Science.gov

Sample records for food transportation act

  1. Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-04-06

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule to establish requirements for shippers, loaders, carriers by motor vehicle and rail vehicle, and receivers engaged in the transportation of food, including food for animals, to use sanitary transportation practices to ensure the safety of the food they transport. This action is part of our larger effort to focus on prevention of food safety problems throughout the food chain and is part of our implementation of the Sanitary Food Transportation Act of 2005 (2005 SFTA) and the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011 (FSMA).

  2. Subchronic administration of short-acting naltrexone has no effect on striatal dopamine transporter availability, food intake or body weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaaijer, Eline R; de Bruin, Kora; la Fleur, Susanne E; Goudriaan, Anna E; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone is successfully used in the treatment of opioid and alcohol dependence. However, questions have been raised about possible anhedonic side effects, because the opioid system is directly involved in hedonic responses to natural rewarding activities, possibly due to its indirect effects on the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT). In order to test this hypothesis, 30 rats were randomized to either a 10-day treatment with 3 mg/kg short-acting naltrexone or vehicle. No significant differences between the groups were found in striatal DAT availability, cumulative food intake (for 48 or 72 h), body weight gain and abdominal fatpad weight. Thus, the results of this study suggest that (sub)chronic treatment with short-acting naltrexone does not induce possible anhedonic effects. However, it cannot be ruled out the anhedonic effect of naltrexone is only short-lived and thus not detected in the current study. Therefore, future studies are needed to study possible acute anhedonic effects at several time points shortly after short-acting naltrexone administration and to directly compare the possible anhedonic effects of long-acting with those of short-acting opioid antagonists.

  3. Ballistic food transport in toucans.

    PubMed

    Baussart, Sabine; Korsoun, Leonid; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Bels, Vincent

    2009-08-01

    The basic mechanism of food transport in tetrapods is lingual-based. Neognathous birds use this mechanism for exploiting a large diversity of food resources, whereas paleognathous birds use cranioinertial mechanism with or without tongue involvement. Food transport in two neognathous species of toucans (Ramphastos toco and R. vitellinus) is defined as ballistic transport mechanism. Only one transport cycle is used for moving the food from the tip of the beak to the pharynx. The food is projected between jaws with similar initial velocity in both species. At the time of release, the angle between trajectory of food position and horizontal is higher in R. vitellinus with a shorter beak than in R. toco. The tongue never makes contact with the food nor is it used to expand the buccal cavity. Tongue movement is associated with throat expansion, permitting the food to reach the entrance of the esophagus at the end of the ballistic trajectory. Selection of large food items in the diet may explain the evolutionary trend of using ballistic transport in the feeding behavior of toucans, which plays a key role in ecology of tropical forest.

  4. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Sutton, Betty [D-OH-13

    2009-06-08

    01/04/2011 Became Public Law No: 111-353. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.2751 was introduced and first passed the House as the Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save Act. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Sutton, Betty [D-OH-13

    2009-06-08

    01/04/2011 Became Public Law No: 111-353. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.2751 was introduced and first passed the House as the Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save Act. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Sutton, Betty [D-OH-13

    2009-06-08

    01/04/2011 Became Public Law No: 111-353. (PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.2751 was introduced and first passed the House as the Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save Act. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Sutton, Betty [D-OH-13

    2009-06-08

    01/04/2011 Became Public Law No: 111-353. (PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.2751 was introduced and first passed the House as the Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save Act. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Jackson-Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18

    2009-04-30

    06/08/2009 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Jackson-Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18

    2009-04-30

    06/08/2009 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Jackson-Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18

    2009-04-30

    Senate - 06/08/2009 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Containers for transporting perishable foods

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, K.; Yuki, I.; Ozeni, S.; Niizeki, K.; Matsushita, K.; Akashi, K.

    1988-05-17

    A container for use in the transportation of perishable foods is described comprising: a storage chamber for containing perishable foods and having a door therein and a machine room divided from each other by partition walls; main cold air flow channels opened at one end on the side of the door and auxiliary cold air flow channels closed at the end on the side of the door, both of which are respectively disposed on the surface of at least one of the bottom wall, top wall or one side wall of the storage chamber; means for flowing cold air having ports perforated substantially over the entire region at the surface of the auxiliary cold air flow channels on the side of the storage chamber; means disposed within the machine room for controlling the temperature of the circulated cold air from the storage chamber and then supplying the air by way of the main cold air flow channels to the inside of the storage chamber; and means disposed within the machine room for pressurizing the circulated cold air from the storage chamber, to a pressure higher than that of the cold air circulated through the main cold air flow channels, and then supplying the air at higher pressure by way of the auxiliary cold air flow channels to the inside of the storage chamber.

  12. [Food Sanitation Act and Minamata Disease].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Immediately after the official recognition of Minamata disease (1956.5.l) a study group at Kumamoto University suggested that Minamata disease was caused by food poisoning. The next year, this suggestion was accepted by the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHW). Prior to the decision to apply the Food Sanitation Act (FSA), the local government asked MHW for the application of FSA. Soon after, the chief of the Public Health Bureau replied to the local government that the application of FSA to the Minamata area was impossible. Epidemiological investigations of residents and polluted areas, therefore, were not carried out. Data essential for the screening for exposed residents were unavailable. The criteria for the screening were presented. The Environmental Agency (EA) presented the criteria in the form of notice in 1971, which were revised in 1977. Notwithstanding the clear difference between the original and revised criteria, EA insisted that these two sets of criteria were quite similar. This insistence by EA and the absence of epidemiological data on residents and polluted area resulted in the present confusion about Minamata disease. The application of FSA was stopped by bureaucrats who had no interest in the environmental problems and by several scientists patronized by stakeholders (Chisso, Japanese Association of Chemical Industries, MHW and EA). Stakeholders suppressed science.

  13. 76 FR 30727 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Focus on Inspections and Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Focus on Inspections and Compliance AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public...

  14. High Labor Costs? Centralize Food Preparation and Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy V.

    1993-01-01

    Cites the advantages and disadvantages for school districts of centralized food preparation and of the different food systems such as hot food systems, transporting cold or frozen food, and cook-chill systems. (MLF)

  15. Food transport in the C. elegans pharynx.

    PubMed

    Avery, Leon; Shtonda, Boris B

    2003-07-01

    Pumping of the C. elegans pharynx transports food particles (bacteria) posteriorly. We examined muscle motions to determine how this posterior transport is effected. We find that the motions of the middle section of the pharynx, the anterior isthmus, are delayed relative to the anterior section, the corpus. Simulations in which particles are assumed to move at mean fluid velocity when not captured by the walls of the pharyngeal lumen show that delayed isthmus motions do indeed cause net particle transport; however, the amount is much less than in the real pharynx. We propose that the geometry of the pharyngeal lumen forces particles to the center, where they move faster than mean fluid velocity. When this acceleration is incorporated into the simulation, particles are transported efficiently. The transport mechanism we propose explains past observations that the timing of muscle relaxation is important for effective transport. Our model also makes a prediction, which we confirm, that smaller bacteria are better food sources for C. elegans than large ones.

  16. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  17. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  18. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  19. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... Laws § 147.23 Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (a) Plant... the plant quarantine regulations. (b) Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The entry of food...

  20. Reconsidering Food Reward, Brain Stimulation, and Dopamine: Incentives Act Forward.

    PubMed

    Newquist, Gunnar; Gardner, R Allen

    2015-01-01

    In operant conditioning, rats pressing levers and pigeons pecking keys depend on contingent food reinforcement. Food reward agrees with Skinner's behaviorism, undergraduate textbooks, and folk psychology. However, nearly a century of experimental evidence shows, instead, that food in an operant conditioning chamber acts forward to evoke species-specific feeding behavior rather than backward to reinforce experimenter-defined responses. Furthermore, recent findings in neuroscience show consistently that intracranial stimulation to reward centers and dopamine release, the proposed reward molecule, also act forward to evoke inborn species-specific behavior. These results challenge longstanding views of hedonic learning and must be incorporated into contemporary learning theory.

  1. The Indian National Food Security Act, 2013: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Varadharajan, Kiruba Sankar; Thomas, Tinku; Kurpad, Anura

    2014-06-01

    The National Food Security Act (NFSA) 2013, passed recently by the Indian Parliament, aims to ensure food security in India, chiefly by providing cereals at subsidized prices through the Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS) for about two-thirds of households. The predominant line of criticism of the NFSA has been the costs of such an ambitious rights-based approach in the context of decelerating economic growth and growing fiscal deficits. We argue that the food subsidy has been increasing through the last few decades and is set to climb even higher with this act but that the incremental costs, at about 0.2% of gross domestic product, are not as high as claimed. Further, recent evidence of increasing utilization of the TPDS and decreasing corruption add credence to the act's premise that significant income transfers to poor households can be achieved, thereby promoting food security as well as dietary diversity. Several concerns remain to be addressed in the design and implementation of the act, including its proposed coverage, a cereal-centric approach, the identification of beneficiaries, and its adaptability at the state level. If these are resolved effectively, the act can prove to be a significant step forward in India's long-drawn-out battle against undernutrition and food insecurity. Finally, the NFSA also provides a fresh opportunity to reform and strengthen the TPDS, which has been an integral component of India's strategy to achieve food security at the national level.

  2. H. R. 3430: Food Contamination Prevention Act. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 6, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bill was introduced in the House of Representatives on October 6, 1989 for the purpose of amending the Solid Waste Disposal Act to regulate the transportation in commerce of solid waste food by prohibiting certain vehicles from transporting both waste and food, and by requiring health and safety standards for certain vehicles used to transport certain waste and food. Hazardous waste, medical waste, and terminal waste cannot be transported in any vehicle that is also used to transport food, food additives, drugs, or cosmetics.

  3. Amtrak Secure Transportation of Firearms Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Wicker, Roger F. [R-MS

    2009-08-06

    Senate - 08/06/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Federal Submerged Lands Transportation Development Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Murkowski, Lisa [R-AK

    2013-10-29

    Senate - 10/29/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Surface Transportation Savings Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Perriello, Thomas S.P. [D-VA-5

    2010-06-25

    07/21/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Transportation Reports Elimination Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Shuster, Bill [R-PA-9

    2013-12-02

    01/09/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Pipeline Transportation Safety Improvement Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Lautenberg, Frank R. [D-NJ

    2010-09-28

    Senate - 09/28/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Horse Transportation Safety Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Kirk, Mark Steven [R-IL

    2011-06-27

    Senate - 06/27/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Horse Transportation Safety Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Kirk, Mark Steven [R-IL

    2013-08-01

    Senate - 08/01/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Transportation Infrastructure Grants and Economic Reinvestment Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Murray, Patty [D-WA

    2011-05-10

    Senate - 05/10/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2010-07-22

    Senate - 07/22/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Surface Transportation Savings Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Perriello, Thomas S.P. [D-VA-5

    2010-06-25

    07/21/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2011-01-25

    Senate - 01/25/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2009-12-16

    12/21/2010 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 111-380. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Essential Transportation Worker Identification Credential Assessment Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jackson Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18

    2013-09-27

    07/29/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Transportation Reports Elimination Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Shuster, Bill [R-PA-9

    2013-12-02

    01/09/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2009-12-16

    12/21/2010 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 111-380. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2014-09-08

    12/12/2014 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 113-321. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2014-09-08

    12/12/2014 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 113-321. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Surface Transportation Safety Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Baucus, Max [D-MT

    2011-05-09

    Senate - 05/09/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Protecting Taxpayers in Transportation Asset Transfers Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard J. [D-IL

    2011-06-16

    Senate - 06/16/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Essential Transportation Worker Identification Credential Assessment Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jackson Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18

    2013-09-27

    07/29/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2009-12-16

    Senate - 12/21/2010 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 111-380. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Essential Transportation Worker Identification Credential Assessment Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Jackson Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18

    2013-09-27

    Senate - 07/29/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2014-09-08

    Senate - 12/12/2014 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 113-321. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Surface Transportation Savings Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Perriello, Thomas S.P. [D-VA-5

    2010-06-25

    Senate - 07/21/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Transportation Reports Elimination Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Shuster, Bill [R-PA-9

    2013-12-02

    Senate - 01/09/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Protecting Taxpayers in Transportation Asset Transfers Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2011-06-16

    06/16/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (text of measure as introduced: CR S3896-3897) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. 78 FR 43261 - Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act... for the Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) program to pay the subsidy....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation...

  10. 78 FR 19715 - Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Provision Requiring FDA To Establish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act... comment period for the notice entitled ``Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Provision... Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), and as it implements the FSMA provisions relating to the tracking...

  11. 21 CFR 880.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 880.9 Section 880.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket...

  12. 21 CFR 880.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 880.9 Section 880.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket...

  13. 21 CFR 862.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 862.9 Section 862.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of...

  14. 21 CFR 880.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 880.9 Section 880.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket...

  15. 21 CFR 862.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 862.9 Section 862.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of...

  16. 21 CFR 880.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 880.9 Section 880.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket...

  17. 21 CFR 862.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 862.9 Section 862.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of...

  18. 21 CFR 862.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 862.9 Section 862.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of...

  19. 21 CFR 880.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 880.9 Section 880.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket...

  20. 21 CFR 862.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 862.9 Section 862.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of...

  1. 76 FR 64354 - Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small Business; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  2. COPI acts in both vesicular and tubular transport

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia-Shu; Valente, Carmen; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Turacchio, Gabriele; Layre, Emilie; Moody, D. Branch; Leslie, Christina C.; Gelb, Michael H.; Brown, William J.; Corda, Daniela; Luini, Alberto; Hsu, Victor W.

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular transport is now appreciated to occur through two general types of carriers, either vesicles 1, 2 or tubules 3, 4. Coat proteins act as the core machinery that initiates vesicle formation 1, 2, but the counterpart that initiates tubule formation has been unclear. Here, we find that the Coat Protein I (COPI) complex initially drives the formation of Golgi buds. Subsequently, a set of opposing lipid enzymatic activities determines whether these buds become vesicles or tubules. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) acyltransferase type γ (LPAAT–γ) promotes COPI vesicle fission for retrograde vesicular transport. In contrast, cytosolic phospholipase A2 type α (cPLA2–α) inhibits this fission event to induce COPI tubules, which act in anterograde intra-Golgi transport and Golgi ribbon formation. These findings not only advance a molecular understanding of how COPI vesicle fission is achieved, but also shed new insight into how COPI acts in intra-Golgi transport and reveal an unexpected mechanistic relationship between vesicular and tubular transport. PMID:21725317

  3. 77 FR 45636 - Food Safety Modernization Act Domestic and Foreign Facility Reinspection, Recall, and Importer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). These fees are... Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) and the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM). Thus, as the...

  4. Americans with Disabilities Act: Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities, Transportation Facilities, Transportation Vehicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Washington, DC.

    Guidelines are presented regarding accessibility to buildings and facilities, transportation facilities, and transportation vehicles by individuals with disabilities, under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. These guidelines are to be applied during building design, construction, and alteration. Part 1 offers detailed facility…

  5. Energy Policy Act Transportation Rate Study: Final Report on Coal Transportation

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    This is the final in a series of reports prepared for the U.S. Congress by the Secretary of Energy on coal distribution and transportation rates as mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486).

  6. 21 CFR 874.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 874.9 Section 874.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  7. 21 CFR 864.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 864.9 Section 864.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  8. 21 CFR 876.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 876.9 Section 876.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  9. 21 CFR 884.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 884.9 Section 884.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  10. 21 CFR 874.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 874.9 Section 874.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  11. 21 CFR 864.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 864.9 Section 864.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  12. 21 CFR 870.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 870.9 Section 870.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  13. 21 CFR 876.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 876.9 Section 876.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  14. 21 CFR 884.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 884.9 Section 884.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  15. 21 CFR 884.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 884.9 Section 884.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  16. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  17. 21 CFR 890.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 890.9 Section 890.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  18. 21 CFR 870.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 870.9 Section 870.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  19. 21 CFR 876.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 876.9 Section 876.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  20. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  1. 21 CFR 876.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 876.9 Section 876.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  2. 21 CFR 884.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 884.9 Section 884.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  3. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  4. 21 CFR 870.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 870.9 Section 870.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  5. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  6. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  7. 21 CFR 890.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 890.9 Section 890.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  8. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  9. 21 CFR 890.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 890.9 Section 890.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  10. 21 CFR 890.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 890.9 Section 890.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  11. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  12. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  13. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  14. 21 CFR 864.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 864.9 Section 864.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  15. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  16. 21 CFR 890.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 890.9 Section 890.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  17. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  18. 21 CFR 874.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 874.9 Section 874.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  19. 21 CFR 884.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 884.9 Section 884.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  20. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  1. 21 CFR 878.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 878.9 Section 878.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  2. 21 CFR 864.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 864.9 Section 864.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  3. 21 CFR 876.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 876.9 Section 876.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  4. 21 CFR 870.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 870.9 Section 870.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  5. 21 CFR 870.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 870.9 Section 870.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  6. 21 CFR 868.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 868.9 Section 868.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section 510(k) of...

  7. 21 CFR 866.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 866.9 Section 866.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., and Cosmetic Act (the act). The exemption from the requirement of premarket notification (section...

  8. Pneumococcal carbohydrate transport: food for thought.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, Carolyn M; King, Samantha J

    2012-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae relies exclusively on carbohydrates as a carbon source and devotes 30% of all transport mechanisms to carbohydrate import. Pneumococci utilize at least 32 carbohydrates in vitro. However, some proposed substrates are not human-derived, so it is unclear where they are encountered in the host niche, and other substrates remain unidentified. The majority of transporter loci are conserved, arguing against redundancy and instead for distinct roles during pathogenesis. Despite this, expression and regulation of carbohydrate transporters in vivo remain ill defined. Recent work has also demonstrated that multiple ABC transporters share an ATPase; whether this evolved for genome minimization or for transporter regulation remains unknown. Continued efforts to understand carbohydrate import may reveal novel vaccine and therapeutic targets and increase our understanding of pneumococcal pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pneumococcal carbohydrate transport: food for thought

    PubMed Central

    Buckwalter, Carolyn M.; King, Samantha J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae relies exclusively on carbohydrates as a carbon source and devotes 30% of all transport mechanisms to carbohydrate import. Pneumococci utilize at least 32 carbohydrates in vitro; yet, some proposed substrates are not human-derived making it unclear where they are encountered in the host niche while other substrates remain unidentified. The majority of transporter loci are conserved, arguing against redundancy and instead for distinct roles during pathogenesis. Despite this, expression and regulation of carbohydrate transporters in vivo remains ill-defined. Recent work has also demonstrated multiple ABC transporters share an ATPase; whether this evolved for genome minimization or for transporter regulation remains unknown. Continued efforts to understand carbohydrate import may reveal novel vaccine and therapeutic targets and increase understanding of pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:22959614

  10. 77 FR 50068 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1192 RIN 3014-AA38 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers... Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is holding a public...

  11. Central transthyretin acts to decrease food intake and body weight

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fenping; Kim, Yonwook J.; Moran, Timothy H.; Li, Hong; Bi, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a blood and cerebrospinal fluid transporter of thyroxine and retinol. Gene expression profiling revealed an elevation of Ttr expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of rats with exercise-induced anorexia, implying that central TTR may also play a functional role in modulating food intake and energy balance. To test this hypothesis, we have examined the effects of brain TTR on food intake and body weight and have further determined hypothalamic signaling that may underlie its feeding effect in rats. We found that intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of TTR in normal growing rats decreased food intake and body weight. This effect was not due to sickness as icv TTR did not cause a conditioned taste aversion. ICV TTR decreased neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels in the DMH and the paraventricular nucleus (P < 0.05). Chronic icv infusion of TTR in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats reversed hyperphagia and obesity and reduced DMH NPY levels. Overall, these results demonstrate a previously unknown anorectic action of central TTR in the control of energy balance, providing a potential novel target for treating obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:27053000

  12. Interaction of Food Additives with Intestinal Efflux Transporters.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Noora; Deng, Feng; Rauvala, Oskari; Tepponen, Tuomas; Kidron, Heidi

    2017-10-05

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (MRP2) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are ABC transporters that are expressed in the intestine, where they are involved in the efflux of many drugs from enterocytes back into the intestinal lumen. The inhibition of BCRP, MRP2, and P-gp can result in enhanced absorption and exposure of substrate drugs. Food additives are widely used by the food industry to improve the stability, flavor, and consistency of food products. Although they are considered safe for consumption, their interactions with intestinal transporters are poorly characterized. Therefore, in this study, selected food additives, including preservatives, colorants, and sweeteners, were studied in vitro for their inhibitory effects on intestinal ABC transporters. Among the studied compounds, several colorants were able to inhibit BCRP and MRP2, whereas P-gp was fairly insensitive to inhibition. Additionally, one sweetener was identified as a potent inhibitor of BCRP. Dose-response studies revealed that the IC50 values of the inhibitors were lower than the estimated intestinal concentrations after the consumption of beverages containing food colorants. This suggests that there is potential for previously unrecognized transporter-mediated food additive-drug interactions.

  13. Analysis of U.S. Food and Drug Administration food allergen recalls after implementation of the food allergen labeling and consumer protection act.

    PubMed

    Gendel, Steven M; Zhu, Jianmei

    2013-11-01

    To avoid potentially life-threatening reactions, food allergic consumers rely on information on food labels to help them avoid exposure to a food or ingredient that could trigger a reaction. To help consumers in the United States obtain the information that they need, the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 defined a major food allergen as being one of eight foods or food groups and any ingredient that contains protein from one of these foods or food groups. A food that contains an undeclared major food allergen is misbranded under the U.S. Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and is subject to recall. Food allergen labeling problems are the most common cause of recalls for U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-regulated food products. To help understand why food allergen recalls continue to occur at a high rate, information on each food allergen recall that occurred in fiscal years 2007 through 2012 was obtained from the FDA recall database. This information was analyzed to identify the food, allergen, root cause, and mode of discovery for each food allergen recall. Bakery products were the most frequently recalled food type, and milk was the most frequently undeclared major food allergen. Use of the wrong package or label was the most frequent problem leading to food allergen recalls. These data are the first reported that indicate the importance of label and package controls as public health measures.

  14. 21 CFR 872.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 872.9 Section 872.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 872.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  15. 21 CFR 888.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 888.9 Section 888.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 888.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  16. 21 CFR 888.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 888.9 Section 888.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 888.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  17. 21 CFR 882.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 882.9 Section 882.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 882.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  18. 21 CFR 886.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 886.9 Section 886.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 886.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  19. 21 CFR 886.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 886.9 Section 886.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 886.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  20. 21 CFR 892.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 892.9 Section 892.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 892.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  1. 21 CFR 888.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 888.9 Section 888.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 888.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  2. 21 CFR 892.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 892.9 Section 892.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 892.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  3. 21 CFR 888.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 888.9 Section 888.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 888.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  4. 21 CFR 872.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 872.9 Section 872.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 872.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  5. 21 CFR 882.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 882.9 Section 882.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 882.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  6. 21 CFR 892.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 892.9 Section 892.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 892.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  7. 21 CFR 888.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 888.9 Section 888.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 888.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  8. 21 CFR 872.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 872.9 Section 872.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 872.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  9. 21 CFR 886.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 886.9 Section 886.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 886.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  10. 21 CFR 872.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 872.9 Section 872.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 872.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  11. 21 CFR 882.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 882.9 Section 882.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 882.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  12. 21 CFR 886.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 886.9 Section 886.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 886.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  13. 21 CFR 886.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 886.9 Section 886.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 886.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  14. 21 CFR 892.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 892.9 Section 892.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 892.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  15. 21 CFR 882.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 882.9 Section 882.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 882.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  16. 21 CFR 892.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 892.9 Section 892.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 892.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  17. 21 CFR 882.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 882.9 Section 882.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Provisions § 882.9 Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  18. An Affordability Comparison Tool (ACT) for Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, C. M.; Bollo, T. R.; Garcia, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA bas recently emphasized the importance of affordability for Commercial Crew Development Program (CCDP), Space Launch Systems (SLS) and Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). System architects and designers are challenged to come up with architectures and designs that do not bust the budget. This paper describes the Affordability Comparison Tool (ACT) analyzes different systems or architecture configurations for affordability that allows for a comparison of: total life cycle cost; annual recurring costs, affordability figures-of-merit, such as cost per pound, cost per seat, and cost per flight, as well as productivity measures, such as payload throughput. Although ACT is not a deterministic model, the paper develops algorithms and parametric factors that use characteristics of the architectures or systems being compared to produce important system outcomes (figures-of-merit). Example applications of outcome figures-of-merit are also documented to provide the designer with information on the relative affordability and productivity of different space transportation applications.

  19. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25% by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental well-being. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be utilized to enhance yields of staple crops, incre...

  20. 19 CFR 147.23 - Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance with Plant Quarantine Act and Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 147.23 Section 147.23 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TRADE FAIRS Requirements of Other...

  1. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

  2. 76 FR 53478 - Food Safety Modernization Act Domestic and Foreign Facility Reinspections, Recall, and Importer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Domestic and Foreign Facility... Modernization Act (FSMA). The document was published with two typographical errors. This document corrects those...

  3. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  4. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  5. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  6. 21 CFR 21.20 - Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Administration Privacy Act Record Systems. 21.20 Section 21.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRIVACY Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act Record Systems § 21.20 Procedures for notice of Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act...

  7. 21 CFR 864.9 - Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations of exemptions from section 510(k) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act). 864.9 Section 864.9 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND...

  8. 77 FR 20353 - United States Warehouse Act; Export Food Aid Commodities Licensing Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Farm Service Agency United States Warehouse Act; Export Food Aid Commodities.... SUMMARY: This notice specifies the fee schedule for the new Export Food Aid Commodities (EFAC) licensing... developed in response to concerns of export food aid providers; specifically, the sanitation and security of...

  9. 78 FR 59751 - Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program... Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) program to pay the subsidy cost of supporting Federal credit...: Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act program or TIFIA program. OMB Control Number:...

  10. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Julian I; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-05-02

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land.

  11. Using membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Frommer, Wolf B.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harrison, Maria J.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Horie, Tomoaki; Kochian, Leon V.; Munns, Rana; Nishizawa, Naoko K.; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Sanders, Dale

    2013-01-01

    With the global population predicted to grow by at least 25 per cent by 2050, the need for sustainable production of nutritious foods is critical for human and environmental health. Recent advances show that specialized plant membrane transporters can be used to enhance yields of staple crops, increase nutrient content and increase resistance to key stresses, including salinity, pathogens and aluminium toxicity, which in turn could expand available arable land. PMID:23636397

  12. What's in a name: the Vermont Genetically Engineered Food Labeling Act

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Malia J.

    2014-01-01

    On May 8, 2014, Vermont passed the Vermont Genetically Engineered Food Labeling Act (Act) requiring labels on certain genetically engineered foods. Once the bill takes effect July 1, 2016, all Vermont-retailed foods with more than 0.9% of their total weight in genetically modified ingredients must be labeled with language stating, “may be partially produced with genetic engineering.” As genetically engineered food are considered scientifically equivalent to their traditional counterparts and are not subject to federal labeling by the FDA, the Act presents several legal questions. Several of the legal questions have been raised in a recent lawsuit filed by the Grocery Manufactures Association that claims the Act violates the First Amendment, Supremacy Clause, and Commerce Clause. This paper will discuss why the Second Circuit could strike down the Act as unconstitutional as to each claim. PMID:27774175

  13. What's in a name: the Vermont Genetically Engineered Food Labeling Act.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Malia J

    2014-09-01

    On May 8, 2014, Vermont passed the Vermont Genetically Engineered Food Labeling Act (Act) requiring labels on certain genetically engineered foods. Once the bill takes effect July 1, 2016, all Vermont-retailed foods with more than 0.9% of their total weight in genetically modified ingredients must be labeled with language stating, "may be partially produced with genetic engineering." As genetically engineered food are considered scientifically equivalent to their traditional counterparts and are not subject to federal labeling by the FDA, the Act presents several legal questions. Several of the legal questions have been raised in a recent lawsuit filed by the Grocery Manufactures Association that claims the Act violates the First Amendment, Supremacy Clause, and Commerce Clause. This paper will discuss why the Second Circuit could strike down the Act as unconstitutional as to each claim.

  14. 78 FR 57320 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules on Foreign Supplier...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... importers currently rely to help manage the safety of their global food supply chains. The purpose of these... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1 and 16 Food and Drug Administration Food... of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies; Public Meetings AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...

  15. The Food Safety Modernization Act: a barrier to trade? Only if the science says so.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    The Food Safety Modernization Act improves oversight of America's food safety system. Title III, which regulates imported food, may create extra burdens for importers and therefore act as a barrier to trade. What will be on trial before the World Trade Organization (WTO), however, is not the law's content, but the science supporting it. Under the WTO regime, food safety laws that could restrict the free movement of food commodities must be sufficiently justified by scientific evidence. Member states must engage in risk assessments and regulate food imports in a manner that is "no more restrictive than necessary" to protect against the health risks identified by scientific evidence. This article examines the requirements of the WTO to evaluate the FSMA's legality under WTO rules. It analyzes the case law of the WTO Panel and Appellate Body and compares the FMSA to the EU's General Food Law.

  16. Regulation of clinical laboratory information systems after the 1990 amendments to the Food and Drug Act.

    PubMed

    Brannigan, V M

    1992-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are among the most sophisticated software users in the modern hospital. The 1990 Medical Device Amendments to the Food and Drug Act caused a significant change in the legal regulation of medical software. The Act replaces the earlier emphasis on premarket approvals with postmarket surveillance. Hospitals and other institutional users are now required to report to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product defects that cause injuries or death. The Act also provides for civil penalties. The combination of these factors may lead to enhanced FDA supervision of medical software, particularly with unregistered producers. Clinical laboratories must understand both the regulatory system and their own responsibilities under the Act.

  17. Protein transport across the small intestine in food allergy.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, Marit; Westerhout, Joost; Wichers, Harry J; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Verhoeckx, Kitty C M

    2014-01-01

    In view of the imminent deficiency of protein sources for human consumption in the near future, new protein sources need to be identified. However, safety issues such as the risk of allergenicity are often a bottleneck, due to the absence of predictive, validated and accepted methods for risk assessment. The current strategy to assess the allergenic potential of proteins focuses mainly on homology, stability and cross-reactivity, although other factors such as intestinal transport might be of added value too. In this review, we present an overview of the knowledge of protein transport across the intestinal wall and the methods currently being used to measure this. A literature study reveals that protein transport in sensitised persons occurs para-cellularly with the involvement of mast cells, and trans-cellularly via enterocytes, while in non-sensitised persons micro-fold cells and enterocytes are considered most important. However, there is a lack of comparable systematic studies on transport of allergenic proteins. Knowledge of the multiple protein transport pathways and which model system can be useful to study these processes may be of added value in the risk assessment of food allergenicity.

  18. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  19. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  20. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  1. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  2. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  3. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  4. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The...

  5. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT... Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. (a) The Administrator...

  6. 78 FR 49988 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules on Foreign Supplier...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1 and 16 Food and Drug Administration Food... of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... proposed rule on the Accreditation of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies would strengthen the...

  7. THE US EPA'S DERMAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH PROGRAM IN SUPPORT OF THE FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 (FQPA) requires that children's risks to pesticide exposures be considered during the tolerance-setting process. FQPA requires exposure assessments to be conducted for all pesticides sources, not just food sources. It also requires tha...

  8. 76 FR 75799 - General Administrative Regulations; Mutual Consent Cancellation; Food Security Act of 1985...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Consent Cancellation; Food Security Act of 1985, Implementation; Denial of Benefits; and Ineligibility for... remove Subpart C--General Administrative Regulations; Mutual Consent Cancellation and Subpart F--Food... quality of the human environment, health, or safety. Therefore, neither an Environmental Assessment nor...

  9. 75 FR 70011 - Guidance for Industry, Mammography Quality Standards Act Inspectors, and Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... approved accreditation body and certified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) or... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry, Mammography Quality Standards Act...: Modifications and Additions to Policy Guidance Help System 13; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  10. THE US EPA'S DERMAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH PROGRAM IN SUPPORT OF THE FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 (FQPA) requires that children's risks to pesticide exposures be considered during the tolerance-setting process. FQPA requires exposure assessments to be conducted for all pesticides sources, not just food sources. It also requires tha...

  11. An analysis of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: protection for consumers and boon for business.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Debra M

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes components of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act, which was prompted by incidents of food contamination, exploring the history of its passage and explaining its significance, as well as its limitations. As the first time in 70 years that food law has been changed substantially, this new law represents only an initial but significant step in the direction of improving food safety. With bipartisan support from both Congress and the President, this legislation embodies a mandate that food safety is at this moment becoming a priority. As a result, the time is ripe for a reassessment of other areas of food laws--particularly genetically modified foods and the use of milk and meat from cloned animals and their progeny--which are allowed under current U.S. law with no labeling, preapprovals, or post-market monitoring. These areas warrant special regulation consistent with the new proactive policy towards securing the safety of the food supply.

  12. Provisions of the Food Security Act of 1985. Agricultural Information Bulletin Number 498.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Lewrene K.

    This report summarizes the 18 titles of the Food Security Act of 1985 and compares it with previous legislation where applicable. It describes the act's provisions for dairy; wool and mohair; wheat; feed grains; cotton; rice; peanuts; soybeans; sugar; other general commodity provisions; trade; conservation; credit; agricultural research,…

  13. 78 FR 10107 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human Food...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing public meeting registration information for two... hazard analysis and risk- based preventive controls for human food (the preventive controls proposed rule...

  14. 78 FR 6762 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human Food...-based preventive controls for human food (the preventive controls proposed rule), which are the first of... modernized, prevention-based food safety system. Among other things, FSMA requires FDA to issue...

  15. Approach to novel functional foods for stress control 4. Regulation of serotonin transporter by food factors.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikiko; Haito, Sakiko; Furumoto, Mari; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2005-11-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are pre-synaptic proteins specialized for the clearance of serotonin following vesicular release at central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system synapses. SERTs are high affinity targets in vivo for antidepressants such as serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These include 'medical' psychopharmacological agents such as analgesics and antihistamines, a plant extract called St John's Wort (Hypericum). Osteoclasts are the primary cells responsible for bone resorption. They arise by the differentiation of osteoclast precursors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of SERTs was increased in RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells. Using RANKL stimulation of RAW264.7 cells as a model system for osteoclast differentiation, we studied the direct effects of food factor on serotonin uptake. The SSRIs (fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) inhibited markedly (approximately 95%) in serotonin transport in differentiated osteoclast cells. The major components of St. John's Wort, hyperforin and hypericine were significantly decreased in serotonin transport activity. Thus, a new in vitro model using RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells may be useful to analyze the regulation of SERT by food factors and SSRIs.

  16. Transport mechanisms acting in toroidal devices: A theoretician's view

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the basic mechanisms of transport in toroidal confinement devices remains one of the more challenging scientific issues in magnetic confinement. At the same time, it is a critical issue for the magnetic fusion program. Recent progress in understanding fluctuations and transport has been fostered by the development and use of new diagnostics, bringing new perspectives on these studies. This has stimulated new theoretical developments. A view of the most recent issues and progress in this area is given. The role of long wavelengths in core transport and the relation between shear flows and turbulence at the plasma edge are the primary topics considered.

  17. 75 FR 43747 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ...The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is proposing to revise and update its accessibility guidelines for buses, over-the-road buses, and vans. The guidelines ensure that transportation vehicles are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities. The guidelines apply to the acquisition of new, used, and remanufactured transportation vehicles, and the remanufacture of existing transportation vehicles to the extent required by regulations issued by the Department of Transportation pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act. The guidelines for transportation vehicles operated in fixed guideway systems (e.g., rapid rail, light rail, commuter rail, and intercity rail) will be revised and updated at a future date.

  18. Two underestimated threats in food transportation: mould and acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, S.; Pankoke, I.; Klus, K.; Schmitt, K.; Stephan, U.; Wöllenstein, J.

    2014-01-01

    Two important parameters are often neglected in the monitoring of perishable goods during transport: mould contamination of fresh food and the influence of acceleration or vibration on the quality of a product. We assert the claim that it is necessary to focus research on these two topics in the context of intelligent logistics in this opinion paper. Further, the technical possibilities for future measurement systems are discussed. By measuring taste deviations, we verified the effect on the quality of beer at different vibration frequencies. The practical importance is shown by examining transport routes and market shares. The general feasibility of a mobile mould detection system is established by examining the measurement resolution of semiconductor sensors for mould-related gases. Furthermore, as an alternative solution, we present a concept for a miniaturized and automated culture-medium-based system. Although there is a lack of related research to date, new efforts can make a vital contribution to the reduction of losses in the logistic chains for several products. PMID:24797139

  19. Two underestimated threats in food transportation: mould and acceleration.

    PubMed

    Janssen, S; Pankoke, I; Klus, K; Schmitt, K; Stephan, U; Wöllenstein, J

    2014-06-13

    Two important parameters are often neglected in the monitoring of perishable goods during transport: mould contamination of fresh food and the influence of acceleration or vibration on the quality of a product. We assert the claim that it is necessary to focus research on these two topics in the context of intelligent logistics in this opinion paper. Further, the technical possibilities for future measurement systems are discussed. By measuring taste deviations, we verified the effect on the quality of beer at different vibration frequencies. The practical importance is shown by examining transport routes and market shares. The general feasibility of a mobile mould detection system is established by examining the measurement resolution of semiconductor sensors for mould-related gases. Furthermore, as an alternative solution, we present a concept for a miniaturized and automated culture-medium-based system. Although there is a lack of related research to date, new efforts can make a vital contribution to the reduction of losses in the logistic chains for several products.

  20. Federal Surface Transportation Policy and Planning Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2009-05-14

    Senate - 05/14/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Federal Surface Transportation Policy and Planning Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2011-02-10

    Senate - 02/10/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-50

    2014-02-06

    04/02/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. National Transportation Safety Board Reauthorization Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Oberstar, James L. [D-MN-8

    2010-03-02

    09/29/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Nebraska Department of Transportation - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against the Nebraska Department of Transportation, a state agency located at 1500 Highway 2, Lincoln, NE 68509, for alleged violations of its municipal separate stormwater sewer sy

  5. Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-50

    2014-02-06

    04/02/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. National Transportation Safety Board Reauthorization Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Oberstar, James L. [D-MN-8

    2010-03-02

    09/29/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Industry invites regulation: the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906.

    PubMed Central

    Barkan, I D

    1985-01-01

    Ending its 27-year stranglehold on proposals for federal pure food and drug legislation, Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act and its companion bill, the Meat Inspection Act, on June 30, 1906. An unprecedented convergence of consumer, scientific, and industrial support in 1906 prompted such action; most industries even planned for it, hoping regulation would restore the competitiveness of their products on weak foreign and domestic markets. The ways in which these interests converged, and the reasons therefore, suggest a change in their relationships to each other and with the federal government as America headed into the twentieth century. Images p21-a p21-b PMID:3881052

  8. 78 FR 15019 - Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice, request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is announcing...

  9. 77 FR 70796 - Privacy Act of 1974; Retirement of Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Retirement of Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office, Department of Homeland Security... Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Homeland Security is giving notice that it will retire the...

  10. MSI-1436 reduces acute food intake without affecting dopamine transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Roitman, Mitchell F; Wescott, Seth; Cone, Jackson J; McLane, Michael P; Wolfe, Henry R

    2010-11-01

    Many therapies designed to reduce food intake and body weight act, in part, by blocking the dopamine transporter (DAT) - a protein responsible for clearing extracellular dopamine (DA) after release thereby terminating its action. Here, we found that a single injection of the drug trodusquemine (MSI-1436) decreased food intake in rats. To assess the effects of MSI-1436 on DAT function, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to measure DA concentration changes in the ventral striatum. DA release was evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area every 5 min. After 3 baseline measurements, rats were injected with MSI-1436 (10 mg/kg), the known DAT blocker bupropion (80 mg/kg) or saline and evoked DA release and reuptake were monitored for an additional hour. Neither saline nor MSI-1436 caused a significant change in the magnitude of evoked release from baseline values whereas bupropion caused a significant increase. In addition, neither saline nor MSI-1436 significantly increased DA decay rates while such an increase was observed with bupropion. Thus, over a time course when MSI-1436 suppresses food intake it does not affect DAT function. The results support MSI-1436 as an anti-obesity treatment which spares DAT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Howard Coble Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-50

    2014-12-01

    12/04/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.2444, which became Public Law 113-281 on 12/18/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. LoBiondo, Frank A. [R-NJ-2

    2012-06-01

    House - 06/07/2012 Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Discharged. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2838, which became Public Law 112-213 on 12/20/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. LoBiondo, Frank A. [R-NJ-2

    2012-06-01

    06/07/2012 Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Discharged. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2838, which became Public Law 112-213 on 12/20/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. National Transportation Safety Board Reauthorization Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Oberstar, James L. [D-MN-8

    2010-03-02

    Senate - 09/29/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Howard Coble Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-50

    2014-12-01

    Senate - 12/04/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.2444, which became Public Law 113-281 on 12/18/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. LoBiondo, Frank A. [R-NJ-2

    2012-06-01

    06/07/2012 Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Discharged. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2838, which became Public Law 112-213 on 12/20/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Howard Coble Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-50

    2014-12-01

    12/04/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.2444, which became Public Law 113-281 on 12/18/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-50

    2014-02-06

    Senate - 04/02/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. EVALUATION OF A PROTOCOL FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT DATA REQUIRED BY THE FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA), the USEPA Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) considers drinking water as a route for pesticide exposure in its human health risk assessments, and may require data on the fate of a pesticide in drinking water be supplied to OPP by the ...

  20. Professional Networks among Rural School Food Service Directors Implementing the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubker Cornish, Disa; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Golembiewski, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study was designed to explore the professional networks of rural school food service directors (FSD), the resources they use for implementing the Healthy, Hunger-free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), and their needs for information and support to continue to implement successfully. Methods: Rural FSD participated in an in-depth…

  1. Professional Networks among Rural School Food Service Directors Implementing the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubker Cornish, Disa; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Golembiewski, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study was designed to explore the professional networks of rural school food service directors (FSD), the resources they use for implementing the Healthy, Hunger-free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), and their needs for information and support to continue to implement successfully. Methods: Rural FSD participated in an in-depth…

  2. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-12-14

    The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board or Board) is issuing a final rule that revises its existing accessibility guidelines for non-rail vehicles--namely, buses, over-the-road buses, and vans--acquired or remanufactured by entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act. The revised guidelines ensure that such vehicles are readily accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is required to revise its accessibility standards for transportation vehicles acquired or remanufactured by entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to be consistent with the final rule.

  3. The Implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act and the Strength of the Sustainable Agriculture Movement.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    In the wake of growing public concerns over salmonella outbreaks and other highly publicized food safety issues, Congress passed the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act in 2011, which placed more stringent standards on food growing and packaging operations. In negotiations preceding the Act's passage, farmers of local, sustainable food argued that these rules would unduly burden local agricultural operations or, at the extreme, drive them out of business by creating overly burdensome rules. These objections culminated in the addition of the Tester-Hagan Amendment to the Food Safety Modernization Act, which created certain exemptions for small farms. Proposed Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rules to implement the Act threatened to weaken this victory for small farm groups, however, prompting a loud response from small farmers and local food proponents. The FDA's second set of proposed rules, issued in September 2014 in response to these and other complaints, were, perhaps surprisingly, responsive to small farmers' concerns. Using comments submitted to the FDA, this article explores the responses of the agriculture industry and public health organizations, as well as small farm groups, consumers of local food, and sustainable agriculture interests (which, for simplicity, I alternately describe as comprising the "sustainable agriculture" or "small farm" movement), to three aspects of the FDA's proposed rules--involving manure application, on-farm packing activities, and exemptions for very small farms--to assess the strength of the sustainable agriculture movement. The rules involving manure application and on-farm packing, it turns out, reveal little about the independent political strength of the local food movement, as large industry groups also objected to these provisions. But for the third issue discussed here--exemptions for very small farms--the interests of sustainable agriculture groups were directly opposed to both industry and public health organizations

  4. Disliked food acting as a contaminant in a sample of young children.

    PubMed

    Brown, S D; Harris, G; Bell, L; Lines, L M

    2012-06-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that a disliked food can act as a contaminant to liked food during childhood. While this has been investigated in an infant sample, the current paper presents the first study to investigate this phenomenon in a sample of young children (4 years 5 months-6 years 1 month old, N=30). Children were shown a liked food at different stages of being contaminated by a disliked food. At each stage, the children were asked to rate their willingness to consume the liked food on a 3-point hedonic scale. The data show that children reduce their rating of a liked food once it has been in contact with a disliked food, in comparison to a like-like combination control measure. The data also show that girls show greater sensitivity than boys to this form of contamination and that the younger children are more likely to show a prolonged response (rating of the liked food does not return to the unadulterated level) than the older children in the sample. Several possible reasons for these findings are discussed including disgust, inferred distaste and associational contamination.

  5. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of a...

  6. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise explicitly...

  7. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise explicitly...

  8. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of a...

  9. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise explicitly...

  10. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 2.308 Section 2.308 Protection of... § 2.308 Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic... Cosmetic Act, as amended, 21 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (2) Petition means a petition for the issuance of a...

  11. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise explicitly...

  12. 40 CFR 23.10 - Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 23.10 Section 23.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise explicitly...

  13. Consumer citizenship: acting to minimise environmental health risks related to the food system.

    PubMed

    Kriflik, Lynda

    2006-05-01

    Public health practitioners interested in supporting consumers to make healthy, sustainable food choices need to understand consumer motivations to reduce food system risk. Increasingly food technologies that have enhanced access to food supply are being recognised as also impacting on the sustainability of the food system. This study explored the actions taken by Australian participants in response to their concerns about perceived food related threats to health and environment. Variance in willingness to act is analysed within the context of environmental and ecological citizenship, and a continuum describes the range of positions held. From the outset some participants self-identified as environmentally concerned and proactive, while others indicated a secondary interest in the environment. The catalyst for action for the majority was the priority of individual health and such self-interest can be a powerful motivator for change. Others related health to the environment and described efforts to minimise individual impact. Equally important for action to occur is being at a stage in life where other demands do not compete for the time and energy necessary to take citizenship actions. These results provide insight into the support that public health practitioners can offer to consumers who wish to make sustainable food choices.

  14. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  15. 21 CFR 1310.11 - Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reinstatement of exemption for drug products distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.11 Section 1310.11 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES § 1310.11...

  16. 21 CFR 1310.10 - Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Removal of the exemption of drugs distributed under the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. 1310.10 Section 1310.10 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE RECORDS AND REPORTS OF LISTED CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES § 1310.10...

  17. 78 FR 36711 - Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII-Drug Supply Chain; Standards for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Chapter I Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII--Drug Supply Chain; Standards for Admission of Imported Drugs, Registration of...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public meeting; request for...

  18. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-17

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  19. Compilation of the Food Stamp Act of 1977 and Other Selected Federal Nutrition Statutes. 98th Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Agriculture.

    This is a compilation of the Food Stamp Act of 1977 and other selected Federal nutrition statutes, including those relating to the Act and major authorities for domestic commodity distribution. The section on the Act itself covers policy, definitions, establishment, eligibility, issuance and use of coupons, value of allotment, approval of food…

  20. Flavonoids act as negative regulators of auxin transport in vivo in arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. E.; Rashotte, A. M.; Murphy, A. S.; Normanly, J.; Tague, B. W.; Peer, W. A.; Taiz, L.; Muday, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Polar transport of the plant hormone auxin controls many aspects of plant growth and development. A number of synthetic compounds have been shown to block the process of auxin transport by inhibition of the auxin efflux carrier complex. These synthetic auxin transport inhibitors may act by mimicking endogenous molecules. Flavonoids, a class of secondary plant metabolic compounds, have been suggested to be auxin transport inhibitors based on their in vitro activity. The hypothesis that flavonoids regulate auxin transport in vivo was tested in Arabidopsis by comparing wild-type (WT) and transparent testa (tt4) plants with a mutation in the gene encoding the first enzyme in flavonoid biosynthesis, chalcone synthase. In a comparison between tt4 and WT plants, phenotypic differences were observed, including three times as many secondary inflorescence stems, reduced plant height, decreased stem diameter, and increased secondary root development. Growth of WT Arabidopsis plants on naringenin, a biosynthetic precursor to those flavonoids with auxin transport inhibitor activity in vitro, leads to a reduction in root growth and gravitropism, similar to the effects of synthetic auxin transport inhibitors. Analyses of auxin transport in the inflorescence and hypocotyl of independent tt4 alleles indicate that auxin transport is elevated in plants with a tt4 mutation. In hypocotyls of tt4, this elevated transport is reversed when flavonoids are synthesized by growth of plants on the flavonoid precursor, naringenin. These results are consistent with a role for flavonoids as endogenous regulators of auxin transport.

  1. Flavonoids act as negative regulators of auxin transport in vivo in arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. E.; Rashotte, A. M.; Murphy, A. S.; Normanly, J.; Tague, B. W.; Peer, W. A.; Taiz, L.; Muday, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Polar transport of the plant hormone auxin controls many aspects of plant growth and development. A number of synthetic compounds have been shown to block the process of auxin transport by inhibition of the auxin efflux carrier complex. These synthetic auxin transport inhibitors may act by mimicking endogenous molecules. Flavonoids, a class of secondary plant metabolic compounds, have been suggested to be auxin transport inhibitors based on their in vitro activity. The hypothesis that flavonoids regulate auxin transport in vivo was tested in Arabidopsis by comparing wild-type (WT) and transparent testa (tt4) plants with a mutation in the gene encoding the first enzyme in flavonoid biosynthesis, chalcone synthase. In a comparison between tt4 and WT plants, phenotypic differences were observed, including three times as many secondary inflorescence stems, reduced plant height, decreased stem diameter, and increased secondary root development. Growth of WT Arabidopsis plants on naringenin, a biosynthetic precursor to those flavonoids with auxin transport inhibitor activity in vitro, leads to a reduction in root growth and gravitropism, similar to the effects of synthetic auxin transport inhibitors. Analyses of auxin transport in the inflorescence and hypocotyl of independent tt4 alleles indicate that auxin transport is elevated in plants with a tt4 mutation. In hypocotyls of tt4, this elevated transport is reversed when flavonoids are synthesized by growth of plants on the flavonoid precursor, naringenin. These results are consistent with a role for flavonoids as endogenous regulators of auxin transport.

  2. Older Americans Act Nutrition Program improves participants' food security in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Sun; Johnson, Mary Ann; Brown, Arvine

    2011-01-01

    It is critical to use convincing research methodology to demonstrate the benefits of nutrition assistance programs targeted to vulnerable older adults. We examined the impact of Older Americans Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) participation on food security in participants and waitlisted people in Georgia using two waves of self-administered mail surveys conducted 4 months apart (n = 717, mean age 74.6 ± 9.5, 70.9% female, 33.2% black). At baseline, 54% of the sample was food insecure. Waitlisted people reported higher levels of persistent food insecurity (45.9%) or becoming food insecure (10.0%) than participants (29.3% and 7.1%, respectively) over 4 months. While considering potential confounders, the estimated odds of achieving food security were 1.65 times (95% CI: 1.10-2.48) higher in participants than in waitlisted people over 4 months. Our data suggest the feasibility of using food insecurity measures to detect the benefits of OAANP participation as well as the need to increase the capacity of OAANP.

  3. Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Provision in the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a memorandum regarding Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Provision in Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, which provides long-term funding certainty for surface transportation infrastructure planning

  4. 78 FR 55657 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 6 CFR Part 5 Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration, DHS/TSA-021, TSA Pre TM Application Program System of Records AGENCY: Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking....

  5. 75 FR 7978 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-023 Workplace Violence... Security Administration-023 Workplace Violence Prevention Program System of Records and this proposed... a new system of records under the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) titled, DHS/TSA-023 Workplace Violence...

  6. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in Neuse River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-...

  7. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in Neuse River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-...

  8. 77 FR 70792 - Privacy Act of 1974; Retirement of Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... the system of records notice DHS/TSA-009 General Legal Records, will have no adverse impacts on... Transportation Security Administration System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of retirement of one Privacy Act system of records notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the...

  9. Initiatives (Part 3): Food Pyramid Juggle; Transportation Initiative Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilty, Katie; Klag, Bill

    2001-01-01

    Presents two group activities for ages 10 and up; one instructs about food groups and reinforces healthy eating habits, while the other is a multitask physical activity stressing cooperation and coordination. Includes target group, group size, time and space needs, activity level, overview, goals, props, instructions, suggestions for framing and…

  10. Enhancing Nutrition Security via India's National Food Security Act: Using an Axe instead of a Scalpel?

    PubMed

    Desai, Sonalde; Vanneman, Reeve

    2015-08-05

    In September 2013, India passed a historic National Food Security Act. This paper examines the potential impact of the two central pillars of this act - expansion of the Public Distribution System and strengthening of the Integrated Child Development Schemes - on child nutrition. Using new data from the India Human Development Survey of 2011-12, this paper shows that access to subsidized grains via PDS is not related to improved child nutrition, and while ICDS seems to be related to lower child undernutrition, it has a limited reach in spite of the universalization of the program. The paper suggests that a tiered strategy in dealing with child undernutrition that starts with the identification of undernourished children and districts and follows through with different strategies for dealing with severe, acute malnutrition, followed by a focus on moderate malnutrition, could be more effective than the existing focus on cereal distribution rooted in the NFSA.

  11. "Reforms Looked Really Good on Paper": Rural Food Service Responses to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Disa; Askelson, Natoshia; Golembiewski, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHKA) required schools to make changes to meals provided to children. Rural school districts have limited resources, with increased obesity rates and local food insecurity. In this study we sought to understand the perceptions of rural food service directors and the barriers to implementing…

  12. "Reforms Looked Really Good on Paper": Rural Food Service Responses to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Disa; Askelson, Natoshia; Golembiewski, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHKA) required schools to make changes to meals provided to children. Rural school districts have limited resources, with increased obesity rates and local food insecurity. In this study we sought to understand the perceptions of rural food service directors and the barriers to implementing…

  13. 75 FR 44163 - Implementation of Regulations Required Under Title XI of the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ...-AB07 Implementation of Regulations Required Under Title XI of the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of... clarify conditions for industry compliance with the P&S Act and provide for a fairer market place. DATES... fairer market place. We have received comments asking for an extension of the comment period, and...

  14. Effects of long-acting beta adrenergic agonists on vocal fold ion transport.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie

    2009-03-01

    Inhaled medications prescribed for the hypersensitive airway typically combine corticosteroids and long-acting beta2 adrenergic agonists (LABAs). The phonatory side effects of these combination treatments are widely recognized. However, there is limited understanding of the physiological changes induced by these medications that underlie the phonatory side effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the distinct effects of corticosteroids and LABAs on vocal fold mucosal physiology. Understanding the physiological changes to the vocal folds after corticosteroid and LABA treatments is necessary to prevent the prevalent vocal decrement associated with these medications. Experimental in vitro design with treatment and control groups. Native porcine vocal fold mucosae (N = 38) were exposed to corticosteroid or LABA treatments. Ion transport was measured continuously at baseline and after treatment. To quantify the nature of ion transport, vocal folds were also treated with chloride and sodium channel inhibitors. Corticosteroid treatment did not alter ion transport. Conversely, exposure to LABAs significantly increased ion transport. This increase in ion transport was transient, observed immediately after treatment in all tissue and associated with increased chloride secretion. The distinct effects of corticosteroids and LABAs on vocal fold physiology have not been examined to date. This study demonstrates that short-term treatment with LABAs, but not corticosteroids, significantly increases ion transport. These findings suggest that one underlying physiological mechanism for phonatory changes associated with inhaled treatments may be related to acute alterations in vocal fold ion transport and surface hydration.

  15. Prior notice of imported food under the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-11-07

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final regulation that requires the submission to FDA of prior notice of food, including animal feed, that is imported or offered for import into the United States. The final rule implements the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 (the Bioterrorism Act), which required prior notification of imported food to begin on December 12, 2003. The final rule requires that the prior notice be submitted to FDA electronically via either the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP or Customs) Automated Broker Interface (ABI) of the Automated Commercial System (ACS) or the FDA Prior Notice System Interface (FDA PNSI). The information must be submitted and confirmed electronically as facially complete by FDA for review no less than 8 hours (for food arriving by water), 4 hours (for food arriving by air or land/rail), and 2 hours (for food arriving by land/road) before the food arrives at the port of arrival. Food imported or offered for import without adequate prior notice is subject to refusal and, if refused, must be held. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of a draft compliance policy guide (CPG) entitled "Sec. 110.310 Prior Notice of Imported Food Under the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002."

  16. Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Availability of data and studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-13

    Pursuant to Section 1340(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), this report presents the Secretary of Energy`s review of data collected by the Federal Government on rates for rail and pipeline transportation of domestic coal, oil, and gas for the years 1988 through 1997, and proposals to develop an adequate data base for each of the fuels, based on the data availability review. This report also presents the Energy Information Administration`s findings regarding the extent to which any Federal agency is studying the impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) and other Federal policies on the transportation rates and distribution patterns of domestic coal, oil, and gas.

  17. Transportation Efficiency Act to End Oil Addiction: Securing America’s Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-17

    policy additions and changes and asks the nation to commit to fundamentally changing the way Americans approach transportation. Robert Puentes , a...takes thinking and acting in ways that may seem contrary to the current American way of life! Endnotes 1 Robert Puentes , ―Strengthening the...Information Home Page, http://www.eia.doe.gov/ (accessed February 17, 2011). 3 Robert Puentes , Congressional Testimony, 2. 4 Jeffrey A. Connelly

  18. Airborne Measurements in Support of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron; Davis, Ken; Barrick, John; Browell, Edward; Chen, Gao; Dobler, Jeremy; Fried, Alan; Lauvaux, Thomas; Lin, Bing; McGill, Matt; hide

    2015-01-01

    NASA announced the research opportunity Earth Venture Suborbital -2 (EVS-2) mission in support of the NASA's science strategic goals and objectives in 2013. Penn State University, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and other academic institutions, government agencies, and industrial companies together formulated and proposed the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport -America (ACT -America) suborbital mission, which was subsequently selected for implementation. The airborne measurements that are part of ACT-America will provide a unique set of remote and in-situ measurements of CO2 over North America at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community and this will greatly enhance our understanding of the carbon cycle. ACT -America will consist of five airborne campaigns, covering all four seasons, to measure regional atmospheric carbon distributions and to evaluate the accuracy of atmospheric transport models used to assess carbon sinks and sources under fair and stormy weather conditions. This coordinated mission will measure atmospheric carbon in the three most important regions of the continental US carbon balance: Northeast, Midwest, and South. Data will be collected using 2 airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented ground towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite. This presentation provides an overview of the ACT-America instruments, with particular emphasis on the airborne CO2and backscatter lidars, and the, rationale, approach, and anticipated results from this mission.

  19. A Neuromedin U Receptor Acts with the Sensory System to Modulate Food Type-Dependent Effects on C. elegans Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Regenass, Martin; Alcedo, Joy

    2010-01-01

    The type of food source has previously been shown to be as important as the level of food intake in influencing lifespan. Here we report that different Escherichia coli food sources alter Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan. These effects are modulated by different subsets of sensory neurons, which act with nmur-1, a homolog of mammalian neuromedin U receptors. Wild-type nmur-1, which is expressed in the somatic gonad, sensory neurons, and interneurons, shortens lifespan only on specific E. coli food sources—an effect that is dependent on the type of E. coli lipopolysaccharide structure. Moreover, the food type-dependent effect of nmur-1 on lifespan is different from that of food-level restriction. Together our data suggest that nmur-1 processes information from specific food cues to influence lifespan and other aspects of physiology. PMID:20520844

  20. Interaction of Drug or Food with Drug Transporters in Intestine and Liver.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-01-01

    Oral bioavailability (F) is determined as fraction of the drug dose absorbed through the gastrointestinal membranes (Fa), the unmetabolized fraction of the absorbed dose that passes through the gut into the portal blood (Fg), and the hepatic first pass availability (Fh), namely F is expressed as the product of Fa, Fg and Fh (F = Fa.Fg.Fh). Current evidence suggests that transporter proteins play a role in intestinal absorption and hepatobiliary clearance of drugs. Among those transporters, this review will focus on PEPT1 and OATP2B1 as influx transporter and p-glycoprotein (P-gp) and BCRP as efflux transporter in intestinal epithelial cells, and on OATP1B1 and 1B3 as influx transporter and MRP2 as efflux transporter in hepatocytes, respectively, because drug-drug (DDI) and -food (DFI) interactions on these transporter are considered to affect bioavailability of their substrate drugs. DDI and DFI may reduce systemic exposure to drug by blocking influx transporters in intestine, but increase it by modulating influx and efflux transporters in liver and efflux transporters in intestines. Namely, drug disposition and efficacy are likely affected by DDI and DFI, resulting in treatment failures or increase in adverse effect. Therefore, it is of significantly importance to understand precise mechanism of DDI and DFI. This review will present information about transporter-based DDI and DFI in the processes of intestinal absorption and hepatic clearance of drugs, and discuss about their clinical implication.

  1. Coordination of oro-pharyngeal food transport during chewing and respiratory phase.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koichiro; Palmer, Jeffrey B

    2015-04-01

    When eating solid food, the tongue intermittently propels triturated food to the oropharynx or valleculae, where a bolus accumulates before swallowing. The tongue motion during this food transport (stage II transport, STII) is distinctly different from that during chewing, and is more similar to the oral propulsive stage of swallowing. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the onset of STII cycles was more likely to occur during expiration than inspiration. Videofluorography was recorded in a lateral projection while 10 healthy subjects ate solid foods. Respiration was concurrently monitored with plethysmography. Jaw motion cycles were classified as masticatory or swallowing. Masticatory cycles were further divided into chewing cycles and STII cycles. STII cycles were defined as those with bolus propulsion through the fauces by the tongue squeezing against the palate (without swallowing). Overall, 28% (62/223) of chewing cycles were initiated during inspiration, compared with only 12% (9/76) of STII cycles in this phase. The fraction of masticatory cycles occurring during inspiration was significantly smaller for STII cycles than for chewing cycles (Odds Ratio: 0.37 [95% CI: 0.17-0.78], p=0.01). All 36 swallowing cycles had onset during expiration. Our findings reveal that stage II oro-pharyngeal food transport is linked to expiration, as is the oral propulsive stage of swallowing. This suggests a similarity in the neural control of these two feeding behaviors.

  2. Elixirs, diluents, and the passage of the 1938 Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    PubMed

    Wax, P M

    1995-03-15

    The Elixir Sulfanilamide disaster of 1937 was one of the most consequential mass poisonings of the 20th century. This tragedy occurred shortly after the introduction of sulfanilamide, the first sulfa antimicrobial drug, when diethylene glycol was used as the diluent in the formulation of a liquid preparation of sulfanilamide known as Elixir Sulfanilamide. One hundred five patients died from its therapeutic use. Under the existing drug regulations, premarketing toxicity testing was not required. In reaction to this calamity, the U.S. Congress passed the 1938 Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, which required proof of safety before the release of a new drug. The 1938 law changed the drug focus of the Food and Drug Administration from that of a policing agency primarily concerned with the confiscation of adulterated drugs to a regulatory agency increasingly involved with overseeing the evaluation of new drugs. The Elixir Sulfanilamide tragedy, its effect on drug regulations, and the history of other diethylene glycol and diluent mass poisonings are discussed.

  3. Impact of food, housing, and transportation insecurity on ART adherence: a hierarchical resources approach.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Talea; Jones, Maranda; Merly, Cynthia; Welles, Brandi; Kalichman, Moira O; Kalichman, Seth C

    2017-04-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV into a manageable illness. However, high levels of adherence must be maintained. Lack of access to basic resources (food, transportation, and housing) has been consistently associated with suboptimal ART adherence. Moving beyond such direct effects, this study takes a hierarchical resources approach in which the effects of access to basic resources on ART adherence are mediated through interpersonal resources (social support and care services) and personal resources (self-efficacy). Participants were 915 HIV-positive men and women living in Atlanta, GA, recruited from community centers and infectious disease clinics. Participants answered baseline questionnaires, and provided prospective data on ART adherence. Across a series of nested models, a consistent pattern emerged whereby lack of access to basic resources had indirect, negative effects on adherence, mediated through both lack of access to social support and services, and through lower treatment self-efficacy. There was also a significant direct effect of lack of access to transportation on adherence. Lack of access to basic resources negatively impacts ART adherence. Effects for housing instability and food insecurity were fully mediated through social support, access to services, and self-efficacy, highlighting these as important targets for intervention. Targeting service supports could be especially beneficial due to the potential to both promote adherence and to link clients with other services to supplement food, housing, and transportation. Inability to access transportation had a direct negative effect on adherence, suggesting that free or reduced cost transportation could positively impact ART adherence among disadvantaged populations.

  4. Overview of the NASA Earth Science Division (ESD) Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, B.; Davis, K. J.; Barrick, J. D. W.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, G.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dobler, J. T.; Fried, A.; Lauvaux, T.; Lin, B.; McGill, M. J.; Miles, N. L.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; O'Dell, C.; Sweeney, C.; Yang, M. Y.

    2016-12-01

    In late 2014 the Earth Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate selected a proposal led by Penn State University and NASA Langley Research Center for an Earth Venture Suborbital Mission (EVS-2). The Mission, entitled Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) America, is aimed at greatly enhancing the understanding of the role of transport in determining the distribution of atmospheric CO2 and relating these observations back to regional sources and sinks of CO2. To address these objectives, this project uses active remote sensing of CO2 at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community in addition to in situ observations. ACT-America will consist of five airborne campaigns to measure regional CO2 distributions and evaluate transport processes under various meteorological conditions. This coordinated program will measure CO2, CH4, related trace gases and meteorological conditions in three different regions: Mid-Atlantic, Mid-West, and Southeast. Data will be collected using two airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). The airborne instrument suite includes three lidars (two for CO2 column measurements and one for aerosol and cloud profiling) as well as several in-situ systems for greenhouse gas and meteorological measurements. The first science campaign conducted in the summer of 2016 is now successfully completed. This presentation provides a review of the instruments, rationale, and approach for ACT-America as well as an overview of operations and a few sample results from the first campaign.

  5. Designating Additions to the Current List of Tropical Diseases in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-08-20

    The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) authorizes the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) to award priority review vouchers (PRVs) to tropical disease product applicants when the applications meet certain criteria. The FD&C Act lists the diseases that are considered to be tropical diseases for purposes of obtaining PRVs, and also provides for Agency expansion of that list to include other diseases that satisfy the definition of ``tropical diseases'' as set forth in the FD&C Act. FDA has determined that Chagas disease and neurocysticercosis satisfy this definition, and therefore is adding them to the list of designated tropical diseases whose product applications may result in the award of PRVs. Sponsors submitting certain applications for the treatment of Chagas disease and neurocysticercosis may be eligible to receive a PRV if such applications are approved by FDA.

  6. New Oil Pollution Act of 1990 will impact facilities, terminals, and transports in the oil industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude of the Exxon Valdez spill galvanized the opinion of both the public and Congress on the need for new oil spill legislation. Consequently, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 - a comprehensive prevention, response, liability, and compensation system for dealing with oil production - was passed by the 101st Congress. This book describes in detail the new law and the liabilities it imposes; the new financial responsibility requirements placed on oil-related facilities and vessels; oil spill prevention and response obligations; and the oil industry's activities to prevent and mitigate oil spills. Also discussed are the compliance problems faced by both fixed facilities and the transportation industry.

  7. Cellular water distribution, transport, and its investigation methods for plant-based food material.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Imran H; Karim, M A

    2017-09-01

    Heterogeneous and hygroscopic characteristics of plant-based food material make it complex in structure, and therefore water distribution in its different cellular environments is very complex. There are three different cellular environments, namely the intercellular environment, the intracellular environment, and the cell wall environment inside the food structure. According to the bonding strength, intracellular water is defined as loosely bound water, cell wall water is categorized as strongly bound water, and intercellular water is known as free water (FW). During food drying, optimization of the heat and mass transfer process is crucial for the energy efficiency of the process and the quality of the product. For optimizing heat and mass transfer during food processing, understanding these three types of waters (strongly bound, loosely bound, and free water) in plant-based food material is essential. However, there are few studies that investigate cellular level water distribution and transport. As there is no direct method for determining the cellular level water distributions, various indirect methods have been applied to investigate the cellular level water distribution, and there is, as yet, no consensus on the appropriate method for measuring cellular level water in plant-based food material. Therefore, the main aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review on the available methods to investigate the cellular level water, the characteristics of water at different cellular levels and its transport mechanism during drying. The effect of bound water transport on quality of food product is also discussed. This review article presents a comparative study of different methods that can be applied to investigate cellular water such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dilatometry. The article closes with a discussion of current challenges to investigating cellular water

  8. 77 FR 21018 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: Amendments Related to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ..., Policy and Program Development Branch, Child Nutrition Division, Food and Nutrition Service, Department...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 226 RIN 0584-AE12 Child and Adult Care Food... Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 affecting the management of the Child and Adult Care Food Program...

  9. Association of serotonin transporter promoter regulatory region polymorphism and cerebral activity to visual presentation of food.

    PubMed

    Kaurijoki, Salla; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Niskanen, Eini; Carlson, Synnöve; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Pesonen, Ullamari; Kaprio, Jaakko M; Rissanen, Aila; Tiihonen, Jari; Karhunen, Leila

    2008-07-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have revealed links between genetic polymorphisms and cognitive and behavioural processes. Serotonin is a classical neurotransmitter of central nervous system, and it is connected to the control of appetite and satiety. In this study, the relationship between the functional variation in the serotonin transporter gene and the activity in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a brain area activated by visual food stimuli was explored. Thirty subjects underwent serial fMRI studies and provided DNA for genetic analyses. Subjects homozygous for the long allele exhibited greater left PCC activity in the comparison food > non-food compared with individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the short allele. The association between genotype and activation was linear, the subjects with two copies of the long allele variant having the strongest activation. These results demonstrate the possible genetically driven variation in the response of the left PCC to visual presentation of food in humans.

  10. Food animal transport: a potential source of community exposures to health hazards from industrial farming (CAFOs).

    PubMed

    Rule, Ana M; Evans, Sean L; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2008-01-01

    Use of antimicrobial feed additives in food animal production is associated with selection for drug resistance in bacterial pathogens, which can then be released into the environment through occupational exposures, high volume ventilation of animal houses, and land application of animal wastes. We tested the hypothesis that current methods of transporting food animals from farms to slaughterhouses may result in pathogen releases and potential exposures of persons in vehicles traveling on the same road. Air and surface samples were taken from cars driving behind poultry trucks for 17 miles. Air conditioners and fans were turned off and windows fully opened. Background and blank samples were used for quality control. Samples were analyzed for susceptible and drug-resistant strains. Results indicate an increase in the number of total aerobic bacteria including both susceptible and drug-resistant enterococci isolated from air and surface samples, and suggest that food animal transport in open crates introduces a novel route of exposure to harmful microorganisms and may disseminate these pathogens into the general environment. These findings support the need for further exposure characterization, and attention to improving methods of food animal transport, especially in highly trafficked regions of high density farming such as the Delmarva Peninsula.

  11. Effect of viscoelastic relaxation on moisture transport in foods. Part I: solution of general transport equation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan P; Maier, Dirk E; Cushman, John H; Haghighi, Kamyar; Corvalan, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of continuum mechanics, Singh et al. developed an integro-differential equation, which applies to both Darcian (Fickian) and non-Darcian (non-Fickian) modes of fluid transport in swelling biological systems. A dimensionless form of the equation was obtained and transformed from moving Eulerian to the stationary Lagrangian coordinates. Here a solution scheme for the transport equation is developed to predict moisture transport and viscoelastic stresses in spheroidal biopolymeric materials. The equation was solved numerically and results used for predicting drying and sorption curves, moisture profiles, and viscoelastic stresses in soybeans. The Lagrangian solution was obtained by assembling together several schemes: the finite element method was used to discretize the equation in space; non-linearity was addressed using the Newton-Raphson method; the Volterra term was handled via a time integration scheme of Patlashenko et al. and the Galerkin rule was used to solve the time-differential term. The solution obtained in Lagrangian coordinates was transformed back to the Eulerian coordinates. In part II of this sequence we present the numerical results.

  12. Adolescent dosing and labeling since the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007.

    PubMed

    Momper, Jeremiah D; Mulugeta, Yeruk; Green, Dionna J; Karesh, Alyson; Krudys, Kevin M; Sachs, Hari C; Yao, Lynn P; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2013-10-01

    During pediatric drug development, dedicated pharmacokinetic studies are generally performed in all relevant age groups to support dose selection for subsequent efficacy trials. To our knowledge, no previous assessments regarding the need for an intensive pharmacokinetic study in adolescents have been performed. To compare U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adult and adolescent drug dosing and to assess the utility of allometric scaling for the prediction of drug clearance in the adolescent population. Adult and adolescent dosing and drug clearance data were obtained from FDA-approved drug labels and publicly available databases containing reviews of pediatric trials submitted to the FDA. Dosing information was compared for products with concordant indications for adolescent and adult patients. Adolescent drug clearance was predicted from adult pharmacokinetic data by using allometric scaling and compared with observed values. Adolescent and adult dosing information and drug clearance. There were 126 unique products with pediatric studies submitted to the FDA since the FDA Amendments Act of 2007, of which 92 had at least 1 adolescent indication concordant with an adult indication. Of these 92 products, 87 (94.5%) have equivalent dosing for adults and adolescent patients. For 18 of these 92 products, a minimum weight or body surface area threshold is recommended for adolescents to receive adult dosing. Allometric scaling predicted adolescent drug clearance with an overall mean absolute percentage error of 17.0%. Approved adult and adolescent drug dosing is equivalent for 94.5% of products with an adolescent indication studied since the FDA Amendments Act of 2007. Allometric scaling may be a useful tool to avoid unnecessary dedicated pharmacokinetic studies in the adolescent population during pediatric drug development, although each development program in adolescents requires a full discussion of drug dosing with the FDA.

  13. RISKIND: An enhanced computer code for National Environmental Policy Act transportation consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y.

    1996-03-01

    The RISKIND computer program was developed for the analysis of radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or other radioactive materials. The code is intended to provide scenario-specific analyses when evaluating alternatives for environmental assessment activities, including those for major federal actions involving radioactive material transport as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). As such, rigorous procedures have been implemented to enhance the code`s credibility and strenuous efforts have been made to enhance ease of use of the code. To increase the code`s reliability and credibility, a new version of RISKIND was produced under a quality assurance plan that covered code development and testing, and a peer review process was conducted. During development of the new version, the flexibility and ease of use of RISKIND were enhanced through several major changes: (1) a Windows{sup {trademark}} point-and-click interface replaced the old DOS menu system, (2) the remaining model input parameters were added to the interface, (3) databases were updated, (4) the program output was revised, and (5) on-line help has been added. RISKIND has been well received by users and has been established as a key component in radiological transportation risk assessments through its acceptance by the U.S. Department of Energy community in recent environmental impact statements (EISs) and its continued use in the current preparation of several EISs.

  14. Bath salts components mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) act synergistically at the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Kolanos, Renata; Solis, Ernesto; Glennon, Richard A; De Felice, Louis J

    2013-04-01

    Bath salts is the street name for drug combinations that contain synthetic cathinone analogues, among them possibly mephedrone (MEPH) and certainly methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In animal studies, cathinone and certain cathinone analogues release dopamine (DA), similar to the action of amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH). AMPH and METH act on the human DA transporter (hDAT); thus, we investigated MEPH and MDPV acting at hDAT. We recorded electrical currents mediated by hDAT expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and exposed to: DA, METH, a known hDAT stimulant and DA releaser, MEPH, MDPV, MEPH + MDPV, or cocaine, a known hDAT inhibitor. DA, METH and MEPH induce an inward current (depolarizing) when the oocyte is held near the resting potential (-60 mV), therefore acting as excitatory hDAT substrates. Structurally analogous MDPV induces an outward (hyperpolarizing) current similar to cocaine, therefore acting as an inhibitory non-substrate blocker. Two components of bath salts, MEPH and MDPV, produce opposite effects at hDAT that are comparable with METH and cocaine, respectively. In our assay, MEPH is nearly as potent as METH; however, MDPV is much more potent than cocaine and its effect is longer lasting. When applied in combination, MEPH exhibits faster kinetics than MDPV, viz., the MEPH depolarizing current occurs seconds before the slower MDPV hyperpolarizing current. Bath salts containing MEPH (or a similar drug) and MDPV might then be expected initially to release DA and subsequently prevent its reuptake via hDAT. Such combined action possibly underlies some of the reported effects of bath salts abuse. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Bath salts components mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) act synergistically at the human dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Kolanos, Renata; Solis, Ernesto; Glennon, Richard A; De Felice, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bath salts is the street name for drug combinations that contain synthetic cathinone analogues, among them possibly mephedrone (MEPH) and certainly methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In animal studies, cathinone and certain cathinone analogues release dopamine (DA), similar to the action of amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH). AMPH and METH act on the human DA transporter (hDAT); thus, we investigated MEPH and MDPV acting at hDAT. Experimental Approach We recorded electrical currents mediated by hDAT expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and exposed to: DA, METH, a known hDAT stimulant and DA releaser, MEPH, MDPV, MEPH + MDPV, or cocaine, a known hDAT inhibitor. Key Results DA, METH and MEPH induce an inward current (depolarizing) when the oocyte is held near the resting potential (–60 mV), therefore acting as excitatory hDAT substrates. Structurally analogous MDPV induces an outward (hyperpolarizing) current similar to cocaine, therefore acting as an inhibitory non-substrate blocker. Conclusions and Implications Two components of bath salts, MEPH and MDPV, produce opposite effects at hDAT that are comparable with METH and cocaine, respectively. In our assay, MEPH is nearly as potent as METH; however, MDPV is much more potent than cocaine and its effect is longer lasting. When applied in combination, MEPH exhibits faster kinetics than MDPV, viz., the MEPH depolarizing current occurs seconds before the slower MDPV hyperpolarizing current. Bath salts containing MEPH (or a similar drug) and MDPV might then be expected initially to release DA and subsequently prevent its reuptake via hDAT. Such combined action possibly underlies some of the reported effects of bath salts abuse. PMID:23170765

  16. The success of the citizen suit: protecting consumers from inaccurate food labeling by amending the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    PubMed

    Springer, James

    2013-01-01

    The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act ("FDCA"), amended in 1990 by the Nutrition Education and Labeling Act ("NLEA"), established a national framework for the administration and promulgation of uniform food labeling standards. Specifically, the NLEA created affirmative obligations for the food--requiring detailed disclosure of food content and strict adherence to regulations governing the use of health and nutritional claims on food packaging. To accomplish these goals, Congress tasked the Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") with the sole responsibility of the enforcement of these new requirements. Under the statutory framework of the FDCA, the United States Supreme Court ("Court") has held that there is no private right of action, of which extended to the enforcement of NLEA standards. This interpretation has left individuals with no federal outlet for relief in the enforcement of federal food labeling standards. Adherence to this interpretation is especially concerning when the FDA currently faces exponential growth in administrative responsibilities while simultaneously experiencing employment reduction, a $206 million "Sequester," and a recent government-wide shutdown. As a result, the American people are left to depend on an Agency that is struggling with drastic resource reduction while being accountable for ever increasing enforcement responsibilities. To ensure consumer protection, this Article argues that Congress should amend the FDCA to include a citizen suit provision in order to provide individuals with a right of private action for the enforcement of NLEA standards. Borrowing from the successes realized under similar citizen suit provisions found in environmental legislation, this Article argues that a citizen suit provision is amendable to the FDCA and would relieve fiscal pressures, strengthen the current enforcement framework of the FDCA, encourage more robust enforcement by the FDA and states, and ensure uniform interpretation of NLEA

  17. Pyrethroid mode(s) of action in the context of Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) regulation.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Derek W; Leggett, Michael F; Clark, John M

    2011-04-13

    A Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP) in June 2009 concluded that a common mode of action existed for pyrethroids, with two subgroups. The purpose of this SAP was to advise the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on the validity of regulation of pyrethroids as a single class under the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996. Two types of pyrethroid action were first described for clinical signs in the rat and clinical signs/nerve effects in the cockroach. In insects, Type I clinical signs correlate with repetitive firing in nerve axons, especially fine sensory axons. The Na(+) inward current is via a TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC). Type II (α-CN) effects on VGSCs do not include repetitive firing following stimulation in these axons. Instead, Type II effects on VGSCs include prolonged Na(+) tail currents along with depolarization of nerve membrane. Other Type II effects have been measured on VG Ca(2+) and K(+) channels and VG and GABA-activated Cl(-) channels. In conclusion, in vivo pyrethroid effects in mammals should be linked with specific channel effects, allowing the use of specific clinical signs or ion channel effects for pyrethroid risk assessment.

  18. Mechanisms Underlying Food-Drug Interactions: Inhibition of Intestinal Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Won, Christina S.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Paine, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively. PMID:22884524

  19. Mechanisms underlying food-drug interactions: inhibition of intestinal metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Won, Christina S; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2012-11-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively.

  20. PREDICTING DRUG DISPOSITION, ABSORPTION / ELIMINATION / TRANSPORTER INTERPLAY AND THE ROLE OF FOOD ON DRUG ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Custodio, Joseph M.; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Benet, Leslie Z.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict drug disposition involves concurrent consideration of many chemical and physiological variables and the effect of food on the rate and extent of availability adds further complexity due to postprandial changes in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. A system that allows for the assessment of the multivariate interplay occurring following administration of an oral dose, in the presence or absence of meal, would greatly benefit the early stages of drug development. This is particularly true in an era when the majority of new molecular entities are highly permeable, poorly soluble, extensively metabolized compounds (BDDCS Class 2), which present the most complicated relationship in defining the impact of transporters due to the marked effects of transporter-enzyme interplay. This review evaluates the GI luminal environment by taking into account the absorption / transport / elimination interplay and evaluates the physiochemical property issues by taking into account the importance of solubility, permeability and metabolism. We concentrate on the BDDCS and its utility in predicting drug disposition. Furthermore, we focus on the effect of food on the extent of drug availability (F), which appears to follow closely what might be expected if a significant effect of high fat meals is inhibition of transporters. That is, high fat meals and lipidic excipients would be expected to have little effect on F for Class 1 drugs; they would increase F of Class 2 drugs, while decreasing F for Class 3 drugs. PMID:18199522

  1. 41 CFR 304-3.8 - Must I adhere to the provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... reimbursed to your agency by the non-Federal source, the provisions of the Fly America Act do not apply....

  2. 41 CFR 304-3.8 - Must I adhere to the provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... reimbursed to your agency by the non-Federal source, the provisions of the Fly America Act do not apply....

  3. 41 CFR 304-3.8 - Must I adhere to the provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... reimbursed to your agency by the non-Federal source, the provisions of the Fly America Act do not apply....

  4. 41 CFR 304-3.8 - Must I adhere to the provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... reimbursed to your agency by the non-Federal source, the provisions of the Fly America Act do not apply....

  5. 41 CFR 304-3.8 - Must I adhere to the provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... provisions of the Fly America Act when I receive air transportation to a meeting furnished or paid by a non... reimbursed to your agency by the non-Federal source, the provisions of the Fly America Act do not apply....

  6. PATHWAY: a simulation model of radionuclide-transport through agricultural food chains

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, T.B.; Whicker, F.W.; Otis, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    PATHWAY simulates the transport of radionuclides from fallout through an agricultural ecosystem. The agro-ecosystem is subdivided into several land management units, each of which is used either for grazing animals, for growing hay, or for growing food crops. The model simulates the transport of radionuclides by both discrete events and continuous, time-dependent processes. The discrete events include tillage of soil, harvest and storage of crops,and deposition of fallout. The continuous processes include the transport of radionuclides due to resuspension, weathering, rain splash, percolation, leaching, adsorption and desorption of radionuclides in the soil, root uptake, foliar absorption, growth and senescence of vegetation, and the ingestion assimilation, and excretion of radionuclides by animals. Preliminary validation studies indicate that the model dynamics and simulated values of radionuclide concentrations in several agricultural products agree well with measured values when the model is driven with site specific data on deposition from world-wide fallout.

  7. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, M. C.; Knightes, C. D.; Dennis, R. L.; Cooter, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system were used. CMAQ simulated atmospheric chemical transport and nitrogen deposition. This data was entered into SWAT which simulated watershed hydrology and water quality. Two cases were investigated: one that incorporates CAAA regulatory emissions controls in CMAQ simulation (with) and a second case that does not (without). SWAT model results forecasted a 70% decrease in inorganic nitrogen discharge from the Little River watershed and a 50% decrease for the Nahunta watershed by 2020 under the emission control (with) scenario. Denitrification and plant nitrogen uptake played important roles in nitrogen discharge from each watershed. The nitrogen discharge response time following a change in atmospheric nitrogen deposition was 4 years for the Nahunta watershed and 2 years for the Little River watershed. The longer response time for Nahunta is primarily due to a higher percentage of soybean land cover (22.5% [Nahunta]; 1.6% [Little River]). Agricultural land covers had varied nitrogen response times to changes in atmospheric deposition, particularly for soybean, hay and corn. The studied watersheds retained >80% of all nitrogen delivered by agriculture fertilization, biological fixation and atmospheric deposition.

  8. Identification of an intronic cis-acting element in the human dopamine transporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Zhou, Yanhong; Lin, Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    The human dopamine transporter gene (hDAT) encodes the dopamine transporter in dopamine (DA) neurons to regulate DA transmission. hDAT expression varies significantly from neuron to neuron, and from individual to individual so that dysregulation of hDAT is related to many neuropsychiatric disorders. It is critical to identify hDAT-specific cis-acting elements that regulate the hDAT expression. Previous studies showed that hDAT Intron 1 displayed inhibitory activity for reporter gene expression. Here we report that the hDAT Intron 1 contains a 121-bp fragment that down-regulated both SV40 and hDAT promoter activities by 80% in vitro. Subfragments of 121-bp still down-regulated the SV40 promoter but not the hDAT promoter, as supported by nuclear protein-binding activities. Collectively, 121-bp is a silencer in vitro that might coordinate with transcriptional activities both inside and outside 121-bp in regulation of hDAT. PMID:22160470

  9. The ActP acetate transporter acts prior to the PitA phosphate carrier in tellurite uptake by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Elías, Alex; Díaz-Vásquez, Waldo; Abarca-Lagunas, María José; Chasteen, Thomas G; Arenas, Felipe; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2015-08-01

    The tellurium oxyanion tellurite is harmful for most microorganisms. Since its toxicity occurs chiefly once the toxicant reaches the intracellular compartment, unveiling the toxicant uptake process is crucial for understanding the whole phenomenon of tellurium toxicity. While the PitA phosphate transporter is thought to be one of the main paths responsible for toxicant entry into Escherichia coli, genetic and physiological evidence have identified the ActP acetate carrier as the main tellurite importer in Rhodobacter capsulatus. In this work, new background on the role of these transporters in tellurite uptake by E. coli is presented. It was found that, similar to what occurs in R. capsulatus, ActP is able to mediate toxicant entry to this bacterium. Lower reactive oxygen species levels were observed in E. coli lacking the actP gene. Antioxidant enzyme catalase and fumarase C activity was almost unchanged after short exposure of E. coli ΔactP to sublethal tellurite concentrations, suggesting a low antioxidant response. In this strain, tellurite uptake decreased significantly during the first 5 min of exposure and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy assays using an actP-overexpressing strain confirmed that this carrier mediates toxicant uptake. Relative gene expression experiments by qPCR showed that actP expression is enhanced at short times of tellurite exposure, while pitA and pitB genes are induced later. Summarizing, the results show that ActP is involved in tellurite entry to E. coli and that its participation occurs mainly at early stages of toxicant exposure.

  10. 78 FR 46966 - Food Safety Modernization Act Domestic and Foreign Facility Reinspection, Recall, and Importer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Reinspection, Recall, and Importer Reinspection Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014 AGENCY: Food and Drug... with a recall order, and importer reinspections that are authorized by the Federal Food, Drug, and... domestic facility and an importer who does not comply with a recall order, to cover food \\1\\ recall...

  11. Vitamin B12 transport from food to the body's cells--a sophisticated, multistep pathway.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Marianne J; Rasmussen, Mie R; Andersen, Christian B F; Nexø, Ebba; Moestrup, Søren K

    2012-05-01

    Vitamin B(12) (B(12); also known as cobalamin) is a cofactor in many metabolic processes; deficiency of this vitamin is associated with megaloblastic anaemia and various neurological disorders. In contrast to many prokaryotes, humans and other mammals are unable to synthesize B(12). Instead, a sophisticated pathway for specific uptake and transport of this molecule has evolved. Failure in the gastrointestinal part of this pathway is the most common cause of nondietary-induced B(12) deficiency disease. However, although less frequent, defects in cellular processing and further downstream steps in the transport pathway are also known culprits of functional B(12) deficiency. Biochemical and genetic approaches have identified novel proteins in the B(12) transport pathway--now known to involve more than 15 gene products--delineating a coherent pathway for B(12) trafficking from food to the body's cells. Some of these gene products are specifically dedicated to B(12) transport, whereas others embrace additional roles, which explains the heterogeneity in the clinical picture of the many genetic disorders causing B(12) deficiency. This Review describes basic and clinical features of this multistep pathway with emphasis on gastrointestinal transport of B(12) and its importance in clinical medicine.

  12. The Global Food System as a Transport Pathway for Hazardous Chemicals: The Missing Link between Emissions and Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Carla A.; von Goetz, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food is a major pathway for human exposure to hazardous chemicals. The modern food system is becoming increasingly complex and globalized, but models for food-borne exposure typically assume locally derived diets or use concentrations directly measured in foods without accounting for food origin. Such approaches may not reflect actual chemical intakes because concentrations depend on food origin, and representative analysis is seldom available. Processing, packaging, storage, and transportation also impart different chemicals to food and are not yet adequately addressed. Thus, the link between environmental emissions and realistic human exposure is effectively broken. Objectives: We discuss the need for a fully integrated treatment of the modern industrialized food system, and we propose strategies for using existing models and relevant supporting data sources to track chemicals during production, processing, packaging, storage, and transport. Discussion: Fate and bioaccumulation models describe how chemicals distribute in the environment and accumulate through local food webs. Human exposure models can use concentrations in food to determine body burdens based on individual or population characteristics. New models now include the impacts of processing and packaging but are far from comprehensive. We propose to close the gap between emissions and exposure by utilizing a wider variety of models and data sources, including global food trade data, processing, and packaging models. Conclusions: A comprehensive approach that takes into account the complexity of the modern global food system is essential to enable better prediction of human exposure to chemicals in food, sound risk assessments, and more focused risk abatement strategies. Citation: Ng CA, von Goetz N. 2017. The global food system as a transport pathway for hazardous chemicals: the missing link between emissions and exposure. Environ Health Perspect 125:1–7; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP

  13. Revocation of advisory opinion entitled "FD&C Act Trade Correspondence 61". Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Notice; revocation.

    PubMed

    1999-05-21

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is revoking an advisory opinion entitled "FD&C Act Trade Correspondence, TC-61," (hereinafter called TC-61) dated February 15, 1940, because it is out of date with current scientific knowledge and is superseded by the final rule for over-the-counter (OTC) sunscreen drug products. As an advisory opinion, this correspondence was not published in the Federal Register.

  14. Transportation of perishable and refrigerated foods in mylar foil bags and insulated containers: a time-temperature study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Schrade, John P; Su, Haiyan; Specchio, John J

    2014-08-01

    Data are lacking on the temperature changes of food during transport without the use of refrigerated trucks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of several insulated and noninsulated containers with or without frozen gel packs to keep perishable and refrigerated foods within the temperature safe zone in relationship to duration of transport. The study was designed to duplicate the practices exhibited by customers purchasing perishable food products from a cash-and-carry business. Approximately 40 perishable food items were evaluated. Four types of containers were tested: a mylar foil bag, a commercial insulated bag, a generic insulated bag, and a commercial insulated blanket. Mixed foods were placed into these containers with or without frozen gel packs, transported in unrefrigerated vehicles, and monitored for 4 h for temperature changes. Two environmental temperatures, room temperature of 21.1°C and a stress temperature of 37.8°C, were evaluated. The internal temperature and surface temperature of the food products in these containers increased slowly but remained well below the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Food Code requirements. The various containers were similar in their ability to retain coolness. The presence of frozen gel packs dramatically enhanced the cold-holding capacity of the containers. The temperature of foods increased more rapidly when stressed in a heated environment. The containers tested used with the frozen gel packs can keep the surface and internal temperatures of various perishable foods (starting at 4.4°C or less) within the Food Code recommendation of under 21.1°C for 4 h. Cash-and-carry businesses should strongly encourage their retail customers to utilize these containers with frozen gel packs to safely transport perishable foods.

  15. Integrative application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial act configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The performance and economic benefits of a constrained application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) are identified, and the approach to airplane design is established for subsequent steps leading to the development of a less constrained final ACT configuration. The active controls configurations are measured against a conventional baseline configuration, a state-of-the-art transport, to determine whether the performance and economic changes resulting from ACT merit proceeding with the project. The technology established by the conventional baseline configuration was held constant except for the addition of ACT. The wing, with the same planform, was moved forward on the initial ACT configuration to move the loading range aft relative to the wing mean aerodynamic chord. Wing trailing-edge surfaces and surface controls also were reconfigured for load alleviation and structural stabilization.

  16. Reduced serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) function causes insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of food intake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoning; Margolis, Kara J; Gershon, Michael D; Schwartz, Gary J; Sze, Ji Y

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) is a key regulator of serotonin neurotransmission and a major target of antidepressants. Antidepressants, such as selectively serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), that block SERT function are known to affect food intake and body weight. Here, we provide genetic evidence that food intake and metabolism are regulated by separable mechanisms of SERT function. SERT-deficient mice ate less during both normal diet and high fat diet feeding. The reduced food intake was accompanied with markedly elevated plasma leptin levels. Despite reduced food intake, SERT-deficient mice exhibited glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, and progressively developed obesity and hepatic steatosis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the metabolic deficits of SERT-deficient mice are attributable to reduced insulin-sensitivity in peripheral tissues. First, SERT-deficient mice exhibited beta-cell hyperplasia and islet-mass expansion. Second, biochemical analyses revealed constitutively elevated JNK activity and diminished insulin-induced AKT activation in the liver of SERT-deficient mice. SERT-deficient mice exhibited hyper-JNK activity and hyperinsulinemia prior to the development of obesity. Third, enhancing AKT signaling by PTEN deficiency corrected glucose tolerance in SERT-deficient mice. These findings have potential implications for designing selective SERT drugs for weight control and the treatment of metabolic syndromes.

  17. FOOD VACUOLE MEMBRANE GROWTH WITH MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED MEMBRANE TRANSPORT IN PARAMECIUM

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence from a morphological study of the oral apparatus of Paramecium caudatum using electron microscope techniques have shown the existence of an elaborate structural system which is apparently designed to recycle digestive-vacuole membrane. Disk-shaped vesicles are filtered out of the cytoplasm by a group of microtubular ribbons. The vesicles, after being transported to the cytostome-cytopharynx region in association with these ribbons, accumulate next to the cytopharynx before they become fused with the cytopharyngeal membrane. This fusion allows the nascent food vacuole to grow and increase its membrane surface area. The morphology of this cytostome-cytopharynx region is described in detail and illustrated with a three-dimensional drawing of a portion of this region and a clay sculpture of the oral apparatus of Paramecium. Evidence from the literature for the transformation of food vacuole membrane into disk-shaped vesicles both from condensing food vacuoles in the endoplasm and from egested food vacuoles at the cytoproct is presented. This transformation would complete a system of digestive vacuole membrane recycling. PMID:4373478

  18. 77 FR 70795 - Privacy Act of 1974; Retirement of Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Transportation Worker Identification Credentialing and other Transportation Security Administration vetting... Assessment (STA) process associated with the TWIC and other TSA vetting programs. Eliminating the system of...

  19. 78 FR 14309 - Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Provision Requiring FDA To Establish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... appropriate technologies that enhance the tracking and tracing of foods along the supply chain from source to... ingredients (minimum of two ingredients) and (b) a selected fruit and/or vegetable along the supply chain; 7... along the Food Supply System.'' FDA is announcing the opening of a docket to provide stakeholders and...

  20. 76 FR 20588 - FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: Focus on Preventive Controls for Facilities; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... animal food and feed (including pet food). DATES: See ``How to Participate in the Meeting'' in the... examine and update current good manufacturing practice requirements and to develop an animal feed safety... request for an opportunity to make an oral presentation. It is only necessary to send one set of comments...

  1. "Reforms Looked Really Good on Paper": Rural Food Service Responses to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Disa; Askelson, Natoshia; Golembiewski, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHKA) required schools to make changes to meals provided to children. Rural school districts have limited resources, with increased obesity rates and local food insecurity. In this study we sought to understand the perceptions of rural food service directors and the barriers to implementing the changes. Food service directors from rural school districts were invited to complete a semistructured telephone interview and online survey. A total of 51 respondents completed both, 6 completed only the online survey, and 16 completed only the telephone interview. Qualitative interview data were analyzed through open thematic coding; descriptive statistics were calculated for the quantitative data. Food service directors mostly perceived the changes as negative, challenging, and burdensome. They believed that the changes resulted from concern about childhood obesity, which they did not view as a problem for their students. Diverse challenges were reported related to cost, preparation, and student preference. Food service directors in isolated, rural areas need support to enhance understanding of HHKA requirements, build professional networks to learn from one another, and communicate with students, families, and other stakeholders. Future efforts should focus on changing perceptions and supporting directors in order to make implementation a success. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  2. Effect of viscosity on food transport and swallow initiation during eating of two-phase food in normal young adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koichiro; Kawase, Soichiro; Wakimoto, Nina; Iwatani, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Yuji; Ogasawara, Tadashi

    2013-03-01

    When eating food containing both liquid and solid phases (two-phase food), the liquid component frequently enters the hypopharynx before swallowing, which may increase the risk of aspiration. We therefore tested whether preswallow bolus transport and swallow initiation would change as the viscosity of two-phase food was increased. Fiberoptic endoscopy was recorded while 18 adult subjects ate 5 g of steamed rice with 3 ml of blue-dye water. Liquid viscosity was set at four levels by adding a thickening agent (0, 1, 2, and 4 wt%, respectively). We measured the timing of the leading edge of the food reaching the base of the epiglottis, as well as the location of the leading edge at swallow initiation. As viscosity increased, the leading edge of the food reached the epiglottis significantly later during chewing and was higher in the pharynx at swallow onset. The time after the leading edge reached the epiglottis did not vary among the viscosities of the two-phase food. This study found that the initial viscosity of two-phase food significantly altered oropharyngeal bolus flow and the timing of swallow initiation. Accordingly, increased two-phase food viscosity may delay food entry into the pharynx and be of use in dysphagic diets.

  3. Application of ozonated dry ice (ALIGAL™ Blue Ice) for packaging and transport in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Fratamico, Pina M; Juneja, Vijay; Annous, Bassam A; Rasanayagam, Vasuhi; Sundar, M; Braithwaite, David; Fisher, Steven

    2012-05-01

    Dry ice is used by meat and poultry processors for temperature reduction during processing and for temperature maintenance during transportation. ALIGAL™ Blue Ice (ABI), which combines the antimicrobial effect of ozone (O(3)) along with the high cooling capacity of dry ice, was investigated for its effect on bacterial reduction in air, in liquid, and on food and glass surfaces. Through proprietary means, O(3) was introduced to produce dry ice pellets to a concentration of 20 parts per million (ppm) by total weight. The ABI sublimation rate was similar to that of dry ice pellets under identical conditions, and ABI was able to hold the O(3) concentration throughout the normal shelf life of the product. Challenge studies were performed using different microorganisms, including E. coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella, and Listeria, that are critical to food safety. ABI showed significant (P < 0.05) microbial reduction during bioaerosol contamination (up to 5-log reduction of E. coli and Listeria), on chicken breast (approximately 1.3-log reduction of C. jejuni), on contact surfaces (approximately 3.9 log reduction of C. jejuni), and in liquid (2-log reduction of C. jejuni). Considering the stability of O(3), ease of use, and antimicrobial efficacy against foodborne pathogens, our results suggest that ABI is a better alternative, especially for meat and poultry processors, as compared to dry ice. Further, ABI can potentially serve as an additional processing hurdle to guard against pathogens during processing, transportation, distribution, and/or storage.

  4. Distribution of PCB congeners in seven lake systems: Interactions between sediment and food-web transport

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, C.R.; Metcalfe, C.D.; Balch, G.C.; Metcalfe, T.L. . Environmental and Resource Studies)

    1993-11-01

    A study was conducted to examine the role of two processes, partitioning of PCBs between sediment and biota and food-web transport, in determining the concentration of PCB congeners in the biota of seven lakes. Biota PCB concentration (lipid)-to-sediment PCB concentration (organic carbon), or BSF, ratios were calculated as markers of the partitioning of PCBs between biota and sediment, and biota PCB concentration (lipid)-to-zooplankton PCB concentration (lipid), or BAS, ratios were calculated as markers of the transport of PCBs through food webs. The lakes ranged from a shallow, well-mixed lake with a historic input of Aroclor technical mixtures to deeper, oligotrophic systems in which atmospheric deposition was the only known source. BSF ratios ranged from approximately one in cyprinids and zooplankton in all lakes to 30 in yellow perch in one lake. A significant correlation between lake maximum depth and combined BSF ratios for all biota indicated that PCBs were generally more available for accumulation in the shallower lakes, regardless of the PCB source. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the biota in the shallower lakes had higher ratios of higher chlorinated congeners, suggesting that predictions of equal concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants on a lipid basis in sediment and lower trophic levels may significantly underestimate the accumulation of very hydrophobic compounds in the organisms of some lake systems. BAF ratios ranged from approximately one in the lower trophic levels to approximately 10 in lake trout.

  5. Tragedy, transformation, and triumph: comparing the factors and forces that led to the adoption of the 1860 Adulteration Act in England and the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act in the United States.

    PubMed

    London, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    The 1860 Adulteration Act in England and the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act in the United States were two of the earliest pieces of legislation to provide generalized regulation of food and drugs on a national scale. While significant scholarly attention has been given to explaining the factors and forces that led to the passage of each Act independent of the other, few books or articles have directly compared the similar individuals and events that led to the adoption of both Acts. This paper attempts to fill that gap. Through a comparative examination, this paper reveals that four main components were key to the national pure food and drug movements in both countries: individuals who crusaded for national adulteration legislation; tragedies that shocked the public into calling for reform; press and publicity that was willing and able to bring the evils of adulteration to the forefront of the public mind; and a transformation of the social, political, and economic systems, which created atmospheres conducive to reform. This paper aims to shed new light on the 1860 Adulteration Act and the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act--two acts that derive their importance not just from the effect that they directly had on the regulation of food and drugs but also as some of the earliest examples of western governments coming to recognize the need for national regulation to protect the public from harm and coming to embrace their changing role as spearheads of modern regulatory states.

  6. Impact of Postovulatory Food Deprivation on the Ova Transport, Hormonal Profiles and Metabolic Changes in Sows

    PubMed Central

    Razdan, P; Mwanza, AM; Kindahl, H; Hultén, F; Einarsson, S

    2001-01-01

    The effect of food deprivation on ova transport, hormonal profiles and metabolic changes was studied in 20 crossbred multiparous sows during their second oestrus after weaning. To determine the time of ovulation, transrectal ultrasonographic examination was performed. The sows were divided into 2 groups, one control group (C-group), which was fed according to Swedish standards, and one experimental group (E-group). The E-group sows were deprived of food from the first morning meal after ovulation until slaughter. Blood samples were collected every second hour from about 12 h before expected ovulation in the second oestrus after weaning until slaughter and were analysed for progesterone, prostaglandin F2α-metabolite, insulin, glucose, free fatty acids and triglycerides. All sows were slaughtered approximately 48 h after ovulation and the genital tract was recovered. The isthmic part of the oviduct was divided into 3 equally long segments and flushed separately with phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Uterine horns were also flushed with PBS. A significantly greater number of ova were found in the first and second part of the isthmus in the E-group (p = 0.05) while in the C-group most of the ova were found in the third part of the isthmus or the uterus (p = 0.01). The level of prostaglandin F2α-metabolite was significantly higher in the E-group compared with the C-group. The concentration of progesterone increased in both groups after ovulation but there were no significant differences between the groups. The other blood parameters showed that the food-deprived sows were in a catabolic state. The 48 h period of fasting results, directly or indirectly in an delayed ova transport, which may be due to a delayed relaxation in the smooth circular muscle layer of the isthmus. PMID:11455901

  7. Clean Air Act Standards and Guidelines for Agriculture, Food and Forestry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the agriculture, food, and forestry industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, just click on the links below.

  8. 78 FR 26845 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary of Transportation; DOT...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... Administrations and Secretarial Offices, to collect and maintain biographical information of Department of Transportation employees and other individuals for the purpose of publicizing skills, experiences, and expertise... submission to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), which will include the...

  9. 75 FR 22713 - Implementation of Sanitary Food Transportation Act of 2005

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... poultry hanging from the roof inside the cargo area of a truck, with juices dripping onto open boxes of..., improper packaging, infestation with insects, insanitary storage (e.g., roof leaks and moldy walls, animal... facilities then serve distribution facilities, which eventually serve retailer outlets, including restaurant...

  10. Enhancing Nutrition Security via India's National Food Security Act: Using an Axe instead of a Scalpel?§

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sonalde; Vanneman, Reeve

    2016-01-01

    In September 2013, India passed a historic National Food Security Act. This paper examines the potential impact of the two central pillars of this act - expansion of the Public Distribution System and strengthening of the Integrated Child Development Schemes – on child nutrition. Using new data from the India Human Development Survey of 2011-12, this paper shows that access to subsidized grains via PDS is not related to improved child nutrition, and while ICDS seems to be related to lower child undernutrition, it has a limited reach in spite of the universalization of the program. The paper suggests that a tiered strategy in dealing with child undernutrition that starts with the identification of undernourished children and districts and follows through with different strategies for dealing with severe, acute malnutrition, followed by a focus on moderate malnutrition, could be more effective than the existing focus on cereal distribution rooted in the NFSA. PMID:27034596

  11. Effects of seasonal changes in food quality and food intake on the transport of sodium and butyrate across ruminal epithelium of reindeer.

    PubMed

    Storeheier, P V; Sehested, J; Diernaes, L; Sundset, M A; Mathiesen, S D

    2003-07-01

    Transport of 22Na and 14C-butyrate across the ruminal epithelium of captive reindeer fed a concentrate diet in summer (n=5) and in winter (n=5) and from free-ranging reindeer taken from summer (n=3) and winter pasture (n=5) was measured in vitro in Ussing chambers. Significant amounts of both Na+ and butyrate were transported across the isolated epithelium without any external driving force. The ruminal transport of Na+ and butyrate were interacting, as evidenced by both the observed amiloride-induced reduction of net butyrate-transport and by the positive correlation between net transport of butyrate and Na+. Amiloride also reduced the net transport of Na+ without significantly affecting the short-circuit current, indicating the presence of an apical Na+/H+ exchanger in the ruminal epithelium of reindeer. The captive reindeer increased the dry matter intake of a constant quality concentrate from winter to summer, but this neither affected their ruminal transport capacity nor their ruminal surface enlargement factor (SEF). Free-ranging reindeer increased their ruminal transport capacity for Na+ and butyrate from summer to winter but simultaneously reduced their ruminal SEF. The present data indicate that this food-induced increase in transport capacity was attributed to changes in the nutrient composition of the diet.

  12. 76 FR 42003 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration--023 Workplace Violence Prevention...--023 Workplace Violence Prevention Program System of Records'' from certain provisions of the Privacy.../Transportation Security Administration--023 Workplace Violence Prevention Program System of Records'' from one or...

  13. 77 FR 70796 - Privacy Act of 1974; Retirement of Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Transportation Security Administration System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office, Department of Homeland Security.../Transportation Security Administration- 019, Secure Flight Records (November 9, 2007, 72 FR 63711) to cover the..., Director, Privacy Policy and Compliance, TSA-36, Transportation Security Administration, 601......

  14. Effects of age and viscosity on food transport and breathing-swallowing coordination during eating of two-phase food in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Matsuo, Koichiro; Izawa, Masayuki; Yamada, Shizuru; Masuda, Yuji; Ogasawara, Tadashi

    2017-04-20

    When eating food that contains both liquid and solid phases, the liquid component frequently enters the hypopharynx before swallowing and can increase the risk of aspiration. Thus, we examined whether the initial viscosity of mixed consistency food could alter pre-swallow food transport and breathing-swallowing coordination in older adults. Fiberoptic endoscopy was recorded while 18 healthy young adults and 19 older adults ate 5 g of steamed rice combined with 3 mL of blue-dye water. Liquid viscosity was set at three levels by the addition of a thickening agent (0 wt%, thin; 2 wt%, thicker; 4 wt%, higher-viscosity, respectively). We measured the timing of swallow initiation and its corresponding respiratory phase for each participant. For thin mixed consistency food, whereas the timing of swallow initiation was comparable between young and older participants, swallowing was initiated during inspiration significantly more often in older participants (31.6 %) than in young participants (5.6 %). In contrast, the timing of swallow initiation was delayed in older participants for thicker and higher-viscosity foods, although swallowing was commonly initiated during expiration in both groups. In older adults, we observed that swallow initiation function was preserved for thin mixed consistency samples, but breathing-swallowing coupling was diminished. For higher-viscosity foods, swallow initiation was delayed in this group, but breathing-swallowing coordination was not disturbed, probably as a result of the slow bolus flow into the hypopharynx. Thus, it appears the initial viscosity of mixed consistency food profoundly affects food transport before swallowing as well as breathing-swallowing coordination in nursing home residents. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Direct visualization of internal respiratory and food transport dynamics in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wah-Keat; Socha, John; Westneat, Mark; Harrison, Jon; Waters, James

    2007-11-01

    Although the internal physiological dynamics of large species, especially humans, are well understood, this is not true for small millimeter-sized animals such as insects. Because of their size and in general, optically opaque exteriors, direct visualization of internal insect physiology has not been possible. As such, biologists have relied on indirect techniques, such as gas exchange or pressure measurements, coupled with histology/dissection, and external observations to infer internal dynamics. A new technique, x-ray phase-contrast imaging, have, for the first time, allowed direct visualization of the internal dynamics related to insect physiology. Compression of air sacs and trachea, and the uptake and transport of food in insects have been seen for the first time. These measurements have raised many questions and call for further theoretical research into these complex systems.

  16. Thinking Globally, Acting Locally About Food, Population and Energy Issues. Seventh Grade Interdisciplinary Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara, Ed.

    This social studies unit suggests activities and teaching methods for use by seventh grade social studies classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on global food, population, and energy problems. Objectives are to help students become aware of global interdependence, identify roles of various nations in causing and…

  17. Linking Intertidal and Subtidal Food Webs: Consumer-Mediated Transport of Intertidal Benthic Microalgal Carbon.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Keun; Park, Hyun Je; Choy, Eun Jung; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Hwang, Kangseok; Kim, Jong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for a large variety of consumers in intertidal and subtidal habitats, and their potential primary food sources [i.e., microphytobenthos (MPB), phytoplankton, and Phragmites australis] in a coastal bay system, Yeoja Bay of Korea, to test the hypothesis that the transfer of intertidal MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal food web can be mediated by motile consumers. Compared to a narrow δ13C range (-18 to -16‰) of offshore consumers, a broad δ13C range (-18 to -12‰) of both intertidal and subtidal consumers indicated that 13C-enriched sources of organic matter are an important trophic source to coastal consumers. In the intertidal areas, δ13C of most consumers overlapped with or was 13C-enriched relative to MPB. Despite the scarcity of MPB in the subtidal, highly motile consumers in subtidal habitat had nearly identical δ13C range with many intertidal foragers (including crustaceans and fish), overlapping with the range of MPB. In contrast, δ13C values of many sedentary benthic invertebrates in the subtidal areas were similar to those of offshore consumers and more 13C-depleted than motile foragers, indicating high dependence on phytoplankton-derived carbon. The isotopic mixing model calculation confirms that the majority of motile consumers and also some of subtidal sedentary ones depend on intertidal MPB for more than a half of their tissue carbon. Finally, although further quantitative estimates are needed, these results suggest that direct foraging by motile consumers on intertidal areas, and thereby biological transport of MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal areas, may provide important trophic connection between intertidal production and the nearshore shallow subtidal food webs.

  18. Food chain transport of nanoparticles affects behaviour and fat metabolism in fish.

    PubMed

    Cedervall, Tommy; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Lard, Mercy; Frohm, Birgitta; Linse, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized (10(-9)-10(-7) m) particles offer many technical and biomedical advances over the bulk material. The use of nanoparticles in cosmetics, detergents, food and other commercial products is rapidly increasing despite little knowledge of their effect on organism metabolism. We show here that commercially manufactured polystyrene nanoparticles, transported through an aquatic food chain from algae, through zooplankton to fish, affect lipid metabolism and behaviour of the top consumer. At least three independent metabolic parameters differed between control and test fish: the weight loss, the triglycerides∶cholesterol ratio in blood serum, and the distribution of cholesterol between muscle and liver. Moreover, we demonstrate that nanoparticles bind to apolipoprotein A-I in fish serum in-vitro, thereby restraining them from properly utilising their fat reserves if absorbed through ingestion. In addition to the metabolic effects, we show that consumption of nanoparticle-containing zooplankton affects the feeding behaviour of the fish. The time it took the fish to consume 95% of the food presented to them was more than doubled for nanoparticle-exposed compared to control fish. Since many nano-sized products will, through the sewage system, end up in freshwater and marine habitats, our study provides a potential bioassay for testing new nano-sized material before manufacturing. In conclusion, our study shows that from knowledge of the molecular composition of the protein corona around nanoparticles it is possible to make a testable molecular hypothesis and bioassay of the potential biological risks of a defined nanoparticle at the organism and ecosystem level.

  19. Food Chain Transport of Nanoparticles Affects Behaviour and Fat Metabolism in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Cedervall, Tommy; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Lard, Mercy; Frohm, Birgitta; Linse, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized (10−9–10−7 m) particles offer many technical and biomedical advances over the bulk material. The use of nanoparticles in cosmetics, detergents, food and other commercial products is rapidly increasing despite little knowledge of their effect on organism metabolism. We show here that commercially manufactured polystyrene nanoparticles, transported through an aquatic food chain from algae, through zooplankton to fish, affect lipid metabolism and behaviour of the top consumer. At least three independent metabolic parameters differed between control and test fish: the weight loss, the triglycerides∶cholesterol ratio in blood serum, and the distribution of cholesterol between muscle and liver. Moreover, we demonstrate that nanoparticles bind to apolipoprotein A-I in fish serum in-vitro, thereby restraining them from properly utilising their fat reserves if absorbed through ingestion. In addition to the metabolic effects, we show that consumption of nanoparticle-containing zooplankton affects the feeding behaviour of the fish. The time it took the fish to consume 95% of the food presented to them was more than doubled for nanoparticle-exposed compared to control fish. Since many nano-sized products will, through the sewage system, end up in freshwater and marine habitats, our study provides a potential bioassay for testing new nano-sized material before manufacturing. In conclusion, our study shows that from knowledge of the molecular composition of the protein corona around nanoparticles it is possible to make a testable molecular hypothesis and bioassay of the potential biological risks of a defined nanoparticle at the organism and ecosystem level. PMID:22384193

  20. Linking Intertidal and Subtidal Food Webs: Consumer-Mediated Transport of Intertidal Benthic Microalgal Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-Keun; Park, Hyun Je; Choy, Eun Jung; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Hwang, Kangseok; Kim, Jong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for a large variety of consumers in intertidal and subtidal habitats, and their potential primary food sources [i.e., microphytobenthos (MPB), phytoplankton, and Phragmites australis] in a coastal bay system, Yeoja Bay of Korea, to test the hypothesis that the transfer of intertidal MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal food web can be mediated by motile consumers. Compared to a narrow δ13C range (−18 to −16‰) of offshore consumers, a broad δ13C range (−18 to −12‰) of both intertidal and subtidal consumers indicated that 13C-enriched sources of organic matter are an important trophic source to coastal consumers. In the intertidal areas, δ13C of most consumers overlapped with or was 13C-enriched relative to MPB. Despite the scarcity of MPB in the subtidal, highly motile consumers in subtidal habitat had nearly identical δ13C range with many intertidal foragers (including crustaceans and fish), overlapping with the range of MPB. In contrast, δ13C values of many sedentary benthic invertebrates in the subtidal areas were similar to those of offshore consumers and more 13C-depleted than motile foragers, indicating high dependence on phytoplankton-derived carbon. The isotopic mixing model calculation confirms that the majority of motile consumers and also some of subtidal sedentary ones depend on intertidal MPB for more than a half of their tissue carbon. Finally, although further quantitative estimates are needed, these results suggest that direct foraging by motile consumers on intertidal areas, and thereby biological transport of MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal areas, may provide important trophic connection between intertidal production and the nearshore shallow subtidal food webs. PMID:26448137

  1. Grapevine MATE-Type Proteins Act as Vacuolar H+-Dependent Acylated Anthocyanin Transporters1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Camila; Terrier, Nancy; Torregrosa, Laurent; Vialet, Sandrine; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Verriès, Clotilde; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Mazauric, Jean-Paul; Klein, Markus; Cheynier, Véronique; Ageorges, Agnès

    2009-01-01

    In grapevine (Vitis vinifera), anthocyanins are responsible for most of the red, blue, and purple pigmentation found in the skin of berries. In cells, anthocyanins are synthesized in the cytoplasm and accumulated into the vacuole. However, little is known about the transport of these compounds through the tonoplast. Recently, the sequencing of the grapevine genome allowed us to identify genes encoding proteins with high sequence similarity to the Multidrug And Toxic Extrusion (MATE) family. Among them, we selected two genes as anthocyanin transporter candidates and named them anthoMATE1 (AM1) and AM3. The expression of both genes was mainly fruit specific and concomitant with the accumulation of anthocyanin pigment. Subcellular localization assays in grapevine hairy roots stably transformed with AM1∷ or AM3∷green fluorescent protein fusion protein revealed that AM1 and AM3 are primarily localized to the tonoplast. Yeast vesicles expressing anthoMATEs transported acylated anthocyanins in the presence of MgATP. Inhibitor studies demonstrated that AM1 and AM3 proteins act in vitro as vacuolar H+-dependent acylated anthocyanin transporters. By contrast, under our experimental conditions, anthoMATEs could not transport malvidin 3-O-glucoside or cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, suggesting that the acyl conjugation was essential for the uptake. Taken together, these results provide evidence that in vitro the two grapevine AM1 and AM3 proteins mediate specifically acylated anthocyanin transport. PMID:19297587

  2. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Final ACT configuration evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Final ACT Configuration Evaluation Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology project within the energy efficient transport program is summarized. The Final ACT Configuration, through application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span, exhibits significant performance improvements over the conventional baseline configuration. At the design range for these configurations, 3590 km, the block fuel used is 10% less for the Final ACT Configuration, with significant reductions in fuel usage at all operational ranges. Results of this improved fuel usage and additional system and airframe costs and the complexity required to achieve it were analyzed to determine its economic effects. For a 926 km mission, the incremental return on investment is nearly 25% at 1980 fuel prices. For longer range missions or increased fuel prices, the return is greater. The technical risks encountered in the Final ACT Configuration design and the research and development effort required to reduce these risks to levels acceptable for commercial airplane design are identified.

  3. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes act as charge transport channel to boost the efficiency of hole transport material free perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Nian; Liu, Pei; Qi, Fei; Xiao, Yuqin; Yu, Wenjing; Yu, Zhenhua; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The two-step spin coating process produces rough perovskite surfaces in ambient condition with high humidity, which are unfavorable for the contact between the perovskite film and the low temperature carbon electrode. To tackle this problem, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are embedded into the perovskite layer. The MWCNTs can act as charge transport high way between individual perovskite nanoparticles and facilitate the collection of the photo-generated holes by the carbon electrode. Longer carrier lifetime is confirmed in the perovskite solar cells with addition of MWCNTs using open circuit voltage decay measurement. Under optimized concentration of MWCNT, average power conversion efficiency of 11.6% is obtained in hole transport material free perovskite solar cells, which is boosted by ∼15% compared to solar cells without MWCNT.

  4. Copper accumulation and transport in a marine food chain composed of Platymonas subcordiformis, brachionus plicatilis and Penaeus monodon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, A.-Gen; Chen, Wei-Qi; Li, Wen-Quan

    1997-09-01

    Accumulation, transport and toxicity of Cu in the food chain consisting of Platymonas subcordiformis, Brachionus plicatilis and Penaeus monodon were studied. Effects of Cu on the growth of organisms in the food chain were investigated and the inhibiting effect concentration (EC50) of Cu was then determined according to the dynamics of the relative number of cells or total individuals of organisms, expressed in percentages with reference to the controlled system, under different culture conditions. On the basis of the variations in accumulation and percentages of accumulation of Cu in the biological phase, the relationship between the accumulation of Cu in organisms and its toxicity was analyzed and the main approach for determining the transport of Cu in the food chain was then discussed.

  5. Effect of school wellness policies and the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act on food-consumption behaviors of students, 2006-2016: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Jennifer L; Savaiano, Dennis A

    2017-07-01

    Federal regulation mandates that the US National School Lunch Program nutrition standards align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. As students consume a substantial proportion of their nutrition during school lunch, increasing access to healthy foods is proposed to improve student dietary outcomes. The purpose of this review is to assess whether policy changes impacted food-consumption behaviors of students during periods when (1) school wellness policies were implemented (2006-2007); (2) the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act was passed (2010-2012); and (3) the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act was implemented (2012-present). PubMed, Web of Science, and Science Direct were searched for primary research studies. Policy evaluations and interventions implemented from 2006 to 2016 were included. A total of 31 studies evaluating plate waste, dietary intake, food selection, and/or purchasing patterns were identified and reviewed. Fourteen of 19 intervention and longitudinal observation studies reported improved food-consumption behaviors (increased selection, intake, and sales of healthy foods, and decreased plate waste). Only 2 of 12 one-time observation studies reported food-consumption behaviors meeting target nutrition standards. The majority of studies indicated that increasing access to healthy foods during school lunch improved students' dietary intakes. Challenges related to study design, adaptation period, quality of foods, and policy implementation likely affect a school lunch program's ability to impact students' food-consumption behaviors. Ongoing evaluation of these programs is warranted.

  6. Transport mechanisms acting in toroidal devices: A theoretician`s view

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B.A.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the basic mechanisms of transport in toroidal confinement devices remains one of the more challenging scientific issues in magnetic confinement. At the same time, it is a critical issue for the magnetic fusion program. Recent progress in understanding fluctuations and transport has been fostered by the development and use of new diagnostics, bringing new perspectives on these studies. This has stimulated new theoretical developments. A view of the most recent issues and progress in this area is given. The role of long wavelengths in core transport and the relation between shear flows and turbulence at the plasma edge are the primary topics considered.

  7. Ibogaine, a noncompetitive inhibitor of serotonin transport, acts by stabilizing the cytoplasm-facing state of the transporter.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Miriam T; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Campbell, Scott D; Rudnick, Gary

    2007-10-05

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid with purported anti-addiction properties, inhibited serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively by decreasing V(max) with little change in the K(m) for serotonin (5-HT). Ibogaine also inhibited binding to SERT of the cocaine analog 2beta-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-[(125)I]iodophenyl)tropane. However, inhibition of binding was competitive, increasing the apparent K(D) without much change in B(max). Ibogaine increased the reactivity of cysteine residues positioned in the proposed cytoplasmic permeation pathway of SERT but not at nearby positions out of that pathway. In contrast, cysteines placed at positions in the extracellular permeation pathway reacted at slower rates in the presence of ibogaine. These results are consistent with the proposal that ibogaine binds to and stabilizes the state of SERT from which 5-HT dissociates to the cytoplasm, in contrast with cocaine, which stabilizes the state that binds extracellular 5-HT.

  8. 75 FR 18867 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... biometric information; intelligence requirements, analysis, and reporting; information systems security... intelligence sources and methods to facilitate such protection and to support intelligence analysis and... Security Administration--011, Transportation Security Intelligence Service Operations Files Systems of...

  9. Focusing Resources, Economic Investment, and Guidance to Help Transportation Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Lautenberg, Frank R. [D-NJ

    2010-07-22

    Senate - 07/22/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Focusing Resources, Economic Investment, and Guidance to Help Transportation Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Lautenberg, Frank R. [D-NJ

    2011-02-16

    Senate - 02/16/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Acting discursively: the development of UK organic food and farming policy networks.

    PubMed

    TOMLINSON, Isobel Jane

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the early evolution of UK organic food and farming policy networks and locates this empirical focus in a theoretical context concerned with understanding the contemporary policy-making process. While policy networks have emerged as a widely acknowledged empirical manifestation of governance, debate continues as to the concept's explanatory utility and usefulness in situations of network and policy transformation since, historically, policy networks have been applied to "static" circumstances. Recognizing this criticism, and in drawing on an interpretivist perspective, this paper sees policy networks as enacted by individual actors whose beliefs and actions construct the nature of the network. It seeks to make links between the characteristics of the policy network and the policy outcomes through the identification of discursively constructed "storylines" that form a tool for consensus building in networks. This study analyses the functioning of the organic policy networks through the discursive actions of policy-network actors.

  12. Variability in dose estimates associated with the food-chain transport and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.O.; Gardner, R.H.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1982-06-01

    Dose predictions for the ingestion of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs, using aquatic and terrestrial food chain transport models similar to those in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.109, are evaluated through estimating the variability of model parameters and determining the effect of this variability on model output. The variability in the predicted dose equivalent is determined using analytical and numerical procedures. In addition, a detailed discussion is included on /sup 90/Sr dosimetry. The overall estimates of uncertainty are most relevant to conditions where site-specific data is unavailable and when model structure and parameter estimates are unbiased. Based on the comparisons performed in this report, it is concluded that the use of the generic default parameters in Regulatory Guide 1.109 will usually produce conservative dose estimates that exceed the 90th percentile of the predicted distribution of dose equivalents. An exception is the meat pathway for /sup 137/Cs, in which use of generic default values results in a dose estimate at the 24th percentile. Among the terrestrial pathways of exposure, the non-leafy vegetable pathway is the most important for /sup 90/Sr. For /sup 90/Sr, the parameters for soil retention, soil-to-plant transfer, and internal dosimetry contribute most significantly to the variability in the predicted dose for the combined exposure to all terrestrial pathways. For /sup 137/Cs, the meat transfer coefficient the mass interception factor for pasture forage, and the ingestion dose factor are the most important parameters. The freshwater finfish bioaccumulation factor is the most important parameter for the dose prediction of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs transported over the water-fish-man pathway.

  13. Leptin acts independently of food intake to modulate gut microbial composition in male mice.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Michael W; Patterson, Christa M; Opp, Judith S; Foltin, Susan K; Young, Vincent B; Myers, Martin G

    2014-03-01

    Shifts in the composition of gut bacterial populations can alter host metabolism and may contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders, including obesity. Mice deficient in leptin action are obese with altered microbiota and increased susceptibility to certain intestinal pathogens. Because antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) secreted by Paneth cells represent a major mechanism by which the host influences the gut microbiome, we examined the mRNA expression of gut AMPs, several of which were decreased in leptin receptor (LepR)-deficient db/db mice, suggesting a potential role for AMP modulation of microbiota composition. To address the extent to which the alterations in gut microbiota and AMP mRNA expression in db/db mice result from increased food intake vs other defects in leptin action, we examined the effects of pair feeding and gut epithelial LepRb ablation on AMP mRNA expression and microbiota composition. We found that the phylum-level changes in fecal microbial content and AMP gene expression persist in pair-fed db/db mice, suggesting that these differences do not stem from hyperphagia alone. In addition, despite recent evidence to support a role for intestinal epithelial LepRb signaling in pathogen susceptibility, ablation of LepRb from the intestinal epithelium fails to alter body weight, composition of the microbiota, or AMP expression, suggesting a role for LepRb elsewhere for this regulation. Indeed, gut LepRb cells are not epithelial but rather constitute a previously uncharacterized population of perivascular cells within the intestinal submucosa. Overall, our data reveal a role for LepRb signaling extrinsic to the intestinal epithelium and independent of food intake in the control of the gut microbiome.

  14. RECOVERY ACT - Thylakoid Assembly and Folded Protein Transport by the Tat Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Dabney-Smith, Carole

    2016-07-18

    Assembly of functional photosystems complete with necessary intrinsic (membrane-bound) and extrinsic proteins requires the function of at least 3 protein transport pathways in thylakoid membranes. Our research focuses on one of those pathways, a unique and essential protein transport pathway found in the chloroplasts of plants, bacteria, and some archaebacteria, the Twin arginine translocation (Tat) system. The chloroplast Tat (cpTat) system is thought to be responsible for the proper location of ~50% of thylakoid lumen proteins, several of which are necessary for proper photosystem assembly, maintenance, and function. Specifically, cpTat systems are unique because they transport fully folded and assembled proteins across ion tight membranes using only three membrane components, Tha4, Hcf106, and cpTatC, and the protonmotive force generated by photosynthesis. Despite the importance of the cpTat system in plants, the mechanism of transport of a folded precursor is not well known. Our long-term goal is to investigate the role protein transport systems have on organelle biogenesis, particularly the assembly of membrane protein complexes in thylakoids of chloroplasts. The objective of this proposal is to correlate structural changes in the membrane-bound cpTat component, Tha4, to the mechanism of translocation of folded-precursor substrates across the membrane bilayer by using a cysteine accessibility and crosslinking approach. Our central hypothesis is that the precursor passes through a proteinaceous pore of assembled Tha4 protomers that have undergone a conformational or topological change in response to transport. This research is predicated upon the observations that Tha4 exists in molar excess in the membrane relative to the other cpTat components; its regulated assembly to the precursor-bound receptor; and our data showing oligomerization of Tha4 into very large complexes in response to transport. Our rationale for these studies is that understanding cp

  15. Establishing a list of qualifying pathogens under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-06-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) is issuing a regulation to establish a list of "qualifying pathogens'' that have the potential to pose a serious threat to public health. This final rule implements a provision of the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now (GAIN) title of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA). GAIN is intended to encourage development of new antibacterial and antifungal drugs for the treatment of serious or life-threatening infections, and provides incentives such as eligibility for designation as a fast-track product and an additional 5 years of exclusivity to be added to certain exclusivity periods. Based on analyses conducted both in the proposed rule and in response to comments to the proposed rule, FDA has determined that the following pathogens comprise the list of ``qualifying pathogens:'' Acinetobacter species, Aspergillus species, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Campylobacter species, Candida species, Clostridium difficile, Coccidioides species, Cryptococcus species, Enterobacteriaceae (e.g., Klebsiella pneumoniae), Enterococcus species, Helicobacter pylori, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, Non-tuberculous mycobacteria species, Pseudomonas species, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, and Vibrio cholerae. The preamble to the proposed rule described the factors the Agency considered and the methodology used to develop the list of qualifying pathogens. As described in the preamble of this final rule, FDA applied those factors and that methodology to additional pathogens suggested via comments on the proposed rule.

  16. 77 FR 56590 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... Part 1192 [Docket No. ATBCB 2010-0004] RIN 3014-AA38 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA... disabilities? 3. How much level space, measured when the bus is sitting on a level surface, can be provided... designs, manufacturers, transit operators, and transit users, including those with disabilities? Bus and...

  17. 75 FR 18863 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-006...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... to the media when there exists a legitimate public interest in disclosing information. Release under... Handgun Violence Prevention Act. Both routine uses are duplicative. The retention and disposal section has... settlement negotiations or in connection with criminal law proceedings. R. To the news media and the...

  18. 75 FR 18860 - Privacy Act of 1974, Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... designed to defend aircraft flight decks against acts of criminal violence or air piracy. As a result of... of information to the media when there exists a legitimate public interest in disclosing information... information with the Attorney General of the United States concerning violations of the Brady Handgun...

  19. Generation and Characterization of Anti-VGLUT Nanobodies Acting as Inhibitors of Transport.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Stephan; Kunz, Laura; Sahlender, Daniela; Pardon, Els; Geertsma, Eric R; Savtchouk, Iaroslav; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Neldner, Yvonne; Štefanić, Saša; Steyaert, Jan; Volterra, Andrea; Dutzler, Raimund

    2017-08-01

    The uptake of glutamate by synaptic vesicles is mediated by vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs). The central role of these transporters in excitatory neurotransmission underpins their importance as pharmacological targets. Although several compounds inhibit VGLUTs, highly specific inhibitors were so far unavailable, thus limiting applications to in vitro experiments. Besides their potential in pharmacology, specific inhibitors would also be beneficial for the elucidation of transport mechanisms. To overcome this shortage, we generated nanobodies (Nbs) by immunization of a llama with purified rat VGLUT1 and subsequent selection of binders from a phage display library. All identified Nbs recognize cytosolic epitopes, and two of the binders greatly reduced the rate of uptake of glutamate by reconstituted liposomes and subcellular fractions enriched with synaptic vesicles. These Nbs can be expressed as functional green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in the cytosol of HEK cells for intracellular applications as immunocytochemical and biochemical agents. The selected binders thus provide valuable tools for cell biology and neuroscience.

  20. The ACT transport: Panacea for the 80's or designer's illusion (panel discussion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A panel discussion was held which attempted to make an objective and pragmatic assessment of the standing of active control technology. The discussion focused on the standing of active control technology relative to civil air transport applications, the value as opposed to the cost of the projected benefits, the need for research, development, and demonstration, the role of government and industry in developing the technology, the major obstacles to its implementation, and the probable timing of the full utilization of active control technology in commercial transportation. An edited transcription of the prepared statements of the panel members and the subsequent open discussion between the panel and the audience is presented.

  1. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial ACT configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The initial ACT configuration design task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is summarized. A constrained application of active controls technology (ACT) resulted in significant improvements over a conventional baseline configuration previously established. The configuration uses the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, payload, and design requirements/objectives as the baseline, except for flying qualities, flutter, and ACT. The baseline wing is moved forward 1.68 m. The configuration incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle of attack limiter, wing load alleviation, and flutter mode control. This resulted in a 930 kg reduction in airplane operating empty weight and a 3.6% improvement in cruise efficiency, yielding a 13% range increase. Adjusted to the 3590 km baseline mission range, this amounts to 6% block fuel reduction and a 15.7% higher incremental return on investment, using 1978 dollars and fuel cost.

  2. Chronic blockade or constitutive deletion of the serotonin transporter reduces operant responding for food reward.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Amy Cecilia; Hussain, Ali J; Hen, René; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2007-11-01

    The therapeutic effects of chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are well documented, yet the elementary behavioral processes that are affected by such treatment have not been fully investigated. We report here the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment and genetic deletion of the serotonin transporter (SERT) on food reinforced behavior in three paradigms: the progressive ratio operant task, the concurrent choice operant task, and the Pavlovian-to-Instrumental transfer task. We consistently find that chronic pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of SERT result in similar behavioral consequences: reduced operant responding for natural reward. This is in line with previous studies reporting declines in operant responding for drugs and intracranial self-stimulation with fluoxetine treatment, suggesting that the effect of SERT blockade can be generalized to different reward types. Detailed analyses of behavioral parameters indicate that this reduction in operant responding affect both goal-directed and non-goal-directed behaviors without affecting the Pavlovian cue-triggered excessive operant responding. In addition, both pharmacological and genetic manipulations reduce locomotor activity in the open field novel environment. Our data contrast with the effect of dopamine in increasing operant responding for natural reward specifically in goal-directed behaviors and in increasing Pavlovian cue-triggered excessive operant responding. Serotonin and dopamine have been proposed to serve opposing functions in motivational processes. Our data suggest that their interactions do not result in simple opponency. The fact that pharmacological blockade and genetic deletion of SERT have similar behavioral consequences reinforces the utility of the SERT null mice for investigation of the mechanisms underlying chronic SSRIs treatment.

  3. Biophysics of food perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbidge, Adam S.; Le Révérend, Benjamin J. D.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present food perception across a range of time and length scales as well as across the disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology. We achieve the objective of the article by presenting food from a material science angle as well as presenting the physiology of food perception that enables humans to probe materials in terms of aroma, taste and texture. We highlight that by using simple physical concepts, one can also decipher the mechanisms of transport that link food structure with perception physiology and define the regime in which physiology operates. Most importantly, we emphasise the notion that food/consumer interaction operates across the biological fluid interface grouped under the terminology of mucus, acting as a transfer fluid for taste, aroma and pressure between food and dedicated receptors.

  4. Pesticides used in forest nursery management in the United States and the impact of the Food Quality Protection Act and other regulatory actions

    Treesearch

    Jesus A. Cota

    2002-01-01

    The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996 has placed new standards on the registration and regulation of pesticides intended to protect children. The most significant changed mandated by FQPA relate to the registration process termed the "Risk Cup." This approach to risk analysis has resulted in greater restrictions on the application of pesticides used...

  5. Clinical pharmacology of single- and multiple-ascending doses of ACT-178882, a new direct renin inhibitor, and its pharmacokinetic interaction with food and midazolam.

    PubMed

    Dingemanse, Jasper; Nicolas, Laurent; Binkert, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the tolerability, safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of ACT-178882, a new direct renin inhibitor, as well as its interaction with food and midazolam. Healthy male subjects received either single (10-1000 mg) or multiple doses (30-600 mg) administered once daily for 14 days of ACT-178882, placebo, or 20 mg enalapril in the fasted state. Following a 2-week washout, the single dose of 30 mg ACT-178882 was also administered in the fed state. In the multiple-ascending-dose part, subjects were dosed with midazolam on days -2, 2, and 12 to investigate interactions with CYP3A4. Dizziness and headache were the most frequently reported adverse events. No clinically relevant changes occurred for body weight, vital signs, clinical laboratory variables, and ECG although both enalapril and ACT-178882 tended to decrease systolic blood pressure. Following single doses of ACT-178882, t1/2 and tmax varied from 18.7 to 24.7 h and from 3 to 5 h, respectively, and food had no significant effect. Steady-state conditions were achieved after 4-6 days of dosing and accumulation was minimal. ACT-178882 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional. ACT-178882 but not enalapril dose-dependently increased Cmax and area under the concentration-time curve of midazolam. Single and multiple doses of ACT-178882 dose-dependently increased active renin and decreased plasma renin activity, whereas enalapril increased both variables. No effects on urinary excretion of creatinine, potassium, and the 6β-hydroxycortisol/cortisol ratio were observed, whereas sodium and aldosterone excretion was decreased by both ACT-178882 and enalapril. The current results with ACT-178882 warrant further clinical investigation of this renin inhibitor in hypertensive patients. © 2012 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  6. The Intestinal Peptide Transporter PEPT1 Is Involved in Food Intake Regulation in Mice Fed a High-Protein Diet

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Manuela; Daniel, Hannelore

    2011-01-01

    High-protein diets are effective in achieving weight loss which is mainly explained by increased satiety and thermogenic effects. Recent studies suggest that the effects of protein-rich diets on satiety could be mediated by amino acids like leucine or arginine. Although high-protein diets require increased intestinal amino acid absorption, amino acid and peptide absorption has not yet been considered to contribute to satiety effects. We here demonstrate a novel finding that links intestinal peptide transport processes to food intake, but only when a protein-rich diet is provided. When mice lacking the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1 were fed diets containing 8 or 21 energy% of protein, no differences in food intake and weight gain were observed. However, upon feeding a high-protein (45 energy%) diet, Pept1−/− mice reduced food intake much more pronounced than control animals. Although there was a regain in food consumption after a few days, no weight gain was observed which was associated with a reduced intestinal energy assimilation and increased fecal energy losses. Pept1−/− mice on high-protein diet displayed markedly reduced plasma leptin levels during the period of very low food intake, suggesting a failure of leptin signaling to increase energy intake. This together with an almost two-fold elevated plasma arginine level in Pept1−/− but not wildtype mice, suggests that a cross-talk of arginine with leptin signaling in brain, as described previously, could cause these striking effects on food intake. PMID:22031831

  7. A vacuolar iron-transporter homologue acts as a detoxifier in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Slavic, Ksenija; Krishna, Sanjeev; Lahree, Aparajita; Bouyer, Guillaume; Hanson, Kirsten K.; Vera, Iset; Pittman, Jon K.; Staines, Henry M.; Mota, Maria M.

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient but is also highly toxic. In yeast and plant cells, a key detoxifying mechanism involves iron sequestration into intracellular storage compartments, mediated by members of the vacuolar iron-transporter (VIT) family of proteins. Here we study the VIT homologue from the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum (PfVIT) and Plasmodium berghei (PbVIT). PfVIT-mediated iron transport in a yeast heterologous expression system is saturable (Km∼14.7 μM), and selective for Fe2+ over other divalent cations. PbVIT-deficient P. berghei lines (Pbvit−) show a reduction in parasite load in both liver and blood stages of infection in mice. Moreover, Pbvit− parasites have higher levels of labile iron in blood stages and are more sensitive to increased iron levels in liver stages, when compared with wild-type parasites. Our data are consistent with Plasmodium VITs playing a major role in iron detoxification and, thus, normal development of malaria parasites in their mammalian host. PMID:26786069

  8. A way through the dark and thorny thickets? The adjudication of "serious injury" under the narrative tests in the Transport Accident Act 1986 (Vic) and the Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2013 (Vic).

    PubMed

    Taliadoros, Jason

    2015-09-01

    The so-called "narrative" test provides the means by which injured persons who satisfy the statutory and common law definition of "serious injury" may bring proceedings for common law damages under s 93 of the Transport Accident Act 1986 (Vic) and s 134AB of the Accident Compensation Act 1985 (Vic) (or, for injuries after 1 July 2014, under ss 324-347 of the Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2013 (Vic)). These are among the most litigated provisions in Australia. This article outlines the legislative and political background to these provisions, the provisions themselves, and an account of the statutory and common law requirements needed to satisfy the provisions.

  9. Food restriction and streptozotocin differentially modify sensitivity to the hypothermic effects of direct- and indirect-acting serotonin receptor agonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2009-06-24

    Food restriction and experimentally-induced diabetes (streptozotocin) can modify serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission and sensitivity to drugs acting on 5-HT systems. This study examined the effects of food restriction and streptozotocin on the hypothermic effects of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (+)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), the 5-HT(2) receptor agonist (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine hydrochloride (DOM), the 5-HT releaser fenfluramine, and the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine. All four drugs significantly decreased body temperature in free feeding rats. Limiting rats to 10 g/day of food for 7 days decreased body weight and sensitivity to 8-OH-DPAT induced hypothermia, without affecting sensitivity to DOM, fenfluramine, or fluoxetine induced hypothermia. Subsequently, 7 days of free feeding restored body weight and sensitivity to 8-OH-DPAT. Sensitivity to all drugs was significantly decreased 7 days after 50 mg/kg streptozotocin; subsequently, 10 days of insulin replacement restored sensitivity to all drugs. These results extend to body temperature the observation that food restriction and experimentally-induced diabetes differentially modify sensitivity to drugs acting on 5-HT systems and they further suggest that the clinical response to therapeutic drugs acting on 5-HT systems might be impacted by nutritional and insulin status.

  10. Does transportation mode modify associations between distance to food store, fruit and vegetable consumption, and BMI in low-income neighborhoods?

    PubMed

    Fuller, Daniel; Cummins, Steven; Matthews, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    A consistent body of research has shown that the neighborhood food environment is associated with fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption and obesity in deprived neighborhoods in the United States. However, these studies have often neglected to consider how transportation can moderate associations between food accessibility and diet-related outcomes. This study examined associations between distance to primary food store, fruit and vegetable consumption, and BMI and whether mode of transportation to the primary food store moderates this relation. Cross-sectional data from the baseline wave of the Philadelphia Neighborhood Food Environment Study were used. A telephone survey of adult (≥18 y of age) household primary food shoppers residing in 2 Philadelphia neighborhoods was conducted (n = 1440). In a bivariate linear regression analysis, distance to primary food store did not predict F&V consumption (β = 0.04; 95% CI: -0.00, 0.09). Linear regression analysis stratified by transportation mode to the main F&V store showed no difference in F&V consumption between car, public, and multimodal transportation users. Compared with respondents using multimodal transportation, those using public transit had a significantly lower BMI (β = -1.31; 95% CI: -2.50, -0.10), whereas those using an automobile did not (β = -0.41; 95% CI: -1.36, 0.54). The assumption that using an automobile to access food stores results in increased F&V consumption was not confirmed. Significant associations were found for the relation between transportation mode and BMI. Theory-based mechanisms explaining relationships between the primary transportation mode used to access food stores and BMI should be further explored.

  11. Food Aid Reform Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Royce, Edward R. [R-CA-39

    2013-05-15

    House - 05/22/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Local School Foods Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Welch, Peter [D-VT-At Large

    2011-10-04

    House - 11/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. School Food Recovery Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Wolf, Frank R. [R-VA-10

    2009-03-09

    04/29/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Eat Local Foods Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Pingree, Chellie [D-ME-1

    2011-05-04

    05/20/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Eat Local Foods Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Pingree, Chellie [D-ME-1

    2011-05-04

    05/20/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. School Food Recovery Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Petri, Thomas E. [R-WI-6

    2011-01-06

    02/25/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. School Food Recovery Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Wolf, Frank R. [R-VA-10

    2009-03-09

    04/29/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. School Food Recovery Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Petri, Thomas E. [R-WI-6

    2011-01-06

    02/25/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. School Food Recovery Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-10-17

    10/17/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. (text of measure as introduced: CR S6604) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. School Food Recovery Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-10-17

    Senate - 10/17/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. School Food Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Collins, Susan M. [R-ME

    2014-04-03

    Senate - 04/03/2014 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. School Food Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Latham, Tom [R-IA-3

    2013-04-26

    House - 07/08/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. School Food Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Latham, Tom [R-IA-4

    2012-09-21

    House - 11/14/2012 Referred to the Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. School Food Recovery Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Petri, Thomas E. [R-WI-6

    2011-01-06

    House - 02/25/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Eat Local Foods Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Pingree, Chellie [D-ME-1

    2011-05-04

    House - 05/20/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. School Food Recovery Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Wolf, Frank R. [R-VA-10

    2009-03-09

    House - 04/29/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Food Aid Reform Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Royce, Edward R. [R-CA-39

    2013-05-15

    05/22/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. School Food Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Latham, Tom [R-IA-3

    2013-04-26

    07/08/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. School Food Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Latham, Tom [R-IA-3

    2013-04-26

    07/08/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Local School Foods Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Welch, Peter [D-VT-At Large

    2011-10-04

    11/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Ergonomic analyses within the French transport and logistics sector: first steps towards a new "act elsewhere" prevention approach.

    PubMed

    Wioland, Liên

    2013-10-01

    Statistics from the French Employee National Health Insurance Fund indicate high accident levels in the transport sector. This study represents initial thinking on a new approach to transport sector prevention based on the assumption that a work situation could be improved by acting on another interconnected work situation. Ergonomic analysis of two connected work situations, involving the road haulage drivers and cross-docking platform employees, was performed to test this assumption. Our results show that drivers are exposed to a number of identified risks, but their multiple tasks raise the question of activity intensification. The conditions, under which the drivers will perform their work and take to the road, are partly determined by the quality and organisation of the platform with which they interact. We make a number of recommendations (e.g. changing handling equipment, re-appraising certain jobs) to improve platform organisation and employee working conditions with the aim of also improving driver conditions. These initial steps in this prevention approach appear promising, but more detailed investigation is required.

  12. Polyglycine Acts as a Rejection Signal for Protein Transport at the Chloroplast Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Endow, Joshua K.; Rocha, Agostinho Gomes; Baldwin, Amy J.; Roston, Rebecca L.; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Kamikubo, Hironari

    2016-01-01

    PolyGly is present in many proteins in various organisms. One example is found in a transmembrane β-barrel protein, translocon at the outer-envelope-membrane of chloroplasts 75 (Toc75). Toc75 requires its N-terminal extension (t75) for proper localization. t75 comprises signals for chloroplast import (n75) and envelope sorting (c75) in tandem. n75 and c75 are removed by stromal processing peptidase and plastidic type I signal peptidase 1, respectively. PolyGly is present within c75 and its deletion or substitution causes mistargeting of Toc75 to the stroma. Here we have examined the properties of polyGly-dependent protein targeting using two soluble passenger proteins, the mature portion of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (mSS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Both t75-mSS and t75-EGFP were imported into isolated chloroplasts and their n75 removed. Resultant c75-mSS was associated with the envelope at the intermembrane space, whereas c75-EGFP was partially exposed outside the envelope. Deletion of polyGly or substitution of tri-Ala for the critical tri-Gly segment within polyGly caused each passenger to be targeted to the stroma. Transient expression of t75-EGFP in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in accumulation of c75-EGFP exposed at the surface of the chloroplast, but the majority of the EGFP passenger was found free in the cytosol with most of its c75 attachment removed. Results of circular dichroism analyses suggest that polyGly within c75 may form an extended conformation, which is disrupted by tri-Ala substitution. These data suggest that polyGly is distinct from a canonical stop-transfer sequence and acts as a rejection signal at the chloroplast inner envelope. PMID:27936133

  13. Polyglycine Acts as a Rejection Signal for Protein Transport at the Chloroplast Envelope

    DOE PAGES

    Endow, Joshua K.; Rocha, Agostinho Gomes; Baldwin, Amy J.; ...

    2016-12-09

    PolyGly is present in many proteins in various organisms. One example is found in a transmembrane β-barrel protein, translocon at the outer-envelope-membrane of chloroplasts 75 (Toc75). Toc75 requires its N-terminal extension (t75) for proper localization. t75 comprises signals for chloroplast import (n75) and envelope sorting (c75) in tandem. n75 and c75 are removed by stromal processing peptidase and plastidic type I signal peptidase 1, respectively. PolyGly is present within c75 and its deletion or substitution causes mistargeting of Toc75 to the stroma. Here in this study we have examined the properties of polyGly-dependent protein targeting using two soluble passenger proteins,more » the mature portion of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (mSS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Both t75-mSS and t75-EGFP were imported into isolated chloroplasts and their n75 removed. Resultant c75-mSS was associated with the envelope at the intermembrane space, whereas c75-EGFP was partially exposed outside the envelope. Deletion of polyGly or substitution of tri-Ala for the critical tri-Gly segment within polyGly caused each passenger to be targeted to the stroma. Transient expression of t75-EGFP in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in accumulation of c75-EGFP exposed at the surface of the chloroplast, but the majority of the EGFP passenger was found free in the cytosol with most of its c75 attachment removed. Results of circular dichroism analyses suggest that polyGly within c75 may form an extended conformation, which is disrupted by tri-Ala substitution. These data suggest that polyGly is distinct from a canonical stop-transfer sequence and acts as a rejection signal at the chloroplast inner envelope.« less

  14. 78 FR 17611 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ..., Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51... Connolly, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-116), Food and Drug Administration, 7500 Standish Pl., MPN2...

  15. 76 FR 13643 - FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: Title III-A New Paradigm for Importers; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... imported foods and animal feed and lessons learned through equivalence determinations. The public hearing... imported foods and animal feed and lessons learned through equivalence determinations. In addition, there... seeking information on importer verification, the Voluntary Qualified Importer Program, import...

  16. The role of co-transported sodium in the effect of indirectly acting sympathomimetic amines.

    PubMed

    Bönisch, H

    1986-02-01

    The adrenergic nerve endings of vasa deferentia of either untreated or reserpine (R) and/or pargyline (P) pretreated rats were loaded with 3H-noradrenaline; COMT was inhibited by U-0521 (U). After 100 min of wash-out with Ca2+-free solution, the efflux of tritium (and of 3H-noradrenaline) from the tissue was largely of neuronal origin and remained constant with time (when expressed as fractional rate of loss; FRL). After 110 min of wash-out the effect of inhibition of the Na+,K+-ATPase (by low K+ or ouabain) on basal and on sympathomimetic amine-induced efflux of tritium (or 3H-noradrenaline, under the condition U) was studied in paired experiments. Inhibition of the Na+,K+-ATPase caused a time-dependent increase in the efflux of tritium (or 3H-noradrenaline) which was inhibited by desipramine. Inhibition of the Na+,K+-ATPase also caused a time-dependent reduction of the initial rate of neuronal uptake of 3H-noradrenaline. The effectiveness of the sympathomimetic amines tyramine and amphetamine in inducing "release" (i.e., outward-transport) of noradrenaline depended on the experimental condition: it was most pronounced under the condition RPU, followed by the condition PU and lowest under the condition U (i.e., in tissue of untreated rats). Inhibition of the Na+,K+-ATPase caused an early and transient enhancement of the "release" of noradrenaline induced by tyramine or amphetamine. This enhancement was seen already within the first min after inhibition of the ATPase, i.e., before a pronounced inhibition of uptake (of noradrenaline) and before a pronounced increase of the basal efflux was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  18. In vitro bioaccessibility, transepithelial transport and antioxidant activity of Urtica dioica L. phenolic compounds in nettle based food products.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Gianpiero; Tedeschi, Paola; Meca, Giuseppe; Bertelli, Davide; Mañes, Jordi; Brandolini, Vincenzo; Maietti, Annalisa

    2016-10-12

    Nettle (Urtica dioica L.) is a well-known plant with a wide historical background use of stems, roots and leaves. Nettle leaves are an excellent source of phenolic compounds, principally 3-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA), caffeoylmalic acid (CMA) and rutin. The aim of this work was to evaluate the bioaccessibility (BAC), the bioavailability (BAV) and the antioxidant activity of nettle phenolic compounds present in foods and supplements. The BAC of nettle phenolics was evaluated with an in vitro dynamic digestion of real food matrices: the type of food matrix and chemical characteristic affected the kinetics of release and solubilization, with the highest BAC after duodenal digestion. A study of duodenal trans epithelial transport evidenced low bioavailability of native forms of 3-CQA, CMA and rutin. Simulation of colonic metabolism confirmed that phenolic compounds are fermented by gut microflora, confirming the need for further investigations on the impact of phenolic compounds at the large intestine level. Photochemiluminescence assay of the simulated digestion fluids demonstrated that ingestion of Urtica based foods contributes to create an antioxidant environment against superoxide anion radicals in the entire gastrointestinal tract (GIT).

  19. Fatty Acid Transporter CD36 Mediates Hypothalamic Effect of Fatty Acids on Food Intake in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moullé, Valentine S.; Le Foll, Christelle; Philippe, Erwann; Kassis, Nadim; Rouch, Claude; Marsollier, Nicolas; Bui, Linh-Chi; Guissard, Christophe; Dairou, Julien; Lorsignol, Anne; Pénicaud, Luc; Levin, Barry E.; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Variations in plasma fatty acid (FA) concentrations are detected by FA sensing neurons in specific brain areas such as the hypothalamus. These neurons play a physiological role in the control of food intake and the regulation of hepatic glucose production. Le Foll et al. previously showed in vitro that at least 50% of the FA sensing in ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) neurons is attributable to the interaction of long chain FA with FA translocase/CD36 (CD36). The present work assessed whether in vivo effects of hypothalamic FA sensing might be partly mediated by CD36 or intracellular events such as acylCoA synthesis or β-oxidation. To that end, a catheter was implanted in the carotid artery toward the brain in male Wistar rats. After 1 wk recovery, animals were food-deprived for 5 h, then 10 min infusions of triglyceride emulsion, Intralipid +/− heparin (IL, ILH, respectively) or saline/heparin (SH) were carried out and food intake was assessed over the next 5 h. Experimental groups included: 1) Rats previously injected in ventromedian nucleus (VMN) with shRNA against CD36 or scrambled RNA; 2) Etomoxir (CPT1 inhibitor) or saline co-infused with ILH/SH; and 3) Triacsin C (acylCoA synthase inhibitor) or saline co-infused with ILH/SH. ILH significantly lowered food intake during refeeding compared to SH (p<0.001). Five hours after refeeding, etomoxir did not affect this inhibitory effect of ILH on food intake while VMN CD36 depletion totally prevented it. Triacsin C also prevented ILH effects on food intake. In conclusion, the effect of FA to inhibit food intake is dependent on VMN CD36 and acylCoA synthesis but does not required FA oxidation. PMID:24040150

  20. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  1. Study on transport packages used for food freshness preservation based on thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ying

    2016-12-01

    In recent time, as the Chinese consumption level increases, the consumption quantity of high-value fruits, vegetables and seafood products have been increasing year by year. As a consequence, the traffic volume of refrigerated products also increases yearly and the popularization degree of the cold-chain transportation enhances. A low-temperature environment should be guaranteed during transportation, thus there is about 40% of diesel oil should be consumed by the refrigerating system and the cold-chain transportation becomes very costly. This study aimed to explore methods that could reduce the cost of transport packages of refrigerated products. On the basis of the heat transfer theory and the fluid mechanics theory, the heat exchanging process of corrugated cases during the operation of refrigerating system was analyzed, the heat transfer process of corrugated cases and refrigerator van was theoretically analyzed and the heat balance equation of corrugated cases was constructed.

  2. Food security of older adults requesting Older Americans Act Nutrition Program in Georgia can be validly measured using a short form of the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Sun; Johnson, Mary Ann; Brown, Arvine; Nord, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Food security is a newly recommended outcome measure for the Older Americans Act Nutrition Program (OAANP); however, it is unknown how best to evaluate the need for this program and assess its impact on a large scale. Therefore, we measured food security in all new OAANP participants and waitlisted applicants in Georgia between July and early November, 2008 (n = 4731) with the self-administered mail survey method used in the ongoing Georgia Performance Outcomes Measures project. We used a modified 6-item U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module (HFSSM) with a 30-d reference period and 2 reminder postcards. Approximately 33% of those identified completed the survey (n = 1594, mean age 74.6 ± 9.5 y, 68.6% female, 30.6% black). Most of the respondents (91%) completed all 6 food security questions, whereas 26 did not respond to any question. Infit and outfit statistics for each of the 6 questions were within an acceptable range. Psychometric properties observed in our food security data were generally similar to those in the nationally representative survey conducted by the Census Bureau and suggest that our food security statistics may be meaningfully compared with national food security statistics published by the USDA. Our findings suggest that food security can be reasonably measured by a short form of HFSSM in older adults requesting OAANP. Such methodology also can be used to estimate the extent of food insecurity and help guide program and policy decisions to meet the nutrition assistance needs of vulnerable older adults.

  3. Cued to Act on Impulse: More Impulsive Choice and Risky Decision Making by Women Susceptible to Overeating after Exposure to Food Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Yeomans, Martin R.; Brace, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that individual differences in tendency to overeat relate to impulsivity, possibly by increasing reactivity to food-related cues in the environment. This study tested whether acute exposure to food cues enhanced impulsive and risky responses in women classified on tendency to overeat, indexed by scores on the three factor eating questionnaire disinhibition (TFEQ-D), restraint (TFEQ-R) and hunger scales. Ninety six healthy women completed two measures of impulsive responding (delayed discounting, DDT and a Go No-Go, GNG, task) and a measure of risky decision making (the balloon analogue risk task, BART) as well as questionnaire measures of impulsive behaviour either after looking at a series of pictures of food or visually matched controls. Impulsivity (DDT) and risk-taking (BART) were both positively associated with TFEQ-D scores, but in both cases this effect was exacerbated by prior exposure to food cues. No effects of restraint were found. TFEQ-D scores were also related to more commission errors on the GNG, while restrained women were slower on the GNG, but neither effect was modified by cue exposure. Overall these data suggest that exposure to food cues act to enhance general impulsive responding in women at risk of overeating and tentatively suggest an important interaction between tendency for impulsive decision making and food cues that may help explain a key underlying risk factor for overeating. PMID:26378459

  4. Cued to Act on Impulse: More Impulsive Choice and Risky Decision Making by Women Susceptible to Overeating after Exposure to Food Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, Martin R; Brace, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that individual differences in tendency to overeat relate to impulsivity, possibly by increasing reactivity to food-related cues in the environment. This study tested whether acute exposure to food cues enhanced impulsive and risky responses in women classified on tendency to overeat, indexed by scores on the three factor eating questionnaire disinhibition (TFEQ-D), restraint (TFEQ-R) and hunger scales. Ninety six healthy women completed two measures of impulsive responding (delayed discounting, DDT and a Go No-Go, GNG, task) and a measure of risky decision making (the balloon analogue risk task, BART) as well as questionnaire measures of impulsive behaviour either after looking at a series of pictures of food or visually matched controls. Impulsivity (DDT) and risk-taking (BART) were both positively associated with TFEQ-D scores, but in both cases this effect was exacerbated by prior exposure to food cues. No effects of restraint were found. TFEQ-D scores were also related to more commission errors on the GNG, while restrained women were slower on the GNG, but neither effect was modified by cue exposure. Overall these data suggest that exposure to food cues act to enhance general impulsive responding in women at risk of overeating and tentatively suggest an important interaction between tendency for impulsive decision making and food cues that may help explain a key underlying risk factor for overeating.

  5. Effects of amount of Food on Path Selection in the Transport Network of AN Amoeboid Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, T.; Saigusa, T.; Tero, A.; Kobayashi, R.

    2007-07-01

    We studied the effect of the size of food sources (FSs) presented to the true slime mould Physarum polycephalum on the tubular networks formed by the organism to absorb nutrient. The amount of plasmodium gathering at an FS was shown to be proportional to both the concentration of nutrient and the surface area of the FS. We presented two FSs to test which connection the organism selected in response to varying amounts of food and derived a simple rule for connection persistence: the longer connection collapses earlier. A mathematical model for tube selection in response to amount of food was derived and predicted our experimental findings regarding the choice of connection. When three FSs were presented to the organism, the longer tubes were also the first to collapse, explained by the relative probability of disconnection. The size of the FS is thus a key parameter determining network formation.

  6. The food contaminant semicarbazide acts as an endocrine disrupter: Evidence from an integrated in vivo/in vitro approach.

    PubMed

    Maranghi, Francesca; Tassinari, Roberta; Marcoccia, Daniele; Altieri, Ilaria; Catone, Tiziana; De Angelis, Giovanna; Testai, Emanuela; Mastrangelo, Sabina; Evandri, Maria Grazia; Bolle, Paola; Lorenzetti, Stefano

    2010-01-05

    Semicarbazide (SEM) is a by-product of the blowing agent azodicarbonamide, present in glass jar-sealed foodstuffs mainly baby foods. The pleiotropic in vivo SEM toxicological effects suggested to explore its possible role as endocrine modulator. Endocrine effects of SEM were assessed in vivo in male and female rats after oral administration for 28 days at 0, 40, 75, 140mg/kg bw pro die during the juvenile period. Vaginal opening and preputial separation were recorded. Concentration of sex steroid in blood, the ex vivo hepatic aromatase activity and testosterone catabolism were detected. The in vitro approach to test SEM role as (anti)estrogen or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs)-(anti)agonist included different assays: yeast estrogenicity, MCF-7 proliferation, stimulation of the alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa cells and LNCaP-based NMDAR interference assay. In vivo SEM-treated female rats showed delayed vaginal opening at all tested doses, whereas in males preputial separation was anticipated at SEM 40 and 75mg/kg and delayed at 140mg/kg, the latter effect probably due to the significantly decreased body weight gain seen at the higher dose in both sexes. Serum estrogen levels were dose-dependently reduced in treated females, whereas dehydrotestosterone serum levels were also decreased but a clear dose-response was not evidenced. Testosterone catabolism was altered in a gender-related way, aromatase activity was increased in treated males at 75 and 140mg/kg and in females in all dose groups. In the three estradiol-competitive assays, SEM showed a weak anti-estrogenic activity, whereas in the LNCaP-based NMDAR interference assay SEM activity resembled MK-801 antagonist effect. SEM appeared to act as an endocrine disrupter showing multiple and gender specific mechanisms of action(s). A possible cascade-mechanism of SEM on reproductive signalling pathways may be hypothesized. Such in vivo-in vitro approach appeared to be an useful tool to highlight SEM

  7. Effects of food lectins on the transport system of human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shintaro; Tomiyama, Mai; Nemoto, Ryo; Naganuma, Takako; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The effects of 16 lectins isolated from foodstuff on the transport system across human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers were investigated by using four fluorescent markers: lucifer yellow (LY) for the paracellular pathway, fluorescein (FL) for the monocarboxylic acid transporter-mediated pathway, rhodamine 123 for the P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux pathway, and calcein for the multidrug resistance associated protein-related efflux pathway. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) values for the monolayers were also measured. WGA from wheat germ, ABA from white mushroom, AOL from Aspergillus oryzae, and CSL3 from chum salmon eggs (each at 100 µg/mL) decreased the TER value by 20-40% which resulted in increased LY transport. These lectins, as well as such other lectins as SBA from soybean, RBA from rice bran, and Con A from jack bean, affected other transport pathways too. These results indicate that the lectins modulated the transepithelial transport system in different ways, probably because of their specific binding characteristics toward Caco-2 cell monolayers.

  8. Relationship between food deprivation before transport and aggression in pigs held in lairage before slaughter.

    PubMed

    Brown, S N; Knowles, T G; Edwards, J E; Warriss, P D

    1999-11-27

    Pigs from three farms were deprived of food for up to one hour, 12 hours or 18 hours before being sent for slaughter. In lairage, the animals' behaviour was monitored, and at slaughter a blood sample was collected and analysed for cortisol, lactate and creatine phosphokinase, potential indicators of stress and physical activity. The carcases were assessed for skin damage as an index of fighting, and rigor in the hind leg as an indicator of stress and/or fatigue. Measurements were also made of cold carcase weight, backfat thickness and liver glycogen concentration. General activity was very high on entry to the lairage pen. Drinking and mounting occurred almost immediately. Fighting developed after an exploratory period, and could last up to 60 minutes. There were large differences in the behaviour of pigs from the three farms. Pigs from farm A fought frequently but showed little mounting activity, whereas pigs from farm C were involved in mounting but little fighting. The period of food deprivation had no effect on average skin damage or rigor score, but the frequency of carcases with the highest scores was different The pigs deprived of food for up to an hour had the lowest incidence of severe skin damage and high rigor scores. Boars had a higher incidence of severe skin damage but a lower incidence of carcases with a high rigor score than gilts. Liver glycogen was almost completely depleted in the pigs deprived of food for 12 and 18 hours and was lower in the pigs deprived for up to an hour than in animals fed immediately before slaughter. The period of food deprivation had no effect on the levels of cortisol, creatine phosphokinase or lactate in the blood.

  9. Benzothiazoles as probes for the 5HT1A receptor and the serotonin transporter (SERT): a search for new dual-acting agents as potential antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue Y; Etukala, Jagan R; Eyunni, Suresh V K; Setola, Vincent; Roth, Bryan L; Ablordeppey, Seth Y

    2012-07-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of several benzothiazole-based compounds are described in an attempt to identify novel dual-acting 5HT(1A) receptor and SERT inhibitors as new antidepressants. Binding affinities at the 5HT(1A) receptor and the serotonin transporter do not appear to be congruent and other areas of the binding sites would need to be explored in order to improve binding simultaneously at both sites. Compounds 20 and 23 show moderate binding affinity at the 5HT(1A) receptor and the SERT site and thus, have the potential to be further explored as dual-acting agents. In addition, compound 20 binds with low affinity to the dopamine transporter (DAT), the norepinephrine transporter (NET) and 5HT(2C) receptor, which are desirable properties as selectivity for SERT (and not DAT or NET) is associated with an absence of cardiovascular side effects. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. "The safety of sodium reduction in the food supply: A cross-discipline balancing act"-Workshop proceedings.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christine; Doyle, Michael; Webb, Densie

    2017-03-28

    This workshop, jointly presented by the ILSI North America Technical Committees on Food Microbiology and Sodium, aimed to provide greater knowledge and appreciation of the opportunities and challenges facing the food industry in answering the public health community's call to reduce sodium levels in the food supply. One major challenge is finding effective substitutes for the various antimicrobial and functional roles that sodium plays across different food categories. Sodium plays a critical role in retarding the growth of pathogens and food spoilage bacteria. Moreover, taste is an important factor for consumers when they choose food products, and the flavor changes that occur when salt is reduced or replaced must be considered and ingredients and processes adjusted accordingly. The workshop provided a platform for a multidisciplinary discussion among the microbiology, food science, nutrition, and public health communities to share progress and propose solutions, including the formation of public-private partnerships, to develop coordinated and comprehensive strategies. This paper provides an overview of the issues raised, rather than a specific summary of workshop discussions. The Food and Drug Administration's Draft Guidance for Industry on voluntary sodium reduction and the 2015 US Dietary Guidelines for Americans were released subsequent to the workshop and are also discussed.

  11. Thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and electrochemistry of external field-assisted nonthermal food technologies.

    PubMed

    Misra, N N; Martynenko, Alex; Chemat, Farid; Paniwnyk, Larysa; Barba, Francisco J; Jambrak, Anet Režek

    2017-03-31

    Interest in the development and adoption of nonthermal technologies is burgeoning within the food and bioprocess industry, the associated research community, and among the consumers. This is evident from not only the success of some innovative nonthermal technologies at industrial scale, but also from the increasing number of publications dealing with these topics, a growing demand for foods processed by nonthermal technologies and use of natural ingredients. A notable feature of the nonthermal technologies such as cold plasma, electrohydrodynamic processing, pulsed electric fields, and ultrasound is the involvement of external fields, either electric or sound. Therefore, it merits to study the fundamentals of these technologies and the associated phenomenon with a unified approach. In this review, we revisit the fundamental physical and chemical phenomena governing the selected technologies, highlight similarities, and contrasts, describe few successful applications, and finally, identify the gaps in research.

  12. Act No. 88-1091 modifying Act No. 66-420 of 18 June 1966 on chartering and maritime transport contracts, 1 December 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This Law provides that international transportation carriers may refuse the boarding or landing of a passenger who does not present a document authorizing landing at the point of arrival and at anticipated ports in France.

  13. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The active control technology (ACT) control/guidance system task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the NASA energy efficient transport program was documented. The air traffic environment of navigation and air traffic control systems and procedures were extrapolated. An approach to listing flight functions which will be performed by systems and crew of an ACT configured airplane of the 1990s, and a determination of function criticalities to safety of flight, are the basis of candidate integrated ACT/Control/Guidance System architecture. The system mechanizes five active control functions: pitch augmented stability, angle of attack limiting, lateral/directional augmented stability, gust load alleviation, and maneuver load control. The scope and requirements of a program for simulating the integrated ACT avionics and flight deck system, with pilot in the loop, are defined, system and crew interface elements are simulated, and mechanization is recommended. Relationships between system design and crew roles and procedures are evaluated.

  14. The effect of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Clean Indoor Air Act on food services and drinking places sales and numbers, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen-Qiang; Fisher, Monica A

    2013-11-27

    Philadelphia enacted its Clean Indoor Air Act (CIAA) nearly 2 years before the statewide CIAA. In this study, we assessed the economic impact of CIAAs on 4 types of food services and drinking places and addressed the predominant limitation of previous pre-post ban studies, namely the lack of control for confounders and changes in secular trends over time. We analyzed data from Pennsylvania Department of Revenue Quarterly 1998-2011 taxable county-level revenue sales and number of food services and drinking places. Region-specific and type-specific adjusted sales and number of food services and drinking places accounted for consumer spending as a general economic indicator. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time-series methodology assessed changes in trend and level. Pennsylvania CIAA had no significant effect on adjusted sales or numbers except for an increase in sales in Philadelphia for limited-service eating places and in the surrounding 4 counties for special food services. Philadelphia CIAA was associated with an increase in adjusted numbers of full-service restaurants in Philadelphia and the rest of the state, special food services in Philadelphia, and drinking places in the rest of the state, and a decrease in the number of special food services in the surrounding counties. Philadelphia CIAA had no significant effect on adjusted sales except for an increase in special food services in the rest of the state. Overall, CIAAs had no negative business-related impact and, for the most part, suggest a positive impact on restaurant sales and numbers. Our results provide further support for comprehensive CIAA ordinance for restaurants.

  15. The Effect of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Clean Indoor Air Act on Food Services and Drinking Places Sales and Numbers, 1998-2011

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Philadelphia enacted its Clean Indoor Air Act (CIAA) nearly 2 years before the statewide CIAA. In this study, we assessed the economic impact of CIAAs on 4 types of food services and drinking places and addressed the predominant limitation of previous pre–post ban studies, namely the lack of control for confounders and changes in secular trends over time. Methods We analyzed data from Pennsylvania Department of Revenue Quarterly 1998–2011 taxable county-level revenue sales and number of food services and drinking places. Region-specific and type-specific adjusted sales and number of food services and drinking places accounted for consumer spending as a general economic indicator. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time-series methodology assessed changes in trend and level. Results Pennsylvania CIAA had no significant effect on adjusted sales or numbers except for an increase in sales in Philadelphia for limited-service eating places and in the surrounding 4 counties for special food services. Philadelphia CIAA was associated with an increase in adjusted numbers of full-service restaurants in Philadelphia and the rest of the state, special food services in Philadelphia, and drinking places in the rest of the state, and a decrease in the number of special food services in the surrounding counties. Philadelphia CIAA had no significant effect on adjusted sales except for an increase in special food services in the rest of the state. Conclusion Overall, CIAAs had no negative business-related impact and, for the most part, suggest a positive impact on restaurant sales and numbers. Our results provide further support for comprehensive CIAA ordinance for restaurants. PMID:24286275

  16. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Linda J; Callaghan, Brid; Rivera, Leni R; Lieu, TinaMarie; Poole, Daniel P; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Bravo, David M; Furness, John B

    2016-10-10

    TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients) include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT) or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1, and in Trpa1-deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM). The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM), and were greatly diminished in Trpa1-/- duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption.

  17. Effects of Food Components That Activate TRPA1 Receptors on Mucosal Ion Transport in the Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Fothergill, Linda J.; Callaghan, Brid; Rivera, Leni R.; Lieu, TinaMarie; Poole, Daniel P.; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Bravo, David M.; Furness, John B.

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a ligand-activated cation channel found in the intestine and other tissues. Components of food that stimulate TRPA1 receptors (phytonutrients) include allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde and linalool, but these may also act at other receptors. Cells lining the intestinal mucosa are immunoreactive for TRPA1 and Trpa1 mRNA occurs in mucosal extracts, suggesting that the TRPA1 receptor is the target for these agonists. However, in situ hybridisation reveals Trpa1 expression in 5-HT containing enteroendocrine cells, not enterocytes. TRPA1 agonists evoke mucosal secretion, which may be indirect (through release of 5-HT) or direct by activation of enterocytes. We investigated effects of the phytonutrients on transmucosal ion currents in mouse duodenum and colon, and the specificity of the phytonutrients in cells transfected with Trpa1, and in Trpa1-deficient mice. The phytonutrients increased currents in the duodenum with the relative potencies: allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) > cinnamaldehyde > linalool (0.1 to 300 μM). The rank order was similar in the colon, but linalool was ineffective. Responses to AITC were reduced by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 μM), and were greatly diminished in Trpa1−/− duodenum and colon. Responses were not reduced by tetrodotoxin, 5-HT receptor antagonists, or atropine, but inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis reduced responses. Thus, functional TRPA1 channels are expressed by enterocytes of the duodenum and colon. Activation of enterocyte TRPA1 by food components has the potential to facilitate nutrient absorption. PMID:27735854

  18. Child and Adult Care Food Program: Meal Pattern Revisions Related to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-04-25

    This final rule updates the meal pattern requirements for the Child and Adult Care Food Program to better align them with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, as required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. This rule requires centers and day care homes participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program to serve more whole grains and a greater variety of vegetables and fruit, and reduces the amount of added sugars and solid fats in meals. In addition, this final rule supports mothers who breastfeed and improves consistency with the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children and with other Child Nutrition Programs. Several of the changes are extended to the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and Special Milk Program. These changes are based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, science-based recommendations made by the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies), cost and practical considerations, and stakeholder's input. This is the first major revision of the Child and Adult Care Food Program meal patterns since the Program's inception in 1968. These improvements to the meals served in the Child and Adult Care Food Program are expected to safeguard the health of young children by ensuring healthy eating habits are developed early, and improve the wellness of adult participants.

  19. Potassium transport at the plasma membrane of the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Demidchik, Vadim; Macpherson, Neil; Davies, Julia M

    2005-01-15

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a commercially important spoilage yeast capable of growth at low pH in the presence of weak organic acid preservatives, such as benzoic acid. A patch-clamp electrophysiological analysis of plasma membrane K+ transport revealed a high conductance pathway for low-affinity K+ uptake. In contrast to the equivalent K+ transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this system remained operative at low extracellular pH and may therefore facilitate K+ uptake in K(+)-rich and acidic beverages. Benzoate inhibited growth, increased intracellular K+ content, yet decreased the magnitude of the K+ uptake conductance; specifically, the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly-rectifying component was reduced. It is proposed that this adaptation helps maintain a hyperpolarized membrane voltage to effect continued ATPase-mediated H+ extrusion and so combat preservative-induced cytosolic acidosis. Again in contrast to S. cerevisiae, the K+ conductance was relatively insensitive to increased extracellular Ca2+. Paradoxically (and unlike S. cerevisiae) increasing extracellular Ca2+ inhibited growth, suggesting a simple expedient to limit spoilage by Z. bailii.

  20. Plasma membrane H+ and K+ transporters are involved in the weak-acid preservative response of disparate food spoilage yeasts.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Neil; Shabala, Lana; Rooney, Henrietta; Jarman, Marcus G; Davies, Julia M

    2005-06-01

    The food spoilage yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been proposed to resist weak-acid preservative stress by different means; Z. bailii by limiting influx of preservative combined with its catabolism, S. cerevisiae by active extrusion of the preservative weak-acid anion and H(+). Measurement of H(+) extrusion by exponential-phase Z. bailii cells suggest that, in common with S. cerevisiae, this yeast uses a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase to expel H(+) when challenged by weak-acid preservative (benzoic acid). Simultaneous measurement of Z. bailii net H(+) and K(+) fluxes showed that net K(+) influx accompanies net H(+) efflux during acute benzoic acid stress. Such ionic coupling is known for S. cerevisiae in short-term preservative stress. Both yeasts significantly accumulated K(+) on long-term exposure to benzoic acid. Analysis of S. cerevisiae K(+) transporter mutants revealed that loss of the high affinity K(+) uptake system Trk1 confers sensitivity to growth in preservative. The results suggest that cation accumulation is an important factor in adaptation to weak-acid preservatives by spoilage yeasts and that Z. bailii and S. cerevisiae share hitherto unsuspected adaptive responses at the level of plasma membrane ion transport.

  1. Report to the Legislature on: School Breakfast and Summer Food Service Programs. MGL Chapter 15 Section 1G(f) and Chapter 61 of the Acts of 2007 Line Item 7053-1925

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the report on "School Breakfast and Summer Food Service Program." Pursuant to Chapter 61 of the Acts of 2007 line item 7053-1925 and Massachusetts General Laws (MGL) chapter 15 section 1G(f), this report is submitted to the Legislature. An Act establishing school-based Nutrition and Child Hunger Relief Programs was…

  2. Secondhand smoke in public places: can Bangalore metropolitan transport corporation be a role model for effective implementation of Cigarette and Other Tobacco Products Act, 2003?

    PubMed

    Nayak, N S; Annigeri, V B; Revankar, D R; Kenchaigol, S

    2010-07-01

    The Indian government enacted 'The cigarettes and other tobacco products act, 2003' (COTPA), which prohibits smoking in public places. To validate the efficacy of the Act of 2003, enacted by the Government of India, to prevent secondhand smoking in public places. The study is based on a non-random sample survey of 2,600 bus passengers carried out in the premises of three mega public road transport organizations in Karnataka state, India, in June 2007. The information was gathered through administration of structured schedules. A sample of 1,000 each for the terminus of Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC) and Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation (KSRTC) in Bangalore and, 600 for North West Karnataka Road Transport Corporation (NWKRTC) in Hubli-Dharwad city was distributed proportionately according to the number of platforms in each terminus. Simple Averages. There is some reduction in smoking in general as perceived by 69% of the passengers as compared to the scenario a year before the enactment of COTPA. The observed smoking is lower in the bus premises of BMTC where there is strict regulation, and higher in the bus premises of NWKRTC, which has not taken any regulatory measures. Knowing smoking is banned in public places can itself create awareness depending on the coverage extended by media and implementing an agency to reach the public. The implementation of an act depends on the willingness of stakeholders to act upon it. The implementation of COTPA as done by BMTC could well become a role model for replication elsewhere, if BMTC can strive harder to accomplish a 100% smoke-free zone.

  3. You are what you eat: influence of type and amount of food consumed on central dopamine systems and the behavioral effects of direct- and indirect-acting dopamine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Baladi, Michelle G; Daws, Lynette C; France, Charles P

    2012-07-01

    The important role of dopamine (DA) in mediating feeding behavior and the positive reinforcing effects of some drugs is well recognized. Less widely studied is how feeding conditions might impact the sensitivity of drugs acting on DA systems. Food restriction, for example, has often been the focus of aging and longevity studies; however, other studies have demonstrated that mild food restriction markedly increases sensitivity to direct- and indirect-acting DA receptor agonists. Moreover, it is becoming clear that not only the amount of food, but the type of food, is an important factor in modifying the effects of drugs. Given the increased consumption of high fat and sugary foods, studies are exploring how consumption of highly palatable food impacts DA neurochemistry and the effects of drugs acting on these systems. For example, eating high fat chow increases sensitivity to some behavioral effects of direct- as well as indirect-acting DA receptor agonists. A compelling mechanistic possibility is that central DA pathways that mediate the effects of some drugs are regulated by one or more of the endocrine hormones (e.g. insulin) that undergo marked changes during food restriction or after consuming high fat or sugary foods. Although traditionally recognized as an important signaling molecule in regulating energy homeostasis, insulin can also regulate DA neurochemistry. Because direct- and indirect-acting DA receptor drugs are used therapeutically and some are abused, a better understanding of how food intake impacts response to these drugs would likely facilitate improved treatment of clinical disorders and provide information that would be relevant to the causes of vulnerability to abuse drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  4. 75 FR 35338 - Implementation of Regulations Required Under Title XI of the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ..., USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Agriculture (USDA), Grain Inspection, Packers..., the P&S Act imposes a variety of more specific limitations and requirements. In particular, it... also sets forth procedures for enforcement actions before the Secretary \\13\\ and private...

  5. [Determination of vitamin D in food using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results of collaborating studies of the working group "Vitamin Analysis" according to section 35 of the German Food Act].

    PubMed

    Bognár, A

    1992-05-01

    A standardized method to determine the vitamin D content of food by means of HPLC is described. After the test material was homogenized and saponified with ethanolic aqueous potassium hydroxide solution, vitamin D was extracted using n-hexane. Using HPLC on a silica gel column, the fraction containing vitamin D is separated from the nonsaponifiable residue. After the fraction was reduced, the residue was dissolved in methanol and the vitamin D content determined after HPLC separation on an RP-C18 column. For evaluation, either a conventional external standard method using laboratory and matrix specific recovery rates as correction factors, or an internal standard method using vitamin D2, and D3, respectively as internal standards were employed. The method was developed and standardized by the working group "Vitamin Analysis" in accordance with section 35 LMBG (German Food Act). Repeatability and comparability of the results were checked in collaborative studies (14 laboratories) in milk powder and gruel that had been enriched with vitamin D3. Applicability of the method to other food (eggs, milk, fish, margarine) was checked separately. The statistical evaluation of the results of the collaborative studies has shown that the method is reliable enough to be included into the "Amtliche Sammlung" (official collection of analytical methods) according to section 35 LMBG. The present method may be used to determine the content of vitamin D2 and D3 in natural and vitaminized food. It is specific for the vitamins D2 and D3 released during saponification of food, but does not allow separate determination of the pre-vitamins D already present in the sample.

  6. Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of tether transportation is given. Four steps were used over a period of time. First, theoretical engineering feasibility and technology requirements were determined. Then the survivors of that effort went into step two in the analysis of promising candidates. Those survivors went into the third phase which is engineering design and cost benefits. Survivors entered into the demonstration mission definition phase. Transportation studies have covered two kinds of deployments. First, steady state deployment was studied. Like the TSS, it's nearly vertical. It takes a long time to deploy and involves relatively high tether tension. Secondly, dynamic deployment was studied. Deployment started in an almost horizontal direction under a very shallow angle which allows a high deployment rate under very low tension. Momentum transfer here occurs by libration. Specific payloads were used to study tethered transportation benefits. Four transportation concepts were studied with regard to cost benefits. A tethered orbiter deboost from the space station, an OTV boost up from the Space Station, a science platform on a tether with a possible micro-g lab moving in between platform and station, and a tethered boost of payloads fromthe orbiter are the four concepts. These benefits are examined in detail.

  7. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Final ACT configuration evaluation. Final Report, October 1980-April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The Final ACT Configuration Evaluation Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology project within the energy efficient transport program is summarized. The Final ACT Configuration, through application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span, exhibits significant performance improvements over the conventional baseline configuration. At the design range for these configurations, 3590 km, the block fuel used is 10% less for the Final ACT Configuration, with significant reductions in fuel usage at all operational ranges. Results of this improved fuel usage and additional system and airframe costs and the complexity required to achieve it were analyzed to determine its economic effects. For a 926 km mission, the incremental return on investment is nearly 25% at 1980 fuel prices. For longer range missions or increased fuel prices, the return is greater. The technical risks encountered in the Final ACT Configuration design and the research and development effort required to reduce these risks to levels acceptable for commercial airplane design are identified.

  8. Tetrahydro-beta-carboline alkaloids that occur in foods and biological systems act as radical scavengers and antioxidants in the ABTS assay.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomas; Galisteo, Juan

    2002-08-01

    Tetrahydro-beta-carboline alkaloids that occur in foods such as wine, seasonings, vinegar and fruit products juices, jams) acted as good radical scavengers (hydrogen- or electron donating) in the ABTS (2,2'-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) assay, and therefore, they could contribute to the beneficial antioxidant capacity attributed to foods. In contrast, the fully aromatic beta-carbolines norharman and harman did not show any radical scavenger activity in the same assay. During the reaction with ABTS.+ radical cation, tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid such as 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (MTCA) and 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (MTCA-COOH) were converted to harman, whereas 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (THCA) and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (THCA-COOH) afforded norharman. These results suggest that food and naturally-occurring tetrahydro-beta-carboline alkaloids if accumulated in tissues, as reported elsewhere, might exhibit antioxidant activity.

  9. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tolerance under section 408(e) of the Act, 21 U.S.C. 346a(e). (c) Basic rules which apply without change. Sections 2.201, 2.202, 2.206, 2.207, and 2.210 through 2.215 apply without change to information to which...) apply without change to information to which this section applies. Section 2.203(c), however, does not...

  10. 40 CFR 2.308 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tolerance under section 408(e) of the Act, 21 U.S.C. 346a(e). (c) Basic rules which apply without change. Sections 2.201, 2.202, 2.206, 2.207, and 2.210 through 2.215 apply without change to information to which...) apply without change to information to which this section applies. Section 2.203(c), however, does not...

  11. Transportability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    psi). (g) Maximum axle load (pneumatic tires) - 2,268 kg (5,000 lb). (h) Maximum wheel load (pneumatic tires) - 1,134 kg (2,500 lb). (i...survivability following the shock or vibration environment induced. Vehicles not typically transported with payload such as wreckers, truck tractors ...combination weight rating (GCWR) means the value specified by the manufacturer as the loaded weight of the combination vehicle. (d) Gross axle weight

  12. Transportation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    International (cont.) European Commission – Directorate General for Energy and Transport, Brussels, Belgium Headquarters Netherlands Customs ...100,000 by 2014. As a result of these challenges and due to the increase in intermodal freight traffic, a customer /client relationship has...increase by 50% domestically and 110% internationally by 2016 (CRS, 2007). United Parcel Service (UPS), FedEx, and DHL currently control the package

  13. UNC-16 (JIP3) Acts Through Synapse-Assembly Proteins to Inhibit the Active Transport of Cell Soma Organelles to Caenorhabditis elegans Motor Neuron Axons.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stacey L; Morrison, Logan M; Yorks, Rosalina M; Hoover, Christopher M; Boominathan, Soorajnath; Miller, Kenneth G

    2015-09-01

    The conserved protein UNC-16 (JIP3) inhibits the active transport of some cell soma organelles, such as lysosomes, early endosomes, and Golgi, to the synaptic region of axons. However, little is known about UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function, which is distinct from its Kinesin-1 adaptor function. We used an unc-16 suppressor screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to discover that UNC-16 acts through CDK-5 (Cdk5) and two conserved synapse assembly proteins: SAD-1 (SAD-A Kinase), and SYD-2 (Liprin-α). Genetic analysis of all combinations of double and triple mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds showed that the three proteins (CDK-5, SAD-1, and SYD-2) are all part of the same organelle transport regulatory system, which we named the CSS system based on its founder proteins. Further genetic analysis revealed roles for SYD-1 (another synapse assembly protein) and STRADα (a SAD-1-interacting protein) in the CSS system. In an unc-16(-) background, loss of the CSS system improved the sluggish locomotion of unc-16 mutants, inhibited axonal lysosome accumulation, and led to the dynein-dependent accumulation of lysosomes in dendrites. Time-lapse imaging of lysosomes in CSS system mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds revealed active transport defects consistent with the steady-state distributions of lysosomes. UNC-16 also uses the CSS system to regulate the distribution of early endosomes in neurons and, to a lesser extent, Golgi. The data reveal a new and unprecedented role for synapse assembly proteins, acting as part of the newly defined CSS system, in mediating UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. The Jones Act and its Effect on Freight Transportation in the Aftermath of Disruptive Events: A GIS Perspective

    DOE PAGES

    Fialkoff, Marc R.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.

    2016-01-01

    In freight transportation, like other critical infrastructures, there are cascading impacts with significant consequences when disruptions occur. In the aftermath of such disruptions, planners and policymakers are faced with tough choices in designing efficient response and recovery plans within their legal limits. Here, with freight transportation, one of the challenges during disasters is to understand the operational and functional readiness of the infrastructure. This is not just a physical resiliency question, but also an institutional, managerial, and connectivity question.

  15. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Test act system validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective of the Test Active Control Technology (ACT) System laboratory tests was to verify and validate the system concept, hardware, and software. The initial lab tests were open loop hardware tests of the Test ACT System as designed and built. During the course of the testing, minor problems were uncovered and corrected. Major software tests were run. The initial software testing was also open loop. These tests examined pitch control laws, wing load alleviation, signal selection/fault detection (SSFD), and output management. The Test ACT System was modified to interface with the direct drive valve (DDV) modules. The initial testing identified problem areas with DDV nonlinearities, valve friction induced limit cycling, DDV control loop instability, and channel command mismatch. The other DDV issue investigated was the ability to detect and isolate failures. Some simple schemes for failure detection were tested but were not completely satisfactory. The Test ACT System architecture continues to appear promising for ACT/FBW applications in systems that must be immune to worst case generic digital faults, and be able to tolerate two sequential nongeneric faults with no reduction in performance. The challenge in such an implementation would be to keep the analog element sufficiently simple to achieve the necessary reliability.

  16. Can we improve top-down GHG inverse methods through informed prior and better representations of atmospheric transport? Insights from the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America Aircraft Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Keller, K.; Davis, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    Current estimates of biogenic carbon fluxes over North America based on top-down atmospheric inversions are subject to considerable uncertainty. This uncertainty stems to a large part from the uncertain prior fluxes estimates with the associated error covariances and approximations in the atmospheric transport models that link observed carbon dioxide mixing ratios with surface fluxes. Specifically, approximations in the representation of vertical mixing associated with atmospheric turbulence or convective transport and largely under-determined prior fluxes and their error structures significantly hamper our capacity to reliably estimate regional carbon fluxes. The Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) mission aims at reducing the uncertainties in inverse fluxes at the regional-scale by deploying airborne and ground-based platforms to characterize atmospheric GHG mixing ratios and the concurrent atmospheric dynamics. Two aircraft measure the 3-dimensional distribution of greenhouse gases at synoptic scales, focusing on the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere during both fair and stormy weather conditions. Here we analyze two main questions: (i) What level of information can we expect from the currently planned observations? (ii) How might ACT-America reduce the hindcast and predictive uncertainty of carbon estimates over North America?

  17. Is Slow-Onset Long-Acting Monoamine Transport Blockade to Cocaine as Methadone is to Heroin? Implication for Anti-Addiction Medications

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao-Qing; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Li, Xia; Spiller, Krista; Li, Jie; Chun, Lauren; Wu, Kuo-Ming; Froimowitz, Mark; Gardner, Eliot L

    2010-01-01

    The success of methadone in treating opiate addiction has suggested that long-acting agonist therapies may be similarly useful for treating cocaine addiction. Here, we examined this hypothesis, using the slow-onset long-acting monoamine reuptake inhibitor 31,345, a trans-aminotetralin analog, in a variety of addiction-related animal models, and compared it with methadone's effects on heroin's actions in the same animal models. Systemic administration of 31,345 produced long-lasting enhancement of electrical brain-stimulation reward (BSR) and extracellular nucleus accumbens (NAc) dopamine (DA). Pretreatment with 31,345 augmented cocaine-enhanced BSR, prolonged cocaine-enhanced NAc DA, and produced a long-term (24-48 h) reduction in cocaine self-administration rate without obvious extinction pattern, suggesting an additive effect of 31,345 with cocaine. In contrast, methadone pretreatment not only dose-dependently inhibited heroin self-administration with an extinction pattern but also dose-dependently inhibited heroin-enhanced BSR and NAc DA, suggesting functional antagonism by methadone of heroin's actions. In addition, 31,345 appears to possess significant abuse liability, as it produces dose-dependent enhancement of BSR and NAc DA, maintains a low rate of self-administration behavior, and dose-dependently reinstates drug-seeking behavior. In contrast, methadone only partially maintains self-administration with an extinction pattern, and fails to induce reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. These findings suggest that 31,345 is a cocaine-like slow-onset long-acting monoamine transporter inhibitor that may act as an agonist therapy for cocaine addiction. However, its pattern of action appears to be significantly different from that of methadone. Ideal agonist substitutes for cocaine should fully emulate methadone's actions, that is, functionally antagonizing cocaine's action while blocking monoamine transporters to augment synaptic DA. PMID:20827272

  18. Is slow-onset long-acting monoamine transport blockade to cocaine as methadone is to heroin? Implication for anti-addiction medications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Qing; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Li, Xia; Spiller, Krista; Li, Jie; Chun, Lauren; Wu, Kuo-Ming; Froimowitz, Mark; Gardner, Eliot L

    2010-12-01

    The success of methadone in treating opiate addiction has suggested that long-acting agonist therapies may be similarly useful for treating cocaine addiction. Here, we examined this hypothesis, using the slow-onset long-acting monoamine reuptake inhibitor 31,345, a trans-aminotetralin analog, in a variety of addiction-related animal models, and compared it with methadone's effects on heroin's actions in the same animal models. Systemic administration of 31,345 produced long-lasting enhancement of electrical brain-stimulation reward (BSR) and extracellular nucleus accumbens (NAc) dopamine (DA). Pretreatment with 31,345 augmented cocaine-enhanced BSR, prolonged cocaine-enhanced NAc DA, and produced a long-term (24-48  h) reduction in cocaine self-administration rate without obvious extinction pattern, suggesting an additive effect of 31,345 with cocaine. In contrast, methadone pretreatment not only dose-dependently inhibited heroin self-administration with an extinction pattern but also dose-dependently inhibited heroin-enhanced BSR and NAc DA, suggesting functional antagonism by methadone of heroin's actions. In addition, 31,345 appears to possess significant abuse liability, as it produces dose-dependent enhancement of BSR and NAc DA, maintains a low rate of self-administration behavior, and dose-dependently reinstates drug-seeking behavior. In contrast, methadone only partially maintains self-administration with an extinction pattern, and fails to induce reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. These findings suggest that 31,345 is a cocaine-like slow-onset long-acting monoamine transporter inhibitor that may act as an agonist therapy for cocaine addiction. However, its pattern of action appears to be significantly different from that of methadone. Ideal agonist substitutes for cocaine should fully emulate methadone's actions, that is, functionally antagonizing cocaine's action while blocking monoamine transporters to augment synaptic DA.

  19. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: current and advanced act control system definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability (2) angle of attack limiting (3) lateral/directional augmented stability (4) gust load alleviation (5) maneuver load control and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  20. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  1. Polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase: a novel biotechnology-based blood substitute that transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide and also acts as an antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yuzhu; Rong, Zhixia; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2012-02-01

    Polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase (PolyHb-SOD-CAT-CA) is a therapeutic antioxidant that also transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide. This is formed by crosslinking Hb with SOD, CAT, and CA using glutaraldehyde. Crosslinking stroma-free Hb from red blood cell (RBC) reduces CA activity to 55%. Addition of more CA resulted in a preparation with the same CA activity as RBC. PolyHb in the complex acts as a buffer to prevent large pH changes as carbon dioxide is converted to carbonic acid. We then prepare and optimize a novel PolyHb-SOD-CAT-CA, a therapeutic antioxidant that also transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide.

  2. Polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase: a novel biotechnology-based blood substitute that transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide and also acts as an antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yuzhu; Rong, Zhixia; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2011-06-01

    Polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase (PolyHb-SOD-CAT-CA) is a therapeutic antioxidant that also transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide. This is formed by crosslinking Hb with SOD, CAT, and CA using glutaraldehyde. Crosslinking stroma free Hb from red blood cell (rbc) reduces CA activity to 55%. Addition of more CA resulted in a preparation with the same CA activity as RBC. PolyHb in the complex acts as a buffer to prevent large pH changes as carbon dioxide is converted to carbonic acid. We then prepare and optimize a novel PolyHb-SOD-CAT-CA, a therapeutic antioxidant that also transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide.

  3. Microbiological Safety of Animal Wastes Processed by Physical Heat Treatment: An Alternative To Eliminate Human Pathogens in Biological Soil Amendments as Recommended by the Food Safety Modernization Act.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Jiang, Xiuping

    2017-03-01

    Animal wastes have high nutritional value as biological soil amendments of animal origin for plant cultivation in sustainable agriculture; however, they can be sources of some human pathogens. Although composting is an effective way to reduce pathogen levels in animal wastes, pathogens may still survive under certain conditions and persist in the composted products, which potentially could lead to fresh produce contamination. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act, alternative treatments are recommended for reducing or eliminating human pathogens in raw animal manure. Physical heat treatments can be considered an effective method to inactivate pathogens in animal wastes. However, microbial inactivation in animal wastes can be affected by many factors, such as composition of animal wastes, type and physiological stage of the tested microorganism, and heat source. Following some current processing guidelines for physical heat treatments may not be adequate for completely eliminating pathogens from animal wastes. Therefore, this article primarily reviews the microbiological safety and economic value of physically heat-treated animal wastes as biological soil amendments.

  4. Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-11-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Although nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA depletions or antagonism leave aspects of appetite and primary food motivation intact, rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and that stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors produces behavioral effects that are similar to those induced by DA antagonism. The present review summarizes the literature on the role of NAc DA and adenosine in effort-related processes, and also presents original data on the effects of local stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NAc core. Local injections of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine directly into NAc core produces shifts in effort-related choice behavior similar to those induced by DA antagonism or A2A receptor stimulation, decreasing lever pressing but increasing chow intake in rats responding on a concurrent fixed ratio/chow feeding choice task. In contrast, injections into a neostriatal control site dorsal to the NAc were ineffective. The actions of pilocarpine on this task were attenuated by co-administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Thus, drugs that act on DA, adenosine A2A, and muscarinic receptors regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia that can be observed in depression and other disorders.

  5. Selenomethionine as a Safer Substitute for Barium Selenate in Long-Acting Injectable Se Supplements for Food-Producing Animals.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Scott O; Grace, Neville D

    2017-09-20

    Nutritional supplementation with selenium (Se) can prevent Se deficiency in food-producing animals. Injection with slow-release formulations is a preferred method for free-range grazing sheep and cattle, and barium selenate (BaSeO4) provides optimal efficacy. This chemical can become a health risk to humans if the concentrated depot of an injection site is consumed, and consequently such use is recently banned in the EU. A possible replacement is selenomethionine (SeMet), a naturally occurring form of Se supplementation hitherto only administered orally. In four animal studies we found that injection with SeMet maintained nutritionally adequate concentrations of Se in blood and tissues of lambs for at least 191 days and in blood and milk of dairy cows for at least 95 days. Stereoisomer forms L- and DL-SeMet were functionally equivalent. This is the first demonstration that injectable SeMet can deliver efficacy similar to BaSeO4 but with less risk of undesirable residues in edible tissues.

  6. Chronic food restriction in young rats results in depression- and anxiety-like behaviors with decreased expression of serotonin reuptake transporter.

    PubMed

    Jahng, Jeong Won; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Bom-Taeck; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2007-05-30

    Evidence of semi-starvation is commonly found in patients with eating disorders. This study was conducted to examine the adverse effects of chronic caloric restriction in young rats, since there have been increasing incidence of eating disorders especially among young populations. Food restriction group was supplied daily with 50% of chow consumed by its ad libitum fed control group from postnatal day 28. After 5 weeks of food restriction, brain contents of serotonin (5-hydroxy-tryptamine; 5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindol acetic acid were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and mRNA expression of 5-HT reuptake transporter (5-HTT) by in situ hybridization. Plasma corticosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Behavioral assessments were performed with Porsolt swim test for depressive behavior and with elevated plus maze test for anxiety. Five weeks of food restriction markedly increased plasma level of corticosterone, and significantly decreased 5-HT turnover rates in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. 5-HTT mRNA expression decreased in the raphe nucleus of food restricted rats compared with free fed controls. Immobility time during the swim test increased in the food restricted group, compared to the control group. Food restricted rats spent more time in the closed arms, less time in the open arms, of elevated plus maze compared with control rats. These results suggest that chronic caloric restriction in young rats may lead to the development of depressive and/or anxiety disorders, likely, in relation with dysfunction of brain 5-HT system.

  7. A bill to require the Transportation Security Administration to comply with the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Lieberman, Joseph I. [ID-CT

    2011-12-14

    12/14/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3670, which became Public Law 112-171 on 8/16/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. A bill to require the Transportation Security Administration to comply with the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Lieberman, Joseph I. [ID-CT

    2011-12-14

    12/14/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (text of measure as introduced: CR S8604) (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3670, which became Public Law 112-171 on 8/16/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. 21 CFR 170.10 - Food additives in standardized foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food additives in standardized foods. 170.10... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES General Provisions § 170.10 Food additives... the Act, which proposes the inclusion of a food additive in such definition and standard of identity...

  10. 21 CFR 170.10 - Food additives in standardized foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food additives in standardized foods. 170.10... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES General Provisions § 170.10 Food additives... the Act, which proposes the inclusion of a food additive in such definition and standard of identity...

  11. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Test act system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The engineering and fabrication of the test ACT system, produced in the third program element of the IAAC Project is documented. The system incorporates pitch-augmented stability and wing-load alleviation, plus full authority fly-by-wire control of the elevators. The pitch-augmented stability is designed to have reliability sufficient to allow flight with neutral or negative inherent longitudinal stability.

  12. H.R. 2400, Report number 105-467, Parts 1, 2 and 3: This act may be cited as the Building Efficient Surface Transportation and Equity Act of 1998, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, March 27, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This act is to authorize funds for Federal-aid highways, highway safety programs, and transit programs, and for other purposes. The topics of the act include Federal-aid highways, highway safety, federal transit administration programs, motor carrier safety, programmatic reforms and streamlining, transportation research, recreational boating safety program and railroads.

  13. The periplasmic membrane proximal domain of MacA acts as a switch in stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by MacB transporter.

    PubMed

    Modali, Sita D; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2011-08-01

    Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC is a tripartite macrolide efflux transporter driven by hydrolysis of ATP. In this complex, MacA is the periplasmic membrane fusion protein that stimulates the activity of MacB transporter and establishes the link with the outer membrane channel TolC. The molecular mechanism by which MacA stimulates MacB remains unknown. Here, we report that the periplasmic membrane proximal domain of MacA plays a critical role in functional MacA-MacB interactions and stimulation of MacB ATPase activity. Binding of MacA to MacB stabilizes the ATP-bound conformation of MacB, whereas interactions with both MacB and TolC affect the conformation of MacA. A single G353A substitution in the C-terminus of MacA inactivates MacAB-TolC function by changing the conformation of the membrane proximal domain of MacA and disrupting the proper assembly of the MacA-MacB complex. We propose that MacA acts in transport by promoting MacB transition into the closed ATP-bound conformation and in this respect, is similar to the periplasmic solute-binding proteins.

  14. Deeming Tobacco Products To Be Subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as Amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act; Restrictions on the Sale and Distribution of Tobacco Products and Required Warning Statements for Tobacco Products. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing this final rule to deem products meeting the statutory definition of "tobacco product,'' except accessories of the newly deemed tobacco products, to be subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), as amended by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act). The Tobacco Control Act provides FDA authority to regulate cigarettes, cigarette tobacco, roll-your-own tobacco, smokeless tobacco, and any other tobacco products that the Agency by regulation deems to be subject to the law. With this final rule, FDA is extending the Agency's "tobacco product'' authorities in the FD&C Act to all other categories of products that meet the statutory definition of "tobacco product" in the FD&C Act, except accessories of such newly deemed tobacco products. This final rule also prohibits the sale of "covered tobacco products" to individuals under the age of 18 and requires the display of health warnings on cigarette tobacco, roll-your own tobacco, and covered tobacco product packages and in advertisements. FDA is taking this action to reduce the death and disease from tobacco products. In accordance with the Tobacco Control Act, we consider and intend the extension of our authorities over tobacco products and the various requirements and prohibitions established by this rule to be severable.

  15. Export of pharmaceuticals and medical devices under the federal Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act: FDA's striking change in interpretation post-Shelhigh.

    PubMed

    Basile, Edward M; Tolomeo, Deborah; Gluck, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    With no communication to industry except court filings in United States v. Undetermined Quantities of Boxes of Articles of Device (Shelhigh) and a draft guidance document, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has articulated new policies regarding export of pharmaceutical products and medical devices. FDA's departure from its historic interpretation of the export provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) significantly limits the ability of manufacturers to export misbranded drugs and medical devices that FDA deems "adulterated," contrary to the plain language and legislative intent of the FDCA. To further exacerbate the issue, FDA has begun to implement these policies without the notice-and-comment rulemaking required by the Administrative Procedures Act (APA), but rather through an enforcement proceeding brought in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. In a letter opinion, the District Court prevented the export of Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) --adulterated medical devices that complied with FDCA Section 801(e)(1), at least as historically interpreted by FDA. The purpose of this article is to review the history of FDA's export policies for pharmaceuticals and medical devices, particularly those aspects of the export policies that are affected by FDA's recent change in position. Three changes in FDA's interpretation of the export provisions of the FDCA will be addressed: 1) unapproved devices that a manufacturer reasonably believes are eligible for Section 510(k) clearance may no longer be exported under Section 801(e) and now must be exported under Section 802, in substantial compliance with Current CGMP; 2) adulterated devices and misbranded drugs can only be exported if the foreign purchaser's specifications cause the product to be adulterated; and 3) an article may not be exported if a like article has ever been sold or offered for sale in domestic commerce. FDA's new interpretations of FDCA

  16. Across-Shelf Transport of Bivalve Larvae: Can the Interface between a Coastal Current and Inshore Waters Act as an Ecological Barrier to Larval Dispersal?

    PubMed Central

    Tilburg, Charles E.; McCartney, Michael A.; Yund, Philip O.

    2012-01-01

    Using an integrated physical and biological approach, we examined across-shelf advection and exchange and the associated transport of bivalve larvae in the presence of a strong coastal current separated from the coast by a stratified inshore environment. We tested the hypothesis that the interface of the coastal current and inshore waters can act as an ecological barrier to across-shelf transport of larvae but can be overcome by wind- or tidally-induced transport. Our study region in the Gulf of Maine encompasses a coastal current that diverges from the coast as it moves downshelf. The region inshore of this current is home to several species that exhibit limited recruitment in spite of extensive upshelf larval sources. Analysis of surface water temperatures and wind velocities revealed episodic decreases in temperature along the coast correlated with alongshelf (but not upwelling) winds, indicating wind-forced onshore movement of the cold coastal current. Such wind-driven onshore migrations are more common along the northern portion of the study region where the coastal current is near the coast, tidal currents are strong, and wind directions are more conducive to onshore migration, but rarer further south where the interface between inshore waters and the coastal current is further offshore and suitable wind events are less common. The distribution of bivalve larvae was consistent with the physical measurements. There was little across-shelf variation in larval abundance where the current abuts the coast, indicating strong across-shelf exchange of larvae, but strong across-shelf variation in larval density where the stratified inshore waters separate the current from the coast, indicating weak across-shelf transport of larvae. Our results suggest that the interface between the coastal current and inshore waters may constitute a major ecological barrier to larval dispersal in the southern part of the region that may only be overcome by rare, strong wind

  17. Analysis of prey capture and food transport kinematics in two Asian box turtles, Cuora amboinensis and Cuora flavomarginata (Chelonia, Geoemydidae), with emphasis on terrestrial feeding patterns.

    PubMed

    Natchev, Nikolay; Heiss, Egon; Lemell, Patrick; Stratev, Daniel; Weisgram, Josef

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the kinematics and morphology of the feeding apparatus of two geoemydid chelonians, the Malayan (Amboina) box turtle (Cuora amboinensis) and the yellow-margined box turtle (Cuora flavomarginata). Both species are able to feed on land as well as in water. Feeding patterns were analysed by high-speed cinematography. The main focus of the present study is on the terrestrial feeding strategies in both Asian box turtles, because feeding on land has probably evolved de novo within the ancestrally aquatic genus Cuora. During terrestrial feeding (analysed for both species), the initial food prehension is always done by the jaws, whereas intraoral food transport and pharyngeal packing actions are tongue-based. The food uptake modes in Cuoras differ considerably from those described for purely terrestrial turtles. Lingual food prehension is typical of all tortoises (Testudinidae), but is absent in C. amboinensis and C. flavomarginata. A previous study on Terrapene carolina shows that this emydid turtle protrudes the tongue during ingestion on land, but that the first contact with the food item occurs by the jaws. Both Asian box turtles investigated here have highly movable, fleshy tongues; nonetheless, the hyolingual complex remains permanently retracted during initial prey capture. In aquatic feeding (analysed for C. amboinensis only), the prey is captured by a fast forward strike of the head (ram feeding). As opposed to ingestion on land, in the underwater grasp the hyoid protracts prior to jaw opening. The head morphology of the investigated species differs. In contrast to the Malayan box turtle, C. flavomarginata exhibits a more complexly structured dorsal lingual epithelium, a considerable palatal vault, weaker jaw adductor muscles and a simplified trochlear complex. The differences in the hyolingual morphology reflect the kinematic patterns of the terrestrial feeding transport.

  18. Trans-epithelial transport of the betalain pigments indicaxanthin and betanin across Caco-2 cell monolayers and influence of food matrix.

    PubMed

    Tesoriere, L; Gentile, C; Angileri, F; Attanzio, A; Tutone, M; Allegra, M; Livrea, M A

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the absorption mechanism of the phytochemicals indicaxanthin and betanin and the influence of their food matrix (cactus pear and red beet) on the intestinal transport. Trans-epithelial transport of dietary-consistent amounts of indicaxanthin and betanin in Caco-2 cell monolayers seeded on Transwell(R) inserts was measured in apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and basolateral to apical (BL-AP) direction, under an inwardly directed pH gradient (pH 6.0/7.4, AP/BL) mimicking luminal and serosal sides of human intestinal epithelium. The effect of inhibitors of membrane transporters on the absorption was also evaluated. Contribution of the paracellular route was investigated after EDTA treatment of the cell monolayer. In vitro digestion of betalainic food was performed to provide a post-intestinal fraction containing bioaccessible pigments. Apparent permeability coefficients (P(app)) in the absorptive direction were (4.4 ± 0.4) × 10⁻⁶ and (3.2 ± 0.3) × 10⁻⁶ cm s⁻¹ for indicaxanthin and betanin, respectively. Transport of indicaxanthin was non-polarized, linear as a function of time and concentration, and unaffected by inhibitors of membrane transporters. Betanin exhibited significantly different bidirectional P(app) values and non-linear efflux kinetics. The concentration-dependent betanin efflux was described by a kinetic model including one non-saturable (K(d) = 0.042 μL cm⁻² min⁻¹) and one saturable component identified as the apical multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2; K(m) = 275 μM; J(max) = 42 pmol min⁻¹ cm⁻²). Permeation of both betalains increased remarkably after EDTA treatment of the cell monolayer. Neither indicaxanthin nor betanin underwent metabolic transformation. Food matrix did not affect trans-epithelial transfer of indicaxanthin, but reduced the absorption rate of betanin, red beet more than cactus pear. Dietary indicaxanthin and betanin can substantially be absorbed through paracellular

  19. Marine Plastic Pollution Prevention Act of 1987. Report of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on H. R. 940, One Hundredth Congress, First Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, to which was referred the bill (H.R. 940) to implement the provisions of Annex V to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, and for other purposes, having considered the same, reports favorably thereon with an amendment in the nature of a substitute and recommends that the bill as amended do pass. H.R. 940, as reported, provides domestic implementation for Annex V, Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution by Garbage from Ships, an Optional Annex to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973 (Convention), as modified by the 1978 Protocol relating to the Convention (MARPOL Protocol). The bill also initiates a public-education program and makes additional changes to the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (33 U.S.C. 1901 et seq.).

  20. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3: a novel candidate for food-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Uwai, Yuichi; Ozeki, Yukihiro; Isaka, Tomonori; Honjo, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Kikuo

    2011-01-01

    Several kinds of food have been shown to influence the absorption and metabolism of drugs, although there is little information about their effect on the renal excretion of drugs. In this study, we performed uptake experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes to assess the inhibitory effects of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and quinic acid, which are contained in coffee, fruits and vegetables, on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3; these transporters mediate renal tubular uptake of anionic drugs from blood. Injection of hOAT1 and hOAT3 cRNA into oocytes stimulated uptake of typical substrates of hOAT1 and hOAT3 (p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate, respectively); among the three compounds tested, caffeic acid most strongly inhibited these transporters. The apparent 50% inhibitory concentrations of caffeic acid were estimated to be 16.6 µM for hOAT1 and 5.4 µM for hOAT3. Eadie-Hofstee plot analysis showed that caffeic acid inhibited both transporters in a competitive manner. In addition to the transport of p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate, that of antifolates and antivirals was inhibited by caffeic acid. These findings show that caffeic acid has inhibitory potential against hOAT1 and hOAT3, suggesting that renal excretion of their substrates could be affected in patients consuming a diet including caffeic acid.

  1. Energy transport corridors: the potential role of Federal lands in states identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, section 368(b).

    SciTech Connect

    Krummel, J.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Kuiper, J.; Kolpa, R.; Moore, R.; May, J.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; McLamore, M.R.; Shamsuddin, S.

    2011-09-01

    On August 8, 2005, the President signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) into law. In Subtitle F of EPAct, Congress set forth various provisions that would change the way certain federal agencies (Agencies) coordinate to authorize the use of land for a variety of energy-related purposes. As part of Subtitle F of EPAct, Section 368 addresses the issue of energy transportation corridors on federal land for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity transmission and distribution facilities. Because of the critical importance of improving the nation's electrical transmission grid, Congress recognized that electricity transmission issues should receive added attention when the Agencies address corridor location and analysis issues. In Section 368, Congress specifically directed the Agencies to consider the need for upgraded and new facilities to deliver electricity: In carrying out [Section 368], the Secretaries shall take into account the need for upgraded and new electricity transmission and distribution facilities to (1) improve reliability; (2) relieve congestion; and (3) enhance capability of the national grid to deliver electricity. Section 368 does not require the Agencies to consider or approve specific projects, applications for rights-of-way (ROWs), or other permits within designated energy corridors. Importantly, Section 368 does not direct, license, or otherwise permit any on-the-ground activity of any sort. If an applicant is interested in obtaining an authorization to develop a project within any corridor designated under Section 368, the applicant would have to apply for a ROW authorization and applicable permits. The Agencies would consider each application by applying appropriate project-specific reviews under requirements of laws and related regulations, including, but not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and Section 106 of

  2. Nitrogen transporter and assimilation genes exhibit developmental stage-selective expression in maize (Zea mays L.) associated with distinct cis-acting promoter motifs.

    PubMed

    Liseron-Monfils, Christophe; Bi, Yong-Mei; Downs, Gregory S; Wu, Wenqing; Signorelli, Tara; Lu, Guangwen; Chen, Xi; Bondo, Eddie; Zhu, Tong; Lukens, Lewis N; Colasanti, Joseph; Rothstein, Steven J; Raizada, Manish N

    2013-10-01

    Nitrogen is considered the most limiting nutrient for maize (Zea mays L.), but there is limited understanding of the regulation of nitrogen-related genes during maize development. An Affymetrix 82K maize array was used to analyze the expression of ≤ 46 unique nitrogen uptake and assimilation probes in 50 maize tissues from seedling emergence to 31 d after pollination. Four nitrogen-related expression clusters were identified in roots and shoots corresponding to, or overlapping, juvenile, adult, and reproductive phases of development. Quantitative real time PCR data was consistent with the existence of these distinct expression clusters. Promoters corresponding to each cluster were screened for over-represented cis-acting elements. The 8-bp distal motif of the Arabidopsis 43-bp nitrogen response element (NRE) was over-represented in nitrogen-related maize gene promoters. This conserved motif, referred to here as NRE43-d8, was previously shown to be critical for nitrate-activated transcription of nitrate reductase (NIA1) and nitrite reductase (NIR1) by the NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 6 (NLP6) in Arabidopsis. Here, NRE43-d8 was over-represented in the promoters of maize nitrate and ammonium transporter genes, specifically those that showed peak expression during early-stage vegetative development. This result predicts an expansion of the NRE-NLP6 regulon and suggests that it may have a developmental component in maize. We also report leaf expression of putative orthologs of nitrite transporters (NiTR1), a transporter not previously reported in maize. We conclude by discussing how each of the four transcriptional modules may be responsible for the different nitrogen uptake and assimilation requirements of leaves and roots at different stages of maize development.

  3. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2009-03-03

    11/30/2010 Passed Senate with an amendment by Yea-Nay Vote. 73 - 25. Record Vote Number: 257. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2751, which became Public Law 111-353 on 1/4/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard J. [D-IL

    2009-03-03

    Senate - 11/30/2010 Passed Senate with an amendment by Yea-Nay Vote. 73 - 25. Record Vote Number: 257. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2751, which became Public Law 111-353 on 1/4/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Food Safety Rapid Response Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Klobuchar, Amy [D-MN

    2009-06-16

    Senate - 06/16/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2009-03-03

    11/30/2010 Passed Senate with an amendment by Yea-Nay Vote. 73 - 25. Record Vote Number: 257. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2751, which became Public Law 111-353 on 1/4/2011. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Drosophila TIM binds importin α1, and acts as an adapter to transport PER to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jang, A Reum; Moravcevic, Katarina; Saez, Lino; Young, Michael W; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-02-01

    Regulated nuclear entry of clock proteins is a conserved feature of eukaryotic circadian clocks and serves to separate the phase of mRNA activation from mRNA repression in the molecular feedback loop. In Drosophila, nuclear entry of the clock proteins, PERIOD (PER) and TIMELESS (TIM), is tightly controlled, and impairments of this process produce profound behavioral phenotypes. We report here that nuclear entry of PER-TIM in clock cells, and consequently behavioral rhythms, require a specific member of a classic nuclear import pathway, Importin α1 (IMPα1). In addition to IMPα1, rhythmic behavior and nuclear expression of PER-TIM require a specific nuclear pore protein, Nup153, and Ran-GTPase. IMPα1 can also drive rapid and efficient nuclear expression of TIM and PER in cultured cells, although the effect on PER is mediated by TIM. Mapping of interaction domains between IMPα1 and TIM/PER suggests that TIM is the primary cargo for the importin machinery. This is supported by attenuated interaction of IMPα1 with TIM carrying a mutation previously shown to prevent nuclear entry of TIM and PER. TIM is detected at the nuclear envelope, and computational modeling suggests that it contains HEAT-ARM repeats typically found in karyopherins, consistent with its role as a co-transporter for PER. These findings suggest that although PER is the major timekeeper of the clock, TIM is the primary target of nuclear import mechanisms. Thus, the circadian clock uses specific components of the importin pathway with a novel twist in that TIM serves a karyopherin-like role for PER.

  8. Drosophila TIM Binds Importin α1, and Acts as an Adapter to Transport PER to the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Jang, A. Reum; Moravcevic, Katarina; Saez, Lino; Young, Michael W.; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Regulated nuclear entry of clock proteins is a conserved feature of eukaryotic circadian clocks and serves to separate the phase of mRNA activation from mRNA repression in the molecular feedback loop. In Drosophila, nuclear entry of the clock proteins, PERIOD (PER) and TIMELESS (TIM), is tightly controlled, and impairments of this process produce profound behavioral phenotypes. We report here that nuclear entry of PER-TIM in clock cells, and consequently behavioral rhythms, require a specific member of a classic nuclear import pathway, Importin α1 (IMPα1). In addition to IMPα1, rhythmic behavior and nuclear expression of PER-TIM require a specific nuclear pore protein, Nup153, and Ran-GTPase. IMPα1 can also drive rapid and efficient nuclear expression of TIM and PER in cultured cells, although the effect on PER is mediated by TIM. Mapping of interaction domains between IMPα1 and TIM/PER suggests that TIM is the primary cargo for the importin machinery. This is supported by attenuated interaction of IMPα1 with TIM carrying a mutation previously shown to prevent nuclear entry of TIM and PER. TIM is detected at the nuclear envelope, and computational modeling suggests that it contains HEAT-ARM repeats typically found in karyopherins, consistent with its role as a co-transporter for PER. These findings suggest that although PER is the major timekeeper of the clock, TIM is the primary target of nuclear import mechanisms. Thus, the circadian clock uses specific components of the importin pathway with a novel twist in that TIM serves a karyopherin-like role for PER. PMID:25674790

  9. The ethics of postmarketing observational studies of drug safety under section 505(o)(3) of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

    PubMed

    Evans, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, Congress granted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) new powers to order pharmaceutical companies to conduct drug safety studies and clinical trials in the postmarketing period after drugs are approved The methodologies include observational studies that examine patients' insurance claims data and clinical records to infer whether drugs are safe in actual clinical practice. Such studies offer a valuable tool for improving drug safety, but they raise ethical and privacy concerns because they would entail widespread use of patients' health information in commercial research by drug manufacturers. This is the first article to explore the ethics of these section 505(0)(3) observational studies, so named after the section of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that authorizes them. Data access problems threaten to make the FDA's section 505(0)(3) study requirements unenforceable. Under existing federal privacy regulations, it appears highly unlikely that pharmaceutical companies will have reliable access to crucial data resources, such as insurance claims data and healthcare records, to use in these studies. State privacy laws present another potential barrier to data access. If pharmaceutical companies do manage to gain access to the needed data, this will raise serious privacy concerns because section 505(0)(3) observational studies do not appear to be covered by any of the major federal regulations that afford ethical and privacy protections to persons whose data are used in research. If the FDA's program of section 505(o)(3) observational studies fails because of the above problems, this failure will have a number of bad consequences: the public will be exposed to avoidable drug safety risks; taxpayers may be forced to bear the costs of having the FDA conduct drug safety investigations that would have been funded by drug manufacturers if data had been available; and, perhaps most troubling, the FDA may be forced to order postmarketing clinical trials to

  10. The US Food and Drug Administration’s drug safety recommendations and long-acting beta2-agonist dispensing pattern changes in adult asthma patients: 2003–2012

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Esther H; Seymour, Sally; Goulding, Margie R; Kang, Elizabeth M; Major, Jacqueline M; Iyasu, Solomon

    2017-01-01

    Background Emerging safety issues associated with long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) have led to multiple regulatory activities by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 2003, including Drug Safety Communications (DSCs) in 2010. These DSCs had three specific recommendations for the safe use of LABA products in adult asthma treatment. Methods We examined the initiation of LABA-containing products for adult asthma treatment using an intermittent time series approach in a claims database from 2003 to 2012. We assessed the alignment of dispensing patterns with the following 2010 FDA recommendations: 1) contraindicated use of single-ingredient (SI)-LABA without an asthma controller medication (ACM); 2) a LABA should only be used when asthma is not adequately controlled on inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) or ACM; and 3) step-down asthma therapy (e.g., discontinue LABA) when asthma control is achieved. Results There were 477,922 adults (18–64 years old) dispensed a new LABA during 2003–2012. Among LABA initiators, patients who initiated an SI-LABA and who did “not” have an ACM dispensed on the same date decreased from >9% in 2003 (the initial labeling change) to <2% post 2010 DSCs (p-value <0.0001 in the segmented regression model). The proportion of asthma patients dispensed an ICS in 6 months prior to initiating LABA treatment did not increase. The proportion of patients with longer than 4 months of continuous treatment did not decrease over the study period. Conclusion Although the decrease in SI-LABA initiation is consistent with FDA’s recommendations, low ICS dispensing before initiating a LABA and LABA continuation practices require further efforts to move toward the recommended safe practices. PMID:28356763

  11. US Food and Drug Administration-mandated trials of long-acting β-agonists safety in asthma: will we know the answer?

    PubMed

    Suissa, Samy; Ariel, Amnon

    2013-05-01

    For 2 decades, long-acting β-agonists (LABAs) have been associated with increased asthma-related death risks in several randomized trials, even when added to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). In reaction, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently mandated that the manufacturers of LABAs conduct five large, noninferiority, randomized trials of the LABA+ICS combination in 53,000 patients with asthma. Three methodologic issues in these trials could lead to masking of or falsely detecting elevated risks. First, the effect of LABA discontinuation among the many patients already using these drugs at enrollment can result in an underestimation of the relative risk by a factor of around 20%. This effect will bias downward the upper bound of the resulting CI away from the preset noninferiority margin of 2.0 for the relative risk, artificially making it more difficult to detect a risk increase. Second, the composite asthma outcome will be dominated by asthma hospitalization, possibly dwarfing an increased risk of asthma-related death, with differences as wide as seven deaths under the LABA+ICS combination vs one death under ICS alone remaining statistically uncertain. Finally, because of the multiple identical trials being requested from the different manufacturers of LABAs, even if each trial is powered at 90%, there is a 41% likelihood that at least one of the trials will not rule out a risk increase when, in truth, there is no risk increase. In view of these impediments, the FDA should preempt such complexities by establishing decision rules regarding the interpretation of the results from these momentous safety trials before their completion, expected in 2017.

  12. Altered transport and metabolism of phenolic compounds in obesity and diabetes: implications for functional food development and assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interest in application of phenolic compounds from diet or supplements for prevention of chronic diseases has grown significantly, but efficacy of such approaches in humans is largely dependent on the bioavailability and metabolism of these compounds. While food and dietary factors have been the foc...

  13. Application of ozonated dry ice (AligalTM Blue Ice) for packaging and transport in the food industry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of ozone contained in dry ice pellets (ALIGALTM Blue Ice; ABI) was investigated for microbial reduction in air, and on food contact surfaces and meat products. Dry ice is used by meat and poultry processors for temperature reduction during processing and for temperature maintenance durin...

  14. Food deprivation increases alpha(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated modulation of jejunal epithelial transport in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Teixeira, V; Vieira-Coelho, M A; Serrão, M P; Soares-da-Silva, P

    2000-10-01

    This study examined the effect of food deprivation on the jejunal response to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor activation in young (20-d-old) and adult (60-d-old) rats, using short-circuit (I(sc)) measurements in the absence or presence of furosemide (1 mmol/L). The effect of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation by 5-bromo-N:-(4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK 14,304; 0.3-3000 nmol/L) was a concentration-dependent decrease in I(sc) with similar half-maximal effective concentration (EC(50); 12.3 +/- 1.1 vs. 9.6 +/- 1.1 nmol/L) and maximal effect (E(max); 70.6 +/- 6.9 vs. 80.6 +/- 4.5% of reduction) values in adult food-deprived and fed rats. The effect of UK 14,304 on I(sc) in fed and food-deprived rats was markedly (P: < 0.05) attenuated by furosemide (1 mmol/L). E(max) values for UK 14,304 in 20-d-old food-deprived rats were higher (P: < 0.05) than those observed in fed rats (93.3 +/- 3.3 vs. 67.0 +/- 11.3% of reduction), without differences in EC(50) values. The effect of UK 14,304 on I(sc) in 20-d-old fed rats was completely abolished by furosemide (1 mmol/L). In food-deprived young rats, the effect of UK 14,304 was also markedly (P: < 0.05) antagonized by furosemide, but not completely abolished. Specific [(3)H]-rauwolscine binding in membranes from jejunal epithelial cells revealed the presence of a single class of binding sites, with an apparent K:(D) in the low nmol/L range. In 20-d-old food-deprived rats, specific [(3)H]-rauwolscine binding was markedly increased, and this was reversed by refeeding. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in isolated jejunal epithelial cells from 60-d-old fed rats was twice that in 20-d-old fed rats [117 +/- 14 vs. 52 +/- 5 nmol free inorganic phosphorus/(mg protein.min)]. Food deprivation in adult rats, but not in 20-d-old rats, was accompanied by a significant decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. In both young and adult rats (fed and food-deprived), UK 14,304 did not affect Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. In conclusion, food

  15. EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PM 2.5 FEDERAL REFERENCE METHOD TO DIFFERENTIATE FINE AND COARSE MODE AEROSOL (A RESPONSE TO SECTION 6102(E) OF THE TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ACT FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is submitted in response to Section 6102(e) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, which states:

    "The Administrator shall conduct a field study of the ability of the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method to differentiate those particles that ...

  16. Application of ozonated dry ice (ALIGAL TM Blue Ice) for packaging and transport in the food industry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of ozone contained in dry ice pellets (ALIGALTM Blue Ice) was investigated for microbial reduction in air and on glass surfaces and meat products. Dry ice is used by meat and poultry processors for temperature reduction during processing and temperature maintenance during transportation. ...

  17. National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule and interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-29

    This rule adopts as final, with some modifications, the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program regulations set forth in the interim final rule published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2013. The requirements addressed in this rule conform to the provisions in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 regarding nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools, other than food sold under the lunch and breakfast programs. Most provisions of this final rule were implemented on July 1, 2014, a full year subsequent to publication of the interim final rule. This was in compliance with section 208 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which required that State and local educational agencies have at least one full school year from the date of publication of the interim final rule to implement the competitive food provisions. Based on comments received on the interim final rule and implementation experience, this final rule makes a few modifications to the nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools implemented on July 1, 2014. In addition, this final rule codifies specific policy guidance issued after publication of the interim rule. Finally, this rule retains the provision related to the standard for total fat as interim and requests further comment on this single standard.

  18. Potential food contaminants and associated health risks.

    PubMed

    Peshin, Sharda Shah; Lall, Shyam Bala; Gupta, Suresh Kumar

    2002-03-01

    The potential toxicants in food are derived from natural or industrial sources. Compounds like lectins and glycoalkaloids that are toxic to man are naturally present in some vegetables like potatoes or legumes. A wide variety of marine toxins mostly produced by dinoflagellates occurring secondarily in molluscs and mussels are usually ingested by human beings causing poisoning. On the other hand, toxic compounds find their way into food during manufacture, storage, or transportation. These include largely the industrial contaminants, persistent organic pollutants (POP), pesticides, heavy metals, and toxins of fungal and bacterial origin. Further, toxic compounds like higher alcohols may be produced as byproducts during processing. Migration of compounds from packaging materials into packaged food like contamination with lead from solder in certain metal cans is well known. Additives (emulsifiers, preservatives, and antioxidants) could also influence the quality of foods. Solvent residues may find their way into food as a result of their use in extraction processes like the use of trichloroethylene and methylene chloride in decaffeination of coffee. In addition, poor hygiene, storage, and preparation may also lead to food contamination by various microbes and ova or cysts of nematodes. The problem of food contamination can be overcome to a great extent by regular surveillance and monitoring programmes and strict implementation of food and adulteration act. In the present review some of these aspects of food contamination have been discussed in detail.

  19. Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Ayotte, Kelly [R-NH

    2013-12-20

    Senate - 11/17/2014 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 599. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2719, which became Public Law 113-245 on 12/18/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Ayotte, Kelly [R-NH

    2013-12-20

    11/17/2014 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 599. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2719, which became Public Law 113-245 on 12/18/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Ayotte, Kelly [R-NH

    2013-12-20

    11/17/2014 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 599. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2719, which became Public Law 113-245 on 12/18/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Accessible Transportation for All Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Harkin, Tom [D-IA

    2014-09-18

    09/18/2014 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance. (text of measure as introduced: CR S5790-5792) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. [On improvement of the mechanism for establishing and changing indicators of quality and food safety in the regulatory and legal acts of the Eurasian Economical Union].

    PubMed

    Arnautov, O V

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with the Treaty on the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) to ensure the sanitary and epidemiological welfare of the population within the Union, a coordinated policy in agreed policy in the sphere of application of sanitary measures is carried out. Sanitary measures are the obligatory requirements and procedures, including requirements for the final product, processing methods, production, transportation, storage and disposal, sampling procedures, methods of research (tests), risk assessment, the state registration, requirements for packaging directly aimed at ensuring the safety of products (goods) in order to protect human welfare, and they should be applied on the basis having a scientific explanation, and only to the extent that is necessary to protect human welfare. Sanitary measures applied within the Union should be based on international and regional standards, guidelines and (or) the recommendations, except when they based on appropriate scientific studies and explanations. In this case sanitary measures which could provide a higher level of sanitary protection are introduced. At present, the mechanism of the development, justification and approval of common sanitary and epidemiological requirements (ESR) and procedures of the Eurasian Economic Commission (the Commission) is not installed. The absence of a clear mechanism for the development, approval and implementation of the ESR to the products (goods) on the basis having a scientific explanation on the one hand could lead to the creation of unjustified barriers to foreign and mutual trade, on the other--to weaken the level of safety for human life and health of products (goods) placed on markets of the Union. In order to bring the regulatory legal acts of the Customs Union in accordance with the Treaty on the Eurasian Economic Union the Commission in cooperation with the competent authorities of the Member States in the field of sanitary and epidemiological welfare developed the project of

  4. The influence of transport phenomena during high-pressure processing of packed food on the uniformity of enzyme inactivation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Chr; Delgado, A

    2003-06-20

    Here we deal with the influence of heat-transport effects on a high-pressure-induced enzyme inactivation in packed substances. Special attention is given to the influence of the geometrical scale and to the heat-transfer characteristics of the packaging material. The investigation is based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulation. The method accounts both for compression phase and holding phase. The model includes convective and conductive heat transfer, fluid motion as well as an enzyme transport equation with a first-order kinetic source term accounting for the inactivation. Three configurations with a total volume of 0.8 L, 6.3 L, and 50.3 L are considered. The pressure medium is water. The enzyme solution is B. subtilis alpha-amylase dissolved in a TRIS-HCl-buffer. The packaging material is polypropylene. The heat-transfer coefficient for conduction through the packaging material is varied to simulate both changes in the material properties as well as modifications of the packaging material thickness. It is found that the efficiency of the inactivation increases with increasing chamber volume as long as the kinetic inactivation constant is increasing with temperature. In the considered case the activity retention obtained in a 0.8 L volume is about 2.4 times larger than the one obtained for the same process carried out in a 50.3 L volume. Furthermore, it was found that the properties of the packaging material could induce a significant degree of nonuniformity (worst case = 69%). An appropriate choice of the material can lead to maximum inactivation and maximum process uniformity since advantage is taken from the slow heat exchange after the compression phase.

  5. 7 CFR 1260.128 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Act. 1260.128 Section 1260.128 Agriculture... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.128 Act. Act means the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985, Title XVI, Subtitle A of the Food Security Act of 1985, Pub. L. 99-198 and any amendments thereto. ...

  6. 7 CFR 1260.128 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Act. 1260.128 Section 1260.128 Agriculture... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.128 Act. Act means the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985, Title XVI, Subtitle A of the Food Security Act of 1985, Pub. L. 99-198 and any amendments thereto. ...

  7. 7 CFR 1260.128 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Act. 1260.128 Section 1260.128 Agriculture... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.128 Act. Act means the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985, Title XVI, Subtitle A of the Food Security Act of 1985, Pub. L. 99-198 and any amendments thereto. ...

  8. 7 CFR 1260.128 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Act. 1260.128 Section 1260.128 Agriculture... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.128 Act. Act means the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985, Title XVI, Subtitle A of the Food Security Act of 1985, Pub. L. 99-198 and any amendments thereto. ...

  9. 7 CFR 1260.128 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1260.128 Section 1260.128 Agriculture... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.128 Act. Act means the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985, Title XVI, Subtitle A of the Food Security Act of 1985, Pub. L. 99-198 and any amendments thereto. ...

  10. Altered Transport and Metabolism of Phenolic Compounds in Obesity and Diabetes: Implications for Functional Food Development and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Redan, Benjamin W; Buhman, Kimberly K; Novotny, Janet A; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2016-11-01

    Interest in the application of phenolic compounds from the diet or supplements for the prevention of chronic diseases has grown substantially, but the efficacy of such approaches in humans is largely dependent on the bioavailability and metabolism of these compounds. Although food and dietary factors have been the focus of intense investigation, the impact of disease states such as obesity or diabetes on their absorption, metabolism, and eventual efficacy is important to consider. These factors must be understood in order to develop effective strategies that leverage bioactive phenolic compounds for the prevention of chronic disease. The goal of this review is to discuss the inducible metabolic systems that may be influenced by disease states and how these effects impact the bioavailability and metabolism of dietary phenolic compounds. Because current studies generally report that obesity and/or diabetes alter the absorption and excretion of these compounds, this review includes a description of the absorption, conjugation, and excretion pathways for phenolic compounds and how they are potentially altered in disease states. A possible mechanism that will be discussed related to the modulation of phenolic bioavailability and metabolism may be linked to increased inflammatory status from increased amounts of adipose tissue or elevated plasma glucose concentrations. Although more studies are needed, the translation of benefits derived from dietary phenolic compounds to individuals with obesity or diabetes may require the consideration of dosing strategies or be accompanied by adjunct therapies to improve the bioavailability of these compounds.

  11. 7 CFR 278.6 - Disqualification of retail food stores and wholesale food concerns, and imposition of civil money...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to comply with the Food Stamp Act of 1977, as amended, or this part. Such disqualification shall... B as specified in the Food Stamp Act of 1977, as amended; (D) Annual staple food sales; (E) Total... that the following acts are prohibited and are in violation of the Food Stamp Act and regulations: the...

  12. Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): non-discretionary funding provisions of the William F. Goodling Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 1998. Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-12-06

    This final rule incorporates into the WIC program regulations numerous non-discretionary funding provisions mandated in the William F. Goodling Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 1998. This rule revises and expands backspend and spendforward authority, conversion of funds, multipurpose/infrastructure grants and the use of food funds for the purchase of breast pumps. The rule also revises nutrition services and administration expenditure standards and expands the timing for the use of vendor and participant collections. The provisions in this rule provide greater flexibility for State agencies in the operation of WIC program relating to funds management.

  13. 49 CFR 215.7 - Prohibited acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prohibited acts. 215.7 Section 215.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS General § 215.7 Prohibited acts....

  14. 49 CFR 215.7 - Prohibited acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibited acts. 215.7 Section 215.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS General § 215.7 Prohibited acts....

  15. 49 CFR 215.7 - Prohibited acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prohibited acts. 215.7 Section 215.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS General § 215.7 Prohibited acts....

  16. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, rs25531) influences the analgesic response to the short acting opioid Remifentanil in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Eva; Jensen, Karin B; Lonsdorf, Tina B; Schalling, Martin; Ingvar, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background There is evidence from animal studies that serotonin (5-HT) can influence the antinociceptive effects of opioids at the spinal cord level. Therefore, there could be an influence of genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system on individual variability in response to opioid treatment of pain. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is a key regulator of serotonin metabolism and availability and its gene harbors several known polymorphisms that are known to affect 5-HTT expression (e.g. 5-HTTLPR, rs25531). The aim of this study was to investigate if the triallelic 5-HTTLPR influences pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. 43 healthy volunteers (12 men, 31 women, mean age 26 years) underwent heat pain stimulations before and after intravenous injection of Remifentanil; a rapid and potent opioid drug acting on μ-type receptors. Subjects rated their perceived pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). All participants were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR and the rs25531 polymorphism. We recruited by advertising, with no history of drug abuse, chronic pain or psychiatric disorders. Results At baseline, there was no difference in pain ratings for the different triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype groups. However, the opiod drug had a differential analgesic effect depending on the triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype. Remifentanil had a significantly better analgesic effect in individuals with a genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression (SA/SA and SA/LG) as compared to those with high expression(LA/LA), p < 0.02. The analgesic effect for the three different genotype groups was linear to degree of 5-HTT expression. Conclusion This is the first report showing an influence of the triallelic 5-HTTLPR on pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. Previously the 5-HTTLPR s-allele has been associated with higher risk of developing chronic pain conditions but in this study we show that the genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression is associated with a

  17. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, rs25531) influences the analgesic response to the short acting opioid Remifentanil in humans.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Eva; Jensen, Karin B; Lonsdorf, Tina B; Schalling, Martin; Ingvar, Martin

    2009-07-01

    There is evidence from animal studies that serotonin (5-HT) can influence the antinociceptive effects of opioids at the spinal cord level. Therefore, there could be an influence of genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system on individual variability in response to opioid treatment of pain. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is a key regulator of serotonin metabolism and availability and its gene harbors several known polymorphisms that are known to affect 5-HTT expression (e.g. 5-HTTLPR, rs25531). The aim of this study was to investigate if the triallelic 5-HTTLPR influences pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. 43 healthy volunteers (12 men, 31 women, mean age 26 years) underwent heat pain stimulations before and after intravenous injection of Remifentanil; a rapid and potent opioid drug acting on micro-type receptors. Subjects rated their perceived pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). All participants were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR and the rs25531 polymorphism. We recruited by advertising, with no history of drug abuse, chronic pain or psychiatric disorders. At baseline, there was no difference in pain ratings for the different triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype groups. However, the opiod drug had a differential analgesic effect depending on the triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype. Remifentanil had a significantly better analgesic effect in individuals with a genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression (SA/SA and SA/LG) as compared to those with high expression(LA/LA), p < 0.02. The analgesic effect for the three different genotype groups was linear to degree of 5-HTT expression. This is the first report showing an influence of the triallelic 5-HTTLPR on pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. Previously the 5-HTTLPR s-allele has been associated with higher risk of developing chronic pain conditions but in this study we show that the genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression is associated with a better analgesic effect of an

  18. H. R. 4394: a bill to amend the Price-Anderson provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to establish liability and indemnification for nuclear incidents arising out of federal storage, disposal, and related transportation of radioactive waste. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 12, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Federal Radioactive Waste Liability Act of 1986 (H.R. 4394) amends the Price-Anderson Act so that the federal government assumes responsibility for compensation of liability claims resulting from nuclear incidents involving federal radioactive wastes. The Act corrects the fact that the 1954 Atomic Energy Act did not provide for claims arising from the storage, disposal, or transport of federal radioactive wastes. The legislation provides for payments from the Nuclear Waste Fund of $5 billion for any one incident.

  19. The Use of the Hanford Onsite Packaging and Transportation Safety Program to Meet Cleanup Milestones Under the Hanford Site Cleanup 2015 Vision and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 - 12403

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, John C.; Edwards, W. Scott; Macbeth, Paul J.; Self, Richard J.; West, Lori D.

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Site presents unique challenges in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) 2015 Cleanup Vision. CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), its subcontractors, and DOE-RL were challenged to retrieve, transport and remediate a wide range of waste materials. Through a collaborative effort by all Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members, disposition pathways for diverse and seemingly impossible to ship wastes were developed under a DOE Order 460.1C-compliant Hanford Onsite Transportation Safety Program. The team determined an effective method for transporting oversized compliant waste payloads to processing and disposition facilities. The use of the onsite TSD packaging authorizations proved to be vital to safely transporting these materials for processing and eventual final disposition. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) provided additional resources to expedite planning and execution of these important cleanup milestones. Through the innovative and creative use of the TSD, the Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members have developed and are executing an integrated project plan that enables the safe and compliant transport of a wide variety of difficult-to-transport waste items, accelerating previous cleanup schedules to meet cleanup milestones. (authors)

  20. Food Safety and Raw Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Food Safety Food Safety Modernization Act Raw Milk Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir RAW MILK ... Decide? Questions & Answers Outbreak Studies Resources & Publications Raw Milk Infographic [PDF – 1 page] More Resources 5 Raw ...

  1. 77 FR 67820 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of a New System of Records; Food and Drug Administration User Fee System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... implementing regulations. The records kept in this system relate to fees assessed under the Freedom of... records fall under GRS 20, Items 2a(4) (hard copy input records), 12 and 16 (Output records and reports... Act Coordinator, Division of Freedom of Information, 12420 Parklawn Dr., ELEM-1036, Rockville,...

  2. [The Patterns of Behavior of Radioactive Particles in the Food Chain of Cattle and Transport in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Animals].

    PubMed

    Kozmin, G V; Yepimakhov, V G

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the patterns of behavior of polydisperse radioactive silicate particles in the components of the food chain of cattle is presented. It is shown that the composition of the size distribution of radioactive particles taken into animal organisms differs from the original composition of the particles deposited on the surface of pasture vegetation, and from dispersion of the particles in the aboveground biomass of vegetation at the time of grazing. The intake of particles into animal organisms is reduced with the increase of their size, and for the particle fraction of 400-800 microns it is about 10 times less than for the fine fraction (< 100 microns). The mathematical compartment model ofthe transport of polydisperse radioactive particles in the digestive tract of cattle has been developed. It is found that the elimination rate of radioactive particles from the animal organism depends on their sizes. Deposition of particles on the fundic surface of the wall ventral sac of rumen and reticulum as well as their long stay in comparison with the chyme in abomasum was noted. The maximum levels of irradiation are formed in these parts of the digestive tract of cattle.

  3. Leucine acts in the brain to suppress food intake but does not function as a physiological signal of low dietary protein

    PubMed Central

    Laeger, Thomas; Reed, Scott D.; Henagan, Tara M.; Fernandez, Denise H.; Taghavi, Marzieh; Addington, Adele; Münzberg, Heike; Martin, Roy J.; Hutson, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular injections of leucine are sufficient to suppress food intake, but it remains unclear whether brain leucine signaling represents a physiological signal of protein balance. We tested whether variations in dietary and circulating levels of leucine, or all three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), contribute to the detection of reduced dietary protein. Of the essential amino acids (EAAs) tested, only intracerebroventricular injection of leucine (10 μg) was sufficient to suppress food intake. Isocaloric low- (9% protein energy; LP) or normal- (18% protein energy) protein diets induced a divergence in food intake, with an increased consumption of LP beginning on day 2 and persisting throughout the study (P < 0.05). Circulating BCAA levels were reduced the day after LP diet exposure, but levels subsequently increased and normalized by day 4, despite persistent hyperphagia. Brain BCAA levels as measured by microdialysis on day 2 of diet exposure were reduced in LP rats, but this effect was most prominent postprandially. Despite these diet-induced changes in BCAA levels, reducing dietary leucine or total BCAAs independently from total protein was neither necessary nor sufficient to induce hyperphagia, while chronic infusion of EAAs into the brain of LP rats failed to consistently block LP-induced hyperphagia. Collectively, these data suggest that circulating BCAAs are transiently reduced by dietary protein restriction, but variations in dietary or brain BCAAs alone do not explain the hyperphagia induced by a low-protein diet. PMID:24898843

  4. Leucine acts in the brain to suppress food intake but does not function as a physiological signal of low dietary protein.

    PubMed

    Laeger, Thomas; Reed, Scott D; Henagan, Tara M; Fernandez, Denise H; Taghavi, Marzieh; Addington, Adele; Münzberg, Heike; Martin, Roy J; Hutson, Susan M; Morrison, Christopher D

    2014-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular injections of leucine are sufficient to suppress food intake, but it remains unclear whether brain leucine signaling represents a physiological signal of protein balance. We tested whether variations in dietary and circulating levels of leucine, or all three branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), contribute to the detection of reduced dietary protein. Of the essential amino acids (EAAs) tested, only intracerebroventricular injection of leucine (10 μg) was sufficient to suppress food intake. Isocaloric low- (9% protein energy; LP) or normal- (18% protein energy) protein diets induced a divergence in food intake, with an increased consumption of LP beginning on day 2 and persisting throughout the study (P < 0.05). Circulating BCAA levels were reduced the day after LP diet exposure, but levels subsequently increased and normalized by day 4, despite persistent hyperphagia. Brain BCAA levels as measured by microdialysis on day 2 of diet exposure were reduced in LP rats, but this effect was most prominent postprandially. Despite these diet-induced changes in BCAA levels, reducing dietary leucine or total BCAAs independently from total protein was neither necessary nor sufficient to induce hyperphagia, while chronic infusion of EAAs into the brain of LP rats failed to consistently block LP-induced hyperphagia. Collectively, these data suggest that circulating BCAAs are transiently reduced by dietary protein restriction, but variations in dietary or brain BCAAs alone do not explain the hyperphagia induced by a low-protein diet.

  5. Product Attributes and Purchasing Behaviour: How Parents' Food Choices Can Act on Their Children's BMI? Empirical Evidence from a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Telese, Antonietta; Scarpato, Debora; Rotondo, Giacomo; Simeone, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    Given the epidemic proportions and economic costs associated with nutrition related diseases in Western countries, an empirical study was carried-out between September and December 2014 in Campania, the Italian region with the highest prevalence of obese children. The survey was conducted in a secondary school and involved 145 children, aged 11 to 14, and their parents, with the ultimate aim of studying the relationship between the behaviour of parents regarding the use of nutrition labels, the attention to product quality and the body weight of their children. The results from our study showed that unhealthy diet concerned stems from the misguided food choices of their parents, who are responsible for their children's dietary habits, lifestyle and body weight. In order to incentivise adults and young people to change their food choices and eating behaviour in favour of healthy and sustainable lifestyles, some useful measures could involve the improvement of political marketing and advertising, labelling clarity and better information and awareness campaigns to do sport and eat healthily. Finally some recent patents related to healthy reformulated food products and communication strategies, with specific regard to healthy eating, have been reviewed.

  6. Potential Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin: a Modeling Investigation Using CMAQ and SWAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been extensive analysis of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) regulation impacts to changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition; however, few studies have focused on watershed nitrogen transfer particularly regarding long-term predictions. In this study, we investigated impa...

  7. Potential Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin: a Modeling Investigation Using CMAQ and SWAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been extensive analysis of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) regulation impacts to changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition; however, few studies have focused on watershed nitrogen transfer particularly regarding long-term predictions. In this study, we investigated impa...

  8. 21 CFR 130.20 - Food additives proposed for use in foods for which definitions and standards of identity are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food additives proposed for use in foods for which...: GENERAL Food Additives in Standardized Foods § 130.20 Food additives proposed for use in foods for which... the act, which proposes the inclusion of a food additive in such definition and standard of identity...

  9. 21 CFR 130.20 - Food additives proposed for use in foods for which definitions and standards of identity are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food additives proposed for use in foods for which...: GENERAL Food Additives in Standardized Foods § 130.20 Food additives proposed for use in foods for which... the act, which proposes the inclusion of a food additive in such definition and standard of identity...

  10. 21 CFR 130.20 - Food additives proposed for use in foods for which definitions and standards of identity are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food additives proposed for use in foods for which...: GENERAL Food Additives in Standardized Foods § 130.20 Food additives proposed for use in foods for which... the act, which proposes the inclusion of a food additive in such definition and standard of identity...

  11. 21 CFR 130.20 - Food additives proposed for use in foods for which definitions and standards of identity are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food additives proposed for use in foods for which...: GENERAL Food Additives in Standardized Foods § 130.20 Food additives proposed for use in foods for which... the act, which proposes the inclusion of a food additive in such definition and standard of identity...

  12. 21 CFR 130.20 - Food additives proposed for use in foods for which definitions and standards of identity are...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food additives proposed for use in foods for which...: GENERAL Food Additives in Standardized Foods § 130.20 Food additives proposed for use in foods for which... the act, which proposes the inclusion of a food additive in such definition and standard of identity...

  13. Understanding the Tobacco Control Act: efforts by the US Food and Drug Administration to make tobacco-related morbidity and mortality part of the USA's past, not its future.

    PubMed

    Husten, Corinne G; Deyton, Lawrence R

    2013-05-04

    The USA has a rich history of public health efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality from tobacco use. Comprehensive tobacco-prevention programmes, when robustly implemented, reduce the prevalence of youth and adult smoking, decrease cigarette consumption, accelerate declines in tobacco-related deaths, and diminish health-care costs from tobacco-related diseases. Effective public health interventions include raising the price of tobacco products, smoke-free policies, counter-marketing campaigns, advertising restrictions, augmenting access to treatment for tobacco use through insurance coverage and telephone help lines, and comprehensive approaches to prevent children and adolescents from accessing tobacco products. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has six major areas of regulatory authority: regulation of tobacco products; regulation of the advertising, marketing, and promotion of tobacco products; regulation of the distribution and sales of tobacco products; enforcement of the provisions of the Tobacco Control Act and tobacco regulations; regulatory science to support FDA authorities and activities; and public education about the harms of tobacco products and to support FDA regulatory actions. With passing of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act) in June, 2009, important new regulatory approaches were added to the tobacco prevention and control arsenal.

  14. Privacy Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the Privacy Act of 1974, the Electronic Government Act of 2002, the Federal Information Security Management Act, and other information about the Environmental Protection Agency maintains its records.

  15. Dietitians: experts about food systems?

    PubMed

    Klitzke, C

    1997-10-01

    Dietary advice that promotes optimal nutrition presupposes adequate land for growing food, environmental quality conducive to food production, stable government, a strong economy, and community food security (or a reliable transportation system). Without these conditions, recommendations for optimal nutrition become moot. Our profession will be strengthened as we develop a broad knowledge of our entire food system.

  16. Obstetric Transport.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julie

    2016-12-01

    Obstetric transport is a specialized medical transport for maternal, fetal, and neonatal concerns. Perinatal regionalization of care provides a broader geographic availability of obstetric services with defined levels of maternal and neonatal care so that women can be transported to centers with increased resources and capabilities to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act provides regulatory guidance for care of laboring women who require transfer to a higher level of care. The Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation communication can identify key pieces of medical information with recommendations given for mutual expectations of next steps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 49 CFR 826.2 - When the Act applies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When the Act applies. 826.2 Section 826.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD RULES IMPLEMENTING THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT OF 1980 General Provisions § 826.2 When the Act...

  18. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    An active controls technology (ACT) system architecture was selected based on current technology system elements and optimal control theory was evaluated for use in analyzing and synthesizing ACT multiple control laws. The system selected employs three redundant computers to implement all of the ACT functions, four redundant smaller computers to implement the crucial pitch-augmented stability function, and a separate maintenance and display computer. The reliability objective of probability of crucial function failure of less than 1 x 10 to the -9th power per flight of 1 hr can be met with current technology system components, if the software is assumed fault free and coverage approaching 1.0 can be provided. The optimal control theory approach to ACT control law synthesis yielded comparable control law performance much more systematically and directly than the classical s-domain approach. The ACT control law performance, although somewhat degraded by the inclusion of representative nonlinearities, remained quite effective. Certain high-frequency gust-load alleviation functions may require increased surface rate capability.

  19. Triheptanoin for glucose transporter type I deficiency (G1D): modulation of human ictogenesis, cerebral metabolic rate, and cognitive indices by a food supplement.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Juan M; Liu, Peiying; Mao, Deng; Kelly, Dorothy I; Hernandez, Ana; Sheng, Min; Good, Levi B; Ma, Qian; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Zhang, Xuchen; Park, Jason Y; Hynan, Linda S; Stavinoha, Peter; Roe, Charles R; Lu, Hanzhang

    2014-10-01

    Disorders of brain metabolism are multiform in their mechanisms and manifestations, many of which remain insufficiently understood and are thus similarly treated. Glucose transporter type I deficiency (G1D) is commonly associated with seizures and with electrographic spike-waves. The G1D syndrome has long been attributed to energy (ie, adenosine triphosphate synthetic) failure such as that consequent to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate depletion. Indeed, glucose and other substrates generate TCAs via anaplerosis. However, TCAs are preserved in murine G1D, rendering energy-failure inferences premature and suggesting a different hypothesis, also grounded on our work, that consumption of alternate TCA precursors is stimulated and may be detrimental. Second, common ketogenic diets lead to a therapeutically counterintuitive reduction in blood glucose available to the G1D brain and prove ineffective in one-third of patients. To identify the most helpful outcomes for treatment evaluation and to uphold (rather than diminish) blood glucose concentration and stimulate the TCA cycle, including anaplerosis, in G1D using the medium-chain, food-grade triglyceride triheptanoin. Unsponsored, open-label cases series conducted in an academic setting. Fourteen children and adults with G1D who were not receiving a ketogenic diet were selected on a first-come, first-enrolled basis. Supplementation of the regular diet with food-grade triheptanoin. First, we show that, regardless of electroencephalographic spike-waves, most seizures are rarely visible, such that perceptions by patients or others are inadequate for treatment evaluation. Thus, we used quantitative electroencephalographic, neuropsychological, blood analytical, and magnetic resonance imaging cerebral metabolic rate measurements. One participant (7%) did not manifest spike-waves; however, spike-waves promptly decreased by 70% (P = .001) in the other participants after consumption of triheptanoin. In addition, the

  20. Food safety.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea; Teuber, Suzanne S; Keen, Carl L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-10-01

    affects the development of the central nervous system and the male reproductive organs. Genetically modified foods present new challenges to regulatory agencies around the world because consumer fears that the possible health risks of these foods have not been allayed. An emerging threat to food safety possibly comes from the increasing use of nanomaterials, which are already used in packaging materials, even though their toxicity remains largely unexplored. Numerous scientific groups have underscored the importance of addressing this issue and developing the necessary tools for doing so. Governmental agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration and other agencies in the USA and their counterparts in other nations have the increasingly difficult task of monitoring the food supply for these chemicals and determining the human health risks associated with exposure to these substances. The approach taken until recently focused on one chemical at a time and one exposure route (oral, inhalational, dermal) at a time. It is increasingly recognized, however, that many of the numerous chemicals we are exposed to everyday are ubiquitous, resulting in exposure from food, water, air, dust, and soil. In addition, many of these chemicals act on the same target tissue by similar mechanisms. "Mixture toxicology" is a rapidly growing science that addresses the complex interactions between chemicals and investigates the effects of cumulative exposure to such "common mechanism groups" of chemicals. It is to be hoped that this results in a deeper understanding of the risks we face from multiple concurrent exposures and makes our food supply safer.

  1. 7 CFR 1220.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1220.101 Section 1220.101 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.101 Act. The term Act means the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act, subtitle E of title XIX, of the Food...

  2. 7 CFR 1220.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Act. 1220.101 Section 1220.101 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.101 Act. The term Act means the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act, subtitle E of title XIX, of the Food...

  3. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Act. 1220.600 Section 1220.600 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the Soybean, Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act set forth in title XIX, subtitle E, of the Food...

  4. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Act. 1220.600 Section 1220.600 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the Soybean, Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act set forth in title XIX, subtitle E, of the Food...

  5. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1220.600 Section 1220.600 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the Soybean, Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act set forth in title XIX, subtitle E, of the Food...

  6. 7 CFR 1220.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Act. 1220.101 Section 1220.101 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.101 Act. The term Act means the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act, subtitle E of title XIX, of the Food...

  7. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Act. 1220.600 Section 1220.600 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the Soybean, Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act set forth in title XIX, subtitle E, of the Food...

  8. 7 CFR 1220.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Act. 1220.101 Section 1220.101 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.101 Act. The term Act means the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act, subtitle E of title XIX, of the Food...

  9. 7 CFR 1220.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Act. 1220.101 Section 1220.101 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.101 Act. The term Act means the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act, subtitle E of title XIX, of the Food...

  10. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Act. 1220.600 Section 1220.600 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the Soybean, Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act set forth in title XIX, subtitle E, of the Food...

  11. Evaluation of PepT1 transport of food-derived antihypertensive peptides, Ile-Pro-Pro and Leu-Lys-Pro using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo transport models.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, John P; Brayden, David J; Ryan, Sinéad M

    2017-06-01

    Ile-Pro-Pro (IPP) and Leu-Lys-Pro (LKP) are food-derived antihypertensive peptides which inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and may have potential to attenuate hypertension. There is debate over their mechanism of uptake across small intestinal epithelia, but paracellular and PepT1 carrier-mediated uptake are thought to be important routes. The aim of this study was to determine their routes of intestinal permeability using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo intestinal models. The presence of an apical side pH of 6.5 (mimicking the intestinal acidic microclimate) and of Gly-Sar (a high affinity competitive inhibitor and substrate for PepT1) were tested on the transepithelial apical to basolateral (A to B) transport of [(3)H]-IPP and [(3)H]-LKP across filter-grown Caco-2 monolayers in vitro and rat jejunal mucosae ex vivo. A buffer pH of 6.5 on the apical side enabled Gly-Sar to reduce the apparent permeability (Papp) of [(3)H]-IPP and [(3)H]-LKP, but this inhibition was not evident at an apical buffer pH of 7.4. Gly-Sar reduced the Papp across isolated jejunal mucosae and the area under the curve (AUC) in intra-jejunal instillations when the apical/luminal buffer pH was either 7.4 or 6.5. However, the jejunal surface acidic pH was maintained in rat jejunal tissue even when the apical side buffer pH was 7.4 due to the presence of the microclimate which is not present in monolayers. PepT1 expression was confirmed by immunofluorescence on monolayers and brush border of rat jejunal tissue. This data suggest that IPP and LKP are highly permeable and cross small intestinal epithelia in part by the PepT1 transporter, with an additional contribution from the paracellular route. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Transporting Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1998-01-01

    Under the 1973 Rehabilitation Act (Section 504) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, school districts must transport students with disabilities to a site providing a free, appropriate education in the least restrictive environment. This article discusses federal and state laws governing student transportation, including wheelchair…

  13. Recovery Act: 'Carbonsheds' as a Framework for Optimizing United States Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Pratson, Lincoln

    2012-11-30

    Carbonsheds are regions in which the estimated cost of transporting CO{sub 2} from any (plant) location in the region to the storage site it encompasses is cheaper than piping the CO{sub 2} to a storage site outside the region. We use carbonsheds to analyze the cost of transport and storage of CO{sub 2} in deploying CCS on land and offshore of the continental U.S. We find that onshore the average cost of transport and storage within carbonsheds is roughly $10/t when sources cooperate to reduce transport costs, with the costs increasing as storage options are depleted over time. Offshore transport and storage costs by comparison are found to be roughly twice as expensive but t may still be attractive because of easier access to property rights for sub-seafloor storage as well as a simpler regulatory system, and possibly lower MMV requirements, at least in the deep-ocean where pressures and temperatures would keep the CO{sub 2} negatively buoyant. Agent-based modeling of CCS deployment within carbonsheds under various policy scenarios suggests that the most cost-effective strategy at this point in time is to focus detailed geology characterization of storage potential on only the largest onshore reservoirs where the potential for mitigating emissions is greatest and the cost of storage appears that it will be among the cheapest.

  14. Children's Protection from Violent Programming Act. Report of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on S. 363. Senate, 105th Congress, 1st Session, Calendar No. 182.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

    Senate Bill 363 is designed to protect American children from the harm caused by viewing violence on television. The bill amends the Communications Act of 1934 to require that violent video programming be limited to broadcast after the hours when children are reasonably likely to comprise a substantial portion of the audience, unless it is…

  15. Bicycle Helmet Promotion Act. Report of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on S. 3096. 102d Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

    Senate Bill 3096 (S. 3096), the Bicycle Helmet Promotion Act, provides incentive grants to state and local governments that seek to promote the use of bicycle helmets by children under the age of 16. Between 1984 and 1988, a total of 4,815 Americans died and 2,830,475 suffered injuries requiring hospitalization as a result of accidents that…

  16. National Competitiveness Act of 1993. Report of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation together with Additional Views on S.4. 103d Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

    This report is a recommendation for passage of Senate bill S.4, the National Competitiveness Act of 1993, with an amendment. The purpose of this bill is to promote the industrial competitiveness and economic growth of the United States by strengthening and expanding the civilian technology programs of the Department of Commerce and amending the…

  17. 77 FR 20826 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This... Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act'' to the Division...

  18. Principle of solid food texture analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food texture reflects the human’s sensory perception of a food item when it is acted upon by force or deformation during mastication to cause changes or breakdown in the structure of the food. It is one major factor in quality evaluation and grading of solid foods. While food texture evaluation can ...

  19. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport is reported. Supplementary technical data on the following topics are included: (1) 1990's avionics technology assessment; (2) function criticality assessment; (3) flight deck system for total control and functional features list; (4) criticality and reliability assessment of units; (5) crew procedural function task analysis; and (6) recommendations for simulation mechanization.

  20. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).