regional climate of eastern Africa and Lake Victoria. The atmospheric component of the model is the North Carolina State University (NCSU) version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) regional climate model (NCSU-RegCM2). The lake component of the model is based on the Princeton ocean model (POM).Three simulations, each 4 months long, have been performed for the short rains of eastern Africa of September through to December. The control experiment is based on the standard NCSU-RegCM2 model coupled to a one-dimensional model of Lake Victoria. The second experiment was based on the stand-alone three-dimensional primitive equation POM-Lake Victoria model forced by output from the atmospheric component of the control run. The third experiment is based on the integration of the coupled system of the NCSU-RegCM2 model where the one-dimensional lake model in the control run has been replaced by the three-dimensional POM hydrodynamical model for Lake Victoria.The results confirm that adopting the traditional modelling approach, in which the lake hydrodynamics are neglected and the formulation is based entirely on thermodynamics alone, is not entirely satisfactory for the Lake Victoria basin. Such a strategy precludes the transport of heat realistically within the lake, from the heat surplus regions to the cooler regions, and thereby results in a degraded simulation of the climate downstream over the rest of the lake and the surrounding land regions. The numerical simulations show that the southwestern region of the lake is an important source of warm water because it is relatively shallower and the water column is heated up much more quickly during the day than the rest of the lake. The result is that the surface temperature anomaly field from the all-lake area average consists of a gradient pattern with warmer water over the shallow region of the lake over the

  16. View of Great Lakes region from STS-64

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-19

    STS064-54-022 (9-20 Sept. 1994) --- All the Great Lakes are visible in this oblique 35mm image exposed from the space shuttle Discovery during the almost 11-day mission. Lake Ontario is in the foreground. The Niagara Falls area and Lake Erie are illuminated by sunglint just below center frame. Detroit is visible just above center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. Wolves in the Great Lakes region: a phylogeographic puzzle.

    PubMed

    Randi, Ettore

    2010-10-01

    Empirical studies demonstrate that natural hybridization in animals is more common than thought so far (Mallet 2005), particularly among species that originated recently through cycles of population contraction-expansion arising from climate changes over the last glacial period, the Pleistocene. In addition, the post-glacial global growth of human populations has fostered anthropogenic hybridization events, mediated by habitat changes, the persecution of large predators and the introduction of alien species (Allendorf et al. 2001). The Canis lineage shows cases of both natural and anthropogenic hybridization, exacerbating the controversy about the number of species that should be formally validated in the taxonomic lists, the evolutionary role of genetic introgression and the ways to manage hybrids with invading wild or domesticated populations. The study by Wheeldon et al. (2010), published in this issue of Molecular Ecology, adds a new piece to the intricate puzzle of evolution and taxonomy of Canis in North America. They show that sympatric wolves (C. lupus) and coyotes (C. latrans) are not (extensively) hybridizing in the western North American Great Lakes region (GLR). Widespread hybridization between coyotes and a genetically distinct, but closely related, wolf-like population (the eastern wolf) occurred in the northeastern regions of North America. In Wheeldon et al.'s (2010) opinion, these data should prove definitely that two different species of wolf (the western gray wolf C. lupus and the eastern wolf C. lycaon) and their hybrids are distributed across the GLR.

  18. Seismic reflection study of recessional moraines beneath Lake Superior and their relationship to regional deglaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmesser, C.W.; Johnson, T.C.; Wold, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 8000 km of continuous seismic reflection profiles throughout Lake Superior were examined for evidence of recessional moraines and other ice-margin deposits associated with the retreat of late Wisconsin ice. These features are correlated with the record of glacial-lake evolution in western Lake Superior. An offlapping sequence of glacial and glacial-lacustrine dediments overlying bedrock is recognized in west-central Lake Superior that is progressively younger to the northeast. The sequence underlies more recent glaical-lacustrine and postglacial sediments. Four facies are recognized on the basis of geomorphologic and acoustic properties and are interpreted to represent a southwest-to-northeast assemblage of: proglacial stratified drift (facies A), drift in major end moraines (facies B), till deposited as glacial retreat resumed, or possibly late-stage ablation till (facies C), and basal till (facies D). The prominent moraines of facies B are unusually thick and are believed to mark the ice-margin shorelines of successive major proglacial lakes that formerly occupied parts of western Lake Superior. The moraines are tentatively correlated with Glacial Lake Duluth (unit 1), Glacial Lake Washburn (unit 2), and Glacial Lake Beaver Bay (unit 3), the most prominent of lakes drained via the progressively lower outlets via the Moose Lake/ Brule-St. Croix Rivers, the Huron Mountains, and the Au Train-Whitefish regions, respectively. ?? 1982.

  19. Sensitivity of lake ice regimes to climate change in the Nordic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebre, S.; Boissy, T.; Alfredsen, K.

    2014-08-01

    A one-dimensional process-based multi-year lake ice model, MyLake, was used to simulate lake ice phenology and annual maximum lake ice thickness for the Nordic region comprising Fennoscandia and the Baltic countries. The model was first tested and validated using observational meteorological forcing on a candidate lake (Lake Atnsjøen) and using downscaled ERA-40 reanalysis data set. To simulate ice conditions for the contemporary period of 1961-2000, the model was driven by gridded meteorological forcings from ERA-40 global reanalysis data downscaled to a 25 km resolution using the Rossby Centre Regional Climate Model (RCA). The model was then forced with two future climate scenarios from the RCA driven by two different general circulation models (GCMs) based on the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A1B. The two climate scenarios correspond to two future time periods namely the 2050s (2041-2070) and the 2080s (2071-2100). To take into account the influence of lake morphometry, simulations were carried out for four different hypothetical lake depths (5 m, 10 m, 20 m, 40 m) placed at each of the 3708 grid cells. Based on a comparison of the mean predictions in the future 30-year periods with the control (1961-1990) period, ice cover durations in the region will be shortened by 1 to 11 weeks in 2041-2070, and 3 to 14 weeks in 2071-2100. Annual maximum lake ice thickness, on the other hand, will be reduced by a margin of up to 60 cm by 2041-2070 and up to 70 cm by 2071-2100. The simulated changes in lake ice characteristics revealed that the changes are less dependent on lake depths though there are slight differences. The results of this study provide a regional perspective of anticipated changes in lake ice regimes due to climate warming across the study area by the middle and end of this century.

  20. Sensitivity of lake ice regimes to climate change in the nordic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebre, S.; Boissy, T.; Alfredsen, K.

    2013-03-01

    A one-dimensional process-based multi-year lake ice model, MyLake, was used to simulate lake ice phenology and annual maximum lake ice thickness for the Nordic region comprising Fennoscandia and the Baltic countries. The model was first tested and validated using observational meteorological forcing on a candidate lake (Lake Atnsjøen) and using downscaled ERA-40 reanalysis data set. To simulate ice conditions for the contemporary period of 1961-2000, the model was driven by gridded meteorological forcings from ERA-40 global reanalysis data downscaled to a 25 km resolution using the Rossby Center Regional Climate Model (RCA). The model was then forced with two future climate scenarios from the RCA driven by two different GCMs based on the SRES A1B emissions scenario. The two climate scenarios correspond to two future time periods namely the 2050s (2041-2070) and the 2080s (2071-2100). To take into account the influence of lake morphometry, simulations were carried out for four different hypothetical lake depths (5 m, 10 m, 20 m, 40 m) placed at each of the 3708 grid cells. Based on a comparison of the mean predictions in the future 30 yr periods with the control (1961-1990) period, ice cover durations in the region will be shortened by 1 to 11 weeks in 2041-2070, and 3 to 14 weeks in 2071-2100. Annual maximum lake ice thickness, on the other hand, will be reduced by a margin of up to 60 cm by 2041-2070 and up to 70 cm by 2071-2100. The simulated changes in lake ice characteristics revealed that the changes are less dependent on lake depths though there are slight differences. The results of this study provide a~regional perspective of anticipated changes in lake ice regimes due to climate warming across the study area by the middle and end of this century.

  1. HISTORICAL SNOW AMOUNTS IN THE LAKE EFFECT REGION OF LAKE SUPERIOR: EVIDENCE OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies (Levitus et al., .2000) suggest a warming of the world ocean over the past 50 years. This could be occurring in the Great Lakes also but thermal measurements are lacking. Historical trends in natural phenomena, such as the duration of ice cover on lakes, provide in...

  2. HISTORICAL SNOW AMOUNTS IN THE LAKE EFFECT REGION OF LAKE SUPERIOR: EVIDENCE OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies (Levitus et al., .2000) suggest a warming of the world ocean over the past 50 years. This could be occurring in the Great Lakes also but thermal measurements are lacking. Historical trends in natural phenomena, such as the duration of ice cover on lakes, provide in...

  3. A STUDY OF HIGHER EDUCATION POSSIBILITIES FOR THE ADIRONDACK LAKES REGION, NEW YORK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HARRIS, NORMAN C.; RUSSEL, JOHN H.

    SEVERAL PROPOSALS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES ARE DISCUSSED. FACTORS ARE PRESENTED WHICH RULE OUT A LOCAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOR THE ADIRONDACK LAKES REGION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A BRANCH OF THE CANTON AGRICULTURAL-TECHNICAL COLLEGE IN THE LAKES AREA. CONSIDERATION SHOULD BE GIVEN, THOUGH, TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A COMMUNITY COLLEGE IN OR NEAR…

  4. 2016 Federal Green Challenge Award Winners in the Great Lakes Region

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016 FGC award winners in the Great Lakes region: Mpls. Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, MN National Guard, U.S. EPA Mid-Continent Ecology Division, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Detroit Field Office, and Naval Station Great Lakes.

  5. ANALYSIS OF MERCURY IN VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE LAKES: EVALUATION OF THE REGIONAL MERCURY CYCLING MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of the Regional Mercury Cycling Model (R-MCM, a steady-state fate and transport model used to simulate mercury concentrations in lakes) is presented based on its application to a series of 91 lakes in Vermont and New Hampshire. Visual and statistical analyses are pr...

  6. ANALYSIS OF MERCURY IN VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE LAKES: EVALUATION OF THE REGIONAL MERCURY CYCLING MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An evaluation of the Regional Mercury Cycling Model (R-MCM, a steady-state fate and transport model used to simulate mercury concentrations in lakes) is presented based on its application to a series of 91 lakes in Vermont and New Hampshire. Visual and statistical analyses are pr...

  7. The mesoproterozoic midcontinent rift system, Lake Superior region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ojakangas, R.W.; Morey, G.B.; Green, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Exposures in the Lake Superior region, and associated geophysical evidence, show that a 2000 km-long rift system developed within the North American craton ??? 1109-1087 Ma, the age span of the most of the volcanic rocks. This system is characterized by immense volumes of mafic igneous rocks, mostly subaerial plateau basalts, generated in two major pulses largely by a hot mantle plume. A new ocean basin was nearly formed before rifting ceased, perhaps due to the remote effect of the Grenville continental collision to the east. Broad sagging/subsidence, combined with a system of axial half-grabens separated along the length of the rift by accommodation zones, provided conditions for the accumulation of as much as 20 km of volcanic rocks and as much as 10 km of post-rift clastic sediments, both along the rift axis and in basins flanking a central, post-volcanic horst. Pre-rift mature, quartzose sandstones imply little or no uplift prior to the onset of rift volcanism. Early post-rift red-bed sediments consist almost entirely of intrabasinally derived volcanic sediment deposited in alluvial fan to fluvial settings; the exception is one gray to black carbon-bearing lacustrine(?) unit. This early sedimentation phase was followed by broad crustal sagging and deposition of progressively more mature red-bed, fluvial sediments with an extra-basinal provenance. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Mesoproterozoic Midcontinent Rift System, Lake Superior Region, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojakangas, R. W.; Morey, G. B.; Green, J. C.

    2001-06-01

    Exposures in the Lake Superior region, and associated geophysical evidence, show that a 2000 km-long rift system developed within the North American craton ∽1109-1087 Ma, the age span of most of the volcanic rocks. This system is characterized by immense volumes of mafic igneous rocks, mostly subaerial plateau basalts, generated in two major pulses largely by a hot mantle plume. A new ocean basin was nearly formed before rifting ceased, perhaps due to the remote effect of the Grenville continental collision to the east. Broad sagging/subsidence, combined with a system of axial half-grabens separated along the length of the rift by accommodation zones, provided conditions for the accumulation of as much as 20 km of volcanic rocks and as much as 10 km of post-rift clastic sediments, both along the rift axis and in basins flanking a central, post-volcanic horst. Pre-rift mature, quartzose sandstones imply little or no uplift prior to the onset of rift volcanism. Early post-rift red-bed sediments consist almost entirely of intrabasinally derived volcanic sediment deposited in alluvial fan to fluvial settings; the exception is one gray to black carbon-bearing lacustrine(?) unit. This early sedimentation phase was followed by broad crustal sagging and deposition of progressively more mature red-bed, fluvial sediments with an extra-basinal provenance.

  9. Monitoring lake level changes by altimetry in the arid region of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Liao, J. J.; Shen, G. Z.; Zhang, X. L.

    2017-07-01

    The study of lake level changes in arid region of Central Asia not only has important significance for the management and sustainable development of inland water resources, but also provides the basis for further study on the response of lakes to climate change and human activities. Therefore, in this paper, eleven typical lakes in Central Asia were observed. The lake edges were obtained through image interpretation using the quasi-synchronous MODIS image, and then water level information with long period (2002-2015) was acquired using ENVISAT/RA-2 and Cryosat-2 satellite borne radar altimeter data. The results show that these 11 lakes all have obvious seasonal changes of water level in a year with a high peak at different month. During 2002 - 2015, their water levels present decreased trend generally except Sarygamysh Lake, Alakol Lake and North Aral Sea. The alpine lakes are most stables, while open lakes’ levels change the most violently and closed lakes change diversely among different lakes.

  10. ASTER measurement of supraglacial lakes in the Mount Everest region of the Himalaya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wessels, R.L.; Kargel, J.S.; Kieffer, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate an application of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) images to detect and monitor supraglacial lakes on glaciers in the Mount Everest region in Tibet (Xizang) and Nepal. ASTER offers powerful capabilities to monitor supraglacial lakes in terms of (1) surface area, growth and disappearance (spatial resolution = 15 m), (2) turbidity (15 m resolution), and (3) temperature (90 m resolution). Preliminary results show an overall similarity of supraglacial lakes on three glaciers. Lakes have widely varying turbidity as indicated by color in visible/near-infrared bands 1-3, the largest lakes being bright blue (highly turbid), cold (near 0??C) and hydrautically connected with other lakes and supraglacial streams, while small lakes are mostly dark blue (relatively clear water), warmer (>4??C), and appear hydrautically isolated. High levels of turbidity in supraglacial lakes indicate high rates of meltwater input from streams or erosion of ice cliffs, and thus are an indirect measure relating to the activity and hydraulic integration of the lake with respect to other lakes and streams in the glacier.

  11. The Penokean orogeny in the Lake Superior region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, K.J.; Cannon, W.F.

    2007-01-01

    period of vertical faulting in the Archean basement and overlying Paleoproterozoic strata. This deformation is now known to have post-dated the terminal Penokean plutons by at least several tens of millions of years. Evidence of the Penokean orogen is now largely confined to the Lake Superior region. Comparisons with more recent orogens formed by similar plate tectonic processes implies that significant parts of a once more extensive Penokean orogen have been removed or overprinted by younger tectonic events. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Regional climate signal modified by local factors - multi core study records (Lake Czechowskie region, N Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiska, Izabela; Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Plessen, Birgit; Tjallingii, Rik; Słowiński, Michał; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments can be utilized as valuable paleoclimate and environmental archives as they contain information of past changes. Multi-proxy analyses of sedimentary compartments (e.g. pollen, diatoms, Cladocera) reveal those changes. However, to decipher the spatial variability of past climate changes and to define the proxies suited for local and regional scale reconstructions archive comparisons are needed. Here we present a detailed multi-proxy study from four different sediment cores covering the Younger Dryas cold period from the Lake Czechowskie region (N Poland). Three cores are located along a transect in the Lake Czechowskie basin from its deepest point towards a former lake bay close to today's shoreline. The fourth lacustrine sediment core was retrieved from the Trzechowskie paleolake, app. 1 km W from Lake Czechowskie. The dataset comprises information from pollen (AP, NAP, Juniperus, Betula-tree, Pinus silvestris), diatom (planktonic/benthic index, diatom valve concentration, dominant species), Cladocera (planktonic/benthic index, dominant species, number of Cladocera species, total sum of specimens) and geochemical (TOC and CaCO3 content, mineral matter, titanium) analyses. At the beginning of the Younger Dryas the AP pollen share decreased and NAP and Juniperus pollen increased in all studied locations. The mineral matter and titanium record showed higher values in two cores taken from the deepest parts of Lake Czechowskie and the core from Trzechowskie paleolake while in the core located at the marginal part of the lake it was already high in Allerød and it did not change much in Younger Dryas. The Cladocera based indexes: total sum of specimens and number of species decreased at the beginning of YD but on the contrary the Cladocera species composition changes were site-specific. The diatoms valve concentration index significantly lowered in core from the deep location while on the contrary increased in core from paleolake Trzechowskie. Our results

  13. Volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Scott, Kevin M.; Nathenson, Manuel

    1997-01-01

    Crater Lake lies in a basin, or caldera, formed by collapse of the Cascade volcano known as Mount Mazama during a violent, climactic eruption about 7,700 years ago. This event dramatically changed the character of the volcano so that many potential types of future events have no precedent there. This potentially active volcanic center is contained within Crater Lake National Park, visited by 500,000 people per year, and is adjacent to the main transportation corridor east of the Cascade Range. Because a lake is now present within the most likely site of future volcanic activity, many of the hazards at Crater Lake are different from those at most other Cascade volcanoes. Also significant are many faults near Crater Lake that clearly have been active in the recent past. These faults, and historic seismicity, indicate that damaging earthquakes can occur there in the future. This report describes the various types of volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake area, estimates of the likelihood of future events, recommendations for mitigation, and a map of hazard zones. The main conclusions are summarized below.

  14. Decadal oscillation of lakes and aquifers in the upper Great Lakes region of North America: hydroclimatic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watras, C.J.; Read, J.S.; Holman, K.D.; Liu, Z.; Song, Y.-Y.; Watras, A.J.; Morgan, S.; Stanley, E.H.

    2014-01-01

    We report a unique hydrologic time-series which indicates that water levels in lakes and aquifers across the upper Great Lakes region of North America have been dominated by a climatically-driven, near-decadal oscillation for at least 70 years. The historical oscillation (~13y) is remarkably consistent among small seepage lakes, groundwater tables and the two largest Laurentian Great Lakes despite substantial differences in hydrology. Hydrologic analyses indicate that the oscillation has been governed primarily by changes in the net atmospheric flux of water (P-E) and stage-dependent outflow. The oscillation is hypothetically connected to large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns originating in the mid-latitude North Pacific that support the flux of moisture into the region from the Gulf of Mexico. Recent data indicate an apparent change in the historical oscillation characterized by a ~12y downward trend beginning in 1998. Record low water levels region-wide may mark the onset of a new hydroclimatic regime.

  15. Environmental Indicators for the Coastal Region of North American Great Lakes: Introduction and Prospectus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental indicators are benchmarks for the current conditions of the Great Lakes coastal region and provide measurable endpoints to assess the success of future management, conservation, protection, and restoration of this important resource.

  16. Environmental Indicators for the Coastal Region of North American Great Lakes: Introduction and Prospectus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental indicators are benchmarks for the current conditions of the Great Lakes coastal region and provide measurable endpoints to assess the success of future management, conservation, protection, and restoration of this important resource.

  17. Effects of land use on lake nutrients: The importance of scale, hydrologic connectivity, and region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soranno, Patricia A.; Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Wagner, Tyler; Webster, Katherine E.; Bremigan, Mary Tate

    2015-01-01

    Catchment land uses, particularly agriculture and urban uses, have long been recognized as major drivers of nutrient concentrations in surface waters. However, few simple models have been developed that relate the amount of catchment land use to downstream freshwater nutrients. Nor are existing models applicable to large numbers of freshwaters across broad spatial extents such as regions or continents. This research aims to increase model performance by exploring three factors that affect the relationship between land use and downstream nutrients in freshwater: the spatial extent for measuring land use, hydrologic connectivity, and the regional differences in both the amount of nutrients and effects of land use on them. We quantified the effects of these three factors that relate land use to lake total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) in 346 north temperate lakes in 7 regions in Michigan, USA. We used a linear mixed modeling framework to examine the importance of spatial extent, lake hydrologic class, and region on models with individual lake nutrients as the response variable, and individual land use types as the predictor variables. Our modeling approach was chosen to avoid problems of multi-collinearity among predictor variables and a lack of independence of lakes within regions, both of which are common problems in broad-scale analyses of freshwaters. We found that all three factors influence land use-lake nutrient relationships. The strongest evidence was for the effect of lake hydrologic connectivity, followed by region, and finally, the spatial extent of land use measurements. Incorporating these three factors into relatively simple models of land use effects on lake nutrients should help to improve predictions and understanding of land use-lake nutrient interactions at broad scales.

  18. Effects of Land Use on Lake Nutrients: The Importance of Scale, Hydrologic Connectivity, and Region

    PubMed Central

    Soranno, Patricia A.; Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Wagner, Tyler; Webster, Katherine E.; Bremigan, Mary Tate

    2015-01-01

    Catchment land uses, particularly agriculture and urban uses, have long been recognized as major drivers of nutrient concentrations in surface waters. However, few simple models have been developed that relate the amount of catchment land use to downstream freshwater nutrients. Nor are existing models applicable to large numbers of freshwaters across broad spatial extents such as regions or continents. This research aims to increase model performance by exploring three factors that affect the relationship between land use and downstream nutrients in freshwater: the spatial extent for measuring land use, hydrologic connectivity, and the regional differences in both the amount of nutrients and effects of land use on them. We quantified the effects of these three factors that relate land use to lake total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) in 346 north temperate lakes in 7 regions in Michigan, USA. We used a linear mixed modeling framework to examine the importance of spatial extent, lake hydrologic class, and region on models with individual lake nutrients as the response variable, and individual land use types as the predictor variables. Our modeling approach was chosen to avoid problems of multi-collinearity among predictor variables and a lack of independence of lakes within regions, both of which are common problems in broad-scale analyses of freshwaters. We found that all three factors influence land use-lake nutrient relationships. The strongest evidence was for the effect of lake hydrologic connectivity, followed by region, and finally, the spatial extent of land use measurements. Incorporating these three factors into relatively simple models of land use effects on lake nutrients should help to improve predictions and understanding of land use-lake nutrient interactions at broad scales. PMID:26267813

  19. Effects of Land Use on Lake Nutrients: The Importance of Scale, Hydrologic Connectivity, and Region.

    PubMed

    Soranno, Patricia A; Cheruvelil, Kendra Spence; Wagner, Tyler; Webster, Katherine E; Bremigan, Mary Tate

    2015-01-01

    Catchment land uses, particularly agriculture and urban uses, have long been recognized as major drivers of nutrient concentrations in surface waters. However, few simple models have been developed that relate the amount of catchment land use to downstream freshwater nutrients. Nor are existing models applicable to large numbers of freshwaters across broad spatial extents such as regions or continents. This research aims to increase model performance by exploring three factors that affect the relationship between land use and downstream nutrients in freshwater: the spatial extent for measuring land use, hydrologic connectivity, and the regional differences in both the amount of nutrients and effects of land use on them. We quantified the effects of these three factors that relate land use to lake total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) in 346 north temperate lakes in 7 regions in Michigan, USA. We used a linear mixed modeling framework to examine the importance of spatial extent, lake hydrologic class, and region on models with individual lake nutrients as the response variable, and individual land use types as the predictor variables. Our modeling approach was chosen to avoid problems of multi-collinearity among predictor variables and a lack of independence of lakes within regions, both of which are common problems in broad-scale analyses of freshwaters. We found that all three factors influence land use-lake nutrient relationships. The strongest evidence was for the effect of lake hydrologic connectivity, followed by region, and finally, the spatial extent of land use measurements. Incorporating these three factors into relatively simple models of land use effects on lake nutrients should help to improve predictions and understanding of land use-lake nutrient interactions at broad scales.

  20. A Fast Algorithm to Estimate the Deepest Points of Lakes for Regional Lake Registration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanfeng; Yu, Xinju; Sheng, Yongwei; Li, Junli; Luo, Jiancheng

    2015-01-01

    When conducting image registration in the U.S. state of Alaska, it is very difficult to locate satisfactory ground control points because ice, snow, and lakes cover much of the ground. However, GCPs can be located by seeking stable points from the extracted lake data. This paper defines a process to estimate the deepest points of lakes as the most stable ground control points for registration. We estimate the deepest point of a lake by computing the center point of the largest inner circle (LIC) of the polygon representing the lake. An LIC-seeking method based on Voronoi diagrams is proposed, and an algorithm based on medial axis simplification (MAS) is introduced. The proposed design also incorporates parallel data computing. A key issue of selecting a policy for partitioning vector data is carefully studied, the selected policy that equalize the algorithm complexity is proved the most optimized policy for vector parallel processing. Using several experimental applications, we conclude that the presented approach accurately estimates the deepest points in Alaskan lakes; furthermore, we gain perfect efficiency using MAS and a policy of algorithm complexity equalization.

  1. Paleoenvironmental changes in the Western Great Lakes National Parks since deglaciation: Implications for the effect of the Great Lakes on regional climate

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, M.G.

    1995-09-01

    Pollen and charcoal analyses of lake and bog core sediments from Voyageur`s National Park and the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore provide evidence of regional Holocene climate changes for the western Great Lakes that differ from paleoclimates interpreted for regions of the Midwest more distant from the Great Lakes. The timing of the middle Holocene dry period when prairie and oak-savannah expanded in the Midwest occurs between 9000 and 5000 yr B. P. in the northern regions, but between 5600 and 3500 yr B.P. in the lower tier of the northern midwestern states away from the lakes.

  2. Lake Urmia (Iran): can future socio-ecologically motivated river basin management restore lake water levels in an arid region with extensive agricultural development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazel, Nasim; Berndtsson, Ronny; Bertacchi Uvo, Cintia; Klove, Bjorn; Madani, Kaveh

    2015-04-01

    Lake Urmia, one of the world's largest hyper saline lakes located in northwest of Iran, is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and Ramsar site, protected as a national park and, supports invaluable and unique biodiversity and related ecosystem services for the region's 6.5 million inhabitants. Due to increased development of the region's water resources for agriculture and industry and to a certain extent climate change, the lake has started to shrink dramatically since 1995 and now is holding less than 30 percent of its volume. Rapid development in agricultural sector and land-use changes has resulted in immense construction of dams and water diversions in almost all lake feeding rivers, intensifying lake shrinking, increasing salinity and degrading its ecosystem. Recently, lake's cultural and environmental importance and social pressure has raised concerns and brought government attention to the lake restoration plans. Along with poor management, low yield agriculture as the most water consuming activity in the region with, rapid, insufficient development is one of the most influential drivers in the lake desiccation. Part of the lake restoration plans in agricultural sector is to restrict the agricultural areas in the main feeding river basins flowing mostly in the southern part of the lake and decreasing the agricultural water use in this area. This study assess the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed plans and its influence on the lake level rise and its impacts on economy in the region using a system dynamics model developed for the Lake consist of hydrological and agro-economical sub-systems. The effect of decrease in agricultural area in the region on GDP and region economy was evaluated and compared with released water contribution in lake level rise for a five year simulation period.

  3. Empirical relationships between watershed attributes and headwater lake chemistry in the Adirondack region

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Christensen, S.W.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S.; Malanchuk, J.L.

    1986-12-01

    This study focuses on the Adirondack region of New York and has two purposes: to (1) develop empirical models that can be used to assess the chemical status of lakes for which no chemistry data exist and (2) determine on a regional scale watershed attributes that account for variability in lake pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). Headwater lakes, rather than lakes linked to upstream lakes, were selected for initial analysis. Both bivariate (correlations and Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests) and multivariate analyses were performed. Fifty-seven watershed attributes were selected as input variables to multiple linear regression and discriminant analysis. For model development approx.200 lakes for which pH and ANC data exist were randomly subdivided into a specification and a verification data set. Several indices were used to select models for predicting lake pH (31 variables) and ANC (27 variables). Twenty-five variables are common to the pH and ANC models: four lake morphology, nine soil/geology, eight land cover, three disturbance, and one watershed aspect. An atmospheric input variable (H/sup +/ or NO/sub 3//sup -/) explains the greatest amount of variation in the dependent variable (pH and ANC) for both models. The percentage of watershed in conifers is the next strongest predictor variable. For all headwater lakes in the Adirondacks, approx.60% of the lakes are estimated to have an ANC less than or equal to50 ..mu..eq/L, and 40% of the lakes have a pH less than or equal to5.5, levels believed to be detrimental to some fish species.

  4. Regional Analysis of the Hazard Level of Glacial Lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisolm, Rachel E.; Jhon Sanchez Leon, Walter; McKinney, Daene C.; Cochachin Rapre, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    The Cordillera Blanca mountain range is the highest in Peru and contains many of the world's tropical glaciers. This region is severely impacted by climate change causing accelerated glacier retreat. Secondary impacts of climate change on glacier retreat include stress on water resources and the risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) from the many lakes that are forming and growing at the base of glaciers. A number of GLOFs originating from lakes in the Cordillera Blanca have occurred over the last century, several of which have had catastrophic impacts on cities and communities downstream. Glaciologists and engineers in Peru have been studying the lakes of the Cordillera Blanca for many years and have identified several lakes that are considered dangerous. However, a systematic analysis of all the lakes in the Cordillera Blanca has never before been attempted. Some methodologies for this type of systematic analysis have been proposed (eg. Emmer and Vilimek 2014; Wang, et al. 2011), but as yet they have only been applied to a few select lakes in the Cordillera Blanca. This study uses remotely sensed data to study all of the lakes of the Glacial Lake Inventory published by the Glaciology and Water Resources Unit of Peru's National Water Authority (UGRH 2011). The objective of this study is to assign a level of potential hazard to each glacial lake in the Cordillera Blanca and to ascertain if any of the lakes beyond those that have already been studied might pose a danger to nearby populations. A number of parameters of analysis, both quantitative and qualitative, have been selected to assess the hazard level of each glacial lake in the Cordillera Blanca using digital elevation models, satellite imagery, and glacier outlines. These parameters are then combined to come up with a preliminary assessment of the hazard level of each lake; the equation weighting each parameter draws on previously published methodologies but is tailored to the regional characteristics

  5. Water Quality and Evaluation of Pesticides in Lakes in the Ridge Citrus Region of Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choquette, Anne F.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2009-01-01

    Water chemistry, including major inorganic constituents, nutrients, and pesticide compounds, was compared between seven lakes surrounded by citrus agriculture and an undeveloped lake on the Lake Wales Ridge (herein referred to as the Ridge) in central Florida. The region has been recognized for its vulnerability to the leaching of agricultural chemicals into the subsurface due to factors including soils, climate, and land use. About 40 percent of Florida's citrus cultivation occurs in 'ridge citrus' areas characterized by sandy well drained soils, with the remainder in 'flatwoods citrus' characterized by high water tables and poorly drained soils. The lakes on the Ridge are typically flow-through lakes that exchange water with adjacent and underlying aquifer systems. This study is the first to evaluate the occurrence of pesticides in lakes on the Ridge, and also represents one of the first monitoring efforts nationally to focus on regional-scale assessment of current-use pesticides in small- to moderate-sized lakes (5 to 393 acres). The samples were collected between December 2003 and September 2005. The lakes in citrus areas contained elevated concentrations of major inorganic constituents (including alkalinity, total dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate), total nitrogen, pH, and pesticides compared to the undeveloped lake. Nitrate (as N) and total nitrogen concentrations were typically elevated in the citrus lakes, with maximum values of 4.70 and 5.19 mg/L (milligrams per liter), respectively. Elevated concentrations of potassium, nitrate, and other inorganic constituents in the citrus lakes likely reflect inputs from the surficial ground-water system that originated predominantly from agricultural fertilizers, soil amendments, and inorganic pesticides. A total of 20 pesticide compounds were detected in the lakes, of which 12 compounds exceeded the standardized reporting level of 0.06 ug/L (microgram per liter). Those

  6. Ecological risk of methylmercury to piscivorous fish of the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Sandheinrich, Mark B; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Bodaly, R A; Drevnick, Paul E; Paul, Eric A

    2011-10-01

    Contamination of fish populations with methylmercury is common in the region of the Laurentian Great Lakes as a result of atmospheric deposition and methylation of inorganic mercury. Using fish mercury monitoring data from natural resource agencies and information on tissue concentrations injurious to fish, we conducted a screening-level risk assessment of mercury to sexually mature female walleye (Sander vitreus), northern pike (Esox lucius), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in the Great Lakes and in interior lakes, impoundments, and rivers of the Great Lakes region. The assessment included more than 43,000 measurements of mercury in fish from more than 2000 locations. Sexually mature female fish that exceeded threshold-effect tissue concentrations of 0.20 μg g(-1) wet weight in the whole body occurred at 8% (largemouth bass) to 43% (walleye) of sites. Fish at 3% to 18% of sites were at risk of injury and exceeded 0.30 μg g(-1) where an alteration in reproduction or survival is predicted to occur. Most fish at increased risk were from interior lakes and impoundments. In the Great Lakes, no sites had sexually mature fish that exceeded threshold-effect concentrations. Results of this screening-level assessment indicate that fish at a substantive number of locations within the Great Lakes region are potentially at risk from methylmercury contamination and would benefit from reduction in mercury concentrations.

  7. Determination of polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters, perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids, perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, and perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids in lake trout from the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Reiner, Eric J; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Helm, Paul A; Mabury, Scott A; Braekevelt, Eric; Tittlemier, Sheryl A

    2012-11-01

    A comprehensive method to extract perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids, perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids, perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids, and polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters simultaneously from fish samples has been developed. The recoveries of target compounds ranged from 78 % to 121 %. The new method was used to analyze lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Great Lakes region. The results showed that the total perfluoroalkane sulfonate concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 145 ng/g (wet weight) with perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) as the dominant contaminant. Concentrations in fish between lakes were in the order of Lakes Ontario ≈ Erie > Huron > Superior ≈ Nipigon. The total perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 18.2 ng/g wet weight. The aggregate mean perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentration in fish across all lakes was 0.045 ± 0.023 ng/g. Mean concentrations of PFOA were not significantly different (p > 0.1) among the five lakes. Perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids were detected in lake trout from Lake Ontario, Lake Erie, and Lake Huron with concentration ranging from non-detect (ND) to 0.032 ng/g. Polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters were detected only in lake trout from Lake Huron, at levels similar to perfluorooctanoic acid.

  8. Source Attribution for Mercury Deposition to the Great Lakes Region in the Context of Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Fisher, J. A.; Wu, S.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury contamination in the Great Lakes region has important implications for human and wildlife health therein. Atmospheric deposition serves as an important pathway for mercury entering into the lakes and mercury originating from sources outside North America also contributes to part of the total mercury deposited to the Great Lakes. Understanding the source apportionment of mercury deposition to the Great Lakes region is critical for policy making. We investigate the present day source attribution of mercury deposition to the Great Lakes region as well as the perturbations driven by various factors in the context of global change (such as the changes in biomass burning emissions, anthropogenic emissions and land use/land cover) using the GEOS-Chem global model. We will quantify the relative contribution of different emission sources (e.g., anthropogenic vs natural) and different regions (e.g., domestic vs intercontinental-transport) to mercury deposition in the Great Lakes region. In addition, we will conduct sensitivity tests to evaluate the model's sensitivity to processes such as atmospheric redox reactions and how it affects the source attribution.

  9. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.128 Section 81.128 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  10. Ecosystem scale VOC exchange measurements at Bosco Fontana (IT) and Hyytiälä (FI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schallhart, S.; Rantala, P.; Taipale, R.; Nemitz, E.; Tillmann, R.; Mentel, T. F.; Ruuskanen, T.; Rinne, J.

    2013-12-01

    The ozone production and destruction mechanisms in the troposphere depend on the abundance of NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). As the latter originate not only from human activities, but to a large extent from vegetation it is important to quantify these biogenic sources as well. The VOC-fluxes were measured in Bosco Fontana forest as a part of an intensive measurement campaign of the Eclaire project, which investigates how climate change alters the threat of air pollution. Measurements were carried out at the Nature Reserve 'Bosco della Fontana' in the Po valley, Italy. The area of the forest is 198 ha and the dominanting tree species are Quercus robur (English oak), Quercus cerris (Turkey oak) and Carpinus betulus (hornbeam). The fluxes were measured on at a height of 32 metres using the eddy covariance method. A PTR-TOF (Ionicon Analytik, Austria) measured volatile organic compounds up to a mass of 300 atomic mass units. The instrument is capable of recording full spectra of VOCs in real-time with a resolution of 10 Hz. In addition to the mass spectrometer a 3D Anemometer was placed next to the inlet. Results will be presented and compared with disjunct eddy covariance measurements (Taipale et al. 2011) from a Pinus sylvestris (Scots Pine) dominated forest in Hyytiälä, Finland. The two forests are characterized by a different emission profile; the Bosco Fontana forest emits large amounts of isoprene, whereas the terpenoid emissions from Hyytiälä forest are dominated by monoterpenes. The magnitude of the emissions differs as emission from Bosco Fontana is much higher. The monoterpene emission from Bosco Fontana is likely to follow different dynamics than that from Hyytiälä as it correlates well with the radiation. This leads to the conclusion, that monoterpenes are released right after they are produced (de novo). In Hyytiälä the emissions are light and temperature dependent, which is caused by de novo and storage emissions. Pines have large

  11. Zooplankton communities and Bythotrephes longimanus in lakes of the montane region of the northern Alps

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Zsófia; Vad, Csaba F.; Preiler, Christian; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Ptáčníková, Radka; Ptáčník, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lakes in the Alps represent a considerable fraction of nutrient-poor lakes in Central Europe, with unique biodiversity and ecosystem properties. Although some individual lakes are well studied, less knowledge is available on large-scale patterns essential to general understanding of their functioning. Here, we aimed to describe crustacean zooplankton communities (Cladocera, Copepoda) and identify their environmental drivers in the pelagic zone of 54 oligotrophic lakes in the montane region of the Alps (400–1200 m) in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland, covering a spatial scale of 650 km. Moreover, we aimed to provide data on the distribution and ecological requirements of the North American invader Bythotrephes longimanus in its Central European native range. Communities were mainly dominated by widespread species typical of lowland habitats, and only a few true specialists of oligotrophic alpine lakes were present. The most frequent taxa were the Daphnia longispina complex and Eudiaptomus gracilis, with 48 and 45 occurrences, respectively. Species richness decreased with altitude and increased with lake area. The main structuring factors of community composition were chlorophyll a concentration and depth, which drove an apparent separation of mesotrophic and oligotrophic communities. Bythotrephes had 13 occurrences, showing a preference for deep oligotrophic lakes. Its presence was not coupled with lower crustacean species richness, as was repeatedly observed in North America. Additionally, it frequently co-occurred with the other large predatory cladoceran, Leptodora kindtii. B. longimanus might be considered a truly montane species in Central Europe, given its absence in lowland and alpine lakes. PMID:28824797

  12. Clustering oxbow lakes in the Upper-Tisza Region on the basis of stable isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babka, Beáta; Futó, István; Szabó, Szilárd

    2011-11-01

    SummarySeveral times a year the River Tisza floods areas between dikes, fills the oxbow lakes on the floodplain and changes their water. However the water addition in the oxbow lakes does not only take place through flooding; it is also likely that water can seep under the surface through the gravelled layers of the old river-beds, and furthermore, precipitation also plays a role. Our goal with this study is to acquire a full, comprehensive picture of the water addition of the oxbow lakes in the Upper-Tisza Region. Surface and groundwater samples were taken from the River Tisza, the oxbow lakes and the boreholes around four oxbow lakes, and stabile isotope ratios were measured. We can get information on the origin, the evaporation and the state of the waters, and the depth of the water table with the help of δ18O VSMOW (‰) and δD VSMOW (‰). During the examination the question we addressed was how oxbow lakes can be classified according to their water addition on the basis of their stable isotope ratios. The results from the Tisza and the oxbow lakes, as well as the results from the oxbow lakes on the reclaimed side and the floodplain are also isolated.

  13. A REGIONAL ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GREAT LAKES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Natural Resources Canada: Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) are conducting a cooperative research landscape ecological study of the Great Lakes Basin. The analyses will include the areas located along the border of the Unit...

  14. A research agenda for silviculture in the Great Lakes Region

    Treesearch

    Brian Palik; Louise Levy

    2004-01-01

    The Great Lakes Silviculture Summit took place in April 2003 at Michigan Technological University. The primary audience of the summit included institutional representatives who define needs and set policy regarding silvicultural approaches and practice, as well as researchers working in silviculture or related disciplines.

  15. A REGIONAL ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GREAT LAKES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Natural Resources Canada: Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) are conducting a cooperative research landscape ecological study of the Great Lakes Basin. The analyses will include the areas located along the border of the Unit...

  16. Application of Landsat imagery to regional-scale assessments of lake clarity.

    PubMed

    Kloiber, Steven M; Brezonik, Patrick L; Bauer, Marvin E

    2002-10-01

    A procedure that uses Landsat imagery to estimate Secchi disk transparency (SDT) of lakes was developed and applied to approximately 500 lakes with surface areas > 10 ha in the seven-county metropolitan area of Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN, USA, to assess spatial patterns and temporal trends in lake clarity. Thirteen Landsat MSS and TM images over the period 1973-1998 were used for the analysis. Satellite brightness values from lake surfaces were calibrated against available historical data on SDT (n = approximately 20-40) measured nearly contemporaneously with the acquisition date of each image. Calibration regression equations for the late-summer TM images had a range of r2 from 0.72 to 0.93. Regression analysis for three late-summer MSS images yielded r2 values ranging from 0.60 to 0.79. Results indicate that a single late-summer image yields a reliable estimate of regional lake clarity and reasonably accurate estimates of SDT for individual lakes. An analysis of seasonal patterns on a large lake water-quality database was used to develop a model that adjusts synoptic satellite SDT estimates from different dates to a common reference, making them more comparable from year-to-year. Analysis of long-term trends shows that in spite of the large land-use changes within the region over the study period, only 49 (about 10%) of assessed lakes in the region showed significant temporal trends in SDT over the period, and more lakes had increasing SDT (34) than decreasing SDT (15).

  17. [Spatial Distribution of Stable Isotope from the Lakes in Typical Temperate Glacier Region].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-yi; Pu, Tao; He, Yuan-qing; Lu, Hao; Niu, He-wen; Xia, Dun-sheng

    2016-05-15

    We focused mainly on the spatial variation and influencing factors of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes between water samples collected at the surface and different depths in the Lashi Lake in August, 2014. Hydrological supply characteristics of the lake in typical temperate glacier region were discussed. The results showed that the values of δ¹⁸O and δD in the Lashi Lake ranged from -12.98 per thousand to -8.16 per thousand with the mean of -9.75 per thousand and from -99.42 per thousand to -73.78 per thousand with the mean of -82.23 per thousand, respectively. There was a reversed spatial variation between δ¹⁸O and d. Relatively low values of δ¹⁸O with high values of d were found at the edge of the lake where the rivers drained into. Meanwhile, the values of d in the vertical profile varied little with depth, suggesting that the waters mixed sufficiently in the vertical direction. The d values increased at first and then decreased from east to west at different layers, but both increase and decrease exhibited different velocities, which were related to the river distribution, the locality of the lake and environmental conditions etc. River water and atmospheric precipitation were the main recharge sources of the Lashi Lake, and the melt-water of snow and ice might also be the supply resource. The δ¹⁸O values of lake water in glacier region decreased along the elevation (except for Lashi Lake), generally, this phenomenon was called "altitude effect". Moreover, high isotopic values of the lake water from non-glacier region were due to the evaporation effect.

  18. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  19. Climatic forcing of carbon-oxygen isotopic covariance in temperate-region marl lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, C. N.; Patterson, W. P.; Walker, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen stable isotopic compositions of lacustrine carbonate from a southeastern Michigan marl lake display linear covariance over a range of 4.0% Peedee belemnite (PDB) in oxygen and 3.9% (PDB) in carbon. Mechanisms of delta 13 C-delta 18 O coupling conventionally attributed to lake closure in arid-region basins are inapplicable to hydrologically open lake systems. Thus, an alternative explanation of isotopic covariance in temperate region dimictic marl lakes is required. We propose that isotopic covariance is a direct record of change in regional climate. In short-residence-time temperate-region lake basins, summer meteoric precipitation is enriched in 18O relative to winter values, and summer organic productivity enriches epilimnic dissolved inorganic carbon in 13C. Thus, climate change toward longer summers and/or shorter winters could result in greater proportions of warm-month meteoric precipitation, longer durations of warm-month productivity, and net long-term enrichment in carbonate 18O and 13C. Isotopic covariance observed in the Michigan marl lake cores is interpreted to reflect postglacial warming from 10 to 3 ka followed by cooler mean annual temperature, a shift toward greater proportions of seasonal summer precipitation, a shortening of the winter season, or some combination of these three factors.

  20. Geophysical Evidence for Holocene Lake-Level Change in Southern California (Dry Lake): Additional Evidence for a Regional Early Holocene High Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, M. E.; Bird, B. W.; Howat, I. M.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2007-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar data are used to develop a Holocene history of basin sedimentation in a small, alpine lake in Southern California (Dry Lake). We define three depositional sequences spanning the past 9,000 calendar years before present (cy BP). Although, the basin contains sediments clearly older than the Holocene, we focus on the past 9,000 cy BP to match our similarly aged sediment cores. Sequence I represents the first phase of an early Holocene high stand. A major regression, perhaps following the 8,200 year cold event, separates Sequence I from Sequence II. The timing of this regression is approximately coeval with major regressions at Owens Lake (Bacon et al., 2006) in southeastern California and Tulare Lake (Negrini et al., 2006) in the southern Central Valley of California. Sequence II represents the second phase of the early Holocene high stand. This second high stand phase is also observed at Tulare Lake but not at Owens Lake. Sequence III represents a permanent shift to low or dry lake stands. By 4,000 cy BP, the lake earns rightfully its appellation of Dry Lake as indicated by a permanently contracted central basin. The similarity in ages of early Holocene lake level change across the greater region of Southern California suggests a similar external forcing - perhaps modulation of early Holocene storm activity by insolation (Kirby et al., 2007). The lake level records are less congruous for the mid-to-late Holocene across the region. Specifically for Dry Lake, it is not clear what caused the apparently rapid shift from a deep, early Holocene lake to a permanent shallow or dry lake by the mid-Holocene.

  1. Simulation of Lake Surface Heat Fluxes by the Canadian Small Lake Model: Offline Performance Assessment for Future Coupling with a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernica, P.; Guerrero, J. L.; MacKay, M.; Wheater, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Lakes strongly influence local and regional climate especially in regions where they are abundant. Development of a lake model for the purpose of integration within a regional climate model is therefore a subject of scientific interest. Of particular importance are the heat flux predictions provided by the lake model since they function as key forcings in a fully coupled atmosphere-land-lake system. The first step towards a coupled model is to validate and characterize the accuracy of the lake model over a range of conditions and to identify limitations. In this work, validation results from offline tests of the Canadian Small Lake Model; a deterministic, computationally efficient, 1D integral model, are presented. Heat fluxes (sensible and latent) and surface water temperatures simulated by the model are compared with in situ observations from two lakes; Landing Lake (NWT, Canada) and L239 (ELA, Canada) for the 2007-2009 period. Sensitivity analysis is performed to identify key parameters important for heat flux predictions. The results demonstrate the ability of the 1-D lake model to reproduce both diurnal and seasonal variations in heat fluxes and surface temperatures for the open water period. These results, in context of regional climate modelling are also discussed.

  2. 129I in lakes of the Chernobyl fallout region and its environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Buraglio, N; Aldahan, A; Possnert, G

    2001-11-01

    We present seasonal results of 129I in fresh-water lakes located in central Sweden, an area over which the amount of fallout deposition from the Chernobyl accident varied significantly (2-120 kBq/m2 for 137Cs). 129I concentrations in the lakes ranged from 2.1 to 15.0 x 10(8) atoms per liter and did not show elevated concentration in lakes located in regions of high Chernobyl fallout. Apparently, the studied region is strongly influenced by 129I releases from the reprocessing facilities through precipitation. Desorption or resuspension of 129I from soils and sediments does not seem to be an active process to increase the concentration of 129I in the lakes.

  3. Lake nutrient stoichiometry is less predictable than nutrient concentrations at regional and sub-continental scales.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sarah M; Oliver, Samantha K; Lapierre, Jean-Francois; Stanley, Emily H; Jones, John R; Wagner, Tyler; Soranno, Patricia A

    2017-07-01

    Production in many ecosystems is co-limited by multiple elements. While a known suite of drivers associated with nutrient sources, nutrient transport, and internal processing controls concentrations of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in lakes, much less is known about whether the drivers of single nutrient concentrations can also explain spatial or temporal variation in lake N:P stoichiometry. Predicting stoichiometry might be more complex than predicting concentrations of individual elements because some drivers have similar relationships with N and P, leading to a weak relationship with their ratio. Further, the dominant controls on elemental concentrations likely vary across regions, resulting in context dependent relationships between drivers, lake nutrients and their ratios. Here, we examine whether known drivers of N and P concentrations can explain variation in N:P stoichiometry, and whether explaining variation in stoichiometry differs across regions. We examined drivers of N:P in ~2,700 lakes at a sub-continental scale and two large regions nested within the sub-continental study area that have contrasting ecological context, including differences in the dominant type of land cover (agriculture vs. forest). At the sub-continental scale, lake nutrient concentrations were correlated with nutrient loading and lake internal processing, but stoichiometry was only weakly correlated to drivers of lake nutrients. At the regional scale, drivers that explained variation in nutrients and stoichiometry differed between regions. In the Midwestern U.S. region, dominated by agricultural land use, lake depth and the percentage of row crop agriculture were strong predictors of stoichiometry because only phosphorus was related to lake depth and only nitrogen was related to the percentage of row crop agriculture. In contrast, all drivers were related to N and P in similar ways in the Northeastern U.S. region, leading to weak relationships between drivers and stoichiometry

  4. Regional economic impacts of water management alternatives: the case of Devils Lake, North Dakota, USA.

    PubMed

    Leistritz, F Larry; Leitch, Jay A; Bangsund, Dean A

    2002-12-01

    Devils Lake, located in a closed basin in northeastern North Dakota has over a century-long history of highly fluctuating water levels. The lake has risen nearly 25 feet (7.7 m) since 1993, more than doubling its surface area. Rising water levels have affected rural lands, transportation routes, and communities near the lake. In response to rising lake levels, Federal, state and local agencies have adopted a three-part approach to flood damage reduction, consisting of (1) upper basin water management to reduce the amount of water reaching the lake, (2) protection for structures and infrastructure if the lake continues to rise, and (3) developing an emergency outlet to release some lake water. The purpose of this study was to provide information about the net regional economic effects of a proposed emergency outlet for Devils Lake. An input-output model was used to estimate the regional economic effects of the outlet, under two scenarios: (1) the most likely future situation (MLS) and (2) a best case situation (BCS) (i.e., where the benefits from the outlet would be greatest), albeit an unlikely one. Regional economic effects of the outlet include effects on transportation (road and railroad construction), agriculture (land kept in production, returned to production sooner, or kept in production longer), residential relocations, and outlet construction expenditures. Effects are measured as changes in gross business volume (gross receipts) for various sectors, secondary employment, and local tax collections. The net regional economic effects of the proposed outlet would be relatively small, and consideration of these economic impacts would not strengthen the case for an outlet.

  5. Isotopic evolution of saline lakes in the low-latitude and polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic fractionations associated with two primary processes (evaporation and freezing of water) are discussed, which are responsible for the formation and evolution of saline lakes in deserts from both low-latitude and the Polar regions. In an evaporative system, atmospheric parameters (humidity and isotopic composition of water vapor) have strong influence on the isotopic behavior of saline lakes, and in a freezing system, salinity build-up largely controls the extent of freezing and associated isotope fractionation. In both systems, salinity has a direct impact on the isotopic evolution of saline lakes. It is proposed that a steady-state terminal lake model with short-term hydrologic and environmental perturbations can serve as a useful framework for investigating both evaporative and freezing processes of perennial saline lakes. Through re-assessment of own work and literature data for saline lakes, it was demonstrated that effective uses of the isotope activity compositions of brines and salinity-chemistry data could reveal dynamic changes and evolution in the isotopic compositions of saline lakes in response to hydrologic and environmental changes. The residence time of isotopic water molecules in lakes determines the nature of responses in the isotopic compositions following perturbations in the water and isotope balances (e.g., dilution by inflow, water deficit by increased evaporation, and/ or reduction in inflow). The isotopic profiles of some saline lakes from the Polar regions show that they switched the two contrasting modes of operation between evaporative and freezing systems, in response to climate and hydrological changes in the past.

  6. Isotopic Evolution of Saline Lakes in the Low-Latitude and Polar Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Juske

    2009-01-01

    Isotopic fractionations associated with two primary processes (evaporation and freezing of water) are discussed, which are responsible for the formation and evolution of saline lakes in deserts from both low-latitude and the Polar regions. In an evaporative system, atmospheric parameters (humidity and isotopic composition of water vapor) have strong influence on the isotopic behavior of saline lakes, and in a freezing system, salinity build-up largely controls the extent of freezing and associated isotope fractionation. In both systems, salinity has a direct impact on the isotopic evolution of saline lakes. It is proposed that a steady-state 'terminal lake' model with short-term hydrologic and environmental perturbations can serve as a useful framework for investigating both evaporative and freezing processes of perennial saline lakes. Through re-assessment of own work and literature data for saline lakes, it was demonstrated that effective uses of the isotope activity compositions of brines and salinity-chemistry data could reveal dynamic changes and evolution in the isotopic compositions of saline lakes in response to hydrologic and environmental changes. The residence time of isotopic water molecules in lakes determines the nature of responses in the isotopic compositions following perturbations in the water and isotope balances (e.g., dilution by inflow, water deficit by increased evaporation, and/or reduction in inflow). The isotopic profiles of some saline lakes from the Polar regions show that they switched the two contrasting modes of operation between evaporative and freezing systems, in response to climate and hydrological changes in the past.

  7. Climate change and waterborne disease risk in the Great Lakes region of the U.S.

    PubMed

    Patz, Jonathan A; Vavrus, Stephen J; Uejio, Christopher K; McLellan, Sandra L

    2008-11-01

    Extremes of the hydrologic cycle will accompany global warming, causing precipitation intensity to increase, particularly in middle and high latitudes. During the twentieth century, the frequency of major storms has already increased, and the total precipitation increase over this time period has primarily come from the greater number of heavy events. The Great Lakes region is projected to experience a rise these extreme precipitation events. For southern Wisconsin, the precipitation rate of the 10 wettest days was simulated using a suite of seven global climate models from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report. For each ranking, the precipitation rate of these very heavy events increases in the future. Overall, the models project that extreme precipitation events will become 10% to 40% stronger in southern Wisconsin, resulting in greater potential for flooding, and for the waterborne diseases that often accompany high discharge into Lake Michigan. Using 6.4 cm (2.5 in) of daily precipitation as the threshold for initiating combined sewer overflow into Lake Michigan, the frequency of these events is expected to rise by 50% to 120% by the end of this century. The combination of future thermal and hydrologic changes may affect the usability of recreational beaches. Chicago beach closures are dependent on the magnitude of recent precipitation (within the past 24 hours), lake temperature, and lake stage. Projected increases in heavy rainfall, warmer lake waters, and lowered lake levels would all be expected to contribute to beach contamination in the future. The Great Lakes serve as a drinking water source for more than 40 million people. Ongoing studies and past events illustrate a strong connection between rain events and the amount of pollutants entering the Great Lakes. Extreme precipitation under global warming projections may overwhelm the combined sewer systems and lead to overflow events that can threaten both human

  8. Simulating the water balance of the Aral Sea with a coupled regional climate-lake model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Small, E.E.; Sloan, L.C.; Hostetler, S.; Giorgi, F.

    1999-01-01

    Before coupled atmosphere-lake models can be used to study the response of large lake systems to climatic forcings, we must first evaluate how well they simulate the water balance and associated lake atmosphere interactions under present-day conditions. We evaluate the hydrology simulated by a lake model coupled to NCAR's regional climate model (RegCM2) in a study of the Aral Sea. The meteorological variables that are input to the lake model are simulated well by RegCM2. Simulated surface air temperatures closely match observed values, except during spring and fall when the simulated temperatures are too cold. The magnitude of precipitation is too high in the region surrounding the Aral Sea during summer and fall. On a yearly basis, RegCM2 produces a reasonable amount of runoff throughout the drainage basin. The lake model coupled to RegCM2 accurately simulates Aral Sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The lake model also simulates observed mid-winter ice fraction well, although the onset of ice growth occurs too late in the year and the ice melts too rapidly in the spring. The simulated annual evaporation from the Aral Sea is consistent with observed estimates; however, the simulated evaporation is greater than observed during summer and less than observed during winter. In a "stand-alone" lake model simulation, the simulated Aral Sea hydrology does not match observations as closely as in the coupled model experiment. These results suggest that a stand-alone lake model would not accurately simulate the hydrologic response of the Aral Sea to various forcings. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Empirical Relationships Between Watershed Attributes and Headwater Lake Chemistry in the Adirondack Region

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    Surface water acidification may be caused or influenced by both natural watershed processes and anthropogenic actions. Empirical models and observational data can be useful for identifying watershed attributes or processes that require further research or that should be considered in the development of process models. This study focuses on the Adirondack region of New York and has two purposes: to (1) develop empirical models that can be used to assess the chemical status of lakes for which no chemistry data exist and (2) determine on a regional scale watershed attributes that account for variability in lake pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). Headwater lakes, rather than lakes linked to upstream lakes, were selected for initial analysis. The Adirondacks Watershed Data Base (AWDB), part of the Acid Deposition Data Network maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), integrates data on physiography, bedrock, soils, land cover, wetlands, disturbances, beaver activity, land use, and atmospheric deposition with the water chemistry and morphology for the watersheds of 463 headwater lakes. The AWD8 facilitates both geographic display and statistical analysis of the data. The report, An Adirondack Watershed Data Base: Attribute and Mapping Information for Regional Acidic Deposition Studies (ORNL/TM--10144), describes the AWDB. Both bivariate (correlations and Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests) and multivariate analyses were performed. Fifty-seven watershed attributes were selected as input variables to multiple linear regression and discriminant analysis. For model development -200 lakes for which pH and ANC data exist were randomly subdivided into a specification and a verification data set. Several indices were used to select models for predicting lake pH (31 variables) and ANC (27 variables). Twenty-five variables are common to the pH and ANC models: four lake morphology, nine soil/geology, eight land cover, three disturbance, and one watershed aspect. An

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: Regional Lake Trophic Patterns in the Northeastern United States: Three Approaches

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    / During the summers of 1991-1994, the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) conducted variable probability sampling on 344 lakes throughout the northeastern United States. Trophic state data were analyzed for the Northeast as a whole and for each of its three major ecoregions-the Adirondacks (ADI), the New England Uplands (NEU), and the Coastal Lowland and Plateau (CLP)-and inferred to the entire population of lakes >/=1 ha (N = 11,076). Results were compared to a large, nonrandomly sampled data set for the same area compiled by Rohm and others and contrasted with lake trophic state information published in the National Water Quality Inventory: 1994 Report to Congress [305(b) report. Lakes across the entire Northeast were identified by EMAP data as 37.9% (+/-8.4%) oligotrophic, 40.1% (+/-9.7%) mesotrophic, 12.6% (+/-7.9%) eutrophic, and 9.3% (+/-6.3%) hypereutrophic. Lakes in the ADI and NEU generally are at a low, nearly identical trophic state (96% oligotrophic/mesotrophic), while those in the CLP are much richer (45% eutrophic). EMAP results are similar to results of the Rohm data set across the entire region. In the CLP, however, EMAP identified approximately 45% of the lakes as eutrophic/hypereutrophic, while the Rohm data set identified only 21% in these categories. Across the entire Northeast, the 305(b) report identified a much higher proportion (32.2%) of lakes in eutrophic condition and a much smaller proportion (19.8%) in oligotrophic condition than did the EMAP survey data (12.5% +/- 7.9% and 37.9% +/- 8.5%, respectively). Probability sampling has several advantages over nonrandom sampling when regional resource condition assessment is the goal.KEY WORDS: Lake trophic state; Phosphorus; Probability survey; Regional condition

  11. Foods of white-tailed deer in the Upper Great Lakes Region -- a review.

    Treesearch

    Lynn L. Rogers; Jack J. Mooty; Deanna Dawson

    1981-01-01

    Available information on year-round food habits of white-tailed deer in the Upper Great Lakes Region (UGLR) is summarized. Problems of deer in that region are discussed. There is a need for additional information on year-round diet, but new study techniques must be developed if a complete picture of diet is to be obtained.

  12. Learning about War and Peace in the Great Lakes Region of Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Lyndsay

    2007-01-01

    Two-thirds of the world's conflicts are in Africa. In particular, the Great Lakes region (Rwanda, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda and Tanzania) continues to see conflicts that are complex, extreme and seemingly intractable. By exploring the narrative experiences of those most affected by the conflicts in the region--specifically…

  13. Learning about War and Peace in the Great Lakes Region of Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Lyndsay

    2007-01-01

    Two-thirds of the world's conflicts are in Africa. In particular, the Great Lakes region (Rwanda, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda and Tanzania) continues to see conflicts that are complex, extreme and seemingly intractable. By exploring the narrative experiences of those most affected by the conflicts in the region--specifically…

  14. Coupling socioeconomic and lake systems for sustainability: a conceptual analysis using Lake St. Clair region as a case study.

    PubMed

    Mavrommati, Georgia; Baustian, Melissa M; Dreelin, Erin A

    2014-04-01

    Applying sustainability at an operational level requires understanding the linkages between socioeconomic and natural systems. We identified linkages in a case study of the Lake St. Clair (LSC) region, part of the Laurentian Great Lakes system. Our research phases included: (1) investigating and revising existing coupled human and natural systems frameworks to develop a framework for this case study; (2) testing and refining the framework by hosting a 1-day stakeholder workshop and (3) creating a causal loop diagram (CLD) to illustrate the relationships among the systems' key components. With stakeholder assistance, we identified four interrelated pathways that include water use and discharge, land use, tourism and shipping that impact the ecological condition of LSC. The interrelationships between the pathways of water use and tourism are further illustrated by a CLD with several feedback loops. We suggest that this holistic approach can be applied to other case studies and inspire the development of dynamic models capable of informing decision making for sustainability.

  15. Integrated Digital Survey of the "FONTANA RUSTICA" in the Gardens of the Quirinale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, L.; Troiano, W.

    2013-07-01

    The paper illustrates the results of a research on integrated digital survey of the "Fontana Rustica" in the gardens of the Quirinale, artifact somewhat atypical for its particular organical configuration, and whose history is still to be discovered. The activity is performed by Critevat, interdepartmental research center in Rieti, within of the scientific collaboration with the Office for the conservation of artistic heritage of the Quirinale Palace. The integrated digital survey in recent years has had a strong impulse thanks to the technological development of the shape acquisition instruments. The research has analyzed the problems of interaction and integration of digital data obtainable using the latest digital technologies such as 3D laser-scanner and digital photogrammetry. A further level of research has focused on the possibility of management of 3D models in relation to data obtained by instruments and methods of investigation of different scientific culture such as seismic transmission tomography and thermografy.

  16. Relationships between water quality and phosphorus concentrations for lakes of the Puget Sound region, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, Robert J.; Bortleson, Gilbert Carl

    1983-01-01

    Predictive regression relationships between concentrations of total phosphorus (P) in near-surface waters (1m) and water-quality characteristics were developed for lakes in the Puget Sound region. Nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratios support the strategy of emphasizing total P for lake eutrophication assessment within the range of lake conditions represented. Relationships based on summer total P concentrations, rather than winter-spring total P, led to more successful prediction of mean summertime chlorophyll a concentrations and Secchi-disc transparencies. The 78 lakes evaluated in the study had an average mean concentration of total phosphorus in near-surface waters of 22 ?g/L during the summer with mean concentrations for individual lakes ranging from 7 to 76 ?g/L. For regression relationships based on summer total phosphorus concentrations, the standard error of predicted Secchi-disc transparencies is ?0.9 meters for phosphorus concentrations of 15 ?g/L or greater, and the standard error of predicted chlorophyll a concentrations is ?5 ?g/L. Predictions for the range of conditions evaluated favorably agreed with predictions from similar relationships developed by other researchers for different lakes. To supplement estimates of transparency and chlorophyll a from regression relationships, a broader system of water-quality groups, including recreational suitability and fish habitat quality, was developed from published information and our experience in the region.

  17. Monitoring variations of inland lakes in the arid region of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jie; Chen, Xi; Yang, Liao; Fang, Hui

    2012-06-01

    Inland lakes are the major surface water resource in the arid regions of Central Asia. Therefore, the surface area changes in inland lakes have been a sensitive indicator of climate changes and human activities, and have often been the focus of ecological and environmental research. This study aimed to monitor the changes in surface area of nine major lakes over a 32-year period. The water body was extracted from MSS images from the mid-1970s, TM images from the early 1990s, ETM + images in the late 1990s, and TM images in 2007. The results indicated that the total surface area of these nine lakes had decreased over time to 50.38% of the area, from 91402.06 km2 in 1975 to 46049.23 km2 in 2007. As the surface area of lakes in the western part of Central Asia was larger than that in the eastern part, the shrinking trend of lake area was more significant in the west than in the east. There was a varied reduction of closed lakes in flat regions. The most substantial decrease was in the surface area of closed lakes in flat regions. Most significantly, the area of the Aral Sea was reduced by 75.7% from its original area in 1975. The area of alpine lakes remained relatively stable; the change in surface area was less than 0.7% during the period 1975-2007. The area change in opened lakes with outlets was notably different from the other two types. The area of Zaysan had increased sharply by 5.85%, and that of Bosten had decreased by 9.1%. Sasykkol had hardly any changes in this period. Due to global climate warming, vapor transfer to the south via westerly winds had been blocked, resulting in a decrease of much-needed precipitation in the western parts of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Kazakhstan between 1970 and 2000. The decrease in precipitation and the increase in water consumption for agricultural irrigation resulted in the decrease of river runoff. Consequently, the area of inland lakes in Central Asia shrank over the past 32 years.

  18. Identification of nitrogen sources to four small lakes in the agricultural region of Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanafield, M.; Rosen, M.; Saito, L.; Chandra, S.; Lamers, J.; Nishonov, Bakhriddin

    2010-01-01

    Pollution of inland waters by agricultural land use is a concern in many areas of the world, and especially in arid regions, where water resources are inherently scarce. This study used physical and chemical water quality and stable nitrogen isotope (δ15N) measurements from zooplankton to examine nitrogen (N) sources and concentrations in four small lakes of Khorezm, Uzbekistan, an arid, highly agricultural region, which is part of the environmentally-impacted Aral Sea Basin. During the 2-year study period, ammonium concentrations were the highest dissolved inorganic N species in all lakes, with a maximum of 3.00 mg N l−1 and an average concentration of 0.62 mg N l−1. Nitrate levels were low, with a maximum concentration of 0.46 mg N l−1 and an average of 0.05 mg N l−1 for all four lakes. The limited zooplankton δ15N values did not correlate with the high loads of synthetic fertilizer applied to local croplands during summer months. These results suggest that the N cycles in these lakes may be more influenced by regional dynamics than agricultural activity in the immediate surroundings. The Amu-Darya River, which provides the main source of irrigation water to the region, was identified as a possible source of the primary N input to the lakes.

  19. Use of wetlands under USEPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) Region 5 Clean Lakes Program. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, J.C.

    1989-05-01

    The EPA's Region V Clean Lakes Program uses several wetlands for controlling degradation of publicly owned, freshwater lakes. The study seeks to determine if the objectives of the Clean Lakes Program are being met by this use of wetlands, and if appropriate institutional arrangements and management techniques are being implemented to manage the wetlands. Conclusions regarding Revion V's use and management of wetlands include: wetland projects are not being monitored adequately for effectiveness and potential negative impacts on ecosystems; other mechanisms which may help to protect wetlands are being employed; management of most wetland projects is decentralized appropriately; most of the wetland projects provide for adequate short-term mass balance studies, prior sedimentation, plant species diversity, water level, retention time, uniform flow of water, and upland pollutant management; and existing evidence suggests that the Clean Lakes wetland projects are instrumental in meeting Program goals and objectives. Based on these conclusions several recommendations for improving wetlands management are reviewed.

  20. Impact of lake-river connectivity and interflow on the Canadian RCM simulated regional climate and hydrology for Northeast Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huziy, O.; Sushama, L.

    2017-02-01

    Lakes affect regional climate by modulating surface albedo, surface energy, and moisture budgets. This is especially important for regions such as Northeast Canada with approximately 10 % of the landmass covered by lakes, wetlands and rivers. From the regional hydrology perspective, interactions between lakes and rivers are important as streamflow patterns can be significantly modified by lake storage, and similarly lake levels can be modified by streamflows. In this study, using a suite of experiments performed with the fifth generation Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5) driven by the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasting ERA40 reanalysis data at the lateral boundaries for the 1979-2010 period, lake-river-atmosphere interactions and their impact on the regional climate/hydrology of north-east Canada are assessed. In these CRCM5 simulations, a one-dimensional lake model represents lakes, while the rivers are modeled using a distributed routing scheme, and one of the simulations includes interflow, i.e. lateral flow of water in the soil layers. Comparison of CRCM5 simulations with and without lakes suggests significant differences in winter/summer precipitation and winter temperature for the study region. CRCM5 simulations performed with and without lake-river interactions suggest improved representation of streamflows when lake storage and routing are taken into account. Adding the interflow process leads to increased streamflows during summer and fall seasons for the majority of the rivers, causing modest changes to land-atmosphere interactions via modified soil moisture. The impact of interflow on streamflow, obtained in this study, is comparable to the impact of lake-atmosphere interactions on streamflows. This study clearly demonstrates the need for realistic representation of lake-river interactions in regional climate models for realistic simulation of regional hydrology, particularly streamflows.

  1. Simulation of Lake Victoria Circulation Patterns Using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS).

    PubMed

    Nyamweya, Chrispine; Desjardins, Christopher; Sigurdsson, Sven; Tomasson, Tumi; Taabu-Munyaho, Anthony; Sitoki, Lewis; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Lake Victoria provides important ecosystem services including transport, water for domestic and industrial uses and fisheries to about 33 million inhabitants in three East African countries. The lake plays an important role in modulating regional climate. Its thermodynamics and hydrodynamics are also influenced by prevailing climatic and weather conditions on diel, seasonal and annual scales. However, information on water temperature and circulation in the lake is limited in space and time. We use a Regional Oceanographic Model System (ROMS) to simulate these processes from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014. The model is based on real bathymetry, river runoff and atmospheric forcing data using the bulk flux algorithm. Simulations show that the water column exhibits annual cycles of thermo-stratification (September-May) and mixing (June-August). Surface water currents take different patterns ranging from a lake-wide northward flow to gyres that vary in size and number. An under flow exists that leads to the formation of upwelling and downwelling regions. Current velocities are highest at the center of the lake and on the western inshore waters indicating enhanced water circulation in those areas. However, there is little exchange of water between the major gulfs (especially Nyanza) and the open lake, a factor that could be responsible for the different water quality reported in those regions. Findings of the present study enhance understanding of the physical processes (temperature and currents) that have an effect on diel, seasonal, and annual variations in stratification, vertical mixing, inshore-offshore exchanges and fluxes of nutrients that ultimately influence the biotic distribution and trophic structure. For instance information on areas/timing of upwelling and vertical mixing obtained from this study will help predict locations/seasons of high primary production and ultimately fisheries productivity in Lake Victoria.

  2. Simulation of Lake Victoria Circulation Patterns Using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Sven; Tomasson, Tumi; Taabu-Munyaho, Anthony; Sitoki, Lewis; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Lake Victoria provides important ecosystem services including transport, water for domestic and industrial uses and fisheries to about 33 million inhabitants in three East African countries. The lake plays an important role in modulating regional climate. Its thermodynamics and hydrodynamics are also influenced by prevailing climatic and weather conditions on diel, seasonal and annual scales. However, information on water temperature and circulation in the lake is limited in space and time. We use a Regional Oceanographic Model System (ROMS) to simulate these processes from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2014. The model is based on real bathymetry, river runoff and atmospheric forcing data using the bulk flux algorithm. Simulations show that the water column exhibits annual cycles of thermo-stratification (September–May) and mixing (June–August). Surface water currents take different patterns ranging from a lake-wide northward flow to gyres that vary in size and number. An under flow exists that leads to the formation of upwelling and downwelling regions. Current velocities are highest at the center of the lake and on the western inshore waters indicating enhanced water circulation in those areas. However, there is little exchange of water between the major gulfs (especially Nyanza) and the open lake, a factor that could be responsible for the different water quality reported in those regions. Findings of the present study enhance understanding of the physical processes (temperature and currents) that have an effect on diel, seasonal, and annual variations in stratification, vertical mixing, inshore—offshore exchanges and fluxes of nutrients that ultimately influence the biotic distribution and trophic structure. For instance information on areas/timing of upwelling and vertical mixing obtained from this study will help predict locations/seasons of high primary production and ultimately fisheries productivity in Lake Victoria. PMID:27030983

  3. Using a Coupled Lake Model with WRF to Improve High-Resolution Regional Climate Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, M.; Bullock, R.; Nolte, C. G.; Alapaty, K.; Otte, T.; Gula, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lakes can play a significant role in regional climate by modifying air masses through fluxes of heat and moisture and by modulating inland extremes in temperature. Representing these effects becomes more important as regional climate modeling efforts employ finer grid spacing in order to simulate smaller scales. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model does not simulate lakes explicitly. Instead, lake points are treated as ocean points, with sea surface temperatures (SSTs) interpolated from the nearest neighboring ocean point in the driving coarse-scale fields. This can result in substantial errors for inland lakes such as the Great Lakes. Although prescribed lake surface temperatures (LSTs) can be used for retrospective modeling applications, this may not be desirable for applications involving downscaling future climate scenarios from a global climate model (GCM). In such downscaling simulations, lakes that impact the regional climate in the area of interest may not be resolved by the coarser global input fields. Explicitly simulating the LST would allow WRF to better represent interannual variability in regions significantly affected by lakes, and the influence of such variability on temperature and precipitation patterns. Therefore, coupling a lake model to WRF may lead to more reliable assessments of the impacts of extreme events on human health and the environment. We employ a version of WRF coupled to the Freshwater Lake model, FLake (Gula and Peltier 2012). FLake is a 1D bulk lake model which provides updated LSTs and ice coverage throughout the integration. This two-layer model uses a temperature-depth profile which includes a homogeneous mixed layer at the surface and a thermocline below. The shape of the thermocline is assumed, based on past theoretical and observational studies. Therefore, additional variables required for FLake to run are minimal, and it does not require tuning for individual lakes. These characteristics are advantageous for a

  4. Petrologic considerations for hot dry rock geothermal site selection in the Clear Lake Region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Stimac, J.; Goff, F. ); Hearn, B.C. Jr. )

    1992-01-01

    The Clear Lake area is well known for anomalous heat flow, thermal springs, hydrothermal mineral deposits, and Quaternary volcanism. These factors, along with the apparent lack of a large reservoir of geothermal fluid north of Collayomi fault make the Clear Lake area an attractive target for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. Petrologic considerations provide some constraints on site selection for HDR development. Spatial and temporal trends in volcanism in the Coast Ranges indicate that magmatism has migrated to the north with time, paralleling passage of the Mendocino triple junction and propagation of the San Andreas fault. Volcanism in the region may have resulted from upwelling of hot asthenosphere along the southern margin of the subducted segment of the Gorda plate. Spatial and temporal trends of volcanism within the Clear Lake volcanic field are similar to larger-scale trends of Neogene volcanism in the Cost Ranges. Volcanism (especially for silicic compositions) shows a general migration to the north over the {approximately}2 Ma history of the field, with the youngest two silicic centers located at Mt. Konocti and Borax Lake. The Mt. Konocti system (active from {approximately} 0.6 to 0.3 Ma) was large and long-lived, whereas the Borax Lake system is much smaller but younger (0.09 Ma). Remnants of silicic magma bodies under Mt. Konocti may be in the latter stages of cooling, whereas a magma body centered under Borax Lake may be in the early stages of development. The existence of an upper crustal silicic magma body of under Borax Lake has yet to be demonstrated by passive geophysics, however, subsurface temperatures in the area as high (> 200{degrees}C at 2000 m) as those beneath the Mt. Konocti area. Based on petrologic considerations alone, the Mt. Konocti-Borax Lake area appears to be the most logical choice for HDR geothermal development in the region.

  5. Lake Vanda: A sentinel for climate change in the McMurdo Sound Region of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castendyk, Devin N.; Obryk, Maciej K.; Leidman, Sasha Z.; Gooseff, Michael; Hawes, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered, meromictic, endorheic lake located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, and an exceptional sentinel of climate change within the region. Lake levels rose 15 m over the past 68 years in response to climate-driven variability in ice-cover sublimation, meltwater production, and annual discharge of the Onyx River, the main source of water to the lake. Evidence from a new bathymetric map and water balance model combined with annual growth laminations in benthic mats suggest that the most recent filling trend began abruptly 80 years ago, in the early 1930s. This change increased lake volume by > 50%, triggered the formation of a new, upper, thermohaline convection cell, and cooled the lower convection cell by at least 2 °C and the bottom-most waters by at > 4 °C. Additionally, the depth of the deep chlorophyll a maximum rose by > 2 m, and deep-growing benthic algal mats declined while shallow benthic mats colonized freshly inundated areas. We attribute changes in hydrology to regional variations in air flow related to the strength and position of the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL) pressure system which have increased the frequency of down-valley, föhn winds associated with surface air temperature warming in the McMurdo Dry Valleys. The ASL has also been implicated in the recent warming of the Antarctic Peninsula, and provides a common link for climate-related change on opposite sides of the continent. If this trend persists, Lake Vanda should continue to rise and cool over the next 200 years until a new equilibrium lake level is achieved. Most likely, future lake rise will lead to isothermal conditions not conducive to thermohaline convection, resulting in a drastically different physical, biogeochemical, and biological structure than observed today.

  6. Predator-prey relations and competition for food between age-0 lake trout and slimy sculpins in the Apostle Island region of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Patrick L.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Bronte, Charles R.

    1995-01-01

    Slimy sculpins (Cottus cognatus) are an important component of the fish community on reefs and adjacent nursery areas of the Great Lakes and overlap spatially with age-0 lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). Important interactions between these fishes are possible during the lake trout's first year of life, which could include predation on each other's eggs and larvae, and competition for food resources. We investigated the diets of age-0 lake trout and slimy sculpins on a lake trout spawning reef (Gull Island Shoal) and adjacent nursery area (near Michigan Island) in the Apostle Island region of western Lake Superior during June through September from 1988 through 1991. Organisms in stomachs of 511 lake trout and 562 sculpins were identified and counted. Of the 11 major food types found in age-0 lake trout stomachs from both areas, Mysis was the dominant food item (mean volume in stomachs = 68%) and occurred in about 3/4 of the fish analyzed. Copepods, cladocerans, chironomid pupae, fish, and Bythotrephes were also common in the diet (frequency of occurrence > 4%). Diets of lake trout were more diverse on the reef than on the nursery area where Mysis dominated the diet. Slimy sculpins were only found in lake trout greater than 50 mm. Mysis was an important food item of slimy sculpins over the reef but not over the nursery area, where Diporeia was by far the most important taxon. A variety ofben-thic invertebrates (Asellus, chironomids, benthic copepods, and snails) comprised the bulk of the sculpin diet over the reef. Sculpins also ate lake trout eggs in November. Based on cluster analysis, diets were most similar over the reef where both consumed Mysis, calanoid copepods and chironomid pupae. Diets diverged over the nursery areas where sculpins were strictly benthic feeders and lake trout maintained their planktonic diet. In Lake Superior, where lake trout recruitment through natural reproduction has become well established, the coexistence of the two

  7. Application of a comprehensive extraction technique for the determination of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Great Lakes Region sediments.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Megson, David; Myers, Anne L; Helm, Paul A; Marvin, Chris; Crozier, Patrick; Mabury, Scott; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Tomy, Gregg; Simcik, Matt; McCarry, Brian; Reiner, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive method to extract perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs), perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs), polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters (diPAPs), perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids (PFPiAs) and perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids (PFPAs) from sediment and analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed and applied to sediment cores from three small isolated lakes (Plastic Lake, Lake 442, Lake Tettegouche) and Lake Ontario in the Great Lakes Region. Recoveries of the target compounds using the optimized acetonitrile/sodium hydroxide extraction ranged from 73% to 120%. The greatest concentrations of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs) were recorded in sediment from Lake Ontario (ΣPFASs 13.1 ng/g), where perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) contributed over 80% of the total. Concentrations in Lake Ontario were approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than the more remote lakes subject to primarily atmospheric inputs. Whilst the PFAS contribution in Lake Ontario was dominated by PFOS, the more remote lakes contained sediment with higher proportions of PFCAs. Trace amounts of emerging PFASs (diPAPs and PFPiAs) were found in very recent surface Lake Ontario and remote lake sediments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Isotope Hydrology of Arctic Tundra Lakes in a Region Impacted by Permafrost Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, D. L.

    2009-05-01

    A projected "hot spot" of climate warming and development is the Mackenzie River Delta region, Northwest Territories, Canada. The upland tundra areas within the Mackenzie Gas Project development area north of Inuvik contain thousands of small lakes and ponds with poorly defined ephemeral drainage that are underlain by thick permafrost and ice-rich sediments for which the basic water balance controls are not fully understood. Natural retrogressive thaw slumps are common along lakeshores and the rapid drainage of ice-rich permafrost-dammed lakes has been occurring. Ongoing oil/gas exploration activities and infrastructure construction may result in terrain disturbance and localized degradation of permafrost, while climate change may increase the magnitude and frequency of thermokarst processes. These disturbed lakes are believed to act as historical analogues for the future effects of climate change on the hydrology, geochemistry, and aquatic ecology of small tundra lake catchments in the continuous permafrost zone of northwestern Canada. Environment Canada initiated an integrated research program in 2005 with the overall goal of improving our understanding of hydro-ecological processes in freshwater aquatic ecosystems affected by shoreline slumping vs. pristine lakes. Limited catchment studies have examined water-balance parameters (e.g., precipitation, evaporation, and surface flows) for tundra lakes in the development area. Enrichment of oxygen-18 (18O) and deuterium (2H) stable isotopes in surface waters have been shown to be useful indicators of water balance variations in remote permafrost regions of Canada where hydroclimatic information is very limited. In particular, information on evaporation: inflow (E/I) ratios and residence times would provide useful information for estimating appropriate water withdrawals from lakes within the proposed development area. A key question is "does permafrost slumping impact the hydrology of tundra lakes via catchment area

  9. Controls on the geochemical evolution of Prairie Pothole Region lakes and wetlands over decadal time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher; Mushet, David M.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Rover, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    One hundred sixty-seven Prairie Pothole lakes, ponds and wetlands (largely lakes) previously analyzed chemically during the late 1960’s and early to mid-1970’s were resampled and reanalyzed in 2011–2012. The two sampling periods differed climatically. The earlier sampling took place during normal to slightly dry conditions, whereas the latter occurred during and immediately following exceptionally wet conditions. As reported previously in Mushet et al. (2015), the dominant effect was expansion of the area of these lakes and dilution of their major ions. However, within that context, there were significant differences in the evolutionary pathways of major ions. To establish these pathways, we employed the inverse modeling computer code NetpathXL. This code takes the initial and final lake composition and, using mass balance constrained by the composition of diluting waters, and input and output of phases, calculates plausible geochemical evolution pathways. Despite the fact that in most cases major ions decreased, a subset of the lakes had an increase in SO42−. This distinction is significant because SO42− is the dominant anion in a majority of Prairie Pothole Region wetlands and lakes. For lakes with decreasing SO42−, the proportion of original lake water required for mass balance was subordinate to rainwater and/or overland flow. In contrast, lakes with increasing SO42− between the two sampling episodes tended to be dominated by original lake water. This suite of lakes tended to be smaller and have lower initial SO42−concentrations such that inputs of sulfur from dissolution of the minerals gypsum or pyrite had a significant impact on the final sulfur concentration given the lower dilution factors. Thus, our study provides context for how Prairie Pothole Region water bodies evolve geochemically as climate changes. Because wetland geochemistry in turn controls the ecology of these water bodies, this research contributes to the prediction of the

  10. Surveillance of Schistosoma japonicum Infection in Domestic Ruminants in the Dongting Lake Region, Hunan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinming; Zhu, Chunxia; Shi, Yaojun; Li, Hao; Wang, Lanpin; Qin, Shangtian; Kang, Saie; Huang, Yanpin; Jin, Yamei; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2012-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica is prevalent in Asian countries and it remains a major public health problem in China. The major endemic foci are the marsh and lake regions of southern China, particularly the Dongting Lake region bordering Hunan and Hubei provinces, and the Poyang Lake region in Jiangxi province. Domestic ruminants, especially bovines, have long been considered to play a major role in the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum to humans. Methods and Findings A miracidial hatching technique was used to investigate the prevalence of S. japonicum infections in domestic ruminants and field feces collected from two towns located to the south and east of Dongting Lake, Hunan province, between 2005 and 2010. The overall prevalence of infection was not significantly reduced from 4.93% in 2005 to 3.64% in 2008, after which it was maintained at this level. Bovines comprised 23.5–58.2% of the total infected ruminants, while goats comprised 41.8–76.5%. Infection rates in cattle and goats were significantly higher than those found in buffalo in most study years. The prevalence in buffalo younger than three years was significantly higher than that in those aged over three years. All the positive field samples of feces were derived from bovines in Nandashan. In Matang Town, 61.22% of the positive field feces were from bovines, while the rest were from goats. The positive rates for field feces were approximately the same in April and November/October. Conclusions The present study found that bovines and goats are major sources of S. japonicum infection in the Dongting lake region and there was age-related resistance in buffalo. Both bovines and goats should be treated equally when controlling S. japonicum infections in the Dongting lake region. It is essential to conduct an additional mass treatment in late March or early April, in addition to the original treatment scheme. PMID:22359638

  11. Lidar Altimeter Mapping of a Supraglacial Lake Region via an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Near Ilulissat, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, J.; Maslanik, J.; Crocker, R. I.; Angier, M.; Weatherhead, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Lidar Altimeter elevation profiles from the Arctic MUSCOX (MUltiSensor Cryospheric Observation eXperiment) project are presented and compared against other techniques for digital elevation mapping of the supraglacial melt lake region in the vicinity of the Jacobshavn Glacier. The hypsography of the sampled region will be discussed, and an estimated volume of a recently drained supraglacial lake will be made. Additionally, a first look at some of the hyperspectral imagery collected over a supraglacial lake will be shown.

  12. Computation of precise regional geoid in Great Lakes region using GOCE data and two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janák, Juraj; Pitoňák, Martin; Minarechová, Zuzana; Huang, Jianliang

    2014-05-01

    The goal of our contribution is to compare the two regional models of the geoid in a relatively flat area around the Great Lakes - Canada and the USA. The first model is computed with the standard Stokes-Helmert (SH) approach while the second model is compiled as numerical Finite Element Solution (FE) to the geodetic boundary-value problem. The terrestrial data used as an input for both models are the same. The GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer) input data are, however, different. The SH model uses the recent GOCE global geopotential model while the FE approach employs the grid of downward continued gravity anomalies derived from the GOCE gravitational gradients. The SH approach is well documented and described in many publications. The FE approach is recent and novelty approach which can be almost independent from the global geopotential model, except from the dependency inherited from the GOCE EGG_TRF2 data product. Moreover the FE approach is able to combine the terrestrial and satellite input data in a natural way. Both models are compared with GNSS-Levelling data to assess the accuracy of both models and efficiency of particular approaches.

  13. Summertime thermally-induced circulations over the Lake Nam Co region of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xianyu; Lü, Yaqiong; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Performance of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) over the Lake Nam Co region of the Tibetan Plateau was evaluated based on the data from five surface observation sites in 2006. The interaction between two thermally-induced circulations (lake breezes and mountain-valley winds) was also investigated. The results show that MM5 could be used to simulate 2-m air temperature; however, MM5 needs improvement in wind field simulation. Two numerical simulations were conducted to study the effect of the lake on the local weather and wind system. The original land cover of the model was used in the control experiment, and the lake was replaced with grassland resembling the area surrounding the lake in the sensitive experiment. The results of the simulations indicate that the lake enhanced the north slope mountain-valley wind and the mountain changed the offshore flow direction at the north shore. During the day, a clear convergent zone and a strong upflow were observed over the north slope of the Nyainq'entanglha Range, which may cause frequent precipitation over the north slope. During the night, the entire area was controlled by a south flow.

  14. Regional spatial and temporal interpolation of atmospheric PCBs: Interpretation of Lake Michigan mass balance data

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.L.; Depinto, J.V.; Sweet, C.; Hornbuckle, K.C.

    2000-05-01

    During the Lake Michigan Mass Balance (LMMB) Project, over 600 atmospheric samples were collected at eight shoreline sites and during seven cruises. These samples were analyzed for persistent organic pollutants, including PCB congeners, atrazine, and trans-nonachlor. The authors have developed a method for interpreting the gas-phase data that includes fractionating the observed PCB concentration into land- and water-based sources. This approach accounts for differences in gas-phase atmospheric PCB concentration over water and over land. Using this fractionation approach, they have interpolated the measured data over time and space to predict PCB air concentrations over the lake during the LMMB field period. The results predict gas-phase {Sigma}PCB (sum of {approximately}98 congener groups) concentrations for each of 2,319 grid cells over the lake, on a monthly basis. The authors estimate that lake-wide monthly average {sigma}PCB gas-phase concentrations range from 0.136 to 1.158 ng/m{sup 3}, with an annual average PCB concentration of 0.457 ng/m{sup 3}. As expected, the highest concentrations of PCBs over the lake when the winds are from the southwest (out of the Chicago-Gary region) and when land surface temperatures are elevated. The predicted influence of Chicago is described on a monthly basis as a zone of elevated PCB concentrations for approximately 40 km into Lake Michigan.

  15. Glial cell biology in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Douglas L; Skoff, Robert P

    2016-03-31

    We report on the tenth bi-annual Great Lakes Glial meeting, held in Traverse City, Michigan, USA, September 27-29 2015. The GLG meeting is a small conference that focuses on current research in glial cell biology. The array of functions that glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) play in health and disease is constantly increasing. Despite this diversity, GLG meetings bring together scientists with common interests, leading to a better understanding of these cells. This year's meeting included two keynote speakers who presented talks on the regulation of CNS myelination and the consequences of stress on Schwann cell biology. Twenty-two other talks were presented along with two poster sessions. Sessions covered recent findings in the areas of microglial and astrocyte activation; age-dependent changes to glial cells, Schwann cell development and pathology, and the role of stem cells in glioma and neural regeneration.

  16. Late quaternary temporal and event classifications, Great Lakes region, North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, W.H.; Hansel, A.K.; Bettis, E. Arthur; Karrow, P.F.; Larson, G.J.; Lowell, T.V.; Schneider, Allan F.

    1997-01-01

    Several temporal and event classifications are used for the Quaternary glacial and interglacial record in the Great Lakes region of North America. Although based on contrasting principles, the classifications, as practiced, are similar to one another in most respects and they differ little from the classification proposed by Chamberlin a century ago. All are based on stratigraphic units having time-transgressive boundaries; thus the associated time spans and events are diachronous. Where application of geochronologic classification based on isochronous boundaries is not practical or useful, we advocate the use of diachronic principles to establish local and regional temporal and event classifications. Diachronic and event classifications based on such principles are proposed herein for the Great Lakes region. Well-established names, including Wisconsin, Sangamon, and Illinois, are used at the episode (or glaciation/interglaciation) rank without significant redefinition. The Hudson Episode (Interglaciation) is introduced for postglacial time, the current interglacial interval. The Wisconsin Episode is divided into the Ontario, Elgin, and Michigan Subepisodes in the eastern and northern parts of the Great Lakes region and into the Athens and Michigan Subepisodes in the southern and western parts of the Great Lakes region. ?? 1997 University of Washington.

  17. Zooplankton communities and Bythotrephes longimanus in lakes of the montane region of the northern Alps

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Zsófia; Vad, Csaba F.; Preiler, Christian; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Ptáčníková, Radka; Ptacnik, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Lakes in the Alps represent a considerable fraction of nutrient-poor lakes in Central Europe, with unique biodiversity and ecosystem properties. Although some individual lakes are well-studied, less knowledge is available on large-scale patterns essential to generalise the understanding of their functioning. Here, we aimed to describe crustacean zooplankton communities (Cladocera, Copepoda) and identify their environmental drivers in the pelagic zone of 54 oligotrophic lakes in the montane region of the Alps (400–1200 m) in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland, covering a spatial scale of 650 km. Moreover, we aimed to provide data on the distribution and ecological requirements of the North American invader Bytotrephes longimanus in its Central European native range. Communities were mainly dominated by widespread species typical of lowland habitats, and only a few true specialists of oligotrophic alpine lakes were present. The most frequent taxa were the Daphnia longispina complex and Eudiaptomus gracilis, with 48 and 45 occurrences, respectively. Species richness decreased with altitude and increased with lake area. The main structuring factors of community composition were chlorophyll a concentration and depth, which drove an apparent separation of mesotrophic and oligotrophic communities. Bytotrephes had 13 occurrences, showing a preference for deep oligotrophic lakes. Its presence was not coupled with lower crustacean species richness as it was repeatedly observed in North America. Additionally, it frequently co-occurred with the other large predatory cladoceran, Leptodora kindtii. B. longimanus might be considered a truly montane species in Central Europe, given its absence in lowland and alpine lakes. PMID:28649318

  18. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards in the Crater Lake Region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Bacon, C.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, K.E.; Nathenson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake lies in a basin, or caldera, formed by collapse of the Cascade volcano known as Mount Mazama during a violent, climactic eruption about 7,700 years ago. This event dramatically changed the character of the volcano so that many potential types of future events have no precedent there. This potentially active volcanic center is contained within Crater Lake National Park, visited by 500,000 people per year, and is adjacent to the main transportation corridor east of the Cascade Range. Because a lake is now present within the most likely site of future volcanic activity, many of the hazards at Crater Lake are different from those at most other Cascade volcanoes. Also significant are many faults near Crater Lake that clearly have been active in the recent past. These faults, and historic seismicity, indicate that damaging earthquakes can occur there in the future. The USGS Open-File Report 97-487 (Bacon and others, 1997) describes the various types of volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake area, estimates of the likelihood of future events, recommendations for mitigation, and a map of hazard zones. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Crater Lake earthquake and volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-487 are included in this data set. USGS scientists created one GIS data layer, c_faults, that delineates these faults and one layer, cballs, that depicts the downthrown side of the faults. Additional GIS layers chazline, chaz, and chazpoly were created to show 1)the extent of pumiceous pyroclastic-flow deposits of the caldera forming Mount Mazama eruption, 2)silicic and mafic vents in the Crater Lake region, and 3)the proximal hazard zone around the caldera rim, respectively.

  19. Potential Effects of Climate Changes on Aquatic Systems: Laurentian Great Lakes and Precambrian Shield Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, J. J.; Webster, K. E.; Assel, R. A.; Bowser, C. J.; Dillon, P. J.; Eaton, J. G.; Evans, H. E.; Fee, E. J.; Hall, R. I.; Mortsch, L. R.; Schindler, D. W.; Quinn, F. H.

    1997-06-01

    The region studied includes the Laurentian Great Lakes and a diversity of smaller glacial lakes, streams and wetlands south of permanent permafrost and towards the southern extent of Wisconsin glaciation. We emphasize lakes and quantitative implications. The region is warmer and wetter than it has been over most of the last 12000 years. Since 1911 observed air temperatures have increased by about 0·11°C per decade in spring and 0·06°C in winter; annual precipitation has increased by about 2·1% per decade. Ice thaw phenologies since the 1850s indicate a late winter warming of about 2·5°C. In future scenarios for a doubled CO2 climate, air temperature increases in summer and winter and precipitation decreases (summer) in western Ontario but increases (winter) in western Ontario, northern Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Such changes in climate have altered and would further alter hydrological and other physical features of lakes. Warmer climates, i.e. 2 × CO2 climates, would lower net basin water supplies, stream flows and water levels owing to increased evaporation in excess of precipitation. Water levels have been responsive to drought and future scenarios for the Great Lakes simulate levels 0·2 to 2·5 m lower. Human adaptation to such changes is expensive. Warmer climates would decrease the spatial extent of ice cover on the Great Lakes; small lakes, especially to the south, would no longer freeze over every year. Temperature simulations for stratified lakes are 1-7°C warmer for surface waters, and 6°C cooler to 8°C warmer for deep waters. Thermocline depth would change (4 m shallower to 3·5 m deeper) with warmer climates alone; deepening owing to increases in light penetration would occur with reduced input of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from dryer catchments. Dissolved oxygen would decrease below the thermocline. These physical changes would in turn affect the phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos and fishes. Annual phytoplankton production may

  20. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in the Western Portion of the South Atlantic-Gulf Region 3 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  1. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in the Southern Portion of the South Atlantic-Gulf Region 3 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  2. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in the Northern Portion of the South Atlantic-Gulf Region 3 HUC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic systems. The lake morphometry dataset included here contains estimates of Surface Area, Shoreline Length, Shoreline Development, Maximum Depth, Mean Depth, Lake Volume, Maximum Lake Length, Mean Lake Width, Maximum Lake Width, and Fetch for each of the ??lakepond?? waterbodies in the NHDPlus V2. The current release of the datasets is version 0.1 and future refinements to the data are expected.

  3. The impact of the African Great Lakes on the regional climate in a dynamically downscaled CORDEX simulation (COSMO-CLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, W.; Panitz, H.; van Lipzig, N.

    2013-12-01

    Owing to the strong contrast in albedo, roughness and heat capacity between land and water, lakes significantly influence the exchange of moisture, heat and momentum between the surface and the boundary layer. To investigate this two-way interaction, a correct representation of lakes within regional climate models is essential. To this end, the one-dimensional lake parameterisation scheme FLake was recently coupled to the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (CCLM). One region where lakes constitute a key component of the climate system is the African Great Lakes region. In this study, the CCLM CORDEX-Africa evaluation simulation is dynamically downscaled from 0.44° (50 km) to 0.0625° (7 km) over East-Africa. The performance of two lake modules within CCLM are compared for the period 1999-2008: the default FLake scheme and the alternative Community Land Model. Model results are evaluated in a three-step procedure. First, the atmospheric state variables near-surface temperature, precipitation, surface energy fluxes, fractional cloud cover and column precipitable water are evaluated using in-situ based and satellite-derived products. Second, a comprehensive set of in-situ water temperature profile observations serves to evaluate the temporal evolution of water temperatures at three sites: Lake Kivu (Ishungu), Lake Tanganyika's northern basin (Kigoma) and southern basin (Mpulungu). Finally, spatial variability of surface temperatures in Lake Kivu and Lake Tanganyika are evaluated on the basis of satellite-derived lake surface temperatures. Subsequently, the preferred model configuration is used to quantify and understand effects by lakes reported for other regions in the world, such as a dampened diurnal temperature range, enhanced evaporation, modified surface layer stability, increased downwind precipitation, stronger winds, and the formation of local circulation patterns. This is achieved through comparison to a model integration excluding lake effects.

  4. A numerical study on the influence of fractured regions on lake/groundwater interaction; the Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbo, Hila; Shavit, Uri; Markel, Doron; Rimmer, Alon

    2003-12-01

    Increased lake salinity is a growing problem in arid and semi-arid regions. Operational management, which is based on a reliable hydrological understanding, has the potential to reduce the lake salinity. This is the case of the salinity in Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), where saline water flows into the lake through on-shore and off-shore springs. Here, we present a time-dependent flow and transport numerical model that successfully reproduces the monitored groundwater level, discharge, and salinity of the lake springs. The model utilizes a continuum approach and describes the flow through a confined saline carbonate aquifer, which interacts with the discharge lake through fractures and faults. In particular, the model investigates the hydrology around two groups of springs, Fuliya and Tabgha, along the western shore of the lake. Based on seasonal characteristics of the springs and measured boundary conditions, the two springs groups were defined as Lake Dominated Springs (LDS, Fuliya) and Aquifer Dominated Springs (ADS, Tabgha). The models of the two groups differ from each other in the distribution of fractured regions that link between the lake and the underlying aquifers. The numerical solution shows how the fractured regions affect groundwater head, spring discharge, and spring salinity. The different behavior of the LDS and ADS was reproduced with an excellent agreement between measured and calculated patterns. Differences in salinity within a group of springs are shown to be dependent on the depth of the fractured region. It was revealed that in addition to the appropriate distribution of fractured regions some adjustment in the up-stream boundary conditions is necessary to fully reproduce the system hydrology. The model has improved our understanding and provides a prediction tool for future management strategies.

  5. Electromagnetic Surveying in the Mangrove Lakes Region of Everglades National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, D.; Price, R.; Frankovich, T.; Fourqurean, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Mangrove Lakes are an interconnected set of shallow (~ 1m), brackish lake and creek systems on the southern margin of the Everglades adjacent to Florida Bay. Current efforts associated with the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) aim to increase freshwater flow into this region. This study describes preliminary results of geophysical surveys in the lakes conducted to assess changes in the groundwater chemistry as part of a larger hydrologic and geochemical study in the Everglades Lakes region. Marine geophysical profiles were conducted in Alligator Creek (West Lake) and McCormick Creek systems in May, 2014. Data included marine electromagnetic (EM) profiles and soundings, water depth measurements, surface water conductivity and salinity measurements. A GSSI Profiler EMP-400 multi-frequency EM conductivity meter continuously recorded in-phase and quadrature field components at 1, 8, and 15 KHz. The system was deployed in a flat bottomed plastic kayak towed behind a motorized skiff. Lake water depths were continuously measured with a sounder/chart plotter which was calibrated with periodic sounding rod measurements. At periodic intervals during the survey, the profiling was stopped and surface water conductivity, temperature and salinity are recorded with a portable YSI probe on the tow boat. Over 40,000 discrete 3-frequency EM measurements were collected. The data were inverted to 2-layer models representing the water layer thickness and conductivity and the lake bottom conductivity. At spot locations, models were constrained with water depth soundings and surface water conductivity measurements. At other locations along the profiles, the water depth and conductivity were allowed to be free, but the free models were generally consistent with the constrained models. Multilayer sub-bottom models were also explored but were found to be poorly constrained. In West Lake, sub-bottom conductivities decreased from 400 mS/m in the west to 200 mS/m in the

  6. Carbon dioxide and methane supersaturation in lakes of semi-humid/semi-arid region, Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhidan; Song, Kaishan; Zhao, Ying; Jin, Xiuliang

    2016-08-01

    Understanding concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in lakes is an important part of a comprehensive global carbon budget. We estimated data on the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and CH4 (pCH4) from sampling with 95 lakes in semi-humid/semi-arid region of Northeastern China during ice-free period. Both pCO2 and pCH4 varied greatly among the study sites. p(CO2) values in these lakes ranged from 21.9 to 30,152.3 μatm (n = 403), and 91% of lakes in this survey were supersaturated with CO2. p(CH4) values ranged from 12.6 to 139,630.7 μatm with all sites in this study of CH4 sources to the atmosphere during the ice-free period. The collected urban lakes samples exhibited higher pCO2 and pCH4 than wild lakes samples. Either the mean value of p(CO2) or p(CH4) in saline waters is higher than in fresh waters. Correlation analysis implied that the partial pressure of the GHGs (CO2 and CH4) showed statistically correlations with water environment indicators like pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and chlorophyll a (Chla). However, the most of the relationships showed a high degree of scatter, only pH might be used as the predictor of the gas partial pressure based on the result of this study (rpCO2 = -0.437, p < 0.01, n = 382; rpCH4 = -0.265, p < 0.01, n = 400). Furthermore, salinity could be a good predictor for p(CO2) and p(CH4) in 83 freshwater lakes in our study (rpCO2 = 0.365, rpCH4 = 0.323, p < 0.01, n = 348). The mean CO2 flux increased with the decreasing lake area size. The calculated annual areal carbon emission rate is 560.2 g C m-2 from 95 lakes in Northeastern China. We could not extrapolate carbon emission from these lakes to the boreal region or a wider scale because of the change of environmental conditions.

  7. The Professional Reading Habits of Senior Housing Officers at ACUHO-I Member Institutions in the Great Lakes Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the professional reading habits of Senior Housing Officers (SHOs) at ACUHO-I member institutions in the Great Lakes region, which encompasses the states of Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, and Indiana. The findings were based on data from the survey responses of SHOs at 71 colleges and universities across the Great Lakes region of the…

  8. The Professional Reading Habits of Senior Housing Officers at ACUHO-I Member Institutions in the Great Lakes Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the professional reading habits of Senior Housing Officers (SHOs) at ACUHO-I member institutions in the Great Lakes region, which encompasses the states of Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, and Indiana. The findings were based on data from the survey responses of SHOs at 71 colleges and universities across the Great Lakes region of the…

  9. Spatial distribution and source apportionment of PFASs in surface sediments from five lake regions, China

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanjie; Huo, Shouliang; Xi, Beidou; Hu, Shibin; Zhang, Jingtian; He, Zhuoshi

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been found in environment globally. However, studies on PFAS occurrence in sediments of lakes or reservoirs remain relatively scarce. In this study, two hundred and sixty-two surface sediment samples were collected from forty-eight lakes and two reservoirs all over China. Average PFAS concentrations in surface sediments from each lake or reservoir varied from 0.086 ng/g dw to 5.79 ng/g dw with an average of 1.15 ng/g dw. Among five lake regions, average PFAS concentrations for the lakes from Eastern Plain Region were the highest. Perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluoroundecanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) were the predominant PFASs in surface sediments. The significant positive correlations between PFAS concentrations and total organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus contents in sediments revealed the influences of sedimentary characteristics on PFAS occurrence. A two-dimensional hierarchical cluster analysis heat map was depicted to analyze the possible origins of sediments and individual PFAS. The food-packaging, textile, electroplating, firefighting and semiconductor industry emission sources and the precious metals and coating industry emission sources were identified as the main sources by two receptor models, with contributions of 77.7 and 22.3% to the total concentrations of C4-C14- perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids and PFOS, respectively. PMID:26947748

  10. Spatial distribution and source apportionment of PFASs in surface sediments from five lake regions, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yanjie; Huo, Shouliang; Xi, Beidou; Hu, Shibin; Zhang, Jingtian; He, Zhuoshi

    2016-03-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have been found in environment globally. However, studies on PFAS occurrence in sediments of lakes or reservoirs remain relatively scarce. In this study, two hundred and sixty-two surface sediment samples were collected from forty-eight lakes and two reservoirs all over China. Average PFAS concentrations in surface sediments from each lake or reservoir varied from 0.086 ng/g dw to 5.79 ng/g dw with an average of 1.15 ng/g dw. Among five lake regions, average PFAS concentrations for the lakes from Eastern Plain Region were the highest. Perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluoroundecanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) were the predominant PFASs in surface sediments. The significant positive correlations between PFAS concentrations and total organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus contents in sediments revealed the influences of sedimentary characteristics on PFAS occurrence. A two-dimensional hierarchical cluster analysis heat map was depicted to analyze the possible origins of sediments and individual PFAS. The food-packaging, textile, electroplating, firefighting and semiconductor industry emission sources and the precious metals and coating industry emission sources were identified as the main sources by two receptor models, with contributions of 77.7 and 22.3% to the total concentrations of C4-C14- perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids and PFOS, respectively.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Trends of Snowfall in Central New York - A Lake Effect Dominated Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, Justin Joseph

    Central New York is located in one of the snowiest regions in the United States, with the city of Syracuse, New York the snowiest metropolis in the nation. Snowfall in the region generally begins in mid-November and lasts until late-March. Snow accumulation occurs from a multitude of conditions: frontal systems, mid-latitude cyclones, Nor'easters, and most notably lake-effect storms. Lake effect snowfall (LES) is a difficult parameter to forecast due to the isolated and highly variable nature of the storm. Consequently, studies have attempted to determine changes in snowfall for lake-effect dominated regions. Annual snowfall patterns are of particular concern as seasonal snowfall totals are vital for water resources, winter businesses, agriculture, government and state agencies, and much more. Through the use of snowfall, temperature, precipitation, and location data from the National Weather Service's Cooperative Observer Program (COOP), spatial and temporal changes in snowfall for Central New York were determined. In order to determine climatic changes in snowfall, statistical analyses were performed (i.e. least squares estimation, correlations, principal component analyses, etc.) and spatial maps analyzed. Once snowfall trends were determined, factors influencing the trends were examined. Long-term snowfall trends for CNY were positive for original stations (˜0.46 +/- 0.20 in. yr -1) and homogenously filtered stations (0.23 +/- 0.20 in. yr -1). However, snowfall trends for shorter time-increments within the long-term period were not consistent, as positive, negative, and neutral trends were calculated. Regional differences in snowfall trends were observed for CNY as typical lake-effect areas (northern counties, the Tug Hill Plateau and the Southern Hills) experienced larger snowfall trends than areas less dominated by LES. Typical lake-effect months (December - February) experienced the greatest snowfall trend in CNY compared to other winter months. The

  12. A REGIONAL ANALYSIS OF LAKE ACIDIFICATION TRENDS FOR THE NORTHEASTEN U.S., 1982-1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic deposition is a regional phenomenon, but its effects have traditionally been studied using site-specific, intensive monitoring. We present trends information for 36 lakes of high-to-moderate acid sensitivity (defined as acid neutralizing capacity [ANC] < 100 eq L-1),and 1...

  13. The Role of Education in Peace-Building in the African Great Lakes Region: Educators' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndura-Ouedraogo, Elavie

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the findings from a qualitative study which examined educators' perceptions of their contributions to the quest for sustainable peace in Burundi and the African Great Lakes region. The study looked at how educators representing different ethnic backgrounds, academic preparation, and currently employed at different levels…

  14. U.S. Forest Service Region 1 Lake Chemistry, NADP, and IMPROVE air quality data analysis

    Treesearch

    Jill Grenon; Mark Story

    2009-01-01

    This report was developed to address the need for comprehensive analysis of U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Region 1 air quality monitoring data. The monitoring data includes Phase 3 (long-term data) lakes, National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP), and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE). Annual and seasonal data for the periods of record...

  15. A REGIONAL ANALYSIS OF LAKE ACIDIFICATION TRENDS FOR THE NORTHEASTEN U.S., 1982-1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic deposition is a regional phenomenon, but its effects have traditionally been studied using site-specific, intensive monitoring. We present trends information for 36 lakes of high-to-moderate acid sensitivity (defined as acid neutralizing capacity [ANC] < 100 eq L-1),and 1...

  16. Bark beetles and fungal associates colonizing white spruce in the Great Lakes region.

    Treesearch

    Kirsten E. Haberkern; Barbara L. Illman; Kenneth F. Raffa

    2002-01-01

    We examined the major bark beetles and associated fungi colonizing subcortical tissues of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) in the Great Lakes region. Trees were felled at one northwestern Wisconsin site in a preliminary study in 1997 and at 10 sites throughout northern Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan in 1998. Fungal isolations were made from beetles...

  17. Forest land cover change (1975-2000) in the Greater Border Lakes region

    Treesearch

    Peter T. Wolter; Brian R. Sturtevant; Brian R. Miranda; Sue M. Lietz; Phillip A. Townsend; John. Pastor

    2012-01-01

    This document and accompanying maps describe land cover classifications and change detection for a 13.8 million ha landscape straddling the border between Minnesota, and Ontario, Canada (greater Border Lakes Region). Land cover classifications focus on discerning Anderson Level II forest and nonforest cover to track spatiotemporal changes in forest cover. Multi-...

  18. Integrated Migratory Bird Planning in the Lower Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Plain Bird Conservation Region

    Treesearch

    Chuck Hayes; Andrew Milliken; Randy Dettmers; Kevin Loftus; Brigitte Collins; Isabelle Ringuet

    2005-01-01

    The Atlantic Coast and Eastern Habitat Joint Ventures hosted two international planning workshops to begin the process of integrating bird conservation strategies under the North American Bird Conservation Initiative in the Lower Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Plain Bird Conservation Region. The workshops identified priority species and habitats, delineated focus areas,...

  19. Kiswahili as Vehicle of Unity and Development in the Great Lakes Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishe, Anna M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the potentiality of Kiswahili in accelerating social, political, economic and cultural integration within the Great Lakes Region. Presently, Kiswahili is a "de facto" lingua franca spoken by almost 100 million people in the world (Ntakirutimana, 2000). This is an indication of its viability in promoting unity among…

  20. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of... Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the following jurisdictions or described area (including the territorial...

  1. Changsha area showing Tung Ting Lake region photographed during MA-9 22 orbit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    S63-06438 (15-16 May 1963) --- Changsha area in China, showing Tung Ting lake region, as photographed from the Mercury-Atlas 9 (MA-9) capsule by astronaut L. Gordon Cooper Jr., during his 22-orbit MA-9 spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Assessment of mercury bioaccumulation within the pelagic food web of lakes in the western Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Rolfhus, Kristofer R; Hall, Britt D; Monson, Bruce A; Paterson, Michael J; Jeremiason, Jeffrey D

    2011-10-01

    While mercury is a health hazard to humans and wildlife, the biogeochemical processes responsible for its bioaccumulation in pelagic food webs are still being examined. Previous studies have indicated both "bottom-up" control of piscivorous fish Hg content through methylmercury.(MeHg) supply, as well as site-specific trophic factors. We evaluated ten studies from the western Great Lakes region to examine the similarity of MeHg trophic transfer efficiency within the pelagic food web, and assessed regional-scale spatial variability. Analyses of bioaccumulation and biomagnification factors between water, seston, zooplankton, and preyfish indicated that the largest increases in MeHg occurred at the base of the food web, and that the relative extent of trophic transfer was similar between sites. Positive correlations were observed between aqueous unfiltered MeHg, total Hg, and dissolved organic carbon, and measures of the efficiency of MeHg trophic transfer were consistent across widely disparate systems (both natural and experimentally manipulated) throughout North America. Such similarity suggests that the aqueous supply of MeHg is largely controlling bioaccumulation in pelagic food webs, while local, lake-specific variability can result from an array of trophic (biological) factors.

  3. Changes in the area of inland lakes in arid regions of central Asia during the past 30 years.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jie; Chen, Xi; Li, Junli; Yang, Liao; Fang, Hui

    2011-07-01

    Inland lakes are major surface water resource in arid regions of Central Asia. The area changes in these lakes have been proved to be the results of regional climate changes and recent human activities. This study aimed at investigating the area variations of the nine major lakes in Central Asia over the last 30 years. Firstly, multi-temporal Landsat imagery in 1975, 1990, 1999, and 2007 were used to delineate lake extents automatically based on Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) threshold segmentation, then lake area variations were detailed in three decades and the mechanism of these changes was analyzed with meteorological data and hydrological data. The results indicated that the total surface areas of these nine lakes had decreased from 91,402.06 km(2) to 46,049.23 km(2) during 1975-2007, accounting for 49.62% of their original area of 1975. Tail-end lakes in flat areas had shrunk dramatically as they were induced by both climate changes and human impacts, while alpine lakes remained relatively stable due to the small precipitation variations. With different water usage of river outlets, the variations of open lakes were more flexible than those of other two types. According to comprehensive analyses, different types of inland lakes presented different trends of area changes under the background of global warming effects in Central Asia, which showed that the increased human activities had broken the balance of water cycles in this region.

  4. Preliminary geologic map of the Fontana 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.

    2003-01-01

    Open-File Report 03-418 is a digital geologic data set that maps and describes the geology of the Fontana 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California. The Fontana quadrangle database is one of several 7.5’ quadrangle databases that are being produced by the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP). These maps and databases are, in turn, part of the nation-wide digital geologic map coverage being developed by the National Cooperative Geologic Map Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). General Open-File Report 03-418 contains a digital geologic map database of the Fontana 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A Postscript file (fon_map.ps) to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 3. An Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file (fon_grey.eps) created in Adobe Illustrator 10.0 to plot the geologic map on a grey topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 4. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. the Readme file; includes in Appendix I, data contained in fon_met.txt b. The same graphics as plotted in 2 and 3 above.Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following

  5. PCBs, mercury, and organochlorine concentrations in lake trout, walleye, and whitefish from selected tribal fisheries in the Upper Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, Shawn L; Dellinger, John A

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of environmental contaminants in the edible portion of fish tissue consumed by Ojibwa residing in the Upper Great Lakes region. Lake trout, whitefish, and walleye were collected from Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan, and selected inland lakes. These fish were harvested by either commercial fishing or spearfishing techniques and analyzed for environmental contaminants. Samples were pooled by species and location of collection and were analyzed as composites. The concentrations of congener-specific polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), total mercury, and 17 other organochlorine compounds of the pooled samples were determined using gas chromatographic and atomic absorption techniques. Differences were noted in both the concentration and composition of contaminants depending on the geographic location of collection and the species examined. Lake trout and whitefish contained higher concentrations of organochlorine compounds than did walleye; and samples from Lakes Michigan and Huron had much higher concentrations than did Lake Superior fish. Conversely, mercury was much higher in walleye (580 ppb) when compared with lake trout (117 ppb) and whitefish (10 ppb). Several PCB congeners were commonly found in all fish samples; these included PCBs 138 + 163, 153, 66 + 95, 118, 77 + 110, 180, and 101. Lake trout accumulated the highly chlorinated PCB congeners, whereas walleye and whitefish accumulated certain lower tri- and tetrachlorobiphenyl congeners. In conclusion, the fish harvested and consumed by Ojibwa tribal members contained both mercury and organochlorine compounds. The concentrations of contaminants found in fish tissue differed among species and sampling sites. Consequently, it is imperative to sample fish that best represent those being consumed by tribal members and to continue long-term monitoring of fish from ceded waters. Therefore, risk assessment and risk management strategies need to take

  6. Malaria Elimination Campaigns in the Lake Kariba Region of Zambia: A Spatial Dynamical Model.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Milen; Bever, Caitlin A; Upfill-Brown, Alexander; Hamainza, Busiku; Miller, John M; Eckhoff, Philip A; Wenger, Edward A; Gerardin, Jaline

    2016-11-01

    As more regions approach malaria elimination, understanding how different interventions interact to reduce transmission becomes critical. The Lake Kariba area of Southern Province, Zambia, is part of a multi-country elimination effort and presents a particular challenge as it is an interconnected region of variable transmission intensities. In 2012-13, six rounds of mass test-and-treat drug campaigns were carried out in the Lake Kariba region. A spatial dynamical model of malaria transmission in the Lake Kariba area, with transmission and climate modeled at the village scale, was calibrated to the 2012-13 prevalence survey data, with case management rates, insecticide-treated net usage, and drug campaign coverage informed by surveillance. The model captured the spatio-temporal trends of decline and rebound in malaria prevalence in 2012-13 at the village scale. Various interventions implemented between 2016-22 were simulated to compare their effects on reducing regional transmission and achieving and maintaining elimination through 2030. Simulations predict that elimination requires sustaining high coverage with vector control over several years. When vector control measures are well-implemented, targeted mass drug campaigns in high-burden areas further increase the likelihood of elimination, although drug campaigns cannot compensate for insufficient vector control. If infections are regularly imported from outside the region into highly receptive areas, vector control must be maintained within the region until importations cease. Elimination in the Lake Kariba region is possible, although human movement both within and from outside the region risk damaging the success of elimination programs.

  7. Malaria Elimination Campaigns in the Lake Kariba Region of Zambia: A Spatial Dynamical Model

    PubMed Central

    Nikolov, Milen; Bever, Caitlin A.; Upfill-Brown, Alexander; Hamainza, Busiku; Miller, John M.; Eckhoff, Philip A.; Wenger, Edward A.; Gerardin, Jaline

    2016-01-01

    As more regions approach malaria elimination, understanding how different interventions interact to reduce transmission becomes critical. The Lake Kariba area of Southern Province, Zambia, is part of a multi-country elimination effort and presents a particular challenge as it is an interconnected region of variable transmission intensities. In 2012–13, six rounds of mass test-and-treat drug campaigns were carried out in the Lake Kariba region. A spatial dynamical model of malaria transmission in the Lake Kariba area, with transmission and climate modeled at the village scale, was calibrated to the 2012–13 prevalence survey data, with case management rates, insecticide-treated net usage, and drug campaign coverage informed by surveillance. The model captured the spatio-temporal trends of decline and rebound in malaria prevalence in 2012–13 at the village scale. Various interventions implemented between 2016–22 were simulated to compare their effects on reducing regional transmission and achieving and maintaining elimination through 2030. Simulations predict that elimination requires sustaining high coverage with vector control over several years. When vector control measures are well-implemented, targeted mass drug campaigns in high-burden areas further increase the likelihood of elimination, although drug campaigns cannot compensate for insufficient vector control. If infections are regularly imported from outside the region into highly receptive areas, vector control must be maintained within the region until importations cease. Elimination in the Lake Kariba region is possible, although human movement both within and from outside the region risk damaging the success of elimination programs. PMID:27880764

  8. 52 glaciers and one lake: how to reconstruct past regional glacier variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasskog, Kristian; Paasche, Øyvind; Nesje, Atle; Boyle, John F.; Birks, H. John B.

    2014-05-01

    Sediment records from distal glacier-fed lakes have been used in numerous reconstructions of past glacier activity, where the basic assumption is that the amount of minerogenic material deposited in the lake is directly proportional to the amount of upstream glacier erosion. However, the minerogenic component of the sediments in a distal glacier-fed lake is commonly derived from several different sources, not only subglacial erosion. Furthermore, glacier reconstructions tend to focus on individual mountain glaciers, which due to local effects might not always reflect regional scale glacier variability. Presently, certain high-resolution analysis techniques allow for fast multi-proxy analyses of sediment cores, which improve the basis for inferring the provenance of lake sediments; however, the only way of actually testing such inferences is to identify the different sediment sources in the adjacent catchment and characterize them using the same proxy measurements as in the lake core. Multi-proxy sedimentary fingerprinting techniques are labor-intensive, however, and proxies such as bulk geochemistry may prove of little use in differentiating between source areas if the bedrock lithology is uniform across the catchment. Here we present a simple method based on environmental magnetism that allow for tracking lake sediments to their sources in catchments where the bedrock lithology is uniform. Unlike ferro- and ferrimagnetic minerals, the magnetic susceptibility of paramagnetic minerals is inversely proportional to temperature. Thus, by measuring the bulk magnetic susceptibility (chi-Bulk) of a sediment sample both at room temperature (293K) and after freezing in liquid nitrogen (77K), the relative contribution from paramagnetic minerals to the total chi-Bulk can be inferred from the ratio of chi-Bulk77K over chi-Bulk293K. Theoretically, a ratio of 3.8 will indicate a purely paramagnetic sample, whereas progressively lower values reflect an increasing contribution

  9. Recruitment synchrony of yellow perch (Perca flavescens, Percidae) in the Great Lakes region, 1966–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honsey, Andrew E.; Bunnell, David; Troy, Cary D.; Fielder, David G.; Thomas, Michael V.; Knight, Carey T.; Chong, Stephen; Hook, Tomas O.

    2016-01-01

    Population-level reproductive success (recruitment) of many fish populations is characterized by high inter-annual variation and related to annual variation in key environmental factors (e.g., climate). When such environmental factors are annually correlated across broad spatial scales, spatially separated populations may display recruitment synchrony (i.e., the Moran effect). We investigated inter-annual (1966–2008) variation in yellow perch (Perca flavescens, Percidae) recruitment using 16 datasets describing populations located in four of the five Laurentian Great Lakes (Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Ontario) and Lake St. Clair. We indexed relative year class strength using catch-curve residuals for each year-class across 2–4 years and compared relative year-class strength among sampling locations. Results indicate that perch recruitment is positively synchronized across the region. In addition, the spatial scale of this synchrony appears to be broader than previous estimates for both yellow perch and freshwater fish in general. To investigate potential factors influencing relative year-class strength, we related year-class strength to regional indices of annual climatic conditions (spring-summer air temperature, winter air temperature, and spring precipitation) using data from 14 weather stations across the Great Lakes region. We found that mean spring-summer temperature is significantly positively related to recruitment success among Great Lakes yellow perch populations.

  10. The Late Pleistocene climatic optimum in the eastern Arctic region: Evidence from El'gygytgyn Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkin, A. V.; Anderson, P. M.; Minyuk, P. S.; Nedorubova, E. Yu.; Goryachev, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    The palynological investigations of sediments of the crater of El'gygytgyn Lake (67°30' N, 172°05' E), which provided a continuous record of interglacial and glacial events in Polar Chukotka, revealed significant climate warming corresponding to Marine Isotope Stage 31 (MIS 31) lasting from 1.062 to 1.081Ma ago. Its upper limit is placed within the Jaramillo paleomagnetic episode (0.99-1.07 Ma) registered in the sedimentary section of the lake. During MIS 31, the vegetation community was dominated by Betula- Alnus forests with subordinate Larix trees. These forests included also coniferous ( Picea, Pinus) and broad-leaved trees and shrubs ( Quercus, Carpinus, Corylus). The interglacial of MIS 31 was characterized by the warmest climate for the entire Quaternary Period. The warming episode established in the continuous record of the section of El'gygytgyn Lake implies relations between climatic events in the Arctic and Antarctic regions.

  11. Hydraulic fracturing and the Crooked Lake Sequences: Insights gleaned from regional seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Ryan; Stern, Virginia; Novakovic, Mark; Atkinson, Gail; Gu, Yu Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Within central Alberta, Canada, a new sequence of earthquakes has been recognized as of 1 December 2013 in a region of previous seismic quiescence near Crooked Lake, ~30 km west of the town of Fox Creek. We utilize a cross-correlation detection algorithm to detect more than 160 events to the end of 2014, which is temporally distinguished into five subsequences. This observation is corroborated by the uniqueness of waveforms clustered by subsequence. The Crooked Lake Sequences have come under scrutiny due to its strong temporal correlation (>99.99%) to the timing of hydraulic fracturing operations in the Duvernay Formation. We assert that individual subsequences are related to fracturing stimulation and, despite adverse initial station geometry, double-difference techniques allow us to spatially relate each cluster back to a unique horizontal well. Overall, we find that seismicity in the Crooked Lake Sequences is consistent with first-order observations of hydraulic fracturing induced seismicity.

  12. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

    1993-05-01

    Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

  13. Spatiotemporal trends of mercury in walleye and largemouth bass from the Laurentian Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Monson, Bruce A; Staples, David F; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Holsen, Thomas M; Schrank, Candy S; Moses, Sara K; McGoldrick, Daryl J; Backus, Sean M; Williams, Kathryn A

    2011-10-01

    The risk of mercury (Hg) exposure to humans and wildlife from fish consumption has driven extensive mercury analysis throughout the Great Lakes Region since the 1970s. This study compiled fish-Hg data from multiple sources in the region and assessed spatiotemporal trends of Hg concentrations in two representative top predator fish species. Walleye (Sander vitreus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were chosen for the trend analysis because they had more Hg records (63,872) than other fish species that had been sampled from waters throughout the region. Waterbody types were inland lakes (70%), the Great Lakes, impoundments, and rivers. The compiled datasets were analyzed with a mixed effects statistical model having random effects of station, year, and fish length; and fixed effects of year, tissue type, fish length, habitat, and season. The results showed a generally declining temporal trend in fish-Hg for the region (1970-2009), with spatial trends of increasing Hg concentration from south to north and from west to east across the region. Nonlinearity was evident in the general downward trends of Ontario walleye, with a shift to an upward trend beginning in the 1990s. Only ongoing monitoring can reveal if this upward shift is an oscillation in a long-term decline, a statistical anomaly, or a sustained declining temporal trend in regional fish-Hg concentrations.

  14. Regional application of the PnET-BGC model to assess historical acidification of Adirondack lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jing; Driscoll, Charles T.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Cosby, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    The Adirondack region of New York has high inputs of acidic deposition and large numbers of acidic lakes. The biogeochemical model, PnET-BGC, was applied to 44 statistically representative Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) lake watersheds in the Adirondacks. Model simulations help provide an understanding of historical effects of acidic deposition on soils and lake waters. Model simulations indicate that median annual concentrations of SO42- and NO3- in the 44 EMAP lakes were 15.9 μeq/L and 3.8 μeq/L, respectively, in 1850, compared to the median current measured values of 88.8 μeq/L and 20.0 μeq/L. Simulated median values of pH, acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), and soil percent base saturation were 6.63, 67.7 μeq/L, and 12.3%, respectively, in 1850, compared to the median current measured values of 5.95, 27.8 μeq/L, and 7.9%. The estimated historical surface water acidification was greatest in lakes having low ANC below values of 100 μeq/L. This pattern of historical acidification is in agreement with a previous paleolimnological investigation.

  15. Physiological refugia: swamps, hypoxia tolerance and maintenance of fish diversity in the Lake Victoria region.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Lauren J; Chapman, Colin A; Nordlie, Frank G; Rosenberger, Amanda E

    2002-11-01

    In Lake Nabugabo, Uganda, a satellite of Lake Victoria, approximately 50% of the indigenous fishes disappeared from the open waters subsequent to the establishment of the introduced predatory Nile perch, Lates niloticus. This pattern is similar to the faunal loss experienced in the much larger Lake Victoria. Several of these species persisted in wetland refugia (e.g. ecotonal wetlands, swamp lagoons); however, deep swamp refugia (habitats lying well within the dense interior of fringing wetlands), are available only to a subset of the basin fauna with extreme tolerance to hypoxia. Although air-breathers are common in deep swamp refugia; we also documented a surprisingly high richness and abundance of non-air-breathing fishes. We describe several mechanisms that may facilitate survival in deep swamp refugia including high hemoglobin concentration, high hematocrit, large gill surface area and a low critical oxygen tension (P(c)). In addition, swamp-dwelling fishes showed lower PO(2) thresholds for onset of aquatic surface respiration than the lake-dwelling fishes. This suggests higher tolerance to hypoxia in the swamp fishes because they are able to withstand a lower oxygen tension before approaching the surface. We suggest that physiological refugia may be important in modulating the impact of Nile perch and indigenous fishes in the Lake Nabugabo region; this highlights the need to evaluate relative tolerance of introduced predators and indigenous prey to environmental stressors.

  16. Climatic implications on variations of Qehan Lake in the arid regions of Inner Mongolia during the recent five decades.

    PubMed

    Chun, Xi; Su, Riguge; Liu, Jiyao; Liang, Wenjun; Yong, Mei; Ulambadrakh, Khkhuudei

    2017-01-01

    The Qehan Lake Basin (QLB) and its system of lakes are located in a marginal monsoon zone and are extremely sensitive to global climate change. In this paper, using aerial photographs from different periods, in addition to MSS, TM, and ETM images, and combining these with regional topographic maps, we analyze lake area changes from 1958 to 2010 and the relation between Qehan Lake (QL) and climate variability. Our results indicate that there was a relatively high lake level in 1959, when the area and volume of the lake were 118.9 km(2) and 151.9 × 10(6) m(3), respectively, but this level was subject to a shrinking trend until 2010, when the lake area was only 28.1 km(2), and the water volume was 41.1 × 10(6) m(3). West Qehan Lake (WQL) has experienced severe water shrinkage and lake level fluctuation. In 1958, WQL was 80.2 km(2) in area and 124.1 × 10(6) m(3) in volume. However, due to a rapid decrease in precipitation and increases in both temperature and evaporation, it began to dry up in 2002. The WQL Water area decreased by 1.82 km(2)/a, and the lake level declined by 7 m during 1958-2002, so it became an ephemeral lake.

  17. Probabilistic projections of regional climatic changes over the Great Lakes Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuquan; Huang, Guohe; Baetz, Brian W.; Zhao, Shan

    2016-11-01

    As the largest surface fresh water system on earth, the Great Lakes is facing the threat of climate change. Understanding how the hydrologic cycle in the Great Lakes region would be affected by human-induced global warming is important for developing informed adaptation strategies. In this study, high-resolution regional climate ensemble simulations based upon the PRECIS modeling system are conducted to project future climatic changes over the Great Lakes Basin. The results show that the Great Lakes Basin is very likely to experience a continuous warming-up throughout the 21st century. Particularly, mean air temperatures will rise by 2.6 °C in the forthcoming decades (i.e., 2030s), 3.8 °C in the middle of the century (i.e., 2050s), and 5.6 °C to the end of the century (i.e., 2080s), respectively. The warming air temperatures are very likely to result in more precipitation over the entire basin. The annual total precipitation over the Great Lakes Basin is projected to increase by 8.9% in the 2030s and 12.2% in the 2050s, while the magnitude of precipitation increase would decline to 7.1% in the 2080s. The slow-down of the precipitation increase from the 2050s to the 2080s indicates a shift from the aggressive increase of precipitation before and in the middle of this century to the eventual decrease by the end of this century, suggesting that a nonlinear response relationship between precipitation and temperature may exist in the Great Lakes Basin and such a relationship is also likely to vary in response to global warming.

  18. Methane efflux from littoral vegetation stands of southern boreal lakes: An upscaled regional estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Irina; Mäkelä, Suvi; Kankaala, Paula; Kortelainen, Pirkko

    We studied the role of vegetated littoral area in the efflux of methane (CH 4) in a southern boreal landscape (1600 km 2), in Finland, covered by 619 lakes. A regression model was constructed to describe the relationship between lake area or lake shoreline length and total macrophyte or total emergent macrophyte coverage. Phragmites australis and Equisetum fluviatile were by far the most widely distributed emergent macrophytes in the area with a proportion of 40% of all zone-forming macrophytes. The zone-forming floating-leaved species Nuphar lutea, Potamogeton natans and Sparganium spp. covered 44% of all vegetated littoral areas. The strong temperature dependence of the emission rates was taken into consideration in the emission estimations for P. australis and E. fluviatile. The regional efflux, estimated for the growing seasons 1998-2002, varied between 0.8×10 5 and 1.1×10 5 kg CH 4 and between 1.6×10 5 and 2.4×10 5 kg CH 4, respectively. The emissions from the stands of floating-leaved species were negligible compared to the emissions from stands of P. australis and E. fluviatile. This indicates that species specific emission rates and areal coverage of the dominating species, as well as ambient temperature, should all be carefully considered when estimating the total regional emissions of CH 4 from lake littorals. The natural open ombrogenous bogs and minerogenous fens in the study region covered a 2.5-fold larger area than P. australis and E. fluviatile littoral, but their emissions were estimated to be only 78% of the emissions of P. australis and E. fluviatile, indicating that vegetated lake littoral is an important natural CH 4 source in the region.

  19. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  20. Possible future lakes resulting from continued glacier shrinkage in the Aosta Valley Region (Western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, Cristina; Machguth, Horst; Huggel, Christian; Godio, Alberto; Perotti, Luigi; Giardino, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Aosta Valley (NW-Alps, Italy) is the region with the largest glaciarized area of Italy (133.73 km2). Like the other alpine regions it has shown a significant glacier retreat starting from the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA, ca. 1850 AD), by losing about 60% of its glaciarized area. As a direct consequence of glacier shrinkage, within glacially-sculpted landscapes, glacier-bed overdeepenings become exposed, offering suitable conditions for glacier lakes formation. In the Aosta Valley region, about 200 glacier lakes have been recognized in different time periods within LIA maximum extent boundaries, mainly dammed by bedrock landforms. With respect to human activities, glacier lakes represent both opportunities (e.g. Miage lake for tourism) and risks (e.g. outburst flood of the Gran Croux lake above Cogne in August 2016) in such a densely populated and developed region. The objective of this contribution is to assess locations of possible future glacier lakes in the Aosta Valley by using the GlabTop2 model (Glacier Bed Topography model version 2). Understanding where future lakes will appear is of fundamental importance for the identification of potential hazards and the interpretation of conditioning factors and dynamics. We first assessed ice thickness and consequently glacier bed topography over large glaciated areas of the region, by using both glaciers outlines related to 1999 (provided by the GlaRiskAlp project) and the regional DEM of 1990 (provided by the Aosta Valley Region) as input data. We performed several runs by varying different input parameters (e,g.: pixel size and basal shear stress). Then we compared modelled results on selected test glaciers (Rutor and Grand Etrèt) with available GPR data. As a validation, we also carried out a GPR survey during summer 2016 on the central area of Indren Glacier (Monte Rosa massif) where GlabTop2 shows the presence of a possible subglacial overdeepening morphology. We found that ice thickness and consequently the

  1. Land use impacts on lake water quality in Alytus region (Lithuania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Laukonis, Rymvidas

    2016-04-01

    Land use has important impacts on soils, surface and ground water quality. Urban agricultural areas are an important source of pollutants, which can reach lakes through surface runoff and underground circulation. Human intervention in the landscape is one of the major causes pollution and land degradation, thus it is very important to understand the impacts of and use on environment and if they have some spatial pattern (Pereira et al., 2013, 2015; Brevik et al., 2016). The identification of the spatial pattern of lakes pollution is in Alytus area (Lithuania) is fundamental, since they provide an important range of ecosystem services to local communities, including food and recreational activities. Thus, the degradation of these environments can induce important economic losses. In this context, it is import to identify the areas with high pollutant accumulation and the environmental and human factors responsible for it. The objective of this work is to study identify the amount of some important nutrients resultant from human activities in lake water quality in Alytus region (Lithuania). Alytus region is located in southern part of Lithuania and has an approximate area of 40 km2. Inside this region we analyzed several water quality parameters of 55 lakes, including, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), suspended materials (SM), water clarity (WC) biochemical oxygen demand (BDO), total phosphorous (TP), total Nitrogen (TN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), as other environmental variables as altitude, lake maximum deep (MD), lake area and land use according Corine land cover classification (CLC2006). Previous to data analysis, data normality and homogeneity of the variances, was assessed with the Shapiro-wilk and Leven's test, respectively. The majority of the data did not respect the Gaussian distribution and the heteroscedasticity, even after a logarithmic, and box-cox transformation. Thus, in this work we used the logarithmic transformed data to do a principal

  2. ARMA-model-based region-growing method for extracting lake region in a remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi H.; Ho, Peter Pei-Gee

    2004-02-01

    Recently the lake area detection has been a popular topic for time series remote sensing images analysis. The two-dimensional Markov model is one of the efficient mathematical models to describe an image especially when the within-object interpixel correlation varies significantly from object to object. The unsupervised Region Growing is a powerful image segmentation method for use in shape classification and analysis. In this paper, the Region Growing method based on two-dimensional Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) model is proposed for lake region detections. Some of the statistical techniques, such as Gaussian distributed white noise error confidence interval, and sample statistics based on mean and variance properties have been used for thresholding during calculations. The linear regression analysis with least mean squares estimation is still of ongoing interest for statistical research and applications especially with the remote sensing images. The LANDSAT 5 database in the area of Italy's Lake Mulargias acquired in July 1996 was used for the computing experiments with satisfactory preliminary results.

  3. A numerical modeling study of the coupled variability of Lake Victoria in eastern Africa and the regional climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yi

    2000-12-01

    The objective of this investigation was to investigate and study the coupled atmosphere-lake climate system over the Lake Victoria basin, and determine the corresponding physical mechanisms that are involved. The primary research vehicle for the investigation is a fully coupled model of the regional climate of Eastern Africa and Lake Victoria which has been developed and applied in this study. The atmospheric component of the model is the NCAR Regional Climate Model (RegCM2). The results show that the bythemetry and geometry of the lake play a fundamental role in determining the climatology of Lake Victoria. There exists Kelvin-like waves in the thermocline trapped along the coast and they propagate clockwise around Lake Victoria with periodicity of about 30 days. Preliminary comparison of the coupled RegCM2-POM model simulation results with the observations indicates that the model produces more realistic lake surface temperatures (LST) and rainfall over and around the lake than the standard version of RegCM2 in which a simple one dimensional thermal diffusion lake model is used. Over Eastern Africa, the regional climate variability is significantly influenced by the circulation over the Lake Victoria basin. The interaction between the lake-land breeze and the prevailing northeasterly flow accounts for the asymmetry in the distribution of the diurnal rainfall variations and the southwestward movement of the dominant bands of divergence/convergence. During the 1982 El Nino when the averaged LST over the lake was higher than that during the normal year, the LST gradient was weakened along the SW-NE axis over the lake by the strong lake circulation. The hydrodynamics of the lake play an important role in determining the coupled variability of the lake circulation and the lake basin-wide climatic conditions. The potential climate change resulting from total clearing of the tropical rain forests in Africa was also investigated by the standard version of the NCAR CCM3

  4. Tectonic controls on magmatism in the Geysers-Clear Lake region: Evidence from new geophysical models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, W.D.; Benz, H.M.; Walters, M.A.; Villasenor, A.; Rodriguez, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    In order to study magmatism and geothermal systems in The Geysers-Clear Lake region, we developed a detailed three-dimensional tomographic velocity model based on local earthquakes. This high-resolution model resolves the velocity structure of the crust in the region to depths of approximately 12 km. The most significant velocity contrasts in The Geysers-Clear Lake region occur in the steam production area, where high velocities are associated with a Quaternary granitic pluton, and in the Mount Hannah region, where low velocities occur in a 5-km-thick section of Mesozoic argillites. In addition, a more regional tomographic model was developed using traveltimes from earthquakes covering most of northern California. This regional model sampled the whole crust, but at a lower resolution than the local model. The regional model outlines low velocities at depths of 8-12 km in The Geysers-Clear Lake area, which extend eastward to the Coast Range thrust. These low velocities are inferred to be related to unmetamorphosed Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. In addition, the regional velocity model indicates high velocities in the lower crust beneath the Clear Lake volcanic field, which we interpret to be associated with mafic underplating. No large silicic magma chamber is noted in either the local or regional tomographic models. A three-dimensional gravity model also has been developed in the area of the tomographic imaging. Our gravity model demonstrates that all density contrasts can be accounted for in the upper 5-7 km of the crust. Two-dimensional magnetotelluric models of data from a regional, east-west profile indicate high resistivities associated with the granitic pluton in The Geysers production area and low resistivities in the low-velocity section of Mesozoic argillites near Mount Hannah. No indication of midcrustal magma bodies is present in the magnetotelluric data. On the basis of heat flow and geologic evidence, Holocene intrusive activity is thought to have

  5. Preliminary Gravity and Magnetic Data of the Lake Pillsbury Region, Northern Coast Ranges, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, Robert C.; Morin, Robert L.; McCabe, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    The Lake Pillsbury region is transected by the Bartlett Springs Fault zone, one of the main strike-slip faults of the San Andreas system north of San Francisco Bay, California. Gravity and magnetic data were collected to help characterize the geometry and offset of the fault zone as well as determine the geometry of the Gravelly Valley pull-apart basin and Potter Valley, an alluvial intermontane basin southwest of Lake Pillsbury. The Bartlett Springs fault zone lies at the base of a significant gravity gradient. Superposed on the gradient is a small gravity low centered over Lake Pillsbury and Gravelly Valley. Another small gravity low coincides with Potter Valley. Inversion of gravity data for basin thickness indicates a maximum thickness of 400 and 440 m for the Gravelly and Potter Valley depressions, respectively. Ground magnetic data indicate that the regional aeromagnetic data likely suffer from positional errors, but that large, long-wavelength anomalies, sourced from serpentinite, may be offset 8 km along the Bartlett Springs Fault zone. Additional gravity data collected either on the lake surface or bottom and in Potter Valley would better determine the shape of the basins. A modern, high-resolution aeromagnetic survey would greatly augment the ability to map and model the fault geometry quantitatively.

  6. Paleoproterozoic basin development and sedimentation in the Lake Superior region, North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ojakangas, R.W.; Morey, G.B.; Southwick, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    The peneplaned Archean craton in the Lake Superior region was the platform upon which a continental margin assemblage was deposited. Extension resulted in localized rifts that received thicker accumulations of sediments and volcanic rocks than did adjacent parts of the platform. Seas transgressed onto the continent several times and an ocean basin opened south of the present-day Lake Superior. Island arcs that formed during subduction collided with the craton margin as the ocean basin closed; oceanic crust is poorly preserved as a dismembered ophiolite sequence. The arc volcanics are preserved as the Wisconsin magmatic terranes. The collision resulted in a fold-and-thrust belt known as the Penokean orogen. To the north of the fold-and-thrust belt, a northward-migrating foreland basin - the Animikie basin - developed. Thick turbidite successions were deposited along the basin axis, and terrigenous clastics and Lake Superior-type iron-formation were deposited on the shelf along the northern margin of the basin. The primary paleoclimatic indicators are: (1) glaciogenic rocks at the base of the Paleoproterozoic succession in Michigan indicating ice-house conditions; 2) remnants of a paleosol on the glaciogenic rocks indicative of deep weathering, probably under subtropical conditions and therefore of greenhouse conditions; and (3) carbonate minerals after gypsum, halite, and anhydrite in stromatolitic dolomite, indicative of aridity. Three second-order depositional sequences are bounded by major unconformities, and can be correlated throughout the Lake Superior region. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Variability in methane emissions from West Siberia's shallow boreal lakes on a regional scale and its environmental controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabrekov, Aleksandr F.; Runkle, Benjamin R. K.; Glagolev, Mikhail V.; Terentieva, Irina E.; Stepanenko, Victor M.; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg R.; Maksyutov, Shamil S.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2017-08-01

    Small lakes represent an important source of atmospheric CH4 from northern wetlands. However, spatiotemporal variations in flux magnitudes and the lack of knowledge about their main environmental controls contribute large uncertainty into the global CH4 budget. In this study, we measured methane fluxes from small lakes using chambers and bubble traps. Field investigations were carried out in July-August 2014 within the West Siberian middle and southern taiga zones. The average and median of measured methane chamber fluxes were 0.32 and 0.30 mgCH4 m-2 h-1 for middle taiga lakes and 8.6 and 4.1 mgCH4 m-2 h-1 for southern taiga lakes, respectively. Pronounced flux variability was found during measurements on individual lakes, between individual lakes and between zones. To analyze these differences and the influences of environmental controls, we developed a new dynamic process-based model. It shows good performance with emission rates from the southern taiga lakes and poor performance for individual lakes in the middle taiga region. The model shows that, in addition to well-known controls such as temperature, pH and lake depth, there are significant variations in the maximal methane production potential between these climatic zones. In addition, the model shows that variations in gas-filled pore space in lake sediments are capable of controlling the total methane emissions from individual lakes. The CH4 emissions exhibited distinct zonal differences not only in absolute values but also in their probability density functions: the middle taiga lake fluxes were best described by a lognormal distribution while the southern taiga lakes followed a power-law distribution. The latter suggests applicability of self-organized criticality theory for methane emissions from the southern taiga zone, which could help to explain the strong variability within individual lakes.

  8. An inventory of glacial lakes in the Third Pole region and their changes in response to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y.; Zhang, G.; Yao, T.; Xie, H.

    2015-12-01

    No glacial lake census exists for the Third Pole region, which includes the Pamir-Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, comprehensive information is lacking about the distribution of and changes in glacial lakes caused by current global warming conditions. In this study, the first glacial lake inventories for the Third Pole were conducted for ~1990, 2000, and 2010 using Landsat TM/ETM+ data. Glacial lake spatial distributions, corresponding areas and temporal changes were examined. The significant results are as follows. (1) There were 4602, 4981, and 5701 glacial lakes (> 0.003 km2) covering areas of 553.9 ± 90, 581.2 ± 97, and 682.4 ± 110 km2 in ~1990, 2000, and 2010, respectively; these lakes are primarily located in the Brahmaputra (39%), Indus (28%), and Amu Darya (10%) basins. (2) Small lakes (< 0.2 km2) are more sensitive to climate changes. (3) Lakes closer to glaciers and at higher altitudes, particularly those connected to glacier termini, have undergone larger area changes. (4) Glacier-fed lakes are dominant in both quantity and area (> 70%) and exhibit faster expansion trends overall compared to non-glacier-fed lakes. We conclude that glacier meltwater may play a dominant role in the areal expansion of most glacial lakes in the Third Pole. In addition, the patterns of the glacier-fed lakes correspond well with warming temperature trends and negative glacier mass balance patterns. This paper presents an important database of glacial lakes and provides a basis for long-term monitoring and evaluation of outburst flood disasters primarily caused by glacial lakes in the Third Pole.

  9. An inventory of glacial lakes in the Third Pole region and their changes in response to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoqing; Yao, Tandong; Xie, Hongjie; Wang, Weicai; Yang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    No glacial lake census exists for the Third Pole region, which includes the Pamir-Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, comprehensive information is lacking about the distribution of and changes in glacial lakes caused by current global warming conditions. In this study, the first glacial lake inventories for the Third Pole were conducted for ~ 1990, 2000, and 2010 using Landsat TM/ETM + data. Glacial lake spatial distributions, corresponding areas and temporal changes were examined. The significant results are as follows. (1) There were 4602, 4981, and 5701 glacial lakes (> 0.003 km2) covering areas of 553.9 ± 90, 581.2 ± 97, and 682.4 ± 110 km2 in ~ 1990, 2000, and 2010, respectively; these lakes are primarily located in the Brahmaputra (39%), Indus (28%), and Amu Darya (10%) basins. (2) Small lakes (< 0.2 km2) are more sensitive to climate changes. (3) Lakes closer to glaciers and at higher altitudes, particularly those connected to glacier termini, have undergone larger area changes. (4) Glacier-fed lakes are dominant in both quantity and area (> 70%) and exhibit faster expansion trends overall compared to non-glacier-fed lakes. We conclude that glacier meltwater may play a dominant role in the areal expansion of most glacial lakes in the Third Pole. In addition, the patterns of the glacier-fed lakes correspond well with warming temperature trends and negative glacier mass balance patterns. This paper presents an important database of glacial lakes and provides a basis for long-term monitoring and evaluation of outburst flood disasters primarily caused by glacial lakes in the Third Pole.

  10. Regional ground-water flow modeling of the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, A. S.; Warzocha, J.; Glaser, P. H.; Siegel, D. I.

    2001-03-01

    Three-dimensional ground-water modeling experiments were done to test the hypothesis that regional ground-water flow is an important component of the water budget in the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands of northern Minnesota. Previous data collected from the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatlands suggest that regional ground-water flow discharges to these peatlands, maintaining saturation, controlling the peat pore-water chemistry, and driving ecological change. To test this hypothesis, steady-state MODFLOW models were constructed that encompassed an area of 10,160 km 2. Data used in this modeling project included surface-water and water-table elevations measured across the study area, digital elevation data, and well logs from scientific test wells and domestic water wells drilled in the study area. Numerical simulations indicate that the Itasca Moraine, located to the south of the peatland, acts as a recharge area for regional ground-water flow. Ground water recharged at the Itasca Moraine did not discharge to the Red Lake Peatlands, but rather was intercepted by the Red Lakes or adjacent rivers. Simulations suggest that ground-water flow within the peatlands consists of local-flow systems with streamlines that are less than 10 km long and that ground water from distant recharge areas does not play a prominent role in the hydrology of these peatlands. Ground-water flow reversals previously observed in the Red Lake Peatlands are either the result of interactions between local and intermediate-scale flow systems or the transient release of water stored in glacial sediments when the water-table is lowered.

  11. A new biogeochemical model to simulate regional scale carbon emission from lakes, ponds and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Tina; Brakebusch, Matthias; Gustafsson, Erik; Beer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Small aquatic systems are receiving increasing attention for their role in global carbon cycling. For instance, lakes and ponds in permafrost are net emitters of carbon to the atmosphere, and their capacity to process and emit carbon is significant on a landscape scale, with a global flux of 8-103 Tg methane per year which amounts to 5%-30% of all natural methane emissions (Bastviken et al 2011). However, due to the spatial and temporal highly localised character of freshwater methane emissions, fluxes remain poorly qualified and are difficult to upscale based on field data alone. While many models exist to model carbon cycling in individual lakes and ponds, we perceived a lack of models that can work on a larger scale, over a range of latitudes, and simulate regional carbon emission from a large number of lakes, ponds and wetlands. Therefore our objective was to develop a model that can simulate carbon dioxide and methane emission from freshwaters on a regional scale. Our resulting model provides an additional tool to assess current aquatic carbon emissions as well as project future responses to changes in climatic drivers. To this effect, we have combined an existing large-scale hydrological model (the Variable Infiltration Capacity Macroscale Hydrologic Model (VIC), Liang & Lettenmaier 1994), an aquatic biogeochemical model (BALTSEM, Savchuk et al., 2012; Gustafsson et al., 2014) and developed a new methane module for lakes. The resulting new process-based biogeochemical model is designed to model aquatic carbon emission on a regional scale, and to perform well in high-latitude environments. Our model includes carbon, oxygen and nutrient cycling in lake water and sediments, primary production and methanogenesis. Results of calibration and validation of the model in two catchments (Torne-Kalix in Northern Sweden and of a large arctic river catchment) will be presented.

  12. Exploring Subglacial Lake Connectivity via Groundwater Aquifers in the Dome C Region, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooch, B. T.; Carter, S. P.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Subglacial lakes lying under the Antarctic Ice Sheet form part of a dynamic, interconnected hydraulic system. Most research exploring the nature of this system has focused on flow along the ice-bed interface, neglecting the effects of groundwater transport, as such systems are thought to lack the transmissivity necessary to accommodate the inferred meltwater volume. In the Dome C region of East Antarctica, however, inferred melt water volumes are relatively low due to proximity to the ice divide and hydraulic gradients are relatively high due to steep subglacial bedrock topography, such that groundwater flow might be viable as a dominant means of water transport. This region contains many small subglacial lakes residing in bedrock depressions of steep basal topography. Preliminary analysis of radar sounding data does not always reveal an obvious hydraulic connection between these lakes despite readily apparent sources of melt feeding these bodies. Here we test several simple models for groundwater flow, including both fractured rock and porous media systems using ice-surface and bedrock geometry inferred from radio-echo sounding data and a published map of melt rates, with the purpose of defining a region in which a groundwater system can account for the majority of the water budget. We then compare these results against maps of basal reflectivity and subglacial lake distribution, as determined from radar sounding data. Areas in which groundwater flow is the dominant process will lack basal lubrication and demonstrate low basal reflectivities, but could still contain small subglacial lakes. While not spatially extensive with respect to the ice sheet, these groundwater-dominated areas could occupy the headwaters of most glacial catchments representing a unique and relatively stable subglacial environment.

  13. The impact of the African Great Lakes on the regional climate in a dynamically downscaled CORDEX simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Wim; Panitz, Hans-Jürgen; Davin, Edouard; van Lipzig, Nicole

    2014-05-01

    Owing to the strong contrast in albedo, roughness and heat capacity between land and water, lakes significantly influence the exchange of moisture, heat and momentum between the surface and the boundary layer. To investigate this two-way interaction, a correct representation of lakes within regional climate models is essential. To this end, the one-dimensional lake parameterisation scheme FLake was recently coupled to the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (CCLM). One region where lakes constitute a key component of the climate system is the African Great Lakes region. In this study, the CCLM CORDEX-Africa evaluation simulation is dynamically downscaled from 0.44° (50 km) to 0.0625° (7 km) over East-Africa, an unprecedented resolution for this region. The performance of different CCLM configurations are compared for the period 1999-2008: in particular, CCLM is tested for its sensitivity to the choice of the lake surface temperature description (SST, FLake, an improved version of FLake and Hostetler) and the land surface model (Terra and Community Land Model). Model results are evaluated in a three-step procedure. First, the atmospheric state variables near-surface temperature, precipitation, surface energy fluxes, fractional cloud cover and column precipitable water are evaluated using in-situ based and satellite-derived products. Second, a comprehensive set of in-situ water temperature profile observations serves to evaluate the temporal evolution of water temperatures at three sites: Lake Kivu (Ishungu), Lake Tanganyika's northern basin (Kigoma) and southern basin (Mpulungu). Finally, spatial variability of surface temperatures in Lake Kivu and Lake Tanganyika are evaluated on the basis of satellite-derived lake surface temperatures. Subsequently, the preferred model configuration is used to quantify and understand effects by lakes reported for other regions in the world, such as a dampened diurnal temperature range, enhanced evaporation, modified surface layer

  14. Regional nitrogen budget of the Lake Victoria Basin, East Africa: syntheses, uncertainties and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minghua; Brandt, Patric; Pelster, David; Rufino, Mariana C.; Robinson, Timothy; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Using the net anthropogenic nitrogen input (NANI) approach we estimated the N budget for the Lake Victoria Basin in East Africa. The NANI of the basin ranged from 887 to 3008 kg N km-2 yr-1 (mean: 1827 kg N km-2 yr-1) for the period 1995-2000. The net nitrogen release at basin level is due primarily to livestock and human consumption of feed and foods, contributing between 69% and 85%. Atmospheric oxidized N deposition contributed approximately 14% to the NANI of the Lake Victoria Basin, while either synthetic N fertilizer imports or biological N fixations only contributed less than 6% to the regional NANI. Due to the low N imports of feed and food products (<20 kg N km-2 yr-1), nitrogen release to the watershed must be derived from the mining of soil N stocks. The fraction of riverine N export to Lake Victoria accounted for 16%, which is much lower than for watersheds located in Europe and USA (25%). A significant reduction of the uncertainty of our N budget estimate for Lake Victoria Basin would be possible if better data on livestock systems and riverine N export were available. Our study indicates that at present soil N mining is the main source of nitrogen in the Lake Victoria Basin. Thus, sustainable N management requires increasing agricultural N inputs to guarantee food security and rehabilitation and protection of soils to minimize environmental costs. Moreover, to reduce N pollution of the lake, improving management of human and animal wastes needs to be carefully considered in future.

  15. Methyl and total mercury in precipitation in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. D.; Manolopoulos, H.; Hurley, J. P.; Schauer, J. J.; St. Louis, V. L.; Kenski, D.; Graydon, J.; Babiarz, C. L.; Cleckner, L. B.; Keeler, G. J.

    Methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg) concentrations were measured in precipitation collected from five US sites in the Great Lakes region: three sites on the southern shore of Lake Superior (Brule River, WI, Eagle Harbor, MI, and Tahquamenon Falls, MI), one at Isle Royale National Park (MI), and one in southern Wisconsin (Devil's Lake), between May 1997 and December 2003. MeHg and THg concentrations at these sites were compared to MeHg and THg concentrations in precipitation collected at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in north-western Ontario, Canada. Detectable MeHg concentrations (>0.01 ng L -1) were found in the majority of rain and snow samples collected from all sites (range=0.01-0.85 ng L -1). In general, the lowest MeHg concentrations were observed in samples taken at Tahquamenon Falls and the ELA, and the highest MeHg concentrations in precipitation were observed in samples collected from Brule River and Eagle Harbor. Total Hg concentrations in precipitation were generally between 10 and 60 ng L -1, exceeding 60 ng L -1 in one precipitation event sampled from each of Brule River, Isle Royale, Tahquamenon Falls, and Devil's Lake. The proportion of THg that was MeHg (%MeHg), was less than 6% at all sites, with the exception of seven events at Tahquamenon Falls and two events at the ELA that were between 6% and 18% MeHg. Generally, the highest MeHg concentrations were found in low-volume precipitation events (<100 mL). At Tahquamenon Falls, meteorological analysis indicated that events with higher MeHg concentrations and %MeHg exceeding 6% were generally associated with lake effect precipitation and weak local winds.

  16. Spatial gradients of methylmercury for breeding common loons in the Laurentian Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Evers, David C; Williams, Kathryn A; Meyer, Michael W; Scheuhammer, Anton M; Schoch, Nina; Gilbert, Andrew T; Siegel, Lori; Taylor, Robert J; Poppenga, Robert; Perkins, Christopher R

    2011-10-01

    Much of the Laurentian Great Lakes region is a mercury-sensitive landscape, in which atmospheric deposition and waterborne sources of mercury (Hg) have led to high concentrations of bioavailable methylmercury (MeHg) in predatory fish and piscivorous wildlife. Efforts since the early 1990s have established the common loon (Gavia immer) as the primary avian indicator for evaluating the exposure and effects of MeHg in North America. A regional Hg dataset was compiled from multiple loon tissue types and yellow perch (Perca flavescens), a preferred prey fish species for loons. Hg exposure in loons and perch was modeled to develop male and female loon units (MLU and FLU, respectively), standardized metrics that represent the estimated blood Hg exposure of a male or female loon for a given loon territory or water body. Using this common endpoint approach to assess loon Hg exposure, the authors demonstrate spatial trends in biotic Hg concentrations, examine MeHg availability in aquatic ecosystems of the Great Lakes region in relation to landscape-level characteristics, and identify areas with potentially significant adverse reproductive impacts to loons and other avian piscivores. Based on 8,101 MLUs, seven biological Hg hotspots were identified in the Great Lakes region. Policy-relevant applications are presented.

  17. Characterizing chemical transport of ozone and fine particles in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, Scott N.

    This dissertation presents a science framework relevant to evaluating impacts of land use policy scenarios, energy technologies, and climate on urban and regional air quality. Emerging from collaboration with urban planners, this work provides a means for employing atmospheric chemical transport modeling to understand environmental ramifications of long-term, spatially disaggregated changes in population and automobile emissions at the census tract level, and to assess the sensitivity of these changes to densification strategies. Toward these goals, the framework is used to evaluate model skill in resolving contemporary characteristics of ozone (O3) and speciated fine particles (PM2.5) in the Great Lakes region of North America, and to quantitatively explore meteorological processes that bring about observed features of these pollutants in the region. The Great Lakes were chosen due to a population concentrated in sprawling metropolitan areas, consistently high and widespread pollutant burdens, and seasonal effects of the lakes on the atmosphere. In annual simulation at 36 km resolution, the Community Multiscale Air Quality model is evaluated using speciated PM2.5 measurements taken at regulatory monitoring networks orientated to sample urban, rural, and remote areas. Performance relative to ad-hoc regional modeling goals and prior studies is average to excellent for most species throughout the year. Both pollution episodes and seasonality are captured. The Great Lakes affect pollution seasonality: strong winds advect aerosols around the deep marine boundary layer to lower surface PM2.5 in fall and winter, while O3 over the lakes is enhanced throughout the year, driven by temperature in the cool seasons and lake breeze circulation in spring and summer. Simulations confirm observational evidence that rural and small-city sources are responsible for most regional PM2.5. Sensitivities to urban and rural reductions are of comparable magnitude on a percentage basis

  18. Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

    1993-02-01

    Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

  19. Aquatic ecological biochemical investigations in the Lake Baikal region

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeeva, S.S.; Kozhova, O.M.

    1986-07-01

    The authors maintain that at the current level of investigations a constructive solution of the problem of protecting aquatic ecosystems is possible only on the basis of a thorough study of biochemical mechanisms of the interaction of biota and pollutants. They believe that in the program of investigations in the Baikal region, with consideration of the easy vulnerability of the aquatic ecosystems, ecological biochemical investigations should occupy one of the leading places. The authors suggest a method for the screening of xenobiotics, consisting of xenobiotics; chemical investigations; biochemical investigations of the properties of xenobiotics, and toxicological investigations of xenobiotics. The differences in the elimination of xenobiotics are considerable due to the species and biochemical characteristics of hydrophytes and chemical structure of the investigated toxicants. The results obtained in experiments with cyanide compounds are of considerable interest, since cyanides, the strongest poisons of animals, prove to be little toxic for higher aquatic plants and algae.

  20. Great Lakes O shore Wind Project: Utility and Regional Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sajadi, Amirhossein; Loparo, Kenneth A.; D'Aquila, Robert; Clark, Kara; Waligorski, Joseph G.; Baker, Scott

    2016-06-30

    This project aims to identify transmission system upgrades needed to facilitate offshore wind projects as well as operational impacts of offshore generation on operation of the regional transmission system in the Great Lakes region. A simulation model of the US Eastern Interconnection was used as the test system as a case study for investigating the impact of the integration of a 1000MW offshore wind farm operating in Lake Erie into FirstEnergy/PJM service territory. The findings of this research provide recommendations on offshore wind integration scenarios, the locations of points of interconnection, wind profile modeling and simulation, and computational methods to quantify performance, along with operating changes and equipment upgrades needed to mitigate system performance issues introduced by an offshore wind project.

  1. INSAR Study Of Landslides In The Region Of Lake Sevan-Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarov, A.; Minchev, D.

    2012-01-01

    The region of Lake Sevan in Armenia is of theoretical and practical interest due to its very high landslide phenomena caused by metrological and hydrological reasons. Based on the ESA Principal Investigator Number C1P-6051 and requested data from ASAR instrument of ESA ENVISAT satellite four single look complex images including two images from 2008 and two images from 2009 of the region of the Sevan Lake in Armenia are obtained and thoroughly investigated. The one of the images is pointed out as a master and the rest of them, three images as slaves. Hence, three interferometric pairs are produced. Then data of NASA SRTM mission is applied to the interferometric pairs in order to remove topography from the interferograms. Three interferograms generated illustrate decreasing of coherence caused by high temporary decorelation, which means decreasing the level of coincidence of SLC’s in each interferometric pair, according to the time of acquisition each of them.

  2. Geologic hypotheses of Lake Tanganyika region, Zaire, drawn from ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolyce, U.; Ilunga, S.

    1974-01-01

    Based on initial work in the Lake Tanganyika area of eastern Zaire, it has been concluded that ERTS imagery is extremely useful for reconnaissance level geologic mapping and analysis in this region of the humid tropics. In particular, ERTS imagery has proven useful for recognizing and mapping regional structural units, for recognizing major structural features, and for arriving at some preliminary hypotheses about the mineral potential of the area. Results so far indicate that ERTS imagery can make a major contribution to the development of the mineral resources of the country. Research has concentrated on applications of ERTS imagery in the field of cartography, geology, forestry, hydrology and agriculture. For the work in geology, a test site was chosen in eastern Zaire on the shore of Lake Tanganyika in the vicinity of the Lukuga River. This area was selected because of its varied geology and the existence of two frames of cloud-free ERTS imagery.

  3. Tectonic controls on magmatism in The Geysers--Clear Lake region: Evidence from new geophysical models

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, W.D.; Benz, H.M.; Villasenor, A.; Rodriguez, B.D.; Walters, M.A.

    1998-09-01

    In order to study magmatism and geothermal systems in the Geysers-Clear Lake region, the authors developed a detailed three-dimensional tomographic velocity model based on local earthquakes. This high-resolution model resolves the velocity structure of the crust in the region to depths of approximately 12 km. The most significant velocity contrasts in The Geysers-Clear Lake region occur in the steam production area, where high velocities are associated with a Quaternary granite pluton, and in the Mount Hannah region, where low velocities occur in a 5-km-thick section of Mesozoic argillites. In addition, a more regional tomographic model was developed using traveltimes from earthquakes covering most of northern California. This regional model sampled the whole crust, but at a lower resolution than the local model. No large silicic magma chamber is noted in either the local or regional tomographic models. A three-dimensional gravity model also has ben developed in the area of the tomographic imaging. The gravity model demonstrates that all density contrasts can be accounted for in the upper 5--7 km of the crust. Two-dimensional magnetotelluric models of data from a regional east-west profile indicate high resistivities associated with the granitic pluton in The Geysers production area and low resistivities in the low-velocity section of Mesozoic argillites near Mount Hannah. No indication of midcrustal magma bodies is present in the magnetotelluric data. The geophysical models, seismicity patterns, distribution of volcanic vents, heat flow, and other data indicate that small, young intrusive bodies that were injected along a northeast trend from The Geysers to Clear Lake probably control the thermal regime.

  4. The regional and global significance of nitrogen removal in lakes and reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, J.A.; Maranger, R.J.; Alexander, R.B.; Giblin, A.E.; Jacinthe, P.-A.; Mayorga, Emilio; Seitzinger, S.P.; Sobota, D.J.; Wollheim, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased the transport of biologically available nitrogen (N) through watersheds to potentially sensitive coastal ecosystems. Lentic water bodies (lakes and reservoirs) have the potential to act as important sinks for this reactive N as it is transported across the landscape because they offer ideal conditions for N burial in sediments or permanent loss via denitrification. However, the patterns and controls on lentic N removal have not been explored in great detail at large regional to global scales. In this paper we describe, evaluate, and apply a new, spatially explicit, annual-scale, global model of lentic N removal called NiRReLa (Nitrogen Retention in Reservoirs and Lakes). The NiRReLa model incorporates small lakes and reservoirs than have been included in previous global analyses, and also allows for separate treatment and analysis of reservoirs and natural lakes. Model runs for the mid-1990s indicate that lentic systems are indeed important sinks for N and are conservatively estimated to remove 19.7 Tg N year-1 from watersheds globally. Small lakes (<50 km2) were critical in the analysis, retaining almost half (9.3 Tg N year -1) of the global total. In model runs, capacity of lakes and reservoirs to remove watershed N varied substantially at the half-degree scale (0-100%) both as a function of climate and the density of lentic systems. Although reservoirs occupy just 6% of the global lentic surface area, we estimate they retain ~33% of the total N removed by lentic systems, due to a combination of higher drainage ratios (catchment surface area:lake or reservoir surface area), higher apparent settling velocities for N, and greater average N loading rates in reservoirs than in lakes. Finally, a sensitivity analysis of NiRReLa suggests that, on-average, N removal within lentic systems will respond more strongly to changes in land use and N loading than to changes in climate at the global scale. ?? 2008 Springer Science

  5. Regional environmental change and human activity over the past hundred years recorded in the sedimentary record of Lake Qinghai, China.

    PubMed

    Sha, ZhanJiang; Wang, Qiugui; Wang, Jinlong; Du, Jinzhou; Hu, Jufang; Ma, Yujun; Kong, Fancui; Wang, Zhuan

    2017-04-01

    Environmental change and human activity can be recorded in sediment cores in aquatic systems such as lakes. Information from such records may be useful for environmental governance in the future. Six sediment cores were collected from Lake Qinghai, China and its sublakes during 2012 and 2013. Measurements of sediment grain-size fractions indicate that sedimentation in the north and southwest of Lake Qinghai is dominated by river input, whereas that in Lake Gahai and Lake Erhai is dominated by dunes. The sedimentation rates in Lake Qinghai were calculated to be 0.101-0.159 cm/y, similar to the rates in other lakes on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Using these data and sedimentation rates from the literature, we compiled the spatial distribution of sedimentation rates. Higher values were obtained in the three main areas of Lake Qinghai: two in river estuaries and one close to sand dunes. Lower values were measured in the center and south of the lake. Measurements of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorus concentrations, and TOC/TN ratios in three cores (QH01, QH02, and Z04) revealed four horizons corresponding to times of increased human activity. These anthropogenic events were (1) the development of large areas of cropland in the Lake Qinghai watershed in 1960, (2) the beginning of nationwide fertilizer use and increases in cropland area in the lake watershed after 1970, (3) the implementation of the national program "Grain to Green," and (4) the rapid increase in the tourism industry from 2000. Profiles of Rb, Sr concentrations, the Rb/Sr ratio, and grain-size fraction in core Z04 indicate that the climate has become drier over the past 100 years. Therefore, we suggest that lake sediments such as those in Lake Qinghai are useful media for high-resolution studies of regional environmental change and human activity.

  6. Monitoring the Changes of Lakes in the Source Region of Three Rivers with Remote Sensing Data from 1976 TO 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengfeng, L.; Yuan, W.; Haoyan, J.; Zhengjun, L.

    2013-07-01

    As the birthplace of Yangtze River, the Yellow River and Lancang Rive, Source Region of Three Rivers (SRTR) is an important resource for fresh water supplement in China. SRTR also has very obvious ecological function which forms ecological security barrier for China's Qinghai-Tibet plateau. The inland lakes here play an important role for the water cycle in the plateau. The monitoring results were extracted with TM data from 1976 to 2009. The results show that from 1976 to 2009 the lakes' area in SRTR dropped first and then expanded with 2000 as sector. The lakes area was 6778 km2 in 2009, about 1.90% of the whole region, and increased than 1976 by 133.15 km2. Most of the large lakes above 80 km2 have the same change trend. The expanded lakes increased in number gradually, while the changes in the amplitude and time characteristics were different. From 1976 to 2000, the number of new lakes increased while died lakes dropped; and from 2000 to 2009 it is just on the contrary. In the study the index of lake change trend (ILCT) was adopted to contrast lake atrophy condition. With ILCT 24.55 there is an expansion trend for the lakes in SRTR during the last 35 years. The lakes with ILCT's absolute value greater than 1 were those merged with or disconnected from surrounding smaller lakes. Here the precipitation and snow melt are main supplies for the lakes. The change of lakes' area has well correlated with precipitation, and weak correlated with temperature from 1976 to 2009. But from 2000 to 2009, there has a strong correlation with precipitation, temperature. All these show from the side that the precipitation and snow melt are important factors to influence the lakes' change. The lakes have the coordination function for the good ecological environment in the region. The conclusions from the study can provide references in response to climate change research and rational utilization of water resources in SRTR.

  7. Summary appraisals of the Nation's ground-water resources; Great Lakes region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weist, William G.

    1978-01-01

    Efficient development and management of ground-water resources requires a through knowledge of the system. Reports on ground water are available for about 80 percent of tbe Great Lakes Region. Most of these reports, however, are not sufficiently detailed to be useful in comprehensive planning. As ground-water development continues, quantitative groundwater studies, utilizing models as predictive tools, will enable this development to proceed in an efficient manner.

  8. Regional Geology of the Southern Lake Erie (Ohio) Bottom: A Seismic Reflection and Vibracore Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    GEOLOGIC HISTORY 1. Introduction. Sedimentary deposits from the Devonian and the Quaternary periods are exposed in the study area. The Devonian Ohio...TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED REGIONAL GEOLOGY OF THE SOUTHERN LAKE ERIE (OHIO) Miscellaneous Report BOTTOM: A SEISMIC...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAG(WIlm Date Egntered) Devonian shale overlain by Quaternary glacial tills and postglacial deposits underlies most of the survey area

  9. Evaluation of real-time high-resolution MM5 predictions over the Great Lakes region

    Treesearch

    Shiyuan Zhong; Hee-Jin In; Xindi Bian; Joseph Charney; Warren Heilman; Brian. Potter

    2005-01-01

    Real-time high-resolution mesoscale predictions using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) over the Great Lakes region are evaluated for the 2002/03 winter and 2003 summer seasons using surface and upper-air observations, with a focus on near-surface and boundary layer properties that are important for applications such as air...

  10. Seismicity and Tectonics of the Lake Tahoe Basin through the Truckee, California Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, T.; Ruhl, C. J.; Schmauder, G. C.; Smith, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    East dipping range bounding normal faults, NE-trending sinistral, and NW-trending dextral strike-slip faults of the Tahoe-Truckee, California-Nevada area define the transtensional strain environment of the Northern Walker Lane. North of Long Valley, California, the Sierran front is comprised of a series of left-stepping normal faults that terminate in the northern Lake Tahoe basin area. Directly north of Lake Tahoe, slip is transferred through the Truckee, California area and northward through a complex distribution of primarily conjugate strike-slip and minor normal fault systems. The recent identification of the Polaris fault zone extends Northern Walker Lake Belt dextral slip south of the Mohawk Valley fault zone to Truckee. The region accommodates as much as 10 mm/yr of dextral shear and has a history of M6+ earthquakes. In contrast to the general lack of background seismicity associated with major range bounding normal faults in the Tahoe region, there is abundant seismicity north of the Lake through this slip transfer zone (i.e., focal mechanisms of small magnitude earthquakes provide limited constraints on the dips of major range bounding normal faults). A NE-SW-trending zone of seismicity north of Lake Tahoe and extending into southeast Reno, Nevada, includes several M4+ strike-slip and normal faulting sequences, and numerous identifiable structures. An M4.5 (2004), M4.8 (2005), and associated general increase in seismicity in the N. Tahoe area may have been triggered by broader deformation resulting from a Moho-depth dike injection event in late 2003 (von Seggern et al., 2008). Preliminary analysis of short-period focal mechanisms reveals a change in T-axis trend from ESE west of the California-Nevada border to ENE east of the border. Focal mechanism and moment tensor solutions produce a ratio of 9/1 strike-slip to normal solutions in contrast to range bounding east dipping normal structures. Earthquake relocations display distinct lineaments of seismicity

  11. Landslide susceptibility in the Tully Valley area, Finger Lakes region, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jager, Stefan; Wieczorek, Gerald E.

    1994-01-01

    As a consequence of a large landslide in the Tully Valley, Onondaga County, New York, an investigation was undertaken to determine the factors responsible for the landslide in order to develop a model for regional landslide susceptibility. The April 27, 1993 Tully Valley landslide occurred within glacial lake clays overlain by till and colluvium on gentle slopes of 9-12 degrees. The landslide was triggered by extreme climatic events of prolonged heavy rainfall combined with rapid melting of a winter snowpack. A photoinventory and field checking of landslides within a 415 km2 study area, including the Tully Valley, revealed small recently-active landslides and other large dormant prehistoric landslides, probably Pleistocene in age. Similar to the larger Tully Valley landslide, the smaller recently-active landslides occurred in red, glacial lake clays very likely triggered by seasonal rainfall. The large dormant landslides have been stable for long periods as evidenced by slope denudational processes that have modified the landslides. These old and ancient landslides correspond with proglacial lake levels during the Pleistocene, suggesting that either inundation or rapid drainage was responsible for triggering these landslides. A logistic regression analysis was performed within a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment to develop a model of landslide susceptibility for the Tully Valley study area. Presence of glacial clays, slope angle, and glacial lake levels were used as explanatory variables for landslide incidence. The spatial probability of landsliding, categorized as low, moderate and high, is portrayed within 90-m square cells on the susceptibility map.

  12. Relationships between water quality and phosphorus concentrations for Puget Sound region lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilliom, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Regression relationships were developed between summer mean total phosphorus (P) concentrations in near-surface water and both chlorophyll a concentrations and Secchi disc transparency for Puget Sound region lakes. Total P concentrations in the lakes studied ranged from 7 to 66 μ/L. The relationship between total P and chlorophyll a, based on data from 69 lakes, explained 57 percent of the variance in chlorophyll a. Predicted chlorophyll a concentrations and 95 percent confidence intervals ranged from 1 +3-0.5μg/L for 7 μg/L P to about +35-10μ/L for 66 μ/L P. The relationship between total P and Secchi disc, based on data from 71 lakes, explained 53 percent of the variance in Secchi disc. Predicted Secchi disc transparencies and 95 percent confidence intervals ranged from 5.5 +5.5-3.0 m for 7 μ/L P to 1.4 +1.5-0.7 m for 66 μ/L P.

  13. Robust environmental flow release strategies in arid and semi-arid regions to rehabilitate endangered saline lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazel, Nasim; Torabi Haghighi, Ali; Kløve, Bjørn

    2017-04-01

    Saline lakes despite their extreme importance for critical habitat, are often threatened by desiccation due to irrigation and land development. For many closed lakes, the lake's level and salinity is highly controlled by hydrology of the basin and the balance between inflows and evaporation. In arid and semi-arid regions overexploitation of water for agricultural use in upstream has imbalance the natural inflow to the lake and the evaporation from surface. Due to the high irrigation water demand in these regions, environmental flow release has led to greater water withdrawals in irrigation seasons. Considering farmers attitude in irrigation along with hydrological and climatic condition, could be an important criteria to design proper environmental flow release plan to maximise lakes' inflow. This study employs a new methodology to define environmental flow strategy in arid and semi-arid regions with intensive agricultural lands adjacent to a terminal lake. The method analyzes farmers' water-use behaviour and natural flow regime in the upstream to design the environmental flow release strategy from a reservoir. We have applied the methodology to water resources systems in Lake Urmia Basin, a highly endangered saline lake in Iran. The spatial analysis show that the lake basin's hydrology is controlled by many upstream reservoirs and intensive agricultural water demand in downstream. Cropland has increased rapidly in the lake basin during last decades through construction of dams and diversion. The released environmental flow was exploited by farmers in lowlands and inflow to the lake in some rivers has been decreased even by 80%. The new environmental flow release has showed water should be released in the shortest possible time (according to reservoir outlet capacity) during the lowest irrigation demand period.

  14. Local to regional scale industrial heavy metal pollution recorded in sediments of large freshwater lakes in central Europe (lakes Geneva and Lucerne) over the last centuries.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Florian; Graham, Neil D; Chiaradia, Massimo; Arpagaus, Philippe; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2011-12-15

    This research first focuses on the spatial and temporal patterns of heavy metals from contrasting environments (highly polluted to deepwater sites) of Lake Geneva. The mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) records from two deepwater sites show that the heavy metal variations before the industrial period are primarily linked to natural weathering input of trace elements. By opposition, the discharge of industrial treated wastewaters into Vidy Bay of Lake Geneva during the second part of the 20th century, involved the sedimentation of highly metal-contaminated sediments in the area surrounding the WWTP outlet pipe discharge. Eventually, a new Pb isotope record of sediments from Lake Lucerne identifies the long-term increasing anthropogenic lead pollution after ca. 1500, probably due to the development of metallurgical activities during the High Middle Ages. These data furthermore allows to compare the recent anthropogenic sources of water pollution from three of the largest freshwater lakes of Western Europe (lakes Geneva, Lucerne, and Constance). High increases in Pb and Hg highlight the regional impact of industrial pollution after ca. 1750-1850, and the decrease of metal pollution in the 1980s due to the effects of remediation strategies such as the implementation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). However, at all the studied sites, the recent metal concentrations remain higher than pre-industrial levels. Moreover, the local scale pollution data reveal two highly contaminated sites (>100 μg Pb/g dry weight sediment) by industrial activities, during the late-19th and early-20th centuries (Lake Lucerne) and during the second part of the 20th century (Vidy Bay of Lake Geneva). Overall, the regional scale pollution history inferred from the three large and deep perialpine lakes points out at the pollution of water systems by heavy metals during the last two centuries due to the discharge of industrial effluents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Paradigms and proboscideans in the southern Great Lakes region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saunders, J.J.; Grimm, E.C.; Widga, C.C.; Campbell, G.D.; Curry, B. Brandon; Grimley, D.A.; Hanson, P.R.; McCullum, J.P.; Oliver, J.S.; Treworgy, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    Thirteen new chronometric dates for Illinois proboscideans are considered in relation to well-dated pollen records from northeastern and central Illinois. These dates span an interval from 21,228 to 12,944 cal BP. When compared to pollen spectra, it is evident that Mammut americanum inhabited spruce (Picea) and black ash (Fraxinus nigra) forest during the B??lling-Aller??d (14,700-12,900 cal BP) and early Younger Dryas (12,900-11,650 cal BP) chronozones. Both Mammuthus jeffersonii and Mammuthus primigenius inhabited spruce dominated open-woodland during the Oldest Dryas chronozone, while M.??primigenius persisted in a forest of predominantly black ash during the Aller??d chronozone. A newly discovered specimen from Lincoln, IL, clarifies the taxonomic distinction between M. primigenius and M.??jeffersonii. Hitherto, a paradigm of proboscidean succession during the full- to late-glacial periods was based on the vegetation succession of steppe tundra-like vegetation to spruce forest to spruce-deciduous forest. The presumed proboscidean succession was that of cold, dry steppe-adapted M. primigenius succeeded by more mesic-tolerant M. jeffersonii that in turn was succeeded by the wet forest-adapted M.??americanum. Reported data do not support this view and indicate a need for re-evaluation of assumptions of proboscidean ecology and history, e.g., the environmental tolerances and habits of M.??primigenius in regions south of 55??N, and its dynamic relationship with other proboscidean taxa. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  16. Ionospheric plasma turbulence over region of 2006 Iran, 2005 Lake Tanganyika and 2010 New Britain Region earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosciesza, Malgorzata; Blecki, Jan; Wronowski, Roman; Parrot, Michel

    2013-04-01

    We report the results of the observation of ELF plasma turbulence registered by DEMETER satellite in the ionosphere over epicenter region of three earthquakes. First one took place on 2nd of February 2005 in Lake Tanganyika Region with magnitude 6.9. Second was earthquake with magnitude 6.1 in Iran on 31st March 2006. The last one took place on 4th of August 2010 in New Britain Region with magnitude 7.0. Obtained results we compare with data gathered during corresponding time and region with quiet seismic conditions. To study this turbulent processes we apply Fourier, wavelet, bispectral analysis and statistical description with use of kurtosis and skewness of the electric field fluctuations. These registrations are correlated with the plasma parameters measured onboard DEMETER satellite and with geomagnetic indices.

  17. Characteristics of influenza H13N8 subtype virus firstly isolated from Qinghai Lake Region, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Bo, Hong; Zhang, Ye; Dong, Libo; Zou, Shumei; Huang, Weijuan; Liu, Jia; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong

    2017-09-18

    Since the highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza caused thousands of deaths of wild bird in this area in 2005, Qinghai Lake in China has become a hot spot for study of the influence of avian influenza to migratory wild birds. However, the ecology and evolution of low pathogenic avian influenza virus in this region are limited. This project-based avian influenza surveillance in Qinghai lake region was initiated in year 2012. Samples of wild bird feces and lake surface water were collected in Qinghai Lake in year 2012.Virus isolation was conducted on embryonated chicken eggs. The influenza A virus was determined by rRT-PCR. Virus sequences were acquired by deep sequencing. The phylogenetic correlation and molecular characteristics of the viruses were analyzed. The virus growth and infection features, receptor binding preference were studied, and pathogenicity in vitro as well as. Two H13N8 subtype influenza viruses were isolated. The viruses are phylogenetically belong to Eurasian lineage. Most of the genes are associated with gull origin influenza virus except PB1 gene, which is most probably derived from Anseriformes virus. The evidence of interspecies reassortment was presented. The two viruses have limited growth capacity on MDCK and A549 cells while grow well in embryonated eggs. The dual receptor binding features of the two viruses was shown up. The low pathogenic features were determined by trypsin dependence plaque formation assay. The two H13N8 subtype influenza viruses are highly associated with gull origin. The interspecies reassortment of H13 subtype virus among Anseriforme sand Charadriiformes wild birds emphasizes the importance of strengthening avian influenza surveillance in this region. This study is helpful to understand the ecology, evolution and transmission pattern of H13 subtype influenza virus globally.

  18. Geologic map of Lake Mead and surrounding regions, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah, and northwestern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felger, Tracey J.; Beard, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Regional stratigraphic units and structural features of the Lake Mead region are presented as a 1:250,000 scale map, and as a Geographic Information System database. The map, which was compiled from existing geologic maps of various scales, depicts geologic units, bedding and foliation attitudes, faults and folds. Units and structural features were generalized to highlight the regional stratigraphic and tectonic aspects of the geology of the Lake Mead region. This map was prepared in support of the papers presented in this volume, Special Paper 463, as well as to facilitate future investigations in the region. Stratigraphic units exposed within the area record 1800 million years of geologic history and include Proterozoic crystalline rocks, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, Cenozoic volcanic and intrusive rocks, sedimentary rocks and surfi cial deposits. Following passive margin sedimentation in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic, late Mesozoic (Sevier) thrusting and Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary compression produced major folding, reverse faulting, and thrust faulting in the Basin and Range, and resulted in regional uplift and monoclinal folding in the Colorado Plateau. Cenozoic extensional deformation, accompanied by sedimentation and volcanism, resulted in large-magnitude high- and low-angle normal faulting and strike-slip faulting in the Basin and Range; on the Colorado Plateau, extension produced north-trending high-angle normal faults. The latest history includes integration of the Colorado River system, dissection, development of alluvial fans, extensive pediment surfaces, and young faulting.

  19. Crustal Structure Beneath the Lake Ontario Region from Inverse Models of Potential Field and Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, L. C.; Benoit, M. H.; Ebinger, C. J.; Horowitz, F.

    2014-12-01

    The regions surrounding Lake Ontario (e.g. the Adirondack mountain region and its northern border with Canada) are among the most seismically active regions in the Eastern US. However, only scant knowledge exists of the location and geometry of faults, suture zones, or crustal thickness variations that may localize strain in the crust beneath sections of New York, Pennsylvania and Ontario. Our aim is to determine the crustal density and magnetic susceptibility contrasts (e.g., steep faults, intrusive bodies, Moho topography) which give rise to anomaly patterns and to place constraints on their geometries and locations. With a better understanding of these structures, we will examine how the distribution of the faults and steep contacts throughout the region compare with zones of active seismicity. Utilizing the North American Gravity Database, we created a profile that crosses a narrow Bouguer anomaly with steep gradients surrounded by Bouguer anomaly highs transecting the lake and extending onshore east of Rochester, subparallel to the seismically active Clarendon-Linden fault. Euler deconvolution and 'worm' analyses show that this narrow anomaly is bounded by east-dipping faults that extend to mid-crustal levels. We perform receiver function analyses of Earthscope TA stations in the region in order to constrain crustal thickness and lateral variations in Vp/Vs. These receiver functions at onshore sites in the area show complex Moho structure which partially explains our anomaly.Additionally, a vintage seismic profile coupled with the Lake Ontario bathymetry dataset was used to place constraints on sedimentary strata thicknesses and to identify structures within Proterozoic basement. Predictive models of crustal variations were created from a potential field profile, receiver functions, and a seismic profile to test interpretations. The Moho topography alone does not fully explain the short wavelength gravity anomaly, and a sedimentary basin of 3-5 km in depth is

  20. Climate Change in Africa: Impacts and Effects on the Inhabitants of the Lake Chad Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, B.; Tahir, S. M.; Olisa, O.

    2009-05-01

    The Department of Energy and Climate Change defined climate as the average weather experienced over a long period. This includes temperature, wind and rainfall patterns. The climate of the Earth is not static, and has changed many times in response to a variety of natural causes. Due to human activities in emmiting green house gases has resulted the Earth to get warmed by 0.74°C over the last hundred years. Around 0.4°C of this warming has occurred since the 1970s. Climate is now one of the major phenomenon threatening lives and humanity in general since the beginning of industrial revolution. Climate exerts a profound influence on the lives of poor populations in the Lake Chad region of Africa who depend on fishing and crop cultivation for livelihood and sustenance, who are unprotected against climate-related diseases, who lacked secure access to water and food and who are vulnerable to hydro meteorological hazard. The effects of climate change on the study area are many and include diminishing resources and conflicts over the available limited water resources. The Lake Chad region is a fragile area with high climate variability and extremes of weather. As this inland water is used for domestic and agricultural purposes, salt mining, as well as transportation by Nigerians, Nigeriens, Chadian and Cameroonians, it is an area of trans-boundary water conflicts. This paper examines the part played by climate change in the decline of fishery resources and livelihood activities in the Lake Chad region. Data from field studies, structured interview and secondary sources show that fish catches and livelihood activities have declined tremendously in recent times due to several factors including overexploitation and increasing demands on the aquatic resources. Findings from the study show that droughty periods have resulted in the reduction of open lake water surface from about 25,000 km2 in 1973 to less than 2,000 km2 in the 1990s. This has led to the diminishing aquatic

  1. Trends in summer chemistry linked to productivity in lakes recovering from acid deposition in the Adirondack region of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Momen, B.; Lawrence, G.B.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. A.; Sutherland, J.W.; Eichler, L.W.; Harrison, J.P.; Boylen, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Adirondack Effects Assessment Program (AEAP) to evaluate and monitor the status of biological communities in lakes in the Adirondack region of New York that have been adversely affected by acid deposition. This program includes chemical analysis of 30 lakes, sampled two to three times each summer. Results of trends analysis for lake chemistry and chlorophyll a (chlor a) are presented for 1994 to 2003, and a general comparison is made with recent results of the Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) Program, which included chemical analysis of all but two of these lakes (plus an additional 24 lakes) monthly, year-round for 1992-2004. Increases in pH were found in 25 of the 30 AEAP lakes (P < 0.05) and increases in acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) were found in 12 of the 30 lakes (P < 0.05). Concentrations of both SO 42- and Mg 2+ decreased in 11 lakes (P < 0.05), whereas concentrations of NO 3- decreased in 20 lakes (P < 0.05). Concentrations of NH 4+ decreased in 10 lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and in three other lakes based on P < 0.1. Concentrations of inorganic and organic monomeric aluminum generally were below the reporting limit of 1.5 ??mol L-1, but decreases were detected in four and five lakes, respectively (P < 0.1). Concentrations of chlor a increased in seven lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and two lakes at a significance level of P < 0.1. A significant inverse correlation was also found between chlor a and NO 3- concentrations in nine lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and two lakes at a significance level of P < 0.1. Results of AEAP analysis of lake chemistry were similar to those of the ALTM Program, although decreases in SO 42- concentrations were more evident in the year-round ALTM record. Overall, the results suggest (a) a degree of chemical recovery from acidification during the summer, (b) an increase in phytoplankton productivity, and (c) a decreasing trend in

  2. The effects of regional climate change on space conditioning needs and the energy industry in the Great Lakes region

    SciTech Connect

    Fernau, M.E.; Maloney, E.D.; Bates, G.T.

    1993-12-31

    To date, studies of the effects of potential climate change on energy use and demand have been done on a macro scale or with coarse model data but, in reality, regional climate change effects will determine the actual behavior of energy users. The output from a 3-year simulation of the coupled NCAR CCM/MM4 regional climate modeling system is used to examine changes in average temperature and temperature variability on a regional scale, the impacts of such change on the need for space conditioning in the Great Lakes region, and the subsequent changes in energy demand. The NCAR modeling system uses general circulation model results to drive a more highly resolved mesoscale model to produce a detailed regional climate. A 3-year run of both base case and doubled CO{sub 2} climate for the United States has been produced. From these results, changes in heating and cooling degree days, and changes in consecutive days above or below various temperature thresholds were calculated. Heating and cooling energy use intensities that are representative of the residential building stock found in the region were used to convert climate data to energy demand. The implications for the energy industry are discussed. The model results indicate that the changed climate under doubled carbon dioxide conditions would have large impacts on energy use, although it is difficult to determine the balance between decreased heating needs and increased cooling needs. It was found that biases present in the temperature output of the modeling system are greater for the Great Lakes region than for the rest of the U.S. and limit the usefulness of the present data set for determining the effects of climate change on energy use in that area.

  3. Regional assessment of lake ecological states using Landsat: A classification scheme for alkaline-saline, flamingo lakes in the East African Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebbs, E. J.; Remedios, J. J.; Avery, S. T.; Rowland, C. S.; Harper, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    In situ reflectance measurements and Landsat satellite imagery were combined to develop an optical classification scheme for alkaline-saline lakes in the Eastern Rift Valley. The classification allows the ecological state and consequent value, in this case to Lesser Flamingos, to be determined using Landsat satellite imagery. Lesser Flamingos depend on a network of 15 alkaline-saline lakes in East African Rift Valley, where they feed by filtering cyanobacteria and benthic diatoms from the lakes' waters. The classification developed here was based on a decision tree which used the reflectance in Landsat ETM+ bands 2-4 to assign one of six classes: low phytoplankton biomass; suspended sediment-dominated; microphytobenthos; high cyanobacterial biomass; cyanobacterial scum and bleached cyanobacterial scum. The classification accuracy was 77% when verified against in situ measurements. Classified imagery and timeseries were produced for selected lakes, which show the different ecological behaviours of these complex systems. The results have highlighted the importance to flamingos of the food resources offered by the extremely remote Lake Logipi. This study has demonstrated the potential of high spatial resolution, low spectral resolution sensors for providing ecologically valuable information at a regional scale, for alkaline-saline lakes and similar hypereutrophic inland waters.

  4. The regional abundance and size distribution of lakes and reservoirs in the United States and implication for estimates of global lake extent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Cory P.; Rover, Jennifer; Stets, Edward G.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed complete geospatial data for the 3.5 million lakes and reservoirs larger than 0.001 km2, with a combined surface area of 131,000 km2, in the contiguous United States (excluding the Laurentian Great Lakes) and identified their regional distribution characteristics. For Alaska, we also analyzed (1) incomplete data that suggest that the state contains 1–2.5 million lakes larger than 0.001 km2 covering over 50,000 km2 and (2) localized high-resolution (5 m) data that suggest that the number of very small water bodies (< 0.001 km2) may be comparable with the number of lakes > 0.001 km2 in some areas. The Pareto distribution cannot accurately describe the lake abundance-size relationship across the entire size spectrum, and extrapolation of this density function to small size classes has likely resulted in the overestimation of the number of small lakes in the world. While small water bodies dominate in terms of numbers, they are not numerous enough to dominate in terms of surface area, as has been previously suggested. Extending our results to the global scale suggests that there are on the order of 64 million water bodies larger than 0.001 km2 in the world, with a total surface area of approximately 3.8 million km2.

  5. A needs assessment for climate change education in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, S.; Schneider, L. B.; Walters, H.

    2011-12-01

    The National Science Foundation funded Great Lakes Climate Change Science and Education Systemic Network project is implementing a two year planning effort to create innovative education programs to benefit the public, formal and informal educators, scientists, and journalists in the region. The current partners include Eastern Michigan University, NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab, University of Michigan, Michigan State University, Knight Center for Environmental Journalism, Ashland University, Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum, and the College of Exploration. To create a network we are planning to bring together different stakeholders to write two white papers, one from the scientists' perspective and the other from the educators'(both formal and informal) perspective. The current partners' key personnel have produced a list of possible people/institutions to include in a stakeholder survey. Some of the key personnel developed their databases from scratch. Some used listserves, and others tried a snowball email. To identify the best strategy that will inform these various stakeholders and the public regarding the science of climate change in the Great Lakes Region, a survey was developed for each of the different stakeholders. The survey is divided into three parts: 1) questions which convey some understanding of climate science and climate change 2) demographic questions, and finally 3) questions that pertain to the professional concerns or perspectives of the various stakeholders. This survey is being used to provide the project team with a "needs assessment" from the interested members of those stakeholders. The results from this process will be summarized.

  6. Seasonal and diurnal variations in methane emissions from Wuliangsu Lake in arid regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaonan; Wang, Xiaoke; Mu, Yujing; Ouyang, Zhiyun

    CH 4 emissions have been widely studied in various wetlands, such as boreal peatlands, rice paddies, and tropical swamps. However, little investigation has been carried out for CH 4 emissions from lakes or wetlands in arid regions where these freshwaters play a vital role in providing ecosystem services for local people. To quantify the spatial and temporal variations of CH 4 flux and understand its key controlling factors in shallow lakes in arid regions of Western China, CH 4 fluxes from Wuliangsu Lake were measured at different vegetation zones and water depths with a static chamber technique during a growing season from April to October in 2003. Results showed that the average emission flux of CH 4 from submerged plant ( Potamogeton pectinatus) growing zones was 2.16 mg CH 4 m -2 h -1, which was 85.8% lower than that from emergent macrophyte ( Phragmites australis) growing zones. CH 4 emissions increased with increasing water depth in Phragmites Community. Significant seasonal and diurnal variations of CH 4 emission were observed for P. australis during the plant growth stage, for P. pectinatus growing zones, however, the variations were minor. In addition to vegetation cover and water depth, bottom silt temperature and light intensity were also important factors influencing seasonal and diurnal variations of CH 4 flux from Phargmites growing zone.

  7. Regional groundwater-flow model of the Lake Michigan Basin in support of Great Lakes Basin water availability and use studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feinstein, D.T.; Hunt, R.J.; Reeves, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    A regional groundwater-flow model of the Lake Michigan Basin and surrounding areas has been developed in support of the Great Lakes Basin Pilot project under the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Availability and Use Program. The transient 2-million-cell model incorporates multiple aquifers and pumping centers that create water-level drawdown that extends into deep saline waters. The 20-layer model simulates the exchange between a dense surface-water network and heterogeneous glacial deposits overlying stratified bedrock of the Wisconsin/Kankakee Arches and Michigan Basin in the Lower and Upper Peninsulas of Michigan; eastern Wisconsin; northern Indiana; and northeastern Illinois. The model is used to quantify changes in the groundwater system in response to pumping and variations in recharge from 1864 to 2005. Model results quantify the sources of water to major pumping centers, illustrate the dynamics of the groundwater system, and yield measures of water availability useful for water-resources management in the region. This report is a complete description of the methods and datasets used to develop the regional model, the underlying conceptual model, and model inputs, including specified values of material properties and the assignment of external and internal boundary conditions. The report also documents the application of the SEAWAT-2000 program for variable-density flow; it details the approach, advanced methods, and results associated with calibration through nonlinear regression using the PEST program; presents the water-level, drawdown, and groundwater flows for various geographic subregions and aquifer systems; and provides analyses of the effects of pumping from shallow and deep wells on sources of water to wells, the migration of groundwater divides, and direct and indirect groundwater discharge to Lake Michigan. The report considers the role of unconfined conditions at the regional scale as well as the influence of salinity on groundwater flow

  8. Development of a regional littoral benthic macroinvertebrate multi-metric index (MMI) for lakes from the National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the 2007 National Lakes Assessment (NLA) benthic macroinvertebrate samples were collected from the lake littoral zone. The purpose of the sampling was to assess the feasibility of a multi-metric index (MMI) to assess the condition of the littoral benthic macroinvertebrate...

  9. Asynchrony in the inter-annual recruitment of lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in the Great Lakes region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zischke, Mitchell T.; Bunnell, David B.; Troy, Cary D.; Berglund, Eric K.; Caroffino, David C.; Ebener, Mark P.; He, Ji X.; Sitar, Shawn P.; Hook, Tomas O.

    2017-01-01

    Spatially separated fish populations may display synchrony in annual recruitment if the factors that drive recruitment success, particularly abiotic factors such as temperature, are synchronised across broad spatial scales. We examined inter-annual variation in recruitment among lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) populations in lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior using fishery-dependent and -independent data from 1971 to 2014. Relative year-class strength (RYCS) was calculated from catch-curve residuals for each year class across multiple sampling years. Pairwise comparison of RYCS among datasets revealed no significant associations either within or between lakes, suggesting that recruitment of lake whitefish is spatially asynchronous. There was no consistent correlation between pairwise agreement and the distance between datasets, and models to estimate the spatial scale of recruitment synchrony did not fit well to these data. This suggests that inter-annual recruitment variation of lake whitefish is asynchronous across broad spatial scales in the Great Lakes. While our method primarily evaluated year-to-year recruitment variation, it is plausible that recruitment of lake whitefish varies at coarser temporal scales (e.g. decadal). Nonetheless, our findings differ from research on some other Coregonus species and suggest that local biotic or density-dependent factors may contribute strongly to lake whitefish recruitment rather than inter-annual variability in broad-scale abiotic factors.

  10. Development of a regional littoral benthic macroinvertebrate multi-metric index (MMI) for lakes from the National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the 2007 National Lakes Assessment (NLA) benthic macroinvertebrate samples were collected from the lake littoral zone. The purpose of the sampling was to assess the feasibility of a multi-metric index (MMI) to assess the condition of the littoral benthic macroinvertebrate...

  11. Projecting the Impact of Regional Land-Use Change and Water Management Policies on Lake Water Quality: An Application to Periurban Lakes and Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Catherine, Arnaud; Mouillot, David; Maloufi, Selma; Troussellier, Marc; Bernard, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    As the human population grows, the demand for living space and supplies of resources also increases, which may induce rapid change in land-use/land-cover (LULC) and associated pressures exerted on aquatic habitats. We propose a new approach to forecast the impact of regional land cover change and water management policies (i.e., targets in nutrient loads reduction) on lake and reservoir water eutrophication status using a model that requires minimal parameterisation compared with alternative methods. This approach was applied to a set of 48 periurban lakes located in the Ile de France region (IDF, France) to simulate catchment-scale management scenarios. Model outputs were subsequently compared to governmental agencies’ 2030 forecasts. Our model indicated that the efforts made to reduce pressure in the catchment of seepage lakes might be expected to be proportional to the gain that might be obtained, whereas drainage lakes will display little improvement until a critical level of pressure reduction is reached. The model also indicated that remediation measures, as currently planned by governmental agencies, might only have a marginal impact on improving the eutrophication status of lakes and reservoirs within the IDF region. Despite the commitment to appropriately managing the water resources in many countries, prospective tools to evaluate the potential impacts of global change on freshwater ecosystems integrity at medium to large spatial scales are lacking. This study proposes a new approach to investigate the impact of region-scale human-driven changes on lake and reservoir ecological status and could be implemented elsewhere with limited parameterisation. Issues are discussed that relate to model uncertainty and to its relevance as a tool applied to decision-making. PMID:23991066

  12. Projecting the impact of regional land-use change and water management policies on lake water quality: an application to periurban lakes and reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Catherine, Arnaud; Mouillot, David; Maloufi, Selma; Troussellier, Marc; Bernard, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    As the human population grows, the demand for living space and supplies of resources also increases, which may induce rapid change in land-use/land-cover (LULC) and associated pressures exerted on aquatic habitats. We propose a new approach to forecast the impact of regional land cover change and water management policies (i.e., targets in nutrient loads reduction) on lake and reservoir water eutrophication status using a model that requires minimal parameterisation compared with alternative methods. This approach was applied to a set of 48 periurban lakes located in the Ile de France region (IDF, France) to simulate catchment-scale management scenarios. Model outputs were subsequently compared to governmental agencies' 2030 forecasts. Our model indicated that the efforts made to reduce pressure in the catchment of seepage lakes might be expected to be proportional to the gain that might be obtained, whereas drainage lakes will display little improvement until a critical level of pressure reduction is reached. The model also indicated that remediation measures, as currently planned by governmental agencies, might only have a marginal impact on improving the eutrophication status of lakes and reservoirs within the IDF region. Despite the commitment to appropriately managing the water resources in many countries, prospective tools to evaluate the potential impacts of global change on freshwater ecosystems integrity at medium to large spatial scales are lacking. This study proposes a new approach to investigate the impact of region-scale human-driven changes on lake and reservoir ecological status and could be implemented elsewhere with limited parameterisation. Issues are discussed that relate to model uncertainty and to its relevance as a tool applied to decision-making.

  13. The magnetic properties of the Lake Bolshoe Yarovoe (Altai Region, Russia) sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosareva, Lina; Nourgaliev, Danis; Nurgalieva, Nuriia; Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Kuzina, Diliara; Antonenko, Vadim; Akhmerov, Rinaz; Evtugyn, Vladimir; Vorob'ev, Vyacheslav

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic minerals of modern lake sediments provide unique source of information for climate changes, regionally and globally as environmental variations are recorded by them with high resolution. Here we report results of magnetic analysis of the endorheic bitter-salty lake Bolshoe Yarovoe located in the Altai Region, Russia. The lake is the deepest one in the Kulunda Steppe with the average depth 4 m and with the catchment area about 560 km2. Five cores were drileld during field research conducted by the Institute of Geology and Petroleum Technologies (Kazan Federal University, Russia) in 2008. Average length of cores is 4 m. The samples were studied using radiocarbon dating, magnetic susceptibility, NRM measurements, coercivity spectrometry, thermomagnetic analysis, TEM and SEM microscopy. The main components of the sediments magnetization, their variability, defined features of sedimentation processes, also the contribution of the paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, superparamagnetic components are identified. Data variability of the paramagnetic component revealed that the lower part of the section is characterized by a gradual increase in revenues of the clay material. The presence of erosion was detected around of 7500 years ago marking occurrence of a fall of the lake level during this period. After this the flow of clay particles was steady with small fluctuations only, indicating the stabilization of sedimentation processes. Ferromagnetic fraction is mainly represented by magnitofossils of different forms, sizes and grain preservation. Such changes may be related to many factors, such as climate, nutrient availability, and environmental variability. Possible relationships between magnitofossil morphology, their magnetic signal and the depositional environment changes are proposed. The work was carried out according to the Russian Government's Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University.

  14. Uncertainty in the Himalayan energy-water nexus: estimating regional exposure to glacial lake outburst floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus; Korup, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Himalayan water resources attract a rapidly growing number of hydroelectric power projects (HPP) to satisfy Asia’s soaring energy demands. Yet HPP operating or planned in steep, glacier-fed mountain rivers face hazards of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) that can damage hydropower infrastructure, alter water and sediment yields, and compromise livelihoods downstream. Detailed appraisals of such GLOF hazards are limited to case studies, however, and a more comprehensive, systematic analysis remains elusive. To this end we estimate the regional exposure of 257 Himalayan HPP to GLOFs, using a flood-wave propagation model fed by Monte Carlo-derived outburst volumes of >2300 glacial lakes. We interpret the spread of thus modeled peak discharges as a predictive uncertainty that arises mainly from outburst volumes and dam-breach rates that are difficult to assess before dams fail. With 66% of sampled HPP are on potential GLOF tracks, up to one third of these HPP could experience GLOF discharges well above local design floods, as hydropower development continues to seek higher sites closer to glacial lakes. We compute that this systematic push of HPP into headwaters effectively doubles the uncertainty about GLOF peak discharge in these locations. Peak discharges farther downstream, in contrast, are easier to predict because GLOF waves attenuate rapidly. Considering this systematic pattern of regional GLOF exposure might aid the site selection of future Himalayan HPP. Our method can augment, and help to regularly update, current hazard assessments, given that global warming is likely changing the number and size of Himalayan meltwater lakes.

  15. Lake seasonality across the Tibetan Plateau and their varying relationship with regional mass changes and local hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yanbin; Yao, Tandong; Yang, Kun; Sheng, Yongwei; Kleinherenbrink, Marcel; Yi, Shuang; Bird, Broxton W.; Zhang, Xiaowen; Zhu, La; Zhang, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    The recent growth and deepening of inland lakes in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) may be a salient indicator of the consequences of climate change. The seasonal dynamics of these lakes is poorly understood despite this being potentially crucial for disentangling contributions from glacier melt and precipitation, which are all sensitive to climate, to lake water budget. Using in situ observations, satellite altimetry and gravimetry data, we identified two patterns of lake level seasonality. In the central, northern, and northeastern TP, lake levels are characterized by considerable increases during warm seasons and decreases during cold seasons, which is consistent with regional mass changes related to monsoon precipitation and evaporation. In the northwestern TP, however, lake levels exhibit dramatic increases during both warm and cold seasons, which deviate from regional mass changes. This appears to be more connected with high spring snowfall and large summer glacier melt. The variable lake level response to different drivers indicates heterogeneous sensitivity to climate change between the northwestern TP and other regions.

  16. PeRL: a circum-Arctic Permafrost Region Pond and Lake database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muster, Sina; Roth, Kurt; Langer, Moritz; Lange, Stephan; Cresto Aleina, Fabio; Bartsch, Annett; Morgenstern, Anne; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin; Sannel, A. Britta K.; Sjöberg, Ylva; Günther, Frank; Andresen, Christian; Veremeeva, Alexandra; Lindgren, Prajna R.; Bouchard, Frédéric; Lara, Mark J.; Fortier, Daniel; Charbonneau, Simon; Virtanen, Tarmo A.; Hugelius, Gustaf; Palmtag, Juri; Siewert, Matthias B.; Riley, William J.; Koven, Charles D.; Boike, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Ponds and lakes are abundant in Arctic permafrost lowlands. They play an important role in Arctic wetland ecosystems by regulating carbon, water, and energy fluxes and providing freshwater habitats. However, ponds, i.e., waterbodies with surface areas smaller than 1. 0 × 104 m2, have not been inventoried on global and regional scales. The Permafrost Region Pond and Lake (PeRL) database presents the results of a circum-Arctic effort to map ponds and lakes from modern (2002-2013) high-resolution aerial and satellite imagery with a resolution of 5 m or better. The database also includes historical imagery from 1948 to 1965 with a resolution of 6 m or better. PeRL includes 69 maps covering a wide range of environmental conditions from tundra to boreal regions and from continuous to discontinuous permafrost zones. Waterbody maps are linked to regional permafrost landscape maps which provide information on permafrost extent, ground ice volume, geology, and lithology. This paper describes waterbody classification and accuracy, and presents statistics of waterbody distribution for each site. Maps of permafrost landscapes in Alaska, Canada, and Russia are used to extrapolate waterbody statistics from the site level to regional landscape units. PeRL presents pond and lake estimates for a total area of 1. 4 × 106 km2 across the Arctic, about 17 % of the Arctic lowland ( < 300 m a.s.l.) land surface area. PeRL waterbodies with sizes of 1. 0 × 106 m2 down to 1. 0 × 102 m2 contributed up to 21 % to the total water fraction. Waterbody density ranged from 1. 0 × 10 to 9. 4 × 101 km-2. Ponds are the dominant waterbody type by number in all landscapes representing 45-99 % of the total waterbody number. The implementation of PeRL size distributions in land surface models will greatly improve the investigation and projection of surface inundation and carbon fluxes in permafrost lowlands. Waterbody maps, study area boundaries, and maps of regional permafrost landscapes including

  17. PeRL: A circum-Arctic Permafrost Region Pond and Lake database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muster, Sina; Roth, Kurt; Langer, Moritz; Lange, Stephan; Cresto Aleina, Fabio; Bartsch, Annett; Morgenstern, Anne; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin; Sannel, A.B.K.; Sjoberg, Ylva; Gunther, Frank; Andresen, Christian; Veremeeva, Alexandra; Lindgren, Prajna R.; Bouchard, Frédéric; Lara, Mark J.; Fortier, Daniel; Charbonneau, Simon; Virtanen, Tarmo A.; Hugelius, Gustaf; Palmtag, J.; Siewert, Matthias B.; Riley, William J.; Koven, Charles; Boike, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Ponds and lakes are abundant in Arctic permafrost lowlands. They play an important role in Arctic wetland ecosystems by regulating carbon, water, and energy fluxes and providing freshwater habitats. However, ponds, i.e., waterbodies with surface areas smaller than 1. 0 × 104 m2, have not been inventoried on global and regional scales. The Permafrost Region Pond and Lake (PeRL) database presents the results of a circum-Arctic effort to map ponds and lakes from modern (2002–2013) high-resolution aerial and satellite imagery with a resolution of 5 m or better. The database also includes historical imagery from 1948 to 1965 with a resolution of 6 m or better. PeRL includes 69 maps covering a wide range of environmental conditions from tundra to boreal regions and from continuous to discontinuous permafrost zones. Waterbody maps are linked to regional permafrost landscape maps which provide information on permafrost extent, ground ice volume, geology, and lithology. This paper describes waterbody classification and accuracy, and presents statistics of waterbody distribution for each site. Maps of permafrost landscapes in Alaska, Canada, and Russia are used to extrapolate waterbody statistics from the site level to regional landscape units. PeRL presents pond and lake estimates for a total area of 1. 4 × 106 km2 across the Arctic, about 17 % of the Arctic lowland ( <  300 m a.s.l.) land surface area. PeRL waterbodies with sizes of 1. 0 × 106 m2 down to 1. 0 × 102 m2 contributed up to 21 % to the total water fraction. Waterbody density ranged from 1. 0 × 10 to 9. 4 × 101 km−2. Ponds are the dominant waterbody type by number in all landscapes representing 45–99 % of the total waterbody number. The implementation of PeRL size distributions in land surface models will greatly improve the investigation and projection of surface inundation and carbon fluxes in permafrost lowlands. Waterbody maps

  18. Development stages of hazardous mountain lakes and simulation of their outbursts (Central Caucasus, Russia; Sichuan mountain region, China).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidyaeva, Vera; Krylenko, Inna; Chernomorets, Sergey; Petrakov, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    The importance of mountain lakes studies is related to the increasing threat of natural disasters, associated with lake outbursts and debris flows formation, because of population growth on exposed areas. The outburst hazard has not been sufficiently researched, there is a lack of data because of the lakes inaccessibility and remote sensing data is usually not detailed enough. The main scientific topics include assessment of outburst possibility and further simulation of possible outbursts scenarios. There are two types of mountain lakes: glacial (cirque, cirque-moraine, barrier-moraine, glacial-barrier, etc.) lakes and barrier (landslide, rockfall, debris flow, etc.) lakes. The first type was studied in the Central Caucasus (Russia), and the second type - in the Sichuan mountain region (China). The group of scientists, including authors, has been monitoring glacial lakes in the Mnt. Elbrus area for more than ten years. The unique data were collected, including detailed hydrological characteristics of more than ten lakes (water level dynamics, temperature, morphometrical characteristics, water balance components, etc.). Outbursts of at least three glacial lakes were observed. Hydrological characteristics of landslide Tangjiashan Lake were collected with Chinese colleagues during field studies in 2010 and 2011 years. Analysis of the collected data was used to understand the outburst mechanisms, formation factors, dam breaking factors, development stages of mountain lakes. Statistical methods of analysis in this case can be applied with some limitations because of the lack of sufficient monitoring objects, and therefore the results has been verified by experts. All types of possible outbursts mechanisms were divided by the authors into five groups: geomorphologic (caused by changes in lake dams), seismic, or geodynamic (caused by seiches, waves from rockfalls, landslides), glacial (caused by breaks in impounding glaciers, ice floating and melting), water

  19. Crystalline rocks of the Lake Superior region, United States. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, W.; Sood, M.; Flower, M.; Tisue, M.

    1983-10-01

    This report is a compendium of the available information on exposed crystalline rocks in the Lake Superior region (Wisconsin, Minnesota, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan). The report provides background information to assist in evaluating the suitability of these crystalline rock bodies for isolating high-level radioactive waste. For each crystalline rock body or complex greater than approximately 78 km/sup 2/ (30 mi/sup 2/) in area, information is presented on size, shape, location, relative and absolute age, origin, petrography, rock structure, and geophysics. Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Lake Superior region are predominantly tonalite to granite in composition in the Archean; granodiorite and granite, with subordinate tonalite, in the early Proterozoic; and alkalic syenite, rapakivi granite, and layered gabbro-troctolite-anorthosite in the Middle Proterozoic. Vertical and horizontal movements, regional and thermal metamorphism, deformation, and intrusion are evident in the region. Based on radiometric ages, three major episodes of orogenic/igneous activity are recognized: Algoman (approx. 2650 My), Penokean (approx. 1850 My), and Keweenawan (900 to 1200 My). Anorogenic magmatism approximately 1500 My ago also played an important role, particularly in Wisconsin. References, 66 figures, 10 tables.

  20. Mercury in the Great Lakes region: bioaccumulation, spatiotemporal patterns, ecological risks, and policy.

    PubMed

    Evers, David C; Wiener, James G; Basu, Niladri; Bodaly, R A; Morrison, Heather A; Williams, Kathryn A

    2011-10-01

    This special issue examines bioaccumulation and risks of methylmercury in food webs, fish and wildlife in the Laurentian Great Lakes region of North America, and explores mercury policy in the region and elsewhere in the United States and Canada. A total of 35 papers emanated from a bi-national synthesis of multi-media data from monitoring programs and research investigations on mercury in aquatic and terrestrial biota, a 3-year effort involving more than 170 scientists and decision-makers from 55 different universities, non-governmental organizations, and governmental agencies. Over 290,000 fish mercury data points were compiled from monitoring programs and research investigations. The findings from this scientific synthesis indicate that (1) mercury remains a pollutant of major concern in the Great Lakes region, (2) that the scope and intensity of the problem is greater than previously recognized and (3) that after decades of declining mercury levels in fish and wildlife concentrations are now increasing in some species and areas. While the reasons behind these shifting trends require further study, they also underscore the need to identify information gaps and expand monitoring efforts to better track progress. This will be particularly important as new pollution prevention measures are implemented, as global sources increase, and as the region faces changing environmental conditions.

  1. Atmospheric processes of organic pollutants over a remote lake on the central Tibetan Plateau: implications for regional cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Chuanfei; Gong, Ping; Yao, Tandong

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric processes (air-surface exchange, and atmospheric deposition and degradation) are crucial for understanding the global cycling and fate of organic pollutants (OPs). However, such assessments over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) remain uncertain. More than 50 % of Chinese lakes are located on the TP, which exerts a remarkable influence on the regional water, energy, and chemical cycling. In this study, air and water samples were simultaneously collected in Nam Co, a large lake on the TP, to test whether the lake is a secondary source or sink of OPs. Lower concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were observed in the atmosphere and lake water of Nam Co, while the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were relatively higher. Results of fugacity ratios and chiral signatures both suggest that the lake acted as the net sink of atmospheric hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), following their long-range transport driven by the Indian monsoon. Different behaviours were observed in the PAHs, which primarily originated from local biomass burning. Acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, and fluorene showed volatilization from the lake to the atmosphere, while other PAHs were deposited into the lake due to the integrated deposition process (wet/dry and air-water gas deposition) and limited atmospheric degradation. As the dominant PAH compound, phenanthrene exhibited a seasonal reversal of air-water gas exchange, which was likely related to the melting of the lake ice in May. The annual input of HCHs from the air to the entire lake area (2015 km2) was estimated as 1.9 kg yr-1, while input estimated for 15PAHs can potentially reach up to 550 kg yr-1. This study highlights the significance of PAH deposition on the regional carbon cycling in the oligotrophic lakes of the TP.

  2. Response of sediment calcium and magnesium species to the regional acid deposition in eutrophic Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yu; Dan, Dai; Chengda, He; Qiujin, Xu; Fengchang, Wu

    2016-11-01

    Acid deposition causes carbonate dissolution in watersheds and leads to profound impacts on water chemistry of lakes. Here, we presented a detailed study on the seasonal, spatial, and vertical variations of calcium and magnesium species in the overlying water, interstitial water, and sediment profiles in eutrophic Taihu Lake under the circumstance of regional acid deposition. The result showed that both the acid deposition and biomineralization in Taihu Lake had effects on Ca and Mg species. In the lake water, calcium carbonate was saturated or over-saturated based on long-term statistical calculation of the saturation index (SI). On the sediment profiles, significant difference in Ca and Mg species existed between the surface sediment (0-10 cm) and deeper sediments (>10 cm). The interstitial water Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), ion-exchangeable Ca and Mg in the surface sediment were higher than those in the deeper sediment. In the spring, when the acid deposition is more intensive, the acid-extracted Ca and Mg in the surface sediment were lower than that in the deeper sediment in the northwest lake, due to carbonate dissolution caused by the regional acid deposition. Spatially, the higher concentration of acid-extracted Ca and Mg in the northwest surface sediment than that in the east lake was observed, indicating the pronounced carbonate biomineralization by algae bloom in the northwest lake. Statistical analysis showed that acid deposition exerted a stronger impact on the variation of acid-extracted Ca and Mg in the surface sediment than the biomineralization in Taihu Lake. For the total Ca and Mg concentration in the spring, however, no significant change between the surface and deeper sediment in the northwest lake was observed, indicating that the carbonate precipitation via biomineralization and the carbonate dissolution due to acidic deposition were in a dynamic balance. These features are of major importance for the understanding of combined effects of acid

  3. Late-Post-Glacial Tilt of the Lake Ladoga - Gulf of Finland Region and Rheology Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amantov, Aleksey; Amantova, Marina; Fjeldskaar, Willy

    2017-04-01

    Numerous Earth rheology models attempt to explain features of late- and post-glacial isostatic adjustment of Fennoscandia. An area of specific interest is the peripheral areas to the former ice sheet. We used geological-geomorphological observations of relevant elements of the Lake Ladoga - Eastern Gulf of Finland for verification of our modeling studies. New revised glaciation- deglaciation were tested together with thin ice model scenario, with only 10-11 000 years total last ice-age duration on largest highs. On this basis we expect an uplift pattern which differ from what is generally usually assumed, with more distinct northern trend eastward from the Ladoga basin, and subsidence in the Lake Onega region. Hydro-isostasy (HI) was a very noticeable factor in the post-glacial adjustment, both in local and regional scale. The local one is connected with water load changes of the Baltic-Ladoga system. Its details are extremely important for the verification of Earth rheology parameters. Gulf of Finland and Ladoga regions have probably experienced several dramatic water level changes, and expected HI pattern was sophisticated. In the modeling we have incorporated drops of large local ice lakes. Another one due to ice sheet retreat in Sweden probably happened 13000 cal. BP, with smaller influence due to posterior readvance and Baltic Ice Lake water rise untill the final drop at 11600 cal. BP. The minimum water level in the region from the model culminated 10800 cal. BP, with expected extensive dry land areas in south-eastern parts of the basin. Ancyllus Lake transgression could have two peaks, with another deep level fall in both separated basins at culmination of Baltic Ancyllus Lake regression 8700-8900 cal. BP. This could be synchronous with the known most pronounced largest sea level fall in Great Lakes of North America, being also caused by global climatic changes. Final dramatic changes influenced south-eastern Ladoga, with transgression and final drop took

  4. Regional-scale analysis of lake outburst hazards in the southwestern Pamir, Tajikistan, based on remote sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergili, M.; Schneider, J. F.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the hazards emanating from the sudden drainage of alpine lakes in South-Western Tajik Pamir. In the last 40 yr, several new lakes have formed in the front of retreating glacier tongues, and existing lakes have grown. Other lakes are dammed by landslide deposits or older moraines. In 2002, sudden drainage of a glacial lake in the area triggered a catastrophic debris flow. Building on existing approaches, a rating scheme was devised allowing quick, regional-scale identification of potentially hazardous lakes and possible impact areas. This approach relies on GIS, remote sensing and empirical modelling, largely based on medium-resolution international datasets. Out of the 428 lakes mapped in the area, 6 were rated very hazardous and 34 hazardous. This classification was used for the selection of lakes requiring in-depth investigation. Selected cases are presented and discussed in order to understand the potentials and limitations of the approach used. Such an understanding is essential for the appropriate application of the methodology for risk mitigation purposes.

  5. A synthesis of thermokarst lake water balance in high-latitude regions of North America from isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Lauren A.; Wolfe, Brent B.; Turner, Kevin W.; Anderson, Lesleigh; Arp, Christopher D.; Birks, Jean; Bouchard, Frédéric; Edwards, Thomas W.D.; Farquharson, Nicole; Hall, Roland I.; McDonald, Ian; Narancic, Biljana; Ouimet, Chantal; Pienitz, Reinhard; Tondu, Jana; White, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies utilizing remote sensing imagery and other methods have documented that thermokarst lakes are undergoing varied hydrological transitions in response to recent climate changes, from surface area expansion to drainage and evaporative desiccation. Here, we provide a synthesis of hydrological conditions for 376 lakes of mainly thermokarst origin across high-latitude North America. We assemble surface water isotope compositions measured during the past decade at five lake-rich landscapes including Arctic Coastal Plain (Alaska), Yukon Flats (Alaska), Old Crow Flats (Yukon), northwestern Hudson Bay Lowlands (Manitoba), and Nunavik (Quebec). These landscapes represent the broad range of thermokarst environments by spanning gradients in meteorological, permafrost, and vegetation conditions. An isotope framework was established based on flux-weighted long-term averages of meteorological conditions for each lake to quantify water balance metrics. The isotope composition of source water and evaporation-to-inflow ratio for each lake were determined, and the results demonstrated a substantial array of regional and subregional diversity of lake hydrological conditions. Controls on lake water balance and how these vary among the five landscapes and with differing environmental drivers are assessed. Findings reveal that lakes in the Hudson Bay Lowlands are most vulnerable to evaporative desiccation, whereas those in Nunavik are most resilient. However, we also identify the complexity in predicting hydrological responses of these thermokarst landscapes to future climate change.

  6. State and regional water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of Michigan's inland lakes, 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, L.M.; Minnerick, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality are jointly monitoring selected water-quality constituents of inland lakes through 2015 as part of Michigan’s Lake Water Quality Assessment program. During 2001–2005, 433 lake basins from 364 inland lakes were monitored for baseline water-quality conditions and trophic status. This report summarizes the water-quality characteristics and trophic conditions of those monitored lake basins throughout the State. Regional variation of water quality in lake basins was examined by grouping on the basis of the five Omernik level III ecoregions within Michigan. Concentrations of most constituents measured were significantly different between ecoregions. Less regional variation of phosphorus concentrations was noted between Northern Lakes and Forests (50) and North Central Hardwoods (51) ecoregions during summer possibly because water samples were collected when lake productivity was high; hence the utilization of the limited amount of phosphorus by algae and macrophytes may have resulted in the more uniform concentrations between these two ecoregions. Concentrations of common ions (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate) measured in the spring typically were higher in the Michigan southern Lower Peninsula in the Eastern Corn Belt Plains (55), Southern Michigan/Northern Indiana Drift Plains (56), and Huron/Erie Lake Plains (57) ecoregions. Most ions whose concentrations were less than the minimum reporting levels or were nondetectable were from lakes in the Michigan northern Lower Peninsula and the Upper Peninsula in the Northern Lakes and Forests (50) and North Central Hardwoods (51) ecoregions. Chlorophyll a concentrations followed a similar distribution pattern. Measured properties such as pH and specific conductance (indicative of dissolved solids) also showed a regional relation. The lakes with the lowest pH and specific conductance were generally in the western

  7. Manganese reduction by microbes from oxic regions of the Lake Vanda (Antarctica) water column

    SciTech Connect

    Bratina, B.J.; Stevenson, B.S.; Schmidt, T.M.; Green, W.J.

    1998-10-01

    Depth profiles of metals in Lake Vanda, a permanently ice-covered, stratified Antarctic lake, suggest the importance of particulate manganese oxides in the scavenging, transport, and release of metals. Since manganese oxides can be solubilized by manganese-reducing bacteria, microbially mediated manganese reduction was investigated in Lake Vanda. Microbes concentrated from oxic regions of the water column, encompassing a peak of soluble manganese [Mn(II)], reduced synthetic manganese oxides (MnO{sub 2}) when incubated aerobically, Pure cultures of manganese-reducing bacteria were readily isolated from waters collected near the oxic Mn(II) peak. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, most of the isolated manganese reducers belong to the genus Carnobacterium. Cultures of a phylogenetically representative strain of Carnobacterium reduced synthetic MnO{sub 2} in the presence of sodium azide, as was seen in field assays. Unlike anaerobes that utilize manganese oxides as terminal electron acceptors in respiration, isolates of the genus Carnobacterium reduced Mn(IV) via a diffusible compound under oxic conditions. The release of adsorbed trace metals accompanying the solubilization of manganese oxides may provide populations of Carnobacterium with a source of nutrients in this extremely oligotrophic environment.

  8. How Do the Laurentian Great Lakes Water Levels Respond to Climate Change? A Regional Climate Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, V.; Notaro, M.; Vavrus, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes contain twenty percent of the world's surface freshwater. Over the past century, inter-annual water levels have fluctuated in a primarily cyclic pattern with amplitudes from 0.2 m in Lake Superior to 0.7 m in Lake Erie. These changes in water levels result in more significant changes in coastlines of the Great Lakes and alter shoreline erosion, pollutant concentrations, and shoreline habitat. As climate changes, we are interested in how lake levels will respond. Global scale climate models do not depict the Great Lakes, and thus, are unlikely to accurately capture the mechanisms impacting water levels. We utilize the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model 4 at 20 km horizontal resolution with an improved, explicit lake model, a groundwater module, and a channel routing model. We simulate the past regional climate (1978-present) using NCEP Reanalysis to evaluate model performance and biases. We then simulate present and future water levels using boundary conditions from the global Community Climate System Model. Model evaluation and preliminary findings for future water levels will be presented.

  9. An investigation of source-receptor relationships for atmospheric mercury in the Great Lakes region using receptor modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Janet M.

    The Great Lakes Atmospheric Mercury Assessment Project (GLAMAP) was begun in 1994 to obtain a region-wide assessment of the spatial and temporal trends in atmospheric mercury levels for the Great Lakes region. The GLAMAP database included two years of concurrent gas- and particle-phase mercury measurements, as well as particulate trace element concentrations, from 10 rural monitoring sites across the entire Great Lakes region. Spatial differences in atmospheric mercury levels were observed between the GLAMAP sites. Average gas-phase mercury concentrations for the two-year study period differed by 25% across the Great Lakes region (1.63-2.03 ng/m3) and average particle-phase mercury levels differed by nearly a factor of three (8.7-24.5 pg/m3). Concentrations of both gas- and particle- phase mercury were higher on average at sites located in the eastern and southern parts of the Great Lakes region. Seasonal trends were also observed, with higher concentrations of gas-phase mercury during the spring and higher particle-phase concentrations during the winter. Receptor modeling techniques were used to investigate the meteorological and source-related influences that contributed to these trends. Above average concentrations of gas- and particle-phase mercury were associated with specific synoptic-scale meteorological conditions. In addition, air mass transport from anthropogenic source areas within the Great Lakes region was associated with the highest levels of gas- and particle-phase mercury at the GLAMAP sites. The impact of these anthropogenic source areas on atmospheric mercury concentrations within the region was quantified using a hybrid-receptor model that combined air mass trajectories with measured levels at the receptor sites. The model results confirmed that air mass transport from the major urban/industrial areas of the Great Lakes region, as well as the upper and lower Ohio River valley areas, contributed to above average concentrations of both gas- and

  10. Lake Ice Cover of Shallow Lakes and Climate Interactions in Arctic Regions (1950-2011): SAR Data Analysis and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdu, C.; Duguay, C.; Brown, L.; Fernàndez-Prieto, D.; Samuelsson, P.

    2012-12-01

    Lake ice cover is highly correlated with climatic conditions and has, therefore, been demonstrated to be an essential indicator of climate variability and change. Recent studies have shown that the duration of the lake ice cover has decreased, mainly as a consequence of earlier thaw dates in many parts of the Northern Hemisphere over the last 50 years, mainly as a feedback to increased winter and spring air temperature. In response to projected air temperature and winter precipitation changes by climate models until the end of the 21st century, the timing, duration, and thickness of ice cover on Arctic lakes are expected to be impacted. This, in turn, will likely alter the energy, water, and bio-geochemical cycling in various regions of the Arctic. In the case of shallow tundra lakes, many of which are less than 3-m deep, warmer climate conditions could result in a smaller fraction of lakes that fully freeze to the bottom at the time of maximum winter ice thickness since thinner ice covers are predicted to develop. Shallow thermokarst lakes of the coastal plain of northern Alaska, and of other similar Arctic regions, have likely been experiencing changes in seasonal ice phenology and thickness over the last few decades but these have not yet been comprehensively documented. Analysis of a 20-year time series of ERS-1/2 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data and numerical lake ice modeling were employed to determine the response of ice cover (thickness, freezing to bed, and phenology) on shallow lakes of the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) to climate conditions over the last three decades. New downscaled data specific to the Arctic domain (at a resolution of 0.44 degrees using ERA Interim Reanalysis as boundary condition) produced by the Rossby Centre Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RCA4) was used to drive the Canadian Lake Ice Model (CLIMo) for the period 1950-2011. In order to assess and integrate the SAR-derived observed changes into a longer historical context, and

  11. Investigating the Seismicity and Stress Field of the Truckee -- Lake Tahoe Region, California -- Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Tyler

    The Lake Tahoe basin is located in a transtensional environment defined by east-dipping range--bounding normal faults, northeast--trending sinistral, and northwest-trending dextral strike-slip faults in the northern Walker Lane deformation belt. This region accommodates as much as 10 mm/yr of dextral shear between the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range proper, or about 20% of Pacific-North American plate motion. There is abundant seismicity north of Lake Tahoe through the Truckee, California region as opposed to a lack of seismicity associated with the primary normal faults in the Tahoe basin (i.e., West Tahoe fault). This seismicity study is focused on the structural transition zone from north-striking east-dipping Sierran Range bounding normal faults into the northern Walker Lane right-lateral strike-slip domain. Relocations of earthquakes between 2000-2013 are performed by initially applying HYPOINVERSE mean sea level datum and station corrections to produce higher confidence absolute locations as input to HYPODD. HYPODD applies both phase and cross-correlation times for a final set of 'best' event relocations. Relocations of events in the upper brittle crust clearly align along well-imaged, often intersecting, high-angle structures of limited lateral extent. In addition, the local stress field is modeled from 679 manually determined short-period focal mechanism solutions, between 2000 and 2013, located within a fairly dense local seismic network. Short-period focal mechanisms were developed with the HASH algorithm and moment tensor solutions using long-period surface waves and the MTINV code. Resulting solutions show a 9:1 ratio of strike-slip to normal mechanisms in the transition zone study area. Stress inversions using the application SATSI (USGS Spatial And Temporal Stress Inversion) generally show a T-axis oriented primarily E-W that also rotates about 30 degrees counterclockwise, from a WNW-ESE trend to ENE-WSW, moving west to east across the California

  12. New geophysical models related to heat sources in the geysers-clear lake region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, W.D.; Blakely, R.J.; ,

    1993-01-01

    We present an updated view of the geological and geophysical complexities of the upper crust in The Geysers-Clear Lake region in order to provide additional information regarding local structures and possible heat sources. New models and ideal-body analysis of the gravity data, new electromagnetic sounding models, and arguments made from other geophysical data sets suggest that many of the geophysical anomalies may be significantly affected by rock-property and physical-state variations in the upper 7 km, and not just to 'magma' at greater depths. We developed the new geophysical models in order to better understand constraints on the location of magma bodies.

  13. Carbon budget in agroecosystems on gray forest soils in the Lake Baikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubnina, E. V.; Pomazkina, L. V.

    2007-05-01

    The carbon budget in agroecosystems with spring wheat was studied in long-term (1997 2004) field experiments on gray forest soils in the forest-steppe of the Lake Baikal region, including soils polluted with the fluorides emitted by an aluminum plant. Pollution was revealed to increase the deficit in the carbon budget due to the more intense mineralization of organic matter and CO2 emission from the soils. Raising of the crops’ productivity upon permanent application of fertilizers may provide maintenance of a positive carbon budget.

  14. Birth outcomes across three rural-urban typologies in the Finger Lakes region of New York.

    PubMed

    Strutz, Kelly L; Dozier, Ann M; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Glantz, J Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The study is a descriptive, population-based analysis of birth outcomes in the New York State Finger Lakes region designed to determine whether perinatal outcomes differed across 3 rural typologies. Hospital birth data for the Finger Lakes region from 2006 to 2007 were used to identify births classified as low birthweight (LBW), small for gestational age (SGA), and preterm delivery (PTD). Maternal residences were defined using 3 existing ZIP code-level rural-urban typologies: Census Bureau ZIP codes, Rural-Urban Commuting Area codes, and Primary Service Areas. Within each typology, rural maternal characteristics and birth outcomes were compared to those in urban areas using multivariable logistic regression models. In bivariate analyses, rurality was associated with LBW and SGA for all typologies, whereas PTD was associated with residence in the Census Bureau typology only. After controlling for demographic characteristics, births to mothers in the most rural level of the Census Bureau typology and to all rural mothers in the Rural-Urban Commuting Area (RUCA) and Primary Service Area typologies were more likely to be LBW and PTD. SGA was not consistently associated with residence across typologies. The typologies produced similar results for these outcomes, although effects were of greater magnitude in the RUCA and Primary Service Area typologies than in the Census Bureau typology. Comparison across typologies can have practical implications for researchers and policy makers interested in understanding the dynamics of rurality and birth outcomes in their regions. © 2011 National Rural Health Association.

  15. Birth Outcomes Across Three Rural-Urban Typologies in the Finger Lakes Region of New York

    PubMed Central

    Strutz, Kelly L.; Dozier, Ann M.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Glantz, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The study is a descriptive, population-based analysis of birth outcomes in the New York State Finger Lakes region designed to determine whether perinatal outcomes differed across 3 rural typologies. Methods Hospital birth data for the Finger Lakes region from 2006-2007 were used to identify births classified as low birthweight (LBW), small for gestational age (SGA), and preterm delivery (PTD). Maternal residences were defined using 3 existing zip-code-level rural-urban typologies: Census Bureau zip codes, Rural-Urban Commuting Area codes, and Primary Service Areas. Within each typology, rural maternal characteristics and birth outcomes were compared to those in urban areas using multivariable logistic regression models. Findings In bivariate analyses, rurality was associated with LBW and SGA for all typologies, while PTD was associated with residence in the Census Bureau typology only. After controlling for demographic characteristics, births to mothers in the most rural level of the Census Bureau typology and to all rural mothers in the RUCA and Primary Service Area typologies were more likely to be LBW and PTD. SGA was not consistently associated with residence across typologies. Conclusions The typologies produced similar results for these outcomes, although effects were of greater magnitude in the RUCA and Primary Service Area typologies than in the Census Bureau typology. Comparison across typologies can have practical implications for researchers and policy makers interested in understanding the dynamics of rurality and birth outcomes in their regions. PMID:22458317

  16. Drying out the Nile? Regional Climate Change and Water Resources in East Africa with a focus on Lake Victoria and Lake Tana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, Ruth; Fox Maule, Cathrine; Thejll, Peter; Stendel, Martin; Drews, Martin; Davies, Sarah; Lamb, Henry

    2014-05-01

    The East African lakes Victoria and Tana are important local water resources for agriculture, fisheries and hydropower; they are also the main sources of the Nile. In this study we focus on the evaporative and evapotranspirative regimes of the hydrological basins for Lakes Tana and Victoria to determine how regional climate change under the A1B scenario is likely to affect the local and regional hydrology. We show results from a very high resolution (10km) simulation, where the state-of-the-art regional climate model (RCM) HIRHAM5 was driven by the global circulation model (GCM) ECHAM5 under the A1B scenario. Three time-slices have been investigated for present day (1980-1999), mid-century (2046-2065) and end of the 21st century (2080-2099) periods. Our analysis includes a comparison with a coarser 0.44o (~50 km) resolution run which demonstrates the importance of using high resolution (10km or higher) in RCM studies of this type to correctly simulate the seasonal and geographical characteristics of the present day east African monsoon system. The projections also indicate that climate change under the intermediate SRES A1B scenario is expected to cause more frequent failures of the East African rains with important consequences for the region and for the hydrology of the East African Lakes. This work introduces the proposed DACEA (Drivers of Aridity Change in East Africa) project which aims to investigate regional and global teleconnections that affect aridity in East Africa. Future work will combine climate palaeoproxies from Lake Tana and Lake Victoria with model experiments carried out with the EC-Earth coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model and downscaled to very high resolution with the RCM HIRHAM5 to determine regional and global scale influences on the African monsoon system. The HIRHAM5 simulations will be dynamically coupled to a regional hydrological model based on MIKE SHE, to evaluate the consequences and the feedback from the regional

  17. Land use in the lake states region: an analysis of past trends and projections of future changes.

    Treesearch

    Thomas E. Mauldin; Andrew J. Plantinga; Ralph J. Alig

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the historic trends and future projections of forest, farm, and urban land uses for the Lake States of Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Since the 1950s, forest and farm land have been decreasing, and urban and other land uses have been increasing throughout the Lake States. Forest, crop, and pasture land have decreased in the region by 3.2, 5.4...

  18. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Mercury Accumulation in Lacustrine Sediments Across the Laurentian Great Lakes Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from 103 sediment cores from the Great Lakes and inland lakes of the Great Lakes airshed were compiled to examine and provide a synthesis of patterns of historical and recent changes in mercury (Hg) deposition. Limited data from the lower Laurentian Great Lakes shows a lega...

  19. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Mercury Accumulation in Lacustrine Sediments Across the Laurentian Great Lakes Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from 103 sediment cores from the Great Lakes and inland lakes of the Great Lakes airshed were compiled to examine and provide a synthesis of patterns of historical and recent changes in mercury (Hg) deposition. Limited data from the lower Laurentian Great Lakes shows a lega...

  20. Abrupt lake-level changes in the Rocky Mountains and surrounding regions since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, B. N.; Serravezza, M.

    2016-12-01

    The paleohydrologic record of western North America since the last glacial maximum reveals a wide range of hydroclimatic variability and distinctive patterns associated with abrupt climate changes. To evaluate the sequence of abrupt hydroclimatic shifts and centennial-to-millennial hydrologic variability in western North America over the past 17 ka, we reconstruct lake-level histories from two high-elevation lakes in the Beartooth and Bighorn Mountains. The lakes represent the headwaters of the Missouri River drainage in northern Wyoming, but also have the potential to capture regional hydroclimate variability that links the northern Rocky Mountains to the mid-continent, Pacific Northwest, and the Great Basin. We first discuss the stratigraphic record of lake-level changes in small mid-latitude lakes and then use ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and sediment cores to track the elevations of shoreline sediments within the lakes through time. We compare the stratigraphies to the records from four other lakes in Wyoming and Colorado, and find widespread evidence for a Terminal Pleistocene Drought from 15-11 ka, an early Holocene humid period from 11-8 ka, and a period of severe mid-Holocene aridity from 8-5.7 ka. The northern Wyoming lakes also provide evidence of high levels before ca. 15 ka, including rapid hydroclimatic changes at ca. 16.8 ka during Heinrich Event 1. We place the changes in a broad context by summarizing and mapping water-level changes from 107 additional, previously studied lakes. Important patterns include 1) extensive drying across the western U.S. after 15 ka; 2) coherent sub-regional differences during the Younger Dryas and Pleistocene-Holocene transition; 3) a north-south contrast from 9-6 ka consistent with a northward shift in storm tracks as the influence of the Laurentide Ice Sheet diminished; and 4) rapid increases in effective moisture across much of western North America from 6-4 ka.

  1. Postglacial uplift of the eastern Gulf of Finland-Lake Ladoga region: models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amantov, Aleksey; Fjeldskaar, Willy; Amantova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The eastern Gulf of Finland - Lake Ladoga region - is at the peripheral part of the Fennoscandian post-glacial uplift. We compared different modeling results for this region with observations, including our revision of geomorphological traces of paleo shorelevel. As in many parts of the general Baltic-White Sea bedrock lowland at the margin of the Fennoscandian Shield, the bedrock landscape was modified by glaciers, but it was also the major controlling factor for the history of glacial grows and decays. First-order landforms of this segment are: Lake Ladoga-Lake Ilmen lowland, Lembolovo High of the Karelic Isthmus and Neva-Gulf of Finland lowland. The range of the bedrock topography is close to 350 m. The landforms reflect different glacial behavior during stadials, with fast movement and strong erosion in northern Ladoga, but passive motion and accumulation around Lembolovo High. The differences influenced the ice sheet and deglaciation history. The shore level displacements in this area are slightly different than westwards in the Baltic area; the shoreline tilts are usually lower in southern-central part of the eastern Gulf of Finland-lake Ladoga region. For example, the shoreline tilts at 11 600 BP in the Baltic Ice Lake in the south-east range from 0.55 to 0.31 m/km. The slope of the Ancylus shoreline varies from 0.12 to 0.18 m/km, increasing to almost the double in the north-western area. Similarly, the Littorina shore level is tilted only 0.08 m/km, rising to 0.14 m/km in the north-west. We have used this data in our high resolution modeling involving glacial isostasy, hydro isostasy, sediment isostasy, and gravity field changes. The mopdeling is based on Earth rheology model with a low-viscosity asthenosphere of thickness less than 150 km and viscosity less than 7.0x10**19 Pa s above a mantle of viscosity 10**21 Pa s, and an effective elastic lithosphere thickness of 30-40 km (flexural rigidity 10**24 Nm). The specific uplift features in the area are

  2. Source of nitrogen in wet deposition to a rice agroecosystem at Tai lake region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yingxin; Xiong, Zhengqin; Xing, Guangxi; Yan, Xiaoyuan; Shi, Shulian; Sun, Guoqing; Zhu, Zhaoliang

    Nitrogen (N) in wet deposition can provide significant nutrients to algae, which potentially contributes to eutrophication in waterbodies, and to nutrient surplus of rice-wheat crops in the Tai lake region, Jiangsu Province, China. Quantifying the N compounds in wet deposition and determining their sources is important to understand how to control eutrophication in lakes and to improve recommendations for fertilizer use. In this study, the concentrations of inorganic N, molar ratios of NH 4+/NO 3- and the natural 15N abundance of NH 4+ ( δ15NH 4+) in wet deposition were determined for 78 precipitation events between June 2003 and July 2005. Samples were collected at two sites in Tai lake region, a watershed rice agroecosystem currently experiencing eutrophication. The average N wet deposition amounted to 27 kg N ha -1 yr -1, with 60% in the form of NH 4+. Annually, two cycles of depleted and enriched δ15NH 4+ indicate the shifting of main source of NH 3 volatilization between chemical fertilizer and excreta of local residents and domestic animals, surface waters, and other organic N. The peak in NH 4+/NO 3- ratio, coupled with depleted δ15NH 4+ in mid-June, coincided with the rice-transplanting period, which is indicative of surplus fertilizer application. Enriched δ15NH 4+ values in August-October and in April-May were indicative of enhanced emissions from excreta and polluted waterbodies in the warmer seasons. Findings suggest that δ15NH 4+ could be used to indicate the sources of NH 3 volatilization, and the NH 4+/NO 3- ratio to indicate the intensity of wet N deposition.

  3. Charcoal dispersion and deposition in boreal lakes from 3 years of monitoring: Differences between local and regional fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oris, France; Ali, Adam A.; Asselin, Hugo; Paradis, Laure; Bergeron, Yves; Finsinger, Walter

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of long-distance transport of charcoal particles on the detection of local wildfires from lake sediment sequences, we tracked three consecutive years of charcoal deposition into traps set within seven boreal lakes in northeastern Canada. Peaks in macroscopic charcoal accumulation (>150 µm) were linked to both local (inside the watershed) and regional wildfires. However, regional fires were characterized by higher proportions of small particles (<0.1 mm2) in charcoal assemblages. We conclude that the analysis of particle size distribution is useful to discriminate "true" local fires from regional wildfires.

  4. Automated Lake Ice Classification of Dual Polarization RADARSAT-2 SAR Imagery with the Iterative Region Growing using Semantics Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, M.; Duguay, C. R.; Clausi, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Changes to the timing and duration of ice cover on lakes throughout the northern landscape has been established as a strong indicator of climate change and variability, which is expected to have implications for both human and environmental systems. In addition, monitoring the extent and timing of ice cover is also required to allow for more reliable weather forecasting across lake-rich northern latitudes. Currently the Canadian Ice Service (CIS) monitors over 130 lakes using RADARSAT-2 SAR (synthetic aperture radar) and optical imagery. These images are visually interpreted, with lake ice cover reported weekly as a fraction out of ten. An automated method of classifying ice and water in SAR scenes would allow for more detailed records of lake ice extent to be delivered operationally. The Vision and Image Processing lab at University of Waterloo has developed a software system called MAGIC (MAp Guided Ice Classification) which allows for automated classification of SAR scenes. This tool offers the Iterative Region Growing using Semantics (IRGS) algorithm which has been successfully tested in the classification of SAR scenes of sea ice with up to 96% accuracy. The IRGS algorithm separates homogeneous regions in an image using a hierarchical watershed approach, then merges like regions into classes. These classes are labeled using a support vector machine classifier, employing SAR gray-level co-occurrence backscatter and texture features. In this study, we have used the MAGIC system to classify ice and water in dual-polarization RADARSAT-2 scenes of Great Slave Lake and Lake Winnipeg during both freeze-up and break-up periods. An accuracy assessment has been performed on the classification results, comparing outcomes from MAGIC with user generated reference data and the CIS weekly fraction reported at the time of image acquisition. The results demonstrate the potential of the MAGIC system to quickly and accurately provide detailed lake ice cover information for

  5. Soil occupation and atmospheric variations over Sobradinho Lake area. Part two: a regional modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, M. F.; da Silva Dias, M. A. F.; da Silva Aragão, M. R.

    2006-11-01

    The impact of the changes on soil cover and land use brought about by the construction of the Sobradinho Dam in the semi-arid region of the São Francisco River Hydrographic Basin is analyzed by means of a numerical model RAMS. Disregarding the influence of a large scale flow, a set of factors were responsible for the creation of a rather complex circulation system that includes mountain-valley winds, lake breeze (LB) and non-conventional circulation all induced by the surface non-homogeneous aspect. Results have demonstrated that the implementation of works of such magnitude brings about environmental changes in an area that stretches far beyond the surroundings of the reservoir. The soil cover alterations due to the ever increasing development of the area with the presence of irrigated crops in a sparsely vegetated region ( caatinga) does affect land surface characteristics, occasioning for that matter the splitting of the available energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes. LB behavior varies in accordance with atmospheric conditions and also in view of the type of vegetation found in the lake surrounding areas. Hydro availability in root zones, even under adverse atmospheric conditions (high temperature and low air humidity) brings up the high rates of evaporation and plant transpiration that contribute towards the increase of humidity and the fall of temperature in lower atmospheric layers.

  6. Analysis of long-term forest bird monitoring data from national forests of the western Great Lakes Region

    Treesearch

    Gerald J. Niemi; Robert W. Howe; Brian R. Sturtevant; Linda R. Parker; Alexis R. Grinde; Nicholas P. Danz; Mark D. Nelson; Edmund J. Zlonis; Nicholas G. Walton; Erin E. Gnass Giese; Sue M. Lietz

    2016-01-01

    Breeding bird communities in forests of the western Great Lakes region are among the most diverse in North America, but the forest environment in this region has changed dramatically during the past 150 years. To address concerns about loss of biodiversity due to ongoing forest harvesting and to better inform forest planning, researchers have systematically monitored...

  7. Climate and climate variability of the wind power resources in the Great Lakes region of the United States

    Treesearch

    X. Li; S. Zhong; X. Bian; W.E. Heilman

    2010-01-01

    The climate and climate variability of low-level winds over the Great Lakes region of the United States is examined using 30 year (1979-2008) wind records from the recently released North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), a three-dimensional, high-spatial and temporal resolution, and dynamically consistent climate data set. The analyses focus on spatial distribution...

  8. Regional differences in size-at-age of the recovering burbot (Lota lota) population in Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, M.A.; Madenjian, C.P.; Tost, J.

    2007-01-01

    The burbot Lota lota population in Lake Erie increased dramatically between 1995 and 2003, due mainly to control of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus, which began in the late 1980s. We estimated total length- and weight-at-age at capture for burbot caught in annual gillnet surveys of eastern Lake Erie during August 1994–2003. Mean total length was generally greater for burbot age 4–9 years that were caught in New York waters than in either Ontario or Pennsylvania waters of Lake Erie. Similarly, mean weight was greater for burbot at ages 4 through 6 years in New York waters than in either Ontario or Pennsylvania waters. Age-9 burbot caught in Ontario waters had greater mean weight and mean total length than did age-9 burbot caught in Pennsylvania waters. One possible explanation for greater length- and weight-at-age for New York burbot may be greater abundance of prey fishes, particularly rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax and round goby Neogobius melanostomus in New York waters. Total lengths at ages 4–10 years were generally greater for burbot caught in Lake Erie during 1994–2003 than those from published studies of other large lakes in North America that we considered, including for Lake Erie in 1946. The regional differences in size-at-age have important management ramifications, particularly because a commercial fishery targeting burbot has been considered for Ontario waters of Lake Erie.

  9. Responses of 20 lake-watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to historical and potential future acidic deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingtao; Driscoll, Charles T; Sullivan, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    Critical loads (CLs) and dynamic critical loads (DCLs) are important tools to guide the protection of ecosystems from air pollution. In order to quantify decreases in acidic deposition necessary to protect sensitive aquatic species, we calculated CLs and DCLs of sulfate (SO4(2-))+nitrate (NO3-) for 20 lake-watersheds from the Adirondack region of New York using the dynamic model, PnET-BGC. We evaluated lake water chemistry and fish and total zooplankton species richness in response to historical acidic deposition and under future deposition scenarios. The model performed well in simulating measured chemistry of Adirondack lakes. Current deposition of SO4(2-)+NO3-, calcium (Ca2+) weathering rate and lake acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in 1850 were related to the extent of historical acidification (1850-2008). Changes in lake Al3+ concentrations since the onset of acidic deposition were also related to Ca2+ weathering rate and ANC in 1850. Lake ANC and fish and total zooplankton species richness were projected to increase under hypothetical decreases in future deposition. However, model projections suggest that lake ecosystems will not achieve complete chemical and biological recovery in the future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Hydrologic Response of Watersheds to Urbanization Across the Upper Great Lakes Region, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Bowling, L.; Cherkauer, K.; Pijanowski, B.

    2007-12-01

    The Great Lakes region has experienced significant urbanization in the last century, resulting in a sharp increase in Impervious Surface Area (ISA). ISA is significantly different from the natural land cover in hydrological response, and has great potential influence on watershed hydrology. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model is employed to investigate the hydrological responses in urbanized watersheds in the Great Lakes region. Previously, VIC did not consider urban as a distinct land cover, either treating the developed areas as bare soil or removing them by rescaling vegetation area. In this study, a simple urban ¡°slab¡± algorithm has been added to the VIC model to make it suitable for the simulation of urbanized watersheds. Approximately 15 small watersheds with drainage areas between 10 to 150 square miles in the White River watershed (Indiana) that have experienced significant urbanization between 1983 and 2001 have been selected for analysis. The change in annual streamflow statistics (e.g. frequency change of high flow peaks and low flow events, and daily variation of streamflow) are examined from 1980 to 2003. Using 1983 and 2001 land cover maps of the White River watershed, the VIC model with urban ¡°slab¡± algorithm is evaluated by comparing the simulated change in discharge statistics due to land use with the observed change in the small watersheds. In addition, surface temperatures from the VIC model simulation are compared to MODIS surface temperature products to evaluate the ability of the ¡°slab¡± algorithm to represent urban heat islands. Subsequently, the feasibility of the predicted impact of increasing ISA to regional hydrological processes is investigated, including the change pattern of the Bowen Ratio for the White River watershed. The hydrologic impact of future land cover change is then quantified for other Great Lakes regional urban watersheds (e.g. the Detroit, Milwaukee and Illinois Rivers), utilizing a 2020 land

  11. Long-term recovery of lakes in the Adirondack region of New York to decreases in acidic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Kristin; Driscoll, Charles; Lynch, Jason; Newcomb, Dani; Roy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    After years of adverse impacts to the acid-sensitive ecosystems of the eastern United States, the Acid Rain Program and Nitrogen Budget Program were developed to control sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and nitrogen oxide (NO x) emissions through market-based cap and trade systems. We used data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program's National Trends Network (NTN) and the U.S. EPA Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) program to evaluate the response of lake-watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to changes in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides resulting from the Acid Rain Program and the Nitrogen Budget Program. TIME is a long-term monitoring program designed to sample statistically selected subpopulations of lakes and streams across the eastern U.S. to quantify regional trends in surface water chemistry due to changes in atmospheric deposition. Decreases in wet sulfate deposition for the TIME lake-watersheds from 1991 to 2007 (-1.04 meq m -2-yr) generally corresponded with decreases in estimated lake sulfate flux (-1.46 ± 0.72 meq m -2-yr), suggesting declines in lake sulfate were largely driven by decreases in atmospheric deposition. Decreases in lake sulfate and to a lesser extent nitrate have generally coincided with increases in acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting in shifts in lakes among ANC sensitivity classes. The percentage of acidic Adirondack lakes (ANC <0 μeq L -1) decreased from 15.5% (284 lakes) to 8.3% (152 lakes) since the implementation of the Acid Rain Program and the Nitrogen Budget Program. Two measures of ANC were considered in our analysis: ANC determined directly by Gran plot analysis (ANC G) and ANC calculated by major ion chemistry (ANC calc = CB - CA). While these two metrics should theoretically show similar responses, ANC calc (+2.03 μeq L -1-yr) increased at more than twice the rate as ANC G (+0.76 μeq L -1-yr). This discrepancy has important implications for assessments of lake recovery

  12. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. -K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Lieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the "Market Characterization" project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University, and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within the Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as "archetypes" by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market.

  13. Developing Flexible, Integrated Hydrologic Modeling Systems for Multiscale Analysis in the Midwest and Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, A. F.; Chiu, C. M.; Sharma, A.; Byun, K.; Hanson, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Physically based hydrologic modeling of surface and groundwater resources that can be flexibly and efficiently applied to support water resources policy/planning/management decisions at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales are greatly needed in the Midwest, where stakeholder access to such tools is currently a fundamental barrier to basic climate change assessment and adaptation efforts, and also the co-production of useful products to support detailed decision making. Based on earlier pilot studies in the Pacific Northwest Region, we are currently assembling a suite of end-to-end tools and resources to support various kinds of water resources planning and management applications across the region. One of the key aspects of these integrated tools is that the user community can access gridded products at any point along the end-to-end chain of models, looking backwards in time about 100 years (1915-2015), and forwards in time about 85 years using CMIP5 climate model projections. The integrated model is composed of historical and projected future meteorological data based on station observations and statistical and dynamically downscaled climate model output respectively. These gridded meteorological data sets serve as forcing data for the macro-scale VIC hydrologic model implemented over the Midwest at 1/16 degree resolution. High-resolution climate model (4km WRF) output provides inputs for the analyses of urban impacts, hydrologic extremes, agricultural impacts, and impacts to the Great Lakes. Groundwater recharge estimated by the surface water model provides input data for fine-scale and macro-scale groundwater models needed for specific applications. To highlight the multi-scale use of the integrated models in support of co-production of scientific information for decision making, we briefly describe three current case studies addressing different spatial scales of analysis: 1) Effects of climate change on the water balance of the Great Lakes, 2) Future

  14. Regional maximum rainfall analysis using L-moments at the Titicaca Lake drainage, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Palomino, Carlos Antonio; Lavado-Casimiro, Waldo Sven

    2017-08-01

    The present study investigates the application of the index flood L-moments-based regional frequency analysis procedure (RFA-LM) to the annual maximum 24-h rainfall (AM) of 33 rainfall gauge stations (RGs) to estimate rainfall quantiles at the Titicaca Lake drainage (TL). The study region was chosen because it is characterised by common floods that affect agricultural production and infrastructure. First, detailed quality analyses and verification of the RFA-LM assumptions were conducted. For this purpose, different tests for outlier verification, homogeneity, stationarity, and serial independence were employed. Then, the application of RFA-LM procedure allowed us to consider the TL as a single, hydrologically homogeneous region, in terms of its maximum rainfall frequency. That is, this region can be modelled by a generalised normal (GNO) distribution, chosen according to the Z test for goodness-of-fit, L-moments (LM) ratio diagram, and an additional evaluation of the precision of the regional growth curve. Due to the low density of RG in the TL, it was important to produce maps of the AM design quantiles estimated using RFA-LM. Therefore, the ordinary Kriging interpolation (OK) technique was used. These maps will be a useful tool for determining the different AM quantiles at any point of interest for hydrologists in the region.

  15. Regional maximum rainfall analysis using L-moments at the Titicaca Lake drainage, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Palomino, Carlos Antonio; Lavado-Casimiro, Waldo Sven

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigates the application of the index flood L-moments-based regional frequency analysis procedure (RFA-LM) to the annual maximum 24-h rainfall (AM) of 33 rainfall gauge stations (RGs) to estimate rainfall quantiles at the Titicaca Lake drainage (TL). The study region was chosen because it is characterised by common floods that affect agricultural production and infrastructure. First, detailed quality analyses and verification of the RFA-LM assumptions were conducted. For this purpose, different tests for outlier verification, homogeneity, stationarity, and serial independence were employed. Then, the application of RFA-LM procedure allowed us to consider the TL as a single, hydrologically homogeneous region, in terms of its maximum rainfall frequency. That is, this region can be modelled by a generalised normal (GNO) distribution, chosen according to the Z test for goodness-of-fit, L-moments (LM) ratio diagram, and an additional evaluation of the precision of the regional growth curve. Due to the low density of RG in the TL, it was important to produce maps of the AM design quantiles estimated using RFA-LM. Therefore, the ordinary Kriging interpolation (OK) technique was used. These maps will be a useful tool for determining the different AM quantiles at any point of interest for hydrologists in the region.

  16. Regional environment and hydrology changes documented by lake sediments from Lake Dalianhai, northeastern Tibetan Plateau since the last glacial maximum and their relationship with Asian summer monsoon variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; Chen, F.; Zhou, A.; Abbott, M. B.

    2016-12-01

    Variability of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) significantly affects environment and hydrology conditions within its area of influence, as well as economic and social development. Thus it is important to investigate the variability of the ASM on various time-scales and to explore its underlying forcing mechanisms, in order to improve our ability to predict the long-term trends of regional and global climate. Northeastern Tibetan Plateau, a margin area of modern ASM, is sensitive to summer monsoon changes. Existing paleoclimate records from this region contain conflicting evidence for the timing of summer monsoon advance into this region: an early arrival pre-Younger Dryas or a late arrival at the beginning of the Holocene. In addition, it is also debated that whether the Holocene ASM maximum in this region occurred during the early Holocene or the middle Holocene. Here we present a high-resolution record of a 52-m drilling core from Lake Dalianhai in this region. Multiply geochemistry indexes were obtained from the sediment core. 22 AMS 14C data from plant remains and bulk organic matters illustrate that the upper 52 m core covered the whole period since the last glacial maximum (LGM). The results generally indicate that the Lake Dalianhai was occupied by very shallow water body with eolian sand surrounding the lake from 20 to 15 ka BP (1ka=1000 cal yr). With the beginning of the B/A warm period, the sedimentary sequence changed to grey lacustrine clay abruptly. The sedimentary environment was relatively stable under a high lake level state during the B/A period which was marked with fine mean grain size, and high exogenous detrital element content (such as Al, K, Ti and Rb), but with low organic matter content. This perhaps was caused by the increasing of ASM precipitation. Increased contents of element Ca, Sr, and Br, as well as TOC and TN, highlight the increase of ASM during the Holocene. However, reddish lacustrine clay with lower magnetic susceptibility and

  17. An evaluation of processes regulating spatial and temporal patterns in lake sulfate in the Adirondack region of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Limin; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2004-09-01

    As a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1970 and 1990, there have been significant decreases in sulfate (SO42-) concentrations in surface waters across the northeastern United States. The 37 Direct/Delayed Response Program (DDRP) watersheds in the Adirondacks receive elevated levels of atmospheric S deposition and showed considerable variability in lake SO42- concentrations. In response to decreases in atmospheric S deposition, these sites have generally exhibited relatively uniform decreases in surface water SO42- concentrations. In this study, an integrated biogeochemical model (PnET-BGC) was used to simulate the response of lake SO42- concentrations at these DDRP sites to recent changes in atmospheric S deposition. Using default parameters and algorithms, the model underpredicted lake SO42- concentrations at sites with high SO42- concentrations and overpredicted at sites with low SO42- concentrations. Initial predictions of lake SO42- were relatively uniform across the region. Initial model simulations also underpredicted decreases in lake SO42- concentrations from 1984 to 2001. We identified seven hypotheses that might explain the discrepancies between model predictions and the measured data. Model inputs, parameters, and algorithms were modified to help test these hypotheses and better understand factors that control spatial and temporal patterns in lake SO42- in this acid-sensitive region.

  18. Evolution of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer one (ITS-1) in cichlid fishes of the Lake Victoria region.

    PubMed

    Booton, G C; Kaufman, L; Chandler, M; Oguto-Ohwayo, R; Duan, W; Fuerst, P A

    1999-03-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster have been determined for 11 species of closely related endemic cichlid fishes of the Lake Victoria region (LVR) and 6 related East African cichlids. The ITS-1 sequences confirmed independently derived basal phylogenies, but provide limited insight within this species flock. The line leading to Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor arose early, close to the divergence event that separated the tilapiine and haplochromine tribes of the "African Group" of the family Cichlidae. In this phylogeny, Astatoreochromis alluaudi and the riverine Astatotilapia burtoni are sister taxa, which together are a sister group to a monophyletic assemblage including both Lake Victoria and Lake Edward taxa. The ITS-1 data support the monophyly of haplochromine genera across lakes. Since Lake Victoria is believed to have been dry between 14, 500 and 12,400 BPE, the modern assemblage must have been derived from reinvasion by the products of earlier cladogenesis events. Thus, although the regional superflock is monophyletic, the haplochromines of Lake Victoria itself did not evolve in situ from a single ancestor.

  19. Impact of regional meteorology on ozone levels in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayne, Sandra; Gertler, Alan; Zielinska, Barbara; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Burley, Joel; Kaplan, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Lake Tahoe Basin is located on the California-Nevada border and occasionally experiences elevated levels of ozone (O3) exceeding the California Air Resources Board ambient air quality standard (8-h average). Previous studies indicate that both the local generation and long-range transport from out-of-basin sources are important in contributing to O3 exceedances, but little is known about the impact of regional meteorology on O3 source regions. To develop a better understanding of the factors affecting O3 levels and sources in the Lake Tahoe Basin, a comprehensive field study was performed in the summer of 2010. Included in this effort was a meteorological analysis addressing potential regional meteorological influences leading to periods of elevated levels of O3. Three approaches were used to conduct the analysis: (1) regional atmospheric pressure difference (i.e., the Washoe Zephyr) to access potential transport, (2) back trajectory modeling using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to determine where the air masses originated and, (3) composite soundings to evaluate in-Basin atmospheric influences. These analyses indicate the Washoe Zephyr did not strongly impact O3 levels; however, higher O3 levels were found to correspond with both a more southerly wind component and a dip in dew point temperature around 400 hPa. The results also indicate that if transport does occur, it is more likely to come from the San Joaquin Valley and move to the southern part of the Basin, rather than originating in the large cities to the west (i.e., Sacramento and San Francisco).

  20. Impact of regional meteorology on ozone levels in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayne, Sandra; Gertler, Alan; Zielinska, Barbara; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Burley, Joel; Kaplan, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The Lake Tahoe Basin is located on the California-Nevada border and occasionally experiences elevated levels of ozone (O3) exceeding the California Air Resources Board ambient air quality standard (8-h average). Previous studies indicate that both the local generation and long-range transport from out-of-basin sources are important in contributing to O3 exceedances, but little is known about the impact of regional meteorology on O3 source regions. To develop a better understanding of the factors affecting O3 levels and sources in the Lake Tahoe Basin, a comprehensive field study was performed in the summer of 2010. Included in this effort was a meteorological analysis addressing potential regional meteorological influences leading to periods of elevated levels of O3. Three approaches were used to conduct the analysis: (1) regional atmospheric pressure difference (i.e., the Washoe Zephyr) to access potential transport, (2) back trajectory modeling using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to determine where the air masses originated and, (3) composite soundings to evaluate in-Basin atmospheric influences. These analyses indicate the Washoe Zephyr did not strongly impact O3 levels; however, higher O3 levels were found to correspond with both a more southerly wind component and a dip in dew point temperature around 400 hPa. The results also indicate that if transport does occur, it is more likely to come from the San Joaquin Valley and move to the southern part of the Basin, rather than originating in the large cities to the west (i.e., Sacramento and San Francisco).

  1. Characterization of Vibrio cholerae bacteriophages isolated from the environmental waters of the Lake Victoria region of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Maina, Alice Nyambura; Mwaura, Francis B; Oyugi, Julius; Goulding, David; Toribio, Ana L; Kariuki, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, cholera outbreaks have become common in some parts of Kenya. The most recent cholera outbreak occurred in Coastal and Lake Victoria region during January 2009 and May 2010, where a total of 11,769 cases and 274 deaths were reported by the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation. The objective of this study is to isolate Vibrio cholerae bacteriophages from the environmental waters of the Lake Victoria region of Kenya with potential for use as a biocontrol for cholera outbreaks. Water samples from wells, ponds, sewage effluent, boreholes, rivers, and lakes of the Lake Victoria region of Kenya were enriched for 48 h at 37 °C in broth containing a an environmental strain of V. cholerae. Bacteriophages were isolated from 5 out of the 42 environmental water samples taken. Isolated phages produced tiny, round, and clear plaques suggesting that these phages were lytic to V. cholerae. Transmission electron microscope examination revealed that all the nine phages belonged to the family Myoviridae, with typical icosahedral heads, long contractile tails, and fibers. Head had an average diameter of 88.3 nm and tail of length and width 84.9 and 16.1 nm, respectively. Vibriophages isolated from the Lake Victoria region of Kenya have been characterized and the isolated phages may have a potential to be used as antibacterial agents to control pathogenic V. cholerae bacteria in water reservoirs.

  2. CO2 and CH4 emissions from streams in a lake-rich landscape: Patterns, controls, and regional significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, John T.; Lottig, Noah R.; Stanley, Emily H.; Walker, John F.; Hanson, Paul C.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-03-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are important components of landscape carbon budgets. In lake-rich landscapes, both lakes and streams may be important sources of carbon gases (CO2 and CH4) to the atmosphere, but the processes that control gas concentrations and emissions in these interconnected landscapes have not been adequately addressed. We use multiple data sets that vary in their spatial and temporal extent during 2001-2012 to investigate the carbon gas source strength of streams in a lake-rich landscape and to determine the contribution of lakes, metabolism, and groundwater to stream CO2 and CH4. We show that streams emit roughly the same mass of CO2 (23.4 Gg C yr-1; 0.49 mol CO2 m-2 d-1) as lakes at a regional scale (27 Gg C yr-1) and that stream CH4 emissions (189 Mg C yr-1; 8.46 mmol CH4 m-2 d-1) are an important component of the regional greenhouse gas balance. Gas transfer velocity variability (range = 0.34 to 13.5 m d-1) contributed to the variability of gas flux in this landscape. Groundwater inputs and in-stream metabolism control stream gas supersaturation at the landscape scale, while carbon cycling in lakes and deep groundwaters does not control downstream gas emissions. Our results indicate the need to consider connectivity of all aquatic ecosystems (lakes, streams, wetlands, and groundwater) in lake-rich landscapes and their connections with the terrestrial environment in order to understand the full nature of the carbon cycle.

  3. CO2 and CH4 emissions from streams in a lake-rich landscape: Patterns, controls, and regional significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, John T.; Lottig, Noah R.; Stanley, Emily H.; Walker, John F.; Hanson, Paul C.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are important components of landscape carbon budgets. In lake-rich landscapes, both lakes and streams may be important sources of carbon gases (CO2 and CH4) to the atmosphere, but the processes that control gas concentrations and emissions in these interconnected landscapes have not been adequately addressed. We use multiple data sets that vary in their spatial and temporal extent during 2001–2012 to investigate the carbon gas source strength of streams in a lake-rich landscape and to determine the contribution of lakes, metabolism, and groundwater to stream CO2 and CH4. We show that streams emit roughly the same mass of CO2 (23.4 Gg C yr−1; 0.49 mol CO2 m−2 d−1) as lakes at a regional scale (27 Gg C yr−1) and that stream CH4 emissions (189 Mg C yr−1; 8.46 mmol CH4 m−2 d−1) are an important component of the regional greenhouse gas balance. Gas transfer velocity variability (range = 0.34 to 13.5 m d−1) contributed to the variability of gas flux in this landscape. Groundwater inputs and in-stream metabolism control stream gas supersaturation at the landscape scale, while carbon cycling in lakes and deep groundwaters does not control downstream gas emissions. Our results indicate the need to consider connectivity of all aquatic ecosystems (lakes, streams, wetlands, and groundwater) in lake-rich landscapes and their connections with the terrestrial environment in order to understand the full nature of the carbon cycle.

  4. [Land cover and landscape pattern changes in Poyang Lake region of China in 1980-2010].

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan-le; Ran, Ying-ying; Zhang, Yong-jie; Cao, Xiao-ming; Yang, Fei

    2013-04-01

    Based on the land cover datasets of Poyang Lake region in 1980, 2005, and 2010, and by using GIS, RS, and landscape ecology approaches, this paper studied the land cover and landscape pattern changes in this region from 1980 to 2010, and quantitatively analyzed the land cover types change degree, patch area index, patch shape index, margin density index, and landscape diversity index. In 1980-2010, the main land cover types in this region were paddy field, inland water, evergreen broadleaf forest, and urban built-up area, and their areas and spatial patterns varied dramatically. Overall, the areas of inland water and urban built-up area had a significant increase, while those of paddy field and dry farmland decreased somewhat. Due to the effects of population growth and economic development, the landscape fragmentation degree and landscape diversity index presented a decreasing trend, but the decrement was small, which implied that the previous environmental management of this region had exerted important roles, but a long term challenge was still faced with between the regional environmental protection and sustainable development.

  5. [Land Use Pattern Change and Regional Sustainability Evaluation of Wetland in Jiaogang Lake].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Cai, Yi-min; Bai, Yan-ying; Chen, Wei-ping; Yang, Xiu-chao

    2015-06-01

    Changes in land use and sustainability evaluation of wetland in Jiaogang Lake from 1995 to 2013 were analyzed, based on the land use change models and an index system, supported by RS, GIS, and social statistical data. The results showed: (1) dry land, paddy field, and building land were the predominant landscape in the study area. The arable land was mainly converted during 1995-2000, which was driven by the extension of agriculture, and the building land increased significantly during 2010-2013, which was driven by the tourism development. (2) Compared to the beginning research area, the building land increased by 123.3%, and the wetland decreased by 23.15%. The land system was at risk for a low proportion of wetland, scarcity of unused land, and the fragmented landscape. (3) The regional sustainability results were bad level, bad level, poor level, good level, and poor level during the different periods, with some room for improvement. (4) The fitness of regional sustainability in study area yielded satisfactory results in 2010, owing to the rapid growth of regional productivity and the regional stability. Since 2010, with the increasing environmental load, the regional sustainability fell down to the poor level. The obstruction of sustainable development is necessary to be addressed in the study area.

  6. Mapping lake level changes using ICESat/GLAS satellite laser altimetry data: a case study in arid regions of central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, JunLi; Fang, Hui; Yang, Liao

    2011-12-01

    Lakes in arid regions of Central Asia act as essential components of regional water cycles, providing sparse but valuable water resource for the fragile ecological environments and human lives. Lakes in Central Asia are sensitive to climate change and human activities, and great changes have been found since 1960s. Mapping and monitoring these inland lakes would improve our understanding of mechanism of lake dynamics and climatic impacts. ICESat/GLAS satellite laser altimetry provides an efficient tool of continuously measuring lake levels in these poorly surveyed remote areas. An automated mapping scheme of lake level changes is developed based on GLAS altimetry products, and the spatial and temporal characteristics of 9 typical lakes in Central Asia are analyzed to validate the level accuracies. The results show that ICESat/GLAS has a good performance of lake level monitoring, whose patterns of level changes are the same as those of field observation, and the max differences between GLAS and field data is 3cm. Based on the results, it is obvious that alpine lakes are increasing greatly in lake levels during 2003-2009 due to climate change, while open lakes with dams and plain endorheic lakes decrease dramatically in water levels due to human activities, which reveals the overexploitation of water resource in Central Asia.

  7. Genetic characterization of H9N2 avian influenza virus in plateau pikas in the Qinghai Lake region of China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Gu, Jin-Yan; Yuan, Zhuang-Chuan; Chen, Xin-Yu; Li, Zeng-Kui; Lei, Jing; Hu, Bo-Li; Yan, Li-Ping; Xing, Gang; Liao, Min; Zhou, Ji-Yong

    2017-04-01

    Qinghai Lake is a major migratory-bird breeding site that has experienced several highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (AIV) epizootics. Plateau pikas (Ochotona curzoniae) have previously been implicated in the ecology of avian influenza virus in this region. We first isolated an H9N2 AIV (A/Pika/Menyuan/01/2008) from plateau pikas between November 2008 and October 2009. Sequence analysis showed that the A/Pika/Menyuan/01/2008 AIV was closely related to the H9N2 AIV strain (A/Turkey/Wisconsin/ 1/1966). Our findings suggested that plateau pikas may contribute to AIV epidemiology in the Qinghai Lake region.

  8. Occurrence of UV filter compounds from sunscreens in surface waters: regional mass balance in two Swiss lakes.

    PubMed

    Poiger, Thomas; Buser, Hans-Rudolf; Balmer, Marianne E; Bergqvist, Per-Anders; Müller, Markus D

    2004-05-01

    Consumer care products often contain UV filters, organic compounds which absorb ultraviolet light. These compounds may enter surface waters directly (when released from the skin during swimming and bathing) or indirectly via wastewater treatment plants (when released during showering or washed from textiles). Predicted and measured UV filter concentrations were compared in a regional mass balance study for two Swiss lakes: Lake Zurich, a typical midland lake which is also an important drinking water resource, and Hüttnersee, a small bathing lake. Both lakes are extensively used for recreational activities and considerable direct input of UV filters is thus expected. This input was estimated from the number of visitors at swimming areas around the lakes and a survey of the usage of sunscreen products among these visitors. Possible additional indirect input via wastewater treatment plants was not considered in this study. The quantitatively most important UV filters, as indicated by the survey data, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, octocrylene, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane, and benzophenone-3, all lipophilic compounds, were selected for analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentrations of individual UV filters in water from Lake Zurich were low, ranging from <2 ng l(-1) (detection limit) to 29 ng l(-1), and somewhat higher at Hüttnersee, ranging from <2 to 125 ng l(-1), with the highest concentrations found in summer, consistent with direct inputs to the lakes during this time. The concentrations were clearly lower than predicted from input estimates based on the surveys. This may be in part due to (i) an overestimation of these inputs (e.g. less than the 50% wash-off of UV filters assumed to occur during swimming), and (ii) some removal of these compounds from the lakes by degradation and/or sorption/sedimentation. UV filters were also detected in semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) deployed at Lake Zurich and Greifensee

  9. The Early Proterozoic structural and tectonic history of the south central Lake Superior Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueng, Wen-Long C.; Larue, Dave K.

    1988-06-01

    The early Proterozoic tectonic evolution of the south central Lake Superior region is complex, owing to the presence of four tectonostratigraphic terranes, which were affected by six phases of deformation. The four terranes are the passive margin of the Superior craton, two paraautochthonous passive margin terranes (Crystal Falls and Florence-Niagara terranes), and a southern magmatic arc complex which is probably allochthonous with respect to the other terranes. Four of the six deformational episodes accompanied subhorizontal shortening, while two were caused by subvertical shortening. The first and the most penetrative phase of deformation is marked by subhorizontal shortening in a NNE-SSW direction. The second and fourth deformations were characterized by subvertical shortening and did not significantly modify the structural orientations from previous events in the study area. The third, fifth, and sixth deformations mostly caused open folding, and shortening directions were NW, NE, and W, respectively. Because all the terranes in the south central Lake Superior region share parallel deformational histories, it is suggested that the accretion of these terranes occurred during the first deformational episode. After removal of younger deformational effects, including open folding of the suture zone, the tectonostratigraphic assemblages in this region show the following sequence from NNE to SSW: a platformal assemblage overlying sialic basement, a basinal assemblage of tholeiitic volcanic rocks overlain by deep-water turbidites, an assemblage of basin floor deposits (Crystal Falls terrane) with apparently no demonstratably underlying crystalline basement, a fault-bounded terrane with highly strained passive margin strata (Florence-Niagara terrane), and a calc-alkaline magmatic arc assemblage. Such an arrangement of tectonostratigraphic assemblages is comparable with cross sections through Phanerozoic accretionary continental margins and therefore supports an arc

  10. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y. M.; Wei, C.; Huang, R.-J.; Bandowe, B. A. M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Cao, J. J.; Jin, Z. D.; Xu, B. Q.; Gao, S. P.; Tie, X. X.; An, Z. S.; Wilcke, W.

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980–2012 relative to the period 1850–1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas. PMID:26750586

  11. Land use investigation with remote sensing based on spectral character analyses in Poyang Lake region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shu-e.; Wang, Baosheng; Wang, Huaiqing

    2004-01-01

    Based on Landsat TM data combined with practical investigation information obtained using Global Positioning Systems (GPS), we created a training field of land use classification. Using the methods of spectral distance analysis, we analyzed spectral signature value of different training fields in TM3, TM4, TM5 and TM7 band, and compared these with the standard deviation analysis. Based on these results, we selected the best spectral bands for classification and created remote sensing interpretation marks of land use classification. Supervising classification was used with the image classification of TM and the maximum likelihood was used for parametric rule of supervised classification. We applied the method of spectral signature analysis to the individual study of land use classification of Poyang Lake region. The land use was classified into 9 classes: paddy field, non-irrigated farmland, forestland, grassland, water area, lake beach, grass beach, sandy land and residential area. Based on the data of GPS investigation, we assessed the classification accuracy. Result indicated that classification accuracy reached 91.43% and the classification effect was better than the common supervised classifying and unsupervised classifying.

  12. Reconstruction of atmospheric soot history in inland regions from lake sediments over the past 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. M.; Wei, C.; Huang, R.-J.; Bandowe, B. A. M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Cao, J. J.; Jin, Z. D.; Xu, B. Q.; Gao, S. P.; Tie, X. X.; An, Z. S.; Wilcke, W.

    2016-01-01

    Historical reconstruction of atmospheric black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot) is still constrained for inland areas. Here we determined and compared the past 150-yr records of BC and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in sediments from two representative lakes, Huguangyan (HGY) and Chaohu (CH), in eastern China. HGY only receives atmospheric deposition while CH is influenced by riverine input. BC, char, and soot have similar vertical concentration profiles as PACs in both lakes. Abrupt increases in concentrations and mass accumulation rates (MARs) of soot have mainly occurred since ~1950, the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, when energy usage changed to more fossil fuel contributions reflected by the variations in the concentration ratios of char/soot and individual PACs. In HGY, soot MARs increased by ~7.7 times in the period 1980–2012 relative to the period 1850–1950. Similar increases (~6.7 times) were observed in CH. The increase in soot MARs is also in line with the emission inventory records in the literature and the fact that the submicrometer-sized soot particles can be dispersed regionally. The study provides an alternative method to reconstruct the atmospheric soot history in populated inland areas.

  13. Mysis diluviana and Hemimysis anomala: reviewing the roles of a native and invasive mysid in the Laurentian Great Lakes region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Maureen G.; Boscarino, Brent T.; Marty, Jérôme; Johannsson, Ora E.

    2012-01-01

    Mysis diluviana and Hemimysis anomala are the only two species of mysid shrimps in the order Mysidacea that are present in the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America. M. diluviana has inhabited the deep, cold waters of this region since Pleistocene-era glacial retreat and is widely considered to have a central role in the functioning of offshore food webs in systems they inhabit. More recently, the Great Lakes were invaded by the Ponto-Caspian native Hemimysis, a species that inhabits warmer water and shallower depths relative to M. diluviana. Hemimysis has rapidly expanded throughout the Great Lakes region and has become integrated into nearshore food webs as both food for planktivorous fish and predators and competitors of zooplankton. This special issue is composed of 14 papers that represent the most recent advances in our understanding of the ecological importance of both species of mysids to lake and river ecosystems in the Great Lakes region of North America. Topics discussed in this special issue will inform future research in all systems influenced by mysid ecology.

  14. Habitat capacity for cougar recolonization in the Upper Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    O Neil, Shawn T; Rahn, Kasey C; Bump, Joseph K

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that cougars (Puma concolor) are expanding their range into the midwestern United States. Confirmed reports of cougar in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin have increased dramatically in frequency during the last five years, leading to speculation that cougars may re-establish in the Upper Great Lakes (UGL) region, USA. Recent work showed favorable cougar habitat in northeastern Minnesota, suggesting that the northern forested regions of Michigan and Wisconsin may have similar potential. Recolonization of cougars in the UGL states would have important ecological, social, and political impacts that will require effective management. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), we extended a cougar habitat model to Michigan and Wisconsin and incorporated primary prey densities to estimate the capacity of the region to support cougars. Results suggest that approximately 39% (>58,000 km2) of the study area could support cougars, and that there is potential for a population of approximately 500 or more animals. An exploratory validation of this habitat model revealed strong association with 58 verified cougar locations occurring in the study area between 2008 and 2013. Spatially explicit information derived from this study could potentially lead to estimation of a viable population, delineation of possible cougar-human conflict areas, and the targeting of site locations for current monitoring. Understanding predator-prey interactions, interspecific competition, and human-wildlife relationships is becoming increasingly critical as top carnivores continue to recolonize the UGL region.

  15. Hindcasting water clarity from Landsat satellite images of unmonitored shallow lakes in the Waikato region, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Brendan J; Stichbury, Glen A; Brabyn, Lars K; Allan, Mathew G; Ashraf, Salman

    2013-09-01

    Cost-effective monitoring is necessary for all investigations of lake ecosystem responses to perturbations and long-term change. Satellite imagery offers the opportunity to extend low-cost monitoring and to examine spatial and temporal variability in water clarity data. We have developed automated procedures using Landsat imagery to estimate total suspended sediments (TSS), turbidity (TURB) in nephlometric turbidity units (NTU) and Secchi disc transparency (SDT) in 34 shallow lakes in the Waikato region, New Zealand, over a 10-year time span. Fifty-three Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus images captured between January 2000 and March 2009 were used for the analysis, six of which were captured within 24 h of physical in situ measurements for each of 10 shallow lakes. This gave 32-36 usable data points for the regressions between surface reflectance signatures and in situ measurements, which yielded r (2) values ranging from 0.67 to 0.94 for the three water clarity variables. Using these regressions, a series of Arc Macro Language scripts were developed to automate image preparation and water clarity analysis. Minimum and maximum in situ measurements corresponding to the six images were 2 and 344 mg/L for TSS, 75 and 275 NTU for TURB, and 0.05 and 3.04 m for SDT. Remotely sensed water clarity estimates showed good agreement with temporal patterns and trends in monitored lakes and we have extended water clarity datasets to previously unmonitored lakes. High spatial variability of TSS and water clarity within some lakes was apparent, highlighting the importance of localised inputs and processes affecting lake clarity. Moreover, remote sensing can give a whole lake view of water quality, which is very difficult to achieve by in situ point measurements.

  16. HELIOTHERMAL LAKE MODEL OF BORATE DEPOSITION IN THE MIOCENE FURNACE CREEK FORMATION, DEATH VALLEY REGION, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Charles E.; Barker, James M.; ,

    1988-01-01

    Heliothermal lakes are density-stratified with shallow submerged margins surrounding areally restricted deep pool(s) containing a dense brine overlain by a much less dense brine. The reflective brine interface allows solar energy to be trapped in the dense brine which may warm to over 90 degree C. Carbonate precipitated from the dense brine is the typical sediment produced in warm deep pool. Miocene borate deposits of the Death Valley region are typically contained within areally limited carbonate-rich pods that interfinger with a finely interlaminated (varve-like) mudstone and limestone. Primary borates there are predominately either Na-Ca borates or Ca-borates. This bimodal evaporite assemblage suggests that brine chemistries and (or) crystallization paths varied significantly in temporally and spatially related portions of this apparently continuous lacustrine deposit.

  17. Malachite green and chloramphenicol in aquatic products from regions around Dongting Lake in Hunan, China.

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Cui, Jingzhen

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic products are important sources of animal proteins in human diet, especially in developing countries. As such, the safety of aquatic products is of primary concern. In this study, a standard method is used to detect malachite green (MG) and chloramphenicol (CAP) and to analyse the contents of these banned chemicals in turtle, mandarin fish and grass carp sampled from the region surrounding Dongting Lake area in Hunan, China. Results showed that 10.6% of the samples were MG-positive, most of them turtles. CAP was found in 8.3% of the samples, mostly in mandarin fish. These data indicated that these banned substances are still used in the surveyed area. Hence, adequate strategies must be implemented by the local government to control these banned substances.

  18. [Longitudinal investigation on intestinal parasite infections among rural people in West Dongting Lake region].

    PubMed

    Hou, Guo-Hong; Xiao, Zeng; Yao, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, Jun-Wen; Zhou, Ying-Cai; Xie, Zhao-Mei; Yu, Qiu-Lan; Guo, Feng-Ying; Zhao, Zheng-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    The nylon pocket concentration method and modified Kato-Katz technique were used to detect the eggs of intestinal parasites and the iodine smear method was used for the detection of protozoa among the rural population in West Dongting Lake region. The infection rate of parasites in 2006 was 11.84%, and it declined by 86.63%, 81.34%, and 47.28%, respectively, compared to the rates in 1983, 1993, and 2003. Six major parasites were detected including Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Fasciolopsis buski, hookworm, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia, and their infection rates were 8.60%, 6.41%, 1.75%, 0.14%, 2.50%, and 1.22%, respectively. The rate of multiple infections was 22.98%. The infection rates in the 5-9 years age group and 10-14 years age group were higher than those in other age groups.

  19. Geographical and environmental drivers of regional differences in the lake pCO2 versus DOC relationship across northern landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, Jean-François; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2012-09-01

    Several recent studies have identified dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as playing a key role in determining surface water partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in northern lakes and, in particular, in shaping the commonly observed patterns of CO2 supersaturation. The nature of this role is unclear, however, and appears to vary regionally, as evidenced by the contrasting strength and shape of the diverse pCO2 versus DOC (pCO2-DOC) relationships. Here we combine original data on lakepCO2 from six boreal and temperate regions of Québec (Canada) with 13 studies from northern temperate and boreal aquatic landscapes published in the past 15 years to explore the factors that explain the differences in regional pCO2 baselines (pCO2 at low DOC) and in the slopes of the pCO2-DOC relationships. Mean elevation was the best predictor of the regionalpCO2 baselines, suggesting that lake position in the landscape determines the contribution of terrestrially derived CO2 to lake pCO2. In contrast, the slope of the pCO2-DOC relationships was strongly negatively correlated to the mean regional TP:DOC ratio. The relationship between DOC and TP varied at the cross-regional scale, and there was a large increase in the TP:DOC ratio at TP > 20μg L-1, resulting in negative slopes of the pCO2-DOC relationships for regions situated in that part of the TP gradient. These results highlight the interplay that exists between geographical gradients, large-scale biogeochemical patterns in regional lake trophic status, and the associated metabolic balance in determiningpCO2 dynamics in northern lakes.

  20. Atmospheric Transference of the Toxic Burden of Atmosphere-Surface Exchangeable Pollutants to the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Perlinger, J. A.; Giang, A.; Zhang, H.; Selin, N. E.; Wu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Toxic pollutants that share certain chemical properties undergo repeated emission and deposition between Earth's surfaces and the atmosphere. Following their emission through anthropogenic activities, they are transported locally, regionally or globally through the atmosphere, are deposited, and impact local ecosystems, in some cases as a result of bioaccumulation in food webs. We call them atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants or "ASEPs", wherein this group is comprised of thousands of chemicals. We are studying potential future contamination in the Great Lakes region by modeling scenarios of the future for three compounds/compound classes, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In this presentation we focus on mercury and future scenarios of contamination of the Great Lake region. The atmospheric transport of mercury under specific scenarios will be discussed. The global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem has been applied to estimate future atmospheric concentrations and deposition rates of mercury in the Great Lakes region for selected future scenarios of emissions and climate. We find that, assuming no changes in climate, annual mean net deposition flux of mercury to the Great Lakes Region may increase by approximately 50% over 2005 levels by 2050, without global or regional policies addressing mercury, air pollution, and climate. In contrast, we project that the combination of global and North American action on mercury could lead to a 21% reduction in deposition from 2005 levels by 2050. US action alone results in a projected 18% reduction over 2005 levels by 2050. We also find that, assuming no changes in anthropogenic emissions, climate change and biomass burning emissions would, respectively, cause annual mean net deposition flux of mercury to the Great Lakes Region to increase by approximately 5% and decrease by approximately 2% over 2000 levels by 2050.

  1. The farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution and its influencing factors in Poyang Lake Region, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meiqiu; Chen, Mengjiao; Lu, Yanfei; Wang, Liguo; Huang, Yujiao

    2016-01-01

    Individual farmers represent the main management entities of agricultural production under the family-contract responsibility system in China, and thus play crucial roles in the prevention and control of agricultural nonpoint source (ANPS) pollution. The analysis of the farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution as well as the factors affecting their perceptions can provide valuable information for relevant policy-making to preserve high quality water in Poyang Lake and regional quality of arable land. Through a survey titled 'Farmers' perceptions of ANPS pollution and farming behaviors in the Poyang Lake Region', the data related to the perceptions of farmers on ANPS pollution were collected. The factors that affect their awareness of ANPS pollution were identified with the method of boosted regression trees (BRT). The results indicated that the farmers had awareness of the risk of ANPS pollution to some extent, but they lacked adequate scientific knowledge. Generally, they had no consciousness about how to prevent and control ANPS pollution and did not understand techniques needed for proper scientifically sound application of fertilizers and pesticides. The main factors that influenced their perceptions of ANPS pollution are (from high to low): the ratio of total income which comes from farming, per capita farmland, age, education level, and household income. Some measures targeted to improve the prevention and control of ANPS pollution were proposed: developing modern agricultural techniques and promoting large-scale farming, increasing public campaigns related to ANPS pollution prevention and control with the goal of raising the level of awareness of farmers, and reforming the methods used to promote science and technology in agriculture and encourage the proper use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

  2. Subsurface structural mapping of Northern Nasser Lake region, Aswan, Egypt, using Bouguer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Salah

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempt to delineate the subsurface structures for the tectonic active region of Northern Nasser Lake using integrated interpretation techniques of gravity data with seismicity. The depths to the gravity sources, and the locations of the contacts of density contrast were estimated. Two methods were used for estimating source depths and contact locations: horizontal gradient (HG) and Euler deconvolution methods. Moreover, power spectral analysis, bandpass and upward continuation techniques were applied to evaluate the shallow and deep seated structures. Shallow depth structures were ranging between 0.30 km and 0.80 km. However, two average levels (interfaces) at depth 3.1 km and 7.2 km below the measuring level were revealed for the intermediate and deep seated structures respectively. Results of Euler deconvolution method suggested that, in the eastern part of the area, the basement could be observed on the ground and has become deeper in the central part. The interpreted structural map reveals that the area is affected by a set of faults trending mainly in the NW, E-W, N-S and NE-SW directions. Actually, this map has confirmed the idea that the intersections between the N-S and E-W striking faults along Nasser Lake area have generated seismic pulses. Moreover, three seismic zones (Z1, Z2 and Z3) are well correlated with the fault trends of the subsurface structures as derived from the horizontal gradient map. The present results suggest that there exist seismically-active fault east of High Dam, passing throughout Aswan reservoir from north to south. This fault is occupying region of high stress values which may generate large earthquakes in future, as it has long extension over several kilometers. Furthermore, the evaluated intruded volcanic bodies are found almost at the intersections between the E-W and NW oriented faults. Finally, the area is dissected by basement uplifts and troughs controlled mainly by the NW-SE faults.

  3. Regional rainfall-runoff relations for simulation of streamflow for watersheds in Lake County, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncker, J.J.; Vail, T.J.; Melching, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Rainfall and streamflow data collected in Lake County, Ill., from March 1990 through September 1993 were used to (1) calibrate a rainfall-runoff model for an area encompassing three watersheds (individual areas of 17.2, 35.7, and 37.0 mi(2) (square miles) and (2) verify the regional model parameter set obtained from the calibration by applying the parameter set to rainfall-runoff models for an additional small (6.3 mi(2)) watershed and a large (59.6 mi (2)) watershed. In addition, rainfall and streamflow data collected from April 1991 through September 1993 were used to calibrate the rainfall-runoff model for three single land-use watersheds (38.2-305 acres), called hydrologic response units (HRU's). Significant differences were found between the best parameters used in the HRU models and in the larger watershed models. The main channels in the HRU's are intermittent streams; thus, the parameters in the HRU models were selected such that a fluctuating water table could be simulated; runoff from the larger watersheds is not as sensitive to the effects of a fluctuating water table. Classification of land cover into two pervious subareas (forest and grass) and one impervious subarea (including parking lots, streets, and rooftops, among others) was sufficient to simulate the rainfall-runoff relations for all watersheds accurately. The model parameters presented in this report, which were refined through regional calibration and verified for watersheds not considered in the calibration, allow simulation of runoff in watersheds in Lake County, Ill., with approximately 93-percent accuracy in the total water balance, an average absolute error in the annual- flow estimates of 10.9 percent (and an error rarely exceeding 25 percent for annual flow), and monthly water balances with correlation coefficients of 93 percent and coefficients of model-fit efficiency of 86 percent. The models closely reproduced the partial-duration series of runoff and storm-runoff frequencies for

  4. Landscape attributes driving avian influenza virus circulation in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Laure; Paul, Mathilde C; Leger, Lucas; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina R; Maminiaina, Olivier F; Jourdan, Marion; Molia, Sophie; Rakotondravao, René; Chevalier, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    While the spatial pattern of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus has been studied throughout Southeast Asia, little is known on the spatial risk factors for avian influenza in Africa. In the present paper, we combined serological data from poultry and remotely sensed environmental factors in the Lake Alaotra region of Madagascar to explore for any association between avian influenza and landscape variables. Serological data from cross-sectional surveys carried out on poultry in 2008 and 2009 were examined together with a Landsat 7 satellite image analysed using supervised classification. The dominant landscape features in a 1-km buffer around farmhouses and distance to the closest water body were extracted. A total of 1,038 individual bird blood samples emanating from 241 flocks were analysed, and the association between avian influenza seroprevalence and these landcape variables was quantified using logistic regression models. No evidence of the presence of H5 or H7 avian influenza subtypes was found, suggesting that only low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) circulated. Three predominant land cover classes were identified around the poultry farms: grassland savannah, rice paddy fields and wetlands. A significant negative relationship was found between LPAI seroprevalence and distance to the closest body of water. We also found that LPAI seroprevalence was higher in farms characterised by predominant wetlands or rice landscapes than in those surrounded by dry savannah. Results from this study suggest that if highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus were introduced in Madagascar, the environmental conditions that prevail in Lake Alaotra region may allow the virus to spread and persist.

  5. An integrated approach for estimation of methane emissions from wetlands and lakes in high latitude regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, C.; Bowling, L. C.; Podest, E.; Bohn, T. J.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Schroeder, R.; McDonald, K. C.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing evidence of significant alteration in the extent of lakes and wetlands in high latitude regions due in part to thawing permafrost, as well as other changes governing surface and subsurface hydrology. Methane is a 23 times more efficient greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide; changes in surface water extent, and the associated subsurface anaerobic conditions, are important controls on methane emissions in high latitude regions. Methane emissions from wetlands vary substantially in both time and space, and are influenced by plant growth, soil organic matter decomposition, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation controlled by soil temperature, water table level and net primary productivity (NPP). The understanding of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of surface saturation, thermal regime and carbon substrate in northern Eurasian wetlands from point measurements are limited. In order to better estimate the magnitude and variability of methane emissions from northern lakes and wetlands, we present an integrated assessment approach based on remote sensing image classification, land surface modeling and process-based ecosystem modeling. Wetlands classifications based on L-band JERS-1 SAR (100m) and ALOS PALSAR (~30m) are used together with topographic information to parameterize a lake and wetland algorithm in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land surface model at 25 km resolution. The enhanced VIC algorithm allows subsurface moisture exchange between surface water and wetlands and includes a sub-grid parameterization of water table position within the wetland area using a generalized topographic index. Average methane emissions are simulated by using the Walter and Heimann methane emission model based on temporally and spatially varying soil temperature, net primary productivity and water table generated from the modified VIC model. Our five preliminary study areas include the Z. Dvina, Upper Volga, Yeloguy, Syum, and Chaya

  6. The role of environmental factors for the composition of microbial communities of saline lakes in the Novosibirsk region (Russia).

    PubMed

    Bryanskaya, Alla V; Malup, Tatyana K; Lazareva, Elena V; Taran, Oxana P; Rozanov, Alexey S; Efimov, Vadim M; Peltek, Sergey E

    2016-01-27

    Nothing is currently known about microbial composition of saline lakes of the Novosibirsk region and its dependence on physical-chemical parameters of waters. We studied the structure of microbial communities of saline lakes of the Novosibirsk region and the effect of physical-chemical parameters of waters on microbial communities of these lakes. According to the ion content, the lakes were classified either as chloride or chloride-sulfate types. Water salinity ranges from 4.3 to 290 g L(-1). Many diverse microbial communities were found. Filamentous and colonial Cyanobacteria of the genera Scytonema, Aphanocapsa, and/or filamentous Algae dominated in littoral communities. Spatial and temporal organization of planktonic microbial communities and the quantities of Archaea and Bacteria were investigated using fluorescent in situ hybridization. We have found that the dominant planktonic component is represented by Archaea, or, less frequently, by Bacteria. Various phylogenetic groups (Bacteria, Archaea, Algae, and Cyanobacteria) are nonuniformly distributed. The principal component analysis was used to detect environmental factors that affect microorganism abundance. We found the principal components responsible for 71.1 % of the observed variation. It was demonstrated that two-block partial least squares was a better method than principal component analysis for analysis of the data. We observed general relationships between microbial abundance and water salinity. We have performed the first-ever study of the structure of the microbial communities of eleven saline lakes in the Novosibirsk region along with their physical-chemical parameters of waters. Our study demonstrates that saline lakes in the Novosibirsk region contain a unique microbial communities that may become a prolific source of microorganisms for fundamental and applied studies in various fields of ecology, microbiology, geochemistry, and biotechnology, and deserve further metagenomic investigation.

  7. Huguangyan Maar Lake (SE China): A solid record of atmospheric mercury pollution history in a non-remote region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan; Chen, Jingan; Yang, Yongqiong; Wang, Jianxu; Zhu, Zhengjie; Li, Jian

    2017-10-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic metal that can cause harm to environment and human health. As atmospheric deposition is the main source of total Hg input to aquatic system in remote and pristine regions, almost all the studies on atmospheric Hg pollution history concentrated in these areas, while the studies in non-remote areas are much limited, especially for the long history records. In this study, Huguangyan Maar Lake, an undisturbed lake system at low altitude in China, was selected to reconstruct the atmospheric mercury pollution history. Variation patterns of TOC, Hg and non-residual Sr in the sediment core indicated that, compared to the direct atmospheric Hg deposition, the effect of either Hg scavenging from water column by algae or the catchment inputs of previously deposited Hg on the Hg accumulation in the lake sediment was limited. The sediment Hg content in Huguangyan Lake was mainly controlled by the atmospheric Hg deposition, and thus accurately reflected the atmospheric Hg pollution history. The Hga (Hg content from atmospheric deposition) in Huguangyan Lake presented a comparable variation pattern to that in remote sites. It had the same variation trend as the global atmospheric Hg before 1950 CE, which could be attributed to the Industrial Revolution. After that, it was mainly controlled by Hg emissions from Asian countries. The variation of Hga also indicated that atmospheric Hg deposition accelerated significantly since 2000 CE. This study, along with other investigations in remote sites in China, showed that the sediment Hg in Huguangyan Lake responded to the atmospheric Hg pollution more sensitively than in the alpine regions. It should be noted that, the more intensive acceleration of Hg deposition in Huguangyan Lake may imply that the South of China suffered from much more serious atmospheric Hg pollution than previous studies revealed.

  8. Implementation of local grid refinement (LGR) for the Lake Michigan Basin regional groundwater-flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoard, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating water availability and use within the Great Lakes Basin. This is a pilot effort to develop new techniques and methods to aid in the assessment of water availability. As part of the pilot program, a regional groundwater-flow model for the Lake Michigan Basin was developed using SEAWAT-2000. The regional model was used as a framework for assessing local-scale water availability through grid-refinement techniques. Two grid-refinement techniques, telescopic mesh refinement and local grid refinement, were used to illustrate the capability of the regional model to evaluate local-scale problems. An intermediate model was developed in central Michigan spanning an area of 454 square miles (mi2) using telescopic mesh refinement. Within the intermediate model, a smaller local model covering an area of 21.7 mi2 was developed and simulated using local grid refinement. Recharge was distributed in space and time using a daily output from a modified Thornthwaite-Mather soil-water-balance method. The soil-water-balance method derived recharge estimates from temperature and precipitation data output from an atmosphere-ocean coupled general-circulation model. The particular atmosphere-ocean coupled general-circulation model used, simulated climate change caused by high global greenhouse-gas emissions to the atmosphere. The surface-water network simulated in the regional model was refined and simulated using a streamflow-routing package for MODFLOW. The refined models were used to demonstrate streamflow depletion and potential climate change using five scenarios. The streamflow-depletion scenarios include (1) natural conditions (no pumping), (2) a pumping well near a stream; the well is screened in surficial glacial deposits, (3) a pumping well near a stream; the well is screened in deeper glacial deposits, and (4) a pumping well near a stream; the well is open to a deep bedrock aquifer. Results indicated that a range of 59 to 50 percent of the

  9. Transcending the Majority Rights and Minority Protection Dichotomy through Multicultural Reflective Citizenship in the African Great Lakes Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndura, Elavie

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the author examines how colonial racist policies and western-bound post-colonial educational practices have contributed to the recurring ethnic conflicts in the Great Lakes region of Africa. After defining democracy and reflective citizenship within the African context, she discusses how teachers' roles should be redefined and…

  10. INDICATORS OF ECOLOGICAL STRESS AND THEIR EXTENT IN THE POPULATION OF NORTHEASTERN LAKES: A REGIONAL-SCALE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's first projects was a survey of 345 lakes in the eight states of the Northeast, during summers of 1991-1996. This survey was the first regional-scale attempt to use a probability-based sampling design to collect biolog...

  11. Evaluation of Sugar Maple Dieback in the Upper Great Lakes Region and Development of a Forest Health Youth Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    Sugar Maple, "Acer saccharum" Marsh., is one of the most valuable trees in the northern hardwood forests. Severe dieback was recently reported by area foresters in the western Upper Great Lakes Region. Sugar Maple has had a history of dieback over the last 100 years throughout its range and different variables have been identified as…

  12. A Network for Educational Change in the Great Lakes Region: A View through the Lens of Educational Service Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Randal E.; Svedkauskaite, Asta

    2008-01-01

    The major purpose of this descriptive report is to provide an overview of the structure, capacity, and roles of educational service agencies (ESAs) across five states--Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin--in the Great Lakes region, within the context of the broader statewide systems of support for educational improvement and progress.…

  13. An Overview of Interdisciplinary Research at Notre Dame Addressing "Grand Challenges" in the Midwest and Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, A. F.; Bolster, D.; Tank, J. L.; Hellmann, J.; Christopher, S. F.; Sharma, A.; Chiu, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Midwest and Great Lakes region face a number of "Grand Challenges" associated with climate, land use, agriculture, and water resources infrastructure. These include sustainability of agricultural systems and related impacts to food security and the regional economy; sustainability of Great Lakes water levels; changing storm statistics and impacts to stormwater management and flooding; water quality in rivers and downstream receiving water bodies related to non-point source pollution on agricultural lands and combined sewer overflows in urban areas; urban impacts related to aging infrastructure and climate change, and ecosystem management and restoration. In the context of water management, groundwater resources are poorly understood in comparison with surface water resources, and regional-scale simulation models are needed to address questions of sustainability both in terms of supply and water quality. Interdisciplinary research at the University of Notre Dame is attempting to address these research challenges via 1) integrated macro-scale groundwater and surface water modeling to address issues related to sustainable water supply, ecosystem restoration, and agricultural impacts; 2) development of high-resolution regional climate models dynamically coupled to the Great Lakes to address urban impacts, changing storm statistics and to quantify precipitation and evaporation over the Great Lakes; 3) and integrated macro-scale hydrology and water quality modeling to assess the large-scale performance of innovative land management BMPs on agricultural land (such as the two-stage ditch, cover crops, and dynamic drainage control) intended to improve water quality.

  14. Evaluation of Sugar Maple Dieback in the Upper Great Lakes Region and Development of a Forest Health Youth Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    Sugar Maple, "Acer saccharum" Marsh., is one of the most valuable trees in the northern hardwood forests. Severe dieback was recently reported by area foresters in the western Upper Great Lakes Region. Sugar Maple has had a history of dieback over the last 100 years throughout its range and different variables have been identified as…

  15. INDICATORS OF ECOLOGICAL STRESS AND THEIR EXTENT IN THE POPULATION OF NORTHEASTERN LAKES: A REGIONAL-SCALE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's first projects was a survey of 345 lakes in the eight states of the Northeast, during summers of 1991-1996. This survey was the first regional-scale attempt to use a probability-based sampling design to collect biolog...

  16. REGIONAL, WATERSHED, AND SITE-SPECIFIC ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ON FISH ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR TRIBUTARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative importance of regional, watershed, and in-stream environmental factors on stream fish assemblage structure and function was investigated as part of a comparative watershed project in the western Lake Superior basin. We selected 48 second and third order watersheds fr...

  17. Modeling Regional Groundwater Implications of Biofuel Crop Production in the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, A.; Kendall, A. D.; Basso, B.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    In response to a growing call for renewable sources of energy that do not compete directly with food resources, the use of second-generation 'cellulosic' biofuel feedstocks has gained much attention in recent years. The push to advance the technologies that would make such a transformation possible is motivated by the United States Renewable Fuel Standard mandate to produce 36 billion gallons of biofuels by 2022, an increase of 334 percent from 2009. Many different crops, including maize, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar have shown promise as cellulosic feedstocks, and in an attempt to supply the needed biomass to meet the 2022 mandate, production of these crops have been on the rise. Yet little is known about the sustainability of large-scale conversion of land to cellulosic biofuel crop production; more research is needed to understand the effects that these crops will have on the quality and quantity of groundwater. This study presents a model scale-up approach to address three questions: What are the hydrologic and nutrient demands of the primary biofuel crops? Which biofuel crops are more water efficient in terms of demand verses energy produced? What are the types and availabilities of land to expand production of these biofuel crops? To answer these questions, we apply a point-based crop dynamics model in combination with a regional-scale hydrologic model, parameterized using stream discharge and chemistry data collected from two representative watersheds in Wisconsin. Approximately 17 stream sites in each watershed are selected for data collection for model parameterization, including stream discharge, nutrient concentrations, and basic chemical characteristics. We then use the System Approach to Land Use Sustainability (SALUS) model, which predicts crop growth under varying soil and climate conditions, to drive vegetation dynamics and groundwater transport of nutrients within the Integrated Landscape Hydrology Model (ILHM). ILHM predictions of stream

  18. Mapping landslide processes in the North Tanganyika - Lake Kivu rift zones: towards a regional hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitte, Olivier; Monsieurs, Elise; Jacobs, Liesbet; Basimike, Joseph; Delvaux, Damien; Draida, Salah; Hamenyimana, Jean-Baptiste; Havenith, Hans-Balder; Kubwimana, Désiré; Maki Mateso, Jean-Claude; Michellier, Caroline; Nahimana, Louis; Ndayisenga, Aloys; Ngenzebuhoro, Pierre-Claver; Nkurunziza, Pascal; Nshokano, Jean-Robert; Sindayihebura, Bernard; Philippe, Trefois; Turimumahoro, Denis; Kervyn, François

    2015-04-01

    The mountainous environments of the North Tanganyika - Lake Kivu rift zones are part of the West branch of the East African Rift. In this area, natural triggering and environmental factors such as heavy rainfalls, earthquake occurrences and steep topographies favour the concentration of mass movement processes. In addition anthropogenic factors such as rapid land use changes and urban expansion increase the sensibility to slope instability. Until very recently few landslide data was available for the area. Now, through the initiation of several research projects and the setting-up of a methodology for data collection adapted to this data-poor environment, it becomes possible to draw a first regional picture of the landslide hazard. Landslides include a wide range of ground movements such as rock falls, deep failure of slopes and shallow debris flows. Landslides are possibly the most important geohazard in the region in terms of recurring impact on the populations, causing fatalities every year. Many landslides are observed each year in the whole region, and their occurrence is clearly linked to complex topographic, lithological and vegetation signatures coupled with heavy rainfall events, which is the main triggering factor. Here we present the current knowledge of the various slope processes present in these equatorial environments. A particular attention is given to urban areas such as Bukavu and Bujumbura where landslide threat is particularly acute. Results and research perspectives on landslide inventorying, monitoring, and susceptibility and hazard assessment are presented.

  19. Phosphorus mobilization from littoral sediments of an inlet region in Lake Delavan, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, W.F.; Barko, J.W.; Field, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Rates of P release from littoral sediments of the inlet region of Lake Delavan, Wisconsin, were examined in the laboratory under different redox and pH regimes using sediment systems and also in situ using sediment peppers. In the laboratory, rates of P release from sediments increased about two-fold (i.e., to 7 mg m-2 d-1) under oxic conditions as a result of adjusting the pH of the overlying water from 8.5 to about 9.0. Laboratory rates increased to a maximum of 23 mg m-2 d-1 under anoxic conditions. Both in situ pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) exhibited marked seasonal fluctuations due, primarily, to metabolism by submersed macrophytes, which occupied over 50% of the inlet region. Using continuous records of in situ pH and DO and ranges in rates of P release measured in the laboratory, we estimated an overall mean rate of P release of 5.7 mg m-2 d-1 from the littoral sediments during the summer (April-September) of 1994. Rates of P release estimated from Fickean diffusional fluxes were similar to rates estimated from pH and DO. Our results suggest that aquatic macrophyte communities of the inlet region enhance the mobilization of P from littoral sediment by regulating pH and DO in the surrounding environment.

  20. Minimal intraspecific variation in the sequence of the transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Zhuo, L; Sajdak, S L; Phillips, R B

    1994-08-01

    Intraspecific variation in the sequence of the transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in lake trout was examined by restriction mapping and sequencing of these regions amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. The length of the first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1) was 566 bases and the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-2) was 368 bases in lake trout. When the 1.4-kb region including the ITS-1, the 5.8S coding region, and the ITS-2 was amplified from 12 individuals from four populations and digested with eight different enzymes only one intraindividual polymorphism was found that occurred in each population. When the amplified ITS-1 region was sequenced from an additional 10 individuals from five populations, no interindividual variation was found in the sequence. A 6-kb portion of the rDNA repeat unit including 1.6 kb of the 18S coding region, the 5' external spacer region (5' ETS), and part of the adjacent intergenic spacer was cloned and a restriction map was prepared for these regions in lake trout. No intraspecific variation was found in the region adjacent to the 18S rDNA, which includes the 5' ETS, although intraspecific and intraindividual length variation was found in the intergenic spacer region 3-6 kb from the 18S. Sequencing of a 609-b segment of the 5' ETS adjacent to the 18S coding region revealed the presence of two 41-b repeats. The 198-b sequence between the repeats had some similarity to the 18S coding region of other fishes. Primers were designed for amplification of 559 b of the 5' ETS using the polymerase chain reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Scenario-based water resources planning for utilities in the Lake Victoria region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, V. K.; Aslam, O.; Dale, L.; Miller, N.; Purkey, D.

    2010-12-01

    Cities in the Lake Victoria (LV) region are experiencing the highest growth rates in Africa, at the same time that their water resource is threatened by domestic waste and industrial pollution. Urban centers use local springs, wetlands and Lake Victoria as source waters. As efforts to meet increasing demand accelerate, integrated water resources management (IWRM) tools provide opportunities for utilities and other stakeholders to develop a planning framework comprehensive enough to include short term (e.g. landuse change), as well as longer term (e.g. climate change) scenarios. This paper presents IWRM models built using the Water Evaluation And Planning (WEAP) decision support system, for three pilot towns in the LV region - Bukoba (Tanzania), Masaka (Uganda), and Kisii (Kenya). Their current populations are 100,000, 70,000 and 200,000 respectively. Demand coverage is ~70% in Masaka and Bukoba, and less than 50% in Kisii. IWRM models for each town were calibrated under current system performance based on site visits, utility reporting and interviews. Projected water supply, demand, revenues and costs were then evaluated against a combination of climate, demographic and infrastructure scenarios upto 2050. In Masaka, flow and climate data were available to calibrate a runoff model to simulate streamflow at water intake. In Masaka, without considering climate change, the system is infrastructure-limited and not water availability (hydrology) limited until 2035, under projected population growth of 2.17%. Under a wet climate scenario as projected by GCM’s for the LV region, the current wetland source could supply all expected demands until 2050. Even under a drought scenario, the wetland could supply all demand until 2032, if the supply infrastructure is updated at an estimated cost of USD 10.8 million. However, demand targets can only be met at the expense of almost no water returning to the wetland downstream of the intake by 2035, unless substantial investments

  2. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region of ciscoes (genus Coregonus): taxonomic implications for the Great Lakes species flock.

    PubMed

    Reed, K M; Dorschner, M O; Todd, T N; Phillips, R B

    1998-09-01

    Sequence variation in the control region (D-loop) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was examined to assess the genetic distinctiveness of the shortjaw cisco (Coregonus zenithicus). Individuals from within the Great Lakes Basin as well as inland lakes outside the basin were sampled. DNA fragments containing the entire D-loop were amplified by PCR from specimens of C. zenithicus and the related species C. artedi, C. hoyi, C. kiyi, and C. clupeaformis. DNA sequence analysis revealed high similarity within and among species and shared polymorphism for length variants. Based on this analysis, the shortjaw cisco is not genetically distinct from other cisco species.

  3. New exposure ages for the Last Glacial Cycle in the Sanabria Lake region (northwestern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María Jose; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier; Valero-Garcés, Blas

    2013-04-01

    The Sanabria Lake region is located in the Trevinca Massif, a mid-latitude mountain area up to 2128 m asl in the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula (42oN 6oW). An ice cap glaciation took place during the Last Glacial Cycle in this massif, with an equilibrium line altitude of 1687 m for the Tera glacial outlet at its local maximum (Cowton et al., 2009). A well preserved glacial sequence occurs on an area of 45 km2 around the present Sanabria Lake (1000 m asl) and is composed by lateral and end moraines in close relationship with glaciolacustrine deposits. This sequence shows the ice snout oscillations of the former Tera glacier during the Last Glacial Cycle and offers a good opportunity to compare radiocarbon and OSL- based chronological models with new cosmogenic isotope dates. The new dataset of 10Be exposure ages presented here for the Sanabria Lake moraines is based on measurements conducted on 23 boulders and is compared with previous radiocarbon and OSL data conducted on ice related deposits (Pérez-Alberti et al., 2011; Rodríguez-Rodríguez et al., 2011). Our results are coherent with the available deglaciation radiocarbon chronology, and support a last deglaciation origin for the whole set of end moraines that are downstream the Sanabria Lake (19.2 - 15.7 10Be ka). Discrepancies between results of the different dating methods concern the timing of the local glacial maximum, with the cosmogenic exposure method always yielding the youngest minimum ages. As proposed to explain similar observations made elsewhere (Palacios et al., 2012), reconciling the ages from different dating methods would imply the occurrence of two glacial advances close enough in extent to generate an overlapping polygenic moraine. Cowton, T., Hughes, P.D., Gibbard, P.L., 2009. Palaeoglaciation of Parque Natural Lago de Sanabria, northwest Spain. Geomorphology 108, 282-291. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., Rico, M.T., Valero-Garcés, B

  4. Changes in winter air temperatures near Lake Michigan, 1851-1993, as determined from regional lake-ice records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Assel, R.A.; Robertson, Dale M.

    1995-01-01

    Records of freezeup and breakup dates for Grand Traverse Bay, Michigan, and Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, are among the longest ice records available near the Great Lakes, beginning in 185 1 and 1855, respectively. The timing of freezeup and breakup results from an integration of meteorological conditions (primarily air temperature) that occur before these events. Changes in the average timing of these ice-events are translated into changes in air temperature by the use of empirical and process-driven models. The timing of freezeup and breakup at the two locations represents an integration of air temperatures over slightly different seasons (months). Records from both locations indicate that the early winter period before about 1890 was - 15°C cooler than the early winter period after that time; the mean temperature has, however, remained relatively constant since about 1890. Changes in breakup dates demonstrate a similar 1.0-1 .5”C increase in late winter and early spring air temperatures about 1890. More recent average breakup dates at both locations have been earlier than during 1890-1940, indicating an additional warming of 1.2”C in March since about 1940 and a warming of 1 . 1°C in January-March since about 1980. Ice records at these sites will continue to provide an early indication of the anticipated climatic warming, not only because of the large response of ice cover to small changes in air temperature but also because these records integrate climatic conditions during the seasons (winter-spring) when most warming is forecast to occur. Future reductions in ice cover may strongly affect the winter ecology of the Great Lakes by reducing the stable environment required by various levels of the food chain. 

  5. Hazards Associated with High Altitude Rain-Fed Lakes (HARL) in the Overdeepened Deglaciated Region of Hindu Kush and Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritashya, U. K.; Hess, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain regions are changing rapidly as a result of climate change. It has been well established that these mountain regions are experiencing rapid glacier retreat. With accelerated retreat, glacial melt runoff can accumulate in an overdeepened glacier bed left behind by the receding glacier and can be bound by the walls of unstable frontal and lateral moraines to form a hazardous lake. However, when smaller glaciers retreat and downwaste they no longer contain enough ice to sustain the flow of water and maintain level of the lake. Furthermore, some smaller glaciers in the Hindu Kush and Himalayan region are observing extreme downwasting, which are either turning them into a rock glacier or heavily debris covered glacier leading to the reduced ice melt. Consequently, it is important to study these overdeepened beds, which are contained by the unstable mass. This is especially significant considering the great degree of complexity in the mountain weather system and recent examples of high intensity and short duration rainfall in the Hindu Kush region of Afghanistan, Karakoram region of Pakistan, and Central Himalayan region of India and Nepal. A precise understanding of mountain climate system is necessary, but so does these potentially deglaciated overdeepened beds where rain-fed lakes can form and increase systems hydrostatic pressure that can breach moraine containment and flood entire downstream region. Once lake has formed it possesses hydrological characteristics that are similar to the glacial lakes, which are known to put lives and infrastructure in danger. Therefore, in this study we evaluated overdeepened beds that are located in the complex topography and contained by abandoned or unstable lateral moraine using field and remote sensing satellite images. Our results provide degree of failure associated with these lakes based on the complex spatial and topological analysis as well as orographic distribution of the region. Such studies are not common in the

  6. Development of a total maximum daily load (TMDL) for acid-impaired lakes in the Adirondack region of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraei, Habibollah; Driscoll, Charles T.; Selvendiran, Pranesh; DePinto, Joseph V.; Bloomfield, Jay; Quinn, Scott; Rowell, H. Chandler

    2014-10-01

    Acidic deposition has impaired acid-sensitive surface waters in the Adirondack region of New York by decreasing pH and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). In spite of air quality programs over past decades, 128 lakes in the Adirondacks were classified as “impaired” under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act in 2010 due to elevated acidity. The biogeochemical model, PnET-BGC, was used to relate decreases in atmospheric sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition to changes in lake water chemistry. The model was calibrated and confirmed using observed soil and lake water chemistry data and then was applied to calculate the maximum atmospheric deposition that the impaired lakes can receive while still achieving ANC targets. Two targets of ANC were used to characterize the recovery of acid-impaired lakes: 11 and 20 μeq L-1. Of the 128 acid-impaired lakes, 97 currently have ANC values below the target value of 20 μeq L-1 and 83 are below 11 μeq L-1. This study indicates that a moderate control scenario (i.e., 60% decrease from the current atmospheric S load) is projected to recover the ANC of lakes at a mean rate of 0.18 and 0.05 μeq L-1 yr-1 during the periods 2022-2050 and 2050-2200, respectively. The total maximum daily load (TMDL) of acidity corresponding to this moderate control scenario was estimated to be 7.9 meq S m-2 yr-1 which includes a 10% margin of safety.

  7. A review of factors affecting productivity of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region: implications for recovery.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, W W; Giesy, J P; Best, D A; Kramer, V J

    1995-05-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population in North America declined greatly after World War II due primarily to the eggshell thinning effects of p,p'-DDE, a biodegradation product of DDT. After the banning of DDT in the United States and Canada during the early 1970s, the bald eagle population started to increase. However, this population recovery has not been uniform. Eagles nesting along the shorelines of the North American Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes still exhibit impaired reproduction. We have explored both ecological and toxicological factors that would limit reproduction of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region. Based on our studies, the most critical factors influencing eagle populations are concentrations of environmental toxicants. While there might be some continuing effects of DDE, total PCBs and most importantly 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ) in fishes from the Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes currently represent a significant hazard to bald eagles living along these shorelines or near these rivers and are most likely related to the impaired reproduction in bald eagles living there.

  8. A review of factors affecting productivity of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region: implications for recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Bowerman, W W; Giesy, J P; Best, D A; Kramer, V J

    1995-01-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population in North America declined greatly after World War II due primarily to the eggshell thinning effects of p,p'-DDE, a biodegradation product of DDT. After the banning of DDT in the United States and Canada during the early 1970s, the bald eagle population started to increase. However, this population recovery has not been uniform. Eagles nesting along the shorelines of the North American Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes still exhibit impaired reproduction. We have explored both ecological and toxicological factors that would limit reproduction of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region. Based on our studies, the most critical factors influencing eagle populations are concentrations of environmental toxicants. While there might be some continuing effects of DDE, total PCBs and most importantly 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ) in fishes from the Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes currently represent a significant hazard to bald eagles living along these shorelines or near these rivers and are most likely related to the impaired reproduction in bald eagles living there. PMID:7556024

  9. Genetic and morphological characterisation of the Ankole Longhorn cattle in the African Great Lakes region

    PubMed Central

    Ndumu, Deo B; Baumung, Roswitha; Hanotte, Olivier; Wurzinger, Maria; Okeyo, Mwai A; Jianlin, Han; Kibogo, Harrison; Sölkner, Johann

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the population structure, diversity and differentiation of almost all of the ecotypes representing the African Ankole Longhorn cattle breed on the basis of morphometric (shape and size), genotypic and spatial distance data. Twentyone morphometric measurements were used to describe the morphology of 439 individuals from 11 sub-populations located in five countries around the Great Lakes region of central and eastern Africa. Additionally, 472 individuals were genotyped using 15 DNA microsatellites. Femoral length, horn length, horn circumference, rump height, body length and fore-limb circumference showed the largest differences between regions. An overall FST index indicated that 2.7% of the total genetic variation was present among sub-populations. The least differentiation was observed between the two sub-populations of Mbarara south and Luwero in Uganda, while the highest level of differentiation was observed between the Mugamba in Burundi and Malagarasi in Tanzania. An estimated membership of four for the inferred clusters from a model-based Bayesian approach was obtained. Both analyses on distance-based and model-based methods consistently isolated the Mugamba sub-population in Burundi from the others. PMID:18694545

  10. Scenario-based water resources planning for utilities in the Lake Victoria region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Vishal K.; Aslam, Omar; Dale, Larry; Miller, Norman; Purkey, David R.

    Urban areas in the Lake Victoria (LV) region are experiencing the highest growth rates in Africa. As efforts to meet increasing demand accelerate, integrated water resources management (IWRM) tools provide opportunities for utilities and other stakeholders to develop a planning framework comprehensive enough to include short term (e.g. landuse change), as well as longer term (e.g. climate change) scenarios. This paper presents IWRM models built using the Water Evaluation And Planning (WEAP) decision support system, for three towns in the LV region - Bukoba (Tanzania), Masaka (Uganda), and Kisii (Kenya). Each model was calibrated under current system performance based on site visits, utility reporting and interviews. Projected water supply, demand, revenues and costs were then evaluated against a combination of climate, demographic and infrastructure scenarios up to 2050. Our results show that water supply in all three towns is currently infrastructure limited; achieving existing design capacity could meet most projected demand until 2020s in Masaka beyond which new supply and conservation strategies would be needed. In Bukoba, reducing leakages would provide little performance improvement in the short-term, but doubling capacity would meet all demands until 2050. In Kisii, major infrastructure investment is urgently needed. In Masaka, streamflow simulations show that wetland sources could satisfy all demand until 2050, but at the cost of almost no water downstream of the intake. These models demonstrate the value of IWRM tools for developing water management plans that integrate hydroclimatology-driven supply to demand projections on a single platform.

  11. On-line Education Initiatives to Galvanize Climate Mitigation in the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) is supporting two different on-line education initiatives that teach about climate change while emphasizing informed and effective responses. The first is an on-line introductory level course for undergraduate students (http://c3.ssec.wisc.edu/) offered through the University of Wisconsin-Madison Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences (AOS) department. Along with a lighter carbon footprint and the convenience of web-based access, students interact via Drupal forums, Google hangouts and twitter. Activities include several pedagogical tools with sustainability-related content and a final project requiring a discussion of regionally relevant mitigation responses to achieve low emission scenarios for assigned locations. The other initiative is a MOOC (massive open online course) focusing on the changing weather and climate in the Great Lakes Region. This 4-week course is set to launch February 23 2015. One of the primary goals of this MOOC will be having participants change four habits, one per week. Each behavior change will provide a personal benefit to participating individuals while also helping to mitigate the collective impacts of climate change. This presentation will share strategies and insights from both projects.

  12. Spatial Analysis of Great Lakes Regional Icing Cloud Liquid Water Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryerson, Charles C.; Koenig, George G.; Melloh, Rae A.; Meese, Debra A.; Reehorst, Andrew L.; Miller, Dean R.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Clustering of cloud microphysical conditions, such as liquid water content (LWC) and drop size, can affect the rate and shape of ice accretion and the airworthiness of aircraft. Clustering may also degrade the accuracy of cloud LWC measurements from radars and microwave radiometers being developed by the government for remotely mapping icing conditions ahead of aircraft in flight. This paper evaluates spatial clustering of LWC in icing clouds using measurements collected during NASA research flights in the Great Lakes region. We used graphical and analytical approaches to describe clustering. The analytical approach involves determining the average size of clusters and computing a clustering intensity parameter. We analyzed flight data composed of 1-s-frequency LWC measurements for 12 periods ranging from 17.4 minutes (73 km) to 45.3 minutes (190 km) in duration. Graphically some flight segments showed evidence of consistency with regard to clustering patterns. Cluster intensity varied from 0.06, indicating little clustering, to a high of 2.42. Cluster lengths ranged from 0.1 minutes (0.6 km) to 4.1 minutes (17.3 km). Additional analyses will allow us to determine if clustering climatologies can be developed to characterize cluster conditions by region, time period, or weather condition. Introduction

  13. Familial aggregation of human infection with Schistosoma japonicum in the Poyang Lake region, China

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Magda K.; Li, Yuesheng; Rong, Zhu; Chen, Honggen; McManus, Donald P.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the success of extensive control measures that have been implemented in China for over 50 years, the number of individuals infected with Schistosoma japonicum remains high in the remaining endemic areas. A variance components analysis was undertaken to estimate the heritable and environmental components that contribute to S. japonicum infection in the Poyang Lake region of Jiangxi Province, PR China. The total target population was 3148 from four separate administrative villages. Two thousand seven hundred and five of these comprised 400 families ranging in size from 3 to 188. After adjustments were made for gender, water contact and past history of having had schistosomiasis, the heritable component was estimated to account for as much as 58% of the phenotype variation under the polygenic model. Household was not shown to be an important environmental factor. Incorporating village effects indicated that the results were valid for the total population. We conclude that genetic heritability in this region is high and plays an important role in determining risk of infection with S. japonicum. PMID:16321389

  14. Sympatric wolf and coyote populations of the western Great Lakes region are reproductively isolated.

    PubMed

    Wheeldon, Tyler J; Patterson, Brent R; White, Bradley N

    2010-10-01

    Interpretation of the genetic composition and taxonomic history of wolves in the western Great Lakes region (WGLR) of the United States has long been debated and has become more important to their conservation given the recent changes in their status under the Endangered Species Act. Currently, the two competing hypotheses on WGLR wolves are that they resulted from hybridization between (i) grey wolves (Canis lupus) and western coyotes (C. latrans) or (ii) between grey wolves and eastern wolves (C. lycaon). We performed a genetic analysis of sympatric wolves and coyotes from the region to assess the degree of reproductive isolation between them and to clarify the taxonomic status of WGLR wolves. Based on data from maternal, paternal and bi-parental genetic markers, we demonstrate a clear genetic distinction between sympatric wolves and coyotes and conclude that they are reproductively isolated and that wolf-coyote hybridization in the WGLR is uncommon. The data reject the hypothesis that wolves in the WGLR derive from hybridization between grey wolves and western coyotes, and we conclude that the extant WGLR wolf population is derived from hybridization between grey wolves and eastern wolves. Grey-eastern wolf hybrids (C. lupus × lycaon) comprise a substantial population that extends across Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and western Ontario. These findings have important implications for the conservation and management of wolves in North America, specifically concerning the overestimation of grey wolf numbers in the United States and the need to address policies for hybrids.

  15. Local and Regional Determinants of an Uncommon Functional Group in Freshwater Lakes and Ponds

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    A combination of local and regional factors and stochastic forces is expected to determine the occurrence of species and the structure of communities. However, in most cases, our understanding is incomplete, with large amounts of unexplained variation. Using functional groups rather than individual species may help explain the relationship between community composition and conditions. In this study, I used survey data from freshwater lakes and ponds to understand factors that determine the presence of the floating plant functional group in the northeast United States. Of the 176 water bodies surveyed, 104 (59.1%) did not contain any floating plant species. The occurrence of this functional group was largely determined by local abiotic conditions, which were spatially autocorrelated across the region. A model predicting the presence of the floating plant functional group performed similarly to the best species-specific models. Using a permutation test, I also found that the observed prevalence of floating plants is no different than expected by random assembly from a species pool of its size. These results suggest that the size of the species pool interacts with local conditions in determining the presence of a functional group. Nevertheless, a large amount of unexplained variation remains, attributable to either stochastic species occurrence or incomplete predictive models. The simple permutation approach in this study can be extended to test alternative models of community assembly. PMID:26121636

  16. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  17. Macro-Scale Correction of Precipitation Undercatch in the Midwest/Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, C. M.; Hamlet, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation gauge undercatch is a serious problem in the context of using observed meteorological data sets for hydrologic modeling studies in regions with cold winters, such as the Midwest. Attention to this matter is urgently needed to support hydroclimatological research efforts in the region. To support hydrologic modeling studies, a new hybrid gridded meteorological dataset at 1/16 degree resolution based on data from CO-OP station records, the U. S. Historical Climatology Network, the Historical Canadian Climate Database, and Precipitation Regression on Independent Slopes Method has been assembled over the Great Lakes and Midwest regions from 1915-2013 at daily time step. Preliminary hydrologic simulations results using the Variable Infiltration Capacity hydrology model with this hybrid gridded meteorological dataset showed that precipitation gauge undercatch was a very significant issue throughout the region, especially for winter snowfall and simulated streamflow, which were both grossly underpredicted. Correction of primary CO-OP station data is generally infeasible due to missing station meta data and lack of local-scale wind speed measurements. Instead, macro-scale post processing techniques were developed to adjust the regridded precipitation product from CO-OP station records from 1950-2013 forwards, accounting for undercatch as a function of regridded wind speed simulations obtained from NCAR Reanalysis. Comparisons of simulated and observed streamflow over seven river basins in the Midwest were used to evaluate the datasets constructed using different combinations of meteorological station inputs, with and without undercatch corrections. The comparisons show promise in producing corrected precipitation data sets from 1950-2013 for hydrologic modeling studies, with substantial improvements in streamflow simulation from the uncalibrated VIC model when gauge undercatch corrections are included.

  18. Novel Application of the Masson-Fontana Stain for Demonstrating Malassezia Species Melanin-Like Pigment Production In Vitro and in Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Gaitanis, George; Chasapi, Vassiliki; Velegraki, Aristea

    2005-01-01

    Melanin-like pigment produced in vitro and in vivo by Malassezia yeasts has not been described before. Masson-Fontana staining confirmed accumulation of black pigment on the cell walls of l-dihydroxyphenylalaline (l-DOPA)-cultured Malassezia species. Black pigment was also observed in cells and hyphae from hyperpigmented patient lesions with culture-confirmed pityriasis versicolor and seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:16081962

  19. Global and regional contributions to total mercury concentrations in Lake Michigan water

    EPA Science Inventory

    A calibrated mercury component mass balance model, LM2-Mercury, was applied to Lake Michigan to predict mercury concentrations in the lake under different mercury loadings, mercury air concentrations, and management scenarios. Although post-audit data are few, model predictions (...

  20. Hydroecological condition and potential for aquaculture in lakes of the arid region of Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crootof, Africa; Mullabaev, Nodirbek; Saito, Laurel; Atwell, Lisa; Rosen, Michael R.; Bekchonova, Marhabo; Ginatullina, Elena; Scott, Julian; Chandra, Sudeep; Nishonov, Bakhriddin; Lamers, John P.A.; Fayzieva, Dilorom

    2015-01-01

    With >400 small (<1 ha) lakes, the arid Khorezm Province in Uzbekistan may be well-suited for aquaculture production. Developing water resources to provide a local food supply could increase fish consumption while improving the rural economy. Hydroecological (biological and physical) and chemical characteristics (including legacy pesticides ΣDDT and ΣHCH) of four representative drainage lakes in Khorezm from 2006 to 2008 were analyzed for the lakes’ capability to support healthy fish populations. Lake characteristics were categorized as “optimal” (having little or no effect on growth and development), “tolerable” (corresponding to chronic or sub-lethal toxicity) and “lethal” (corresponding to acute toxicity). Results indicate that three lakes are likely well-suited for raising fish species, with water quality meeting World Bank aquaculture guidelines. However, the fourth lake often had salinity concentrations > optimal levels for local fish species. Pesticide concentrations in water of all four lakes were within tolerable aquaculture ranges. Although water ΣDDT concentrations were >optimal limits, results from chemical analysis of fish tissues and semi-permeable membrane devices indicated that study lake ΣDDT concentrations were not accumulating in fish or posing a human health threat. Land and water management to maintain adequate lake water quality are imperative for sustaining fish populations for human consumption.

  1. Global and regional contributions to total mercury concentrations in Lake Michigan water

    EPA Science Inventory

    A calibrated mercury component mass balance model, LM2-Mercury, was applied to Lake Michigan to predict mercury concentrations in the lake under different mercury loadings, mercury air concentrations, and management scenarios. Although post-audit data are few, model predictions (...

  2. A Holocene molluscan succession from floodplain sediments of the upper Lena River (Lake Baikal region), Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Dustin; Preece, Richard C.; Shchetnikov, Alexander A.; Parfitt, Simon A.; Dlussky, Konstantin G.

    2008-05-01

    Floodplain sediments of the upper Lena River near Basovo in south-central Siberia have yielded the most detailed Holocene molluscan succession yet reported from the entire eastern Palaearctic. Over 72,500 shells from at least 28 species of terrestrial and 23 species of freshwater mollusc have been recovered, an abundance and diversity far higher than previously reported from the region. The molluscan assemblages are dominated by land snails, especially members of the genus Vallonia, represented by five species including Vallonia tenuilabris and two poorly known species Vallonia kamtschatica and Vallonia cf. chinensis. Other noteworthy species recovered include Gastrocopta theeli, Carychium pessimum, Vertigo extima (southernmost record), Vertigo microsphaera and the first Asian records of three other taxa ( Vertigo geyeri, Vertigo genesii and Vertigo parcedentata). Illustrations are provided for the critical species, since opinions differ about the status of various taxa and the correct names that should be used. The molluscan assemblages show clear successional trends during the early to mid-Holocene, reflecting episodes of dryness/wetness on the floodplain. Drier conditions at ca 6350 14C yr BP coincide with major changes in the archaeological record seen at other sites in the region but it remains unclear whether the two are linked. A prominent charcoal-rich horizon dated to ca 2800 14C yr BP marks a burning event in the catchment, which resulted in a two-fold increase in sediment accumulation rate. Remains of small mammals occurred throughout the sequence including a tooth of Microtus cf. maximowiczii, possibly the first occurrence of Ungar vole west of Lake Baikal. The faunal analyses have been integrated with a detailed pedological study of the sedimentary profile and a chronology was obtained by means of 12 AMS radiocarbon dates. This study provides the first detailed palaeoecological information relating to Holocene molluscan assemblages from the Cis

  3. Climate Induced Birch Mortality in Trans-Baikal Lake Region, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Ranson, K. J.; Oskorbin, P. A.; Im, S. T.; Dvinskaya, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Trans-Baikal (or Zabailkal'e) region includes the forest-steppe ecotones south and east of Lake Baikal in Russia and has experienced drought for several years. The decline and mortality of birch (Betula pendula) stands within the forest-steppe ecotone Trans-Baikal region was studied based on a temporal series of satellite data, ground measurements, and tree ring analysis. During the first decade of the 21st century birch stands decline and mortality were observed on )about 5% of the total area of stands within our 1250 km(exp 2 study area. Birch forest decline and mortality occurs mainly at the margins of stands, within the forest-steppe ecotone on slopes with direct insolation. During the first decade of the 21st century summer (June-August) precipitation was about 25% below normal. Soil water content measurements were lowest within dead stands and highest within healthy stands and intermediate within damaged stands. Drought impact on stands was amplified by an increase in summer air temperatures (+0.9 C) in comparison with the previous decade. Tree ring data of ''surviving'' and ''dead'' tree groups showed a positive correlation with summer/annual precipitation and negative correlation with summer air temperatures. Temperature and precipitation extreme anomalies tend to occur in the region with a period of about 27 years. The observed anomaly was the most severe since the beginning of meteorological observations in the year 1900. Data for the other sites showed a positive climate impact on the growth and expansion of Siberian forests. That is, the same species (B. pendula) showed considerable increase (1.4 times both in height and stem volume) during 20th-21st centuries as temperature increased but precipitation remained at adequate levels.

  4. Glacial erosion of bedrock and preliminary Quaternary stratigraphy in the western Lake Erie coastal region

    SciTech Connect

    Shideler, G.I. ); Stone, B.D. )

    1994-04-01

    An analysis of 120 km of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and onshore well records in the southwestern Lake Erie coastal zone shows a highly dissected bedrock surface. Regional subsurface data confirm extensive glacial modification of the preglacial landscape and the differential erosion of bedrock units. Areas of deep glacial scour coincide with shale and dolostone subcrop belts, in which bedrock strike direction was subparallel to glacial flow directions during early and late phases of glaciation. Locally, deep scouring also occurred over zones of fractured bedrock. In southeastern Michigan, large bedrock valleys, widened and deepened by glacial erosion, are preserved on the north side of the area of the Erie ice lobe. To the south in areas of axial flow of the Erie lobe and southerly ice flow during glacial maxima, traces of preglacial valleys have been more severely modified by glacial erosion in diverging directions. Striations in the region record three such diverging ice-flow directions of the last ice sheet. In one quarry, the position and cross-cutting erosional relationships of the three striation sets indicate their relative ages, from oldest to youngest: SSW, SW, and W. The SSW-trending set is overlain by a compact, loamy till containing abundant Canadian-shield crystalline gravel clasts. The till and the striations record the initial Late Wisconsinan ice advance into the region. The younger striation sets are overlain by the clayey, shale-rich till of the Erie lobe. Onshore, glaciolacustrine massive silty clay overlies the clayey till and fills broad troughs between areas of till at the surface. Offshore, seismic profiles reveal stratification in the clay, which is overlain by late Holocene mud. A nearby test hole through the beach west of Turtle Creek suggests a valley-fill sequence consisting of Late Wisconsinan till overlain by 5 m of organic mud deposited during the late Holocene transgression of Late Erie.

  5. Changing land use and its impact on the habitat suitability for wintering Anseriformes in China's Poyang Lake region.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuguang; Li, Hengpeng; Xu, Xibao; Yang, Guishan; Liu, Guihua; Li, Xinyan; Chen, Dongqiang

    2016-07-01

    As an internationally important wetland for migratory waterbirds, China's Poyang Lake region has experienced substantial changes in land use during the past two decades owing to climate change and anthropogenic disturbances. Recent dam constructions on the Yangtze River and its tributaries for agriculture and hydroelectric power exert strong effects on the hydrological regimes of this lake. However, few studies have investigated how the land-use changes through time affect the habitat suitability for wintering Anseriformes-the largest community in this region. Thus, it is necessary to timely monitor changes in the habitat quality and understand the potential factors that alter it. In this study, three periods (1995, 2005 and 2014) of typical environmental indicators that have direct impacts on foraging and resting for the Anserformes, including proximity to water (density of lakes, rivers and ponds), human disturbances (density of residences and various road networks), preferred land cover types and food availability (NDVI), are integrated to develop a habitat suitability index model for habitat mapping. The results indicate that long-term lake shrinkage in low-water periods led to greatly expanded wetlands in these years, which provided more suitable habitat for migratory waterfowl. The amount of highly suitable habitat in 2014 was nearly twice as much as in 1995. Recent survey data from 1997 to 2013 also revealed an increase in the population size, and confirmed the improvement of habitat suitability in the Poyang Lake region. Spatial analysis revealed that land use changes contributed most to the improved habitat coverage between 1995 and 2014. However, the relative significances of these transformations for highly suitable and moderately suitable habitats are strikingly different. Increases in wetland and paddy field area are the main reasons for explaining these improvements, respectively. The framework model proposed in this study will help governments to

  6. Scaling up carbon storage in human-dominated heterogeneous landscapes in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, W.; Brown, D. G.; Kiger, S.; Nassauer, J. I.; Robinson, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    partly from the presence of turfgrasses and old-field vegetation. The Great Lakes region has a 150-year history of land cover conversions among forest, agriculture, residential land, and managed and un-managed heterogeneous reforestation and fragmentation. Our results highlight the importance of confronting human-caused heterogeneity in the scaling of C pools and C trajectories in the region.

  7. EVALUATING REGIONAL PREDICTIVE CAPACITY OF A PROCESS-BASED MERCURY EXPOSURE MODEL, REGIONAL-MERCURY CYCLING MODEL (R-MCM), APPLIED TO 91 VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE LAKES AND PONDS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulatory agencies must develop fish consumption advisories for many lakes and rivers with limited resources. Process-based mathematical models are potentially valuable tools for developing regional fish advisories. The Regional Mercury Cycling model (R-MCM) was specifically d...

  8. EVALUATING REGIONAL PREDICTIVE CAPACITY OF A PROCESS-BASED MERCURY EXPOSURE MODEL, REGIONAL-MERCURY CYCLING MODEL (R-MCM), APPLIED TO 91 VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE LAKES AND PONDS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulatory agencies must develop fish consumption advisories for many lakes and rivers with limited resources. Process-based mathematical models are potentially valuable tools for developing regional fish advisories. The Regional Mercury Cycling model (R-MCM) was specifically d...

  9. Deep drilling of ancient Lake Ohrid (Balkan region) to capture over 1 million years of evolution and global climate cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Bernd; Francke, Alexander; Wilke, Thomas; Krastel, Sebastian; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Sulpizio, Roberto; Reicherter, Klaus; Leng, Melanie; Grazhdani, Andon; Trajanovski, Sasho; Levkov, Zlatko; Reed, Jane; Wonik, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ancient lakes, with sediment records spanning >1 million years, are very rare. The UNESCO World Heritage site of Lake Ohrid in the Balkan region is thought to be the oldest lake in continuous existence in Europe and, with 212 endemic species described to date, is a hotspot of evolution. An international group of scientists working on a project entitled 'Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO)' realized a deep drilling campaign of Lake Ohrid in spring 2013. Based on several coring seismic campaigns between 2004 and 2011, Lake Ohrid became the target of an ICDP deep drilling campaign, with specific research aims: (i) obtain precise information about the age and origin of the lake, (ii) unravel the lake's seismotectonic history, (iii) obtain a continuous record of Quaternary volcanic activity and climate change, and (iv) investigate the influence of major geological/environmental events on evolution and the generation of extraordinary endemic biodiversity. Drilling began in April 2013 using the Deep Lake Drilling System (DLDS) of DOSECC (USA). The campaign, completed by late May, was deemed one of the most successful ICDP lake drilling projects, with a total of ~2100 m of sediment recovered from four different sites. At the central "DEEP" site, hydro-acoustic data indicated a maximum sediment fill of ca. 700 m, of which the uppermost 568 m was recovered. Coarse gravel and pebbles underlying clay and shallow water facies hampered deeper penetration. A total of 1526 m of sediment cores was collected from six boreholes, with a composite field recovery ('master core') of 544 m (95%). Three additional sites were drilled in order to analyze lake-level fluctuations, catchment dynamics, biodiversity and evolution processes ("Cerava", deepest drilled depth: 90 m), to investigate active tectonics and spring dynamics ("Gradiste", deepest drilled depth: 123 m), and to try to understand the geological origins of the Ohrid Basin ("Pestani

  10. Glacio-lacustrine facies of the Finger Lakes region of New York state

    SciTech Connect

    Wellner, R.W.; Mullins, H.T. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    A high-resolution (< 1 m), Uniboom seismic reflection survey ([approximately]1,500 km) of the eleven lakes that comprise the Finger Lakes of central New York State has revealed the nature of the thick (270 m at a maximum) glacio-lacustrine sediment-fill beneath the lakes. These seismic data have been ground truthed via piston cores from Seneca and Cayuga Lakes, as well as drillcore and geophysical data from the dry valley south ([approximately]3 km) of Canandaigua Lake, and outcrop exposures. Six depositional sequences, each with distinct acoustic characteristics, have been recognized. The oldest sequence (1) typically occurs in the southern third of each lake basin where it is as much as 100+ m thick. It is characterized by a chaotic facies and is correlated with outcrops of the stratified, waterlain drift of the Valley Heads Moraine. Sequence 2 is characterized by a lateral change from a chaotic (north) to reflection-free or transparent (south) facies. Piston cores from an esker-like ridge in Cayuga Lake recovered fine-grained rhythmites with dropstones before bottoming in a clast-supported gravel. Sequence 3 is characterized by an acoustically transparent facies. Although this sequence was not sampled, this seismic facies suggests rapidly deposited, fine-grained sediments. Sequence 4 is characterized by continuous parallel, high-frequency reflections. Drillcore south of Canandaigua Lake recovered a coarsening-upward sequence of sands and gravels (with artesian water). Sequence 6 is characterized throughout each lake basin by a low amplitude to acoustically transparent facies. In general, the sedimentary record beneath the Finger Lakes reflects an overall change from high-energy, subglacial deposition to lower energy, proglacial deposition as a result of the northward retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet during Termination 1A of the marine record.

  11. [Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Different Species Mercury in Water Body of Changshou Lake in Three Gorges Reservoir Region].

    PubMed

    Bai, Wei-yang; Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Zheng; Tang, Zhen-ya; Wang, Ding-yong

    2015-08-01

    An investigation on the concentrations and the spatial distribution characteristics of different species of mercury in the water body of Changshou Lake in Three Gorges Reservoir region was carried out based on the AreGIS statistics module. The results showed that the concentration of the total mercury in Changshou Lake surface water ranged from 0.50 to 3.78 ng x L(-1), with an average of 1.51 ng x L(-1); the concentration of the total MeHg (methylmercury) ranged from 0.10 to 0.75 ng x L(-1), with an average of 0.23 ng x L(-1). The nugget effect value of total mercury in surface water (50.65%), dissolved mercury (49.80%), particulate mercury (29.94%) and the activity mercury (26.95%) were moderate spatial autocorrelation. It indicated that the autocorrelation was impacted by the intrinsic properties of sediments (such as parent materials and rocks, geological mineral and terrain), and on the other hand it was also disturbed by the exogenous input factors (such as aquaculture, industrial activities, farming etc). The nugget effect value of dissolved methylmercury (DMeHg) in Changshou lake surface water (3.49%) was less than 25%, showing significant strong spatial autocorrelation. The distribution was mainly controlled by environmental factors in water. The proportion of total MeHg in total Hg in Changshou Lake water reached 30% which was the maximum ratio of the total MeHg to total Hg in freshwater lakes and rivers. It implied that mercury was easily methylated in the environment of Chanashou Lake.

  12. Midcontinent rift volcanism in the Lake Superior region: Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic evidence for a mantle plume origin

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, S.W. Univ. of Minnesota, MN ); Shirey, S.B. )

    1990-07-10

    Between 1091 and 1098 Ma, most of a 15- to 20-km thickness of dominantly tholeiitic basalt erupted in the Midcontinent Rift System of the Lake Superior region, North American. The Portage Lake Volcanics in Michigan, which are the youngest MRS flood basalts, fall into distinctly high- and low-TiO{sub 2} types having different liquid lines of descent. Incompatible trace elements in both types of tholeiites are enriched compared to depleted or primitive mantle (La/Yb = 4.3-5.3; Th/Ta = 2.12-2.16; Zr/Y = 4.3-4.4), and both basalt types are isotopically indistinguishable. Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of the Portage Lake tholeiites have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr{sub i} {approx}0.7038, {epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 {plus minus} 2, and {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2. Model ages with respect to a depleted mantle source (T{sub DM}) average about 1950-2100 Ma. Portage Lake rhyolits fall into two groups. Type I rhyolites have Nd and Pb isotopic characteristics ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}0 to {minus}4.7; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}8.2-7.8) consistent with contamination of tholeiitic rocks by 5-10% Archean crust. The one type II rhyolite analyzed has Nd and Pb isotopic compositions ({epsilon}{sub Nd(1095 Ma)} {approx}{minus}13 to {minus}16; {mu}{sub 1} {approx}7.6-7.7) which are consistent with partial melting of Archean crust. Early Proterozoic crust was not a major contaminant of MRS rocks in the Lake Superior region. Most reported Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of MRS tholeiites from the main stage of volcanism in the Lake Superior region and of the Duluth Complex are comparable to the Nd and Pb isotopic data for Portage lake tholeiites. The isotopic enrichment of the MRS source compared to depleted mantle is striking and must have occurred at least 700 m.y. before 1100 Ma.

  13. Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

    2011-07-19

    This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

  14. Extreme Precipitation and Beach Closures in the Great Lakes Region: Evaluating Risk among the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Kathleen F.; Fossani, Cheryl L.; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Gronlund, Carina J.; O’Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of climate change, extreme precipitation events are expected to increase in frequency and intensity. Runoff from these extreme events poses threats to water quality and human health. We investigated the impact of extreme precipitation and beach closings on the risk of gastrointestinal illness (GI)-related hospital admissions among individuals 65 and older in 12 Great Lakes cities from 2000 to 2006. Poisson regression models were fit in each city, controlling for temperature and long-term time trends. City-specific estimates were combined to form an overall regional risk estimate. Approximately 40,000 GI-related hospital admissions and over 100 beach closure days were recorded from May through September during the study period. Extreme precipitation (≥90th percentile) occurring the previous day (lag 1) is significantly associated with beach closures in 8 of the 12 cities (p < 0.05). However, no association was observed between beach closures and GI-related hospital admissions. These results support previous work linking extreme precipitation to compromised recreational water quality. PMID:24534768

  15. Micrometeorological Measurements of Air-Surface Exchange Rates of PBTs in the Great Lakes Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, D. E.; Perlinger, J. A.; Morrow, P.

    2002-12-01

    The fate of persistent bioaccumulative toxic chemicals (PBTs) in the environment is controlled by their exchange with various aquatic and terrestrial surfaces. Many of the PBTs are semivolatile and present in the atmosphere almost entirely in the vapor phase. The rate of exchange of these vapor phase chemicals can be predicted from physicochemical properties of the chemical and the surface and the meteorological conditions during the exchange. However, field studies of the uptake of the PBTs are extremely limited or nonexistent making it difficult to evaluate the modeled transfer velocities. This presentation describes a novel method to directly measure air-surface exchange rates of PBTs above aquatic and terrestrial surfaces by the micrometeorological technique known as the modified Bowen ratio approach. Simultaneous measurements of the air temperature, water vapor content, windspeed, and the chemical species concentration at two heights above the surface are required to derive the transfer velocity of the chemical. Advanced techniques that minimize the number of sample preparation steps are required to make the two concentration measurements with adequate relative accuracy. To accomplish this task, ambient air is sampled with a multicapillary column and the analytes are directly desorbed into a high-resolution gas chromatograph for quantitation. This presentation will summarize preliminary measurements made in the near-shore region of Upper Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula on Lake Superior during the summer of 2001 and 2002.

  16. Urban anglers in the Great Lakes region: Fish consumption patterns, influences, and responses to advisory messages.

    PubMed

    Bruce Lauber, T; Connelly, Nancy A; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Knuth, Barbara A

    2017-07-15

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and many state advisory programs consider urban anglers at high risk of being exposed to contaminants through fish consumption because the urban poor may be dependent on fish they catch for food and lack access to non-contaminated fishing sites. Past research has supported this characterization of urban anglers, but most studies have been site-specific and limited to subsets of urban anglers. We used a mail survey and focus groups to (a) explore how urban anglers living in the Great Lakes region of the United States differed from rural and suburban anglers and (b) characterize their fishing patterns, fish consumption, factors influencing their fish consumption, and response to fish consumption advisory messages. Although we detected some differences between licensed urban, suburban, and rural anglers, their magnitude was not striking. Lower income urban anglers tended to consume less purchased and sport-caught fish than higher income urban anglers and were not at high risk as a group. Nevertheless, focus group data suggested there may be subpopulations of urban anglers, particularly from immigrant populations, that consume higher amounts of potentially contaminated fish. Although urban anglers in general may not require a special approach for communicating fish consumption advice, subpopulations within this group may be best targeted by using community-based programs to communicate fish consumption advice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fish consumption among women anglers of childbearing age in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Nancy A; Bruce Lauber, T; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Knuth, Barbara A

    2016-10-01

    Fish consumption advisories are issued by the federal government for women of childbearing age (WCBA). These advisories make recommendations about the amount and types of fish that should be consumed to provide the greatest health benefits to women and their children while avoiding risks from chemical contaminants. We used diary methods to study fish consumption patterns of 1395 WCBA in the Great Lakes coastal region who purchased fishing licenses, a group which has significant opportunity to eat larger quantities of fish. Very few members of this group reported exceeding the federal recommendations for total fish consumption (between 3% and 5% depending on assumptions about portion sizes), consumption of canned "white" tuna (0%), or consumption of "do not eat" species (4%). They did report eating more fish on average than recent national study estimates, but they did not report consuming as much fish as is recommended to obtain the greatest health benefits of fish consumption. Only 10-12% of study participants reported eating within the recommended range of 8-12oz. of fish per week, with 84-87% eating less than the recommended amount. Additional efforts are likely needed to encourage WCBA to eat more low-risk fish, even among this group of higher-than-average fish consumers.

  18. Estimating ecological water stress caused by anthropogenic uses in the US Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alian, S.; Mayer, A. S.; Maclean, A.; Watkins, D. W., Jr.; Gyawali, R.; Mirchi, A.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropocentric water resources management that prioritizes socio-economic growth can cause harmful ecological water stress by depriving aquatic ecosystems of the water needed to sustain habitats. It is important to better understand the impacts of water withdrawal by different economic sectors (e.g., agriculture, power utilities, manufacturing, etc.), withdrawal sources, and extent of return flow (i.e., return of water to river system) at different spatial and temporal scales in order to characterize potentially harmful streamflow disturbances, and to inform water management. Herein, GIS technology is used to characterize and map ecological water stress in the Great Lakes region by compiling and analyzing water withdrawal data for different use categories. An integrative geospatial method is developed to quantify catchment scale streamflow disturbance as the sum of flow depletion and return flow, and propagate it along the stream network in order to calculate water stress index as function of consumptive use and impacted streamflow. Results for the Kalamazoo River Watershed, Michigan, illustrate that although average annual and July water stress is generally relatively low, protective management actions may be necessary in a significant number of catchments, especially in urban catchments with very high water stress. Water stress is significantly higher under low flow conditions, indicating the need to adjust withdrawals to reduce adverse resource impacts on sensitive streams.

  19. Extreme precipitation and beach closures in the great lakes region: evaluating risk among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bush, Kathleen F; Fossani, Cheryl L; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Gronlund, Carina J; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-14

    As a result of climate change, extreme precipitation events are expected to increase in frequency and intensity. Runoff from these extreme events poses threats to water quality and human health. We investigated the impact of extreme precipitation and beach closings on the risk of gastrointestinal illness (GI)-related hospital admissions among individuals 65 and older in 12 Great Lakes cities from 2000 to 2006. Poisson regression models were fit in each city, controlling for temperature and long-term time trends. City-specific estimates were combined to form an overall regional risk estimate. Approximately 40,000 GI-related hospital admissions and over 100 beach closure days were recorded from May through September during the study period. Extreme precipitation (≥90th percentile) occurring the previous day (lag 1) is significantly associated with beach closures in 8 of the 12 cities (p < 0.05). However, no association was observed between beach closures and GI-related hospital admissions. These results support previous work linking extreme precipitation to compromised recreational water quality.

  20. Invasion of Nostocales (cyanobacteria) to Subtropical and Temperate Freshwater Lakes - Physiological, Regional, and Global Driving Forces.

    PubMed

    Sukenik, Assaf; Hadas, Ora; Kaplan, Aaron; Quesada, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Similar to the increased number of studies on invasive plants and animals in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, many reports were recently published on the invasion of Nostocales (cyanobacteria) to freshwater environments worldwide. Invasion and proliferation of Nostocales in new habitats have the potential to significantly alter the structure of the native community and to modify ecosystem functioning. But most importantly, they influence the water quality due to a variety of toxic compounds that some species produce. Therefore a special attention was given to the invasion and persistence of toxic cyanobacteria in many aquatic ecosystems. Here we summarize the currently published records on the invasion of two Nostocales genera, Cylindrospermopsis and Aphanizomenon, to lakes and water reservoirs in subtropical and temperate zones. These invading species possess traits thought to be common to many invasive organisms: high growth rate, high resource utilization efficiency and overall superior competitive abilities over native species when local conditions vary. Assuming that dispersion routes of cyanobacteria have not been changed much in recent decades, their recent establishment and proliferation in new habitats indicate changes in the environment under which they can exploit their physiological advantage over the native phytoplankton population. In many cases, global warming was identified as the major driving force for the invasion of Nostocales. Due to this uncontrollable trend, invasive Nostocales species are expected to maintain their presence in new habitats and further expand to new environments. In other cases, regional changes in nutrient loads and in biotic conditions were attributed to the invasion events.

  1. Distribution and diversity of diatom assemblages in surficial sediments of shallow lakes in Wapusk National Park (Manitoba, Canada) region of the Hudson Bay Lowlands.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Olivier; Bouchard, Frédéric; MacDonald, Lauren A; Hall, Roland I; Wolfe, Brent B; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2016-07-01

    The hydrology of shallow lakes (and ponds) located in the western Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is sensitive to climate warming and associated permafrost thaw. However, their biological characteristics are poorly known, which hampers effective aquatic ecosystem monitoring. Located in northern Manitoba along the southwestern coast of Hudson Bay, Wapusk National Park (WNP) encompasses numerous shallow lakes representative of the subarctic zone. We analyzed the distribution and diversity of diatom (microscopic algae; class Bacillariophyceae) assemblages in surficial sediments of 33 lakes located in three different ecozones spanning a vegetation gradient, from NE to SW: the Coastal Fen (CF), the Interior Peat Plateau (IPP), and the Boreal Spruce Forest (BSF). We found significant differences (P < 0.05) in diatom community composition between CF and IPP lakes, and CF and BSF lakes, but not between IPP and BSF lakes. These results are consistent with water chemistry measurements, which indicated distinct limnological conditions for CF lakes. Diatom communities in CF lakes were generally dominated by alkaliphilous taxa typical of waters with medium to high conductivity, such as Nitzschia denticula. In contrast, several IPP and BSF lakes were dominated by acidophilous and circumneutral diatom taxa with preference for low conductivity (e.g., Tabellaria flocculosa, Eunotia mucophila, E. necompacta var. vixcompacta). This exploratory survey provides a first detailed inventory of the diatom assemblages in the WNP region needed for monitoring programs to detect changes in shallow lake ecosystems and ecozonal shifts in response to climate variations.

  2. NREL/SCE High-Penetration PV Integration Project: Report on Field Demonstration of Advanced Inverter Functionality in Fontana, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, B.

    2014-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Southern California Edison High-Penetration PV Integration Project is (1) researching the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration photovoltaic (PV) integration, (2) determining mitigation methods to reduce or eliminate those impacts, and (3) seeking to demonstrate these mitigation methods on actual high-penetration PV distribution circuits. This report describes a field demonstration completed during the fall of 2013 on the Fontana, California, study circuit, which includes a total of 4.5 MW of interconnected utility-scale rooftop PV systems. The demonstration included operating a 2-MW PV system at an off-unity power factor that had been determined during previously completed distribution system modeling and PV impact assessment analyses. Data on the distribution circuit and PV system operations were collected during the 2-week demonstration period. This demonstration reinforces the findings of previous laboratory testing that showed that utility-scale PV inverters are capable of operating at off-unity power factor to mitigate PV impacts; however, because of difficulties setting and retaining PV inverter power factor set points during the field demonstration, it was not possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-unity power factor operation to mitigate the voltage impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Lessons learned from this field demonstration are presented to inform future field demonstration efforts.

  3. Spatially explicit exposure assessment for small streams in catchments of the orchard growing region `Lake Constance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, B.; Bach, M.; Krumpe, J.

    2009-04-01

    1. Introduction Small streams differ greatly from the standardised water body used in the context of aquatic risk assessment for the regulation of plant protection products in Germany. The standard water body is static, with a depth of 0.3 m and a width of 1.0 m. No dilution or water replacement takes place. Spray drift happens always in direction to the water body. There is no variability in drift deposition rate (90th percentile spray drift deposition values [2]). There is no spray drift filtering by vegetation. The application takes place directly adjacent to the water body. In order to establish a more realistic risk assessment procedure the Federal Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety (BVL) and the Federal Environment Agency (UBA) aggreed to replace deterministic assumptions with data distributions and spatially explicit data and introduce probabilistic methods [3, 4, 5]. To consider the spatial and temporal variability in the exposure situations of small streams the hydraulic and morphological characteristics of catchments need to be described as well as the spatial distribution of fields treated with pesticides. As small streams are the dominant type of water body in most German orchard regions, we use the growing region Lake Constance as pilot region. 2. Materials and methods During field surveys we derive basic morphological parameters for small streams in the Lake Constance region. The mean water width/depth ratio is 13 with a mean depth of 0.12 m. The average residence time is 5.6 s/m (n=87) [1]. Orchards are mostly located in the upper parts of the catchments. Based on an authoritative dataset on rivers and streams of Germany (ATKIS DLM25) we constructed a directed network topology for the Lake Constance region. The gradient of the riverbed is calculated for river stretches of > 500 m length. The network for the pilot region consists of 2000 km rivers and streams. 500 km stream length are located within a distance of 150 m to orchards. Within

  4. Eruptive history and geochronology of Mount Mazama and the Crater Lake region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2006-01-01

    Geologic mapping, K-Ar, and 40Ar/39Ar age determinations, supplemented by paleomagnetic measurements and geochemical data, are used to quantify the Quaternary volcanic history of the Crater Lake region in order to define processes and conditions that led to voluminous explosive eruptions. The Cascade arc volcano known as Mount Mazama collapsed during its climactic eruption of ∼50 km3 of mainly rhyodacitic magma ∼7700 yr ago to form Crater Lake caldera. The Mazama edifice was constructed on a Pleistocene silicic lava field, amidst monogenetic and shield volcanoes ranging from basalt to andesite similar to parental magmas for Mount Mazama. Between 420 ka and 35 ka, Mazama produced medium-K andesite and dacite in 2:1 proportion. The edifice was built in many episodes; some of the more voluminous occurred approximately coeval with volcanic pulses in the surrounding region, and some were possibly related to deglaciation following marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 12, 10, 8, 6, 5.2, and 2. Magmas as evolved as dacite erupted many times, commonly associated with or following voluminous andesite effusion. Establishment of the climactic magma chamber was under way when the first preclimactic rhyodacites vented ca. 27 ka. The silicic melt volume then grew incrementally at an average rate of 2.5 km3 k.y.−1 for nearly 20 k.y. The climactic eruption exhausted the rhyodacitic magma and brought up crystal-rich andesitic magma, mafic cumulate mush, and wall-rock granodiorite. Postcaldera volcanism produced 4 km3 of andesite during the first 200–500 yr after collapse, followed at ca. 4800 yr B.P. by 0.07 km3 of rhyodacite. The average eruption rate for all Mazama products was ∼0.4 km3 k.y.−1, but major edifice construction episodes had rates of ∼0.8 km3 k.y.−1. The long-term eruption rate for regional monogenetic and shield volcanoes was d∼0.07 km3 k.y.−1, but only ∼0.02 km3 k.y.−1 when the two major shields are excluded. Plutonic xenoliths and evidence for

  5. Using existing data to estimate aquifer properties, Great Lakes Region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darner, Robert A.; Sheets, Rodney A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine specific storage and porosity, areally limited and time-consuming aquifer tests are frequently done. Hydrogeologic studies often do not have the resources to collect such data and rely on existing data sources for aquifer properties. An alternative tool for determining these aquifer properties is the analysis of earth tides. The objective of this study was to determine whether existing water-level and barometric-pressure data could be used to determine aquifer properties, such as porosity and specific storage, on a regional scale. In this study, national databases from the Great Lakes Region were queried for continuous records of groundwater-level and barometric-pressure data. Records from 37 selected wells were then analyzed for barometric efficiency and earth-tide responses. Specific-storage (Ss) and porosity values were determined, and the quality of the results were assessed with a measure of the "goodness of fit" (percent variance) of reconstruction of the response. Records from wells completed in several aquifer systems were analyzed with varying degrees of success. Aquifer Ss values ranging from 5.9 x 10-8 to 3.8 x 10-6/m were derived, with percent variance of reconstruction ranging from 1% to 78%. Comparisons with aquifer and laboratory testing of Ss and porosity are favorable if the percent variance of reconstruction is above about 30%. Although the earth-tide-analysis method is not suitable for every situation, the Ss and porosity of aquifers can, in many places, be estimated with existing water-level and barometric-pressure data or with data that are relatively inexpensive to collect.

  6. Modeled aerosol nitrate formation pathways during wintertime in the Great Lakes region of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo Jung; Spak, Scott N.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Riemer, Nicole; Stanier, Charles O.

    2014-11-01

    Episodic wintertime particle pollution by ammonium nitrate is an important air quality concern across the Midwest U.S. Understanding and accurately forecasting PM2.5 episodes are complicated by multiple pathways for aerosol nitrate formation, each with uncertain rate parameters. Here, the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) simulated regional atmospheric nitrate budgets during the 2009 LADCO Winter Nitrate Study, using integrated process rate (IPR) and integrated reaction rate (IRR) tools to quantify relevant processes. Total nitrate production contributing to PM2.5 episodes is a regional phenomenon, with peak production over the Ohio River Valley and southern Great Lakes. Total nitrate production in the lower troposphere is attributed to three pathways, with 57% from heterogeneous conversion of N2O5, 28% from the reaction of OH and NO2, and 15% from homogeneous conversion of N2O5. TNO3 formation rates varied day-to-day and on synoptic timescales. Rate-limited production does not follow urban-rural gradients and NOx emissions due, to counterbalancing of urban enhancement in daytime HNO3 production with nocturnal reductions. Concentrations of HNO3 and N2O5 and nighttime TNO3 formation rates have maxima aloft (100-500 m), leading to net total nitrate vertical flux during episodes, with substantial vertical gradients in nitrate partitioning. Uncertainties in all three pathways are relevant to wintertime aerosol modeling and highlight the importance of interacting transport and chemistry processes during ammonium nitrate episodes, as well as the need for additional constraint on the system through field and laboratory experiments.

  7. Mosaic maternal ancestry in the Great Lakes region of East Africa.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Verónica; Pala, Maria; Salas, Antonio; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Amorim, António; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Carracedo, Ángel; Clarke, Douglas J; Hill, Catherine; Mormina, Maru; Shaw, Marie-Anne; Dunne, David W; Pereira, Rui; Pereira, Vânia; Prata, Maria João; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Rito, Teresa; Soares, Pedro; Gusmão, Leonor; Richards, Martin B

    2015-09-01

    The Great Lakes lie within a region of East Africa with very high human genetic diversity, home of many ethno-linguistic groups usually assumed to be the product of a small number of major dispersals. However, our knowledge of these dispersals relies primarily on the inferences of historical, linguistics and oral traditions, with attempts to match up the archaeological evidence where possible. This is an obvious area to which archaeogenetics can contribute, yet Uganda, at the heart of these developments, has not been studied for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation. Here, we compare mtDNA lineages at this putative genetic crossroads across 409 representatives of the major language groups: Bantu speakers and Eastern and Western Nilotic speakers. We show that Uganda harbours one of the highest mtDNA diversities within and between linguistic groups, with the various groups significantly differentiated from each other. Despite an inferred linguistic origin in South Sudan, the data from the two Nilotic-speaking groups point to a much more complex history, involving not only possible dispersals from Sudan and the Horn but also large-scale assimilation of autochthonous lineages within East Africa and even Uganda itself. The Eastern Nilotic group also carries signals characteristic of West-Central Africa, primarily due to Bantu influence, whereas a much stronger signal in the Western Nilotic group suggests direct West-Central African ancestry. Bantu speakers share lineages with both Nilotic groups, and also harbour East African lineages not found in Western Nilotic speakers, likely due to assimilating indigenous populations since arriving in the region ~3000 years ago.

  8. Development of a Regional Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraether (GDGT) - Temperature Calibration for Antarctic and sub-Antarctic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S. J.; Foster, L. C.; Pearson, E. J.; Steve, J.; Hodgson, D.; Saunders, K. M.; Verleyen, E.

    2016-12-01

    Temperature calibration models based on the relative abundances of sedimentary glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) have been used to reconstruct past temperatures in both marine and terrestrial environments, but have not been widely applied in high latitude environments. This is mainly because the performance of GDGT-temperature calibrations at lower temperatures and GDGT provenance in many lacustrine settings remains uncertain. To address these issues, we examined surface sediments from 32 Antarctic, sub-Antarctic and Southern Chilean lakes. First, we quantified GDGT compositions present and then investigated modern-day environmental controls on GDGT composition. GDGTs were found in all 32 lakes studied. Branched GDGTs (brGDGTs) were dominant in 31 lakes and statistical analyses showed that their composition was strongly correlated with mean summer air temperature (MSAT) rather than pH, conductivity or water depth. Second, we developed the first regional brGDGT-temperature calibration for Antarctic and sub-Antarctic lakes based on four brGDGT compounds (GDGT-Ib, GDGT-II, GDGT-III and GDGT-IIIb). Of these, GDGT-IIIb proved particularly important in cold lacustrine environments. Our brGDGT-Antarctic temperature calibration dataset has an improved statistical performance at low temperatures compared to previous global calibrations (r2=0.83, RMSE=1.45°C, RMSEP-LOO=1.68°C, n=36 samples), highlighting the importance of basing palaeotemperature reconstructions on regional GDGT-temperature calibrations, especially if specific compounds lead to improved model performance. Finally, we applied the new Antarctic brGDGT-temperature calibration to two key lake records from the Antarctic Peninsula and South Georgia. In both, downcore temperature reconstructions show similarities to known Holocene warm periods, providing proof of concept for the new Antarctic calibration model.

  9. Genetic analysis of historic western Great Lakes region wolf samples reveals early Canis lupus/lycaon hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wheeldon, Tyler; White, Bradley N

    2009-02-23

    The genetic status of wolves in the western Great Lakes region has received increased attention following the decision to remove them from protection under the US Endangered Species Act. A recent study of mitochondrial DNA has suggested that the recovered wolf population is not genetically representative of the historic population. We present microsatellite genotype data on three historic samples and compare them with extant populations, and interpret published genetic data to show that the pre-recovery population was admixed over a century ago by eastern wolf (Canis lycaon) and grey wolf (Canis lupus) hybridization. The DNA profiles of the historic samples are similar to those of extant animals in the region, suggesting that the current Great Lakes wolves are representative of the historic population.

  10. Cooperation control strategies for China's cross-region pollution in a lake basin based on green reduction cost.

    PubMed

    Li, Changmin; Sun, Dong; Xie, Xiaoqiang; Xue, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The cross-region water pollution issue has always been the widespread concern around the world. It becomes especially critical for China due to the imbalance relates to environmental costs that have accompanied rapid growth of economy. Though the government makes great efforts to improve it, the potential for water pollution conflict is still great. We consider the problem of determining combined control strategies for China's cross-region lake pollution based on the environmental green costs. The problem is first formulated as a generalized bilevel mathematical program where the upper level consists in each region that reduces environmental green costs including three parts: the reduction cost, pollution permit trade cost and cost of environment damage, while the lower level is represented by pollution permit equilibrium market. Finally, we take an empirical analysis in Taihu lake. The numerical study shows that the minimum costs of both total and regional are obviously superior to the current processing costs, which provides theoretical basis for the price of emission permits. Today, China's rapid gross domestic product (GDP) growth has come at a very high cost, as real estate prices have skyrocketed, the wealth gap has widened, and environmental pollution has worsened. China's central government is urged to correct the GDP-oriented performance evaluation system that is used to judge administrative region leaders. The cross-region water pollution issue has become a troubling issue that urgently needs to be resolved in China. This paper will not only actively aid efforts to govern Lake Taihu and other cross-region valleys, but it will also provide a supplement for theoretical research on cross-region pollution issues.

  11. Regional Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (RILWAS): Major findings for Adirondack and Blue Ridge Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Gherini, S.A.; Munson, R.K. ); Altwicker, E.; Clesceri, N. ); April, R. ); Chen, C.W. ); Cronan, C.S. ); Driscoll, C.T. ); Johannes, A.H. ); Newton, R.M.

    1989-12-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to test the hydrologic and chemical theory developed during the Integrated Lake Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS). A secondary objective was to assess the distribution of fish species among lakes of varying water quality. A total of 24 lake-watershed systems across the Adirondacks served as stuey sites over a period of two years. The US Forest Service's, Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, with over 20 years of data, was used to test the ILWAS model on a Blue Ridge mountain stream. 122 refs., 123 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. Spatial patterns of ice and snow storms disturbance on a subtropical forested landscape in the Poyang Lake region, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.

    2011-12-01

    In early 2008, an unexpected ice and snow storm (major freezing rain events) hit southern China, severely affected the subtropical forest ecosystems, especially in the Poyang Lake region. While plot and stand-scale ecological impacts of the 2008 storm have received attention, spatial heterogeneity of larger-extent damage has not been previously evaluated. The objective of this study is to investigate the spatial pattern of the 2008 ice and snow storm on subtropical forests and to analyze the effect of topography features (elevation, aspect and slope inclination) on the damage with remote sensing data in the Poyang Lake region. The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) was employed to assess forest vigor and canopy density in atmospherically corrected Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite imagery of study area. Digital change analysis of the baseline forest condition (2004 EVI data), and the condition encountered in a post-storm image (2008 EVI data) was conducted. The results display a northeast-to-southwest gradient and a gradient from the center to boundary of Poyang basin and Jitai basin in damage that apparently corresponds to a gradient in the depth of ice and snow that accumulated during the storms (Figure 1). Damage also varied topographically, particularly by elevation and slope in the Poyang Lake region. Topography affected patterns of ice and snow damages in study area with the greatest EVI losses occurring on north-, northeast- and east-facing (windward) slopes; and at middle elevations; and on slopes of moderate steepness. Unlike previous studies in North America that found damage was most extensive at middle elevations, EVI decrease associated with the 2008 storm was greater not only at the middle elevations (0.09), but also at the higher elevations (0.07) in the Poyang Lake region. This result suggests that subtropical forests are more vulnerable to ice and snow disturbance.

  13. Temporal and spatial variability of frost-free seasons in the Great Lakes region of the United States

    Treesearch

    Lejiang Yu; Shiyuan Zhong; Xindi Bian; Warren E. Heilman; Jeffrey A. Andresen

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and timing of frost events and the length of the growing season are critical limiting factors in many human and natural ecosystems. This study investigates the temporal and spatial variability of the date of last spring frost (LSF), the date of first fall frost (FFF), and the length of the frost-free season (FFS) in the Great Lakes region of the United...

  14. Climate in the Great Lakes Region between 14,000 and 4000 years ago from isotopic composition of conifer wood

    Treesearch

    Steven W. Leavitt; Irina P. Panyushkina; Todd Lange; Alex Wiedenhoeft; Li Cheng; R. Douglas Hunter; John Hughes; Frank Pranschke; Allan F. Schneider; Joseph Moran; Ron Stieglitz

    2006-01-01

    The isotopic composition of ancient wood has the potential to provide information about past environments. We analyzed the ä13C, ä18O, and ä2H of cellulose of conifer trees from several cross-sections at each of 9 sites around the Great Lakes region ranging from ~4000 to 14,000 cal BP. Isotopic values of Picea, Pinus, and Thuja species seem inter-changeable for ä18O...

  15. First record of Mylagaulid rodents (Rodentia, Mammalia) from the Miocene of Eastern Siberia (Olkhon Island, Baikal Lake, Irkutsk Region, Russia).

    PubMed

    Tesakov, A S; Lopatin, A V

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of rodent, Lamugaulus olkhonensis, belonging to the subfamily Promylagaulinae of the family Mylagaulidae, is described on the basis of isolated teeth from the Khalagay Formation of the Lower Miocene Tagay locality (Olkhon island, Lake Baikal, Irkutsk Region). This is the first record of mylagaulids in Eastern Siberia, significantly expanding the data on the distribution of this mainly North American group of rodents in Asia and showing its presence outside the Central Asian arid zone.

  16. Remote sensing estimation of the total phosphorus concentration in a large lake using band combinations and regional multivariate statistical modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongnian; Gao, Junfeng; Yin, Hongbin; Liu, Chuansheng; Xia, Ting; Wang, Jing; Huang, Qi

    2015-03-15

    Remote sensing has been widely used for ater quality monitoring, but most of these monitoring studies have only focused on a few water quality variables, such as chlorophyll-a, turbidity, and total suspended solids, which have typically been considered optically active variables. Remote sensing presents a challenge in estimating the phosphorus concentration in water. The total phosphorus (TP) in lakes has been estimated from remotely sensed observations, primarily using the simple individual band ratio or their natural logarithm and the statistical regression method based on the field TP data and the spectral reflectance. In this study, we investigated the possibility of establishing a spatial modeling scheme to estimate the TP concentration of a large lake from multi-spectral satellite imagery using band combinations and regional multivariate statistical modeling techniques, and we tested the applicability of the spatial modeling scheme. The results showed that HJ-1A CCD multi-spectral satellite imagery can be used to estimate the TP concentration in a lake. The correlation and regression analysis showed a highly significant positive relationship between the TP concentration and certain remotely sensed combination variables. The proposed modeling scheme had a higher accuracy for the TP concentration estimation in the large lake compared with the traditional individual band ratio method and the whole-lake scale regression-modeling scheme. The TP concentration values showed a clear spatial variability and were high in western Lake Chaohu and relatively low in eastern Lake Chaohu. The northernmost portion, the northeastern coastal zone and the southeastern portion of western Lake Chaohu had the highest TP concentrations, and the other regions had the lowest TP concentration values, except for the coastal zone of eastern Lake Chaohu. These results strongly suggested that the proposed modeling scheme, i.e., the band combinations and the regional multivariate

  17. Seasonal dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum infection in buffaloes in the Poyang Lake region and suggestions on local treatment schemes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Ming; Yu, Hua; Shi, Yao-Jun; Li, Hao; He, Liang; Li, Jian-Xi; Dong, Chang-Hua; Xie, Qiao; Jin, Ya-Mei; Lu, Ke; Lin, Jiao-Jiao

    2013-11-15

    Schistosomiasis japonica remains a major public health problem and the Poyang Lake region in Jiangxi province is one of the worst affected endemic areas. Buffaloes play a major role in the transmission of Schistosoma japonicum to humans. The aim of the present study was to increase understanding of the epidemic characteristics of schistosomiasis japonica in water buffaloes in the Poyang Lake region, after achieving the national mid-term goal, and to provide a basis for further interventions. The baseline prevalence in two villages in the Poyang Lake region in May 2010 was compared with respect to usage, sex and age in the total study population. Seasonal dynamics from May 2010 to May 2011 were observed in a natural village in the studied area. The baseline prevalence of infection in both villages (Caohui and Gaozhou) was 4.94% in May 2010. The prevalence in buffalo younger than 12 months was 12.82% in Caohui and 15.11% in Gaozhou, which was significantly higher than that found in those aged 13-24 months and older than 24 months. Of the 28 infected buffaloes, 82.14% (23) were younger than 12 months. The flow of seasonal dynamics showed that S. japonicum infection buffaloes were found from May to July and from November to January of the following year. This survey suggested that it is necessary to conduct two mass treatments (especially for young animals) in late March or early April and November, with an additional treatment of positive animals in July or June.

  18. A link between North Atlantic cooling and dry events in the core SW monsoon region in Lonar Lake, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Philip; Gaye, Birgit; Prasad, Sushma; Plessen, Birgit; Stebich, Martina; Anoop, Ambili; Riedel, Nils; Basavaiah, Nathani

    2014-05-01

    A sediment core from Lonar Lake in central India covers the complete Holocene and was used to reconstruct the monsoon history of the core SW-monsoon region. We compare C/N ratios, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes, grain size, as well as amino acid derived degradation proxies with climatically sensitive proxies of other records from South Asia and the North Atlantic region. The comparison reveals some more or less contemporaneous climate shifts. At Lonar Lake, a general long term climate transition from wet conditions during the early Holocene to drier conditions during the late Holocene, delineating the insolation curve, can be reconstructed. Several phases of shorter term climate alteration that superimpose the general climate trend correlate with cold phases in the North Atlantic region. The most pronounced climate deteriorations indicated by our data occurred between 6.2 - 5.2, 4.65 - 3.9, and 2.05 - 0.55 cal ka BP. The strong dry phase between 4.65 - 3.9 cal ka BP at Lonar Lake corroborates the hypothesis that severe climate deterioration contributed to the decline of the Indus Civilisation about 3.9 ka BP.

  19. Large Water Management Projects and Schistosomiasis Control, Dongting Lake Region, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue-Sheng; Zhao, Zheng-Yuan; He, Yong-Kang; Ellis, Magda K.; McManus, Donald P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction of the Three Gorges Dam across the Yangtze River will substantially change the ecology of the Dongting Lake in southern China. In addition, the Central and Hunan Provinces’ governmental authorities have instigated a Return Land to Lake Program that will extend the Dongting Lake surface area from the current 2,681 km2 to 4,350 km2.The previous construction of embankments and the large silt deposits made by the Yangtze River and other connecting rivers have contributed to frequent disastrous flooding. As a consequence of the 2 water projects, >2 million persons and their domestic animals are being resettled. This article provides an overview of the historical background of these 2 large water management projects, the associated population movement, and their impact on future transmission and control of schistosomiasis in the Dongting Lake area. The dam will likely substantially extend the range of the snail habitats and increase schistosome transmission and schistosomiasis cases. PMID:18214167

  20. 40 CFR 81.275 - Lake Tahoe Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited: In the State of California: El Dorado County—that portion of El Dorado County within the drainage area naturally tributary to Lake Tahoe including said...

  1. 40 CFR 81.275 - Lake Tahoe Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited: In the State of California: El Dorado County—that portion of El Dorado County within the drainage area naturally tributary to Lake Tahoe including said...

  2. 40 CFR 81.275 - Lake Tahoe Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited: In the State of California: El Dorado County—that portion of El Dorado County within the drainage area naturally tributary to Lake Tahoe including said...

  3. 40 CFR 81.275 - Lake Tahoe Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited: In the State of California: El Dorado County—that portion of El Dorado County within the drainage area naturally tributary to Lake Tahoe including said...

  4. A generalized forest growth projection system applied to the Lake States region.

    Treesearch

    USDA FS

    1979-01-01

    A collection of 12 papers describing the need, design, calibration database, potential diameter growth function, crown ratio, modifier, and mortality functions, as well as a diameter growth allocation rule, management algorithms, computer program, tests, and Lake State climate during calibration.

  5. ZOOPLANKTON - PHYTOPLANKTON BIOMASS SEZE STRUCTURE IN NEARSHORE REGIONS OF LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation addresses new technologies and new strategies for developing biological indicators to assess the Great Lakes . . . We assessed biomass size-spectra acquired with an optical plankton counter (OPC) or laser optical counter (LOPC) and phytoplankton samples analyzed with...

  6. 40 CFR 81.275 - Lake Tahoe Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... outermost boundaries of the area so delimited: In the State of California: El Dorado County—that portion of El Dorado County within the drainage area naturally tributary to Lake Tahoe including said...

  7. ZOOPLANKTON - PHYTOPLANKTON BIOMASS SEZE STRUCTURE IN NEARSHORE REGIONS OF LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation addresses new technologies and new strategies for developing biological indicators to assess the Great Lakes . . . We assessed biomass size-spectra acquired with an optical plankton counter (OPC) or laser optical counter (LOPC) and phytoplankton samples analyzed with...

  8. Human health research and policy development: experience in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Annette E; Hicks, Heraline E; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2005-01-01

    As a direct outgrowth of industrial and agricultural activities, the quality of the Great Lakes ecosystem has declined significantly because of toxic substances in the water, eutrophication, overfishing, and invasive species that have been introduced into the waterways. Although measures have been adopted to restore the health of the ecosystem, contamination of Great Lakes sport fish continues arising from conditions that still prevail, but on a more limited scale. As a consequence, the Great Lakes states have issued guidelines for the public in the form of health advisories for fish consumption to encourage practices that will minimize exposure to contaminants found in Great Lakes sport fish. Scientific research has strongly influenced many policy decisions, including the development of laws, rules, and guidelines applicable to public health not only in regard to fish advisories but also other issues impacting human health. This paper proposes to outline how policy has been influenced by scientific findings and the far-reaching effect that these decisions have had on the health status of the public in the Great Lakes area and its potential for influencing the nation as a whole and our global neighbors. Within the Great Lakes basin, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and mercury are the subject of the greatest number of fish advisories. Great Lakes-based researchers have studied populations residing in the Great Lakes basin to determine their level of awareness concerning fish consumption health advisories. They found that almost 50% of the residents who consumed Great Lakes sport fish were aware of sport fish consumption advisories. Of those with awareness, almost 60% were males and only about 40% were females. The researchers attributed the greater awareness among males to the health advisory materials that males receive with their fishing licenses and to their contact with fishing-related groups. The lower level of awareness among women regarding fish consumption

  9. Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Regional Transportation Study: Commodity Flow Forecasts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    the officials of the two major Canadian steel producers, the Steel Company of Canada (Stelco) and Dominion Foundries ( Dofasco ) , applied to 1978 iron...through each lock system was adjusted to account for sourcing shifts identified by Stelco and Dofasco . V-20 j! Forecasts of other commodities in this...increase strongly in 2000 due to a new Dofasco plant on Lake V-21 Ontario scheduled to open in the year 2000. This plant will receive ore from Lake

  10. Statistical distributions of airborne PCB and pesticide concentrations measured at regional sites on the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Gatz, D.F.; Sweet, C.W.; Basu, I.; Harlin, K.S.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to report results of testing measured concentrations of total PCBs and ten chlorinated pesticides in air and precipitation in the Great Lakes area for goodness-of-fit to the log normal distribution. Samples were collected at sites on Lakes Superior, Michigan, Erie, and Ontario in 1991--1993. With very few exceptions, distributions of concentrations in the gas and particle phases and in precipitation were not significantly different from log normal.

  11. Tree-Ring Proxies of Hydroclimate Variability in the Great Lakes Region during Cold Excursions Back to 15ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyushkina, I. P.; Leavitt, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    A decade-long investigation of subfossil wood buried in glacio-fluvial, fluvial and lacustrine deposits from the U.S. Great Lakes region has resulted in a Great Lakes tree-ring network (GLTRN) comprising 47 sites dated from ca. 15 ka to 3ka. The GLTRN provides high-resolution proxies for exploration of local and regional responses to hydroclimate change at inter-annual scales during the transition from the Late Pleistocene to the Holocene. Classification of radiometric ages of GLTRN wood with relative cumulative-probability function delineates intervals and importance of hydrological changes in time and space. The overwhelming majority of wood burial events correlate with generally cold climate excursions. Forest-stand deterioration and tree mortality events at the studied sites are demonstrated to result from flooding, via river aggradation (identifying occurrence of extreme hydrologic events), rise of water table, or lake inundation. To better evaluate the special patterns of hydrological change back to 15ka, we developed four floating d13C chronologies from spruce tree rings. The length of these tree-ring proxy series that capture high-frequency moisture variability of the Great Lakes area ranges from 120 to 250 years. Our data indicate progressive wet intervals during the cold excursions precisely dated with 14C tree-ring wiggles at 13.7ka, 12.1ka, and 11.3ka that fall in the Bølling-Allerød and Pre-Boreal Interstadials, and Younger Dryas Stadial. The inter-annual and decadal variability of tree-ring moisture proxies are similar across the studied locations and time intervals. Such coherence of respective proxies may result from both local ecological stability of spruce communities or regional response to a common source of moisture at the studied time intervals and locations. This study demonstrates a potential of GLTRN proxies for modeling hydroclimatic changes at the North American continent back 15 ka.

  12. The Water Level Fall of Lake Megali Prespa (N Greece): an Indicator of Regional Water Stress Driven by Climate Change and Amplified by Water Extraction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schriek, Tim; Giannakopoulos, Christos

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean stands out globally due to its sensitivity to (future) climate change, with future projections predicting an increase in excessive drought events and declining rainfall. Regional freshwater ecosystems are particularly threatened: precipitation decreases, while extreme droughts increase and human impacts intensify (e.g. water extraction, drainage, pollution and dam-building). Many Mediterranean lake-wetland systems have shrunk or disappeared over the past two decades. Protecting the remaining systems is extremely important for supporting global biodiversity and for ensuring sustainable water availability. This protection should be based on a clear understanding of lake-wetland hydrological responses to natural and human-induced changes, which is currently lacking in many parts of the Mediterranean. The interconnected Prespa-Ohrid Lake system is a global hotspot of biodiversity and endemism. The unprecedented fall in water level (~8m) of Lake Megali Prespa threatens this system, but causes remain debated. Modelling suggests that the S Balkan will experience rainfall and runoff decreases of ~30% by 2050. However, projections revealing the potential impact of these changes on future lake level are unavailable as lake regime is not understood. A further drop in lake level may have serious consequences. The Prespa Lakes contribute ~25% of the total inflow into Lake Ohrid through underground karst channels; falling lake levels decrease this discharge. Lake Ohrid, in turn, feeds the Drim River. This entire catchment may therefore be affected by falling lake levels; its water resources are of great importance for Greece, Albania, FYROM and Montenegro (e.g. tourism, agriculture, hydro-energy, urban & industrial use). This new work proves that annual water level fluctuations of Lake Megali Prespa are predominantly related to precipitation during the first 7 months (Oct-Apr) of the hydrological year (Oct-Sep). Lake level is very sensitive to regional and

  13. Growth changes of the bloater (Coregonus hoyi) of the Apostle Islands region of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dryer, William R.; Beil, Joseph

    1968-01-01

    Studies were based primarily on 3,097 bloaters collected in experimental gill nets and bottom trawls fished in 1958-65 in the Apostle Islands region of Lake Superior. The average size of bloaters increased considerably during the period. The percentage longer than 8.9 inches increased from 45% in 1959 to 99% in 1965. Calculated lengths were without exception higher in 1962-65 than in 1958-61. Growth in length and weight showed nearly steady improvement from 1951 to 1964. The species composition of chubs has apparently changed considerably over the past 40 years. The bloater has replaced the shortjaw cisco (C. zenithicus) as the principal species in commercial landings of chubs in Wisconsin. Annulus formation of bloaters extended from mid-May to August. Growth was slow during the spring and early summer but increased sharply in August. Age-group VI was dominant in the samples. Fluctuations in year-class strength were slight. Females outnumbered males in all age groups above III. The sex composition varied according to season of capture. Some bloaters matured at age II and all fish older than III were mature. The shortest length of mature bloaters was 6.0 inches for males and 7.0 inches for females; all fish longer than 8.4 inches were mature. Apostle Island bloaters spawn principally in February and March. The average number of eggs produced by 20 females, 8.4 to 11.7 inches long, was 6,533. Crustaceans were the most common food.

  14. Do singing-ground surveys reflect american woodcock abundance in the western Great Lakes region?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matthew R. Nelson,; Andersen, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The Singing-ground Survey (SGS) is the primary monitoring tool used to assess population status and trends of American woodcock (Scolopax minor). Like most broad-scale surveys, the SGS cannot be directly validated because there are no independent estimates of abundance of displaying male American woodcock at an appropriate spatial scale. Furthermore, because locations of individual SGS routes have generally remained stationary since the SGS was standardized in 1968, it is not known whether routes adequately represent the landscapes they were intended to represent. To indirectly validate the SGS, we evaluated whether 1) counts of displaying male American woodcock on SGS routes related to land-cover types known to be related to American woodcock abundance, 2) changes in counts of displaying male American woodcock through time were related to changes in land cover along SGS routes, and 3) land-cover type composition along SGS routes was similar to land-cover type composition of the surrounding landscape. In Wisconsin and Minnesota, USA, counts along SGS routes reflected known American woodcock-habitat relations. Increases in the number of woodcock heard along SGS routes over a 13-year period in Wisconsin were related to increasing amounts of early successional forest, decreasing amounts of mature forest, and increasing dispersion and interspersion of cover types. Finally, the cover types most strongly associated with American woodcock abundance were represented along SGS routes in proportion to their composition of the broader landscape. Taken together, these results suggest that in the western Great Lakes region, the SGS likely provides a reliable tool for monitoring relative abundance and population trends of breeding, male American woodcock.

  15. Quantification and index of non-point source pollution in Taihu Lake region with GIS.

    PubMed

    Guo, H Y; Wang, X R; Zhu, J G

    2004-01-01

    The contribution of phosphorus and nitrogen from non-point source pollution (NPS) in the Taihu Lake region was investigated through case study and surveying in the town of Xueyan, From experimental results coupled with survey and statistics in the studied area, the distribution of nitrogen and phosphorus input to the water body is achieved from four main sources: agricultural land, village, the town center and the poultry factory. The results showed that about 38% of total phosphorus (TP) and 48% of total nitrogen (TN) discharged is from agricultural land, 33% of TP and 40% TN from village residents, 25% of TP and 10% of TN from the town center and 4% of TP and 2% of TN from the poultry factory. The Agricultural Non-point Pollution Potential Index (APPI) system for identifying and ranking critical areas of NPS was established with a Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based technology. Quantification of the key factors in non-point sources pollution was carried out utilizing the following: Sediment Production Index (SPI), Runoff Index (RI), People and Animal Loading Index (PALI) and Chemical Use Index (CUI). These are the core parts of the model, and the weighting factor of each index was evaluated according the results of quantification. The model was successfully applied for evaluating APPI in Xueyan. Results from the model showed that the critical area identified for NPS control in Xueyan. The model has several advantages including: requiring fewer parameters, easy acquirement of these parameters, friendly interface, and convenience of operation. In addition it is especially useful for identifying critical areas of NPS when the basic data are not fully accessible, which is the present situation in China.

  16. Alpine Channel and Floodplain Dynamics in the Lake Tahoe Region, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liquori, M.; Chris, B.; Parris, A.; Heins, A.; Stofleth, J.; Wickland, M.

    2006-12-01

    Alpine floodplains provide diverse habitat components for terrestrial and aquatic species, and strongly influence bank stability and channel migration processes. They also present complex restoration challenges. Several systems in the Lake Tahoe region have been diagnosed with incised channel conditions that generate excessive mobile sediment from eroding banks, degrade riparian vegetation communities, and diminish floodplain wetland abundance and quality. Conventional efforts to restore these systems focus on reconnecting floodplains, primarily through channel or floodplain modifications designed to reestablish floodplain inundation frequency near a Q1.5 level. Recent observations along lower Squaw Creek and the Upper Truckee River suggest that human impacts and climate-induced shifts over the 20th Century appear to significantly change the processes and dynamics between channels and floodplains. Our observations highlight differences in alpine settings as compared with lowland environments. Increased rain-on-snow frequency appears to increase the importance of avulsion and channel widening processes over channel meander processes. Loss of channel sinuosity, increases in depth and changes in channel shape appear to follow rain-on-snow events. These changes affect the overall sediment transport regime, even as snowmelt duration continues to exert the primary influence over dominant discharge relationships. During floods, discontinuous, proximal deposition of coarse sediment replaces uniform, distal deposition of finer sediments, altering the structure of the channel bed and floodplain. Early snowm