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  1. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III; Hoeth, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This abstract describes work that will be done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in assessing the success of different model configurations in predicting "wind cycling" cases at Edwards Air Force Base, CA (EAFB), in which the wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model allows users to choose among two dynamical cores - the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) and the Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM). There are also data assimilation analysis packages available for the initialization of the WRF model - the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) and the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS). Having a series of initialization options and WRF cores, as well as many options within each core, creates challenges for local forecasters, such as determining which configuration options are best to address specific forecast concerns. The goal of this project is to assess the different configurations available and determine which configuration will best predict surface wind speed and direction at EAFB.

  2. CloudSat Preps for Launch at Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The CloudSat spacecraft sits encapsulated within its Boeing Delta launch vehicle dual payload attach fitting at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. CloudSat will share its ride to orbit late next month with NASA's CALIPSO spacecraft. The two spacecraft are designed to reveal the secrets of clouds and aerosols.

  3. 10. "TEST STAND 15, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STAND 1-5, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. 1958. Test Area 1-115. Original is a color print, showing Test Stand 1-5 from below, also showing the superstructure of TS1-4 at left. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph G.; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for space shuttle landings. As defined in the Flight Rules (FR), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings, and is required to issue surface average and 10-minute peak wind speed forecasts. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC; Lambert 2003). However, the shuttle occasionally may land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at KSC in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested a similar tool be developed for EAFB.

  5. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III

    2008-01-01

    NASA prefers to land the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). When weather conditions violate Flight Rules at KSC, NASA will usually divert the shuttle landing to Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in Southern California. But forecasting surface winds at EAFB is a challenge for the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) forecasters due to the complex terrain that surrounds EAFB, One particular phenomena identified by SMG is that makes it difficult to forecast the EAFB surface winds is called "wind cycling". This occurs when wind speeds and directions oscillate among towers near the EAFB runway leading to a challenging deorbit bum forecast for shuttle landings. The large-scale numerical weather prediction models cannot properly resolve the wind field due to their coarse horizontal resolutions, so a properly tuned high-resolution mesoscale model is needed. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model meets this requirement. The AMU assessed the different WRF model options to determine which configuration best predicted surface wind speed and direction at EAFB, To do so, the AMU compared the WRF model performance using two hot start initializations with the Advanced Research WRF and Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model dynamical cores and compared model performance while varying the physics options.

  6. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for Space Shuttle landings. As defined in the Shuttle Flight Rules (FRs), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMTJ) developed a personal computer based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak-wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. However, the shuttle must land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested that a similar tool be developed for EAFB. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel archived and performed quality control of 2-minute average and 10-minute peak wind speeds at each tower adjacent to the main runway at EAFB from 1997- 2004. They calculated wind climatologies and probabilities of average peak wind occurrence based on the average speed. The climatologies were calculated for each tower and month, and were stratified by hour, direction, and direction/hour. For the probabilities of peak wind occurrence, MSFC calculated empirical and modeled probabilities of meeting or exceeding specific 10-minute peak wind speeds using probability density functions. The AMU obtained and reformatted the data into Microsoft Excel PivotTables, which allows users to display different values with point-click-drag techniques. The GUT was then created from the PivotTables using Visual Basic for Applications code. The GUI is run through a macro within Microsoft Excel and allows forecasters to quickly display and

  7. Thermoelectromotive force in Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu4O11 bismuth-based high-temperature superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragimov, S. S.; Askerzade, I. N.

    2010-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the thermoemf in Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu4O11 bismuth-based high-temperature superconductors is studied. The thermoemf is positive at high temperatures ( T > 300 K) and negative at low temperatures. As the temperature decreases, the thermoemf reaches a maximum slightly above T c and then sharply drops to zero. The results can be explained in the framework of the two-band theory with a linear temperature term.

  8. 3. SOUTH SIDE. Edwards Air Force Base, South Base ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Methods for Manipulating CaF Using Optical Polychromatic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, Edward E.; Galica, Scott E.; Aldridge, Leland M.

    2013-06-01

    We are undertaking theoretical and experimental studies of laser deceleration and cooling of molecules using coherent multi-frequency optical forces. A primary objective is to reduce radiative loss into dark states when a pure two-level cycling transition is unavailable. The optical bichromatic force (BCF) can multiply the available velocity change for a given number of radiative cycles, by employing alternating cycles of excitation and stimulated emission from opposing directions. Tests in atomic helium show that when the BCF is combined with frequency chirping, very large decelerations are achieved. We report numerical studies of variations intended to further optimize deceleration, including a 4-color version. We describe progress on experimental tests using the 531 nm B ^2Σ^+leftrightarrow X ^2Σ^+ transition in CaF. We also describe low-cost lasers and electronics developed for these experiments. Several versatile new instruments are based on 32-bit microcontrollers, interfaced to an Android tablet that provides a touch-screen graphical interface. These include a timing/ramp generator, a PZT driver, a temperature controller, and even a phase-synchronized dual 35-4000 MHz rf synthesizer that fits on a 2 1/4" × 4 3/4" board. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation. M.A. Chieda and E.E. Eyler, Phys. Rev. A 86, 053415 (2012); also Phys. Rev. A 84, 063401 (2011).

  10. Optical Bichromatic Force on CaF Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, L.; Galica, S. E.; Sheets, D.; Eyler, E. E.

    2016-05-01

    The optical bichromatic force (BCF) is a coherent optical force which can be much stronger than saturated radiative forces. BCF has been experimentally demonstrated in atomic systems and has recently drawn attention as an option for deflecting or decelerating neutral molecular beams. We have devised a realistic numerical model for calcium monofluoride (CaF), including the full 16-level hyperfine structure of two rovibrational states and magnetic-field destabilization of coherent dark states. We show that BCF illumination of this system produces a force two orders of magnitude stronger than that achieved by radiative forces, and we find that the required parameters are experimentally realistic and are robust against small variations. A simplified simulation scheme that saves computational time at little expense to accuracy is also presented. Experimental tests on the B <--> X transition in CaF are underway in our laboratory, starting with transverse deflection of a supersonic molecular beam. In collaboration with the group of John Doyle, we are also looking into BCF on the triatomic SrOH molecule. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the University of Connecticut.

  11. Interior view Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  12. Interior, looking northwest Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking northwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  13. Exterior, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. Interior, looking northeast Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  15. Exterior, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  17. Interior Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Gate House, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Interior, looking northeast Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. Looking north Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  20. Interior, looking northeast Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  1. Missile Warning Operations Center (MWOC) Beale Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Missile Warning Operations Center (MWOC) - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  2. Interior, looking southeast Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking southeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Supply Warehouse, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Exterior, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Guard Tower, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  4. Interior, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Guard Tower, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  5. Exterior, looking north Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Supply Warehouse, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  6. Highbay Generator Room, looking northwest Beale Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Highbay Generator Room, looking northwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Power Plant, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  7. Exterior, detail, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, detail, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Power Plant, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  8. Exterior, looking southwest Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking southwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  9. 26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED TEST TRACK." Drawing No. 10-259. One inch to 400 feet plan of original 10,000-foot sled track. No date. No D.O. series number. No headings as above. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 76 FR 25548 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA in the Federal Register (74 FR 214). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...

  11. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17).

  12. [Forced Oscillations of DNA Bases].

    PubMed

    Yakushevich, L V; Krasnobaeva, L A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the studying of forced angular oscillations of the DNA bases with the help of the mathematical model consisting of two coupled nonlinear differential equations that take into account the effects of dissipation and the influence of an external periodic field. The calculation results are illustrated for sequence of gene encoding interferon alpha 17 (IFNA 17). PMID:27192830

  13. Effects of trimebutine on cytosolic Ca2+ and force transitions in intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Kobayashi, T; Tamaki, H

    1991-04-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on cytosolic free Ca2+ and force transitions in the guinea-pig taenia cecum were studied by fura-2 fluorometry and tension recording. The addition of 80 mM K+ induced a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension, followed by a sustained increase. Trimebutine (10 microM) suppressed both [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development. The tonic responses were more potently inhibited than the phasic responses. Phasic components gradually increased as the added K+ increased (10-40 mM). The relationship between the peak increases in [Ca2+]i and tension was not affected by trimebutine (10 microM). This means that trimebutine does not affect the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile elements. In a high K+ and Ca(2+)-free medium, carbachol (10 microM) or caffeine (30 mM) caused transient [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development in the smooth muscle. Trimebutine (10 microM) decreased the amplitude of both responses. Trimebutine (10 microM) inhibited the spontaneous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and motility of taenia cecum in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.3 microM). These results suggest that trimebutine has two types of inhibitory actions on intestinal smooth muscle; one, the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels, and the other, the inhibition of Ca2+ release from intracellular storage sites. PMID:1868878

  14. Store-operated Ca2+ entry and depolarization explain the anomalous behaviour of myometrial SR: Effects of SERCA inhibition on electrical activity, Ca2+ and force

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Debbie; Borysova, Lyudmyla; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, Theodor

    2014-01-01

    In the myometrium SR Ca2+ depletion promotes an increase in force but unlike several other smooth muscles, there is no Ca2+ sparks-STOCs coupling mechanism to explain this. Given the importance of the control of contractility for successful parturition, we have examined, in pregnant rat myometrium, the effects of SR Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) inhibition on the temporal relationship between action potentials, Ca2+ transients and force. Simultaneous recording of electrical activity, calcium and force showed that SERCA inhibition, by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA 20 μM), caused time-dependent changes in excitability, most noticeably depolarization and elevations of baseline [Ca2+]i and force. At the onset of these changes there was a prolongation of the bursts of action potentials and a corresponding series of Ca2+ spikes, which increased the amplitude and duration of contractions. As the rise of baseline Ca2+ and depolarization continued a point was reached when electrical and Ca2+ spikes and phasic contractions ceased, and a maintained, tonic force and Ca2+ was produced. Lanthanum, a non-selective blocker of store-operated Ca2+ entry, but not the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (1–10 μM), could abolish the maintained force and calcium. Application of the agonist, carbachol, produced similar effects to CPA, i.e. depolarization, elevation of force and calcium. A brief, high concentration of carbachol, to cause SR Ca2+ depletion without eliciting receptor-operated channel opening, also produced these results. The data obtained suggest that in pregnant rats SR Ca2+ release is coupled to marked Ca2+ entry, via store operated Ca2+ channels, leading to depolarization and enhanced electrical and mechanical activity. PMID:25084623

  15. Ca2+ Changes the Force Sensitivity of the Hair-Cell Transduction Channel

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Eunice L. M.; Corey, David P.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanically gated transduction channels of vertebrate hair cells tend to close in ∼1 ms after their activation by hair bundle deflection. This fast adaptation is correlated with a quick negative movement of the bundle (a “twitch”), which can exert force and may mediate an active mechanical amplification of sound stimuli in hearing organs. We used an optical trap to deflect bullfrog hair bundles and to measure bundle movement while controlling Ca2+ entry with a voltage clamp. The twitch elicited by repolarization of the cell varied with force applied to the bundle, going to zero where channels were all open or closed. The force dependence is quantitatively consistent with a model in which a Ca2+-bound channel requires ∼3 pN more force to open, and rules out other models for the site of Ca2+ action. In addition, we characterized a faster, voltage-dependent “flick”, which requires intact tip links but not current through transduction channels. PMID:16214875

  16. Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, COmbat Operations Center, Utility Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 57, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/57, Rev. "B"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966 "drawings updated." Various scales. 29 x 41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  17. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  20. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  1. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  2. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  3. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Supply Warehouse, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  4. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  5. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  6. Progress Toward Slowing and Cooling of CaF with Optical Bichromatic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, Edward E.; Chieda, Michael A.

    2012-06-01

    While rapid progress has been made on slowing and cooling of molecules by optical radiative forces, accepted (2012).} there remain major obstacles because molecules do not have true two-level cyling transitions -- eventually they are ``lost" to radiative decay into a dark state. The optical bichromatic force (BCF) can multiply the available velocity change for a given number of radiative cycles, by employing alternating cycles of excitation and stimulated emission from opposing directions. We recently proposed methods for BCF deceleration of CaF molecules with about 12.4 times the acceleration of the usual radiative force, and demonstrated the feasibility of the scheme with test experiments in metastable helium. Experiments on the CaF molecule are now getting underway, similar to the scheme in Ref. [b] except that we utilize the 531 nm B ^2Σ^+lrarr; X ^2Σ^+ transition rather than the A\\lrarr X transition. Although our initial tests will emphasize transverse deflection, which is particularly easy to achieve, longitudinal deceleration by 150 m/s or more should eventually be possible. We also expect significant laser-induced cooling due to the non-adiabatic BCF velocity profile. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation. J. F. Barry, E. S. Shuman, E. B. Norrgard, and D. DeMille, Phys. Rev. Lett., accepted (2012). M. A. Chieda and E. E. Eyler, Phys. Rev. A 84, 063401 (2011).

  7. The Effects of Force Inhibition by Sodium Vanadate on Cross-Bridge Binding, Force Redevelopment, and Ca2+ Activation in Cardiac Muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Martyn,D.; Smith, L.; Kreutziger, K.; Xu, S.; Yu, L.; Regnie, M.

    2007-01-01

    Strongly bound, force generating myosin crossbridges play an important role as allosteric activators of cardiac thin filaments. Sodium vanadate (Vi) is a phosphate analog that inhibits force by preventing crossbridge transition into force producing states. This study characterizes the mechanical state of crossbridges with bound Vi as a tool to examine the contribution of crossbridges to cardiac contractile activation. The K{sub i} of force inhibition by Vi was {approx} 40 {mu}M. Sinusoidal stiffness was inhibited with Vi, although to a lesser extent than force. We used chord stiffness measurements to monitor Vi induced changes in crossbridge attachment/detachment kinetics at saturating [Ca{sup 2+}]. Vi decreased chord stiffness at the fastest rates of stretch, while at slow rates chord stiffness actually increased. This suggests a shift in crossbridge population towards low force states with very slow attachment/detachment kinetics. Low angle X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that with Vi crossbridge mass shifted away from thin filaments, implying decreased crossbridge-thin filament interaction. The combined X-ray and mechanical data suggest at least two crossbridge populations with Vi; one characteristic of normal cycling crossbridges, and a population of weak-binding crossbridges with bound Vi and slow attachment/detachment kinetics. The Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of force (pCa{sub 50}) and force redevelopment kinetics (k{sub TR}) were measured to study the effects of Vi on contractile activation. When maximal force was inhibited by 40% with Vi pCa{sub 50} decreased, but greater force inhibition at higher [Vi] did not further alter pCa{sub 50}. In contrast, the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitivity of k{sub TR} was unaffected by Vi. Interestingly, when force was inhibited by Vi k{sub TR} increased at sub-maximal levels of CaS{sup 2+}-activated force. Additionally, kTR is faster at saturating Ca{sup 2+} at [Vi] that inhibit force by more than {approx}70%. The effects of Vi on

  8. Active transport of the Ca(2+)-pump: introduction of the temperature difference as a driving force.

    PubMed

    Lervik, Anders; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-05-01

    We analyse a kinetic cycle of the Ca(2+)-ATPase molecular pump using mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The pump is known to generate heat, and by analysing the operation on the mesoscopic level, we are able to introduce a temperature difference and the corresponding heat flux in the description. Integration over the internal coordinates then results in non-linear flux-force relations describing the operation of the pump on the macroscopic level. Specifically, we obtain an expression for the heat flux associated with the active transport and the coupling of heat effects to the transport of ions and the rate of the ATP-hydrolysis.

  9. Velocity, force, power, and Ca2+ sensitivity of fast and slow monkey skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Bodine, S. C.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (Sol) muscles of adult male rhesus monkeys and assessed the effects of the spaceflight living facility known as the experiment support primate facility (ESOP). Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 wk before and immediately after an 18-day ESOP sit, and fiber type was determined by immunohistochemical techniques. The MG slow type I fiber was significantly smaller than the MG type II, Sol type I, and Sol type II fibers. The ESOP sit caused a significant reduction in the diameter of type I and type I/II (hybrid) fibers of Sol and MG type II and hybrid fibers but no shift in fiber type distribution. Single-fiber peak force (mN and kN/m2) was similar between fiber types and was not significantly different from values previously reported for other species. The ESOP sit significantly reduced the force (mN) of Sol type I and MG type II fibers. This decline was entirely explained by the atrophy of these fiber types because the force per cross-sectional area (kN/m2) was not altered. Peak power of Sol and MG fast type II fiber was 5 and 8.5 times that of slow type I fiber, respectively. The ESOP sit reduced peak power by 25 and 18% in Sol type I and MG type II fibers, respectively, and, for the former fiber type, shifted the force-pCa relationship to the right, increasing the Ca2+ activation threshold and the free Ca2+ concentration, eliciting half-maximal activation. The ESOP sit had no effect on the maximal shortening velocity (Vo) of any fiber type. Vo of the hybrid fibers was only slightly higher than that of slow type I fibers. This result supports the hypothesis that in hybrid fibers the slow myosin heavy chain would be expected to have a disproportionately greater influence on Vo.

  10. 33 CFR 165.1184 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA. 165.1184 Section 165.1184 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.1184 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay.... If the exercises conclude prior to the scheduled termination time, the Coast Guard will...

  11. Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/14, Rev. "B"; file drawer 77-1/102. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. photocopy on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  12. Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/15, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  13. Unraveling Base Stacking Driving Forces in DNA.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H

    2016-07-01

    Base stacking is a key determinant of nucleic acid structures, but the precise origin of the thermodynamic driving force behind the stacking of nucleobases remains open. The rather mild stacking free energy measured experimentally, roughly a kcal/mol depending on the identity of the bases, is physiologically significant because while base stacking confers stability to the genome in its double helix form, the duplex also has to be unwound in order to be replicated or transcribed. A stacking free energy that is either too high or too low will over- or understabilize the genome, impacting the storage of genetic information and also its retrieval. While the molecular origin of stacking driving force has been attributed to many different sources including dispersion, electrostatics, and solvent hydrogen bonding, here we show via a systematic decomposition of the stacking free energy using large-scale computer simulations that the dominant driving force stabilizing base stacking is nonhydrophobic solvent entropy. Counteracting this is the conformational entropic penalty on the sugar-phosphate backbone against stacking, while solvent hydrogen-bonding, charge-charge interactions, and dispersive forces produce only secondary perturbations. Solvent entropic forces and DNA backbone conformational strains therefore work against each other, leading to a very mild composite stacking free energy in agreement with experiments. PMID:27045853

  14. Store-operated Ca²⁺ entry and depolarization explain the anomalous behaviour of myometrial SR: effects of SERCA inhibition on electrical activity, Ca²⁺ and force.

    PubMed

    Noble, Debbie; Borysova, Lyudmyla; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, Theodor

    2014-09-01

    In the myometrium SR Ca(2+) depletion promotes an increase in force but unlike several other smooth muscles, there is no Ca(2+) sparks-STOCs coupling mechanism to explain this. Given the importance of the control of contractility for successful parturition, we have examined, in pregnant rat myometrium, the effects of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibition on the temporal relationship between action potentials, Ca(2+) transients and force. Simultaneous recording of electrical activity, calcium and force showed that SERCA inhibition, by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA 20 μM), caused time-dependent changes in excitability, most noticeably depolarization and elevations of baseline [Ca(2+)]i and force. At the onset of these changes there was a prolongation of the bursts of action potentials and a corresponding series of Ca(2+) spikes, which increased the amplitude and duration of contractions. As the rise of baseline Ca(2+) and depolarization continued a point was reached when electrical and Ca(2+) spikes and phasic contractions ceased, and a maintained, tonic force and Ca(2+) was produced. Lanthanum, a non-selective blocker of store-operated Ca(2+) entry, but not the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine (1-10 μM), could abolish the maintained force and calcium. Application of the agonist, carbachol, produced similar effects to CPA, i.e. depolarization, elevation of force and calcium. A brief, high concentration of carbachol, to cause SR Ca(2+) depletion without eliciting receptor-operated channel opening, also produced these results. The data obtained suggest that in pregnant rats SR Ca(2+) release is coupled to marked Ca(2+) entry, via store operated Ca(2+) channels, leading to depolarization and enhanced electrical and mechanical activity. PMID:25084623

  15. Distinct mechanisms regulating mechanical force-induced Ca2+ signals at the plasma membrane and the ER in human MSCs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Joo, Chirlmin; Seong, Jihye; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Botvinick, Elliot L; Berns, Michael W; Palmer, Amy E; Wang, Ning; Ha, Taekjip; Jakobsson, Eric; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear that how subcellular organelles respond to external mechanical stimuli. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical force regulates Ca2+ signaling at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in human mesenchymal stem cells. Without extracellular Ca2+, ER Ca2+ release is the source of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations induced by laser-tweezer-traction at the plasma membrane, providing a model to study how mechanical stimuli can be transmitted deep inside the cell body. This ER Ca2+ release upon mechanical stimulation is mediated not only by the mechanical support of cytoskeleton and actomyosin contractility, but also by mechanosensitive Ca2+ permeable channels on the plasma membrane, specifically TRPM7. However, Ca2+ influx at the plasma membrane via mechanosensitive Ca2+ permeable channels is only mediated by the passive cytoskeletal structure but not active actomyosin contractility. Thus, active actomyosin contractility is essential for the response of ER to the external mechanical stimuli, distinct from the mechanical regulation at the plasma membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04876.001 PMID:25667984

  16. Secure electronic commerce communication system based on CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deyun; Zhang, Junfeng; Pei, Shujun

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the situation of electronic commercial security, then we analyze the working process and security for SSL protocol. At last, we propose a secure electronic commerce communication system based on CA. The system provide secure services such as encryption, integer, peer authentication and non-repudiation for application layer communication software of browser clients' and web server. The system can implement automatic allocation and united management of key through setting up the CA in the network.

  17. Time course changes in [Ca2+]i, force, and protein content in hindlimb-suspended mouse soleus muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, C. P.; Wenke, J. C.; Armstrong, R. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to reduced gravitational forces during spaceflight is associated with significant reductions in skeletal muscle mass and strength. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that increases in resting cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) would precede reductions in protein content and maximal isometric tetanic force (Po) in mouse soleus muscle after initiation of hindlimb suspension. METHODS: Female ICR mice (n = 42) were hindlimb suspended for 1, 2, 3, 5, or 7 d; weight-matched mice were used as controls. Following the hindlimb suspension, the left soleus muscle was used to determine Po in vitro and the right soleus muscle was used to determine protein content and [Ca2+]i via confocal laser scanning microscopy. RESULTS: Compared with controls, [Ca2+]i was elevated by 38% at 2 d, and 117% at 7 d. Compared with controls, soleus muscle total and myofibrillar protein contents were reduced 27-29% and 30-34%, respectively, at 5-7 d after initiation of hindlimb suspension. Compared with controls, soleus muscle Po was decreased by 24% at 3 d, and 38% at 7 d. CONCLUSION: It appears that resting cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis is disturbed soon after the initiation of hindlimb suspension, and these elevations in [Ca2+]i may play a role in initiating soleus muscle atrophy.

  18. Electrorheological Fluid Based Force Feedback Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfeiffer, Charles; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Dolgin, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    Parallel to the efforts to develop fully autonomous robots, it is increasingly being realized that there are applications where it is essential to have a fully controlled robot and "feel" its operating conditions, i.e. telepresence. This trend is a result of the increasing efforts to address tasks where humans can perform significantly better but, due to associated hazards, distance, physical limitations and other causes, only robots can be employed to perform these tasks. Such robots need to be assisted by a human that remotely controls the operation. To address the goal of operating robots as human surrogates, the authors launched a study of mechanisms that provide mechanical feedback. For this purpose, electrorheological fluids (ERF) are being investigated for the potential application as miniature haptic devices. This family of electroactive fluids has the property of changing the viscosity during electrical stimulation. Consequently, ERF can be used to produce force feedback haptic devices for tele-operated control of medical and space robotic systems. Forces applied at the robot end-effector due to a compliant environment are reflected to the user using an ERF device where a change in the system viscosity will occur proportionally to the transmitted force. Analytical model and control algorithms are being developed taking into account the non-linearities of these type of devices. This paper will describe the concept and the developed mechanism of ERF based force feedback. The test process and the physical properties of this device will be described and the results of preliminary tests will be presented.

  19. The Implementation of School Based Continuous Assessment (CA) in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapambwe, William M.

    2010-01-01

    In Zambia, continuous assessment (CA) is defined as an on-going, diagnostic, classroom-based process that uses a variety of assessment tools to measure learner performance (MOE, 2005:5). Over the years, examinations have been used for selection and certification, without formal considerations on school-based continuous assessment as a component in…

  20. Nanoactuators Based on Electrostatic Forces on Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2005-01-01

    Nanoactuators of a proposed type would exploit the forces exerted by electric fields on dielectric materials. As used here, "nanoactuators" includes motors, manipulators, and other active mechanisms that have dimensions of the order of nanometers and/or are designed to manipulate objects that have dimensions of the order of nanometers. The underlying physical principle can be described most simply in terms of the example of a square parallel-plate capacitor in which a square dielectric plate is inserted part way into the gap between the electrode plates (see Figure Typically, the force is small from our macroscopic human perspective. The above equation shows that the force depends on the ratio between the capacitor dimensions but does not depend on the size. In other words, the force remains the same if the capacitor and the dielectric slab are shrunk to nanometer dimensions. At the same time, the masses of all components are proportional to third power of their linear dimensions. Therefore the force-to-mass ratio (and, consequently, the acceleration that can be imparted to the dielectric slab) is much larger at the nanoscale than at the macroscopic scale. The proposed actuators would exploit this effect. The upper part of Figure 2 depicts a simple linear actuator based on a parallel- plate capacitor similar to Figure 1. In this case, the upper electrode plate would be split into two parts (A and B) and the dielectric slab would be slightly longer than plate A or B. The actuator would be operated in a cycle. During the first half cycle, plate B would be grounded to the lower plate and plate A would be charged to a potential, V, with respect to the lower plate, causing the dielectric slab to be pulled under plate A. During the second half cycle, plate A would be grounded and plate B would be charged to potential V, causing the dielectric slab to be pulled under plate B. The back-and-forth motion caused by alternation of the voltages on plates A and B could be used

  1. Phosphatidic acid increases intracellular free Ca2+ and cardiac contractile force.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y J; Panagia, V; Shao, Q; Wang, X; Dhalla, N S

    1996-08-01

    Although phosphatidic acid (PA) is mainly formed due to the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine by myocardial phospholipase D, its functional significance in the heart is not fully understood. The present study was designed to determine the effects of PA on intracellular free Ca2+ level ([Ca2+]i) in freshly isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes by using fura 2-acextoxmethylester and free fura 2 technique. Addition of PA at concentrations of 1-200 microM produced a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i from the basal level of 117 +/- 8 nM; maximal increase in [Ca2+]i was 233 +/- 50 nM, whereas median effective concentration (EC50) for PA was 45 +/- 1.2 microM. This increase in [Ca2+]i was abolished by the removal of extracellular Ca2+ with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid and was partially attenuated by Ca2+ channel blockers, verapamil or diltiazem. Preincubation of cardiomyocytes with cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin or with ryanodine [to deplete sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+] attenuated the PA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i by 66, 37, and 43%, respectively. Furthermore, the response of [Ca2+]i to PA was blunted by 2-nitro-4 carboxyphenylcarbonate, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, but was unaffected by staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor. PA was also observed to induce Ca2+ efflux from the myocytes. In addition, an injection of PA (0.34 microgram/100 g body wt i.v.) in rats produced a significant increase of the left ventricular developed pressure as well as the maximum rates of cardiac contraction and relaxation within 5 min. These data suggest that the PA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in cardiomyocytes is a consequence of both Ca2+ influx from the extracellular source and Ca2+ release from the intracellular SR stores. Furthermore, these in vitro data suggest the possibility that PA may regulate [Ca2+]i and contractile parameters in the heart.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  3. ANALOG I/O MODULE TEST SYSTEM BASED ON EPICS CA PROTOCOL AND ACTIVEX CA INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,YHOFF,L.

    2003-10-13

    Analog input (ADC) and output (DAC) modules play a substantial role in device level control of accelerator and large experiment physics control system. In order to get the best performance some features of analog modules including linearity, accuracy, crosstalk, thermal drift and so on have to be evaluated during the preliminary design phase. Gain and offset error calibration and thermal drift compensation (if needed) may have to be done in the implementation phase as well. A natural technique for performing these tasks is to interface the analog VO modules and GPIB interface programmable test instruments with a computer, which can complete measurements or calibration automatically. A difficulty is that drivers of analog modules and test instruments usually work on totally different platforms (vxworks VS Windows). Developing new test routines and drivers for testing instruments under VxWorks (or any other RTOS) platform is not a good solution because such systems have relatively poor user interface and developing such software requires substantial effort. EPICS CA protocol and ActiveX CA interface provide another choice, a PC and LabVIEW based test system. Analog 110 module can be interfaced from LabVIEW test routines via ActiveX CA interface. Test instruments can be controlled via LabVIEW drivers, most of which are provided by instrument vendors or by National Instruments. Labview also provides extensive data analysis and process functions. Using these functions, users can generate powerful test routines very easily. Several applications built for Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) system are described in this paper.

  4. Lorentz Force Based Satellite Attitude Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Dipak Kumar; Sinha, Manoranjan

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of attitude control of a satellite, various active and passive control strategies have been developed. These include using thrusters, momentum wheels, control moment gyros and magnetic torquers. In this present work, a new technique named Lorentz force based Coulombic actuators for the active control is proposed. This method uses electrostatic charged shells, which interact with the time varying earth's magnetic field to establish a full three axes control of the satellite. It is shown that the proposed actuation mechanism is similar to a satellite actuated by magnetic coils except that the resultant magnetic moment vanishes under two different conditions. The equation for the required charges on the the Coulomb shells attached to the satellite body axes is derived, which is in turn used to find the available control torque for actuating the satellite along the orbit. Stability of the proposed system for very high initial angular velocity and exponential stability about the origin are proved for a proportional-differential control input. Simulations are carried out to show the efficacy of the proposed system for the attitude control of the earth-pointing satellite.

  5. Development and evaluation of materials for thermochemical heat storage based on the CaO/CaCO3 reaction couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellariou, Kyriaki G.; Tsongidis, Nikolaos I.; Karagiannakis, George; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.; Baciu, Diana; Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Steriotis, Theodore; Stubos, Athanasios; Arlt, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The current work relates to the development of synthetic calcium oxide (CaO) based compositions as candidate materials for energy storage under a cyclic carbonation/decarbonation reaction scheme. Although under such a cyclic scheme the energy density of natural lime based CaO is high (˜ 3MJ/kg), the particular materials suffer from notable cycle-to-cycle deactivation. To this direction, pure CaO and CaO/Al2O3 composites have been prepared and preliminarily evaluated under the suggested cyclic carbonation/decarbonation scheme in the temperature range of 600-800°C. For the composite materials, Ca/Al molar ratios were in the range between 95/5 and 52/48 and upon calcination the formation of mixed Ca/Al phases was verified. The preliminary evaluation of materials studied was conducted under 3 carbonation/decarbonation cycles and the loss of activity for the case of natural CaO was obvious. Synthetic materials with superior stability/capture c.f. natural CaO were further subjected to multi-cyclic carbonation/decarbonation, via which the positive effect of alumina addition was made evident. Selected compositions exhibited adequately high CO2 capture capacity and stable performance during multi-cyclic operation. Moreover, this study contains preliminary experiments referring to proof-of-principle validation of a concept based on the utilization of a CaO-based honeycomb reactor/heat exchanger preliminary design. In particular, cordierite monolithic structures were coated with natural CaO and in total 11 cycles were conducted. Upon operation, clear signs of heat dissipation by the imposed flow in the duration of the exothermic reaction step were identified.

  6. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  7. Atom world based on nano-forces: 25 years of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morita, Seizo

    2011-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has opened up the new nanoworlds of scanning probe microscopy. STM is the first-generation atomic tool that can image, evaluate and manipulate individual atoms and consequently can create nanostructures by true bottom-up methods based on atom-by-atom manipulation. Atomic force microscopy is a second-generation atomic tool that has followed the footsteps of STM, and which is now opening doors to a new atom world based on using nanoscale forces.

  8. Impact of volcanism on the evolution of Lake Van (eastern Anatolia) III: Periodic (Nemrut) vs. episodic (Süphan) explosive eruptions and climate forcing reflected in a tephra gap between ca. 14 ka and ca. 30 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich; Sumita, Mari

    2014-09-01

    Fifteen Lateglacial to Holocene rhyolitic, dominantly primary tephra layers piston-cored and drilled (ICDP Paleovan drilling project) in western Lake Van (eastern Anatolia, Turkey) were precisely correlated to either of the two adjacent and active large volcanoes Nemrut and Süphan based on shard textures, mineralogy and mineral and glass compositions. The young peralkaline (comenditic to pantelleritic) primary rhyolitic Nemrut tephras are characterized by anorthoclase, hedenbergitic to augitic clinopyroxene, fayalitic olivine, minor quartz, and rare accessory chevkinite and zircon. Phenocrysts in subalkaline primary rhyolitic Süphan tephras are chiefly oligoclase-labradorite, with minor K-rich sanidine in some, biotite, amphibole, hypersthene, rare augitic clinopyroxene, relatively common allanite and rare zircon. Two contrasting explosive eruptive modes are distinguished from each other: episodic (Süphan) and periodic (Nemrut). The Lateglacial Süphan tephra swarm covers a short time interval of ca. 338 years between ca. 13,078 vy BP and 12,740 vy BP, eruptions having occurred statistically every ca. 42 years with especially short intervals between V-11 (reworked) and V-14. Causes for the strongly episodic Süphan explosive behavior might include seismic triggering of a volcano-magma system unable to erupt explosively without the benefit of external triggering, as reflected in pervasive faulting preceding the Süphan tephra swarm. Seismic triggering may have caused the rise of more mafic ("trachyandesitic") parent magma, heating near-surface pockets of highly evolved magma - that might have formed silicic domes during this stage of volcano evolution - resulting in ascent and finally explosive fragmentation of magma essentially by external factors, probably significantly enhanced by magma-water/ice interaction. Explosive eruptions of the Nemrut volcano system, interpreted to be underlain by a large fractionating magma reservoir, follow a more periodic mode of (a

  9. Linear thermal circulator based on Coriolis forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanan; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2015-02-01

    We show that the presence of a Coriolis force in a rotating linear lattice imposes a nonreciprocal propagation of the phononic heat carriers. Using this effect we propose the concept of Coriolis linear thermal circulator which can control the circulation of a heat current. A simple model of three coupled harmonic masses on a rotating platform permits us to demonstrate giant circulating rectification effects for moderate values of the angular velocities of the platform.

  10. Separations based on the mechanical forces of light.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bum Suk; Koo, Yoon-Mo; Chung, Doo Soo

    2006-01-18

    A photon as a particle has an energy and a momentum. In a matter-photon interaction, the matter and photons may exchange their momenta observing the momentum conservation law. The consequence of the momentum transfer from a photon to a matter particle is a mechanical force exerted on the particle. Several separation methods based on this force of light are reviewed. Photophoresis separations for micron-sized particles and optical force chromatography for chemical-sized molecules are discussed.

  11. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional diagnostic ultrasound images portray differences in the acoustic properties of soft tissues, whereas ultrasound-based elasticity images portray differences in the elastic properties of soft tissues (i.e. stiffness, viscosity). The benefit of elasticity imaging lies in the fact that many soft tissues can share similar ultrasonic echogenicities, but may have different mechanical properties that can be used to clearly visualize normal anatomy and delineate pathological lesions. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods use acoustic radiation force to transiently deform soft tissues, and the dynamic displacement response of those tissues is measured ultrasonically and is used to estimate the tissue's mechanical properties. Both qualitative images and quantitative elasticity metrics can be reconstructed from these measured data, providing complimentary information to both diagnose and longitudinally monitor disease progression. Recently, acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging techniques have moved from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where clinicians are beginning to characterize tissue stiffness as a diagnostic metric, and commercial implementations of radiation force-based ultrasonic elasticity imaging are beginning to appear on the commercial market. This article provides an overview of acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging, including a review of the relevant soft tissue material properties, a review of radiation force-based methods that have been proposed for elasticity imaging, and a discussion of current research and commercial realizations of radiation force based-elasticity imaging technologies. PMID:22419986

  12. Information-based physics, influence, and forces

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, James Lyons; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2015-01-13

    In recent works, Knuth and Bahreyni have demonstrated that the concepts of space and time are emergent in a coarse-grained model of direct particle-particle influence. In addition, Knuth demonstrated that observer-made inferences regarding the free particle, which is defined as a particle that influences others, but is not itself influenced, result in a situation identical to the Feynman checkerboard model of the Dirac equation. This suggests that the same theoretical framework that gives rise to an emergent spacetime is consistent with quantum mechanics. In this paper, we begin to explore the effect of influence on the emergent properties of a particle. This initial study suggests that when a particle is influenced, it is interpreted as accelerating in a manner consistent with special relativity implying that, at least in this situation, influence can be conceived of as a force.

  13. The CA Integrated Subject File II. Evaluation of Alternative Data Base Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Zipperer, William C.

    1974-01-01

    The relative retrieval performances of the CA Integrated Subject File (CAISF), CA Condensates, and a Merged File created from these two data bases were measured. Retrieval performance is reported in terms of recall, precision values, and costs. (Author/JB)

  14. Mobile Quarantine Facility unloaded at Ellington Air Force Base, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A Mobile Quarantine Facility, with the three Apollo 11 crewmen inside, is unloaded from a U.S. Air Force C141 transport at Ellington Air Force Base early Sunday after a flight from Hawaii. A large crowd was present to welcome Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin Aldrin Jr. back to Houston following their historic lunar landing mission.

  15. Viscoelastic mechanical behavior of soft microcantilever-based force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, I.-Kuan; Liao, Yen-Ming; Liu, Yan; Ou, Kuang-Shun; Chen, Kuo-Shen; Zhang, Xin

    2008-12-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microcantilevers have been used as force sensors for studying cellular mechanics by converting their displacements to cellular mechanical forces. However, PDMS is an inherently viscoelastic material and its elastic modulus changes with loading rates and elapsed time. Therefore, the traditional approach to calculating cellular mechanical forces based on elastic mechanics can result in errors. This letter reports a more in-depth method for viscoelastic characterization, modeling, and analysis associated with the bending behavior of the PDMS microcantilevers. A viscoelastic force conversion model was developed and validated by proof-of-principle bending tests.

  16. An ABS control logic based on wheel force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, D.; Galvagno, E.; Ondrak, V.; van Leeuwen, B.; Vigliani, A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents an anti-lock braking system (ABS) control logic based on the measurement of the longitudinal forces at the hub bearings. The availability of force information allows to design a logic that does not rely on the estimation of the tyre-road friction coefficient, since it continuously tries to exploit the maximum longitudinal tyre force. The logic is designed by means of computer simulation and then tested on a specific hardware in the loop test bench: the experimental results confirm that measured wheel force can lead to a significant improvement of the ABS performances in terms of stopping distance also in the presence of road with variable friction coefficient.

  17. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic Fluid Buildings, Northeast of Looking Glass Avenue at southwest side of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  18. Space chimp Enos returns to Patrick Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Enos the chimpanzee that orbited the earth twice in a Mercury spacecraft arrives back at Patrick Air Force Base. Enos landed some 220 nautical miles south of Bermuda and was picked up up by the U.S.S. Stormes.

  19. General view. View to southwest Offutt Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view. View to southwest - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  20. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  1. Force-rebalanced Lorentz force magnetometer based on a micromachined oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmezoglu, S.; Li, M.; Horsley, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a 3-axis Lorentz force magnetometer based on an encapsulated micromechanical silicon resonator having three orthogonal vibration modes, each measuring one vector component of the external magnetic field. One mode, with natural frequency (fn) of 46.973 kHz and quality factor (Q) of 14 918, is operated as a closed-loop electrostatically excited oscillator to provide a frequency reference for 3-axis sensing and Lorentz force generation. Current, modulated at the reference frequency, is injected into the resonator, producing Lorentz force that is centered at the reference frequency. Lorentz force in the first axis is nulled by the oscillator loop, resulting in force-rebalanced operation. The bandwidth and scale-factor of this force-rebalanced axis are independent of resonator Q, improving the sensor's temperature coefficient from 20 841 ppm/ °C to 424 ppm/ °C. The frequencies of the other two modes are closely spaced to the first mode's reference frequency and are demonstrated to track this frequency over temperature within 1 ppm/K. Field measurements in these two axes are conducted open-loop and off-resonance, ensuring that the scale-factor is independent of Q to first order and producing a measurement bandwidth of over 40 Hz.

  2. Distinct mechanisms regulating mechanical force-induced Ca²⁺ signals at the plasma membrane and the ER in human MSCs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Joo, Chirlmin; Seong, Jihye; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Botvinick, Elliot L; Berns, Michael W; Palmer, Amy E; Wang, Ning; Ha, Taekjip; Jakobsson, Eric; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-02-10

    It is unclear that how subcellular organelles respond to external mechanical stimuli. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical force regulates Ca(2+) signaling at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in human mesenchymal stem cells. Without extracellular Ca(2+), ER Ca(2+) release is the source of intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations induced by laser-tweezer-traction at the plasma membrane, providing a model to study how mechanical stimuli can be transmitted deep inside the cell body. This ER Ca(2+) release upon mechanical stimulation is mediated not only by the mechanical support of cytoskeleton and actomyosin contractility, but also by mechanosensitive Ca(2+) permeable channels on the plasma membrane, specifically TRPM7. However, Ca(2+) influx at the plasma membrane via mechanosensitive Ca(2+) permeable channels is only mediated by the passive cytoskeletal structure but not active actomyosin contractility. Thus, active actomyosin contractility is essential for the response of ER to the external mechanical stimuli, distinct from the mechanical regulation at the plasma membrane.

  3. Vehicle lateral state estimation based on measured tyre forces.

    PubMed

    Tuononen, Ari J

    2009-01-01

    Future active safety systems need more accurate information about the state of vehicles. This article proposes a method to evaluate the lateral state of a vehicle based on measured tyre forces. The tyre forces of two tyres are estimated from optically measured tyre carcass deflections and transmitted wirelessly to the vehicle body. The two remaining tyres are so-called virtual tyre sensors, the forces of which are calculated from the real tyre sensor estimates. The Kalman filter estimator for lateral vehicle state based on measured tyre forces is presented, together with a simple method to define adaptive measurement error covariance depending on the driving condition of the vehicle. The estimated yaw rate and lateral velocity are compared with the validation sensor measurements. PMID:22291535

  4. Vehicle Lateral State Estimation Based on Measured Tyre Forces

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2009-01-01

    Future active safety systems need more accurate information about the state of vehicles. This article proposes a method to evaluate the lateral state of a vehicle based on measured tyre forces. The tyre forces of two tyres are estimated from optically measured tyre carcass deflections and transmitted wirelessly to the vehicle body. The two remaining tyres are so-called virtual tyre sensors, the forces of which are calculated from the real tyre sensor estimates. The Kalman filter estimator for lateral vehicle state based on measured tyre forces is presented, together with a simple method to define adaptive measurement error covariance depending on the driving condition of the vehicle. The estimated yaw rate and lateral velocity are compared with the validation sensor measurements. PMID:22291535

  5. Forces driving late Pleistocene (ca. 77-12 ka) landscape evolution in the Cimarron River valley, southwestern Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layzell, Anthony L.; Mandel, Rolfe D.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Smith, Jon J.

    2015-07-01

    This study presents stratigraphic, geomorphic, and paleoenvironmental (δ13C) data that provide insight into the late Pleistocene landscape evolution of the Cimarron River valley in the High Plains of southwestern Kansas. Two distinct valley fills (T-1 and T-2) were investigated. Three soils occur in the T-2 fill and five in the T-1 fill, all indicating periods of landscape stability or slow sedimentation. Of particular interest are two cumulic soils dating to ca. 48-28 and 13-12.5 ka. δ13C values are consistent with regional paleoenvironmental proxy data that indicate the prevalence of warm, dry conditions at these times. The Cimarron River is interpreted to have responded to these climatic changes and to local base level control. Specifically, aggradation occurred during cool, wet periods and slow sedimentation with cumulic soil formation occurred under warmer, drier climates. Significant valley incision (~ 25 m) by ca. 28 ka likely resulted from a lowering of local base level caused by deep-seated dissolution of Permian evaporite deposits.

  6. Toward Standardized Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-Based Ultrasound Elasticity Measurements With Robotic Force Control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shalki; Lily, Kuo; Sen, H. Tutkun; Iordachita, Iulian; Kazanzides, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acoustic radiation force (ARF)-based approaches to measure tissue elasticity require transmission of a focused high-energy acoustic pulse from a stationary ultrasound probe and ultrasound-based tracking of the resulting tissue displacements to obtain stiffness images or shear wave speed estimates. The method has established benefits in biomedical applications such as tumor detection and tissue fibrosis staging. One limitation, however, is the dependence on applied probe pressure, which is difficult to control manually and prohibits standardization of quantitative measurements. To overcome this limitation, we built a robot prototype that controls probe contact forces for shear wave speed quantification. Methods The robot was evaluated with controlled force increments applied to a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo abdominal tissue from three human volunteers. Results The root-mean-square error between the desired and measured forces was 0.07 N in the phantom and higher for the fatty layer of in vivo abdominal tissue. The mean shear wave speeds increased from 3.7 to 4.5 m/s in the phantom and 1.0 to 3.0 m/s in the in vivo fat for compressive forces ranging from 2.5 to 30 N. The standard deviation of shear wave speeds obtained with the robotic approach were low in most cases (< 0.2 m/s) and comparable to that obtained with a semiquantitative landmark-based method. Conclusion Results are promising for the introduction of robotic systems to control the applied probe pressure for ARF-based measurements of tissue elasticity. Significance This approach has potential benefits in longitudinal studies of disease progression, comparative studies between patients, and large-scale multidimensional elasticity imaging. PMID:26552071

  7. Capillary and van der Waals interactions on CaF2 crystals from amplitude modulation AFM force reconstruction profiles under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Calò, Annalisa; Robles, Oriol Vidal; Santos, Sergio; Verdaguer, Albert

    2015-01-01

    There has been much interest in the past two decades to produce experimental force profiles characteristic of the interaction between nanoscale objects or a nanoscale object and a plane. Arguably, the advent of the atomic force microscope AFM was instrumental in driving such efforts because, in principle, force profiles could be recovered directly. Nevertheless, it has taken years before techniques have developed enough as to recover the attractive part of the force with relatively low noise and without missing information on critical ranges, particularly under ambient conditions where capillary interactions are believed to dominate. Thus a systematic study of the different profiles that may arise in such situations is still lacking. Here we employ the surfaces of CaF2, on which nanoscale water films form, to report on the range and force profiles that might originate by dynamic capillary interactions occurring between an AFM tip and nanoscale water patches. Three types of force profiles were observed under ambient conditions. One in which the force decay resembles the well-known inverse-square law typical of van der Waals interactions during the first 0.5-1 nm of decay, a second one in which the force decays almost linearly, in relatively good agreement with capillary force predicted by the constant chemical potential approximation, and a third one in which the attractive force is almost constant, i.e., forms a plateau, up to 3-4 nm above the surface when the formation of a capillary neck dominates the tip-sample interaction.

  8. Mapping of surface-immobilized DNA with force-based atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonhee; Kwon, Sung Hong; Kim, Youngkyu; Lee, Jong-Bong; Park, Joon Won

    2013-04-16

    Single-stranded 50-mer, 100-mer, and 150-mer DNAs were immobilized on a surface, and force-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to examine their behavior. A complementary 20-mer probe DNA on an AFM tip was used for the measurements. High-resolution maps were generated, and relevant parameters, including the force, stretching distance, unbinding probability, cluster size, and degree of distortion, were analyzed. Due to thermal drift, the cluster shape became increasingly distorted as the scan speed was decreased and as the map area was reduced. The cluster radius increased with the number of base (N), and the radius was proportional to N(0.6) (r = 0.977) and N(0.53) (r = 0.991). Due to the effect of the pulling angle, the apparent values of the stretching distance and the unbinding force decreased as the AFM probe was moved away from the center position; these values can be described as a function of sin θ.

  9. Fluorescent Protein-Based Ca2+ Sensor Reveals Global, Divalent Cation-Dependent Conformational Changes in Cardiac Troponin C

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Myriam A.; Pinto, Jose R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is a key effector in cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling as the Ca2+ sensing subunit responsible for controlling contraction. In this study, we generated several FRET sensors for divalent cations based on cTnC flanked by a donor fluorescent protein (CFP) and an acceptor fluorescent protein (YFP). The sensors report Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding, and relay global structural information about the structural relationship between cTnC’s N- and C-domains. The sensors were first characterized using end point titrations to decipher the response to Ca2+ binding in the presence or absence of Mg2+. The sensor that exhibited the largest responses in end point titrations, CTV-TnC, (Cerulean, TnC, and Venus) was characterized more extensively. Most of the divalent cation-dependent FRET signal originates from the high affinity C-terminal EF hands. CTV-TnC reconstitutes into skinned fiber preparations indicating proper assembly of troponin complex, with only ~0.2 pCa unit rightward shift of Ca2+-sensitive force development compared to WT-cTnC. Affinity of CTV-TnC for divalent cations is in agreement with known values for WT-cTnC. Analytical ultracentrifugation indicates that CTV-TnC undergoes compaction as divalent cations bind. C-terminal sites induce ion-specific (Ca2+ versus Mg2+) conformational changes in cTnC. Our data also provide support for the presence of additional, non-EF-hand sites on cTnC for Mg2+ binding. In conclusion, we successfully generated a novel FRET-Ca2+ sensor based on full length cTnC with a variety of cellular applications. Our sensor reveals global structural information about cTnC upon divalent cation binding. PMID:27736894

  10. Micro-Vibration-Based Slip Detection in Tactile Force Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Raul; Payo, Ismael; Vazquez, Andres S.; Becedas, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Tactile sensing provides critical information, such as force, texture, shape or temperature, in manipulation tasks. In particular, tactile sensors traditionally used in robotics are emphasized in contact force determination for grasping control and object recognition. Nevertheless, slip detection is also crucial to successfully manipulate an object. Several approaches have appeared to detect slipping, the majority being a combination of complex sensors with complex algorithms. In this paper, we deal with simplicity, analyzing how a novel, but simple, algorithm, based on micro-vibration detection, can be used in a simple, but low-cost and durable, force sensor. We also analyze the results of using the same principle to detect slipping in other force sensors based on flexible parts. In particular, we show and compare the slip detection with: (i) a flexible finger, designed by the authors, acting as a force sensor; (ii) the finger torque sensor of a commercial robotic hand; (iii) a commercial six-axis force sensor mounted on the wrist of a robot; and (iv) a fingertip piezoresistive matrix sensor. PMID:24394598

  11. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  12. Micro-vibration-based slip detection in tactile force sensors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Raul; Payo, Ismael; Vazquez, Andres S; Becedas, Jonathan

    2014-01-03

    Tactile sensing provides critical information, such as force, texture, shape or temperature, in manipulation tasks. In particular, tactile sensors traditionally used in robotics are emphasized in contact force determination for grasping control and object recognition. Nevertheless, slip detection is also crucial to successfully manipulate an object. Several approaches have appeared to detect slipping, the majority being a combination of complex sensors with complex algorithms. In this paper, we deal with simplicity, analyzing how a novel, but simple, algorithm, based on micro-vibration detection, can be used in a simple, but low-cost and durable, force sensor. We also analyze the results of using the same principle to detect slipping in other force sensors based on flexible parts. In particular, we show and compare the slip detection with: (i) a flexible finger, designed by the authors, acting as a force sensor; (ii) the finger torque sensor of a commercial robotic hand; (iii) a commercial six-axis force sensor mounted on the wrist of a robot; and (iv) a fingertip piezoresistive matrix sensor.

  13. GPI based velocity/force observer design for robot manipulators.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Giles, Alejandro; Arteaga-Pérez, Marco A

    2014-07-01

    In many applications involving a robot in contact with a surface it is important to control the interaction between the manipulator and its environment, usually by employing force sensors. However, sometimes it is desirable to remove them due to a variety of reasons, e.g. high costs, noisy measurements and a narrow bandwidth. To overcome these drawbacks, in this work it is proposed as a velocity/force observer based on the Generalized Proportional Integral (GPI) technique. Joint velocities and contact forces are estimated with only position measurements and then used in a force/position control scheme. Ultimate boundedness of the observation errors is formally proven and an arbitrarily small ultimate bound is then achieved. Simulation results are used to validate the proposed approach.

  14. GPI based velocity/force observer design for robot manipulators.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Giles, Alejandro; Arteaga-Pérez, Marco A

    2014-07-01

    In many applications involving a robot in contact with a surface it is important to control the interaction between the manipulator and its environment, usually by employing force sensors. However, sometimes it is desirable to remove them due to a variety of reasons, e.g. high costs, noisy measurements and a narrow bandwidth. To overcome these drawbacks, in this work it is proposed as a velocity/force observer based on the Generalized Proportional Integral (GPI) technique. Joint velocities and contact forces are estimated with only position measurements and then used in a force/position control scheme. Ultimate boundedness of the observation errors is formally proven and an arbitrarily small ultimate bound is then achieved. Simulation results are used to validate the proposed approach. PMID:24780160

  15. Kinetics of Isothermal Melt Crystallization in CaO-SiO2-CaF2-Based Mold Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Myung-Duk; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Baek, Ji-Yeon; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2015-10-01

    A kinetic study for isothermal melt crystallization of CaO-SiO2-CaF2-based mold fluxes with different basicity of 0.94 and 1.34 has been carried out systematically by DSC measurements. The kinetic parameters were determined by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. The average Avrami exponent of cuspidine (3CaO·2SiO2·CaF2) crystallization for mold flux of lower basicity (0.94) is calculated to be 3.1, implying that the crystallization mode is instantaneous nucleation followed by 3-dimensional growth. For the mold flux of higher basicity (1.34), the average Avrami exponent of cuspidine equals to 3.4, strongly suggesting that the growth is still 3 dimensional but the nucleation should be continuous. It was found that the effective crystallization rate constant for both mold fluxes increases as the crystallization temperature decreases, showing that the crystallization rate could be governed by nucleation rate. The negative effective activation energy indicates an anti-Arrhenius behavior for crystallization of the mold fluxes studied. Therefore, it is concluded that the melt crystallization for the commercial mold fluxes will be determined by thermodynamics of nucleation which is relevant to degree of undercooling. The morphology of cuspidine crystals observed by SEM agreeds well with the isothermal crystallization kinetics results.

  16. Ab Initio Force Fields for Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jesse G; Choi, Eunsong; Son, Chang Yun; Schmidt, J R; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-07-21

    We develop ab initio force fields for alkylimidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) that predict the density, heats of vaporization, diffusion, and conductivity that are in semiquantitative agreement with experimental data. These predictions are useful in light of the scarcity of and sometimes inconsistency in experimental heats of vaporization and diffusion coefficients. We illuminate physical trends in the liquid cohesive energy with cation chain length and anion. These trends are different than those based on the experimental heats of vaporization. Molecular dynamics prediction of the room temperature dynamics of such ILs is more difficult than is generally realized in the literature due to large statistical uncertainties and sensitivity to subtle force field details. We believe that our developed force fields will be useful for correctly determining the physics responsible for the structure/property relationships in neat ILs.

  17. STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATIONS IN CA-BASED SORBENTS USED FOR SO2 EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses structural transformations in Ca-based sorbents used for SO2 emission control. conomizer temperature injection of Ca-based sorbents is an option for dry control of SO2 emissions from coal-fired boilers. heir reactivity with SO2 was found to be a function of th...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1120 - Security Zone; Naval Amphibious Base, San Diego, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Base, San Diego, CA. 165.1120 Section 165.1120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.1120 Security Zone; Naval Amphibious Base, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The following area is a security zone: the waters of San Diego Bay, enclosed by lines connecting the following points: Beginning...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1120 - Security Zone; Naval Amphibious Base, San Diego, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Base, San Diego, CA. 165.1120 Section 165.1120 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.1120 Security Zone; Naval Amphibious Base, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The following area is a security zone: the waters of San Diego Bay, enclosed by lines connecting the following points: Beginning...

  20. REACTION KINETICS OF CA-BASED SORBENTS WITH HC1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics of the reaction between CaO and HCl were investigated under conditions that minimize bulk mass transfer and pore diffusion limitations. Reactivity data from 0.2- to 1-s exposure to 5000 ppm HCl in a fixed bed reactor were analyzed by a shrinking core model of diffusi...

  1. The Campus-Based Formula. NASFAA Task Force Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) Campus-Based Aid Allocation Task Force was to examine the formula by which congressional appropriations for the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Perkins Loan programs are distributed to schools,…

  2. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  3. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear is on the ground and the nose gear is about to touch down as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  4. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed in this view of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it completes a mission of almost 17 days duration in space on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995.

  5. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour, after completing a mission of almost 17 days duration in space, touches down on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995. In this photo the nose gear is still in the air as the orbiter touches down.

  6. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  7. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  8. Geothermal-resource verification for Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, P.R. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    This report summarizes the various types of geothermal energy reviews some legal uncertainties of the resource and then describes a methodology to evaluate geothermal resources for applications to US Air Force bases. Estimates suggest that exploration costs will be $50,000 to $300,000, which, if favorable, would lead to drilling a $500,000 exploration well. Successful identification and development of a geothermal resource could provide all base, fixed system needs with an inexpensive, renewable energy source.

  9. Measurement of membrane binding between recoverin, a calcium-myristoyl switch protein, and lipid bilayers by AFM-based force spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Desmeules, Philippe; Grandbois, Michel; Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Yamazaki, Akio; Salesse, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Myristoyl switch is a feature of several peripheral membrane proteins involved in signal transduction pathways. This unique molecular property is best illustrated by the "Ca(2+)-myristoyl switch" of recoverin, which is a Ca(2+)-binding protein present in retinal rod cells of vertebrates. In this transduction pathway, the Ca(2+)-myristoyl switch acts as a calcium sensor involved in cell recovery from photoactivation. Ca(2+) binding by recoverin induces the extrusion of its myristoyl group to the solvent, which leads to its translocation from cytosol to rod disk membranes. Force spectroscopy, based on atomic force microscope (AFM) technology, was used to determine the extent of membrane binding of recoverin in the absence and presence of calcium, and to quantify this force of binding. An adhesion force of 48 +/- 5 pN was measured between recoverin and supported phospholipid bilayers in the presence of Ca(2+). However, no binding was observed in the absence of Ca(2+). Experiments with nonmyristoylated recoverin confirmed these observations. Our results are consistent with previously measured extraction forces of lipids from membranes. PMID:12023256

  10. Exploring Mg-Zn-Ca-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses for Biomedical Applications Based on Thermodynamic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, M.; Sarwat, Syed Ghazi; Udhayabanu, V.; Raj, Baldev; Ravi, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg)-based metallic glasses are considered as possible candidates in orthopedic implant applications. This paper aims to theoretically predict the glass-forming ability (GFA) in Mg-Zn-Ca alloy using a newly proposed thermodynamic model ( P HHS), and the consistency of this model is verified through experimental analysis. P HHS is based on thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy of chemical mixing, elastic enthalpy, and configurational entropy, thus incorporating the pivotal effects, i.e., electron transfer effects, effect of atomic size mismatch, and effect of randomness, which aid to high GFA. In essence, P HHS can be visualized as the energy barrier that exists between the transformations of random atomic structure of glass to ordered crystalline structure. When the P HHS value is more negative, the energy barrier will be high, supporting easy glass formation. Various Mg-Zn-Ca metallic glass compositions displayed almost an expected and supporting trend, where the critical diameter of the metallic glass rod increased with a more negative P HHS value. Among the predicted Mg-Zn-Ca systems, the Mg60Zn35Ca5 composition shows deviation from the expected trend. This discrepancy has been clearly elucidated using a eutectic phase diagram. In addition to the consistency of the P HHS parameter to verifying the GFA of various compositions, the unique ability of this model is to predict unexplored Mg-Zn-Ca glass-forming compositions using contour development. Thus, proving P HHS parameter to be used as an efficient tool in predicting new glass-forming compositions.

  11. Long-Term Changes in Calcium (Ca) Sources in Base-Poor Forest Ecosystem: Insight from Stable Ca-Isotopes in Tree Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, J.; Dejeant, A.; Orwig, D.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) is an essential nutrient in higher plants and also a major base-cation predicted to be most affected by environmental perturbations such as acid rain deposition and/or excessive biomass harvesting. Therefore, a better understanding of the Ca cycling in terrestrial environment is of primary interest and critical for the sustainable forest management. The aim of this project was to investigate the use of Ca isotopes as a tracer of the forest Ca cycle and its evolution through time. Here we present stable Ca isotope composition (δ44/40Ca and δ44/42Ca) and elemental concentrations of a 260-year record of tree-rings from Red Oak (Quercus rubra). The core sample was collected at an undisturbed old-growth forest site in southern New England (Wachusett Mountain, MA, USA) developed on granitic bedrock. The associated soils (sandy loams) are thus naturally base-poor and sensitive to the loss of Ca due to increased acid rain deposition and/or excessive biological uptake. The δ44/40Ca (NIST) record of decadal tree-ring increments shows a general declining trend from -0.35 to -0.80 ±0.1 per mil (from year 1750 to 2000). Superimposed on this long-term δ44/40Ca trend is a systematic negative excursion with a minimum of -0.95 ±0.1 per mil dated between 1870 and 1950. Overall, the long-term δ44/40Ca record shows statistically significant correlation with Ca/Sr ratios (R2 = 0.87, p < .01) as well as Na/Ca data (R2 = 0.69, p < .01). The fact that δ44/40Ca correlates also with Na/Ca suggest that the observed Ca isotope variations are likely related to changes in soil-Ca sources rather than being a consequence of biological processes within the tree. This is because the sodium budget of trees and forests is primarily controlled by silicate weathering rates derived from the dissolution of Na-rich minerals such as plagioclase and/or K-feldspar. Nevertheless, the role of biological processes on tree-ring δ44/40Ca record will be tested independently via measurements

  12. Capillary and van der Waals interactions on CaF2 crystals from amplitude modulation AFM force reconstruction profiles under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Annalisa; Robles, Oriol Vidal; Santos, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been much interest in the past two decades to produce experimental force profiles characteristic of the interaction between nanoscale objects or a nanoscale object and a plane. Arguably, the advent of the atomic force microscope AFM was instrumental in driving such efforts because, in principle, force profiles could be recovered directly. Nevertheless, it has taken years before techniques have developed enough as to recover the attractive part of the force with relatively low noise and without missing information on critical ranges, particularly under ambient conditions where capillary interactions are believed to dominate. Thus a systematic study of the different profiles that may arise in such situations is still lacking. Here we employ the surfaces of CaF2, on which nanoscale water films form, to report on the range and force profiles that might originate by dynamic capillary interactions occurring between an AFM tip and nanoscale water patches. Three types of force profiles were observed under ambient conditions. One in which the force decay resembles the well-known inverse-square law typical of van der Waals interactions during the first 0.5–1 nm of decay, a second one in which the force decays almost linearly, in relatively good agreement with capillary force predicted by the constant chemical potential approximation, and a third one in which the attractive force is almost constant, i.e., forms a plateau, up to 3–4 nm above the surface when the formation of a capillary neck dominates the tip–sample interaction. PMID:25977852

  13. Effects of sympathetic nerve stimulation on membrane potential, [Ca2+]i and force in the arrested sinus venosus of the toad, Bufo marinus.

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, H M; Bramich, N J

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of sympathetic nerve stimulation on membrane potential and on the intracellular concentration of calcium ions, [Ca2+]i, were recorded concurrently from the sinus venosus of the toad, Bufo marinus, in preparations where beating had been abolished by adding an organic calcium antagonist to the physiological saline. In a separate set of experiments the effects of sympathetic nerve stimulation on force production were examined. 2. Stimulation of the sympathetic nerves caused a membrane depolarization and a simultaneous increase in [Ca2+]i. Both responses were reduced by dihydroergotamine (20 microM). 3. The membrane depolarization and increase in [Ca2+]i evoked by sympathetic nerve stimulation were abolished by ryanodine (10 microM), or caffeine (3 mM). The effects of caffeine, but not those of ryanodine, were fully reversible. 4. Although the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (30 microM) itself had little effect on the responses to sympathetic nerve stimulation, in its presence caffeine (3 mM) irreversibly abolished the responses. 5. In the presence of nifedipine (10 microM), sympathetic nerve stimulation caused contractions of the sinus venosus. These responses were abolished by either ryanodine (10 microM) or caffeine (3 mM). 6. The results suggest that neuronally released transmitter activates a complex biochemical pathway which triggers the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. PMID:9423190

  14. Extracellular Ca2+-induced force restoration in K+-depressed skeletal muscle of the mouse involves an elevation of [K+]i: implications for fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Leader, John P.; Loiselle, Denis S.; Higgins, Amanda; Lin, Wei; Renaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether a Ca2+-K+ interaction was a potential mechanism operating during fatigue with repeated tetani in isolated mouse muscles. Raising the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) from 1.3 to 10 mM in K+-depressed slow-twitch soleus and/or fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles caused the following: 1) increase of intracellular K+ activity by 20–60 mM (raised intracellular K+ content, unchanged intracellular fluid volume), so that the K+-equilibrium potential increased by ∼10 mV and resting membrane potential repolarized by 5–10 mV; 2) large restoration of action potential amplitude (16–54 mV); 3) considerable recovery of excitable fibers (∼50% total); and 4) restoration of peak force with the peak tetanic force-extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) relationship shifting rightward toward higher [K+]o. Double-sigmoid curve-fitting to fatigue profiles (125 Hz for 500 ms, every second for 100 s) showed that prior exposure to raised [K+]o (7 mM) increased, whereas lowered [K+]o (2 mM) decreased, the rate and extent of force loss during the late phase of fatigue (second sigmoid) in soleus, hence implying a K+ dependence for late fatigue. Prior exposure to 10 mM [Ca2+]o slowed late fatigue in both muscle types, but was without effect on the extent of fatigue. These combined findings support our notion that a Ca2+-K+ interaction is plausible during severe fatigue in both muscle types. We speculate that a diminished transsarcolemmal K+ gradient and lowered [Ca2+]o contribute to late fatigue through reduced action potential amplitude and excitability. The raised [Ca2+]o-induced slowing of fatigue is likely to be mediated by a higher intracellular K+ activity, which prolongs the time before stimulation-induced K+ efflux depolarizes the sarcolemma sufficiently to interfere with action potentials. PMID:25571990

  15. Eielson Air Force Base Operable Unit 2 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.E.; Jarvis, T.T.; Jarvis, M.R.; Whelan, G.

    1994-10-01

    Operable Unit 2 at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, is one of several operable units characterized by petroleum, oil, and lubricant contamination, and by the presence of organic products floating at the water table, as a result of Air Force operations since the 1940s. The base is approximately 19,270 acres in size, and comprises the areas for military operations and a residential neighborhood for military dependents. Within Operable Unit 2, there are seven source areas. These source areas were grouped together primarily because of the contaminants released and hence are not necessarily in geographical proximity. Source area ST10 includes a surface water body (Hardfill Lake) next to a fuel spill area. The primary constituents of concern for human health include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Monitored data showed these volatile constituents to be present in groundwater wells. The data also showed an elevated level of trace metals in groundwater.

  16. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase blocks agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization of myosin phosphorylation and force in guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Swärd, Karl; Dreja, Karl; Susnjar, Marija; Hellstrand, Per; Hartshorne, David J; Walsh, Michael P

    2000-01-01

    Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle contraction involves the small GTPase RhoA, inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) and enhanced myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation. A potential effector of RhoA is Rho-associated kinase (ROK).The role of ROK in Ca2+ sensitization was investigated in guinea-pig ileum.Contraction of permeabilized muscle strips induced by GTPγS at pCa 6.5 was inhibited by the kinase inhibitors Y-27632, HA1077 and H-7 with IC50 values that correlated with the known Ki values for inhibition of ROK. GTPγS also increased LC20 phosphorylation and this was prevented by HA1077. Contraction and LC20 phosphorylation elicited at pCa 5.75 were, however, unaffected by HA1077.Pre-treatment of intact tissue strips with HA1077 abolished the tonic component of carbachol-induced contraction and the sustained elevation of LC20 phosphorylation, but had no effect on the transient or sustained increase in [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol.LC20 phosphorylation and contraction dynamics suggest that the ROK-mediated increase in LC20 phosphorylation is due to MLCP inhibition, not myosin light chain kinase activation.In the absence of Ca2+, GTPγS stimulated 35S incorporation from [35S]ATPγS into the myosin targeting subunit of MLCP (MYPT). The enhanced thiophosphorylation was inhibited by HA1077. No thiophosphorylation of LC20 was detected.These results indicate that ROK mediates agonist-induced increases in myosin phosphorylation and force by inhibiting MLCP activity through phosphorylation of MYPT. Under Ca2+-free conditions, ROK does not appear to phosphorylate LC20in situ, in contrast to its ability to phosphorylate myosin in vitro. In particular, ROK activation is essential for the tonic phase of agonist-induced contraction. PMID:10618150

  17. Jamming transitions in force-based models for pedestrian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Ezaki, Takahiro; Tordeux, Antoine; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Schadschneider, Andreas; Seyfried, Armin

    2015-10-01

    Force-based models describe pedestrian dynamics in analogy to classical mechanics by a system of second order ordinary differential equations. By investigating the linear stability of two main classes of forces, parameter regions with unstable homogeneous states are identified. In this unstable regime it is then checked whether phase transitions or stop-and-go waves occur. Results based on numerical simulations show, however, that the investigated models lead to unrealistic behavior in the form of backwards moving pedestrians and overlapping. This is one reason why stop-and-go waves have not been observed in these models. The unrealistic behavior is not related to the numerical treatment of the dynamic equations but rather indicates an intrinsic problem of this model class. Identifying the underlying generic problems gives indications how to define models that do not show such unrealistic behavior. As an example we introduce a force-based model which produces realistic jam dynamics without the appearance of unrealistic negative speeds for empirical desired walking speeds.

  18. Jamming transitions in force-based models for pedestrian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Ezaki, Takahiro; Tordeux, Antoine; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Schadschneider, Andreas; Seyfried, Armin

    2015-10-01

    Force-based models describe pedestrian dynamics in analogy to classical mechanics by a system of second order ordinary differential equations. By investigating the linear stability of two main classes of forces, parameter regions with unstable homogeneous states are identified. In this unstable regime it is then checked whether phase transitions or stop-and-go waves occur. Results based on numerical simulations show, however, that the investigated models lead to unrealistic behavior in the form of backwards moving pedestrians and overlapping. This is one reason why stop-and-go waves have not been observed in these models. The unrealistic behavior is not related to the numerical treatment of the dynamic equations but rather indicates an intrinsic problem of this model class. Identifying the underlying generic problems gives indications how to define models that do not show such unrealistic behavior. As an example we introduce a force-based model which produces realistic jam dynamics without the appearance of unrealistic negative speeds for empirical desired walking speeds. PMID:26565291

  19. An EGaIn-based flexible piezoresistive shear and normal force sensor with hysteresis analysis in normal force direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaomei; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang; Zheng, Yongping; Wai, P. K. A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports a flexible piezoresistive shear and normal force sensor based on eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn) with fabrication and testing results, which includes further study on the hysteresis analysis in the normal force direction. By using EGaIn as a gauge material, it can detect force on a flexible and stretchable substrate without breaking the gauge wires. However, the liquid-metal gauge wire needs to be packaged and protected in an elastomeric substrate, which creates hysteresis on the sensed resistance with respect to the change of applied force. This paper shows measurement results in static force and also under different speeds of loading force cycles. The relationship between the applied normal force and hysteresis of signal was observed, mainly owing to larger deformation and slower recovering time of the elastomeric substrate that defines the shape of the liquid-metal gauge wire for resistance measurement.

  20. Cryogel micromechanics unraveled by atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Petra B; Friedrichs, Jens; Grimmer, Milauscha; Vogler, Steffen; Freudenberg, Uwe; Werner, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    Cell-instructive physical characteristics of macroporous scaffolds, developed for tissue engineering applications, often remain difficult to assess. Here, an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation approach is adapted to quantify the local mechanical properties of biohybrid glycosaminoglycan-poly(ethylene glycol) cryogels. Resulting from cryoconcentration effects upon gel formation, cryogel struts are observed to feature a higher stiffness compared to the corresponding bulk hydrogel materials. Local Young's moduli, porosity, and integral moduli of the cryogel scaffolds are compared in dependence on gel formation parameters. The results provide valuable insights into the cryogelation process and a base for adjusting physical characteristics of the obtained cryogel scaffolds, which can critically influence the cellular response.

  1. Energy storage for a lunar base by the reversible chemical reaction: CaO+H2O reversible reaction Ca(OH)2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Difilipo, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A thermochemical solar energy storage concept involving the reversible reaction CaO + H2O yields Ca(OH)2 is proposed as a power system element for a lunar base. The operation and components of such a system are described. The CaO/H2O system is capable of generating electric power during both the day and night. The specific energy (energy to mass ratio) of the system was estimated to be 155 W-hr/kg. Mass of the required amount of CaO is neglected since it is obtained from lunar soil. Potential technical problems, such as reactor design and lunar soil processing, are reviewed.

  2. Plastic media blasting activities at Hill Air Force Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J. D.

    1993-03-01

    Hill Air Force Base in Utah developed plastic media blasting (PMB) paint removal process for removing paint from Air Force aircraft. The development of the process involved extensive testing of various abrasives and subsequent parameters to end up with an approved production process. Hill AFB has been using PMB in a production mode since 1985, and completely discontinued chemical stripping of airframes in 1989. We have recently installed and began operating a fully automated PMB facility that utilizes two nine-axis robots to strip an aircraft. This system has enabled us to further reduce the manhours required to strip an aircraft, and also allowed us to remove the employee from the blasting atmosphere into a control room. We have, and will continue to realize, significant environmental and economic savings by using PMB. Hill is also actively involved with the development of future paint stripping technologies.

  3. Utilization of geothermal resources at United States Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Grogger, P.K.

    1980-09-01

    The Air Force installations on the continental United States as well as Alaska and Hawaii, were evaluated as to the possibility of utilizing geothermal energy to develop electricity, produce process steam, or heat and/or cool buildings. Twenty-five bases have suspected geothermal resources available. Because of either need or available technology seven installations were rated priority I, six were rated priority II and priority III and IV totaled ten. Geological and geophysical data indicated further investigation of the priority I installations, Saylor Creek Range, Idaho, Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota, Charleston AFB, South Carolina, Kirkland AFB, New Mexico, Vandenberg AFB, California, Luke AFB, Arizona, and Williams AFB, Arizona, should be accomplished as soon as possible. The use of geothermal energy will decrease the need for fossil fuels by the USAF and during times of short supply allow such fuels to be used for the Air Force's primary mission, military defense.

  4. GAP, an aequorin-based fluorescent indicator for imaging Ca2+ in organelles

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Arancha; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Navas-Navarro, Paloma; Aulestia, Francisco Javier; Gallego-Sandin, Sonia; Garcia-Sancho, Javier; Alonso, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators allow monitoring subcellular Ca2+ signals inside organelles. Most genetically encoded calcium indicators are fusions of endogenous calcium-binding proteins whose functionality in vivo may be perturbed by competition with cellular partners. We describe here a novel family of fluorescent Ca2+ sensors based on the fusion of two Aequorea victoria proteins, GFP and apo-aequorin (GAP). GAP exhibited a unique combination of features: dual-excitation ratiometric imaging, high dynamic range, good signal-to-noise ratio, insensitivity to pH and Mg2+, tunable Ca2+ affinity, uncomplicated calibration, and targetability to five distinct organelles. Moreover, transgenic mice for endoplasmic reticulum-targeted GAP exhibited a robust long-term expression that correlated well with its reproducible performance in various neural tissues. This biosensor fills a gap in the actual repertoire of Ca2+ indicators for organelles and becomes a valuable tool for in vivo Ca2+ imaging applications. PMID:24501126

  5. Contact force measurement of instruments for force-feedback on a surgical robot: acceleration force cancellations based on acceleration sensor readings.

    PubMed

    Shimachi, Shigeyuki; Kameyama, Fumie; Hakozaki, Yoshihide; Fujiwara, Yasunori

    2005-01-01

    For delicate operations conducted using surgical robot systems, surgeons need to receive information regarding the contact forces on the tips of surgical instruments. For the detection of this contact force, one of the authors previously proposed a new method, called the overcoat method, in which the instrument is supported by sensors positioned on the overcoat pipe. This method requires cancellation of the acceleration forces of the instrument/holder attached to the overcoat sensor. In the present report, the authors attempt to use acceleration sensors to obtain the acceleration forces of the instrument/holder. The new cancellation method provides a force-detection accuracy of approximately 0.05-0.1 N for a dynamic response range of up to approximately 20 Hz, compared to approximately 1 Hz, which was achieved by using acceleration forces based on the theoretical robot motion.

  6. Estimating dynamic external hand forces during manual materials handling based on ground reaction forces and body segment accelerations.

    PubMed

    Faber, Gert S; Chang, Chien-Chi; Kingma, Idsart; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-10-18

    Direct measurement of hand forces during assessment of manual materials handling is infeasible in most field studies and some laboratory studies (e.g., during patient handling). Therefore, this study proposed and evaluated the performance of a novel hand force estimation method based on ground reaction forces (GRFs) and body segment accelerations. Ten male subjects performed a manual lifting/carrying task while an optoelectronic motion tracking system measured 3D full body kinematics, a force plate measured 3D GRFs and an instrumented box measured 3D hand forces. The estimated 3D hand forces were calculated by taking the measured GRF vector and subtracting the force vectors due to weight and acceleration of all body segments. Root-mean-square difference (RMSD) between estimated and measured hand forces ranged from 11 to 27N. When ignoring the segment accelerations (just subtracting body weight from the GRFs), the hand force estimation errors were much higher, with RMSDs ranging from 21 to 101N. Future studies should verify the performance of the proposed hand force estimation method when using an ambulatory field measurement system.

  7. Terbium induced glassy magnetism in La,Ca-based cobaltites

    SciTech Connect

    Maryško, M. Hejtmánek, J.; Jirák, Z.; Kaman, O.; Knížek, K.

    2014-05-07

    The La{sub 0.8–x}Tb{sub x}Ca{sub 0.2}CoO{sub 3} cobaltites of orthoperovskite Pbnm structure were investigated by the X-ray and neutron diffraction, specific heat, and magnetization measurements. The terbium doping has two important effects, it increases the size disorder on perovskite A-sites and influences the magnetic properties due to large Ising-type moments (∼8.9 Bohr magnetons per Tb). The compounds show a bulk magnetic moment below T{sub C} = 82 K, 53 K, and 30 K for x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3, respectively. The neutron diffraction evidences a long-range ferromagnetic arrangement of cobalt moments, combined below ∼20 K with ordering of terbium moments in a canted arrangement. A homogeneous magnetic phase is proved for the x = 0.1 sample, while x = 0.2 and 0.3 are in an intrinsically non-homogeneous magnetic state with long-range ordering only comprising 55% and 30% of the sample volumes. The ac susceptibility experiments prove a glassy character of the terbium doped samples and provide arguments for the short-range ordering above T{sub C} and wide distribution of relaxation times.

  8. Tailoring force interactions for solvent-based processing of ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woan, Karran V.

    Environmental pollution resulting from burn-off is a major concern during ceramics processing. Focus on decreasing organic content and increasing recovery of solvents has become very desirable both from a manufacturing plant standpoint as well as from the standpoint of the government and its people. Colloid processing advances using atomic force microscopy is presented as a means to develop a solvent-based system through which interactions of particles in suspensions with the wall or with themselves can be tailored without the use of organic dispersants. Predictions are made and expected force interactions are calculated for silica particle interactions with a steel wall under various liquid environments. Attachment of a colloid sphere atop of an AFM cantilever allows for the measurement of interaction between the sphere and a surface. Van der Waals interactions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments are specifically calculated and addressed and the effect of porosity is compared with the idealized solid-sphere case. Furthermore, development of methodologies to examine force interactions of particles (both hydrophobic and hydrophilic) in solvents is detailed.

  9. Geothermal studies at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, L.; Grant, B.

    1981-05-01

    Due to an effort by government installations to discontinue use of natural gas, alternative energy sources are being investigated at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico. New Mexico has geologic characteristics favorable for geothermal energy utilization. Local heat flow and geochemical studies indicate a normal subsurface temperature regime. The alluvial deposits, however, extend to great depths where hot fluids, heated by the normal geothermal gradient, could be encountered. Two potential models for tapping geothermal energy are presented: the basin model and the fault model.

  10. Vandenberg Air Force Base Pressure Gradient Wind Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Warning category winds can adversely impact day-to-day space lift operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. NASA's Launch Services Program and other programs at VAFB use wind forecasts issued by the 30 Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) to determine if they need to limit activities or protect property such as a launch vehicle. The 30 OSSWF tasked the AMU to develop an automated Excel graphical user interface that includes pressure gradient thresholds between specific observing stations under different synoptic regimes to aid forecasters when issuing wind warnings. This required the AMU to determine if relationships between the variables existed.

  11. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC3 AIR FORCE BUILDING (BLDG. 761) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC-3 AIR FORCE BUILDING (BLDG. 761) FROM THE SOUTHWEST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, SLC-3 Air Force Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC3 AIR FORCE BUILDING (BLDG. 761) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC-3 AIR FORCE BUILDING (BLDG. 761) FROM THE NORTHWEST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, SLC-3 Air Force Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. Eielson Air Force Base OU-1 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.T.; Jarvis, T.T.; Van Houten, N.C.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment report is the second volume in a set of three volumes for operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The companion documents contain the Remedial Investigation and the Feasibility Study. Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) is one of several groups of hazardous waste sites located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska. The operable units at Eielson are typically characterized by petroleum, oil, lubricant/solvent contamination, and by the presence of organics floating at the water table. In 1989 and 1990, firms under contract to the Air Force conducted field studies to gather information about the extent of chemical contamination in soil, groundwater, and soil air pore space (soil gas) at the site. This report documents the results of a baseline risk assessment, which uses the 1989 and 1991 site characterization database to quantify the potential human health risk associated with past Base industrial activities in the vicinity of OU-1. Background data collected in 1992 were also used in the preparation of this report.

  14. Feedback Control of Floor Reaction Force Based on Force-Reflecting-Type Multilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kazuki; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Real-world haptics is being studied not only for improving feedback on real-world haptic information in teleoperation but also for developing key technologies for future human support. For the remote operating of systems at distant places, haptic information is required in addition to visual information. The haptic information around a work environment can be the floor reaction force, which can be obtained using a movement-type haptic device. The floor reaction force from the environment that the mobile haptic device touches is fed back accurately to the operator. First, this paper proposes a general force-reflecting-type multilateral control. Second, this paper extends the control to feedback control of the floor reaction force by using force-reflecting-type multilateral control and a novel haptic device employing a biped robot with a slave system. The position response of a master system is transformed to a leg tip position command for the biped-type haptic device. In addition, the floor reaction force determined by the biped-type haptic device is fed back to the master system. The proposed method can determine the force feedback to the sole of the foot, which is not possible with a conventional stationary system. As a result, the floor reaction force from a large area can be obtained, and the operability of the control system is improved by using the proposed system.

  15. A novel reciprocating micropump based on Lorentz force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Hakimsima, Abbas; Shafii, Mohammad Behshad

    2015-03-01

    Lorentz force is the pumping basis of many electromagnetic micropumps used in lab-on-a-chip. In this paper a novel reciprocating single-chamber micropump is proposed, in which the actuation technique is based on Lorentz force acting on an array of microwires attached on a membrane surface. An alternating current is applied through the microwires in the presence of a magnetic field. The resultant force causes the membrane to oscillate and pushes the fluid to flow through microchannel using a ball-valve. The pump chamber (3 mm depth) was fabricated on a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate using laser engraving technique. The chamber was covered by a 60 μm thick hyper-elastic latex rubber diaphragm. Two miniature permanent magnets capable of providing magnetic field of 0.09 T at the center of the diaphragm were mounted on each side of the chamber. Square wave electric current with low-frequencies was generated using a function generator. Cylindrical copper microwires (250 μm diameter and 5 mm length) were attached side-by-side on top surface of the diaphragm. Thin loosely attached wires were used as connectors to energize the electrodes. Due to large displacement length of the diaphragm (~3 mm) a high efficiency (~90%) ball valve (2 mm diameter stainless steel ball in a tapered tubing structure) was used in the pump outlet. The micropump exhibits a flow rate as high as 490 μl/s and pressure up to 1.5 kPa showing that the pump is categorized among high-flow-rate mechanical micropumps.

  16. 33 CFR 165.1184 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION... Coast Guard District § 165.1184 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1184 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION... Coast Guard District § 165.1184 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1184 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION... Coast Guard District § 165.1184 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo...

  19. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. Thermodynamic properties and atomic structure of Ca-based liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poizeau, Sophie

    To identify the most promising positive electrodes for Ca-based liquid metal batteries, the thermodynamic properties of diverse Ca-based liquid alloys were investigated. The thermodynamic properties of Ca-Sb alloys were determined by emf measurements. It was found that Sb as positive electrode would provide the highest voltage for Ca-based liquid metal batteries (1 V). The price of such a battery would be competitive for the grid-scale energy storage market. The impact of Pb, a natural impurity of Sb, was predicted successfully and confirmed via electrochemical measurements. It was shown that the impact on the open circuit voltage would be minor. Indeed, the interaction between Ca and Sb was demonstrated to be much stronger than between Ca and Pb using thermodynamic modeling, which explains why the partial thermodynamic properties of Ca would not vary much with the addition of Pb to Sb. However, the usage of the positive electrode would be reduced, which would limit the interest of a Pb-Sb positive electrode. Throughout this work, the molecular interaction volume model (MIVM) was used for the first time for alloys with thermodynamic properties showing strong negative deviation from ideality. This model showed that systems such as Ca-Sb have strong short-range order: Ca is most stable when its first nearest neighbors are Sb. This is consistent with what the more traditional thermodynamic model, the regular association model, would predict. The advantages of the MIVM are the absence of assumption regarding the composition of an associate, and the reduced number of fitting parameters (2 instead of 5). Based on the parameters derived from the thermodynamic modeling using the MIVM, a new potential of mixing for liquid alloys was defined to compare the strength of interaction in different Ca-based alloys. Comparing this trend with the strength of interaction in the solid state of these systems (assessed by the energy of formation of the intermetallics), the systems with

  2. Calcium isotope constraints on the uptake and sources of Ca 2+ in a base-poor forest: A new concept of combining stable (δ 44/42 Ca) and radiogenic ( &z.epsiv; Ca ) signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkaš, Juraj; Déjeant, Adrien; Novák, Martin; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2011-11-01

    Plant-available reserves of major base cations, Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, decreased markedly in soils over the past century, thus posing a potential threat to forest ecosystem health. Trees are thought to obtain dissolved Ca 2+ ions mainly from an easily accessible soil-water reservoir also termed the 'exchangeable cation pool'. The status of Ca reserves in this soil pool is sensitive to anthropogenic perturbations such as soil acidification induced by acid rain and/or excessive timber harvesting. Here we show that in a base-poor forest of the northeastern USA (i.e. Wachusett Mountain, Massachusetts) the 'exchangeable Ca pool' of deeper mineral soils has a unique isotope signature that is significantly enriched in the radiogenic 40Ca, due to the dissolution of K-rich silicate minerals such as biotite. Using a simple isotope mass balance, and assuming that the input of Ca from biotite has a ɛCa signature of ˜16, the results of our calculation indicate that the weathering of biotite may supply a sizeable fraction, up to 25%, of Ca 2+ ions into the 'exchangeable cation pool' of deeper mineral soils. Importantly, samples of local vegetation (i.e. woody tissues of red oak) show no detectable excess of the radiogenic 40Ca, and based on our model the upper limit of a possible biotite-derived Ca contribution in vegetation is estimated at ˜5%. We also found no evidence of the radiogenic 40Ca signal in the samples of forest floor and the uppermost organic-rich soils (0-15 cm depth), which in turn suggest that over the long-term development of the forest and its organic matter accumulation, the vegetation growth must have also relied primarily on the non-radiogenic Ca sources. Based on our experimental data, such sources may include (i) wet atmospheric deposition, (ii) the organically-complexed Ca in topsoil horizons, and (iii) chemical weathering and/or fungal-mediated dissolution of apatite and Ca-rich plagioclase. Hence, our stable and radiogenic Ca isotope data indicate that

  3. Force-compensated hydrogel-based pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Kangfa; Gerlach, Gerald; Guenther, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the design, simulation, assembly and testing of a force-compensated hydrogel-based pH sensor. In the conventional deflection method, a piezoresistive pressure sensor is used as a chemical-mechanical-electronic transducer to measure the volume change of a pH-sensitive hydrogel. In this compensation method, the pH-sensitive hydrogel keeps its volume constant during the whole measuring process, independent of applied pH value. In order to maintain a balanced state, an additional thermal actuator is integrated into the close-loop sensor system with higher precision and faster dynamic response. Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) with 5 mol% monomer 3-acrylamido propionic acid (AAmPA) is used as the temperature-sensitive hydrogel, while poly (vinyl alcohol) with poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) serves as the pH-sensitive hydrogel. A thermal simulation is introduced to assess the temperature distribution of the whole microsystem, especially the temperature influence on both hydrogels. Following tests are detailed to verify the working functions of a sensor based on pH-sensitive hydrogel and an actuator based on temperature-sensitive hydrogel. A miniaturized prototype is assembled and investigated in deionized water: the response time amounts to about 25 min, just half of that one of a sensor based on the conventional deflection method. The results confirm the applicability of t he compensation method to the hydrogel-based sensors.

  4. Water Resources Investigations at Edwards Air Force Base since 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California (fig. 1) has relied on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. The extraction of ground water has led to two major problems that can directly affect the mission of EAFB: declining water levels (more than 120 ft since the 1920s) and land subsidence, a gradual downward movement of the land surface (more than 4 ft since the late 1920s). As water levels decline, this valuable resource becomes depleted, thus requiring mitigating measures. Land subsidence has caused cracked (fissured) runways and accelerated erosion on Rogers lakebed. In 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began investigations of the effects of declining water levels and land subsidence at EAFB and possible mitigation measures, such as the injection of imported surface water into the ground-water system. The cooperative investigations included data collection and analyses, numerical simulations of ground-water flow and land subsidence, and development of a preliminary simulation-optimization model. The results of these investigations indicate that the injection of imported water may help to control land subsidence; however, the potential ground-water-quality impacts are unknown.

  5. Ca2+-driven intestinal HCO(3)(-) secretion and CaCO3 precipitation in the European flounder in vivo: influences on acid-base regulation and blood gas transport.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher A; Whittamore, Jonathan M; Wilson, Rod W

    2010-04-01

    Marine teleost fish continuously ingest seawater to prevent dehydration and their intestines absorb fluid by mechanisms linked to three separate driving forces: 1) cotransport of NaCl from the gut fluid; 2) bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) secretion and Cl(-) absorption via Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange fueled by metabolic CO(2); and 3) alkaline precipitation of Ca(2+) as insoluble CaCO(3), which aids H(2)O absorption). The latter two processes involve high rates of epithelial HCO(3)(-) secretion stimulated by intestinal Ca(2+) and can drive a major portion of water absorption. At higher salinities and ambient Ca(2+) concentrations the osmoregulatory role of intestinal HCO(3)(-) secretion is amplified, but this has repercussions for other physiological processes, in particular, respiratory gas transport (as it is fueled by metabolic CO(2)) and acid-base regulation (as intestinal cells must export H(+) into the blood to balance apical HCO(3)(-) secretion). The flounder intestine was perfused in vivo with salines containing 10, 40, or 90 mM Ca(2+). Increasing the luminal Ca(2+) concentration caused a large elevation in intestinal HCO(3)(-) production and excretion. Additionally, blood pH decreased (-0.13 pH units) and plasma partial pressure of CO(2) (Pco(2)) levels were elevated (+1.16 mmHg) at the highest Ca perfusate level after 3 days of perfusion. Increasing the perfusate [Ca(2+)] also produced proportional increases in net acid excretion via the gills. When the net intestinal flux of all ions across the intestine was calculated, there was a greater absorption of anions than cations. This missing cation flux was assumed to be protons, which vary with an almost 1:1 relationship with net acid excretion via the gill. This study illustrates the intimate link between intestinal HCO(3)(-) production and osmoregulation with acid-base balance and respiratory gas exchange and the specific controlling role of ingested Ca(2+) independent of any other ion or overall osmolality in marine

  6. Relighting demonstration project Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, L.L.; Purcell, C.W.; McKay, H.; Harris, L.

    1994-09-01

    Significant energy savings are available through relighting with modern, energy efficient systems. As a demonstration, a relighting project was recently completed at Robins Air Force Base, Warner-Robins, Georgia. The project was designed to overcome a reluctance to pursue large scale relighting of the entire facility due to prior unfavorable experiences and an unusually large non-office working environment. The project followed contemporary lighting design practices, with the added dimension of involving building occupants in the process. Involving building occupants promoted their acceptance of the project and provided needed critical feedback. Their involvement helped secure their assistance in resolving special design concerns involving radio frequency interference and glare. Although often cited as simple, relighting projects are commonly confronted with problems. This document describes problems, foreseen and unforeseen, encountered by this relighting demonstration, and their solutions.

  7. Force feedback microscopy based on an optical beam deflection scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Vitorino, Miguel V.; Rodrigues, Mario S.; Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca

    2014-07-07

    Force feedback microscopy circumvents the jump to contact in atomic force microscopy when using soft cantilevers and quantitatively measures the interaction properties at the nanoscale by simultaneously providing force, force gradient, and dissipation. The force feedback microscope developed so far used an optical cavity to measure the tip displacement. In this Letter, we show that the more conventional optical beam deflection scheme can be used to the same purpose. With this instrument, we have followed the evolution of the Brownian motion of the tip under the influence of a water bridge.

  8. Possibility of Mg- and Ca-based intermetallic compounds as new biodegradable implant materials.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Koji; Fujii, Kenta; Matsugaki, Aira; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2013-10-01

    Mg- or Ca-based intermetallic compounds of Mg2Ca, Mg2Si, Ca2Si and CaMgSi are investigated as possible new candidates for biodegradable implant materials, attempting to improve the degradation behavior compared to Mg and Ca alloys. The reactivity of Ca can be indeed reduced by the formation of compounds with Mg and Si, but its reactivity is still high for applications as an implant material. In contrast, Mg2Si shows a higher corrosion resistance than conventional Mg alloys while retaining biodegradability. In cytotoxicity tests under the severe condition conducted in this study, both pure Mg and Mg2Si showed relatively high cytotoxicity on preosteoblast MC3T3-E1. However, the cell viability cultured in the Mg2Si extract medium was confirmed to be better than that in a pure Mg extract medium in all the conditions investigated with the exception of the 10% extract medium, because of the lower corrosion rate of Mg2Si. The cytotoxicity derived from the Si ion was not significantly detected in the Mg2Si extract medium in the concentration level of ~70 mg/l measured in the present study. For aiming the practical application of Mg2Si as an implant material, however, its brittle nature must be improved.

  9. 41Ca ultratrace determination with isotopic selectivity > 10(12) by diode-laser-based RIMS.

    PubMed

    Müller, P; Bushaw, B A; Blaum, K; Diel, S; Geppert, C; Nähler, A; Trautmann, N; Nörtershäuser, W; Wendt, K

    2001-07-01

    41Ca ultratrace determination by diode-laser-based resonance ionization mass spectrometry with extremely high isotopic selectivity is presented. Application to environmental dosimetry of nuclear reactor components, to cosmochemical investigations of production cross sections, and biomedical isotope-tracer studies of human calcium kinetics are discussed. Future investigations are possible use in 41Ca-radiodating. Depending on the application, 41Ca isotopic abundances in the range of 10(-9) to 10(-15) relative to the dominant stable isotope 40Ca must be determined. Either double- or triple-resonance optical excitation with narrow-band extended cavity diode lasers and subsequent non-resonant photoionization of calcium in a collimated atomic beam were used. The resulting photoions are detected with a quadrupole mass spectrometer optimized for background reduction and neighboring mass suppression. Applying the full triple-resonance scheme provides a selectivity of approximately 5 x 10(12) in the suppression of neighboring isotopes and > 10(8) for isobars, together with an overall detection efficiency of approximately 5 x 10(-5). Measurements on a variety of sample types are discussed; the accuracy and reproducibility of the resulting 41Ca/40Ca isotope ratios was better than 5%.

  10. 8. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Muroc ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Muroc Flight Test Base, Unit History, 1 September 1942 - 30 June 1945. Alfred F. Simpson Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. Maxwell AFB, Alabama. View of concrete base for jet engine rotor balancing machine. Location where photograph was taken not determined, but presumed to be in shops of Building 4505 which had a sizeable machine shop. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar, End of North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 9. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Muroc ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Muroc Flight Test Base, Unit History, 1 September 1942 - 30 June 1945. Alfred F. Simpson Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. Maxwell AFB, Alabama. View of concrete base and brackets of jet engine rotor balancing machine. Location where photograph was taken not determined, but presumed to be in shops of Building 4505. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar, End of North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Sitewide feasibility study Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Lanigan, D.C.; Josephson, G.B.; Bagaasen, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    The Sitewide Feasibility Study (FS) is required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for Eielson Air Force Base (AFB). It is based on findings presented in the Sitewide Remedial Investigation (RI) Report (USAF 1995a), and the Sitewide Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) Report (USAF 1995b). Under the FFA, 64 potential source areas were placed in one of six operable units, based on similar contaminant and environmental characteristics, or were included for evaluation under a Source Evaluation Report (SER). The sitewide RI was directed at contamination that was not confined to an operable unit (OU) or SER source area. The objectives of the sitewide RI were to: Provide information about site characteristics to support individual OU RI/FS efforts and the sitewide RI/FS, including site hydrogeology and determination of background soil and groundwater characteristics; identify and characterize contamination that is not confined or attributable to a specific source area through sitewide monitoring of groundwater and surface water; evaluate cumulative risks to human health and the environment from contamination on a sitewide basis; and provide a mechanism for continued cohesive sitewide monitoring.

  13. Review of wildlife resources of Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1989-01-01

    Wildlife resources are reviewed for purposes of developing a Base Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in Santa Barbara County, California. The review and recommendations were prepared by review of applicable scientific literature and environmental documents for VAFB, discussing information needs with natural resource management professionals at VAFB, and observations of base field conditions. This process found that there are 29 federally listed vertebrates (endangered, threatened, or Category 2) that occur or may occur in the vicinity of VAFB. There are also 63 other state listed or regionally declining species that may occur in the vicinity of VAFB. Habitats of VAFB represent a very valuable environmental resource for rare and declining wildlife in California. However, little information is available on VAFB wildlife resources other than lists of species that occur or are expected to occur. Recommendations are presented to initiate a long-term wildlife monitoring program at VAFB to provide information for environmental impact assessment and wise land use planning.

  14. History of wildland fires on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickson, Diana E.

    1988-01-01

    The fire history of the past 50 years for Vandenberg AFB, California was determined using aerial photography, field investigation, and historical and current written records. This constitutes a record of the vegetation age classes for the entire base. The location, cause, and fuel type for sixty fires from this time period were determined. The fires were mapped and entered into a geographic infomation system (GIS) for Vandenberg. Fire history maps derived from this GIS were printed at 1:9600 scale and are on deposit at the Vandenberg Environmental Task Force Office. Although some ecologically significant plant communities on Vandenberg are adapted to fire, no natural fire frequency could be determined, since only one fire possibly caused by lightning occurred in the area now within the base since 1937. Observations made during this study suggest that burning may encourage the invasion of exotic species into chaparral, in particular Burton Mesa or sandhill chaparral, an unusual and geographically limited form of chaparral found on the base.

  15. Vegetation studies on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hickson, Diana E.; Hinkle, C. Ross

    1988-01-01

    Vandenburg Air Force Base, located in coastal central California with an area of 98,400 ac, contains resources of considerable biological significance. Available information on the vegetation and flora of Vandenburg is summarized and new data collected in this project are presented. A bibliography of 621 references dealing with vegetation and related topics related to Vanderburg was compiled from computer and manual literature searches and a review of past studies of the base. A preliminary floristic list of 642 taxa representing 311 genera and 80 families was compiled from past studies and plants identified in the vegetation sampling conducted in this project. Fifty-two special interest plant species are known to occur or were suggested to occur. Vegetation was sampled using permanent plots and transects in all major plant communities including chaparral, Bishop pine forest, tanbark oak forest, annual grassland, oak woodland, coastal sage scrub, purple sage scrub, coastal dune scrub, coastal dunes, box elder riparian woodland, will riparian woodland, freshwater marsh, salt marsh, and seasonal wetlands. Comparison of the new vegetation data to the compostie San Diego State University data does not indicate major changes in most communities since the original study. Recommendations are made for additional studies needed to maintain and extend the environmental data base and for management actions to improve resource protection.

  16. Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M.

    2014-10-28

    The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

  17. Towards a force field based on density fitting.

    PubMed

    Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Cisneros, G Andrés; Reinhardt, Peter; Gresh, Nohad; Darden, Thomas A

    2006-03-14

    Total intermolecular interaction energies are determined with a first version of the Gaussian electrostatic model (GEM-0), a force field based on a density fitting approach using s-type Gaussian functions. The total interaction energy is computed in the spirit of the sum of interacting fragment ab initio (SIBFA) force field by separately evaluating each one of its components: electrostatic (Coulomb), exchange repulsion, polarization, and charge transfer intermolecular interaction energies, in order to reproduce reference constrained space orbital variation (CSOV) energy decomposition calculations at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level. The use of an auxiliary basis set restricted to spherical Gaussian functions facilitates the rotation of the fitted densities of rigid fragments and enables a fast and accurate density fitting evaluation of Coulomb and exchange-repulsion energy, the latter using the overlap model introduced by Wheatley and Price [Mol. Phys. 69, 50718 (1990)]. The SIBFA energy scheme for polarization and charge transfer has been implemented using the electric fields and electrostatic potentials generated by the fitted densities. GEM-0 has been tested on ten stationary points of the water dimer potential energy surface and on three water clusters (n = 16,20,64). The results show very good agreement with density functional theory calculations, reproducing the individual CSOV energy contributions for a given interaction as well as the B3LYP total interaction energies with errors below kBT at room temperature. Preliminary results for Coulomb and exchange-repulsion energies of metal cation complexes and coupled cluster singles doubles electron densities are discussed.

  18. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging-Based Needle Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Rotemberg, Veronica; Palmeri, Mark; Rosenzweig, Stephen; Grant, Stuart; Macleod, David; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle placement is widely used in the clinical setting, particularly for central venous catheter placement, tissue biopsy and regional anesthesia. Difficulties with ultrasound guidance in these areas often result from steep needle insertion angles and spatial offsets between the imaging plane and the needle. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging leads to improved needle visualization because it uses a standard diagnostic scanner to perform radiation force based elasticity imaging, creating a displacement map that displays tissue stiffness variations. The needle visualization in ARFI images is independent of needle-insertion angle and also extends needle visibility out of plane. Although ARFI images portray needles well, they often do not contain the usual B-mode landmarks. Therefore, a three-step segmentation algorithm has been developed to identify a needle in an ARFI image and overlay the needle prediction on a coregistered B-mode image. The steps are: (1) contrast enhancement by median filtration and Laplacian operator filtration, (2) noise suppression through displacement estimate correlation coefficient thresholding and (3) smoothing by removal of outliers and best-fit line prediction. The algorithm was applied to data sets from horizontal 18, 21 and 25 gauge needles between 0–4 mm offset in elevation from the transducer imaging plane and to 18G needles on the transducer axis (in plane) between 10° and 35° from the horizontal. Needle tips were visualized within 2 mm of their actual position for both horizontal needle orientations up to 1.5 mm off set in elevation from the transducer imaging plane and on-axis angled needles between 10°–35° above the horizontal orientation. We conclude that segmented ARFI images overlaid on matched B-mode images hold promise for improved needle visibility in many clinical applications. PMID:21608445

  19. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; MacDill Air Force....768 Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. The following area is a... title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of MacDill Air Force Base,...

  20. "Galileo's Machine": Late Notes on Free Fall, Projectile Motion, and the Force of Percussion (ca. 1638-1639)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvia, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    My paper focuses upon the problem of determining the nature, establishing the proportionality, and measuring the intensity of the force of percussion of a projected or falling body, as treated in the Sixth Day of Galileo's Discorsi e dimostrazioni matematiche intorno a due nuove scienze (1638). This fragment was written around 1638-1639 as part of two additional Days of the Discorsi, which Galileo never finished and remained unpublished until 1718. Galileo's last works on percussion show a significant step towards a generalization of his own views on uniform and accelerated motion that will later lead to the Newtonian principle of inertia. The experiment with two equal weights hanging on a pulley, performed in Arcetri during the same period, is compared with the Paduan 1604-1608 experience of the "water balance." Both account for more than three decades of inquiries into what Galileo called forza della percossa, which marked the transition from preclassical to classical mechanics.

  1. Ligand-based virtual screening interface between PyMOL and LiSiCA.

    PubMed

    Dilip, Athira; Lešnik, Samo; Štular, Tanja; Janežič, Dušanka; Konc, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-based virtual screening of large small-molecule databases is an important step in the early stages of drug development. It is based on the similarity principle and is used to reduce the chemical space of large databases to a manageable size where chosen ligands can be experimentally tested. Ligand-based virtual screening can also be used to identify bioactive molecules with different basic scaffolds compared to already known bioactive molecules, thus having the potential to increase the structural variability of compounds. Here, we present an interface between the popular molecular graphics system PyMOL and the ligand-based virtual screening software LiSiCA available at http://insilab.org/lisica-plugin and demonstrate how this interface can be used in the early stages of drug discovery process.Graphical AbstractLigand-based virtual screening interface between PyMOL and LiSiCA. PMID:27606012

  2. A voice coil motor based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shengdong; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Liangzhou; Zhou, Liping; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    In tactile scanning profiler, the measuring force would change in a wide range when it was used for profile measurement in a large range, which could possibly destroy the measured surface. To solve the problem, measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was needed. In the paper, a voice coil motor-based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was designed. In the design, a low stiffness coefficient spring was used to provide contact force, while a voice coil motor (VCM) to balance the spring force so that the contact force could be kept for constant measuring force. A VCM was designed specially, and for active measuring force control, a precision current source circuit under the control of a DSP unit was designed to drive the VCM. The performance of voice coil motor based measuring force control system had been tested, and its good characteristics were verified.

  3. Spray water reactivation/pelletization of spent CaO-based sorbent from calcium looping cycles.

    PubMed

    Manovic, Vasilije; Wu, Yinghai; He, Ian; Anthony, Edward J

    2012-11-20

    This paper presents a novel method for reactivation of spent CaO-based sorbents from calcium looping (CaL) cycles for CO(2) capture. A spent Cadomin limestone-derived sorbent sample from a pilot-scale fluidized bed (FBC) CaL reactor is used for reactivation. The calcined sorbent is sprayed by water in a pelletization vessel. This reactivation method produces pellets ready to be used in FBC reactors. Moreover, this procedure enables the addition of calcium aluminate cement to further enhance sorbent strength. The characterization of reactivated material by nitrogen physisorption (BET, BJH) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the enhanced morphology of sorbent particles for reaction with CO(2). This improved CO(2) carrying capacity was demonstrated in calcination/carbonation tests performed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Finally, the resulting pellets displayed a high resistance to attrition during fluidization in a bubbling bed.

  4. Optical fiber-based force transducer for microscale samples.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri Rao, R V; Kalelkar, Chirag; Pullarkat, Pramod A

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the design, instrumentation, and calibration of a versatile force transducer with feedback control, called the Micro-Extensional Rheometer (MER). A force range of eight decades (1-10(8) pN) and a displacement range of four decades (10-10(5) nm) with a spatial resolution of the order of nanometers are accessible with the instrument. A feedback-loop algorithm is used to control the commanded force or the extensional strain on the sample and implement different rheometric protocols such as step-strain, step-force, exponential strain, among others. The device may also be used to measure the forces exerted by active suspensions, pulling neurons, etc. PMID:24182163

  5. Studies of Surface morphology and Atomic Force Microscope-induced Surface Modifications in Calcium Manganese Oxide (CaMnO) Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Anthony; Hart, Cacie; Chaudhry, Adeel; Lawson, Bridget; Ferrone, Natalie; Neubauer, Samuel; Houston, David; Kolagani, Rajeswari; Schaefer, David

    CaMnOis a material of interest for applications as a catalyst for renewable energy applications. Our recent work on epitaxial thin films of this material has shown that films with a tensile lattice mismatch strain exhibit structural and electrical properties that indicate oxygen deficiency. We are studying the influence of strain and oxygen stoichiometry variations on surface morphology as revealed by atomic force microscopy. Our previous work in epitaxial thin films of the hole doped manganite nanoscale has demonstrated surface modifications induced by a voltage-biased AFM tip. Such surface modifications have been shown to be associated with changes in cation and oxygen stoichiometry. We will report results of similar studies on strained CaMnOthin films; relevant for understanding the surface mobility of oxygen vacancies. We acknowledge support from the Towson Office of University Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant and Undergraduate Research Grant from the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, and Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies.

  6. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Photograph Files, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Early view of the Control Tower (designated T-65, Building 4500) fitted out with radio antennae. Structure at base of tower was T42 (later Building 4503), Flight Operations - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Radio & Control Tower T-65, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Evaluation of the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Ca3SiO5-based cement.

    PubMed

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Logar, Gustavo de Almeida; Mori, Graziela Garrido; Teixeira, Ligia Moraes; Silva, Bruna Camila Ferreira da; Moraes, Ana Elisa Maranho de; Cabral, Felipe André

    2016-01-01

    Ca3SiO5 is new cement based on the composition of Portland that has been developed to have superior physicochemical and biological properties. In a clinical evaluation, the cement did not appear to have cytotoxic properties and allowed for the proliferation of pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts. However, no previous studies have evaluated the genotoxicity or the mutagenicity of Ca3SiO5in vivo. Therefore, the goal of this study is to evaluate the genotoxic and mutagenic potential of Ca3SiO5-based cement in vivo. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups (n = 8). Group A rats received subcutaneous implantation of Ca3SiO5 in the dorsum. Group B rats received a single dose of cyclophosphamide (positive control). Group C rats received subcutaneous implantation of empty tubes in the dorsum (negative control). After 24 hours, all animals were euthanized and the bone marrow of the femurs was collected for use in the comet assay and the micronucleus test. The comet assay revealed that the Ca3SiO5 group had a tail intensity of 23.57 ± 7.70%, the cyclophosphamide group had a tail intensity of 27.43 ± 7.40%, and the negative control group had a tail intensity of 24.75 ± 5.55%. The average number of micronuclei was 6.25 (standard deviation, SD = 3.53) in the Ca3SiO5 group, 9.75 (SD = 2.49) in the cyclophosphamide group, and 0.75 (SD = 1.03) in the negative control group. There was an increase in the micronuclei frequency in the Ca3SiO5 group compared to that of the negative control group (p < 0.05). Our data showed that exposure to the Ca3SiO5-based cement resulted in an increase in the frequency of micronuclei, but no genotoxicity was detected according to the comet assay. PMID:27556557

  8. Comparison of force sensors for atomic force microscopy based on quartz tuning forks and length-extensional resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Pielmeier, Florian; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2011-09-01

    The force sensor is key to the performance of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nowadays, most atomic force microscopes use micromachined force sensors made from silicon, but piezoelectric quartz sensors are being applied at an increasing rate, mainly in vacuum. These self-sensing force sensors allow a relatively easy upgrade of a scanning tunneling microscope to a combined scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope. Two fundamentally different types of quartz sensors have achieved atomic resolution: the “needle sensor,” which is based on a length-extensional resonator, and the “qPlus sensor,” which is based on a tuning fork. Here, we calculate and measure the noise characteristics of these sensors. We find four noise sources: deflection detector noise, thermal noise, oscillator noise, and thermal drift noise. We calculate the effect of these noise sources as a factor of sensor stiffness, bandwidth, and oscillation amplitude. We find that for self-sensing quartz sensors, the deflection detector noise is independent of sensor stiffness, while the remaining three noise sources increase strongly with sensor stiffness. Deflection detector noise increases with bandwidth to the power of 1.5, while thermal noise and oscillator noise are proportional to the square root of the bandwidth. Thermal drift noise, however, is inversely proportional to bandwidth. The first three noise sources are inversely proportional to amplitude while thermal drift noise is independent of the amplitude. Thus, we show that the earlier finding that quoted an optimal signal-to-noise ratio for oscillation amplitudes similar to the range of the forces is still correct when considering all four frequency noise contributions. Finally, we suggest how the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensors can be improved further, we briefly discuss the challenges of mounting tips, and we compare the noise performance of self-sensing quartz sensors and optically detected Si cantilevers.

  9. Evidence for insolation and Pacific forcing of late glacial through Holocene climate in the Central Mojave Desert (Silver Lake, CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Matthew E.; Knell, Edward J.; Anderson, William T.; Lachniet, Matthew S.; Palermo, Jennifer; Eeg, Holly; Lucero, Ricardo; Murrieta, Rosa; Arevalo, Andrea; Silveira, Emily; Hiner, Christine A.

    2015-09-01

    Silver Lake is the modern terminal playa of the Mojave River in southern California (USA). As a result, it is well located to record both influences from the winter precipitation dominated San Bernardino Mountains - the source of the Mojave River - and from the late summer to early fall North American monsoon at Silver Lake. Here, we present various physical, chemical and biological data from a new radiocarbon-dated, 8.2 m sediment core taken from Silver Lake that spans modern through 14.8 cal ka BP. Texturally, the core varies between sandy clay, clayey sand, and sand-silt-clay, often with abrupt sedimentological transitions. These grain-size changes are used to divide the core into six lake status intervals over the past 14.8 cal ka BP. Notable intervals include a dry Younger Dryas chronozone, a wet early Holocene terminating 7.8 - 7.4 cal ka BP, a distinct mid-Holocene arid interval, and a late Holocene return to ephemeral lake conditions. A comparison to potential climatic forcings implicates a combination of changing summer - winter insolation and tropical and N Pacific sea-surface temperature dynamics as the primary drivers of Holocene climate in the central Mojave Desert.

  10. Development of Tuning Fork Based Probes for Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilian, Romaneh; Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M.; Torrez, Neil; Alizadeh, Amirali; Askari, Davood

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the development of tuning fork-based AFM/STM probes in NaugaNeedles LLC for use in atomic force microscopy. These probes can be mounted on different carriers per customers' request. (e.g., RHK carrier, Omicron carrier, and tuning fork on a Sapphire disk). We are able to design and engineer tuning forks on any type of carrier used in the market. We can attach three types of tips on the edge of a tuning fork prong (i.e., growing Ag2Ga nanoneedles at any arbitrary angle, cantilever of AFM tip, and tungsten wire) with lengths from 100-500 μm. The nanoneedle is located vertical to the fork. Using a suitable insulation and metallic coating, we can make QPlus sensors that can detect tunneling current during the AFM scan. To make Qplus sensors, the entire quartz fork will be coated with an insulating material, before attaching the nanoneedle. Then, the top edge of one prong is coated with a thin layer of conductive metal and the nanoneedle is attached to the fork end of the metal coated prong. The metal coating provides electrical connection to the tip for tunneling current readout and to the electrodes and used to read the QPlus current. Since the amount of mass added to the fork is minimal, the resonance frequency spectrum does not change and still remains around 32.6 KHz and the Q factor is around 1,200 in ambient condition. These probes can enhance the performance of tuning fork based atomic microscopy.

  11. Porous spherical CaO-based sorbents via PSS-assisted fast precipitation for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengping; Fan, Lijing; Li, Chun; Zhao, Yujun; Ma, Xinbin

    2014-10-22

    In this paper, we report the development of synthetic CaO-based sorbents via a fast precipitation method with the assistance of sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). The effect of PSS on physical properties of the CaO sorbents and their CO2 capture performance were investigated. The presence of PSS dispersed the CaO particles effectively as well as increased their specific surface area and pore volume remarkably. The obtained porous spherical structure facilitated CO2 to diffuse and react with inner CaO effectively, resulting in a significant improvement in initial CO2 carbonation capacity. A proper amount of Mg(2+) precursor solution was doped during a fast precipitation process to gain CaO-based sorbents with a high anti-sintering property, which maintained the porous spherical structure with the high specific surface area. CaO-based sorbents derived from a MgxCa1-xCO3 precursor existed in the form of CaO and MgO. The homogeneous distribution of MgO in the CaO-based sorbents effectively prevented the CaO crystallite from growing and sintering, further resulting in the favorable long-term durability with carbonation capacity of about 52.0% after 30 carbonation/calcination cycles.

  12. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca2+ and H+ Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I.; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca2+ and H+ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot®565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca2+ or H+ probes. These ‘Rubies’ are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid) for H+ or Ca2+ sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca2+ and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging. PMID:26404317

  13. Role of hydrogen in the electronic properties of CaFeAsH-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. N.; Liu, D. Y.; Zou, L. J.; Pickett, W. E.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the hydride superconductor CaFeAsH, which superconducts up to 47 K when electron doped with La, and the isovalent alloy system CaFeAsH1 -xFx are investigated using density functional based methods. The Q ⃗=(π ,π ,0 ) peak of the nesting function ξ (q ⃗) is found to be extremely strong and sharp, and the additional structure in ξ (q ⃗) associated with the near-circular Fermi surfaces (FSs) that may impact low energy excitations is quantified. The unusual band introduced by H, which shows strong dispersion perpendicular to the FeAs layers, is shown to be connected to a peculiar van Hove singularity just below the Fermi level. This band provides a three-dimensional electron ellipsoid Fermi surface not present in other Fe-based superconducting materials nor in CaFeAsF. Electron doping by 25% La or Co has a minor effect on this ellipsoid Fermi surface, but suppresses FS nesting strongly, consistent with the viewpoint that eliminating strong nesting and the associated magnetic order allows high Tc superconductivity to emerge. Various aspects of the isovalent alloy system CaFeAsH1 -xFx and means of electron doping are discussed in terms of influence of incipient bands.

  14. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  15. Pore structure effects on Ca-based sorbent sulfation capacity at medium temperatures: activated carbon as sorbent/catalyst support.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Lin, Chiou-Liang; Chang, Yu-Chen

    2002-11-01

    The reaction between three different Ca-based sorbents and SO2 were studied in a medium temperature range (473-773 K). The largest SO2 capture was found with Ca(OH)2 at 773 K, 126.31 mg SO2 x g Ca(OH)2(-1), and the influence of SO2 concentration on the sorbent utilization was observed. Investigations of the internal porous structure of Ca-based sorbents showed that the initial reaction rate was controlled by the surface area, and once the sulfated products were produced, pore structure dominated. To increase the surface area of Ca-based sorbents available to interact with and retain SO2, one kind of CaO/ activated carbon (AC) sorbent/catalyst was prepared to study the effect of AC on the dispersion of Ca-based materials. The results indicated that the Ca-based material dispersed on high-surface-area AC had more capacities for SO2 than unsupported Ca-based sorbents. The initial reaction rates of the reaction between SO2 and Ca-based sorbents and the prepared CaO/AC sorbents/catalysts were measured. Results showed that the reaction rate apparently increased with the presence of AC. It was concluded that CaO/AC was the active material in the desulfurization reaction. AC acting as the support can play a role to supply O2 to increase the affinity to SO2. Moreover, when AC is acting as a support, the surface oxygen functional group formed on the surface of AC can serve as a new site for SO2 adsorption.

  16. An analysis of rumor propagation based on propagation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhen-jun; Liu, Yong-mei; Wang, Ke-xi

    2016-02-01

    A propagation force is introduced into the analysis of rumor propagation to address uncertainty in the process. The propagation force is portrayed as a fuzzy variable, and a category of new parameters with fuzzy variables is defined. The classic susceptible, infected, recovered (SIR) model is modified using these parameters, a fuzzy reproductive number is introduced into the modified model, and the rationality of the fuzzy reproductive number is illuminated through calculation and comparison. Rumor control strategies are also discussed.

  17. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: "Intermolecular Forces"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-01-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students' understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student's alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight…

  18. Chiral EFT based nuclear forces: achievements and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machleidt, R.; Sammarruca, F.

    2016-08-01

    During the past two decades, chiral effective field theory has become a popular tool to derive nuclear forces from first principles. Two-nucleon interactions have been worked out up to sixth order of chiral perturbation theory and three-nucleon forces up to fifth order. Applications of some of these forces have been conducted in nuclear few- and many-body systems—with a certain degree of success. But in spite of these achievements, we are still faced with great challenges. Among them is the issue of a proper uncertainty quantification of predictions obtained when applying these forces in ab initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. A related problem is the order by order convergence of the chiral expansion. We start this review with a pedagogical introduction and then present the current status of the field of chiral nuclear forces. This is followed by a discussion of representative examples for the application of chiral two- and three-body forces in the nuclear many-body system including convergence issues.

  19. CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Firing Control Building, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 75 FR 30689 - Modification of Class C Airspace; Beale Air Force Base, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Department of Transportation (DOT) Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and..., 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Modification of Class C Airspace; Beale...

  1. Credit USAF, ca. 1943. Original housed in the Muroc Flight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF, ca. 1943. Original housed in the Muroc Flight Test Base, Unit History, 1 September 1942 - 30 June 1945. Alfred F. Simpson Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. Maxwell AFB, Alabama. Historic view looking north across southwest end of swimming pool as army personnel work on finishing the pool bottom. View looks towards Mess Hall (T-10) on Second Street - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Swimming Pool, Second Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. 4. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Muroc ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Muroc Flight Test Base, Unit History, 1 September 1942 - 30 June 1945. Alfred F. Simpson Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. Maxwell AFB, Alabama. Photographic copy of photograph captioned "Hangar No. 2 Hydraulics Room." Location within Building 4402 not determined. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar No. 2, First & A Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Spring, Sarah E; Miles, A Keith; Anderson, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 microl/L of TCE and 0.07 microl/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals.

  4. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spring, Sarah E.; Miles, A. Keith; Anderson, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 μl/L of TCE and 0.07 μl/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals.

  5. A novel force field parameter optimization method based on LSSVR for ECEPP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunling; Tao, Lan; Lu, Jianjun; Xu, Shuo; Ma, Qin; Duan, Qingling

    2011-03-23

    In this paper, we propose a novel force field parameter optimization method based on LSSVR and optimize the torsion energy parameters of ECEPP force field. In this method force field parameter optimization problem is turned into a support vector regression problem. Protein samples for regression model training are chosen from Protein Data Bank. The experiments show that the optimized force-field parameters make both α-helix and β-hairpin structures more consistent with the experimental implications than the original parameters.

  6. High-precision horizontally directed force measurements for high dead loads based on a differential electromagnetic force compensation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyan, Suren; Rivero, Michel; Schleichert, Jan; Halbedel, Bernd; Fröhlich, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an application for realizing high-precision horizontally directed force measurements in the order of several tens of nN in combination with high dead loads of about 10 N. The set-up is developed on the basis of two identical state-of-the-art electromagnetic force compensation (EMFC) high precision balances. The measurement resolution of horizontally directed single-axis quasi-dynamic forces is 20 nN over the working range of  ±100 μN. The set-up operates in two different measurement modes: in the open-loop mode the mechanical deflection of the proportional lever is an indication of the acting force, whereas in the closed-loop mode it is the applied electric current to the coil inside the EMFC balance that compensates deflection of the lever to the offset zero position. The estimated loading frequency (cutoff frequency) of the set-up in the open-loop mode is about 0.18 Hz, in the closed-loop mode it is 0.7 Hz. One of the practical applications that the set-up is suitable for is the flow rate measurements of low electrically conducting electrolytes by applying the contactless technique of Lorentz force velocimetry. Based on a previously developed set-up which uses a single EMFC balance, experimental, theoretical and numerical analyses of the thermo-mechanical properties of the supporting structure are presented.

  7. SO2 retention by reactivated CaO-based sorbent from multiple CO2 capture cycles.

    PubMed

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J

    2007-06-15

    This paper examines the reactivation of spent sorbent, produced from multiple CO2 capture cycles, for use in SO2 capture. CaO-based sorbent samples were obtained from Kelly Rock limestone using three particle size ranges, each containing different impurities levels. Using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), the sulfation behavior of partially sulfated and unsulfated samples obtained after multiple calcination-carbonation cycles in a tube furnace (TF), following steam reactivation in a pressurized reactor, is examined. In addition, samples calcined/sintered under different conditions after hydration are also examined. The results show that suitably treated spent sorbent has better sulfation characteristics than that of the original sorbent. Thus for example, after 2 h sulfation, > 80% of the CaO was sulfated. In addition, the sorbent showed significant activity even after 4 h when > 95% CaO was sulfated. The results were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, which showed that, by the end of the sulfation process, samples contained CaSO4 with only traces of unreacted CaO. The superior behavior of spent reactivated sorbent appears to be due to swelling of the sorbent particles during steam hydration. This enables the development of a more suitable pore surface area and pore volume distribution for sulfation, and this has been confirmed by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms and the Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) method. The surface area morphology of sorbent after reactivation was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ca(OH)2 crystals were seen, which displayed their regular shape, and their elemental composition was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The improved characteristics of spent reactivated sorbent in comparison to the original and to the sorbent calcined under different conditions and hydrated indicate the beneficial effect of CO2 cycles on sorbent reactivation and subsequent sulfation. These results allow us to propose a

  8. Chelate titrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) using microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Karita, Shingo; Kaneta, Takashi

    2016-06-14

    We developed microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) for the chelate titrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in natural water. The μPAD consisted of ten reaction zones and ten detection zones connected through narrow channels to a sample zone located at the center. Buffer solutions with a pH of 10 or 13 were applied to all surfaces of the channels and zones. Different amounts of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) were added to the reaction zones and a consistent amount of a metal indicator (Eriochrome Black T or Calcon) was added to the detection zones. The total concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (total hardness) in the water were measured using a μPAD containing a buffer solution with a pH of 10, whereas only Ca(2+) was titrated using a μPAD prepared with a potassium hydroxide solution with a pH of 13. The μPADs permitted the determination of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in mineral water, river water, and seawater samples within only a few minutes using only the naked eye-no need of instruments. PMID:27181645

  9. Chelate titrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) using microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Karita, Shingo; Kaneta, Takashi

    2016-06-14

    We developed microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) for the chelate titrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in natural water. The μPAD consisted of ten reaction zones and ten detection zones connected through narrow channels to a sample zone located at the center. Buffer solutions with a pH of 10 or 13 were applied to all surfaces of the channels and zones. Different amounts of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) were added to the reaction zones and a consistent amount of a metal indicator (Eriochrome Black T or Calcon) was added to the detection zones. The total concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (total hardness) in the water were measured using a μPAD containing a buffer solution with a pH of 10, whereas only Ca(2+) was titrated using a μPAD prepared with a potassium hydroxide solution with a pH of 13. The μPADs permitted the determination of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in mineral water, river water, and seawater samples within only a few minutes using only the naked eye-no need of instruments.

  10. Study on Optimized Elman Neural Network Classification Algorithm Based on PLS and CA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dean; Shen, Tian; Zhao, Yuyan

    2014-01-01

    High-dimensional large sample data sets, between feature variables and between samples, may cause some correlative or repetitive factors, occupy lots of storage space, and consume much computing time. Using the Elman neural network to deal with them, too many inputs will influence the operating efficiency and recognition accuracy; too many simultaneous training samples, as well as being not able to get precise neural network model, also restrict the recognition accuracy. Aiming at these series of problems, we introduce the partial least squares (PLS) and cluster analysis (CA) into Elman neural network algorithm, by the PLS for dimension reduction which can eliminate the correlative and repetitive factors of the features. Using CA eliminates the correlative and repetitive factors of the sample. If some subclass becomes small sample, with high-dimensional feature and fewer numbers, PLS shows a unique advantage. Each subclass is regarded as one training sample to train the different precise neural network models. Then simulation samples are discriminated and classified into different subclasses, using the corresponding neural network to recognize it. An optimized Elman neural network classification algorithm based on PLS and CA (PLS-CA-Elman algorithm) is established. The new algorithm aims at improving the operating efficiency and recognition accuracy. By the case analysis, the new algorithm has unique superiority, worthy of further promotion. PMID:25165470

  11. Improve photovoltaic performance of titanium dioxide nanorods based dye-sensitized solar cells by Ca-doping

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weixin; Yang, Junyou Zhang, Jiaqi; Gao, Sheng; Luo, Yubo; Liu, Ming

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanorods doped with Ca ions were synthesized by one-step hydrothermal method. • The flat band edge of rutile TiO{sub 2} shifted positively via Ca-doping. • The photoelectric conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on TiO{sub 2} electrode was much enhanced by Ca-doping. • A relatively high open circuit voltage was obtained by adopting Ca-doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods electrode. - Abstract: Ca-doped TiO{sub 2} nanorod arrays were prepared via the one-step hydrothermal method successfully, and the effect of Ca ions content on the photovoltaic conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells has been fully discussed in the paper. Although no obvious change on the microstructure and morphology was observed by field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope for the Ca-doped samples, the results of X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that Ti{sup 4+} was substituted with Ca{sup 2+} successfully. UV–vis spectroscopy results revealed that the flat band edge shifted positively by Ca ions doping. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cells based on the 2 mol% Ca-doped TiO{sub 2} electrode was 43% higher than that of the undoped one due to the less recombination possibility.

  12. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Muroc Flight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Muroc Flight Test Base, Unit History, 1 September 1942 - 30 June 1945. Alfred F. Simpson Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. Maxwell AFB, Alabama. View looks north at a hutment typical of several structures erected at the Muroc Flight Test Base (North Base) ca. 1943-1945. Similar structures, Buildings T-61, T-62 and T-63, lie in the distance behind T-40 - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Barracks T-40, Second & A Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Credit USAF, ca. 1943. Original housed in the Photograph Files, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF, ca. 1943. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Historic view of finished swimming pool, with fence and lifeguard station. View looks west - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Swimming Pool, Second Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Endosome-based protein trafficking and Ca2+ homeostasis in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to dynamically regulate, traffic, retain, and recycle proteins within the cell membrane is fundamental to life and central to the normal function of the heart. In the cardiomyocyte, these pathways are essential for the regulation of Ca2+, both at the level of the plasma membrane, but also in local cellular domains. One intracellular pathway often overlooked in relation to cardiovascular Ca2+ regulation and signaling is the endosome-based trafficking pathway. Highlighting its importance, this system and its molecular components are evolutionarily conserved across all metazoans. However, remarkably little is known of how endosome-based protein trafficking and recycling functions within mammalian cells systems, especially in the heart. As the endosomal system acts to regulate the expression and localization of membrane proteins central for cardiac Ca2+ regulation, understanding the in vivo function of this system in the heart is critical. This review will focus on endosome-based protein trafficking in the heart in both health and disease with special emphasis for the role of endocytic regulatory proteins, C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHDs). PMID:25709583

  15. Problem decomposition by mutual information and force-based clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Richard Edward

    The scale of engineering problems has sharply increased over the last twenty years. Larger coupled systems, increasing complexity, and limited resources create a need for methods that automatically decompose problems into manageable sub-problems by discovering and leveraging problem structure. The ability to learn the coupling (inter-dependence) structure and reorganize the original problem could lead to large reductions in the time to analyze complex problems. Such decomposition methods could also provide engineering insight on the fundamental physics driving problem solution. This work forwards the current state of the art in engineering decomposition through the application of techniques originally developed within computer science and information theory. The work describes the current state of automatic problem decomposition in engineering and utilizes several promising ideas to advance the state of the practice. Mutual information is a novel metric for data dependence and works on both continuous and discrete data. Mutual information can measure both the linear and non-linear dependence between variables without the limitations of linear dependence measured through covariance. Mutual information is also able to handle data that does not have derivative information, unlike other metrics that require it. The value of mutual information to engineering design work is demonstrated on a planetary entry problem. This study utilizes a novel tool developed in this work for planetary entry system synthesis. A graphical method, force-based clustering, is used to discover related sub-graph structure as a function of problem structure and links ranked by their mutual information. This method does not require the stochastic use of neural networks and could be used with any link ranking method currently utilized in the field. Application of this method is demonstrated on a large, coupled low-thrust trajectory problem. Mutual information also serves as the basis for an

  16. Rasch model based analysis of the Force Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinic, Maja; Ivanjek, Lana; Susac, Ana

    2010-06-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) is an important diagnostic instrument which is widely used in the field of physics education research. It is therefore very important to evaluate and monitor its functioning using different tools for statistical analysis. One of such tools is the stochastic Rasch model, which enables construction of linear measures for persons and items from raw test scores and which can provide important insight in the structure and functioning of the test (how item difficulties are distributed within the test, how well the items fit the model, and how well the items work together to define the underlying construct). The data for the Rasch analysis come from the large-scale research conducted in 2006-07, which investigated Croatian high school students’ conceptual understanding of mechanics on a representative sample of 1676 students (age 17-18 years). The instrument used in research was the FCI. The average FCI score for the whole sample was found to be (27.7±0.4)% , indicating that most of the students were still non-Newtonians at the end of high school, despite the fact that physics is a compulsory subject in Croatian schools. The large set of obtained data was analyzed with the Rasch measurement computer software WINSTEPS 3.66. Since the FCI is routinely used as pretest and post-test on two very different types of population (non-Newtonian and predominantly Newtonian), an additional predominantly Newtonian sample ( N=141 , average FCI score of 64.5%) of first year students enrolled in introductory physics course at University of Zagreb was also analyzed. The Rasch model based analysis suggests that the FCI has succeeded in defining a sufficiently unidimensional construct for each population. The analysis of fit of data to the model found no grossly misfitting items which would degrade measurement. Some items with larger misfit and items with significantly different difficulties in the two samples of students do require further examination

  17. Vandenberg Air Force Base Upper Level Wind Launch Weather Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Wheeler, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman III ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The maximum wind speed and 1000-ft shear values for each sounding in each subseason were determined. To accurately calculate the PoV, the AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum shear datasets. Ultimately it was discovered that the maximum wind speeds follow a Gaussian distribution while the maximum shear values follow a lognormal distribution. These results were applied when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition to the requirements outlined in the original task plan, the AMU also included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on day of launch. The interactive graphical user interface (GUI) for this project was developed in

  18. Rasch Model Based Analysis of the Force Concept Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinic, Maja; Ivanjek, Lana; Susac, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) is an important diagnostic instrument which is widely used in the field of physics education research. It is therefore very important to evaluate and monitor its functioning using different tools for statistical analysis. One of such tools is the stochastic Rasch model, which enables construction of linear…

  19. Lorentz force velocimetry based on time-of-flight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viré, Axelle; Knaepen, Bernard; Thess, André

    2010-12-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a contactless technique for the measurement of liquid metal flowrates. It consists of measuring the force acting upon a magnetic system and arising from the interaction between an external magnetic field and the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. In this study, a new design is proposed so as to make the measurement independent of the fluid's electrical conductivity. It is made of one or two coils placed around a circular pipe. The forces produced on each coil are recorded in time as the liquid metal flows through the pipe. It is highlighted that the auto- or cross-correlation of these forces can be used to determine the flowrate. The reliability of the flowmeter is first investigated with a synthetic velocity profile associated with a single vortex ring, which is convected at a constant speed. This configuration is similar to the movement of a solid rod and enables a simple analysis of the flowmeter. Then, the flowmeter is applied to a realistic three-dimensional turbulent flow. In both cases, the influence of the coil radii, coil separation, and sign of the coil-carrying currents is systematically assessed. The study is entirely numerical and uses a second-order finite volume method. Two sets of simulations are performed. First, the equations of motion are solved without accounting for the effect of the magnetic field on the flow (kinematic simulations). Second, the Lorentz force is explicitly added to the momentum balance (dynamic simulations), and the influence of the external magnetic field on the flow is then quantified.

  20. Monitoring biological impacts of space shuttle launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base: Establishment of baseline conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmaizer, Paul A.; Hinkle, C. Ross

    1987-01-01

    Space shuttle launches produce environmental impacts resulting from the formation of an exhaust cloud containing hydrogen chloride aerosols and aluminum oxide particulates. Studies have shown that most impacts occur near-field (within 1.5 km) of the launch site while deposition from launches occurs far-field (as distant as 22 km). In order to establish baseline conditions of vegetation and soils in the areas likely to be impacted by shuttle launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), vegetation and soils in the vicinity of Space Launch Complex-6 (SLC-6) were sampled and a vegetation map prepared. The areas likely to be impacted by launches were determined considering the structure of the launch complex, the prevailing winds, the terrain, and predictions of the Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion Model (REEDM). Fifty vegetation transects were established and sampled in March 1986 and resampled in September 1986. A vegetation map was prepared for six Master Planning maps surrounding SLC-6 using LANDSAT Thematic Mapper imagery as well as color and color infrared aerial photography. Soil samples were collected form the 0 to 7.5 cm layer at all transects in the wet season and at a subsample of the transects in the dry season and analyzed for pH, organic matter, conductivity, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable Ca, Mg, Na, K, and Al, available NH3-N, PO4-P, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, and TKN.

  1. Simulation of the change of regional ecosystem services value based on CA-Markov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiuji; Yao, Wanqiang

    2008-10-01

    During the last few years, the value of ecosystem services, the possibilities and rationalities of evaluating these services have attracted interests of many ecologists and economists. However, the dynamic change of ecosystem services is less studied. In this paper, the dynamic simulation method (i.e., CA-Markov) is used to simulate the change of ecosystem services value in research area. The main objective of this study is to give comprehensive and reasonable assessment of the ecosystem services value change in the research area which would provide scientific basis for environment, ecosystem construction and strategic decisions. Based on the remote sensing dada of year 1992 and 2003, the landscape information of research area is obtained, and the transfer matrix among various landscapes is calculated during the period, then the data of landscape of research area in year 2015 is predicted using the model of CA-Markov. Then the change of ecosystem services value is calculated based on the value coefficient of various landscapes. The research demonstrates that the CA-Markov is a good tool for simulating the change of ecosystem services value. The studied result can provide scientific basis for ecosystem construction and strategic decisions.

  2. Do Ca2+-adsorbing ceramics reduce the release of calcium ions from gypsum-based biomaterials?

    PubMed

    Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Pałka, Krzysztof; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-02-01

    Bone implantable materials based on calcium sulfate dihydrate dissolve quickly in tissue liquids and release calcium ions at very high levels. This phenomenon induces temporary toxicity for osteoblasts, may cause local inflammation and delay the healing process. Reduction in the calcium ion release rate by gypsum could be therefore beneficial for the healing of gypsum-filled bone defects. The aim of this study concerned the potential use of calcium phosphate ceramics of various porosities for the reduction of high Ca(2+) ion release from gypsum-based materials. Highly porous ceramics failed to reduce the level of Ca(2+) ions released to the medium in a continuous flow system. However, it succeeded to shorten the period of high calcium level. It was not the phase composition but the high porosity of ceramics that was found crucial for both the shortening of the Ca(2+) release-related toxicity period and intensification of apatite deposition on the composite. Nonporous ceramics was completely ineffective for this purpose and did not show any ability to absorb calcium ions at a significant level. Moreover, according to our observations, complex studies imitating in vivo systems, rather than standard tests, are essential for the proper evaluation of implantable biomaterials. PMID:25492196

  3. Do Ca2+-adsorbing ceramics reduce the release of calcium ions from gypsum-based biomaterials?

    PubMed

    Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Pałka, Krzysztof; Hajnos, Mieczysław; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2015-02-01

    Bone implantable materials based on calcium sulfate dihydrate dissolve quickly in tissue liquids and release calcium ions at very high levels. This phenomenon induces temporary toxicity for osteoblasts, may cause local inflammation and delay the healing process. Reduction in the calcium ion release rate by gypsum could be therefore beneficial for the healing of gypsum-filled bone defects. The aim of this study concerned the potential use of calcium phosphate ceramics of various porosities for the reduction of high Ca(2+) ion release from gypsum-based materials. Highly porous ceramics failed to reduce the level of Ca(2+) ions released to the medium in a continuous flow system. However, it succeeded to shorten the period of high calcium level. It was not the phase composition but the high porosity of ceramics that was found crucial for both the shortening of the Ca(2+) release-related toxicity period and intensification of apatite deposition on the composite. Nonporous ceramics was completely ineffective for this purpose and did not show any ability to absorb calcium ions at a significant level. Moreover, according to our observations, complex studies imitating in vivo systems, rather than standard tests, are essential for the proper evaluation of implantable biomaterials.

  4. 33 CFR 334.740 - North Shore Choctawhatchee Bay, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Shore Choctawhatchee Bay, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States as defined at 33 CFR part 329 within the area bounded by a..., Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. 334.740 Section 334.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF...

  5. Rigorous force field optimization principles based on statistical distance minimization.

    PubMed

    Vlcek, Lukas; Chialvo, Ariel A

    2015-10-14

    We use the concept of statistical distance to define a measure of distinguishability between a pair of statistical mechanical systems, i.e., a model and its target, and show that its minimization leads to general convergence of the model's static measurable properties to those of the target. We exploit this feature to define a rigorous basis for the development of accurate and robust effective molecular force fields that are inherently compatible with coarse-grained experimental data. The new model optimization principles and their efficient implementation are illustrated through selected examples, whose outcome demonstrates the higher robustness and predictive accuracy of the approach compared to other currently used methods, such as force matching and relative entropy minimization. We also discuss relations between the newly developed principles and established thermodynamic concepts, which include the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality and the thermodynamic length. PMID:26472366

  6. Rigorous force field optimization principles based on statistical distance minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Vlcek, Lukas; Chialvo, Ariel A.

    2015-10-14

    We use the concept of statistical distance to define a measure of distinguishability between a pair of statistical mechanical systems, i.e., a model and its target, and show that its minimization leads to general convergence of the model’s static measurable properties to those of the target. We exploit this feature to define a rigorous basis for the development of accurate and robust effective molecular force fields that are inherently compatible with coarse-grained experimental data. The new model optimization principles and their efficient implementation are illustrated through selected examples, whose outcome demonstrates the higher robustness and predictive accuracy of the approach compared to other currently used methods, such as force matching and relative entropy minimization. We also discuss relations between the newly developed principles and established thermodynamic concepts, which include the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality and the thermodynamic length.

  7. 33 CFR 165.1102 - Security Zone; Naval Base Point Loma; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) Regulations. (1) The general regulations governing security zones found in 33 CFR 165.33 apply to... Loma; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. 165.1102 Section 165.1102 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.1102 Security Zone; Naval Base Point Loma; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA....

  8. 33 CFR 165.1102 - Security Zone; Naval Base Point Loma; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (b) Regulations. (1) The general regulations governing security zones found in 33 CFR 165.33 apply to... Loma; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. 165.1102 Section 165.1102 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.1102 Security Zone; Naval Base Point Loma; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA....

  9. The salt marsh vegetation spread dynamics simulation and prediction based on conditions optimized CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yujuan; Zhang, Liquan

    2006-10-01

    The biodiversity conservation and management of the salt marsh vegetation relies on processing their spatial information. Nowadays, more attentions are focused on their classification surveying and describing qualitatively dynamics based on RS images interpreted, rather than on simulating and predicting their dynamics quantitatively, which is of greater importance for managing and planning the salt marsh vegetation. In this paper, our notion is to make a dynamic model on large-scale and to provide a virtual laboratory in which researchers can run it according requirements. Firstly, the characteristic of the cellular automata was analyzed and a conclusion indicated that it was necessary for a CA model to be extended geographically under varying conditions of space-time circumstance in order to make results matched the facts accurately. Based on the conventional cellular automata model, the author introduced several new conditions to optimize it for simulating the vegetation objectively, such as elevation, growth speed, invading ability, variation and inheriting and so on. Hence the CA cells and remote sensing image pixels, cell neighbors and pixel neighbors, cell rules and nature of the plants were unified respectively. Taking JiuDuanSha as the test site, where holds mainly Phragmites australis (P.australis) community, Scirpus mariqueter (S.mariqueter) community and Spartina alterniflora (S.alterniflora) community. The paper explored the process of making simulation and predictions about these salt marsh vegetable changing with the conditions optimized CA (COCA) model, and examined the links among data, statistical models, and ecological predictions. This study exploited the potential of applying Conditioned Optimized CA model technique to solve this problem.

  10. Low-temperature linear thermal rectifiers based on Coriolis forces.

    PubMed

    Suwunnarat, Suwun; Li, Huanan; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that a three-terminal harmonic symmetric chain in the presence of a Coriolis force, produced by a rotating platform that is used to place the chain, can produce thermal rectification. The direction of heat flow is reconfigurable and controlled by the angular velocity Ω of the rotating platform. A simple three-terminal triangular lattice is used to demonstrate the proposed principle.

  11. Low-temperature linear thermal rectifiers based on Coriolis forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwunnarat, Suwun; Li, Huanan; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that a three-terminal harmonic symmetric chain in the presence of a Coriolis force, produced by a rotating platform that is used to place the chain, can produce thermal rectification. The direction of heat flow is reconfigurable and controlled by the angular velocity Ω of the rotating platform. A simple three-terminal triangular lattice is used to demonstrate the proposed principle.

  12. A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Phosphorus Partition between CaO-based Slags and Hot Metal during Hot Metal Dephosphorization Pretreatment Process Based on the Ion and Molecule Coexistence Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-min; Li, Jin-yan; Chai, Guo-ming; Duan, Dong-ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    dephosphorization ability of the CaO-based slags. Furthermore, a parabolic relationship of L P against binary basicity or complex basicity CB2 and CB3 can be established at binary basicity in 1.8 or at complex basicity CB2 and CB3 in 2.0 corresponding to the maximum of dephosphorization ability of the CaO-based slags. However, the linear relationship between L P and optical basicity can only be correlated with the mathematically regressed Λ_{{FeO}} = 1.0 and Λ_{{{{Fe}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 3}}} =0.75. A great gradient of oxygen potential or oxygen activity a %,O between the dynamically formed metal film beneath slag-metal interface and hot metal bath is the main driving forces of hot metal dephosphorization by the CaO-based slags. The formed metal film with high oxygen content and low carbon content can dynamically be exchanged or replaced by hot metal elements from bath during hot metal dephosphorization process until dephosphorization products mainly as 3CaO·P2O5 are saturated in the CaO-based slags.

  13. Novel nonlinear knowledge-based mean force potentials based on machine learning.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qiwen; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2011-01-01

    The prediction of 3D structures of proteins from amino acid sequences is one of the most challenging problems in molecular biology. An essential task for solving this problem with coarse-grained models is to deduce effective interaction potentials. The development and evaluation of new energy functions is critical to accurately modeling the properties of biological macromolecules. Knowledge-based mean force potentials are derived from statistical analysis of proteins of known structures. Current knowledge-based potentials are almost in the form of weighted linear sum of interaction pairs. In this study, a class of novel nonlinear knowledge-based mean force potentials is presented. The potential parameters are obtained by nonlinear classifiers, instead of relative frequencies of interaction pairs against a reference state or linear classifiers. The support vector machine is used to derive the potential parameters on data sets that contain both native structures and decoy structures. Five knowledge-based mean force Boltzmann-based or linear potentials are introduced and their corresponding nonlinear potentials are implemented. They are the DIH potential (single-body residue-level Boltzmann-based potential), the DFIRE-SCM potential (two-body residue-level Boltzmann-based potential), the FS potential (two-body atom-level Boltzmann-based potential), the HR potential (two-body residue-level linear potential), and the T32S3 potential (two-body atom-level linear potential). Experiments are performed on well-established decoy sets, including the LKF data set, the CASP7 data set, and the Decoys “R”Us data set. The evaluation metrics include the energy Z score and the ability of each potential to discriminate native structures from a set of decoy structures. Experimental results show that all nonlinear potentials significantly outperform the corresponding Boltzmann-based or linear potentials, and the proposed discriminative framework is effective in developing knowledge-based

  14. 6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. SR-71 Tail #844 Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    With distinctive heat waves trailing behind its engines, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, lands at the Edwards AFB runway after a 1996 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  17. Debonding forces of three different customized bases of a lingual bracket system

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jang-Won; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate whether extension of the custom base is necessary for enhancement of bond strength, by comparing the debonding forces and residual adhesives of 3 different lingual bracket systems. Methods A total of 42 extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups of 14 each for bonding with brackets having (1) a conventional limited resin custom base; (2) an extended gold alloy custom base: Incognito™; and (3) an extended resin custom base: KommonBase™. The bonding area was measured by scanning the bracket bases with a 3-dimensional digital scanner. The debonding force was measured with an Instron universal testing machine, which applied an occlusogingival shear force. Results The mean debonding forces were 60.83 N (standard deviation [SD] 10.12), 69.29 N (SD 9.59), and 104.35 N (SD17.84) for the limited resin custom base, extended gold alloy custom base, and extended resin custom base, respectively. The debonding force observed with the extended resin custom base was significantly different from that observed with the other bases. In addition, the adhesive remnant index was significantly higher with the extended gold alloy custom base. Conclusions All 3 custom-base lingual brackets can withstand occlusal and orthodontic forces. We conclude that effective bonding of lingual brackets can be obtained without extension of the custom base. PMID:24228238

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of zinc-modified ca-si-based ceramic coating for bone implants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiangming; Li, Kai; Zheng, Xuebin; He, Dannong; Ye, Xiaojian; Wang, Meiyan

    2013-01-01

    The host response to calcium silicate ceramic coatings is not always favorable because of their high dissolution rates, leading to high pH within the surrounding physiological environment. Recently, a zinc-incorporated calcium silicate-based ceramic Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating, developed on a Ti-6Al-4V substrate using plasma-spray technology, was found to exhibit improved chemical stability and biocompatibility. This study aimed to investigate and compare the in vitro response of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating, CaSiO3 coating, and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V titanium control at cellular and molecular level. Our results showed Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating enhanced MC3T3-E1 cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation compared to CaSiO3 coating and control. In addition, Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating increased mRNA levels of osteoblast-related genes (alkaline phosphatase, procollagen α1(I), osteocalcin), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). The in vivo osteoconductive properties of Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating, compared to CaSiO3 coating and control, was investigated using a rabbit femur defect model. Histological and histomorphometrical analysis demonstrated new bone formation in direct contact with the Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating surface in absence of fibrous tissue and higher bone-implant contact rate (BIC) in the Ca2ZnSi2O7 coating group, indicating better biocompatibility and faster osseointegration than CaSiO3 coated and control implants. These results indicate Ca2ZnSi2O7 coated implants have applications in bone tissue regeneration, since they are biocompatible and able to osseointegrate with host bone.

  19. Structuralization of Ca(2+)-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks Prepared via Coordination Replication of Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Kenji; Hu, Ming; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as potential candidates to supplant existing adsorbent types in real-world applications has led to an explosive growth in the number of compounds available to researchers, as well as in the diversity of the metal salts and organic linkers from which they are derived. In this context, the use of carbonate-based precursors as metal sources is of interest due to their abundance in mineral deposits and their reaction chemistry with acids, resulting in just water and carbon dioxide as side products. Here, we have explored the use of calcium carbonate as a metal source and demonstrate its versatility as a precursor to several known frameworks, as well as a new flexible compound based on the 2,5-dihydroxybenzoquinone (H2dhbq) linker, Ca(dhbq)(H2O)2. Furthermore, inspired by the ubiquity and unique structures of biomineralized forms of calcium carbonate, we also present examples of the preparation of superstructures of Ca-based MOFs via the coordination replication technique. In all, the results confirm the suitability of carbonate-based metal sources for the preparation of MOFs and further expand upon the growing scope of coordination replication as a convenient strategy for the preparation of structuralized materials. PMID:27002690

  20. Status and future transition of rapid urbanizing landscape in central Western Ghats - CA based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath, S..; Rajan, K. S.; Ramachandra, T. V.

    2014-11-01

    The land use changes in forested landscape are highly complex and dynamic, affected by the natural, socio-economic, cultural, political and other factors. The remote sensing (RS) and geographical information system (GIS) techniques coupled with multi-criteria evaluation functions such as Markov-cellular automata (CA-Markov) model helps in analysing intensity, extent and future forecasting of human activities affecting the terrestrial biosphere. Karwar taluk of Central Western Ghats in Karnataka state, India has seen rapid transitions in its forest cover due to various anthropogenic activities, primarily driven by major industrial activities. A study based on Landsat and IRS derived data along with CA-Markov method has helped in characterizing the patterns and trends of land use changes over a period of 2004-2013, expected transitions was predicted for a set of scenarios through 2013-2022. The analysis reveals the loss of pristine forest cover from 75.51% to 67.36% (1973 to 2013) and increase in agriculture land as well as built-up area of 8.65% (2013), causing impact on local flora and fauna. The other factors driving these changes are the aggregated level of demand for land, local and regional effects of land use activities such as deforestation, improper practices in expansion of agriculture and infrastructure development, deteriorating natural resources availability. The spatio temporal models helped in visualizing on-going changes apart from prediction of likely changes. The CA-Markov based analysis provides us insights into the localized changes impacting these regions and can be useful in developing appropriate mitigation management approaches based on the modelled future impacts. This necessitates immediate measures for minimizing the future impacts.

  1. 5. METAL SHOP ROOM (AREA 108 ON PLAN CA236R36). Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. METAL SHOP ROOM (AREA 108 ON PLAN CA-236-R-36). Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Characterization of flue gas cleaning residues from European solid waste incinerators: assessment of various Ca-based sorbent processes.

    PubMed

    Bodénan, F; Deniard, Ph

    2003-05-01

    For the first time, a set of samples of European flue gas cleaning residues, mainly from the incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW), has undergone a mineralogical study. The residues are the result of the neutralization of acid flue gases by lime, the predominant method adopted in Europe, using dry and semi-dry washing processes. The study protocol combines physico-chemical analytical techniques (XRD, FTIR, DSC/TGA) and global chemical analysis enabling identification of the chemical composition of the main constituents, particularly chlorinated Ca-based phases, as well as establishment of modal distributions of the represented phases, both crystalline and amorphous. The samples are slightly hydrated and values vary for trapped Cl, S and even CO(2). The main crystalline phases are NaCl, KCl, CaSO(4), CaCO(3), Ca(OH)(2) and calcium hydroxychloride CaOHCl. CaOHCl is the main chlorine phase, regardless of the treatment process, filtration mode, and specific surface of the Ca-based sorbent. This phase develops during neutralization of HCl by excess lime present according to the reaction Ca(OH)(2)+HCl-->CaOHCl+H(2)O, to the detriment of a complete yield involving the two lime OH groups with formation of CaCl(2).2H(2)O. In addition, it seems that gas temperatures above 150 degrees C increase competition between lime-based neutralization of HCl, SO(2) acid flue gases and CO(2) trapping, thus reducing washing efficiency. PMID:12597999

  3. Educational Program for Scientists and Engineers at the Wright Patterson Air Force Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weed, Herman R.; And Others

    The objective of the study was to develop an educational program to update Air Force scientists, engineers, senior technicians and managers of science and engineering (both military and civilian) working at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). Needs in continuing education were assessed from data obtained from: the Office of Professional and…

  4. 5. Credit USAF, ca. 1942. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Credit USAF, ca. 1942. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. View of Bell Aircraft XP-59A Airacomet in flight. This was the United States military's first jet propelled aircraft which was extensively flight tested in secrecy at the Muroc Flight Test Base (North Base). - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. Surface Roughness Model Based on Force Sensors for the Prediction of the Tool Wear

    PubMed Central

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Rubio, Eva María; Sebastián, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a methodology has been developed with the objective of evaluating the surface roughness obtained during turning processes by measuring the signals detected by a force sensor under the same cutting conditions. In this way, the surface quality achieved along the process is correlated to several parameters of the cutting forces (thrust forces, feed forces and cutting forces), so the effect that the tool wear causes on the surface roughness is evaluated. In a first step, the best cutting conditions (cutting parameters and radius of tool) for a certain quality surface requirement were found for pieces of UNS A97075. Next, with this selection a model of surface roughness based on the cutting forces was developed for different states of wear that simulate the behaviour of the tool throughout its life. The validation of this model reveals that it was effective for approximately 70% of the surface roughness values obtained. PMID:24714391

  6. Surface roughness model based on force sensors for the prediction of the tool wear.

    PubMed

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Rubio, Eva María; Sebastián, Miguel Ángel

    2014-04-04

    In this study, a methodology has been developed with the objective of evaluating the surface roughness obtained during turning processes by measuring the signals detected by a force sensor under the same cutting conditions. In this way, the surface quality achieved along the process is correlated to several parameters of the cutting forces (thrust forces, feed forces and cutting forces), so the effect that the tool wear causes on the surface roughness is evaluated. In a first step, the best cutting conditions (cutting parameters and radius of tool) for a certain quality surface requirement were found for pieces of UNS A97075. Next, with this selection a model of surface roughness based on the cutting forces was developed for different states of wear that simulate the behaviour of the tool throughout its life. The validation of this model reveals that it was effective for approximately 70% of the surface roughness values obtained.

  7. Suspension force control of bearingless permanent magnet slice motor based on flux linkage identification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suming; Zhu, Huangqiu

    2015-07-01

    The control accuracy and dynamic performance of suspension force are confined in the traditional bearingless permanent magnet slice motor (BPMSM) control strategies because the suspension force control is indirectly achieved by adopting a closed loop of displacement only. Besides, the phase information in suspension force control relies on accurate measurement of rotor position, making the control system more complex. In this paper, a new suspension force control strategy with displacement and radial suspension force double closed loops is proposed, the flux linkage of motor windings is identified based on voltage-current model and the flexibility of motor control can be improved greatly. Simulation and experimental results show that the proposed suspension force control strategy is effective to realize the stable operation of the BPMSM.

  8. Sensorless Interaction Force Control Based on B-Spline Function for Human-Robot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsantisuk, Chowarit; Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    In this paper, to provide precise force sensation of human operator, a twin direct-drive motor system with wire rope mechanism has been developed. The human-robot interaction force and the wire rope tension are independently controlled in acceleration dimension by realizing the dual disturbance observer based on modal space design. In the common mode, it is utilized for control of vibration suppression and wire rope tension. In the differential mode, the purity of human external force with compensation of friction force is obtained. This mode is useful for control of the interaction force of human. Furthermore, the human-robot system that has the ability of support of human interaction force is also proposed. The interaction force generation based on B-spline function is applied to automatically adjust the smooth force command corresponding to the adaptive parameters.
    To analyze the human movement stroke, the multi-sensor scheme is applied to fuse both two motor encoders and acceleration sensor signal by using Kalman filter. From the experimental results, the ability to design different level of assistive force makes it well suited to customized training programs due to time and human movement constraints.

  9. The Sequential Evolution of Universes Based on Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derow, Catherine Kari

    2015-08-01

    Universes may arise as nature abhors a void. Upon ending of a universe, a new universe forms to fill a new void, forming after perhaps a period of nothingness.The nature of a new universe and the nature of formation, may be related to the nature of the previous universe and the nature of its ending, respectively, e.g., if the end of a universe was prolonged, this might be followed by a short period of nothingness and then an explosive creation of a new universe. Long approach to nothingness and a brief period of nothingness may mean a universe arises quickly and energetically in response to this long latent period of expectancy of void-filling. In terms of order in a universe, order may engender new more ordered universes, until need for chaos means a more chaotic universe arises. Ordered universes may cause new even more ordered universes to atise. The order principle dictates the type of matter organization that arises in universes in series. An ordered universe may have a latent energy of order which leads to a smaller more ordered universe. This minimizes the expectancy of a void, as a smaller more regularly filled void will then ensue in the new universe, until the energy held in by this order is released in the formation of a large much less ordered and slower forming and expanding universe, with more regions of near void. Nature may strive for a build up of intensity of focused order filling an ever- smaller void, averting the void, until the principle of chaos predominates and the energy that this requirement builds causes explosive formation of a large and disordered universe. The need to fill any void that arises and a force that favors a small void arising as void is abhorred and this void being regularly and densely filled competes with the force that favors matter tending towards chaos. These principles governs universes arising in series, until a period of nothingness can prevail until the need to create a void predominates. Nothingness is able to

  10. Contractive tension force stack actuator based on soft dielectric EAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Gabor; Düring, Lukas

    2009-03-01

    Among the electronic polymers EAPs especially the dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as muscle-like actuators due to their inherent compliancy and good overall performance. The combination of huge active deformations, high energy densities, good efficiencies and fast response is unique to dielectric elastomers. Furthermore, they are lightweight, have a simple structure and can be easily tailored to various applications. Up to now most scientific research work has been focused on the planar expanding actuation mode due to the fact that the commercially available acrylic material VHB 4910 (3M) can easily be processed to planar actuators and has demonstrated very high actuation performance when pre-strained. Many different actuator designs have been developed and tested which expands in plane when voltage is applied and shrinks back as soon as the applied charges are removed from the electrodes. Obviously the contractive operation mode at activation is required for a wide range of application. Due to the principle of operation of soft DE EAP, mainly two directions to performed work against external loads are possible. Beside of the commonly used expanding actuation in planar direction the contractile actuation in thickness direction of the DE film represents a very promising option in the multilayer configuration. First approaches have been presented by the folded actuator design and by the multilayer tactile display device. In this study a novel approach for active structures driven by soft dielectric EAP is presented, which can perform contractive displacements at external tensile load. The device is composed of an array of equal segments, where the dielectric films are arranged in a pile-up configuration. In order to maintain satisfying structural integrity when external tension load is applied special attention was paid to the compliant electrode design which takes a central importance concerning the force transmission

  11. Tunability of laser based on Yb-doped hot-pressed CaF2 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Jan; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Jelínková, Helena; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Konyushkin, Vasilii A.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of presented study was an investigation of tunability of diode pumped laser based on hot-pressed Yb:CaF2 ceramics. The tested Yb:CaF2 sample was in the form of 3.5mm thick plane-parallel face-polished plate (without AR coatings). The Yb3+ concentration was 5.5 %. A fiber (core diameter 200 μm, NA= 0.22) coupled laser diode (LIMO, HLU25F200-980) with emission at wavelength 976 nm, was used for longitudinal Yb:CaF2 pumping. The laser diode was operating in the pulsed regime (4 ms pulse length, 20 Hz repetition rate). The duty-cycle 8% ensured a low thermal load even under the maximum diode pumping power amplitude 10W (crystal sample was only air-cooled). This radiation was focused into the crystal (pumping beam waist diameter ~ 170 μm). The 145mm long semi-hemispherical laser resonator consisted of a flat pumping mirror (HR @ 1.01 - 1.09 μm, HT @ 0.97 μm) and curved (r = 150mm) output coupler with a reflectivity of ~ 98% @ 1.01 - 1.09 μm. Tuning of the ytterbium laser was accomplished by using a birefringent filter (single 1.5mm thick quartz plate) placed inside the optical resonator at the Brewster angle between the output coupler and the laser active medium. The extremely broad and smooth tuning was obtained. The laser was continuously tunable over ~ 66nm (from 1015nm to 1081 nm) and the tuning band was mostly limited by free spectral range of used birefringent filter. The tunability FWHM was 40 nm corresponding bandwidth 10 THz results in Fourier limited gaussian pulse width ~ 40 fs (FWHM). The maximum output power amplitude 0.68W was obtained at wavelength 1054nm for absorbed pump power amplitude 6W. The laser slope efficiency was 15%.

  12. QUALITY MANAGEMENT DURING SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES EXAMPLE SITE MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the remedial approach, organizational structure and key elements facilitating effective and efficient remediation of contaminated sites at March Air Force Base (AFB), California. The U.S. implementation and quality assurance approach to site remediation for ...

  13. QUALITY MANAGEMENT DURING SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES; EXAMPLE SITE MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the remedial approach, organizational structure and key elements facilitating effective and efficient remediation of contaminated sites at March Air Force Base (AFB), California. The U.S. implementation and quality assurance approach to site remediation for a...

  14. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  15. Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S8, Launch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S-8, Launch Control Center (LCC), Approximately 3 miles east of Winters, 500 feet southwest of Highway 17700, northwest of Launch Facility, Winters, Runnels County, TX

  16. TEMPORAL GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE FT-2-PLUME AT THE WURTSMITH AIR FORCE BASE, OSCODA, MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) facility has been the focus of several geophysical investigations. After several decades of fire training exercises, significant amounts of hydrocarbons and some solvents seeped into the Subsurface cont...

  17. Temporal Geophysical Investigations of the FT-2-Plume at the Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) facility has been the focus of several geophysical investigations. After several decades of fire training exercises, significant amounts of hydrocarbons and some solvents seeped into the subsurface cont...

  18. Structural basis for the in situ Ca2+ sensitization of cardiac troponin C by positive feedback from force-generating myosin cross-bridges

    PubMed Central

    Rieck, Daniel C.; Li, King-Lun; Ouyang, Yexin; Solaro, R. John; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2013-01-01

    The in situ structural coupling between the cardiac troponin (cTn) Ca2+-sensitive regulatory switch (CRS) and strong myosin cross-bridges was investigated using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The double cysteine mutant cTnC(T13C/N51C) was fluorescently labeled with the FRET pair 5-(iodoacetamidoethyl)aminonaphthelene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDENS) and N-(4-dimethylamino-3,5-dinitrophenyl)maleimide (DDPM) and then incorporated into detergent skinned left ventricular papillary fiber bundles. Ca2+ titrations of cTnC(T13C/N51C)AEDENS/DDPM-reconstituted fibers showed that the Ca2+-dependence of the opening of the N-domain of cTnC (N-cTnC) statistically matched the force–Ca2+ relationship. N-cTnC opening still occurred steeply during Ca2+ titrations in the presence of 1 mM vanadate, but the maximal extent of ensemble-averaged N-cTnC opening and the Ca2+-sensitivity of the CRS were significantly reduced. At nanomolar, resting Ca2+ levels, treatment with ADP•Mg in the absence of ATP caused a partial opening of N-cTnC. During subsequent Ca2+ titrations in the presence of ADP•Mg and absence of ATP, further N-cTnC opening was stimulated as the CRS responded to Ca2+ with increased Ca2+-sensitivity and reduced steepness. These findings supported our hypothesis here that strong cross-bridge interactions with the cardiac thin filament exert a Ca2+-sensitizing effect on the CRS by stabilizing the interaction between the exposed hydrophobic patch of N-cTnC and the switch region of cTnI. PMID:23896515

  19. Ca analysis: an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Greensmith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow.

  20. Cellular force measurements using single-spaced polymeric microstructures: isolating cells from base substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Chew Lim, Chee; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Liao, Ronglih; Zhang, Xin

    2005-09-01

    Mechanical force is one of the most important parameters in cellular physiological behavior. To quantify the cellular force locally and more precisely, soft material probes, such as bulk polymeric surfaces or raised individual polymeric structures, have been developed which are deformable by the cell. The extent of deformation and the elastic properties of the probes allow for calculation of the mechanical forces exerted by the cell. Bulk polymeric surfaces have the disadvantage of requiring computational intensive calculations due to the continuous distortion of a large area, and investigators have attempted to address this problem by using raised polymeric structures to simplify the derivation of cellular mechanical force. These studies, however, have ignored the possibility of formation of local adhesions of the cell to the underlying base substrate, which could result in inaccurate cellular force measurements. Clearly, there is a need to develop polymeric structures that can efficiently isolate the cells from the underlying base substrate, in order to eliminate the continuous distortion problem. In this paper, we demonstrate the measurement of cellular force in isolated cardiac myocytes using single-spaced polymeric microstructures. Each structure is 2 µm in diameter and single-spaced packed. This geometry of the structures successfully isolates the cells from the underlying substrate. Displacement of the structures was measured in areas underneath the attached cell and at areas in close proximity to the cell. The results show that the individual structures underneath the cell were significantly displaced whereas no substantial strain in the underlying base substrate was detected. The mechanical force of the cell was derived from the displacements of individual structures upon multiplication with the locally determined spring constant. The force distribution reveals a parallel alignment as well as a periodic motion of the contractile units of the myocyte. The

  1. In vivo assessment of artery smooth muscle [Ca2+]i and MLCK activation in FRET-based biosensor mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Raina, Hema; Blaustein, Mordecai P.; Wier, W. Gil

    2010-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms that control arterial diameter in vivo, particularly in hypertension, are uncertain. Here, we report a method that permits arterial intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation, and artery external diameter to be recorded simultaneously with arterial blood pressure (BP) in living mice under 1.5% isofluorane anesthesia. The method also enables an assessment of local receptor activity on [Ca2+]i, MLCK activity, and diameter in arteries, uncomplicated by systemic effects. Transgenic mice that express, in smooth muscle, a Ca2+/calmodulin-activated, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based “ratiometric”, exogenous MLCK biosensor were used. Vasoactive substances were administered either intravenously or locally to segments of exposed femoral or cremaster arteries. In the basal state, mean BP was ∼90 mmHg, femoral arteries were constricted to 65% of their passive diameter, MLCK fractional activation was 0.14, and [Ca2+]i was 131 nM. Phenylephrine (300 ng/g wt iv) elevated mean BP transiently to ∼110 mmHg, decreased heart rate, increased femoral artery [Ca2+]i to 244 nM and fractional MLCK activation to 0.24, and decreased artery diameter by 23%. In comparison, local application of 1.0 μM phenylephrine raised [Ca2+]i to 279 nM and fractional MLCK activation to 0.26, and reduced diameter by 25%, but did not affect BP or heart rate. Intravital FRET imaging of exogenous MLCK biosensor mice permits quantification of changes in [Ca2+]i and MLCK activation that accompany small changes in BP. Based on the observed variance of the FRET data, this method should enable the detection of a difference in basal [Ca2+]i of 29 nM between two groups of 12 mice with a significance of P < 0.05. PMID:20622107

  2. 9. Credit USAF, ca. 1955. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Credit USAF, ca. 1955. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. View of Lockheed XVF-1 Pogo, an experimental vertical take-off and landing aircraft at North Base. Photograph was taken on the apron between buildings 4401 and 4402, looking north northeast towards back of Building 4402 and officers' quarters (T-15) beyond. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. A micropillar-based on-chip system for continuous force measurement of C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Ali; Nock, Volker; Johari, Shazlina; Blaikie, Richard; Chen, XiaoQi; Wang, Wenhui

    2012-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a well-established model organism and has been gaining interest particularly related to worm locomotion and the investigation of the relationship between muscle arms and the motion pattern of the nematode. In this paper, we report on a micropillar-based on-chip system which is capable of quantifying multi-point locomotive forces of a moving C. elegans. A Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device was microfabricated to allow C. elegans to move in a matrix of micropillars in a channel, and an image processing method was developed to resolve the worm force from the bending pillars. The current micropillar-based system is able to measure force with a resolution of 2.07 µN for body width of 80 µm. Initial experiments have been conducted to collect a maximum force level for thirteen wild type worm samples. A maximum force level of 61.94 µN was observed from 1571 data points, based on which an average maximum force level was 32.61 µN for multi-point measurements. The demonstrated capabilities of the system can be an enabling technology that allows biologist to gain a better understanding of subtle force patterns of C. elegans and worm muscle development.

  4. Liquid scintillation based quantitative measurement of dual radioisotopes (3H and 45Ca) in biological samples for bone remodeling studies

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Susanta K; Sharma, M; Bhattacharyya, M H

    2011-01-01

    Acute and prolonged bone complications associated with radiation and chemotherapy in cancer survivors underscore the importance of establishing a laboratory-based complementary dual-isotope tool to evaluate short- as well as long-term bone remodeling in an in vivo model. To address this need, a liquid scintillation dual-label method was investigated using different scintillation cocktails for quantitative measurement of 3H-tetracycline (3H-TC) and 45Ca as markers of bone turnover in mice. Individual samples were prepared over a wide range of known 45Ca/3H activity ratios. Results showed that 45Ca/3H activity ratios determined experimentally by the dual-label method were comparable to the known activity ratios (percentage difference ~2%), but large variations were found in samples with 45Ca/3H activity ratios in range of 2–10 (percentage difference ~ 20–30%). Urine and fecal samples from mice administered with both 3H-TC and 45Ca were analyzed with the dual-label method. Positive correlations between 3H and 45Ca in urine (R = 0.93) and feces (R = 0.83) indicate that 3H-TC and 45Ca can be interchangeably used to monitor longitudinal in vivo skeletal remodeling. PMID:21900015

  5. TMX1 determines cancer cell metabolism as a thiol-based modulator of ER-mitochondria Ca2+ flux.

    PubMed

    Raturi, Arun; Gutiérrez, Tomás; Ortiz-Sandoval, Carolina; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Herrera-Cruz, Maria Sol; Rockley, Jeremy P; Gesson, Kevin; Ourdev, Dimitar; Lou, Phing-How; Lucchinetti, Eliana; Tahbaz, Nasser; Zaugg, Michael; Baksh, Shairaz; Ballanyi, Klaus; Simmen, Thomas

    2016-08-15

    The flux of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria regulates mitochondria metabolism. Within tumor tissue, mitochondria metabolism is frequently repressed, leading to chemotherapy resistance and increased growth of the tumor mass. Therefore, altered ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux could be a cancer hallmark, but only a few regulatory proteins of this mechanism are currently known. One candidate is the redox-sensitive oxidoreductase TMX1 that is enriched on the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM), the site of ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux. Our findings demonstrate that cancer cells with low TMX1 exhibit increased ER Ca(2+), accelerated cytosolic Ca(2+) clearance, and reduced Ca(2+) transfer to mitochondria. Thus, low levels of TMX1 reduce ER-mitochondria contacts, shift bioenergetics away from mitochondria, and accelerate tumor growth. For its role in intracellular ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux, TMX1 requires its thioredoxin motif and palmitoylation to target to the MAM. As a thiol-based tumor suppressor, TMX1 increases mitochondrial ATP production and apoptosis progression. PMID:27502484

  6. Screening of binders for pelletization of CaO-based sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilije Manovic; Edward J. Anthony

    2009-09-15

    CaO-based CO{sub 2} looping cycle technology is a promising method for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas and syngas at high temperatures. The process of CO{sub 2} capture is expected to take place in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) systems, which implies significant attrition and elutriation of the solid sorbent. Hence, both reactivation of spent sorbent and preparation of modified CaO-based sorbent may be required to maximize the performance of the sorbent. We present initial results on the screening of suitable binders for pelletization. Two types of bentonite (Na- and Ca-bentonite) and four types of commercial calcium aluminate cements (CA-14, CA-25, Secar 51, and Secar 80) were investigated here, with a primary focus of maintaining a high CO{sub 2}-capture capacity over 30-35 cycles. The tests were carried out using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and the results showed that the presence of bentonites led to faster decay in activity as a result of the formation of calcium-silica compounds with low melting points, which leads to enhanced sintering. This is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and also X-ray diffraction (XRD), which showed the presence of spurrite (Ca{sub 5}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}) as the dominant compound in the pellet after this series of cycles. Better results were obtained with no binder, i.e., by hydration of lime, where Ca(OH){sub 2} plays the role of the binder. Promising results were obtained also with calcium aluminate cements, where no effect of sintering because of the presence of these binders was noticed. Thus, on the basis of this study, the use of calcium aluminate cements for pelletization of CaO-based sorbent is recommended. 39 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Flood-prone areas and waterways, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Robert W.; Bowers, James C.

    2002-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) is in the Mojave Desert region of southern California. Although the climate in the study area is arid, occasional intense storms result in flooding on the base, damaging roads and buildings. To plan for anticipated development at EAFB, the U.S. Department of the Air Force (USAF) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a cooperative study to locate flood-prone areas on the base. This report describes flood hazards and shows flood-prone areas of the base.

  8. Assisting control for attendant propelled wheelchair based on force velocity relationship.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tatsuto; Uchiyama, Hironobu; Holloway, Catherine; Tyler, Nick

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to develop an assisting device which can be adapted to the individual capabilities of elderly attendants, which would allow them to maintain a level of fitness when pushing a wheelchair, while minimising the risk of injury to them. Furthermore there is a need to reduce the overall energy consumption of the device in keeping with the current trends of reducing carbon emissions. The control system for attendants pushing wheelchairs that reduces the energy needed by the assisting device is an increasing trend of optimisation of assistive technology devices to individual capabilities to ensure less energy expenditure of the attendant. The control parameters for existing assisting systems for attendant wheelchair propulsion are difficult to optimise for individual capabilities. We focus on the individual propelling performance, and propose an assisting control method based on the force velocity relationship of the individual. Our proposed assisting controller generates an assisting force when the attendant's propelling force exceeds an assisting boundary defined by the force velocity relationship. In this paper, we tested the performance of the assisting controller based on force velocity (FV) relationship using simulation. The simulation used an attendant wheelchair model with parameters determined from experiments. From the simulated results of the assisting force trajectories, the FV assisting system worked as we defined. The FV assisting system used less energy consumption than the existing proportional assisting systems. Also the FV assisting system would have a limit of maximum attendant propelling power, so the distribution between the attendant force and the assisting force can be easily adjusted to the individual's force velocity relationship. Our proposed FV assisting system would be useful as it would allow an optimised system based on individual capabilities to be created for rehabilitation/training systems, which would allow optimum energy

  9. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26666911

  10. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease.

  11. Distributed forcing of the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Thierry; Bury, Yannick; DAEP Team

    2012-11-01

    The topology of bluff body wakes may be highly sensitive to forcing at frequencies close to intrinsic flow instabilities. In a similar way, a steady but spatially varying forcing at wavelengths close to specific flow instabilities can lead to analogous outcomes. Such forcing is commonly referred to as distributed forcing. However, although distributed forcing has proven to be a relevant control strategy for three-dimensional flows past nominally two-dimensional geometries (e.g. extruded circular cylinder at Re > 180), its impact on the flow past nominally three-dimensional geometries is still unknown. Here we assess the receptivity of the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body to an azimuthally distributed forcing applied at the periphery of the bluff-body base. We show that the impact of RSPa, RSPb and RSPc instabilities on the drag fluctuations experienced by the bluff body can be suppressed, depending on the forcing wavelengths. The authors acknowledge the French Ministry of Defence and DGA for funding this work.

  12. A force based model of individual cell migration with discrete attachment sites and random switching terms.

    PubMed

    Dallon, J C; Scott, Matthew; Smith, W V

    2013-07-01

    A force based model of cell migration is presented which gives new insight into the importance of the dynamics of cell binding to the substrate. The main features of the model are the focus on discrete attachment dynamics, the treatment of the cellular forces as springs, and an incorporation of the stochastic nature of the attachment sites. One goal of the model is to capture the effect of the random binding and unbinding of cell attachments on global cell motion. Simulations reveal one of the most important factor influencing cell speed is the duration of the attachment to the substrate. The model captures the correct velocity and force relationships for several cell types.

  13. Matlab-based interface for the simultaneous acquisition of force measures and Doppler ultrasound muscular images.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Buedo, José; Martínez-Sober, Marcelino; Alakhdar-Mohmara, Yasser; Soria-Olivas, Emilio; Benítez-Martínez, Josep C; Martínez-Martínez, José M

    2013-04-01

    This paper tackles the design of a graphical user interface (GUI) based on Matlab (MathWorks Inc., MA), a worldwide standard in the processing of biosignals, which allows the acquisition of muscular force signals and images from a ultrasound scanner simultaneously. Thus, it is possible to unify two key magnitudes for analyzing the evolution of muscular injuries: the force exerted by the muscle and section/length of the muscle when such force is exerted. This paper describes the modules developed to finally show its applicability with a case study to analyze the functioning capacity of the shoulder rotator cuff. PMID:23176896

  14. Influence of carbon curvature on molecular adsorptions in carbon-based materials: a force field approach.

    PubMed

    Kostov, M K; Cheng, H; Cooper, A C; Pez, G P

    2002-09-30

    A general force field methodology is developed for description of molecular interactions in carbon-based materials. The method makes use of existing parameters of potential functions developed for sp(2) and sp(3) carbons and allows accurate representation of molecular forces in curved carbon environment. The potential parameters are explicitly curvature and site dependent. The proposed force field approach was used in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The results reveal significant nanotube deformations and the calculated energies of adsorption are comparable to the reported experimental heat of adsorption for H2 in SWNTs. PMID:12366059

  15. Sliding mode-based lateral vehicle dynamics control using tyre force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnappillil Madhusudhanan, Anil; Corno, Matteo; Holweg, Edward

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a lateral vehicle dynamics control based on tyre force measurements is proposed. Most of the lateral vehicle dynamics control schemes are based on yaw rate whereas tyre forces are the most important variables in vehicle dynamics as tyres are the only contact points between the vehicle and road. In the proposed method, active front steering is employed to uniformly distribute the required lateral force among the front left and right tyres. The force distribution is quantified through the tyre utilisation coefficients. In order to address the nonlinearities and uncertainties of the vehicle model, a gain scheduling sliding-mode control technique is used. In addition to stabilising the lateral dynamics, the proposed controller is able to maintain maximum lateral acceleration. The proposed method is tested and validated on a multi-body vehicle simulator.

  16. CO{sub 2} capture from flue gases using three Ca-based sorbents in a fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.S.; Fang, F.; Cai, N.S.

    2009-06-15

    Abstract: Experiments of CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration characteristics of limestone, dolomite, and CaO/Ca{sub 1}2Al{sub 14}O{sub 3}3 at high temperature were investigated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fluidized bed reactor. The effect of reactivity decay of limestone, dolomite, and CaO/Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 3}3 sorbents on CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration processes was studied. The experimental results indicated that the operation time of high efficient CO{sub 2} capture stage declined continuously with increasing of the cyclic number due to the loss of the sorbent activity, and the final CO{sub 2} capture efficiency would remain nearly constant, due to the sorbent already reaching the final residual capture capacity. After the CO{sub 2} capture step, the Ca-based sorbents need to be regenerated to be used for a subsequent cycle, and the multiple calcination processes of Ca-based sorbent under different calcination conditions are studied and discussed. Reactivity loss of limestone, dolomite and CaO/Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 3}3 sorbents from a fluidized bed reactor at both mild and severe calcination conditions was compared with the TGA data. At mild calcination conditions, TGA results of sorbent reactivity loss were similar to the experimental results of fluidized bed reactor for three sorbents at 850 degrees C calcination temperature, and this indicated that TGA experimental results can be used as a reference to predict sorbent reactivity loss behavior in fluidized bed reactor. At severe calcination condition, sorbent reactivity loss behavior for limestone and dolomite from TGA compare well with the result from a fluidized bed reactor.

  17. Apollo 15 crew receive welcome on arrival at Ellington Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The three Apollo 15 crew receive a welcome on their arrival at Ellington Air Force Base, Houston, Texas, after en eight-hour flight aboard a U.S. Air Force C-141 jet aircraft from Hawaii. Left to right are Astronauts David R. Scott, Alfred M. Worden and James B. Irwin. Members of the astronaut's families identified in picture are left to right, Scott's daughter, Tracy; Worden's father, Merrill Worden; Worden's daughter, Merrill; and Irwin's two daughters, Joy and Jill.

  18. Numerical Study on the Flow Mechanism of Base Aerodynamic Force Acting on the Vertical Landing Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimatsu, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Kojiro

    The base flow field of a vertical landing rocket in ground effect is numerically studied to clarify the mechanism of downward force acting on the body. Two characteristic patterns in the pressure distribution on the base surface are successfully captured as observed in the experiments. When the distance between the base and the ground surface is small, vorticies generated in the shear layer of the jet boundary interact with both the ground and base surfaces. The base pressure near the axis of the base is significantly reduced and large downward force appears due to vortical structure in the base region. When the distance is large, the vorticies are convected along the ground surface and the base pressure near the edge of the vehicle base is reduced due to suction of the ambient air. The numerical results indicate that unsteady motion of such vortices plays an important role in formation of the flow patterns described above.

  19. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  20. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  1. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  2. 8. Credit USAF, ca. 1952. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Credit USAF, ca. 1952. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Oblique low-level aerial view of North Base looking northeast. Based on positions and types of aircraft and automobiles, this photo taken same day as HAER photo CA-170-7. Most temporary structures in this view have been demolished with the exception of the hangars. The concrete foundations remain of many structures, while no trace was found of others. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. High precision deflection measurement of microcantilever in an optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2012-11-15

    This paper presents the methodology to measure the precise deflection of microcantilever in an optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy. In this paper, three types of calibration methods have been proposed: full linearization, sectioned linearization, and the method based on astigmatism. In addition, the probe heads for easy calibration of optical pickup head and fast replacement of optical pickup head have been developed. The performances of each method have been compared through a set of experiments and constant height mode operation which was not possible in the optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy has been carried out successfully.

  4. Base-flow data in the Arnold Air Force Base area, Tennessee, June and October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, John A.; Haugh, Connor J.

    2004-01-01

    Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) occupies about 40,000 acres in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. The primary mission of AAFB is to support the development of aerospace systems. This mission is accomplished through test facilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), which occupies about 4,000 acres in the center of AAFB. Base-flow data including discharge, temperature, and specific conductance were collected for basins in and near AAFB during high base-flow and low base-flow conditions. Data representing high base-flow conditions from 109 sites were collected on June 3 through 5, 2002, when discharge measurements at sites with flow ranged from 0.005 to 46.4 ft3/s. Data representing low base-flow conditions from 109 sites were collected on October 22 and 23, 2002, when discharge measurements at sites with flow ranged from 0.02 to 44.6 ft3/s. Discharge from the basin was greater during high base-flow conditions than during low base-flow conditions. In general, major tributaries on the north side and southeastern side of the study area (Duck River and Bradley Creek, respectively) had the highest flows during the study. Discharge data were used to categorize stream reaches and sub-basins. Stream reaches were categorized as gaining, losing, wet, dry, or unobserved for each base-flow measurement period. Gaining stream reaches were more common during the high base-flow period than during the low base-flow period. Dry stream reaches were more common during the low base-flow period than during the high base-flow period. Losing reaches were more predominant in Bradley Creek and Crumpton Creek. Values of flow per square mile for the study area of 0.55 and 0.37 (ft3/s)/mi2 were calculated using discharge data collected on June 3 through 5, 2002, and October 22 and 23, 2002, respectively. Sub-basin areas with surplus or deficient flow were defined within the basin. Drainage areas for each stream measurement site were delineated and measured from topographic maps

  5. Distributed forcing of the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Thierry; Bury, Yannick

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we address the influence of a blowing-/suction-type distributed forcing on the flow past a blunt-based axisymmetric bluff body by means of direct numerical simulations. The forcing is applied via consecutive blowing and suction slots azimuthally distributed along the trailing edge of the bluff body. We examine the impact of the forcing wavelength, amplitude and waveform on the drag experienced by the bluff body and on the occurrence of the reflectional symmetry preserving and reflectional symmetry breaking wake modes, for Reynolds numbers 800 and 1,000. We show that forcing the flow at wavelengths inherent to the unforced flow drastically damps drag oscillations associated with the vortex shedding and vorticity bursts, up to their complete suppression. The overall parameter analysis suggests that this damping results from the surplus of streamwise vorticity provided by the forcing that tends to stabilize the ternary vorticity lobes observed at the aft part of the bluff body. In addition, conversely to a blowing-type or suction-type forcing, the blowing-/suction-type forcing involves strong nonlinear interactions between locally decelerated and accelerated regions, severely affecting both the mean drag and the frequencies representative of the vortex shedding and vorticity bursts.

  6. Experimental study of frost heaving force based on transient shock response using piezoceramic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruolin; Peng, Tongxiao; Wang, Ming L.

    2016-04-01

    In seasonally frozen soil regions, the frost heaving problem made it difficult to monitor or evaluate the pile safety for long term. So far, no mature tool can be utilized to monitor the frost heaving force, which was unevenly distributed along the pile. In this paper, a piezoceramic sensing based transient excitation response approach was proposed to monitor the frost heaving force in real time. Freeze-thaw cycles can result in great changes of soil engineering properties, including the frost heaving force. So, the freeze-thaw cycle was repeated fourth to study its effect. In the experiment, transient horizontal shock on the top of the pile will be detected by the 6 PZT sensors glued on the pile. The signal data received by the 6 PZT sensors can be used to illustrate the frost heaving force distribution along the pile. Moisture content effect is also one of the important reasons that cause the variation of soil mechanical properties. So three different moisture content (6%, 12%, 18%) testing soil were used in this experiment to detect the variance of the frost heaving force. An energy indicator was developed to quantitatively evaluate the frost heaving force applied on the pile. The experimental results showed that the proposed method was effective in monitoring the uneven distribution of frost heaving force along the pile.

  7. Testing a Non-Competency Inservice Education Model Based on Humanistic or Third Force Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, William

    1978-01-01

    The investigation of the impact of the "growth" approach, based on humanistic or Third Force psychology, involved developing a "growth" model based on humanistic psychology, pilot "testing" the model, and drawing implications regarding the model's potential for inservice education. The data indicated that the "growth" approach to inservice…

  8. 77 FR 5781 - Record of Decision for the Air Space Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Record of Decision for the Air Space Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base... Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The...

  9. Reporting a new siderophore based Ca(2+) selective chemosensor that works as a staining agent in the live organism Artemia.

    PubMed

    Raju, M; Nair, Ratish R; Raval, Ishan H; Haldar, Soumya; Chatterjee, Pabitra B

    2015-11-21

    A Ca(2+)-specific chemosensor involving acyclic non-ether and non-carboxylato-type metal chelating ligands is rare. The tetradentate OONO artificial receptor, HL, possessing a sulfur-containing intermediate siderophore aeruginic acid, tethered to a rhodamine 6G based signalling unit in a single molecule has been synthesized. The fluoroionophore required excitation in the visible wavelength (510 nm) and showed highly selective and sensitive detection of Ca(2+) ions in 100% water solution in HEPES buffer at physiological pH (7.4). The probe HL, with LOD as low as 70 nM, behaves reversibly and showed nearly 17-fold enhanced selectivity for Ca(2+) over other cell abundant alkali and alkaline metal ions such as Na(+), K(+), Li(+), and Mg(2+) without any intervention. Job's plot, (1)H NMR titration and ESI-MS data provided corroborative evidence in support of 1 : 1 association between HL and Ca(2+). From a wide range of transition and heavy metal ions series, HL also binds Cu(2+). However, the use of l-cysteine removes the interference from Cu(2+) and results in highly selective detection specificity of HL for Ca(2+). As a reversible "off-on-off" fluorescent chemosensor, it is possible to detect Ca(2+) at as low as 5 μM in the midgut region of the gastrointestinal tract of the live animal Artemia, a brine shrimp. PMID:26460620

  10. Development of a quartz tuning-fork-based force sensor for measurements in the tens of nanoNewton force range during nanomanipulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oiko, V. T. A. Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D.; Martins, B. V. C.; Silva, P. C.

    2014-03-15

    Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1–100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently, applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 5–40 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.

  11. Steady-state equation of water vapor sorption for CaCl2-based chemical sorbents and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiquan; Yuan, Yanping; Sun, Qingrong; Cao, Xiaoling; Sun, Liangliang

    2016-09-01

    Green CaCl2-based chemical sorbent has been widely used in sorption refrigeration, air purification and air desiccation. Methods to improve the sorption rate have been extensively investigated, but the corresponding theoretical formulations have not been reported. In this paper, a sorption system of solid-liquid coexistence is established based on the hypothesis of steady-state sorption. The combination of theoretical analysis and experimental results indicates that the system can be described by steady-state sorption process. The steady-state sorption equation, μ = (η ‑ γT) , was obtained in consideration of humidity, temperature and the surface area. Based on engineering applications and this equation, two methods including an increase of specific surface area and adjustment of the critical relative humidity (γ) for chemical sorbents, have been proposed to increase the sorption rate. The results indicate that the CaCl2/CNTs composite with a large specific surface area can be obtained by coating CaCl2 powder on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The composite reached sorption equilibrium within only 4 h, and the sorption capacity was improved by 75% compared with pure CaCl2 powder. Furthermore, the addition of NaCl powder to saturated CaCl2 solution could significantly lower the solution’s γ. The sorption rate was improved by 30% under the same environment.

  12. Steady-state equation of water vapor sorption for CaCl2-based chemical sorbents and its application

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiquan; Yuan, Yanping; Sun, Qingrong; Cao, Xiaoling; Sun, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    Green CaCl2-based chemical sorbent has been widely used in sorption refrigeration, air purification and air desiccation. Methods to improve the sorption rate have been extensively investigated, but the corresponding theoretical formulations have not been reported. In this paper, a sorption system of solid-liquid coexistence is established based on the hypothesis of steady-state sorption. The combination of theoretical analysis and experimental results indicates that the system can be described by steady-state sorption process. The steady-state sorption equation, μ = (η − γT) , was obtained in consideration of humidity, temperature and the surface area. Based on engineering applications and this equation, two methods including an increase of specific surface area and adjustment of the critical relative humidity (γ) for chemical sorbents, have been proposed to increase the sorption rate. The results indicate that the CaCl2/CNTs composite with a large specific surface area can be obtained by coating CaCl2 powder on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The composite reached sorption equilibrium within only 4 h, and the sorption capacity was improved by 75% compared with pure CaCl2 powder. Furthermore, the addition of NaCl powder to saturated CaCl2 solution could significantly lower the solution’s γ. The sorption rate was improved by 30% under the same environment. PMID:27682811

  13. Wavelet Transform-Based De-Noising for Two-Photon Imaging of Synaptic Ca2+ Transients

    PubMed Central

    Tigaret, Cezar M.; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Collingridge, Graham L.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Postsynaptic Ca2+ transients triggered by neurotransmission at excitatory synapses are a key signaling step for the induction of synaptic plasticity and are typically recorded in tissue slices using two-photon fluorescence imaging with Ca2+-sensitive dyes. The signals generated are small with very low peak signal/noise ratios (pSNRs) that make detailed analysis problematic. Here, we implement a wavelet-based de-noising algorithm (PURE-LET) to enhance signal/noise ratio for Ca2+ fluorescence transients evoked by single synaptic events under physiological conditions. Using simulated Ca2+ transients with defined noise levels, we analyzed the ability of the PURE-LET algorithm to retrieve the underlying signal. Fitting single Ca2+ transients with an exponential rise and decay model revealed a distortion of τrise but improved accuracy and reliability of τdecay and peak amplitude after PURE-LET de-noising compared to raw signals. The PURE-LET de-noising algorithm also provided a ∼30-dB gain in pSNR compared to ∼16-dB pSNR gain after an optimized binomial filter. The higher pSNR provided by PURE-LET de-noising increased discrimination accuracy between successes and failures of synaptic transmission as measured by the occurrence of synaptic Ca2+ transients by ∼20% relative to an optimized binomial filter. Furthermore, in comparison to binomial filter, no optimization of PURE-LET de-noising was required for reducing arbitrary bias. In conclusion, the de-noising of fluorescent Ca2+ transients using PURE-LET enhances detection and characterization of Ca2+ responses at central excitatory synapses. PMID:23473483

  14. Proceedings: The Conference of the University/Urban Schools National Task Force: What Works in Urban Schools (3rd, San Francisco, CA, July 9-10, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossone, Richard M., Ed.

    Proceedings of the University/Urban Schools Task Force conference on what works in urban schools are summarized in this report. The future direction of the Task Force, articulated by conference participants, is described as a move toward the conceptualization and design of programs to teach thinking skills versus programs that mainly teach subject…

  15. Comparison of an EMG-based and a stress-based method to predict shoulder muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Christoph; Malfroy Camine, Valérie; Ingram, David; Müllhaupt, Philippe; Farron, Alain; Pioletti, Dominique; Terrier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The estimation of muscle forces in musculoskeletal shoulder models is still controversial. Two different methods are widely used to solve the indeterminacy of the system: electromyography (EMG)-based methods and stress-based methods. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of these two methods on the prediction of muscle forces, glenohumeral load and joint stability after total shoulder arthroplasty. An EMG-based and a stress-based method were implemented into the same musculoskeletal shoulder model. The model replicated the glenohumeral joint after total shoulder arthroplasty. It contained the scapula, the humerus, the joint prosthesis, the rotator cuff muscles supraspinatus, subscapularis and infraspinatus and the middle, anterior and posterior deltoid muscles. A movement of abduction was simulated in the plane of the scapula. The EMG-based method replicated muscular activity of experimentally measured EMG. The stress-based method minimised a cost function based on muscle stresses. We compared muscle forces, joint reaction force, articular contact pressure and translation of the humeral head. The stress-based method predicted a lower force of the rotator cuff muscles. This was partly counter-balanced by a higher force of the middle part of the deltoid muscle. As a consequence, the stress-based method predicted a lower joint load (16% reduced) and a higher superior-inferior translation of the humeral head (increased by 1.2 mm). The EMG-based method has the advantage of replicating the observed cocontraction of stabilising muscles of the rotator cuff. This method is, however, limited to available EMG measurements. The stress-based method has thus an advantage of flexibility, but may overestimate glenohumeral subluxation.

  16. REACTION MECHANISMS OF DRY CA-BASED SORBENTS WITH GASEOUS HCL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms of HC1 reaction with dry Ca(OH)2 or CaO sorbents in flue gas cleaning applications were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry, and X-ray diffraction. A short-time differential reactor (STDR) was used to contact 1000 ...

  17. Vision-based force measurement using neural networks for biological cell microinjection.

    PubMed

    Karimirad, Fatemeh; Chauhan, Sunita; Shirinzadeh, Bijan

    2014-03-21

    This paper presents a vision-based force measurement method using an artificial neural network model. The proposed model is used for measuring the applied load to a spherical biological cell during micromanipulation process. The devised vision-based method is most useful when force measurement capability is required, but it is very challenging or even infeasible to use a force sensor. Artificial neural networks in conjunction with image processing techniques have been used to estimate the applied load to a cell. A bio-micromanipulation system capable of force measurement has also been established in order to collect the training data required for the proposed neural network model. The geometric characterization of zebrafish embryos membranes has been performed during the penetration of the micropipette prior to piercing. The geometric features are extracted from images using image processing techniques. These features have been used to describe the shape and quantify the deformation of the cell at different indentation depths. The neural network is trained by taking the visual data as the input and the measured corresponding force as the output. Once the neural network is trained with sufficient number of data, it can be used as a precise sensor in bio-micromanipulation setups. However, the proposed neural network model is applicable for indentation of any other spherical elastic object. The results demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. The outcomes of this study could be useful for measuring force in biological cell micromanipulation processes such as injection of the mouse oocyte/embryo. PMID:24411067

  18. Vision-based force measurement using neural networks for biological cell microinjection.

    PubMed

    Karimirad, Fatemeh; Chauhan, Sunita; Shirinzadeh, Bijan

    2014-03-21

    This paper presents a vision-based force measurement method using an artificial neural network model. The proposed model is used for measuring the applied load to a spherical biological cell during micromanipulation process. The devised vision-based method is most useful when force measurement capability is required, but it is very challenging or even infeasible to use a force sensor. Artificial neural networks in conjunction with image processing techniques have been used to estimate the applied load to a cell. A bio-micromanipulation system capable of force measurement has also been established in order to collect the training data required for the proposed neural network model. The geometric characterization of zebrafish embryos membranes has been performed during the penetration of the micropipette prior to piercing. The geometric features are extracted from images using image processing techniques. These features have been used to describe the shape and quantify the deformation of the cell at different indentation depths. The neural network is trained by taking the visual data as the input and the measured corresponding force as the output. Once the neural network is trained with sufficient number of data, it can be used as a precise sensor in bio-micromanipulation setups. However, the proposed neural network model is applicable for indentation of any other spherical elastic object. The results demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. The outcomes of this study could be useful for measuring force in biological cell micromanipulation processes such as injection of the mouse oocyte/embryo.

  19. A Large Area Tactile Sensor Patch Based on Commercial Force Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Barquero, Maria Jose; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Navas-González, Rafael; Sánchez, Jose Antonio; Serón, Javier; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the design of a tactile sensor patch to cover large areas of robots and machines that interact with human beings. Many devices have been proposed to meet such a demand. These realizations are mostly custom-built or developed in the lab. The sensor of this paper is implemented with commercial force sensors. This has the benefit of a more foreseeable response of the sensor if its behavior is understood as the aggregation of readings from all the individual force sensors in the array. A few reported large area tactile sensors are also based on commercial sensors. However, the one in this paper is the first of this kind based on the use of polymeric commercial force sensing resistors (FSR) as unit elements of the array or tactels, which results in a robust sensor. The paper discusses design issues related to some necessary modifications of the force sensor, its assembly in an array, and the signal conditioning. The patch has 16 × 9 force sensors mounted on a flexible printed circuit board with a spatial resolution of 18.5 mm. The force range of a tactel is 6 N and its sensitivity is 0.6 V/N. The array is read at a rate of 78 frames per second. Finally, two simple application examples are also carried out with the sensor mounted on the forearm of a rescue robot that communicates with the sensor through a CAN bus. PMID:22163910

  20. Finite Element Method Based Modeling for Prediction of Cutting Forces in Micro-end Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap, Tej; Patra, Karali

    2016-04-01

    Micro-end milling is one of the widely used processes for producing micro features/components in micro-fluidic systems, biomedical applications, aerospace applications, electronics and many more fields. However in these applications, the forces generated in the micro-end milling process can cause tool vibration, process instability and even cause tool breakage if not minimized. Therefore, an accurate prediction of cutting forces in micro-end milling is essential. In this work, a finite element method based model is developed using ABAQUS/Explicit 6.12 software for prediction of cutting forces in micro-end milling with due consideration of tool edge radius effect, thermo-mechanical properties and failure parameters of the workpiece material including friction behaviour at tool-chip interface. Experiments have been performed for manufacturing of microchannels on copper plate using 500 µm diameter tungsten carbide micro-end mill and cutting forces are acquired through a dynamometer. Predicted cutting forces in feed and cross feed directions are compared with experimental results and are found to be in good agreements. Results also show that FEM based simulations can be applied to analyze size effects of specific cutting forces in micro-end milling process.

  1. Reciprocity-based experimental determination of dynamic forces and moments: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, Istvan L.; Howe, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    BBN Systems and Technologies has been tasked by the Georgia Tech Research Center to carry Task Assignment No. 7 for the NASA Langley Research Center to explore the feasibility of 'In-Situ Experimental Evaluation of the Source Strength of Complex Vibration Sources Utilizing Reciprocity.' The task was carried out under NASA Contract No. NAS1-19061. In flight it is not feasible to connect the vibration sources to their mounting points on the fuselage through force gauges to measure dynamic forces and moments directly. However, it is possible to measure the interior sound field or vibration response caused by these structureborne sound sources at many locations and invoke principle of reciprocity to predict the dynamic forces and moments. The work carried out in the framework of Task 7 was directed to explore the feasibility of reciprocity-based measurements of vibration forces and moments.

  2. Micropipet-based pico force transducer: in depth analysis and experimental verification.

    PubMed Central

    Simson, D A; Ziemann, F; Strigl, M; Merkel, R

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of forces in the piconewton range are very important for the study of molecular adhesion and mechanics. Recently, a micropipet-based force transducer for this type of experiment was presented (E. Evans, K. Ritchie, and R. Merkel, 1995, Biophys. J., 68:2580-2587). In the present article we give a detailed mechanical analysis of this transducer, including nonlinear effects. An analytical expression for the transducer stiffness at small elongations is given. Using magnetic tweezers (F. Ziemann, J. Rädler, and E. Sackmann, 1994, Biophys. J., 66:2210-2216), we were able to determine the force displacement relation of this transducer experimentally. Forces from approximately 10 pN to 500 pN were applied. Theoretical predictions and experimental results coincide remarkably well. PMID:9545067

  3. Research on spatial state conversion rule mining and stochastic predicting based on CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyun; Kong, Xiangqiang

    2007-06-01

    Spatial dynamic prediction in GIS is the process of spatial calculation that infers the thematic maps in future according to the historical thematic maps, and it is space-time calculation from map to map. There is great application value that spatial dynamic prediction applied to the land planning, urban land-use planning and town planning, but there is some imperfect in method and technique at present. The main technical difficulty is excavation and expression of spatial state conversion rule. In allusion to the deficiency in spatial dynamic prediction using CA, the method which excavated spatial state conversion rule based on spatial data mining was put forward. Stochastic simulation mechanism was put into the prediction calculating based on state conversion rule. The result of prediction was more rational and the relation between the prediction steps and the time course was clearer. The method was applied to prediction of spatial structure change of urban land-use in Jinan. The Urban land-use change maps were predicted in 2006 and 2010 by using the land-use maps in 1998 and 2002. The result of this test was rational by analyzing.

  4. 7. Credit USAF, ca. 1952. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Credit USAF, ca. 1952. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Oblique aerial view of North Base AFFTC (Air Force Flight Test Center) looking west northwest. The flight line at the edge of Rogers Dry Lake appears in the foreground, served by the facility's four hangars. Temporary structures beyond the hangars were demolished later in the 1950s. The fence that formerly surrounded the swimming pool in earlier photos has been taken down. In the distance lies the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Test Station, in its pre-1953 configuration. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Zhu, Chao; Muntele, Claudiu I; Zhang, Tao; Liaw, Peter K; He, Wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50 keV at a fluence of 8 × 10(15)ions/cm(2) to (Zr0.55Al0.10Ni0.05Cu0.30)99Y1 (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other. PMID:25492195

  6. CaO-based pellets supported by calcium aluminate cements for high-temperature CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J

    2009-09-15

    The development of highly efficient CaO-based pellet sorbents, using inexpensive raw materials (limestones) or the spent sorbent from CO2 capture cycles, and commercially available calcium aluminate cements (CA-14, CA-25, Secar 51, and Secar 80), is described here. The pellets were prepared using untreated powdered limestones or their corresponding hydrated limes and were tested for their CO2 capture carrying capacities for 30 carbonation/calcination cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Their morphology was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their compositions before and after carbonation/calcination cycleswere determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Pellets prepared in this manner showed superior behavior during CO2 capture cycles compared to natural sorbents, with the highest conversions being > 50% after 30 cycles. This improved performance was attributed to the resulting substructure of the sorbent particles, i.e., a porous structure with nanoparticles incorporated. During carbonation/calcination cycles mayenite (Ca12Al14O33) was formed, which is believed to be responsible for the favorable performance of synthetic CaO-based sorbents doped with alumina compounds. An added advantage of the pellets produced here is their superior strength, offering the possibility of using them in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) systems with minimal sorbent loss due to attrition. PMID:19806751

  7. O(-) identified at high temperatures in CaO-based catalysts for oxidative methane dimerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, F.; Maiti, G. C.; Batllo, F.; Baerns, M.

    1990-01-01

    A technique called charge-distribution analysis (CDA) is employed to study mobile charge carriers in the oxidation catalysts CaO, CaO with 11 percent Na2O, and CaO with 10 percent La2O3. A threshold temperature of about 550-600 C is identified at which highly mobile charge carriers are present, and the CDA studies show that they are O(-) states. The present investigation indicates the usefulness of CDA in catalysis research with pressed powder samples and gas/solid reactions.

  8. a Pcb Based Capacitive Shear Force Sensor Developed for Robotic Gripper Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian-Lin; Chen, Sheng-Jui; Wu, Gwo-Jen; Wu, Chung-Lin; Pan, Sheau-Shi

    The shear force sensor is one of the key elements in future robotic industry, it is of great importance in applications where robotic arms are required to delicately interact with objects to be handled. In this paper, we present the development of a capacitive shear force capable of sensing shear forces in two degrees of freedom. The fabrication of the sensor is based on the printed circuit board (PCB) fabrication process, a well-known and mature technology. We adopt the capacitance sensing scheme for its high sensitivity and easy implementation. For sensor characterization, we used a force gauge and an optical interferometer to measure sensor's parameters including its sensing coefficient and resolution. The dimension of our prototype shear force sensor including the metal housing is 26 mm×13 mm×58 mm suitable for the integration with commercial robotic grippers. For sensor performance, we achieved a shear force sensing coefficient of 23.3 fF/N and a resolution of smaller than 5mN.

  9. Mechanical dynamics in live cells and fluorescence-based force/tension sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Yichen; Meng, Fanjie; Sachs, Frederick; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Three signaling systems play the fundamental roles in modulating cell activities: chemical, electrical, and mechanical. While the former two are well studied, the mechanical signaling system is still elusive because of the lack of methods to measure structural forces in real time at cellular and subcellular levels. Indeed, almost all biological processes are responsive to modulation by mechanical forces that trigger dispersive downstream electrical and biochemical pathways. Communication among the three systems is essential to make cells and tissues receptive to environmental changes. Cells have evolved many sophisticated mechanisms for the generation, perception and transduction of mechanical forces, including motor proteins and mechanosensors. In this review, we introduce some background information about mechanical dynamics in live cells, including the ubiquitous mechanical activity, various types of mechanical stimuli exerted on cells and the different mechanosensors. We also summarize recent results obtained using genetically encoded FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based force/tension sensors; a new technique used to measure mechanical forces in structural proteins. The sensors have been incorporated into many specific structural proteins and have measured the force gradients in real time within live cells, tissues, and animals. PMID:25958335

  10. Mechanical dynamics in live cells and fluorescence-based force/tension sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaohan; Guo, Yichen; Meng, Fanjie; Sachs, Frederick; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Three signaling systems play the fundamental roles in modulating cell activities: chemical, electrical, and mechanical. While the former two are well studied, the mechanical signaling system is still elusive because of the lack of methods to measure structural forces in real time at cellular and subcellular levels. Indeed, almost all biological processes are responsive to modulation by mechanical forces that trigger dispersive downstream electrical and biochemical pathways. Communication among the three systems is essential to make cells and tissues receptive to environmental changes. Cells have evolved many sophisticated mechanisms for the generation, perception and transduction of mechanical forces, including motor proteins and mechanosensors. In this review, we introduce some background information about mechanical dynamics in live cells, including the ubiquitous mechanical activity, various types of mechanical stimuli exerted on cells and the different mechanosensors. We also summarize recent results obtained using genetically encoded FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based force/tension sensors; a new technique used to measure mechanical forces in structural proteins. The sensors have been incorporated into many specific structural proteins and have measured the force gradients in real time within live cells, tissues, and animals.

  11. Label-Free Sensing of Adenosine Based on Force Variations Induced by Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingfeng; Li, Qing; Colombi Ciacchi, Lucio; Wei, Gang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple force-based label-free strategy for the highly sensitive sensing of adenosine. An adenosine ssDNA aptamer was bound onto an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe by covalent modification, and the molecular-interface adsorption force between the aptamer and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In the presence of adenosine, the molecular recognition between adenosine and the aptamer resulted in the formation of a folded, hairpin-like DNA structure and hence caused a variation of the adsorption force at the graphite/water interface. The sensitive force response to molecular recognition provided an adenosine detection limit in the range of 0.1 to 1 nM. The addition of guanosine, cytidine, and uridine had no significant interference with the sensing of adenosine, indicating a strong selectivity of this sensor architecture. In addition, operational parameters that may affect the sensor, such as loading rate and solution ionic strength, were investigated. PMID:25808841

  12. DNA-based digital tension probes reveal integrin forces during early cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Ge, Chenghao; Zhu, Cheng; Salaita, Khalid

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical stimuli profoundly alter cell fate, yet the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction remain obscure because of a lack of methods for molecular force imaging. Here to address this need, we develop a new class of molecular tension probes that function as a switch to generate a 20- to 30-fold increase in fluorescence upon experiencing a threshold piconewton force. The probes employ immobilized DNA hairpins with tunable force response thresholds, ligands and fluorescence reporters. Quantitative imaging reveals that integrin tension is highly dynamic and increases with an increasing integrin density during adhesion formation. Mixtures of fluorophore-encoded probes show integrin mechanical preference for cyclized RGD over linear RGD peptides. Multiplexed probes with variable guanine-cytosine content within their hairpins reveal integrin preference for the more stable probes at the leading tip of growing adhesions near the cell edge. DNA-based tension probes are among the most sensitive optical force reporters to date, overcoming the force and spatial resolution limitations of traction force microscopy.

  13. Moving forces identification based on structure health monitoring for cable-stayed bridge with regularizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fujian; Li, Hui

    2011-04-01

    A new approach suitable for cable-stayed bridge is presented in this paper. Moving force identification method for cablestayed bridge was seldom reported. In previous research bridges were modeled as Timoshenko beams or orthotropic plates, while cable-stayed bridge can't be modeled as beams or plates. In this paper, the deck of bridge was separated from other parts, by replacing the cables with equivalent forces based on measurements. And according to D'Alembert principle the equation of motion of deck can be established, from which the moving external forces can be obtained, given measured time-varying cable forces and accelerations. However this is typically an inverse and ill-posed problem, because the measured global variables is not so sensitive to local loads such as vehicle loads for a large-span bridge meanwhile the noise plays an essential role in measured signals. The Tikhonov regularization methods are adopted for solving the ill-posed problem. Simulation studies are used to verify the method. The main contributions of this paper are: a. to propose a method for identifying moving forces on cable-stayed bridge; b. both the location and the magnitude of the force can be identified; c. the vehicles in different lanes can be identified.

  14. Atomistic insight into orthoborate-based ionic liquids: force field development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-07-24

    We have developed an all-atomistic force field for a new class of halogen-free chelated orthoborate-phosphonium ionic liquids. The force field is based on an AMBER framework with determination of force field parameters for phosphorus and boron atoms, as well as refinement of several available parameters. The bond and angle force constants were adjusted to fit vibration frequency data derived from both experimental measurements and ab initio calculations. The force field parameters for several dihedral angles were obtained by fitting torsion energy profiles deduced from ab initio calculations. To validate the proposed force field parameters, atomistic simulations were performed for 12 ionic liquids consisting of tetraalkylphosphonium cations and chelated orthoborate anions. The predicted densities for neat ionic liquids and the [P6,6,6,14][BOB] sample, with a water content of approximately 2.3-2.5 wt %, are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The potential energy components of 12 ionic liquids were discussed in detail. The radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions were analyzed and visualized to probe the microscopic ionic structures of these ionic liquids. There are mainly four high-probability regions of chelated orthoborate anions distributed around tetraalkylphosphonium cations in the first solvation shell, and such probability distribution functions are strongly influenced by the size of anions. PMID:25020237

  15. Label-free sensing of adenosine based on force variations induced by molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingfeng; Li, Qing; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi; Wei, Gang

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple force-based label-free strategy for the highly sensitive sensing of adenosine. An adenosine ssDNA aptamer was bound onto an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe by covalent modification, and the molecular-interface adsorption force between the aptamer and a flat graphite surface was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In the presence of adenosine, the molecular recognition between adenosine and the aptamer resulted in the formation of a folded, hairpin-like DNA structure and hence caused a variation of the adsorption force at the graphite/water interface. The sensitive force response to molecular recognition provided an adenosine detection limit in the range of 0.1 to 1 nM. The addition of guanosine, cytidine, and uridine had no significant interference with the sensing of adenosine, indicating a strong selectivity of this sensor architecture. In addition, operational parameters that may affect the sensor, such as loading rate and solution ionic strength, were investigated.

  16. Atomistic insight into orthoborate-based ionic liquids: force field development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-07-24

    We have developed an all-atomistic force field for a new class of halogen-free chelated orthoborate-phosphonium ionic liquids. The force field is based on an AMBER framework with determination of force field parameters for phosphorus and boron atoms, as well as refinement of several available parameters. The bond and angle force constants were adjusted to fit vibration frequency data derived from both experimental measurements and ab initio calculations. The force field parameters for several dihedral angles were obtained by fitting torsion energy profiles deduced from ab initio calculations. To validate the proposed force field parameters, atomistic simulations were performed for 12 ionic liquids consisting of tetraalkylphosphonium cations and chelated orthoborate anions. The predicted densities for neat ionic liquids and the [P6,6,6,14][BOB] sample, with a water content of approximately 2.3-2.5 wt %, are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The potential energy components of 12 ionic liquids were discussed in detail. The radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions were analyzed and visualized to probe the microscopic ionic structures of these ionic liquids. There are mainly four high-probability regions of chelated orthoborate anions distributed around tetraalkylphosphonium cations in the first solvation shell, and such probability distribution functions are strongly influenced by the size of anions.

  17. Feedforward suppression of force ripple based on a simplex-optimized dither signal.

    PubMed

    Tan, K K; Chin, S J; Dou, H F

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the design and realization of a feedforward dither signal to reduce the force ripple in an iron-core permanent magnet linear motor (PMLM). A composite control structure is used, consisting of three components: a simple feedforward component, a PID feedback component, and a ripple compensator (RC). The first two components are designed based on a dominant linear model of the motor. The dither signal is generated based on a signal model which is identified using a multidimensional simplex downhill method. In this way, a simple approach is available to eliminate or suppress the inherent force ripple, thus facilitating smooth precise motion while uncompromising on the maximum force achievable. Real-time experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme for high precision motion trajectory tracking.

  18. Creep force modelling for rail traction vehicles based on the Fastsim algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Polach, Oldrich; Cole, Colin

    2013-11-01

    The evaluation of creep forces is a complex task and their calculation is a time-consuming process for multibody simulation (MBS). A methodology of creep forces modelling at large traction creepages has been proposed by Polach [Creep forces in simulations of traction vehicles running on adhesion limit. Wear. 2005;258:992-1000; Influence of locomotive tractive effort on the forces between wheel and rail. Veh Syst Dyn. 2001(Suppl);35:7-22] adapting his previously published algorithm [Polach O. A fast wheel-rail forces calculation computer code. Veh Syst Dyn. 1999(Suppl);33:728-739]. The most common method for creep force modelling used by software packages for MBS of running dynamics is the Fastsim algorithm by Kalker [A fast algorithm for the simplified theory of rolling contact. Veh Syst Dyn. 1982;11:1-13]. However, the Fastsim code has some limitations which do not allow modelling the creep force - creep characteristic in agreement with measurements for locomotives and other high-power traction vehicles, mainly for large traction creep at low-adhesion conditions. This paper describes a newly developed methodology based on a variable contact flexibility increasing with the ratio of the slip area to the area of adhesion. This variable contact flexibility is introduced in a modification of Kalker's code Fastsim by replacing the constant Kalker's reduction factor, widely used in MBS, by a variable reduction factor together with a slip-velocity-dependent friction coefficient decreasing with increasing global creepage. The proposed methodology is presented in this work and compared with measurements for different locomotives. The modification allows use of the well recognised Fastsim code for simulation of creep forces at large creepages in agreement with measurements without modifying the proven modelling methodology at small creepages.

  19. A pre-conditioned implicit direct forcing based immersed boundary method for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunwook; Pan, Xiaomin; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2016-06-01

    A novel immersed boundary (IB) method based on an implicit direct forcing (IDF) scheme is developed for incompressible viscous flows. The key idea for the present IDF method is to use a block LU decomposition technique in momentum equations with Taylor series expansion to construct the implicit IB forcing in a recurrence form, which imposes more accurate no-slip boundary conditions on the IB surface. To accelerate the IB forcing convergence during the iterative procedure, a pre-conditioner matrix is introduced in the recurrence formulation of the IB forcing. A Jacobi-type parameter is determined in the pre-conditioner matrix by minimizing the Frobenius norm of the matrix function representing the difference between the IB forcing solution matrix and the pre-conditioner matrix. In addition, the pre-conditioning parameter is restricted due to the numerical stability in the recurrence formulation. Consequently, the present pre-conditioned IDF (PIDF) enables accurate calculation of the IB forcing within a few iterations. We perform numerical simulations of two-dimensional flows around a circular cylinder and three-dimensional flows around a sphere for low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The result shows that PIDF yields a better imposition of no-slip boundary conditions on the IB surfaces for low Reynolds number with a fairly larger time step than IB methods with different direct forcing schemes due to the implicit treatment of the diffusion term for determining the IB forcing. Finally, we demonstrate the robustness of the present PIDF scheme by numerical simulations of flow around a circular array of cylinders, flows around a falling sphere, and two sedimenting spheres in gravity.

  20. 78 FR 15718 - Palmco Power CA, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Palmco Power CA, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization This is a supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of Palmco Power...

  1. Mechanical activation of CaO-based adsorbents for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Sayyah, Maryam; Lu, Yongqi; Masel, Richard I; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2013-01-01

    The reversible cycling of CaO adsorbents to CaCO(3) for high-temperature CO(2) capture is substantially improved by mechanical treatment. The mechanical milling intensity and conditions of grinding (e.g., wet vs. dry, planetary vs. vibratory milling) were determined to be the main factors that control the effectiveness of the mechanochemical synthesis to enhance the recycling stability of the sorbents prepared. In addition, MgO was used as an example of an inert binder to help mitigate CaCO(3) sintering. Wet planetary milling of MgO into CaCO(3) allowed efficient particle size reduction and the effective dispersion of MgO throughout the particles. Wet planetary milling yielded the most stable sorbents during 50 cycles of carbonation-calcination.

  2. Microscopic evidence for Ca(2+) mediated pectin-pectin interactions in carrot-based suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kyomugasho, Clare; Willemsen, Katleen L D D; Christiaens, Stefanie; Van Loey, Ann M; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2015-12-01

    This study explored the use of fluorescently labeled pectin to obtain evidence for Ca(2+) mediated pectin-pectin interactions in situ. Specifically, carrots were either blanched at low temperature (LTB) or blanched at high temperature (HTB) to activate or inactivate endogenous pectin methylesterase, respectively. Consequently, pectin in tissue particles of LTB and HTB carrots exhibited low degree of methylesterification (DM) and high DM, respectively. Pectin present in the LTB carrot serum exhibited a lower DM, was more branched, and showed a higher molar mass compared to HTB carrot serum pectin. Ca(2+) mediated pectin-pectin interactions were influenced by serum pectin molecular structure, increased with increasing pH and Ca(2+) concentration, and decreasing DM. Presence of more linear pectin in the serum created a competition, leading to less intense interactions between labeled pectin and pectin at tissue particle surfaces. Generally, the most intense Ca(2+) mediated pectin-pectin interactions were observed for pectin of LTB carrot particles.

  3. A neutron scintillator based on transparent nanocrystalline CaF2:Eu glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struebing, Christian; Chong, JooYun; Lee, Gyuhyon; Zavala, Martin; Erickson, Anna; Ding, Yong; Wang, Cai-Lin; Diawara, Yacouba; Engels, Ralf; Wagner, Brent; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-04-01

    There are no efficient Eu2+ doped glass neutron scintillators reported due to low doping concentrations of Eu2+ and the amorphous nature of the glass matrix. In this work, an efficient CaF2:Eu glass ceramic neutron scintillator was prepared by forming CaF2:Eu nanocrystals in a 6Li-containing glass matrix. Through appropriate thermal treatments, the scintillation light yield of the transparent glass ceramic was increased by a factor of at least 46 compared to the as-cast amorphous glass. This improvement was attributed to more efficient energy transfer from the CaF2 crystals to the Eu2+ emitting centers. Further light yield improvement is expected if the refractive index of the glass matrix can be matched to the CaF2 crystal.

  4. Molecular simulations of imidazolium-based tricyanomethanide ionic liquids using an optimized classical force field.

    PubMed

    Vergadou, Niki; Androulaki, Eleni; Hill, Jörg-Rüdiger; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-03-01

    Imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) incorporating the tricyanomethanide ([TCM(-)]) anion are studied using an optimized classical force field. These ILs are very promising candidates for use in a wide range of cutting-edge technologies and, to our knowledge, it is the first time that this IL family is subject to a molecular simulation study with the use of a classical atomistic force field. The [C4mim(+)][TCM(-)] ionic liquid at 298.15 K and at atmospheric pressure was used as the basis for force field optimization which primarily involved the determination of the Lennard-Jones parameters of [TCM(-)] and the implementation of three quantum mechanical schemes for the calculation of the partial charge distribution and the identification of the appropriate scaling factor for the reduction of the total ionic charge. The optimized force field was validated by performing simulations of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tricyanomethanide ([Cnmim(+)][TCM(-)], n = 2, 4, 6, and 8) IL family at various temperatures. The results for density, self-diffusivity and viscosity are in very good agreement with the available experimental data for all ILs verifying that the force field reliably reproduces the behaviour of the imidazolium-based [TCM(-)] IL family in a wide temperature range. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the microscopic structure and the complex dynamic behaviour of the ILs under study was performed. PMID:26878611

  5. Analyzing excitation forces acting on a plate based on measured acoustic pressure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Zhou, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on "seeing" through an elastic structure to uncover the root cause of sound and vibration by using nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) and normal modes expansion. This approach is of generality because vibro-acoustic responses on the surface of a vibrating structure can always be reconstructed, exactly or approximately. With these vibro-acoustic responses, excitation forces acting on the structure can always be determined, analytically or numerically, given any set of boundary conditions. As an example, the explicit formulations for reconstructing time-harmonic excitation forces, including point, line and surface forces, and their arbitrary combinations acting on a rectangular thin plate in vacuum mounted on an infinite baffle are presented. The reason for choosing this example is that the analytic solutions to vibro-acoustic responses are available, and in-depth analyses of results are possible. Results demonstrate that this approach allows one to identify excitation forces based on measured acoustic pressures and reveal their characteristics such as locations, types and amplitudes, as if one could "see" excitation forces acting behind the plate based on acoustic pressure measured on the opposite side. This approach is extendable to general elastic structures, except that in such circumstance numerical results must be sought. PMID:27475174

  6. [Force-based local navigation in robot-assisted implantation bed anlage in the lateral skull base. An experimental study].

    PubMed

    Plinkert, P K; Federspil, P A; Plinkert, B; Henrich, D

    2002-03-01

    Excellent precision, miss of retiring, reproducibility are main characteristics of robots in the operating theatre. Because of these facts their use for surgery in the lateral scull base is of great interest. In recent experiments we determined process parameters for robot assisted reaming of a cochlea implant bed and for a mastoidectomy. These results suggested that optimizing parameters for thrilling with the robot is needed. Therefore we implemented a suitable reaming curve from the geometrical data of the implant and a force controlled process control for robot assisted reaming at the lateral scull base. Experiments were performed with an industrial robot on animal and human scull base specimen. Because of online force detection and feedback of sensory data the reaming with the robot was controlled. With increasing force values above a defined limit feed rates were automatically regulated. Furthermore we were able to detect contact of the thrill to dura mater by analyzing the force values. With the new computer program the desired implant bed was exactly prepared. Our examinations showed a successful reaming of an implant bed in the lateral scull base with a robot. Because of a force controlled reaming process locale navigation is possible and enables careful thrilling with a robot.

  7. Lift vs. drag based mechanisms for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects.

    PubMed

    Jones, S K; Laurenza, R; Hedrick, T L; Griffith, B E; Miller, L A

    2015-11-01

    We used computational fluid dynamics to determine whether lift- or drag-based mechanisms generate the most vertical force in the flight of the smallest insects. These insects fly at Re on the order of 4-60 where viscous effects are significant. Detailed quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available, and as a result both drag- and lift-based strategies have been suggested as the mechanisms by which these insects stay aloft. We used the immersed boundary method to solve the fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction problem of a flexible wing immersed in a two-dimensional viscous fluid to compare three idealized hovering kinematics: a drag-based stroke in the vertical plane, a lift-based stroke in the horizontal plane, and a hybrid stroke on a tilted plane. Our results suggest that at higher Re, a lift-based strategy produces more vertical force than a drag-based strategy. At the Re pertinent to small insect hovering, however, there is little difference in performance between the two strategies. A drag-based mechanism of flight could produce more vertical force than a lift-based mechanism for insects at Re<5; however, we are unaware of active fliers at this scale.

  8. Theoretical studies of the osmium based perovskites AOsO3 (A=Ca, Sr and Ba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zahid; Sattar, Abdul; Asadabadi, S. Jalali; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2015-11-01

    Osmium based perovskites AOsO3 (A=Ca, Sr and Ba) have been studied theoretically using density functional theory approach. These studies show that CaOsO3 and SrOsO3 are orthorhombic and BaOsO3 is cubic and are consistent with the experiments. The electronic band structures demonstrate that these compounds are metals. The magnetic studies verify the experimental observations at low temperature, where the spin effects are canceled by the orbitals. The stable magnetic phase optimizations and magnetic susceptibilities calculations by the post-DFT treatment confirm that CaOsO3 and SrOsO3 are weak ferromagnetic whereas BaOsO3 is a paramagnetic material. The directional magnetic study shows that these compounds are magnetically anisotropic, and reveals that the easy magnetization axis is [001] direction.

  9. 5. Credit USAF, ca. 1944. Original housed in the Muroc ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Credit USAF, ca. 1944. Original housed in the Muroc Flight Test Base, Unit History, 1 September 1942 - 30 June 1945. Alfred F. Simpson Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. Maxwell AFB, Alabama. Interior view of hangar, looking north northwest. Note exposed wooden construction. Two jet engines lie partially concealed by tarpaulins in the background, along with a combustion chamber assembly (horizontal cylinders in a circular array). On the workbench in the foreground lie an engine rotor hub and what appears to be an engine fuel line assembly. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar No. 1, First & B Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Credit USAF, ca. 1943. Original housed in the Muroc Flight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF, ca. 1943. Original housed in the Muroc Flight Test Base, Unit History, 1 September 1942 - 30 June 1945. Alfred F. Simpson Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. Maxwell AFB, Alabama. Historic view looking northeast along southeast edge of swimming pool during construction. The wavy edge of the pool visible here remains as a ground surface feature in 1995. Building in the background is the second Bachelor Officers' Quarters (T-15) built in 1943 - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Swimming Pool, Second Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. The Impact of Acquiescence on Forced-Choice Responses: A Model-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Anguiano-Carrasco, Cristina; Chico, Eliseo

    2011-01-01

    The general aim of the present study is to assess the potential usefulness of the normative Forced Choice (FC) format for reducing the impact of acquiescent responding (AR). To this end it makes two types of contributions: methodological and substantive. Methodologically, it proposes a model-based procedure, derived from a basic response…

  12. SIMULATION OF INTRINSIC BIOREMEDIATION PROCESSES AT WURTSMITH AIR FORCE BASE, MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In October, 1988, a KC-135 aircraft crashed at Wurtsmith Air Force base (AFB), Oscoda, Michigan during an attempted landing. Approximately 3000 gallons of jet fuel (JP-4) were spilled onto the ground, with a large portion of the fuel entering the subsurface. Previous investigat...

  13. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS AT MULTIPLE AIR FORCE BASE DEMONSTRATION SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural attenuation treatability studies(TSs) were conducted at 14 US Air Force bases. Only sites where biodegradation of CAHs was suspected were selected for the study. The major initiative was to evaluate the effectiveness of monitored natural attenuation(MNA) at sites contam...

  14. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD EVALUATION: EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, ALASKA (EPA/540/R-95/533)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication, one of a series presenting the findings of the Bioremediation Field Initiatives bioremediation field evaluations, provides a detailed summary of the evaluation conducted at the Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) Superfund site in Fairbanks, Alaska. At this site, the ...

  15. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.560 Section 334.560 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560...

  16. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.560 Section 334.560 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560...

  17. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.560 Section 334.560 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560...

  18. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.560 Section 334.560 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560...

  19. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.560 Section 334.560 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560...

  20. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the temporal variability of wind vectors at 1 km altitude intervals from 0 to 27 km altitude taken from a 10-year data sample of twice-daily rawinsode wind measurements over Vandenberg Air Force Base, California is presented.

  1. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  2. Applying Model Analysis to a Resource-Based Analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Trevor I.; Wittmann, Michael C.; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we analyzed the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation in terms of a resources-based model that allows for clustering of questions so as to provide useful information on how students correctly or incorrectly reason about physics. In this paper, we apply model analysis to show that the associated model plots provide more information…

  3. Landing of STS-59 Shuttle Endeavour at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear of the Space Shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base to complete the 11 day STS-59/SRL-1 mission. Landing occured at 9:54 a.m., April 20, 1994. Mission duration was 11 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes.

  4. STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION RESEARCH FOR DNAPL IN FRACTURED ROCK, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, LIMESTONE, MAINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details a research project on Steam Enhanced Remediation (SER) for the recovery of volatile organic compounds from fractured limestone that was carried out at the Quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base in Limestone, Maine. This project was carried out by USEPA, Ma...

  5. Ground-water conditions at Beale Air Force Base and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Ground-water conditions were studied in a 168-square-mile area between the Sierra Nevada and the Feather River in Yuba County, Calif. The area is in the eastern part of the Sacramento Valley and includes most of Beale Air Force Base. Source, occurrence, movement, and chemical quality of the ground water were evaluated. Ground water occurs in sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Tertiary and Quaternary age. The base of the freshwater is in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks of Oligocene and Eocene age, that contain water of high dissolved-solids concentration. The ground water occurs under unconfined and partly confined conditions. At Beale Air Force Base it is at times partly confined. Recharge is principally from the rivers. Pumpage in the study area was estimated to be 129,000 acre-feet in 1975. In the 1960's, water levels in most parts of the study area declined less rapidly than in earlier years or became fairly stable. In the 1970's, water levels at Beale Air Force Base declined only slightly. Spacing of wells on the base and rates of pumping are such that excessive pumping interference is avoided. Water quality at the base and throughout the study area is generally good. Dissolved-solids concentrations are 700 to 900 milligrams per liter in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks beneath the base well field. (USGS)

  6. Elucidating the driving force of superconductivity increase in compressed optimally doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Struzhkin, Viktor; Zhang, Jian-Bo; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Goncharov, Alexander; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Gu, Genda

    An optimally doped cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x is as a perfect model system to explore the mechanism of superconductivity by applying pressure as one can avoid complicated competing orders in the underdoped regime and explore pure intrinsic effects rather than secondary effects related to change in the carrier concentration. Here, by carefully examining the collected high-pressure Raman spectra at low temperatures, we have observed an enhanced two-magnon mode and connected this to the observed 10 K increase in Tc (reaching more than 100 K for the first time) in the optimally doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x upon compression clearly delineating the effect of pressure-induced charge transfer that must suppress Tc for this optimally doped sample. Our finely designed experiments offer the direct and convincing evidence for identifying the magnetic fluctuations as the pairing interaction in cuprate superconductors.

  7. Force/torque and tactile sensors for sensor-based manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbrussel, H.; Belieen, H.; Bao, Chao-Ying

    1989-01-01

    The autonomy of manipulators, in space and in industrial environments, can be dramatically enhanced by the use of force/torque and tactile sensors. The development and future use of a six-component force/torque sensor for the Hermes Robot Arm (HERA) Basic End-Effector (BEE) is discussed. Then a multifunctional gripper system based on tactile sensors is described. The basic transducing element of the sensor is a sheet of pressure-sensitive polymer. Tactile image processing algorithms for slip detection, object position estimation, and object recognition are described.

  8. Data on wells in the Edwards Air Force Base area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutcher, L.C.; Bader, J.S.; Hiltgen, W.J.

    1962-01-01

    The data presented In this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as a phase of the investigation of ground-water geology and hydrology of the Edwards Air Force Base area. The study was made in cooperation with the Department of the Air Force but also was coincident with the U.S. Geological Survey investigation of water wells and general hydrologic conditions throughout much of the desert region of southern California. The overall study of general hydrologic conditions in the desert is part of a cooperative program with the California Department of Water Resources.

  9. Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Geothermal Resource Assessment and Future Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base in early 2011 near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this well—the most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140°C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home Air Force Base. In conclusion, Recommendation for follow-up efforts include the following:

  10. Wave-based control of under-actuated flexible structures with strong external disturbing forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, William J.; Habibi, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    Wave-based control of under-actuated, flexible systems has many advantages over other methods. It considers actuator motion as launching a mechanical wave into the flexible system which it absorbs on its return to the actuator. The launching and absorbing proceed simultaneously. This simple, intuitive idea leads to robust, generic, highly efficient, precise, adaptable controllers, allowing rapid and almost vibrationless re-positioning of the system, using only sensors collocated at the actuator-system interface. It has been very successfully applied to simple systems such as mass-spring strings, systems of Euler-Bernoulli beams, planar mass-spring arrays, and flexible three-dimensional space structures undergoing slewing motion. In common with most other approaches, this work also assumed that, during a change of position, the forces from the environment were negligible in comparison with internal forces and torques. This assumption is not always valid. Strong external forces considerably complicate the flexible control problem, especially when unknown, unexpected or unmodelled. The current work extends the wave-based strategy to systems experiencing significant external disturbing forces, whether enduring or transient. The work also provides further robustness to sensor errors. The strategy has the controller learn about the disturbances and compensate for them, yet without needing new sensors, measurements or models beyond those of standard wave-based control.

  11. Viscoelastic model based force control for soft tissue interaction and its application in physiological motion compensation.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Zemiti, Nabil; Liu, Chao; Poignet, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Controlling the interaction between robots and living soft tissues has become an important issue as the number of robotic systems inside the operating room increases. Many researches have been done on force control to help surgeons during medical procedures, such as physiological motion compensation and tele-operation systems with haptic feedback. In order to increase the performance of such controllers, this work presents a novel force control scheme using Active Observer (AOB) based on a viscoelastic interaction model. The control scheme has shown to be stable through theoretical analysis and its performance was evaluated by in vitro experiments. In order to evaluate how the force control scheme behaves under the presence of physiological motion, experiments considering breathing and beating heart disturbances are presented. The proposed control scheme presented a stable behavior in both static and moving environment. The viscoelastic AOB presented a compensation ratio of 87% for the breathing motion and 79% for the beating heart motion.

  12. Force control of a magnetorheological damper using an elementary hysteresis model-based feedforward neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekkachai, Kittipong; Tungpimolrut, Kanokvate; Nilkhamhang, Itthisek

    2013-11-01

    An inverse controller is proposed for a magnetorheological (MR) damper that consists of a hysteresis model and a voltage controller. The force characteristics of the MR damper caused by excitation signals are represented by a feedforward neural network (FNN) with an elementary hysteresis model (EHM). The voltage controller is constructed using another FNN to calculate a suitable input signal that will allow the MR damper to produce the desired damping force. The performance of the proposed EHM-based FNN controller is experimentally compared to existing control methodologies, such as clipped-optimal control, signum function control, conventional FNN, and recurrent neural network with displacement or velocity inputs. The results show that the proposed controller, which does not require force feedback to implement, provides excellent accuracy, fast response time, and lower energy consumption.

  13. 3D force control for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery based on viscoelastic tissue model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Moreira, Pedro; Zemiti, Nabil; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Current cardiac surgery faces the challenging problem of heart beating motion even with the help of mechanical stabilizer which makes delicate operation on the heart surface difficult. Motion compensation methods for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery have been proposed recently in literature, but research on force control for such kind of surgery has hardly been reported. Moreover, the viscoelasticity property of the interaction between organ tissue and robotic instrument further complicates the force control design which is much easier in other applications by assuming the interaction model to be elastic (industry, stiff object manipulation, etc.). In this work, we present a three-dimensional force control method for robotic-assisted beating heart surgery taking into consideration of the viscoelastic interaction property. Performance studies based on our D2M2 robot and 3D heart beating motion information obtained through Da Vinci™ system are provided.

  14. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  15. A Noncontact Force Sensor Based on a Fiber Bragg Grating and Its Application for Corrosion Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Clara J.; Bruno, Antonio C.

    2013-01-01

    A simple noncontact force sensor based on an optical fiber Bragg grating attached to a small magnet has been proposed and built. The sensor measures the force between the magnet and any ferromagnetic material placed within a few millimeters of the sensor. Maintaining the sensor at a constant standoff distance, material loss due to corrosion increases the distance between the magnet and the corroded surface, which decreases the magnetic force. This will decrease the strain in the optical fiber shifting the reflected Bragg wavelength. The measured shift for the optical fiber used was 1.36 nm per Newton. Models were developed to optimize the magnet geometry for a specific sensor standoff distance and for particular corrosion pit depths. The sensor was able to detect corrosion pits on a fuel storage tank bottom with depths in the sub-millimeter range. PMID:23995095

  16. A noncontact force sensor based on a fiber Bragg grating and its application for corrosion measurement.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Clara J; Bruno, Antonio C

    2013-01-01

    A simple noncontact force sensor based on an optical fiber Bragg grating attached to a small magnet has been proposed and built. The sensor measures the force between the magnet and any ferromagnetic material placed within a few millimeters of the sensor. Maintaining the sensor at a constant standoff distance, material loss due to corrosion increases the distance between the magnet and the corroded surface, which decreases the magnetic force. This will decrease the strain in the optical fiber shifting the reflected Bragg wavelength. The measured shift for the optical fiber used was 1.36 nm per Newton. Models were developed to optimize the magnet geometry for a specific sensor standoff distance and for particular corrosion pit depths. The sensor was able to detect corrosion pits on a fuel storage tank bottom with depths in the sub-millimeter range. PMID:23995095

  17. Development of AMOEBA force field for 1,3-dimethylimidazolium based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Starovoytov, Oleg N; Torabifard, Hedieh; Cisneros, G Andrés

    2014-06-26

    The development of AMOEBA (a multipolar polarizable force field) for imidazolium based ionic liquids is presented. Our parametrization method follows the AMOEBA procedure and introduces the use of QM intermolecular total interactions as well as QM energy decomposition analysis (EDA) to fit individual interaction energy components. The distributed multipoles for the cation and anions have been derived using both the Gaussian distributed multipole analysis (GDMA) and Gaussian electrostatic model-distributed multipole (GEM-DM) methods.1 The intermolecular interactions of a 1,3-dimethylimidazolium [dmim(+)] cation with various anions, including fluoride [F(-)], chloride [Cl(-)], nitrate [NO(3)(-)], and tetraflorouborate [BF(4)(-)], were studied using quantum chemistry calculations at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. Energy decomposition analysis was performed for each pair using the restricted variational space decomposition approach (RVS) at the HF/6-311G(d,p) level. The new force field was validated by running a series of molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and by analyzing thermodynamic and structural properties of these systems. A number of thermodynamic properties obtained from MD simulations were compared with available experimental data. The ionic liquid structure reproduced using the AMOEBA force field is also compared with the data from neutron diffraction experiment and other MD simulations. Employing GEM-DM force fields resulted in a good agreement on liquid densities ρ, enthalpies of vaporization ΔH(vap), and diffusion coefficients D(±) in comparison with conventional force fields.

  18. Video-based and interference-free axial force detection and analysis for optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knust, Sebastian; Spiering, Andre; Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Tönsing, Katja; Sischka, Andy; Anselmetti, Dario

    2012-10-01

    For measuring the minute forces exerted on single molecules during controlled translocation through nanopores with sub-piconewton precision, we have developed a video-based axial force detection and analysis system for optical tweezers. Since our detection system is equipped with a standard and versatile CCD video camera with a limited bandwidth offering operation at moderate light illumination with minimal sample heating, we integrated Allan variance analysis for trap stiffness calibration. Upon manipulating a microbead in the vicinity of a weakly reflecting surface with simultaneous axial force detection, interference effects have to be considered and minimized. We measured and analyzed the backscattering light properties of polystyrene and silica microbeads with different diameters and propose distinct and optimized experimental configurations (microbead material and diameter) for minimal light backscattering and virtually interference-free microbead position detection. As a proof of principle, we investigated the nanopore threading forces of a single dsDNA strand attached to a microbead with an overall force resolution of ±0.5 pN at a sample rate of 123 Hz.

  19. Cogging force rejection method of linear motor based on internal model principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Zhenyu; Yang, Tianbo

    2015-02-01

    The cogging force disturbance of linear motor is one of the main factors affecting the positioning accuracy of ultraprecision moving platform. And this drawback could not be completely overcome by improving the design of motor body, such as location modification of permanent magnet array, or optimization design of the shape of teeth-slot. So the active compensation algorithms become prevalent in cogging force rejection area. This paper proposed a control structure based on internal mode principle to attenuate the cogging force of linear motor which deteriorated the accuracy of position, and this structure could make tracking and anti-disturbing performance of close-loop designed respectively. In the first place, the cogging force was seen as the intrinsic property of linear motor and its model constituting controlled object with motor ontology model was obtained by data driven recursive identification method. Then, a control structure was designed to accommodate tracking and anti-interference ability separately by using internal model principle. Finally, the proposed method was verified in a long stroke moving platform driven by linear motor. The experiment results show that, by employing this control strategy, the positioning error caused by cogging force was decreased by 70%.

  20. Kinetic analysis of ski turns based on measured ground reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Vaverka, Frantisek; Vodickova, Sona; Elfmark, Milan

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to devise a method of kinetic analysis of the ground reaction force that enables the durations and magnitudes of forces acting during the individual phases of ski turns to be described exactly. The method is based on a theoretical analysis of physical forces acting during the ski turn. Two elementary phases were defined: (1) preparing to turn (initiation) and (2) actual turning, during which the center of gravity of the skier-ski system moves along a curvilinear trajectory (steering). The starting point of the turn analysis is a dynamometric record of the resultant acting ground reaction force applied perpendicularly on the ski surface. The method was applied to six expert skiers. They completed a slalom course comprising five gates arranged on the fall line of a 26° slope at a competition speed using symmetrical carving turns (30 evaluated turns). A dynamometric measurement system was placed on the carving skis (168 cm long, radius 16 m, data were recorded at 100 Hz). MATLAB procedures were used to evaluate eight variables during each turn: five time variables and three force variables. Comparison of the turn analysis results between individuals showed that the method is useful for answering various research questions associated with ski turns.

  1. Force spectroscopy 101: how to design, perform, and analyze an AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy experiment.

    PubMed

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2011-10-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy presents a deceptively simple approach to probing interaction between molecules and molecular assemblies on the nanoscale by measuring forces that it takes to pull the molecules apart. Yet, a more detailed analysis reveals a wealth of different behaviors and interesting physics. This article aims to explore basic physical concepts behind these experiments from a strictly practical point of using these data to extract meaningful information about the interactions. It also focuses on different loading regimes in these experiments, different kinetics that they cause, and different data interpretation that is required for measurements in those regimes. PMID:21862386

  2. Determination of nitric oxide mediating intracellular Ca2+ release on neurons based on confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; He, Yipeng; Zeng, Yixiu; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    The gas NO is a ubiquitous intercellular messenger that modulates a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological functions. But few studies were made to study the role of NO in the Ca2+ release in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by confocal microscopy. Thus the objective of this study was to assess if NO has a role in Ca2+ signaling in DRG neurons using confocal microscopy combined with special fluorescence probe Fluo-3/AM. A 100 μM concentration of the NO donors (Sodium Nitroprusside, Dihydrate, SNP) and NO synthase inhibitor (NG-Monomethyl-L-arginine, Monoacetate salt, L-NMMA) was used in the study. Results showed that the fluorescence intensity increased rapidly after injecting SNP, which indicated that SNP could enhance intracellular Ca2+ release. And the fluorescence intensity shrank gradually with time and kept at a low level for quite a long period after loading with L-NMMA which indicated that L-NMMA could block intracellular Ca2+ release. All these results demonstrated that NO was involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ release in the DRG neurons.

  3. Prediction of ground reaction forces during gait based on kinematics and a neural network model.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Eel; Choi, Ahnryul; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2013-09-27

    Kinetic information during human gait can be estimated with inverse dynamics, which is based on anthropometric, kinematic, and ground reaction data. While collecting ground reaction data with a force plate is useful, it is costly and requires regulated space. The goal of this study was to propose a new, accurate methodology for predicting ground reaction forces (GRFs) during level walking without the help of a force plate. To predict GRFs without a force plate, the traditional method of Newtonian mechanics was used for the single support phase. In addition, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was applied for the double support phase to solve statically indeterminate structure problems. The input variables of the ANN model, which were selected to have both dependency and independency, were limited to the trajectory, velocity, and acceleration of the whole segment's mass centre to minimise errors. The predicted GRFs were validated with actual GRFs through a ten-fold cross-validation method, and the correlation coefficients (R) for the ground forces were 0.918 in the medial-lateral axis, 0.985 in the anterior-posterior axis, and 0.991 in the vertical axis during gait. The ground moments were 0.987 in the sagittal plane, 0.841 in the frontal plane, and 0.868 in the transverse plane during gait. The high correlation coefficients(R) are due to the improvement of the prediction rate in the double support phase. This study also proved the possibility of calculating joint forces and moments based on the GRFs predicted with the proposed new hybrid method. Data generated with the proposed method may thus be used instead of raw GRF data in gait analysis and in calculating joint dynamic data using inverse dynamics. PMID:23962528

  4. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca²⁺ and H⁺ Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-09-23

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and H⁺ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot(®)565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca(2+) or H⁺ probes. These 'Rubies' are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid) for H⁺ or Ca(2+) sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging.

  5. FRET-Based Nanobiosensors for Imaging Intracellular Ca²⁺ and H⁺ Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Despras, Guillaume; Luccardini, Camilla; Collot, Mayeul; de Waard, Michel; Oheim, Martin; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Feltz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) are luminous point emitters increasingly being used to tag and track biomolecules in biological/biomedical imaging. However, their intracellular use as highlighters of single-molecule localization and nanobiosensors reporting ion microdomains changes has remained a major challenge. Here, we report the design, generation and validation of FRET-based nanobiosensors for detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and H⁺ transients. Our sensors combine a commercially available CANdot(®)565QD as an energy donor with, as an acceptor, our custom-synthesized red-emitting Ca(2+) or H⁺ probes. These 'Rubies' are based on an extended rhodamine as a fluorophore and a phenol or BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid) for H⁺ or Ca(2+) sensing, respectively, and additionally bear a linker arm for conjugation. QDs were stably functionalized using the same SH/maleimide crosslink chemistry for all desired reactants. Mixing ion sensor and cell-penetrating peptides (that facilitate cytoplasmic delivery) at the desired stoichiometric ratio produced controlled multi-conjugated assemblies. Multiple acceptors on the same central donor allow up-concentrating the ion sensor on the QD surface to concentrations higher than those that could be achieved in free solution, increasing FRET efficiency and improving the signal. We validate these nanosensors for the detection of intracellular Ca(2+) and pH transients using live-cell fluorescence imaging. PMID:26404317

  6. Integration of calcium and chemical looping combustion using composite CaO/CuO-based materials.

    PubMed

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J

    2011-12-15

    Calcium looping cycles (CaL) and chemical looping combustion (CLC) are two new, developing technologies for reduction of CO(2) emissions from plants using fossil fuels for energy production, which are being intensively examined. Calcium looping is a two-stage process, which includes oxy-fuel combustion for sorbent regeneration, i.e., generation of a concentrated CO(2) stream. This paper discuss the development of composite materials which can use copper(II)-oxide (CuO) as an oxygen carrier to provide oxygen for the sorbent regeneration stage of calcium looping. In other words, the work presented here involves integration of calcium looping and chemical looping into a new class of postcombustion CO(2) capture processes designated as integrated CaL and CLC (CaL-CLC or Ca-Cu looping cycles) using composite pellets containing lime (CaO) and CuO together with the addition of calcium aluminate cement as a binder. Their activity was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) during calcination/reduction/oxidation/carbonation cycles. The calcination/reduction typically was performed in methane (CH(4)), and the oxidation/carbonation stage was carried out using a gas mixture containing both CO(2) and O(2). It was confirmed that the material synthesized is suitable for the proposed cycles; with the very favorable finding that reduction/oxidation of the oxygen carrier is complete. Various schemes for the Ca-Cu looping process have been explored here that would be compatible with these new composite materials, along with some different possibilities for flow directions among carbonator, calciner, and air reactor.

  7. Robust Operation of Tendon-Driven Robot Fingers Using Force and Position-Based Control Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E (Inventor); Platt, Jr., Robert J. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A (Inventor); Strawser, Philip A (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven finger and a control system. The system controls the finger via a force-based control law when a tension sensor is available, and via a position-based control law when a sensor is not available. Multiple tendons may each have a corresponding sensor. The system selectively injects a compliance value into the position-based control law when only some sensors are available. A control system includes a host machine and a non-transitory computer-readable medium having a control process, which is executed by the host machine to control the finger via the force- or position-based control law. A method for controlling the finger includes determining the availability of a tension sensor(s), and selectively controlling the finger, using the control system, via the force or position-based control law. The position control law allows the control system to resist disturbances while nominally maintaining the initial state of internal tendon tensions.

  8. Polymer-based flexible capacitive sensor for three-axial force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzynska, J. A.; Gijs, M. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a flexible-substrate-based three-axial force sensor, composed of finger-shaped electrode capacitors, whose operation is based on the measurement of a capacitance change induced upon applying a three-axial load. The electrode design supports high sensitivity to shear forces. An overall flexibility of the sensor and elasticity of the capacitor's dielectric is obtained by integrating three polymers in the sensor's technology process, namely polyimide, parylene-C, and polydimethylsiloxane, combined with standard metallization processes. We have theoretically modeled the sensor's capacitance and its three-axial force sensitivity. The unit capacitors have static capacitances in the range of 20 pF. The electro-mechanical characterization of the capacitors reveals in the normal direction a sensitivity Sz = 0.024 kPa-1 for pressures <10 kPa, whereas for higher pressures the measured sensitivity Sz = 6.6 × 10-4 kPa-1. Typical measured shear force sensitivity Sx = 2.8 × 10-4 kPa-1. These values give our transducer high potential for use in skin-like sensing applications.

  9. Highly sensitive force sensor based on optical microfiber asymmetrical Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuan; Yu, Cai-Bin; Wang, Ting-Ting; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Zhang, Ming-Lei; Wu, Hui-Juan; Chen, Xiao-Xiao; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2014-02-10

    An asymmetrical Fabry-Perot interferometric (AFPI) force sensor is fabricated based on a narrowband reflection of low-reflectivity fiber Bragg grating (LR-FBG) and a broadband Fresnel reflection of the cleaved fiber end. The AFPI sensor includes a section of microfiber made by tapering and it achieves a force sensitivity of 0.221 pm/μN with a tapered microfiber of 40 mm length and 6.1 μm waist diameter. Compared with similar AFPI structure in 125 μm-diameter single mode fiber, the force sensitivity of the microfiber AFPI structure is greatly enhanced due to its smaller diameter and can be optimized for different force scales by controlling the diameter. The fabrication process of the AFPI sensor is simple and cost-effective. The AFPI sensor has better multiplexing capacity than conventional extrinsic fiber-optic Fabry-Perot sensors, while it also release the requirement on the wavelength matching of the FBG-pair-based FPI.

  10. Rehabilitation of the Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ray, Ronald J.; Phillips, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since initial use in 1958 for the X-15 rocket-powered research airplane, the Rocket Engine Test Facility has proven essential for testing and servicing rocket-powered vehicles at Edwards Air Force Base. For almost two decades, several successful flight-test programs utilized the capability of this facility. The Department of Defense has recently demonstrated a renewed interest in propulsion technology development with the establishment of the National Aerospace Initiative. More recently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is undergoing a transformation to realign the organization, focusing on the Vision for Space Exploration. These initiatives provide a clear indication that a very capable ground-test stand at Edwards Air Force Base will be beneficial to support the testing of future access-to-space vehicles. To meet the demand of full integration testing of rocket-powered vehicles, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory have combined their resources in an effort to restore and upgrade the original X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility to become the new Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand. This report describes the history of the X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility, discusses the current status of the facility, and summarizes recent efforts to rehabilitate the facility to support potential access-to-space flight-test programs. A summary of the capabilities of the facility is presented and other important issues are discussed.

  11. Highly sensitive force sensor based on optical microfiber asymmetrical Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuan; Yu, Cai-Bin; Wang, Ting-Ting; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Zhang, Ming-Lei; Wu, Hui-Juan; Chen, Xiao-Xiao; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2014-02-10

    An asymmetrical Fabry-Perot interferometric (AFPI) force sensor is fabricated based on a narrowband reflection of low-reflectivity fiber Bragg grating (LR-FBG) and a broadband Fresnel reflection of the cleaved fiber end. The AFPI sensor includes a section of microfiber made by tapering and it achieves a force sensitivity of 0.221 pm/μN with a tapered microfiber of 40 mm length and 6.1 μm waist diameter. Compared with similar AFPI structure in 125 μm-diameter single mode fiber, the force sensitivity of the microfiber AFPI structure is greatly enhanced due to its smaller diameter and can be optimized for different force scales by controlling the diameter. The fabrication process of the AFPI sensor is simple and cost-effective. The AFPI sensor has better multiplexing capacity than conventional extrinsic fiber-optic Fabry-Perot sensors, while it also release the requirement on the wavelength matching of the FBG-pair-based FPI. PMID:24663648

  12. LandCaRe-DSS - model based tools for irrigation management under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotterweich, Markus; Wilkinson, Kristina; Cassel, Martin; Scherzer, Jörg; Köstner, Barbara; Berg, Michael; Grocholl, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is expected to have a strong influence on agricultural systems in the future. It will be important for decision makers and stakeholders to assess the impact of climate change at the farm and regional level in order to facilitate and maintain a sustainable and profitable farming infrastructure. Climate change impact studies have to incorporate aspects of uncertainty and the underlying knowledge is constantly expanding and improving. Decision support systems (DSS) with flexible data bases are therefore a useful tool for management and planning: different models can be applied under varying boundary conditions within a conceptual framework and the results can be used e.g. to show the effects of climate change scenarios and different land management options. Within this project, the already existing LandCaRe DSS will be further enhanced and improved. A first prototype had been developed for two regions in eastern Germany, mainly to show the effects of climate change on yields, nutrient balances and farm economy. The new model version will be tested and applied for a region in north-western Germany (Landkreis Uelzen) where arable land makes up about 50% of overall land-use and where 80 % of the arable land is already irrigated. For local decision makers, it will be important to know how water demand and water availability are likely to change in the future: Is more water needed for irrigation? Is more water actually available for irrigation? Will the existing limits for ground water withdrawal be sufficient for farmers to irrigate their crops? How can the irrigation water demand be influenced by land management options like the use of different crops and varieties or different farming and irrigation techniques? The main tasks of the project are (I) the integration of an improved irrigation model, (II) the development of a standardized interface to apply the DSS in different regions, (III) to optimize the graphical user interface, (IV) to transfer and

  13. 19. DETAIL OF AIR FORCE WEATHER INFORMATION TERMINAL AND CHART ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL OF AIR FORCE WEATHER INFORMATION TERMINAL AND CHART RECORDER LOCATED IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF CONSOLE IN PHOTOS A-15 THROUGH A-18. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Analysis of Snow Albedo, Grain Size and Radiative Forcing based on the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) Imaging Spectroscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Climate is expected to be most vulnerable in mountainous and arctic regions where the atmosphere and the hydrosphere are directly linked to the cryosphere. A combination of modeling and large-scale observational efforts is required to investigate related scientific questions. NASA's Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory addresses some of these needs by establishing new quantitative observational capabilities in regional mapping of mountain snow properties. In addition, ASO's key products showed that we are able to achieve societal benefits by improving water resources management. We will show the first analysis of snow optical products (albedo, grain size, and radiative forcing) from the spring 2013 ASO campaign in the Sierra Nevada, CA, USA. In addition, we will present the retrieval methods used to derive these products based on airborne imaging spectroscopy, LiDAR, as well as radiative transfer models. The preliminary findings provide new important insights into the temporal and spatial aspects of Western US mountain snow and its melt.

  15. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)-Italian version: regression based norms and equivalent scores.

    PubMed

    Conti, Silvia; Bonazzi, Stefano; Laiacona, Marcella; Masina, Marco; Coralli, Mirco Vanelli

    2015-02-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a brief cognitive screening instrument developed by Nasreddine et al. to detect mild cognitive impairment, a high-risk condition for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. In this study we report normative data on the MoCA-Italian version, collected on a sample of 225 Italian healthy subjects ranged in age between 60 and 80 years, and in formal education from 5 to 23 years. The global normal cognition was established in accordance with the Mini-Mental State Examination score and with the Prose Memory Test score (Spinnler and Tognoni, Ital J Neurol Sci 6:25-27, 1987). None of the participants had a history of psychiatric, neurological, cerebrovascular disorders or brain injury or took drugs affecting cognition. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the potential effect of age, education and sex on the MoCA total performance score. We provide correction grids to adjust raw scores and equivalent scores with cut-off value to allow comparison between MoCA performance and others neuropsychological test scores that can be administered on the same subject. PMID:25139107

  16. [Analysis of soluble Ca content in banana pulp based on pretreatment of digestion model in vitro].

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Hua; Huang, Mao-Fang; Xu, Fei; Tang, Yong-Fu; Fu, Tiao-Kun

    2010-04-01

    In the present paper, soluble Ca content in banana pulp was analyzed with pretreatment of digestion model in vitro. All the samples were digested by strong acid (perchloric acid and nitric acid with 1 : 4 ratio) and determined by AA700 flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS). Meanwhile, the reproducibility of the analytical method was investigated. The results showed that (1) Content of Ca was 1.479 mg x g(-1) x DW in eighty percent maturity banana pulp. And the relative standard deviation was 4.12%. (2) Contents of Ca in the soluble and insoluble fractions were 1.108 and 0.412 mg x g(-1) x DW, respectively in eighty percent maturity banana pulp with pretreatment of digestion model in vitro. The extraction rate was 74.9% and the residue rate was 27.8%. (3) The relative standard deviations of the analytical results of Ca contents in those two fractions were 2.56% and 9.10%, respectively, in the reproducibility tests. It was showed that the digestion model in vitro did not affect the reproduction quality significantly. Moreover, the deviation between the theoretical value and the summation value of the extraction and the residue rates was only 2.7%, which showed good availability of the digestion model in vitro to be used as a pretreatment method in mineral element analysis process. (4) Relative standard deviation and recovery yield in the determination procedure were 0.11% (n = 9) and 99.2%, respectively. PMID:20545175

  17. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)-Italian version: regression based norms and equivalent scores.

    PubMed

    Conti, Silvia; Bonazzi, Stefano; Laiacona, Marcella; Masina, Marco; Coralli, Mirco Vanelli

    2015-02-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a brief cognitive screening instrument developed by Nasreddine et al. to detect mild cognitive impairment, a high-risk condition for Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. In this study we report normative data on the MoCA-Italian version, collected on a sample of 225 Italian healthy subjects ranged in age between 60 and 80 years, and in formal education from 5 to 23 years. The global normal cognition was established in accordance with the Mini-Mental State Examination score and with the Prose Memory Test score (Spinnler and Tognoni, Ital J Neurol Sci 6:25-27, 1987). None of the participants had a history of psychiatric, neurological, cerebrovascular disorders or brain injury or took drugs affecting cognition. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the potential effect of age, education and sex on the MoCA total performance score. We provide correction grids to adjust raw scores and equivalent scores with cut-off value to allow comparison between MoCA performance and others neuropsychological test scores that can be administered on the same subject.

  18. Microscopic evidence for Ca(2+) mediated pectin-pectin interactions in carrot-based suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kyomugasho, Clare; Willemsen, Katleen L D D; Christiaens, Stefanie; Van Loey, Ann M; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2015-12-01

    This study explored the use of fluorescently labeled pectin to obtain evidence for Ca(2+) mediated pectin-pectin interactions in situ. Specifically, carrots were either blanched at low temperature (LTB) or blanched at high temperature (HTB) to activate or inactivate endogenous pectin methylesterase, respectively. Consequently, pectin in tissue particles of LTB and HTB carrots exhibited low degree of methylesterification (DM) and high DM, respectively. Pectin present in the LTB carrot serum exhibited a lower DM, was more branched, and showed a higher molar mass compared to HTB carrot serum pectin. Ca(2+) mediated pectin-pectin interactions were influenced by serum pectin molecular structure, increased with increasing pH and Ca(2+) concentration, and decreasing DM. Presence of more linear pectin in the serum created a competition, leading to less intense interactions between labeled pectin and pectin at tissue particle surfaces. Generally, the most intense Ca(2+) mediated pectin-pectin interactions were observed for pectin of LTB carrot particles. PMID:26041174

  19. CaO-based CO2 sorbents: from fundamentals to the development of new, highly effective materials.

    PubMed

    Kierzkowska, Agnieszka M; Pacciani, Roberta; Müller, Christoph R

    2013-07-01

    The enormous anthropogenic emission of the greenhouse gas CO2 is most likely the main reason for climate change. Considering the continuing and indeed growing utilisation of fossil fuels for electricity generation and transportation purposes, development and implementation of processes that avoid the associated emissions of CO2 are urgently needed. CO2 capture and storage, commonly termed CCS, would be a possible mid-term solution to reduce the emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. However, the costs associated with the currently available CO2 capture technology, that is, amine scrubbing, are prohibitively high, thus making the development of new CO2 sorbents a highly important research challenge. Indeed, CaO, readily obtained through the calcination of naturally occurring limestone, has been proposed as an alternative CO2 sorbent that could substantially reduce the costs of CO2 capture. However, one of the major drawbacks of using CaO derived from natural sources is its rapidly decreasing CO2 uptake capacity with repeated carbonation-calcination reactions. Here, we review the current understanding of fundamental aspects of the cyclic carbonation-calcination reactions of CaO such as its reversibility and kinetics. Subsequently, recent attempts to develop synthetic, CaO-based sorbents that possess high and cyclically stable CO2 uptakes are presented. PMID:23821467

  20. Polarizable Empirical Force Field for Hexopyranose Monosaccharides Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A polarizable empirical force field based on the classical Drude oscillator is presented for the hexopyranose form of selected monosaccharides. Parameter optimization targeted quantum mechanical (QM) dipole moments, solute–water interaction energies, vibrational frequencies, and conformational energies. Validation of the model was based on experimental data on crystals, densities of aqueous-sugar solutions, diffusion constants of glucose, and rotational preferences of the exocylic hydroxymethyl of d-glucose and d-galactose in aqueous solution as well as additional QM data. Notably, the final model involves a single electrostatic model for all sixteen diastereomers of the monosaccharides, indicating the transferability of the polarizable model. The presented parameters are anticipated to lay the foundation for a comprehensive polarizable force field for saccharides that will be compatible with the polarizable Drude parameters for lipids and proteins, allowing for simulations of glycolipids and glycoproteins. PMID:24564643

  1. Baseline meteorological soundings for parametric environmental investigations at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, M.; Stephens, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Meteorological soundings representative of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, are presented. Synthetic meteorological soundings at Kennedy Space Center, including fall, spring, and a sea breeze, and at Vandenberg Air Force Base (sea breeze with low and high level inversion and stationary upper level troughs) are shown. Soundings of frontal passages are listed. The Titan launch soundings at Kennedy Space Center present a wide range of meteorological conditions, both seasonal and time of day variations. The meteorological data input of altitude, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and pressure may be used as meteorological inputs for the NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Model or other models to obtain quantitative estimates of effluent concentrations associated with the potential emission of major combustion products in the lower atmosphere to simulate actual launches of space vehicles. The Titan launch soundings are also of value in terms of rocket effluent measurements for analysis purposes.

  2. Radioactive waste disposal sites: Two successful closures at Tinker Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, G.; Mohatt, J.V.; Kowall, S.J.; Jarvis, M.F.

    1993-06-01

    This article describes remediation and closure of two radioactive waste disposal sites at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, making them exemption regulatory control. The approach consisted of careful exhumation and assessment of soils in sites expected to be contaminated based on historical documentation, word of mouth, and geophysical surveys; removal of buried objects that had gamma radiation exposure levels above background; and confirmation that the soil containing residual radium-226 was below an activity level equal to no more than a 10 mrem/yr annual dose equivalent. In addition, 4464 kg of chemically contaminated excavated soils were removed for disposal. After remediation, the sites met standards for unrestricted use. These sites were two of the first three Air Force radioactive disposal sites to be closed and were the first to be closed under Draft NUREG/CR-5512.

  3. Exploration and Resource Assessment at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Using an Integrated Team Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

    2012-10-01

    The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this well—the most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140°C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home AFB.

  4. 33 CFR 334.635 - Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defined at 33 CFR 329, within the following boundaries. Commencing from the shoreline at the northeast... contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.635 Section 334.635 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.635 Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

  5. 33 CFR 334.635 - Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.635 Section 334.635 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.635 Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

  6. 33 CFR 334.635 - Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.635 Section 334.635 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.635 Hillsborough Bay and waters contiguous to MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

  7. New method of space debris cleaning based on light negative force: tractor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiongge; Gao, Long; Li, Chen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new way of space debris removal and protection, that is, using tractor laser, which based on light negative force, to achieve space debris cleaning and shielded. Tractor laser is traceable from the theory of optical tweezers, accompanied with non-diffraction beam. These kind of optical beams have the force named negative force pointing to optical source, this will bring the object along the trajectory of laser beam moving to the optical source. The negative force leads to the new method to convey and sampling the space micro-objects. In this paper, the application of tractor laser in the space debris collection and protection of 1cm is studied. The application of the several tractor beams in the space debris and sample collection is discussed. The proposed method can reduce the requirements of the laser to the satellite platform, and realize the collection of space debris, make the establishment of the space garbage station possible, and help to study the spatial non contact sample transmission and reduce the risk of space missions.

  8. APT a next generation QM-based reactive force field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappé, A. K.; Bormann-Rochotte, L. M.; Wiser, D. C.; Hart, J. R.; Pietsch, M. A.; Casewit, C. J.; Skiff, W. M.

    Modelling reactivity at the nanoscale is a major computational challenge. Both reactive force field and combined QM-MM methodologies have been and are being developed to study reactivity at this boundary between molecules and the solid state. There have been more than 1500 publications since the mid-1990s, on combined QM-MM methodologies. Limitations in current models include the distortional characteristics of force field potential terms, the smooth transit from one potential surface to another, rather than surface hopping, and the blending of electrostatics between QM and MM portions of a QM-MM model. Functional forms, potential surface coupling terms, and parameterization strategies for the Approximate Pair Theory (APT), a next generation reactive force field model, are described. The APT model has been developed to correct a number of limitations in current reactive force field models as well as providing a foundation for a next generation QM-MM model. Chemical bonding concepts are used to develop fully dissociative bond stretch, bend, torsion, and inversion valence terms. Quantum mechanics also provides functional forms for potential surface coupling terms that permit a general description of reactivity from hydrogen bonding, through non-classical carbocations and cracking, to olefin polymerization, oxidation, and metathesis. Van der Waals, electrostatic, and metallic bonding models also derive from quantum mechanical resonance. Finally, Pauli Principle-based orthogonality provides a way to electrostatically couple the QM and MM portions of a QM-MM model that will support arbitrarily large basis sets.

  9. A Physically-Based Estimate of Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Sulfate Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J. ); Easter, Richard C. ); Chapman, Elaine G. ); Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Zhang, Yang ); Leung, Ruby ); Laulainen, Nels S. ); Saylor, Rick D. ); Zaveri, Rahul A. )

    2001-04-01

    Estimates of direct and indirect radiative forcing by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols from an integrated global aerosol and climate modeling system are presented. A detailed global tropospheric chemistry and aerosol model that predicts concentrations of oxidants as well as aerosols and aerosol precursors, is coupled to a general circulation model that predicts both cloud water mass and cloud droplet number. Both number and mass of several externally-mixed aerosol size modes are predicted, with internal mixing assumed for the different aerosol components within each mode. Predicted aerosol species include sulfate, organic and black carbon, soil dust, and sea salt. The models use physically-based treatments of aerosol radiative properties (including dependence on relative humidity) and aerosol activation as cloud condensation nuclei. Parallel simulations with and without anthropogenic sulfate aerosol are performed for a global domain. The global and annual mean direct and indirect radiative forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate are estimated to be -0.3 to -0.5 and -1.5 to -3.0 W m-2, respectively. The radiative forcing is sensitive to the model's horizontal resolution, the use of predicted vs. analyzed relative humidity, the prediction vs. diagnosis of aerosol number and droplet number, and the parameterization of droplet collision/coalescence. About half of the indirect radiative forcing is due to changes in droplet radius and half to increased cloud liquid water.

  10. Development and precision position/force control of a new flexure-based microgripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-ling; Wei, Yan-ding; Lou, Jun-qiang; Xie, Feng-ran; Fu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling and position/force control of a new piezo-driven microgripper with integrated position and force sensors. The structural design of the microgripper is based on double amplification mechanisms employing the bridge-type mechanism and the parallelogram mechanism. The microgripper can generate a large gripping range and pure translation of the gripping arm. Through the pseudorigid-body-model method, theoretical models are derived. By means of several finite-element analysis simulations, the optimal structural parameters for the microgripper are acquired and the theoretical models are analyzed and validated. Furthermore, to improve the performance of the microgripper, a new hybrid position/force control scheme employing a nonlinear fuzzy logic controller combined with an incremental proportional-integral controller is presented. The control scheme is capable of regulating the position and the gripping force of the microgripper simultaneously. Experimental investigation and validation were performed and the experimental results verify the effectiveness of the developed structural design and the proposed hybrid control scheme.

  11. Hierarchical CaCO3 chromatography: a stationary phase based on biominerals.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kosuke; Oaki, Yuya; Takahashi, Daisuke; Toshima, Kazunobu; Imai, Hiroaki

    2015-03-23

    In biomineralization, acidic macromolecules play important roles for the growth control of crystals through a specific interaction. Inspired by this interaction, we report on an application of the hierarchical structures in CaCO3 biominerals to a stationary phase of chromatography. The separation and purification of acidic small organic molecules are achieved by thin-layer chromatography and flash chromatography using the powder of biominerals as the stationary phase. The unit nanocrystals and their oriented assembly, the hierarchical structure, are suitable for the adsorption site of the target organic molecules and the flow path of the elution solvents, respectively. The separation mode is ascribed to the specific adsorption of the acidic molecules on the crystal face and the coordination of the functional groups to the calcium ions. The results imply that a new family of stationary phase of chromatography can be developed by the fine tuning of hierarchical structures in CaCO3 materials.

  12. Fluorescence-Based Force/Tension Sensors: A Novel Tool to Visualize Mechanical Forces in Structural Proteins in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Sachs, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Three signaling systems, chemical, electrical, and mechanical, ubiquitously contribute to cellular activities. There is limited information on the mechanical signaling system because of a lack of tools to measure stress in specific proteins. Although significant advances in methodologies such as atomic force microscopy and laser tweezers have achieved great success in single molecules and measuring the mean properties of cells and tissues, they cannot deal with specific proteins in live cells. Recent Advances: To remedy the situation, we developed a family of genetically encoded optical force sensors to measure the stress in structural proteins in living cells. The sensors can be incorporated into specific proteins and are not harmful in transgenic animals. The chimeric proteins distribute and function as their wild-type counterparts, and local stress can be read out from changes in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Critical Issues: Our original sensor used two mutant green fluorescence proteins linked by an alpha helix that served as a linking spring. Ever since, we have improved the probe design in a number of ways. For example, we replaced the helical linker with more common elastic protein domains to better match the compliance of the wild-type hosts. We greatly improved sensitivity by using the angular dependence of FRET rather than the distance dependence as the transduction mechanism, because that has nearly 100% efficiency at rest and nearly zero when stretched. Future Directions: These probes enable researchers to investigate the roles of mechanical force in cellular activities at the level of single molecules, cells, tissues, and whole animals. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 986–999. PMID:24205787

  13. Effect of ca2+ to salicylic acid release in pectin based controlled drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistriyani, L.; Wirawan, S. K.; Sediawan, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Wastes from orange peel are potentially be utilized to produce pectin, which are currently an import commodity. Pectin can be used in making edible film. Edible films are potentially used as a drug delivery system membrane after a tooth extraction. Drug which is used in the drug delivery system is salicylic acid. It is an antiseptic. In order to control the drug release rate, crosslinking process is added in the manufacturing of membrane with CaCl2.2H2O as crosslinker. Pectin was diluted in water and mixed with a plasticizer and CaCl2.2H2O solution at 66°C to make edible film. Then the mixture was dried in an oven at 50 °C. After edible film was formed, it was coated using plasticizer and CaCl2.2H2O solution with various concentration 0, 0.015, 0.03 and 0.05g/mL. This study showed that the more concentration of crosslinker added, the slower release of salicylic acid would be. This was indicated by the value of diffusivites were getting smaller respectively. The addition of crosslinker also caused smaller gels swelling value,which made the membrane is mechanically stronger

  14. MEMS based Low Cost Piezoresistive Microcantilever Force Sensor and Sensor Module

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, H. J.; Kim, Hyun Tae; Roy, Rajarshi; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we report fabrication and characterization of a low-cost MEMS based piezoresistive micro-force sensor with SU-8 tip using laboratory made silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. To prepare SOI wafer, silicon film (0.8 µm thick) was deposited on an oxidized silicon wafer using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The films were deposited in Argon (Ar) ambient without external substrate heating. The material characteristics of the sputtered deposited silicon film and silicon film annealed at different temperatures (400–1050°C) were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The residual stress of the films was measured as a function of annealing temperature. The stress of the as-deposited films was observed to be compressive and annealing the film above 1050°C resulted in a tensile stress. The stress of the film decreased gradually with increase in annealing temperature. The fabricated cantilevers were 130 µm in length, 40 µm wide and 1.0 µm thick. A series of force-displacement curves were obtained using fabricated microcantilever with commercial AFM setup and the data were analyzed to get the spring constant and the sensitivity of the fabricated microcantilever. The measured spring constant and sensitivity of the sensor was 0.1488N/m and 2.7mV/N. The microcantilever force sensor was integrated with an electronic module that detects the change in resistance of the sensor with respect to the applied force and displays it on the computer screen. PMID:24855449

  15. MEMS based Low Cost Piezoresistive Microcantilever Force Sensor and Sensor Module.

    PubMed

    Pandya, H J; Kim, Hyun Tae; Roy, Rajarshi; Desai, Jaydev P

    2014-03-01

    In the present work, we report fabrication and characterization of a low-cost MEMS based piezoresistive micro-force sensor with SU-8 tip using laboratory made silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. To prepare SOI wafer, silicon film (0.8 µm thick) was deposited on an oxidized silicon wafer using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The films were deposited in Argon (Ar) ambient without external substrate heating. The material characteristics of the sputtered deposited silicon film and silicon film annealed at different temperatures (400-1050°C) were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The residual stress of the films was measured as a function of annealing temperature. The stress of the as-deposited films was observed to be compressive and annealing the film above 1050°C resulted in a tensile stress. The stress of the film decreased gradually with increase in annealing temperature. The fabricated cantilevers were 130 µm in length, 40 µm wide and 1.0 µm thick. A series of force-displacement curves were obtained using fabricated microcantilever with commercial AFM setup and the data were analyzed to get the spring constant and the sensitivity of the fabricated microcantilever. The measured spring constant and sensitivity of the sensor was 0.1488N/m and 2.7mV/N. The microcantilever force sensor was integrated with an electronic module that detects the change in resistance of the sensor with respect to the applied force and displays it on the computer screen.

  16. Summary and evaluation of hydraulic property data available for Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Thorne, P.D.

    1994-07-01

    Most of the contaminant source areas at Eielson Air Force Base are located above an unconfined alluvial aquifer with relatively high hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic tests that have been conducted on wells at the base were evaluated, and in some cases reanalyzed, to determine hydraulic conductivity and specific yield for the aquifer. The reviewed tests included 2 multiple-well pumping tests and 30 slug tests. One slug test was conducted on a well in the bedrock aquifer at Site 38. All the other tests were conducted on the alluvial aquifer.

  17. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  18. Critical Assessment of P2O5 Activity Coefficients in CaO-based Slags during Dephosphorization Process of Iron-based Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-min; Li, Jin-yan; Chai, Guo-Ming; Duan, Dong-ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    According to the experimental results of hot metal dephosphorization by CaO-based slags at a commercial-scale hot metal pretreatment station, activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in the CaO-based slags has been determined using the calculated comprehensive mass action concentration N_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}{} of iron oxides by the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT) for representing the reaction ability of Fe t O, i.e., activity of a_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}{} . The collected ten models from the literature for predicting activity coefficient γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags have been evaluated based on the determined activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 by the IMCT as the criterion. The collected ten models of activity coefficient γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags can be described in the form of a linear function as log γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} ≡ y = c0 + c1 x , in which independent variable x represents the chemical composition of slags, intercept c0 including the constant term depicts temperature effect and other unmentioned or acquiescent thermodynamic factors, and slope c1 is regressed by the experimental results. Thus, a general approach for obtaining good prediction results of activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags is proposed by revising the constant term in intercept c0 for the collected ten models. The better models with an ideal revising possibility or flexibility in the collected ten models have been selected and recommended.

  19. Design and Flight Evaluation of a New Force-Based Flow Angle Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Vachon, Michael Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A novel force-based flow angle probe was designed and flight tested on the NASA F-15B Research Testbed aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The prototype flow angle probe is a small, aerodynamic fin that has no moving parts. Forces on the prototype flow angle probe are measured with strain gages and correlated with the local flow angle. The flow angle probe may provide greater simplicity, greater robustness, and better access to flow measurements in confined areas relative to conventional moving vane-type flow angle probes. Flight test data were obtained at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic Mach numbers to a maximum of Mach 1.70. Flight conditions included takeoff, landing, straight and level flight, flight at higher aircraft angles of attack, and flight at elevated g-loadings. Flight test maneuvers included angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip sweeps. The flow angle probe-derived flow angles are compared with those obtained with a conventional moving vane probe. The flight tests validated the feasibility of a force-based flow angle measurement system.

  20. [The motive force of evolution based on the principle of organismal adjustment evolution.].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jia-Shu

    2010-08-01

    From the analysis of the existing problems of the prevalent theories of evolution, this paper discussed the motive force of evolution based on the knowledge of the principle of organismal adjustment evolution to get a new understanding of the evolution mechanism. In the guide of Schrodinger's theory - "life feeds on negative entropy", the author proposed that "negative entropy flow" actually includes material flow, energy flow and information flow, and the "negative entropy flow" is the motive force for living and development. By modifying my own theory of principle of organismal adjustment evolution (not adaptation evolution), a new theory of "regulation system of organismal adjustment evolution involved in DNA, RNA and protein interacting with environment" is proposed. According to the view that phylogenetic development is the "integral" of individual development, the difference of negative entropy flow between organisms and environment is considered to be a motive force for evolution, which is a new understanding of the mechanism of evolution. Based on such understanding, evolution is regarded as "a changing process that one subsystem passes all or part of its genetic information to the next generation in a larger system, and during the adaptation process produces some new elements, stops some old ones, and thereby lasts in the larger system". Some other controversial questions related to evolution are also discussed.

  1. Radar Scan Strategies for the Patrick Air Force Base Weather Surveillance Radar, Model-74C, Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David

    2008-01-01

    The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) is replacing the Weather Surveillance Radar, Model 74C (WSR-74C) at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB), with a Doppler, dual polarization radar, the Radtec 43/250. A new scan strategy is needed for the Radtec 43/250, to provide high vertical resolution data over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) launch pads, while taking advantage of the new radar's advanced capabilities for detecting severe weather phenomena associated with convection within the 45 WS area of responsibility. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed several scan strategies customized for the operational needs of the 45 WS. The AMU also developed a plan for evaluating the scan strategies in the period prior to operational acceptance, currently scheduled for November 2008.

  2. An Atomic Force Microscopy based investigation of specific biomechanical properties for various types of neuronal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedden, Elise; White, James; Kaplan, David; Staii, Cristian

    2012-02-01

    Here we describe the use of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) based techniques to characterize and explore the influence of biochemical and biomechanical cues on the growth and interaction of neuronal cells with surrounding guidance factors. Specifically, we use AFM topography and AFM force spectroscopy measurements to systematically investigate the morphology, elasticity, and real time growth of neuronal processes in the presence of different types of extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors. We therefore create a series of systems containing specified neuron densities where the type of the underlying growth promoting protein is different from sample to sample. For each system we measure key biomechanical parameters related to neuronal growth such as height and elastic modulus at multiple growth points on several types of neurons. We show that systematic measurements of these parameters yield fundamental information about the role played by substrate-plated guidance factors in determining elastic and morphological properties of neurons during growth.

  3. Bubble-Based Acoustic Radiation Force Using Chirp Insonation to Reduce Standing Wave Effects

    PubMed Central

    Erpelding, Todd N.; Hollman, Kyle W.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Bubble-based acoustic radiation force can measure local viscoelastic properties of tissue. High intensity acoustic waves applied to laser-generated bubbles induce displacements inversely proportional to local Young’s modulus. In certain instances, long pulse durations are desirable but are susceptible to standing wave artifacts, which corrupt displacement measurements. Chirp pulse acoustic radiation force was investigated as a method to reduce standing wave artifacts. Chirp pulses with linear frequency sweep magnitudes of 100, 200, and 300 kHz centered around 1.5 MHz were applied to glass beads within gelatin phantoms and laser-generated bubbles within porcine lenses. The ultrasound transducer was translated axially to vary standing wave conditions, while comparing displacements using chirp pulses and 1.5 MHz tone burst pulses of the same duration and peak rarefactional pressure. Results demonstrated significant reduction in standing wave effects using chirp pulses, with displacement proportional to acoustic intensity and bubble size. PMID:17306697

  4. Central-force decomposition of spline-based modified embedded atom method potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winczewski, S.; Dziedzic, J.; Rybicki, J.

    2016-10-01

    Central-force decompositions are fundamental to the calculation of stress fields in atomic systems by means of Hardy stress. We derive expressions for a central-force decomposition of the spline-based modified embedded atom method (s-MEAM) potential. The expressions are subsequently simplified to a form that can be readily used in molecular-dynamics simulations, enabling the calculation of the spatial distribution of stress in systems treated with this novel class of empirical potentials. We briefly discuss the properties of the obtained decomposition and highlight further computational techniques that can be expected to benefit from the results of this work. To demonstrate the practicability of the derived expressions, we apply them to calculate stress fields due to an edge dislocation in bcc Mo, comparing their predictions to those of linear elasticity theory.

  5. Force-Based Puncture Detection and Active Position Holding for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Tran, Nhat; Riviere, Cameron N.; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vein cannulation is a demanding procedure proposed to treat retinal vein occlusion by direct therapeutic agent delivery methods. Challenges in identifying the moment of venous puncture, achieving cannulation and maintaining cannulation during drug delivery currently limit the feasibility of the procedure. In this study, we respond to these problems with an assistive system combining a handheld micromanipulator, Micron, with a force-sensing microneedle. The integrated system senses the instant of vein puncture based on measured forces and the position of the needle tip. The system actively holds the cannulation device securely in the vein following cannulation and during drug delivery. Preliminary testing of the system in a dry phantom, stretched vinyl membranes, demonstrates a significant improvement in the total time the needle could be maintained stably inside of the vein. This was especially evident in smaller veins and is attributed to decreased movement of the positioned cannula following venous cannulation. PMID:27127804

  6. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  7. SO{sub 2} Retention by CaO-Based Sorbent Spent in CO{sub 2} Looping Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Manovic, V.; Anthony, E.J.; Loncarevic, D.

    2009-07-15

    CaO-based looping cycles are promising processes for CO{sub 2} Capture from both syngas and flue gas. The technology is based on cyclical carbonation of CaO and regeneration of CaCO{sub 3} in a dual fluidized-bed reactor to produce a pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration. Use of spent sorbent from CO{sub 2} looping cycles for SO{sub 2} capture is investigated. Three limestones were investigated: Kelly Rock (Canada), La Blanca (Spain), and Katowice (Poland, Upper Silesia). Carbonation/calcination cycles were performed in a tube furnace with both the original limestones and samples thermally pretreated for different times (i.e., sintered). The spent sorbent samples were sulfated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The changes in the resulting sorbent pore structure were then investigated using mercury porosimetry. It has been shown that the sulfation rates of both thermally pretreated and spent sorbent samples are lower in comparison with those of the original samples. However, final conversions of both spent and pretreated sorbents after longer sulfation time were comparable or higher than those observed for the original sorbents under comparable conditions. Maximum sulfation levels strongly depend on sorbent porosity and pore surface area. The results showed that spent sorbent samples from CO{sub 2} looping cycles can be used as sorbents for SO{sub 2} retention in cases where significant porosity loss does not occur during CO{sub 2} reaction cycles. In the case of spent Kelly Rock and Katowice samples, sorbent particles are practically uniformly sulfated, achieving final conversions that are determined by the total pore volume available for the bulky CaSO{sub 4} product.

  8. Annular force based variable curvature mirror aiming to realize non-moving element optical zooming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Xie, Xiaopeng; Wei, Jingxuan; Ren, Guorui; Pang, Zhihai; Xu, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new kind of optical zooming technique in which no moving elements are involved has been paid much attention. The elimination of moving elements makes optical zooming suitable for applications which has exacting requirements in space, power cost and system stability. The mobile phone and the space-borne camera are two typical examples. The key to realize non-moving elements optical zooming lies in the introduction of variable curvature mirror (VCM) whose radius of curvature could be changed dynamically. When VCM is about to be used to implement optical zoom imaging, two characteristics should be ensured. First, VCM has to provide large enough saggitus variation in order to obtain a big magnification ratio. Second, after the radius of curvature has been changed, the corresponding surface figure accuracy should still be maintained superior to a threshold level to make the high quality imaging possible. In this manuscript, based on the elasticity theory, the physical model of the annular force based variable curvature mirror is established and numerically analyzed. The results demonstrate that when the annular force is applied at the half-the-aperture position, the actuation force is reduced and a smaller actuation force is required to generate the saggitus variation and thus the maintenance of surface figure accuracy becomes easier during the variation of radius of curvature. Besides that, a prototype VCM, whose diameter and thickness are 100mm and 3mm respectively, have been fabricated and the maximum saggitus variation that could be obtained approaches more than 30 wavelengths. At the same time, the degradation of surface figure accuracy is weakly correlated to the curvature radius variation. Keywords: optical zooming; variable curvature mirror; surface figure accuracy; saggitus;

  9. Development of a novel liquid crystal based cell traction force transducer system.

    PubMed

    Soon, C F; Youseffi, M; Berends, R F; Blagden, N; Denyer, M C T

    2013-01-15

    Keratinocyte traction forces play a crucial role in wound healing. The aim of this study was to develop a novel cell traction force (CTF) transducer system based on cholesteryl ester liquid crystals (LC). Keratinocytes cultured on LC induced linear and isolated deformation lines in the LC surface. As suggested by the fluorescence staining, the deformation lines appeared to correlate with the forces generated by the contraction of circumferential actin filaments which were transmitted to the LC surface via the focal adhesions. Due to the linear viscoelastic behavior of the LC, Hooke's equation was used to quantify the CTFs by associating Young's modulus of LC to the cell induced stresses and biaxial strain in forming the LC deformation. Young's modulus of the LC was profiled by using spherical indentation and determined at approximately 87.1±17.2kPa. A new technique involving cytochalasin-B treatment was used to disrupt the intracellular force generating actin fibers, and consequently the biaxial strain in the LC induced by the cells was determined. Due to the improved sensitivity and spatial resolution (∼1μm) of the LC based CTF transducer, a wide range of CTFs was determined (10-120nN). These were found to be linearly proportional to the length of the deformations. The linear relationship of CTF-deformations was then applied in a bespoke CTF mapping software to estimate CTFs and to map CTF fields. The generated CTF map highlighted distinct distributions and different magnitude of CTFs were revealed for polarized and non-polarized keratinocytes. PMID:22809522

  10. Development of a novel liquid crystal based cell traction force transducer system.

    PubMed

    Soon, C F; Youseffi, M; Berends, R F; Blagden, N; Denyer, M C T

    2013-01-15

    Keratinocyte traction forces play a crucial role in wound healing. The aim of this study was to develop a novel cell traction force (CTF) transducer system based on cholesteryl ester liquid crystals (LC). Keratinocytes cultured on LC induced linear and isolated deformation lines in the LC surface. As suggested by the fluorescence staining, the deformation lines appeared to correlate with the forces generated by the contraction of circumferential actin filaments which were transmitted to the LC surface via the focal adhesions. Due to the linear viscoelastic behavior of the LC, Hooke's equation was used to quantify the CTFs by associating Young's modulus of LC to the cell induced stresses and biaxial strain in forming the LC deformation. Young's modulus of the LC was profiled by using spherical indentation and determined at approximately 87.1±17.2kPa. A new technique involving cytochalasin-B treatment was used to disrupt the intracellular force generating actin fibers, and consequently the biaxial strain in the LC induced by the cells was determined. Due to the improved sensitivity and spatial resolution (∼1μm) of the LC based CTF transducer, a wide range of CTFs was determined (10-120nN). These were found to be linearly proportional to the length of the deformations. The linear relationship of CTF-deformations was then applied in a bespoke CTF mapping software to estimate CTFs and to map CTF fields. The generated CTF map highlighted distinct distributions and different magnitude of CTFs were revealed for polarized and non-polarized keratinocytes.

  11. 4. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Low level oblique aerial view of Muroc Flight Test Base (North Base), looking southwest along flightline. HANG-P-A hangar (Building 4505) is in the right foreground. A Bell XP-59A Airacomet, the United States military's first jet propelled aircraft, is being towed on the apron toward the control tower. Other aircraft in the foreground include Douglas DC-3s, North American Aviation P-51 Mustangs, and Lockheed P-38 Lightnings. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Interparticle force based methodology for prediction of cohesive powder flow properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esayanur, Madhavan Sujatha Sarma

    The transport and handling of powders are key areas in the process industry that have a direct impact on the efficiency and/or the quality of the finished product. A lack of fundamental understanding of powder flow properties as a function of operating variables such as relative humidity, and particle size, leading to problems such as arching, rat-holing and segregation, is one the main causes for unscheduled down times in plant operation and loss of billions of dollars in revenues. Most of the current design strategies and characterization techniques for industrial powders are based on a continuum approach similar to the field of soil mechanics. Due to an increase in complexity of the synthesis process and reduction in size of powders to the nanoscale, the surface properties and inter particle forces play a significant role in determining the flow characteristics. The use of ensemble techniques such as direct shear testing to characterize powders are no longer adequate due to lack of understanding of the changes in the property of powders as a function of the major operating variables such as relative humidity, temperature etc. New instrumentation or techniques need to be developed to reliably characterize powder flow behavior. Simultaneously, scalability of the current models to predict powder flow needs to be revisited. Specifically, this study focuses on the development of an inter particle force based model for predicting the unconfined yield strength of cohesive powders. To understand the role of interparticle forces in determining the strength of cohesive powders, the particle scale interactions were characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), contact angle, surface tension, and coefficient of friction. The bulk scale properties such as unconfined yield strength, packing structure, and size of the shear zone were also investigated. It was determined that an interparticle force based model incorporating the effect of particle size and packing structure

  13. Visualiser of two-micron laser radiation based on Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lyapin, A A; Ryabochkina, P A; Ushakov, S N; Fedorov, P P

    2014-06-30

    The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals corresponding to the {sup 5}G{sub 4} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}G{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 3} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 4}({sup 5}S{sub 2}) → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}S{sub 2} → {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}I{sub 4} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}I{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}F{sub 3} → {sup 5}I{sub 6}, {sup 5}I{sub 6} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 6}, and {sup 5}I{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 7} transitions upon excitation of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level of Ho{sup 3+} ions are studied. A method for visualisation of IR radiation in the two-micron range using Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals is proposed. The energy efficiency of conversion of two-micron laser radiation to radiation in the red spectral range 620 – 690 nm by a 1 mol % HoF{sub 3}:CaF{sub 2} crystal is estimated to be no higher than 0.02%. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  14. Acid-base site detection and mapping on solid surfaces by Kelvin force microscopy (KFM).

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Rubia F; Bernardes, Juliana S; Ducati, Telma R D; Galembeck, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Electrostatic potential at the surface of acidic or basic solids changes under higher relative humidity (RH), as determined by using Kelvin force microscopy (KFM). The potential on acid surfaces becomes more negative as the water vapor pressure increases, while it becomes more positive on basic solids. These results verify the following hypothesis: OH(-) or H(+) ions associated with atmospheric water ion clusters are selectively adsorbed on solid surfaces, depending on the respective Brønsted acid or base character. Therefore, Kelvin microscopy, under variable humidity, is a rigorous but convenient alternative to determine the acid-base character of solid surfaces, with a great advantage: it uses only one amphoteric and simple reagent to determine both the acid and base sites. Moreover, this technique provides information on the spatial distribution of acid-base sites, which is currently inaccessible to any other method.

  15. Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlstrom, R.R.; King, D.A.; Parker, S.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

    1993-08-01

    The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption on the base. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Patrick AFB. It is a comparison report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profile information to be used to improve the characterization of energy use on the base. The characteristics of electricity, natural gas, and No. 2 fuel oil are analyzed for on-base facilities and housing. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Patrick AFB facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985-1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the north and south substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

  16. Sting-free Unsteady Flowfield, Base Pressure and Force Measurements on Axisymmetric Bluff-Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideo; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kunimasu, Tetsuya

    2006-11-01

    To avoid interference of model support, flowfields as well as aerodynamic force and base pressure on blunt short cylinders in axial flow were measured at Re=100,000 with the JAXA 60cm magnetic suspension and balance system. The fineness ratio ranged from 1.27 to 1.79. A digital telemeter system was developed for the base pressure measurement, and the velocity field was obtained using a PIV system. Vortices along separating shear layer and shear layer flappings with or without reattachment on the wall were observed. Downstream the cylinder in the azimuthal plane, PIV snapshots showed large-scale motion of longitudinal vortices. These instantaneous flowfields presented excellent axisymmetry when they were ensemble-averaged. Mean base pressure agreed with the drag variation at different fineness ratios. The present magnetic suspension and balance system allowed evaluation of low frequency unsteady aerodynamic force vector from feedback current to the coils and the detected small model movement. Base pressure fluctuations were compared with the drag fluctuations and discussed in light of overall flowfield phenomena.

  17. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  18. Groundwater level and nitrate concentration trends on Mountain Home Air Force Base, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Mountain Home Air Force Base in southwestern Idaho draws most of its drinking water from the regional aquifer. The base is located within the State of Idaho's Mountain Home Groundwater Management Area and is adjacent to the State's Cinder Cone Butte Critical Groundwater Area. Both areas were established by the Idaho Department of Water Resources in the early 1980s because of declining water levels in the regional aquifer. The base also is listed by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality as a nitrate priority area. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began monitoring wells on the base in 1985, and currently monitors 25 wells for water levels and 17 wells for water quality, primarily nutrients. This report provides a summary of water-level and nitrate concentration data collected primarily between 2001 and 2013 and examines trends in those data. A Regional Kendall Test was run to combine results from all wells to determine an overall regional trend in water level. Groundwater levels declined at an average rate of about 1.08 feet per year. Nitrate concentration trends show that 3 wells (18 percent) are increasing in nitrate concentration trend, 3 wells (18 percent) show a decreasing nitrate concentration trend, and 11 wells (64 percent) show no nitrate concentration trend. Six wells (35 percent) currently exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant limit of 10 milligrams per liter for nitrate (nitrite plus nitrate, measured as nitrogen).

  19. Evaluation of Sr/Ca-based paleoclimate reconstructions in modern and Medieval Diploria strigosa corals in the northeastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Pearson, S. P.; Kilbourne, K.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical sea surface temperature (SST) has been implicated as a driver of climate changes during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, 950-1300 A.D.) but little data exists from the tropical oceans during this time period. We collected three modern and seven sub-fossil Diploria strigosa coral colonies from an overwash deposit on Anegada, British Virgin Islands (18.73 °N, 63.33 °W) in order to reconstruct climate in the northeastern Caribbean and Tropical North Atlantic during the MCA. The first step in our reconstruction was to verify the climate signal from this species at this site. We sub-sampled the modern corals along thecal walls with an average sampling resolution of 11-13 samples per year. Sr/Ca ratios measured in the sub-samples were calibrated to temperature using three different calibration techniques (ordinary least squares, reduced major axis, and weighted least squares (WLS)) on the monthly data that includes the seasonal cycles and on the monthly anomaly data. WLS regression accounts for unequal errors in the x and y terms, so we consider it the most robust technique. The WLS regression slope between gridded SST and coral Sr/Ca is similar to the previous two calibrations of this species. Mean Sr/Ca for each of the three modern corals is 8.993 × 0.004 mmol/mol, 9.127 × 0.003 mmol/mol, and 8.960 × 0.007 mmol/mol. These straddle the mean Diploria strigosa Sr/Ca found by Giry et al., (2010), 9.080 mmol/mol, at a site with nearly the same mean SST as Anegada (27.4 °C vs. 27.5 °C). The climatological seasonal cycles for SST derived from the modern corals are statistically indistinguishable from the seasonal cycles in the instrumental SST data. The coral-based seasonal cycles have ranges of 2.70 × 0.31 °C, 2.65 × 0.08 °C and 2.71 × 0.53 °C. These results indicate that this calibration can be applied to our sub-fossil coral data. We applied the WLS calibration to monthly-resolution Sr/Ca data from multiple sub-fossil corals dating to the medieval

  20. Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chul E; Ramanathan, V; Decremer, Damien

    2012-07-17

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) emitted by fossil and biomass fuels consist of black carbon (BC), a strong absorber of solar radiation, and organic matter (OM). OM scatters as well as absorbs solar radiation. The absorbing component of OM, which is ignored in most climate models, is referred to as brown carbon (BrC). Model estimates of the global CA radiative forcing range from 0 to 0.7 Wm(-2), to be compared with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate for the pre-Industrial to the present net radiative forcing of about 1.6 Wm(-2). This study provides a model-independent, observationally based estimate of the CA direct radiative forcing. Ground-based aerosol network data is integrated with field data and satellite-based aerosol observations to provide a decadal (2001 through 2009) global view of the CA optical properties and direct radiative forcing. The estimated global CA direct radiative effect is about 0.75 Wm(-2) (0.5 to 1.0). This study identifies the global importance of BrC, which is shown to contribute about 20% to 550-nm CA solar absorption globally. Because of the inclusion of BrC, the net effect of OM is close to zero and the CA forcing is nearly equal to that of BC. The CA direct radiative forcing is estimated to be about 0.65 (0.5 to about 0.8) Wm(-2), thus comparable to or exceeding that by methane. Caused in part by BrC absorption, CAs have a net warming effect even over open biomass-burning regions in Africa and the Amazon. PMID:22753522

  1. Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chul E; Ramanathan, V; Decremer, Damien

    2012-07-17

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) emitted by fossil and biomass fuels consist of black carbon (BC), a strong absorber of solar radiation, and organic matter (OM). OM scatters as well as absorbs solar radiation. The absorbing component of OM, which is ignored in most climate models, is referred to as brown carbon (BrC). Model estimates of the global CA radiative forcing range from 0 to 0.7 Wm(-2), to be compared with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate for the pre-Industrial to the present net radiative forcing of about 1.6 Wm(-2). This study provides a model-independent, observationally based estimate of the CA direct radiative forcing. Ground-based aerosol network data is integrated with field data and satellite-based aerosol observations to provide a decadal (2001 through 2009) global view of the CA optical properties and direct radiative forcing. The estimated global CA direct radiative effect is about 0.75 Wm(-2) (0.5 to 1.0). This study identifies the global importance of BrC, which is shown to contribute about 20% to 550-nm CA solar absorption globally. Because of the inclusion of BrC, the net effect of OM is close to zero and the CA forcing is nearly equal to that of BC. The CA direct radiative forcing is estimated to be about 0.65 (0.5 to about 0.8) Wm(-2), thus comparable to or exceeding that by methane. Caused in part by BrC absorption, CAs have a net warming effect even over open biomass-burning regions in Africa and the Amazon.

  2. Comparison of NLDAS Weather Forcing Data with Ground-based Measurements in Irrigated Areas of Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, C. M.; Geli, H. M.; Lewis, C. S.; Verdin, J. P.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    This analysis is being conducted in the context of standardizing and providing guidelines for the production of evapotranspiration (ET) and crop water use maps in the Western United States, a project funded by the USGS. Spatial ET maps can be obtained using remote sensing-based methods at field/local scales. There are presently different remote sensing methods in the literature that provide reasonable levels of accuracy at these scales. Most of these methods use weather data from ground-based weather stations in the area being modeled with the assumption of being reasonably representative of the local conditions. Ground-based stations are generally sparse in nature for various reasons. However, at regional/continental scales this assumption will not be applicable and requires the use of other approaches to account for the variability of the near surface weather conditions. The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) which provides gridded weather forcing data can potentially provide such information. These NLDAS data are available at 1/8th of a degree grid (~ 14 km × 14 km) a relatively coarse resolution considering the requirement of estimating ET at field scales. In order to use the NLDAS weather forcing data in remote sensing of ET at field to regional scales with increased confidence, it is important to compare it with ground-based observations under different surface conditions. Such comparison will help to identify the associated uncertainties and biases. It can also help to quantify the uncertainties in the remote sensing-based model estimates of ET. This study presents a preliminary result the comparison between ground-based weather data to the NLDAS gridded products in irrigated areas. Ground-based data from about 24 stations in and around the state of Utah, maintained by the National Weather Service and Utah State University, are used in the analysis. The comparison considered both hourly and daily data. These stations were operated over

  3. Manufacture of (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-based tapes with a composite sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivel, J.-C.; Abrahamsen, A. B.; Andersen, N. H.; Saksl, K.

    2008-02-01

    (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-based single-filament tapes were prepared using a pure Ag protective sheath in contact with the ceramic core and an external sheath consisting of Ni. The influence of the composite sheath geometry on the (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 phase formation kinetics was studied by in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a 8.5% O2 - 91.5% N2 gas mixture and was found to depend strongly on the sheath architecture as a consequence of differences in the oxygen supply between the ceramic core and the outer atmosphere. Owing to the efficient protection of the pure Ag layer against Ni diffusion, the critical temperature of the (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 phase is unaffected. Critical current densities as high as 35 kA/cm2 (77K, self field) were obtained in a single heat treatment when a slow cooling rate was used. The ceramic density was significantly improved in comparison with that of tapes prepared using only pure Ag as sheath material and heat treated once. This effect can be attributed to the higher mechanical strength of the composite sheath at elevated temperatures, which prevents the development of an otherwise significant porosity during the growth of the superconducting crystallites.

  4. Robins Air Force Base Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline Detail

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), a US Air Force Materiel Command facility located near Macon, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins AFB. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Robins AFB. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year 1991. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Robins AFB by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  5. Shemya Air Force Base, Alaska No Further Action Decision document for Hg-1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-05

    This document is being prepared to document that a No Further Action Decision (NFAD) document is appropriate for the Hg-1 site at Shemya Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The IRP is a Department of Defense (DOD) program established to identify and remediate hazardous waste problems on DOD property that result from past practices. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) draft document {open_quotes}No Further Action Criteria for DOD Military/FUD Sites{close_quotes} has been used as a guide in preparing this document. Air Force personnel have stated that the Hg-1 site may have been used to store mercury and PCB-contaminated material. The site was added to the IRP in 1987, and later that year a field investigation was conducted at the site. Soil samples were collected and analyzed for mercury, EP toxicity, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dioxin. All concentrations of contaminants found in Area Hg-1 are below regulatory action levels for PCBs (40 CFR 761) and mercury (55 FR 30798) or below detection levels for dioxin/furans. Therefore, leaving these soils in place is acceptable.

  6. Shemya Air Force Base, Alaska No Further Action Decision document for Hg-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-05

    This document is being prepared to document that a No Further Action Decision (NFAD) document is appropriate for the Hg-1 site at Shemya Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The IRP is a Department of Defense (DOD) program established to identify and remediate hazardous waste problems on DOD property that result from past practices. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (ADEC) draft document [open quotes]No Further Action Criteria for DOD Military/FUD Sites[close quotes] has been used as a guide in preparing this document. Air Force personnel have stated that the Hg-1 site may have been used to store mercury and PCB-contaminated material. The site was added to the IRP in 1987, and later that year a field investigation was conducted at the site. Soil samples were collected and analyzed for mercury, EP toxicity, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dioxin. All concentrations of contaminants found in Area Hg-1 are below regulatory action levels for PCBs (40 CFR 761) and mercury (55 FR 30798) or below detection levels for dioxin/furans. Therefore, leaving these soils in place is acceptable.

  7. GROMOS 53A6GLYC, an Improved GROMOS Force Field for Hexopyranose-Based Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pol-Fachin, Laercio; Rusu, Victor H; Verli, Hugo; Lins, Roberto D

    2012-11-13

    An improved parameter set for explicit-solvent simulations of carbohydrates (referred to as GROMOS 53A6GLYC) is presented, allowing proper description of the most stable conformation of all 16 possible aldohexopyranose-based monosaccharides. This set includes refinement of torsional potential parameters associated with the determination of hexopyranose rings conformation by fitting to their corresponding quantum-mechanical profiles. Other parameters, as the rules for third and excluded neighbors, are taken directly from the GROMOS 53A6 force field. Comparisons of the herein presented parameter set to our previous version (GROMOS 45A4), the GLYCAM06 force field, and available NMR data are presented in terms of ring puckering free energies, conformational distribution of the hydroxymethyl group, and glycosidic linkage geometries for 16 selected monosaccharides and eight disaccharides. The proposed parameter modifications have shown a significant improvement for the above-mentioned quantities over the two tested force fields, while retaining full compatibility with the GROMOS 53A6 and 54A7 parameter sets for other classes of biomolecules. PMID:26605624

  8. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the 'footprint' of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7. PMID:27454881

  9. A Polarizable Multipole-based Force Field for Dimethyl and Trimethyl Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changsheng; Lu, Chao; Wang, Qiantao; Ponder, Jay W.; Ren, Pengyu

    2016-01-01

    Using quantum mechanical studies and liquid phase simulations, the AMOEBA force field for dimethylphosphate (DMP) ion and trimethylphosphate (TMP) has been developed. Based on ab initio calculations, it was found that ion binding and the solution environment significantly impact both the molecular geometry and the energy differences between conformations. Atomic multipole moments are derived from MP2/cc-pVQZ calculations of methyl phosphates at several conformations with accounting of chemical environments. Many-body polarization is handled via a Thole-style induction model using distributed atomic polarizabilities. Van der Waals parameters of phosphate and oxygen atoms are determined by fitting to the quantum mechanical interaction energy curves for water with DMP or TMP. Additional stretch-torsion and angle-torsion coupling terms were introduced in order to capture asymmetry in P-O bond lengths and angles due to the generalized anomeric effect. The resulting force field for DMP and TMP is able to accurately describe both the molecular structure and conformational energy surface, including bond and angle variations with conformation, as well as interaction of both species with water and metal ions. The force field was further validated for liquid TMP by comparing simulated density and heat of vaporization values with experimental data. Structural insight obtained from MD simulations indicates liquid TMP is stabilized by both nonpolar-nonpolar contacts and hydrogen bonding. The current study is an important step towards developing the AMOEBA model for nucleic acids. PMID:26574325

  10. Comparison of Brownian-dynamics-based estimates of polymer tension with direct force measurements.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Mark E; Purohit, Prashant K; Goldman, Yale E; Shuman, Henry; Bau, Haim H

    2010-11-01

    With the aid of brownian dynamics models, it is possible to estimate polymer tension by monitoring polymers' transverse thermal fluctuations. To assess the precision of the approach, brownian dynamics-based tension estimates were compared with the force applied to rhodamine-phalloidin labeled actin filaments bound to polymer beads and suspended between two optical traps. The transverse thermal fluctuations of each filament were monitored with a CCD camera, and the images were analyzed to obtain the filament's transverse displacement variance as a function of position along the filament, the filament's tension, and the camera's exposure time. A linear Brownian dynamics model was used to estimate the filament's tension. The estimated force was compared and agreed within 30% (when the tension <0.1 pN ) and 70% (when the tension <1 pN ) with the applied trap force. In addition, the paper presents concise asymptotic expressions for the mechanical compliance of a system consisting of a filament attached tangentially to bead handles (dumbbell system). The techniques described here can be used for noncontact estimates of polymers' and fibers' tension.

  11. Bis(terpyridine)-based surface template structures on graphite: a force field and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Daniela; Markert, Thomas; Gross, Axel; Benoit, David M

    2009-10-21

    Host-guest networks formed by ordered organic layers are promising candidates for applications in molecular storage and quantum computing. We have studied 2-dimensionally ordered surface template structures of bis(terpyridine)-derived molecules (BTPs) on graphite using force field and DFT methods and compared the results to recent experimental observations. In order to determine the force field best suited for surface calculations, bond lengths and angles, torsional potentials, adsorption and stacking energies of smaller aromatic molecules were calculated with different force fields (Compass, UFF, Dreiding and CVFF). Density functional perturbation theory calculations were used to study the intermolecular interactions between 3,3'-BTP molecules. Structural properties, adsorption energies and rotational barriers of the 3,3'-BTP surface structure and its host-guest systems with phthalocyanine (PcH(2)) or excess 3,3'-BTP as guest molecules have been addressed. In addition, STM images of oligopyridine and phthalocyanine molecules were simulated based on periodic and local density functional theory calculations.

  12. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: `Intermolecular Forces'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-05-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students’ understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student’s alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight 9th grade students were stratified by cognitive levels and then randomly assigned to experimental (PBL, 40 students) and control (lecture-style teaching, 38 students) groups. Following a preparatory lesson where activation and remediation of existing knowledge occur, a pre-test was given, and no significant difference was found between the two groups of students ( p > .05). After the instruction was completed, a post-test and also a questionnaire related to the quality of the problem, the teacher’s role and group functioning were administered. Results from the post-test of both groups ( p < .05) and questionnaire showed that PBL is affective on students’ achievement, remedying formation of alternate conceptions and also social skills.

  13. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G. Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the ‘footprint’ of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7.

  14. Complex terbium luminescence centers in spectral transformers based on CaSO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtseva, I.; Lushchik, A.; Lushchik, Ch.; Maaroos, A.; Nagirnyi, V.; Pazylbek, S.; Tussupbekova, A.; Vasil'chenko, E.

    2015-11-01

    The blue and green terbium luminescence excitation spectra (5-15 eV) at a temperature of 9 or 300 K have been measured for a set of CaSO4 : Tb3+ phosphors with calcium and terbium ions characterized by fundamental features, which were synthesized by the solid-state reaction method with variations in the composition of the raw material, the type of terbium compounds, and the concentration of introduced terbium. A comprehensive analysis of these data, emission spectra, and decay kinetics (with the rising stage) of the terbium luminescence has revealed that the main luminescence centers in an efficient phosphor with 4 at % Tb3+ each contain four closely spaced Tb3+ ions in calcium positions, as well as Na+ ions and hydrogen-containing radicals. In such complex luminescence centers, cooperative nonradiative resonant transitions in neighboring terbium ions leads to a nearly complete concentration of the terbium luminescence in the green spectral region (5 D 4 → 7 F J ). The quantum yield of the green luminescence in CaSO4 : Tb3+ (4 at %) exceeds unity, QY > 1, in the region of direct excitation of Tb3+ into the 5 d state (~5.9 eV) or excitation of oxyanions near the terbium ions (~8.1 eV).

  15. Photophysical study of a polyoxo ethylene linked naphthalene-based fluorescent chemosensor for Mg2+ and Ca2+ detection.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dan; Guo, Yali; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu

    2013-07-01

    A naphthalene-based bichromophoric fluorescent sensor 2,2'-[oxy-bis(2-oxatetramethyleneoxy)]-bis[N-(2-naphthyl)-benzamide)] (1) was synthesized and characterized. Fluorescence decay for 1 in alcoholic solvents in the region of 415-460 nm revealed bi-exponential behavior. The faster component of the decay can be attributed to the formation of dimers. Above 480 nm, besides the dimer, there is also a little excimer formation and this excimer emits at longer wavelengths than the dimer. The observation of the change of the fluorescence emission spectra upon addition of water in EtOH-water mixtures is in line with the formation of water-bridged complexes preventing excimer formation. The sensor shows an increase in fluorescence intensity upon increasing Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) concentration in EtOH because the formation of the excimer can be hindered upon complexation with Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) ions. Because of the competition between hydrated metal ions and the water-bridged complex, spectral changes by complexation with Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) in EtOH-H2O (9 : 1 v/v) are quite different from those in neat ethanol. The ground-state dissociation constant K(d) estimated for the complex with Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) was found to be around 2.0 mM in EtOH-H2O (9 : 1 v/v), which makes it suitable for the measurement of the concentrations of these ions in physiologically relevant concentration ranges.

  16. CaO--P2O5--Na2O-based sintering additives for hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kalita, S J; Bose, S; Hosick, H L; Bandyopadhyay, A

    2004-05-01

    We have assessed the effect of CaO--P2O5--Na2O-based sintering additives on mechanical and biological properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics. Five different compositions of sintering additives were selected and prepared by mixing of CaO, P2O5, and Na2CO3 powders. 2.5 wt% of each additive was combined with commercial HAp powder, separately, followed by ball milling, and sintering at 1250 degrees C and 1300 degrees C in a muffle furnace. Green and sintered densities of the compacts were analyzed for the influence of additives on densification of HAp. Phase analyses were carried out using an X-ray diffractometer. Vickers microhardness testing was used to evaluate hardness of sintered compacts of different compositions. A maximum microhardness of 4.6 (+/- 0.28) GPa was attained for a composition with 2.5 wt% addition of CaO:P2O5:Na2O in the ratio of 3:3:4. Results from mechanical property evaluation showed that some of these sintering additives improved failure strength of HAp under compressive loading. Maximum compressive strength was observed for samples with 2.5 wt% addition of CaO. Average failure strength for this set of samples was calculated to be 220 (+/- 50) MPa. Cytotoxicity, and cell attachment studies were carried out using a modified human osteoblast cell line called OPC-1. In vitro results showed that these compositions were non-toxic. Some sintering aids enhanced cell attachment and proliferation, which was revealed from SEM examination of the scaffolds seeded with OPC-1 cells. PMID:14741598

  17. Structure and properties of bioactive eutectic glasses based on the Ca3(PO4)2-CaSiO3-CaMg(SiO3)2 system.

    PubMed

    Magallanes-Perdomo, M; De Aza, A H; Sobrados, I; Sanz, J; Pena, P

    2012-02-01

    Taking into account the phase equilibrium relationships within the Ca3(PO4)2-CaSiO3-CaMg(SiO3)2 ternary system, three bioactive glasses with a eutectic composition and analogous amounts of Ca3(PO4)2 (∼40 wt.%) have been prepared. The structure of the glasses was investigated by 31P and 29Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy. The glasses exhibited thermal expansion coefficients (50-600 °C) of 11.8-13.3×10(-6) °C(-1), a glass transition temperature of 790-720 °C and a softening temperature of 811-750 °C. The mechanical properties of the glasses were as follows: bending strength ∼100 MPa, Young's modulus 94-83 GPa, Vickers microhardness 7.1-4.1 GPa and toughness 0.8 MPa m1/2. The bioactive properties were discussed in terms of their structure deduced by MAS-NMR spectroscopy and the field strength of the network modifiers (Mg2+ and Ca2+). A knowledge of the glass structure was important in predicting its bioactivity.

  18. Personal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel vapors and exhaust at air force bases.

    PubMed

    Pleil, J D; Smith, L B; Zelnick, S D

    2000-03-01

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and ground crew personnel during preflight operations and for maintenance personnel performing routine tasks. Personal exposure at an Air Force base occurs through occupational exposure for personnel involved with fuel and aircraft handling and/or through incidental exposure, primarily through inhalation of ambient fuel vapors. Because JP-8 is less volatile than its predecessor fuel (JP-4), contact with liquid fuel on skin and clothing may result in prolonged exposure. The slowly evaporating JP-8 fuel tends to linger on exposed personnel during their interaction with their previously unexposed colleagues. To begin to assess the relative exposures, we made ambient air measurements and used recently developed methods for collecting exhaled breath in special containers. We then analyzed for certain volatile marker compounds for JP-8, as well as for some aromatic hydrocarbons (especially benzene) that are related to long-term health risks. Ambient samples were collected by using compact, battery-operated, personal whole-air samplers that have recently been developed as commercial products; breath samples were collected using our single-breath canister method that uses 1-L canisters fitted with valves and small disposable breathing tubes. We collected breath samples from various groups of Air Force personnel and found a demonstrable JP-8 exposure for all subjects, ranging from slight elevations as compared to a control cohort to > 100 [mutilpe] the control values. This work suggests that further studies should be performed on specific issues to obtain pertinent exposure data. The data can be applied to assessments of health outcomes and to recommendations for changes in the use of personal protective

  19. A High resolution dataset of reference evaporation based on the WFDEI forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperna Weiland, Frederiek; van Dijk, Albert; Lopez, Patricia; Schellekens, Jaap

    2015-04-01

    With global hydrological models being applied at ever higher spatial resolution, correspondingly high resolution global meteorological forcing data are needed. Such high resolution observations are sometimes available from satellite remote sensing, but these need to be merged with station data to remove inevitable biases and the developed datasets may in some cases suffer from remaining artefacts. Alternatively, higher resolution forcing data may be available for certain nations or regions but cannot be merged with global data sets because they are conceptually inconsistent or because of license restrictions. Importantly such data are also not available for long-term (i.e. >10 years) applications as baseline water resources assessment and global hydrological change analysis. These applications are limited to the 0.5° or coarser grid resolution of climate station analysis and model reanalysis data. Until higher resolution climate re-analysis become available, additional processing is needed to downscale the data. Simple oversampling of such coarse data can introduce large and systematic biases, particularly in areas with strong relief. By using a high resolution DEM, the main variables for determining reference evaporation can already be down-scaled and improved considerably for the complete period of the reanalysis based meteorological forcing. As part of the eartH2Observe project, we produced Penman-Monteith, Priestley-Taylor and Hargreaves reference evaporation estimates by down-scaling WFDEI climate forcing data to 10x10 km resolution using elevation data. Down-scaling was performed by applying a lapse rate on temperature, an altitude correction on air pressure and incoming radiation and by taking the effect of aspect, slope and local shading on illumination into account. We analysed the impact of the individual down-scaling methods on calculated reference evaporation and discuss the impacts on related hydrological processes. The data and tools are made

  20. Cell mechanics using atomic force microscopy-based single-cell compression.

    PubMed

    Lulevich, Valentin; Zink, Tiffany; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Liu, Gang-Yu

    2006-09-12

    We report herein the establishment of a single-cell compression method based on force measurements in atomic force microscopy (AFM). The high-resolution bright-field or confocal laser scanning microscopy guides the location of the AFM probe and then monitors the deformation of cell shape, while microsphere-modified AFM probes compress the cell and measure the force. Force and deformation profiles of living cells reveal a cubic relationship at small deformation (<30%), multiple peaks at 30-70% compression, and a rapid increase at over 80% deformation. The initial compression may be described qualitatively and quantitatively using a simple model of a nonpermeable balloon filled with incompressible fluid. Stress peaks reflect cell membrane rupture, followed by the deformation and rupture of intracellular components, beyond which the cell responses become irreversible. The Young's modulus and bending constant of living cell membranes are extracted from the balloon models, with 10-30 MPa and 17-52 kT, respectively. The initial compression of dead and fixed cells is modeled using Hertzian contact theory, assuming that the cell is a homogeneous sphere. Dead cells exhibit a cytoskeleton elasticity of 4-7.5 kPa, while fixation treatment leads to a dramatic increase in the cytoskeletal Young's modulus (150-230 kPa) due to protein cross-linking by imine bonds. These results demonstrate the high sensitivity of the single-cell compression method to the molecular-level structural changes of cells, which suggests a new generic platform for investigating cell mechanics in tissue engineering and cancer research.

  1. Using the PhysX engine for Physics-based Virtual Surgery with Force Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Anderson; Halic, Tansel; Lu, Zhonghua; Nedel, Luciana P.; De, Suvranu

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of modern surgical simulators is highly challenging as they must support complex simulation environments. The demand for higher realism in such simulators has driven researchers to adopt physics-based models which are computationally very demanding. This poses a major problem since real time interactions must permit graphical updates of 30 Hz and a much higher rate of 1 kHz for force feedback (haptics). Recently several physics engines have been developed which offer multi-physics simulation capabilities including rigid and deformable bodies, cloth and fluids. While such physics engines provide unique opportunities for the development of surgical simulators, their higher latencies, compared to what is necessary for real time graphics and haptics, offer significant barriers to their use in interactive simulation environments. Methods In this work, we propose solutions to this problem and demonstrate how a multimodal surgical simulation environment may be developed based on NVIDIA’s PhysX physics library. Hence, models that are undergoing relatively low frequency updates in PhysX can exist in an environment that demands much higher frequency updates for haptics. We use a collision handling layer to interface between the physical response provided by PhysX and the haptic rendering device to provide both real time tissue response and force feedback. Results Our simulator integrates a bimanual haptic interface for force-feedback and per-pixel shaders for graphics realism in real time. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we present the simulation of the Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) procedure as a case study. Conclusions To develop complex and realistic surgical trainers with realistic organ geometries and tissue properties demands stable physics-based deformation methods which are not always compatible with the interaction level required for such trainers. We have shown that combining different modeling

  2. 1. Credit USAF, ca. 1942. Original housed in the Muroc ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Credit USAF, ca. 1942. Original housed in the Muroc Flight Test Base, Unit History, 1 September 1942 - 30 June 1945. Alfred F. Simpson Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. Maxwell AFB, Alabama. Historical view looks west southwest at construction of Building 4317, Deluge Water Pumping Station (then designated Pump House No. 3). This in-ground structure houses fire pumps which draw water from an in-ground reservoir, Building 4316 (See HAER photos CA-170-I). Pumping station was built in-ground to take advantage of gravity, since water flows from reservoir to prime the pumps, and fire system piping is underground. Opening in far wall is to stairs leading up to ground level. Earth mound in background is part of water reservoir construction (Building 4316). - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Deluge Water Pumping Station, Near Second & D Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. Measurement of Contractile Activity in Small Animal's Digestive Organ by Carbon Nanotube-Based Force Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takeda, Naoki; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Koike, Kanako; Shimatani, Yuichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Akiya, Masahiro; Taguchi, Akira

    2011-03-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-based force transducer designed to be embedded in the body of a live animal was fabricated and implanted into the stomach of a rat omit to measure contractile movement. The transducer comprised dispersed poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled CNTs applied to a comb-like Au-electrode formed on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheet. The implanted rat was injected with acetylcholine to induce muscular contractions and changes in the resistance of the transducer were measured. Such changes arise owing to strain in the CNT network upon distortion. The measured resistance change was found to be proportional to the concentration of injected acetylcholine.

  4. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Xiaoning; Tittmann, Bernhard; Kim, Seong H.

    2015-01-14

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  5. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xiaoning; Kim, Seong H.; Tittmann, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  6. Ab initio based force field and molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB.

    PubMed

    Gee, Richard H; Roszak, Szczepan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan; Fried, Laurence E

    2004-04-15

    An all-atom force field for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) is presented. The classical intermolecular interaction potential for TATB is based on single-point energies determined from high-level ab initio calculations of TATB dimers. The newly developed potential function is used to examine bulk crystalline TATB via molecular dynamics simulations. The isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressures obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations are in good agreement with experiment. The calculated volume-temperature expansion is almost one dimensional along the c crystallographic axis, whereas under compression, all three unit cell axes participate, albeit unequally. PMID:15267608

  7. Installation restoration program records search for McClellan Air Force Base, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The main purpose of the Records Search Program is to determine the potential, if any, for migration of toxic and hazardous materials off the McClellan Air Force Base, (AFB) installation boundaries. The potential for migration of hazardous contaminants is determined by a review of existing information, including a detailed analysis of installation records. Pertinent information includes a history of operations, the geological and hydrogeological conditions which contribute to the migration of contaminants off the installation, and ecological records for evidence of environmental effects resulting from contaminants.

  8. Physically-based modeling of drag force caused by natural woody vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvelä, J.; Aberle, J.

    2014-12-01

    Riparian areas and floodplains are characterized by woody vegetation, which is an essential feature to be accounted for in many hydro-environmental models. For applications including flood protection, river restoration and modelling of sediment processes, there is a need to improve the reliability of flow resistance estimates. Conventional methods such as the use of lumped resistance coefficients or simplistic cylinder-based drag force equations can result in significant errors, as these methods do not adequately address the effect of foliage and reconfiguration of flexible plant parts under flow action. To tackle the problem, physically-based methods relying on objective and measurable vegetation properties are advantageous for describing complex vegetation. We have conducted flume and towing tank investigations with living and artificial plants, both in arrays and with isolated plants, providing new insight into advanced parameterization of natural vegetation. The stem, leaf and total areas of the trees confirmed to be suitable characteristic dimensions for estimating flow resistance. Consequently, we propose the use of leaf area index and leaf-to-stem-area ratio to achieve better drag force estimates. Novel remote sensing techniques including laser scanning have become available for effective collection of the required data. The benefits of the proposed parameterization have been clearly demonstrated in our newest experimental studies, but it remains to be investigated to what extent the parameter values are species-specific and how they depend on local habitat conditions. The purpose of this contribution is to summarize developments in the estimation of vegetative drag force based on physically-based approaches as the latest research results are somewhat dispersed. In particular, concerning woody vegetation we seek to discuss three issues: 1) parameterization of reconfiguration with the Vogel exponent; 2) advantage of parameterizing plants with the leaf area

  9. Characterization of base pressure fluctuations in a blunt trailing edge wake with three-dimensional forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Heather; Lavoie, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The wakes of many nominally two-dimensional bluff bodies exhibit multiple intrinsic three-dimensional instabilities whose spatiotemporal structure and growth rate depend on geometry and Reynolds number. Here, these features are investigated experimentally for a blunt trailing edge profiled body using simultaneous measurements of velocity and fluctuating surface pressure on the model rear face near separation. Passive three-dimensional forcing of the wake is implemented with an array of vortex generators that are distributed according to the characteristic spanwise wavelength of the dominant secondary instability. For a Reynolds number of 8000 based on model thickness, the control strategy is found to increase the base pressure coefficient by 26% while globally reducing the amplitude of base pressure fluctuations, relative to the unforced flow. Additionally, amplitude modulation of the pressure signals that is observed in the natural wake decreases in strength with distributed forcing as a result of the modified three-dimensional flow structure. The spanwise distribution of pressure will be further examined for the baseline and controlled flows via temporal spectral analysis and spatial modal decomposition.

  10. Operable Unit 1 remedial investigation report, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.J.; Fruland, R.M.; Liikala, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    This remedial investigation report for operable Unit 1 (OU-1) at Eielson Air Force Base presents data, calculations, and conclusions as to the nature and extent of surface and subsurface contamination at the eight source areas that make up OU-1. The information is based on the 1993 field investigation result and previous investigations. This report is the first in a set of three for OU-1. The other reports are the baseline risk assessment and feasibility study. The information in these reports will lead to a Record of Decision that will guide and conclude the environmental restoration effort for OU-1 at Eielson Air Force Base. The primary contaminants of concern include fuels and fuel-related contaminants (diesel; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene; total petroleum hydrocarbon; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), maintenance-related solvents and cleaners (volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroothylene), polychlorinated biphenyls, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The origins of contaminants of concern include leaks from storage tanks, drums and piping, and spills. Ongoing operations and past sitewide practices also contribute to contaminants of concern at OU-1 source areas. These include spraying mixed oil and solvent wastes on unpaved roads and aerial spraying of DDT.

  11. A drag-based mechanism for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Shannon; Laurenza, Ryan; Miller, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Previous work has shown that the flight kinematics and aerodynamics of the smallest flying insects may be significantly different than that of their larger counterparts. These small insects, such as thrips and parasitoid wasps, are on the order of 1 mm in length and operate at a Reynolds number less than 10. Due to their small size and high wing beat frequency, quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available. As a result, there has been much debate and speculation about the flight strategies employed by these insects. With the challenges associated with generating lift at low Reynolds numbers, it could be beneficial for the smallest insects to use a drag-based motion to generate some or all of its vertical force, however this has not been rigorously investigated. We used computational fluid dynamics to investigate the feasibility of drag-based propulsion in the tiniest insects. We investigated the vertical force generated by an idealized drag-based vertical stroke over a range of Reynolds numbers from 1 to 150. We also compared this stroke to more conventional hovering stroke kinematics such as that of a fruit fly and dragonfly.

  12. Nanopipette combined with quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for force spectroscopy/microscopy and liquid delivery-based nanofabrication

    SciTech Connect

    An, Sangmin; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Noh, Haneol; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Manhee; Hong, Mun-Heon; Jhe, Wonho

    2014-03-15

    This paper introduces a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope system (nanopipette/QTF-AFM), and describes experimental and theoretical investigations of the nanoscale materials used. The system offers several advantages over conventional cantilever-based AFM and QTF-AFM systems, including simple control of the quality factor based on the contact position of the QTF, easy variation of the effective tip diameter, electrical detection, on-demand delivery and patterning of various solutions, and in situ surface characterization after patterning. This tool enables nanoscale liquid delivery and nanofabrication processes without damaging the apex of the tip in various environments, and also offers force spectroscopy and microscopy capabilities.

  13. Nanopipette combined with quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for force spectroscopy/microscopy and liquid delivery-based nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    An, Sangmin; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Noh, Haneol; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Manhee; Hong, Mun-Heon; Jhe, Wonho

    2014-03-01

    This paper introduces a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope system (nanopipette/QTF-AFM), and describes experimental and theoretical investigations of the nanoscale materials used. The system offers several advantages over conventional cantilever-based AFM and QTF-AFM systems, including simple control of the quality factor based on the contact position of the QTF, easy variation of the effective tip diameter, electrical detection, on-demand delivery and patterning of various solutions, and in situ surface characterization after patterning. This tool enables nanoscale liquid delivery and nanofabrication processes without damaging the apex of the tip in various environments, and also offers force spectroscopy and microscopy capabilities.

  14. Design of a MEMS-based motion stage based on a lever mechanism for generating large displacements and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Shi, Hongliang; Dagalakis, Nicholas G.; Gupta, Satyandra K.

    2016-09-01

    Conventional miniaturized motion stages have a volume of 50–60 cm3 and a range of motion around 100 μm. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based motion stages have been good alternatives in some applications for small footprint, micron-level accuracy, and a lower cost. However, existing MEMS-based motion stages are able to provide a force of μN level, small displacements (less than tens of microns), and need additional features for practical applications like a probe or a stage. In this paper, a single degree of freedom motion stage is designed and analyzed for a larger displacement, a larger output force, a smaller out-of-plane deformation, and a bigger moving stage for further applications. For these purposes, the presented motion stage is designed with a thermal actuator, folded springs, and a lever, and it is experimentally characterized. Furthermore, three different types of flexure joints are investigated to characterize their capabilities and suitability to serve as the revolute joint of the lever: a beam, a cartwheel, and a butterfly flexure. The presented motion stage has a moving stage of 15 mm  ×  15 mm and shows a maximum displacement over 80 μm, and out-of-plane deformation under a weight of 120 μN less than 2 μm. The force generated by the actuator is estimated to be 68.6 mN.

  15. Design of a MEMS-based motion stage based on a lever mechanism for generating large displacements and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Shi, Hongliang; Dagalakis, Nicholas G.; Gupta, Satyandra K.

    2016-09-01

    Conventional miniaturized motion stages have a volume of 50-60 cm3 and a range of motion around 100 μm. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based motion stages have been good alternatives in some applications for small footprint, micron-level accuracy, and a lower cost. However, existing MEMS-based motion stages are able to provide a force of μN level, small displacements (less than tens of microns), and need additional features for practical applications like a probe or a stage. In this paper, a single degree of freedom motion stage is designed and analyzed for a larger displacement, a larger output force, a smaller out-of-plane deformation, and a bigger moving stage for further applications. For these purposes, the presented motion stage is designed with a thermal actuator, folded springs, and a lever, and it is experimentally characterized. Furthermore, three different types of flexure joints are investigated to characterize their capabilities and suitability to serve as the revolute joint of the lever: a beam, a cartwheel, and a butterfly flexure. The presented motion stage has a moving stage of 15 mm  ×  15 mm and shows a maximum displacement over 80 μm, and out-of-plane deformation under a weight of 120 μN less than 2 μm. The force generated by the actuator is estimated to be 68.6 mN.

  16. 21. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia) Photographer unknown. View of beginning preparation of reinforcing steel for egg of launch control center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  17. 26. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. View of egg of launch control center and elevator shaft, forms still in place - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  18. 23. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. View of reinforcing steel for egg of launch control center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  19. 22. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia) Photographer unknown. View of concrete forms for egg of launch control center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  20. 25. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. View of reinforcing steel and forms for egg of launch control center, showing vents - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  1. 29. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. View of egg of launch control center and elevator shaft, forms removed - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  2. 30. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. View of egg of launch control center and elevator shaft, vents installed - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  3. 27. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. View of passage from elevator shaft to egg of launch control center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  4. 24. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. View of reinforcing steel and forms for egg of launch control center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  5. 20. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. View of bed preparation for concrete "egg" of launch control center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  6. 31. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia) Photographer unknown. Aerial view of egg of launch control center, nearly buried - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  7. 19. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Peter Kiewit Sons' Co., Omaha, Nebraska) Photographer unknown. Road signs for Alpha Flight Launch Facility sites 8-11 and Bravo Flight Launch Facility sites 2 and 11 - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  8. 33. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia) Photographer unknown. Aerial view of launch control facility under construction, parking area and approach road completed, sewage lagoon at lower right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  9. 34. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Photographic copy of photograph (ca. 1962, original print in possession of Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia) Photographer unknown. View of launch control facility under construction, security gate at left - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  10. Surface modification of alignment layer by ultraviolet irradiation to dramatically improve the detection limit of liquid-crystal-based immunoassay for the cancer biomarker CA125

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hui-Wen; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensing has attracted much attention in recent years. We focus on improving the detection limit of LC-based immunoassay techniques by surface modification of the surfactant alignment layer consisting of dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMOAP). The cancer biomarker CA125 was detected with an array of anti-CA125 antibodies immobilized on the ultraviolet (UV)-modified DMOAP monolayer. Compared with a pristine counterpart, UV irradiation enhanced the binding affinity of the CA125 antibody and reproducibility of immunodetection in which a detection limit of 0.01 ng/ml for the cancer biomarker CA125 was achieved. Additionally, the optical texture observed under a crossed polarized microscope was correlated with the analyte concentration. In a proof-of-concept experiment using CA125-spiked human serum as the analyte, specific binding between the CA125 antigen and the anti-CA125 antibody resulted in a distinct and concentration-dependent optical response despite the high background caused by nonspecific binding of other biomolecules in the human serum. Results from this study indicate that UV modification of the alignment layer, as well as detection with LCs of large birefringence, contributes to the enhanced performance of the label-free LC-based immunodetection, which may be considered a promising alternative to conventional label-based methods.

  11. Surface modification of alignment layer by ultraviolet irradiation to dramatically improve the detection limit of liquid-crystal-based immunoassay for the cancer biomarker CA125.

    PubMed

    Su, Hui-Wen; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensing has attracted much attention in recent years. We focus on improving the detection limit of LC-based immunoassay techniques by surface modification of the surfactant alignment layer consisting of dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMOAP). The cancer biomarker CA125 was detected with an array of anti-CA125 antibodies immobilized on the ultraviolet (UV)-modified DMOAP monolayer. Compared with a pristine counterpart, UV irradiation enhanced the binding affinity of the CA125 antibody and reproducibility of immunodetection in which a detection limit of 0.01 ng∕ml for the cancer biomarker CA125 was achieved. Additionally, the optical texture observed under a crossed polarized microscope was correlated with the analyte concentration. In a proof-of-concept experiment using CA125-spiked human serum as the analyte, specific binding between the CA125 antigen and the anti-CA125 antibody resulted in a distinct and concentration-dependent optical response despite the high background caused by nonspecific binding of other biomolecules in the human serum. Results from this study indicate that UVmodification of the alignment layer, as well as detection with LCs of large birefringence, contributes to the enhanced performance of the label-free LC-based immunodetection, which may be considered a promising alternative to conventional label-based methods. PMID:26000796

  12. Cell force mapping using a double-sided micropillar array based on the moiré fringe method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Anderson, S.; Zheng, X.; Roberts, E.; Qiu, Y.; Liao, R.; Zhang, X.

    2014-07-01

    The mapping of traction forces is crucial to understanding the means by which cells regulate their behavior and physiological function to adapt to and communicate with their local microenvironment. To this end, polymeric micropillar arrays have been used for measuring cell traction force. However, the small scale of the micropillar deflections induced by cell traction forces results in highly inefficient force analyses using conventional optical approaches; in many cases, cell forces may be below the limits of detection achieved using conventional microscopy. To address these limitations, the moiré phenomenon has been leveraged as a visualization tool for cell force mapping due to its inherent magnification effect and capacity for whole-field force measurements. This Letter reports an optomechanical cell force sensor, namely, a double-sided micropillar array (DMPA) made of poly(dimethylsiloxane), on which one side is employed to support cultured living cells while the opposing side serves as a reference pattern for generating moiré patterns. The distance between the two sides, which is a crucial parameter influencing moiré pattern contrast, is predetermined during fabrication using theoretical calculations based on the Talbot effect that aim to optimize contrast. Herein, double-sided micropillar arrays were validated by mapping mouse embryo fibroblast contraction forces and the resulting force maps compared to conventional microscopy image analyses as the reference standard. The DMPA-based approach precludes the requirement for aligning two independent periodic substrates, improves moiré contrast, and enables efficient moiré pattern generation. Furthermore, the double-sided structure readily allows for the integration of moiré-based cell force mapping into microfabricated cell culture environments or lab-on-a-chip devices.

  13. Ab Initio Protein Structure Assembly Using Continuous Structure Fragments and Optimized Knowledge-based Force Field

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Ab initio protein folding is one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology due to the difficulties in force field design and conformational search. We developed a novel program, QUARK, for template-free protein structure prediction. Query sequences are first broken into fragments of 1–20 residues where multiple fragment structures are retrieved at each position from unrelated experimental structures. Full-length structure models are then assembled from fragments using replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulations, which are guided by a composite knowledge-based force field. A number of novel energy terms and Monte Carlo movements are introduced and the particular contributions to enhancing the efficiency of both force field and search engine are analyzed in detail. QUARK prediction procedure is depicted and tested on the structure modeling of 145 non-homologous proteins. Although no global templates are used and all fragments from experimental structures with template modeling score (TM-score) >0.5 are excluded, QUARK can successfully construct 3D models of correct folds in 1/3 cases of short proteins up to 100 residues. In the ninth community-wide Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP9) experiment, QUARK server outperformed the second and third best servers by 18% and 47% based on the cumulative Z-score of global distance test-total (GDT-TS) scores in the free modeling (FM) category. Although ab initio protein folding remains a significant challenge, these data demonstrate new progress towards the solution of the most important problem in the field. PMID:22411565

  14. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 224 Altus Air Force Base Solar Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Bryan J.

    2010-09-30

    The principal goal of this project was to evaluate altus Air Force Base for building integrated silicon or thin film module photovoltaic opportunities. This report documents PNNL's efforts and documents study conclusions.

  15. Adaptive method for real-time gait phase detection based on ground contact forces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lie; Zheng, Jianbin; Wang, Yang; Song, Zhengge; Zhan, Enqi

    2015-01-01

    A novel method is presented to detect real-time gait phases based on ground contact forces (GCFs) measured by force sensitive resistors (FSRs). The traditional threshold method (TM) sets a threshold to divide the GCFs into on-ground and off-ground statuses. However, TM is neither an adaptive nor real-time method. The threshold setting is based on body weight or the maximum and minimum GCFs in the gait cycles, resulting in different thresholds needed for different walking conditions. Additionally, the maximum and minimum GCFs are only obtainable after data processing. Therefore, this paper proposes a proportion method (PM) that calculates the sums and proportions of GCFs wherein the GCFs are obtained from FSRs. A gait analysis is then implemented by the proposed gait phase detection algorithm (GPDA). Finally, the PM reliability is determined by comparing the detection results between PM and TM. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed PM is highly reliable in all walking conditions. In addition, PM could be utilized to analyze gait phases in real time. Finally, PM exhibits strong adaptability to different walking conditions.

  16. Coral Sr/Ca-based sea surface temperature and air temperature variability from the inshore and offshore corals in the Seribu Islands, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Cahyarini, Sri Yudawati; Zinke, Jens; Troelstra, Simon; Suharsono; Aldrian, Edvin; Hoeksema, B W

    2016-09-30

    The ability of massive Porites corals to faithfully record temperature is assessed. Porites corals from Kepulauan Seribu were sampled from one inshore and one offshore site and analyzed for their Sr/Ca variation. The results show that Sr/Ca of the offshore coral tracked SST, while Sr/Ca variation of the inshore coral tracked ambient air temperature. In particular, the inshore SST variation is related to air temperature anomalies of the urban center of Jakarta. The latter we relate to air-sea interactions modifying inshore SST associated with the land-sea breeze mechanism and/or monsoonal circulation. The correlation pattern of monthly coral Sr/Ca with the Niño3.4 index and SEIO-SST reveals that corals in the Seribu islands region respond differently to remote forcing. An opposite response is observed for inshore and offshore corals in response to El Niño onset, yet similar to El Niño mature phase (December to February). SEIO SSTs co-vary strongly with SST and air temperature variability across the Seribu island reef complex. The results of this study clearly indicate that locations of coral proxy record in Indonesia need to be chosen carefully in order to identify the seasonal climate response to local and remote climate and anthropogenic forcing.

  17. Coral Sr/Ca-based sea surface temperature and air temperature variability from the inshore and offshore corals in the Seribu Islands, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Cahyarini, Sri Yudawati; Zinke, Jens; Troelstra, Simon; Suharsono; Aldrian, Edvin; Hoeksema, B W

    2016-09-30

    The ability of massive Porites corals to faithfully record temperature is assessed. Porites corals from Kepulauan Seribu were sampled from one inshore and one offshore site and analyzed for their Sr/Ca variation. The results show that Sr/Ca of the offshore coral tracked SST, while Sr/Ca variation of the inshore coral tracked ambient air temperature. In particular, the inshore SST variation is related to air temperature anomalies of the urban center of Jakarta. The latter we relate to air-sea interactions modifying inshore SST associated with the land-sea breeze mechanism and/or monsoonal circulation. The correlation pattern of monthly coral Sr/Ca with the Niño3.4 index and SEIO-SST reveals that corals in the Seribu islands region respond differently to remote forcing. An opposite response is observed for inshore and offshore corals in response to El Niño onset, yet similar to El Niño mature phase (December to February). SEIO SSTs co-vary strongly with SST and air temperature variability across the Seribu island reef complex. The results of this study clearly indicate that locations of coral proxy record in Indonesia need to be chosen carefully in order to identify the seasonal climate response to local and remote climate and anthropogenic forcing. PMID:27181035

  18. Eielson Air Force Base operable unit 2 and other areas record of decision

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.E.; Smith, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial actions and no action decisions for Operable Unit 2 (OU2) at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska, chosen in accordance with state and federal regulations. This document also presents the decision that no further action is required for 21 other source areas at Eielson AFB. This decision is based on the administrative record file for this site. OU2 addresses sites contaminated by leaks and spills of fuels. Soils contaminated with petroleum products occur at or near the source of contamination. Contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater occur in plumes on the top of a shallow groundwater table that fluctuates seasonally. These sites pose a risk to human health and the environment because of ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact with contaminated groundwater. The purpose of this response is to prevent current or future exposure to the contaminated groundwater, to reduce further contaminant migration into the groundwater, and to remediate groundwater.

  19. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy for viscoelastic characterization of polymer-based nanocomposites at variable temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Marco; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Tamburri, Emanuela; Terranova, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of mechanical properties at the nanometer scale at variable temperature is one of the main challenges in the development of polymer-based nanocomposites for application in high temperature environments. Contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) is a powerful technique to characterize viscoelastic properties of materials at the nanoscale. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of CR-AFM of characterizing viscoelastic properties (i.e., storage and loss moduli, as well as loss tangent) of polymer-based nanocomposites at variable temperature. CR-AFM is first illustrated on two polymeric reference samples, i.e., low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polycarbonate (PC). Then, temperature-dependent viscoelastic properties (in terms of loss tangent) of a nanocomposite sample constituted by a epoxy resin reinforced with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated.

  20. Exploring the impact of forcing error characteristics on physically based snow simulations within a global sensitivity analysis framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raleigh, M. S.; Lundquist, J. D.; Clark, M. P.

    2015-07-01

    Physically based models provide insights into key hydrologic processes but are associated with uncertainties due to deficiencies in forcing data, model parameters, and model structure. Forcing uncertainty is enhanced in snow-affected catchments, where weather stations are scarce and prone to measurement errors, and meteorological variables exhibit high variability. Hence, there is limited understanding of how forcing error characteristics affect simulations of cold region hydrology and which error characteristics are most important. Here we employ global sensitivity analysis to explore how (1) different error types (i.e., bias, random errors), (2) different error probability distributions, and (3) different error magnitudes influence physically based simulations of four snow variables (snow water equivalent, ablation rates, snow disappearance, and sublimation). We use the Sobol' global sensitivity analysis, which is typically used for model parameters but adapted here for testing model sensitivity to coexisting errors in all forcings. We quantify the Utah Energy Balance model's sensitivity to forcing errors with 1 840 000 Monte Carlo simulations across four sites and five different scenarios. Model outputs were (1) consistently more sensitive to forcing biases than random errors, (2) generally less sensitive to forcing error distributions, and (3) critically sensitive to different forcings depending on the relative magnitude of errors. For typical error magnitudes found in areas with drifting snow, precipitation bias was the most important factor for snow water equivalent, ablation rates, and snow disappearance timing, but other forcings had a more dominant impact when precipitation uncertainty was due solely to gauge undercatch. Additionally, the relative importance of forcing errors depended on the model output of interest. Sensitivity analysis can reveal which forcing error characteristics matter most for hydrologic modeling.

  1. All-atom polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-06-15

    Presented is a first generation atomistic force field (FF) for DNA in which electronic polarization is modeled based on the classical Drude oscillator formalism. The DNA model is based on parameters for small molecules representative of nucleic acids, including alkanes, ethers, dimethylphosphate, and the nucleic acid bases and empirical adjustment of key dihedral parameters associated with the phosphodiester backbone, glycosidic linkages, and sugar moiety of DNA. Our optimization strategy is based on achieving a compromise between satisfying the properties of the underlying model compounds in the gas phase targeting quantum mechanical (QM) data and reproducing a number of experimental properties of DNA duplexes in the condensed phase. The resulting Drude FF yields stable DNA duplexes on the 100-ns time scale and satisfactorily reproduce (1) the equilibrium between A and B forms of DNA and (2) transitions between the BI and BII substates of B form DNA. Consistency with the gas phase QM data for the model compounds is significantly better for the Drude model as compared to the CHARMM36 additive FF, which is suggested to be due to the improved response of the model to changes in the environment associated with the explicit inclusion of polarizability. Analysis of dipole moments associated with the nucleic acid bases shows the Drude model to have significantly larger values than those present in CHARMM36, with the dipoles of individual bases undergoing significant variations during the MD simulations. Additionally, the dipole moment of water was observed to be perturbed in the grooves of DNA. PMID:24752978

  2. Tip-surface interactions at redox responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane) (PFS) interface by AFM-based force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hong Jing; Song, Jing; Vancso, G. Julius

    2009-05-01

    Poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) belong to the class of redox responsive organometallic polymers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used earlier to study single chain PFS response and redox energy driven single chain PFS molecular motors. Here we present further AFM investigations of force interactions between tip and a grafted PFS surface under potential control in electrochemical redox cycles. Typical tip-Au interaction is considered as reference in the force measurements. First the electrostatic component in the diffused double layer (DL) in NaClO 4 electrolyte environment was considered for a "grafted to" PFS, which dominated the interplay between the tip and sample surface. The DL forces can also hinder the physisorption of PFS chain onto the tip when the voltage was applied at -0.1 V. On the other hand, if the tip contacted the PFS surface prior to the electrochemical process, physisorption of PFS chains governed the overall interaction regardless of subsequently applied surface potential. In addition, prolonged contact time, tc, may also contribute to the stability of tip-PFS bridging and detection of electrostatic forces between the tip-PFS interface. The results showed that tip-substrate interaction forces without PFS grafts have negligibly small force contributions under similar, electrochemically controlled, conditions used in single PFS chain based molecular motors.

  3. Computational ligand-based rational design: Role of conformational sampling and force fields in model development

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jihyun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of drug discovery efforts are based on natural products or high throughput screens from which compounds showing potential therapeutic effects are identified without knowledge of the target molecule or its 3D structure. In such cases computational ligand-based drug design (LBDD) can accelerate the drug discovery processes. LBDD is a general approach to elucidate the relationship of a compound's structure and physicochemical attributes to its biological activity. The resulting structure-activity relationship (SAR) may then act as the basis for the prediction of compounds with improved biological attributes. LBDD methods range from pharmacophore models identifying essential features of ligands responsible for their activity, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) yielding quantitative estimates of activities based on physiochemical properties, and to similarity searching, which explores compounds with similar properties as well as various combinations of the above. A number of recent LBDD approaches involve the use of multiple conformations of the ligands being studied. One of the basic components to generate multiple conformations in LBDD is molecular mechanics (MM), which apply an empirical energy function to relate conformation to energies and forces. The collection of conformations for ligands is then combined with functional data using methods ranging from regression analysis to neural networks, from which the SAR is determined. Accordingly, for effective application of LBDD for SAR determinations it is important that the compounds be accurately modelled such that the appropriate range of conformations accessible to the ligands is identified. Such accurate modelling is largely based on use of the appropriate empirical force field for the molecules being investigated and the approaches used to generate the conformations. The present chapter includes a brief overview of currently used SAR methods in LBDD followed by a more

  4. Ground-water data, 1969-77, Vandenberg Air Force Base area, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    The water supply for Vandenberg Air Force Base is obtained from wells in the Lompoc Plain, San Antonio Valley, and Lompoc Terrace groundwater basins. Metered pumpage during the period 1969-77 from the Lompoc Plain decreased from a high of 3,670 acre-feet in 1969 to a low of 2,441 acre-feet in 1977, while pumpage from the San Antonio Valley increased from a low of 1 ,020 acre-feet in 1969 to a high of 1,829 acre-feet in 1977. Pumpage from the Lompoc Terrace has remained relatively constant and was 187 acre-feet in 1977. In the Barka Slough area of the San Antonio Valley, water levels in four shallow wells declined during 1976 and 1977. Water levels in observation wells in the two aquifers of the Lompoc Terrace ground-water basin fluctuated during the period, but show no long term trends. Chemical analyses or field determinations of temperature and specific conductance were made of 219 water samples collected from 53 wells. In the Lompoc Plain the dissolved-solids concentration in all water samples was more than 625 milligrams per liter, and in most was more than 1,000 milligrams per liter. The manganese concentration in analyzed samples equaled or exceeded the recommended limit of 50 micrograms per liter for public water supplies. Dissolved-solids concentrations increased with time in water samples from two wells east of the Air Force Base in San Antonio Valley. In the base well-field area, concentrations of dissolved solids ranged from 290 to 566 milligrams per liter. Eight analyses show manganese at or above the recommended limit of 50 milligrams per liter. In the Lompoc Terrace area dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 470 to 824 milligrams per liter. Five new supply wells, nine observation wells, and two exploratory/observation wells were drilled on the base during the period 1972-77. (USGS)

  5. EMRE Is a Matrix Ca(2+) Sensor that Governs Gatekeeping of the Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter.

    PubMed

    Vais, Horia; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Hoff, Henry; Payne, Riley; Tanis, Jessica E; Foskett, J Kevin

    2016-01-26

    The mitochondrial uniporter (MCU) is an ion channel that mediates Ca(2+) uptake into the matrix to regulate metabolism, cell death, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signaling. Matrix Ca(2+) concentration is similar to that in cytoplasm, despite an enormous driving force for entry, but the mechanisms that prevent mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload are unclear. Here, we show that MCU channel activity is governed by matrix Ca(2+) concentration through EMRE. Deletion or charge neutralization of its matrix-localized acidic C terminus abolishes matrix Ca(2+) inhibition of MCU Ca(2+) currents, resulting in MCU channel activation, enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, and constitutively elevated matrix Ca(2+) concentration. EMRE-dependent regulation of MCU channel activity requires intermembrane space-localized MICU1, MICU2, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Thus, mitochondria are protected from Ca(2+) depletion and Ca(2+) overload by a unique molecular complex that involves Ca(2+) sensors on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane, coupled through EMRE.

  6. The effect of the physical structure of a porous Ca-based sorbent on its phosphorus removal capacity.

    PubMed

    Khadhraoui, M; Watanabe, T; Kuroda, M

    2002-09-01

    A macroporous calcium-based sorbent made from bentonite, calcium hydroxide and Yalloun coal was prepared and tested for its phosphorus removal performance. The coal was added as a solid pore-forming agent. Pores sizes as large as a few micron were generated when the Yalloun coal was incorporated at a relatively high proportion. These pores were formed due to the burning out of the added coal during the thermal treatment conducted at 700 degrees C. Results of phosphorus removal experiments showed that the increase of the amount of phosphorus removed could be positively correlated with the increase of the total pore volume and the mean pore size. Decreases in pore sizes and total pore volume were pronounced in sorbents used to remove phosphorus due to the formation of a Ca-phosphate mineral on their surfaces. It was suggested that the widely formed pores avoided the rapid plugging and contributed to maintain the diffusional transport of the substrate to a certain extent. Hydroxyapatite was formed and coated on the surface of the sorbent during phosphorus removal. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that modification of the physical structure of Ca-based sorbents by creating large pore sizes, revealed to be effective for increasing their phosphorus uptake. PMID:12369518

  7. Immunoassays for the cancer biomarker CA125 based on a large-birefringence nematic liquid-crystal mixture

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shih-Hung; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Yun-Han; Lee, Wei; Song, Xiaolong; Chen, Chao-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The use of fluorescence is ubiquitously found in the detection of immunoreaction; though with good sensitivity, this technique requires labeling as well as other time-consuming steps to perform the measurement. An alternative approach involving liquid crystals (LCs) was proposed, based on the fact that an immunocomplex can disturb the orientation of LCs, leading to an optical texture different from the case when only antigen or antibody exists. This method is label-free, easy to manipulate and low-cost. However, its sensitivity was low for practical usage. In this study, we adopted a high-birefringence liquid crystal (LC) to enhance the sensitivity for the immunodetection. Experiments were performed, targeting at the cancer biomarker CA125. We showed that the larger birefringence (Δn = 0.33 at 20 °C) amplifies the detected signal and, in turn, dramatically improves the detection limit. To avoid signal loss from conventional rinsing steps in immunodetection, CA125 antigen and antibody were reacted before immobilized on substrates. We studied the specific binding events and obtained a detection limit as low as 1 ng/ml. The valid temperature ranges were compared by using the typical single-compound LC 5CB and the high-birefringence LC mixture. We further investigated time dependency of the optical textures and affirmed the capability of LC-based immunodetection in distinguishing between specific and nonspecific antibodies. PMID:25657889

  8. Immunoassays for the cancer biomarker CA125 based on a large-birefringence nematic liquid-crystal mixture.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih-Hung; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Yun-Han; Lee, Wei; Song, Xiaolong; Chen, Chao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The use of fluorescence is ubiquitously found in the detection of immunoreaction; though with good sensitivity, this technique requires labeling as well as other time-consuming steps to perform the measurement. An alternative approach involving liquid crystals (LCs) was proposed, based on the fact that an immunocomplex can disturb the orientation of LCs, leading to an optical texture different from the case when only antigen or antibody exists. This method is label-free, easy to manipulate and low-cost. However, its sensitivity was low for practical usage. In this study, we adopted a high-birefringence liquid crystal (LC) to enhance the sensitivity for the immunodetection. Experiments were performed, targeting at the cancer biomarker CA125. We showed that the larger birefringence (Δn = 0.33 at 20 °C) amplifies the detected signal and, in turn, dramatically improves the detection limit. To avoid signal loss from conventional rinsing steps in immunodetection, CA125 antigen and antibody were reacted before immobilized on substrates. We studied the specific binding events and obtained a detection limit as low as 1 ng/ml. The valid temperature ranges were compared by using the typical single-compound LC 5CB and the high-birefringence LC mixture. We further investigated time dependency of the optical textures and affirmed the capability of LC-based immunodetection in distinguishing between specific and nonspecific antibodies. PMID:25657889

  9. Efficient burst mode amplifier for ultra-short pulses based on cryogenically cooled Yb³⁺:CaF₂.

    PubMed

    Körner, Jörg; Hein, Joachim; Liebetrau, Hartmut; Seifert, Reinhard; Klöpfel, Diethard; Kahle, Martin; Loeser, Markus; Siebold, Mathias; Schramm, Ulrich; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-11-18

    We present a novel approach for the amplification of high peak power femtosecond laser pulses at a high repetition rate. This approach is based on an all-diode pumped burst mode laser scheme. In this scheme, pulse bursts with a total duration between 1 and 2 ms are be generated and amplified. They contain 50 to 2000 individual pulses equally spaced in time. The individual pulses have an initial duration of 350 fs and are stretched to 50 ps prior to amplification. The amplifier stage is based on Yb3+:CaF2 cooled to 100 K. In this amplifier, a total output energy in excess of 600 mJ per burst at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is demonstrated. For lower repetition rates the total output energy per burst can be scaled up to 915 mJ using a longer pump duration. This corresponds to an efficiency as high as 25% of extracted energy from absorbed pump energy. This is the highest efficiency, which has so far been demonstrated for a pulsed Yb3+:CaF2 amplifier.

  10. The Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based AMOEBA Force Field for Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yue; Xia, Zhen; Zhang, Jiajing; Best, Robert; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.; Ren, Pengyu

    2013-01-01

    Development of the AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Simulation) force field for proteins is presented. The current version (AMOEBA-2013) utilizes permanent electrostatic multipole moments through the quadrupole at each atom, and explicitly treats polarization effects in various chemical and physical environments. The atomic multipole electrostatic parameters for each amino acid residue type are derived from high-level gas phase quantum mechanical calculations via a consistent and extensible protocol. Molecular polarizability is modeled via a Thole-style damped interactive induction model based upon distributed atomic polarizabilities. Inter- and intramolecular polarization is treated in a consistent fashion via the Thole model. The intramolecular polarization model ensures transferability of electrostatic parameters among different conformations, as demonstrated by the agreement between QM and AMOEBA electrostatic potentials, and dipole moments of dipeptides. The backbone and side chain torsional parameters were determined by comparing to gas-phase QM (RI-TRIM MP2/CBS) conformational energies of dipeptides and to statistical distributions from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for short peptides in explicit water to examine their conformational properties in solution. Overall the calculated conformational free energies and J-coupling constants are consistent with PDB statistics and experimental NMR results, respectively. In addition, the experimental crystal structures of a number of proteins are well maintained during molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. While further calculations are necessary to fully validate the force field, initial results suggest the AMOEBA polarizable multipole force field is able to describe the structure and energetics of peptides and proteins, in both gas-phase and solution environments. PMID:24163642

  11. The Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based AMOEBA Force Field for Proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yue; Xia, Zhen; Zhang, Jiajing; Best, Robert; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu

    2013-01-01

    Development of the AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Simulation) force field for proteins is presented. The current version (AMOEBA-2013) utilizes permanent electrostatic multipole moments through the quadrupole at each atom, and explicitly treats polarization effects in various chemical and physical environments. The atomic multipole electrostatic parameters for each amino acid residue type are derived from high-level gas phase quantum mechanical calculations via a consistent and extensible protocol. Molecular polarizability is modeled via a Thole-style damped interactive induction model based upon distributed atomic polarizabilities. Inter- and intramolecular polarization is treated in a consistent fashion via the Thole model. The intramolecular polarization model ensures transferability of electrostatic parameters among different conformations, as demonstrated by the agreement between QM and AMOEBA electrostatic potentials, and dipole moments of dipeptides. The backbone and side chain torsional parameters were determined by comparing to gas-phase QM (RI-TRIM MP2/CBS) conformational energies of dipeptides and to statistical distributions from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for short peptides in explicit water to examine their conformational properties in solution. Overall the calculated conformational free energies and J-coupling constants are consistent with PDB statistics and experimental NMR results, respectively. In addition, the experimental crystal structures of a number of proteins are well maintained during molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. While further calculations are necessary to fully validate the force field, initial results suggest the AMOEBA polarizable multipole force field is able to describe the structure and energetics of peptides and proteins, in both gas-phase and solution environments.

  12. A new (Ba, Ca) (Ti, Zr)O3 based multiferroic composite with large magnetoelectric effect

    PubMed Central

    Naveed-Ul-Haq, M.; Shvartsman, Vladimir V.; Salamon, Soma; Wende, Heiko; Trivedi, Harsh; Mumtaz, Arif; Lupascu, Doru C.

    2016-01-01

    The lead-free ferroelectric 0.5Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 − 0.5(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 (BCZT) is a promising component for multifunctional multiferroics due to its excellent room temperature piezoelectric properties. Having a composition close to the polymorphic phase boundary between the orthorhombic and tetragonal phases, it deserves a case study for analysis of its potential for modern electronics applications. To obtain magnetoelectric coupling, the piezoelectric phase needs to be combined with a suitable magnetostrictive phase. In the current article, we report on the synthesis, dielectric, magnetic, and magnetoelectric characterization of a new magnetoelectric multiferroic composite consisting of BCZT as a piezoelectric phase and CoFe2O4 (CFO) as the magnetostrictive phase. We found that this material is multiferroic at room temperature and manifests a magnetoelectric effect larger than that of BaTiO3 −CoFe2O4 bulk composites with similar content of the ferrite phase. PMID:27555563

  13. Preparation and Charge Density in (Co, Fe)-Doped La-Ca-Based Chromite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, R.; Thenmozhi, N.; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2016-08-01

    Transition metal-doped lanthanum chromites (La0.8Ca0.2)(Cr0.9- x Co0.1Fe x )O3 ( x = 0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12) have been synthesized by solid state reaction method. The synthesized samples were characterized for their structural properties using powder x-ray diffraction analysis, which shows that the grown samples are orthorhombic in structure with single phase. The nature of bonding and the charge distribution of the grown samples have been analyzed by maximum entropy method. Further, the samples were characterized for their optical and magnetic properties using ultraviolet-visible spectra and vibrating sample magnetometry. The microstructural studies were carried by scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy techniques. From the optical absorption spectra, it was found that the energy band gap of the samples ranges from 2.135 eV to 2.405 eV. From vibrating sample magnetometer measurements, ferromagnetic like behaviour with large coercive field was observed for Fe doping concentration of x = 0.12. Since the doped lanthanum chromites have good mechanical properties and electrical conductivity at high temperature, these materials are used in solid oxide fuel cells.

  14. A new (Ba, Ca) (Ti, Zr)O3 based multiferroic composite with large magnetoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed-Ul-Haq, M.; Shvartsman, Vladimir V.; Salamon, Soma; Wende, Heiko; Trivedi, Harsh; Mumtaz, Arif; Lupascu, Doru C.

    2016-08-01

    The lead-free ferroelectric 0.5Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 ‑ 0.5(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 (BCZT) is a promising component for multifunctional multiferroics due to its excellent room temperature piezoelectric properties. Having a composition close to the polymorphic phase boundary between the orthorhombic and tetragonal phases, it deserves a case study for analysis of its potential for modern electronics applications. To obtain magnetoelectric coupling, the piezoelectric phase needs to be combined with a suitable magnetostrictive phase. In the current article, we report on the synthesis, dielectric, magnetic, and magnetoelectric characterization of a new magnetoelectric multiferroic composite consisting of BCZT as a piezoelectric phase and CoFe2O4 (CFO) as the magnetostrictive phase. We found that this material is multiferroic at room temperature and manifests a magnetoelectric effect larger than that of BaTiO3 ‑CoFe2O4 bulk composites with similar content of the ferrite phase.

  15. Short-term stability improvements of an optical frequency standard based on free Ca atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Jeff; Oates, Chris

    2010-03-01

    Compared to optical frequency standards featuring trapped ions or atoms in optical lattices, the strength of a standard using freely expanding neutral calcium atoms is not ultimate accuracy but rather short-term stability and experimental simplicity. Recently, a fractional frequency instability of 4 x10-15 at 1 second was demonstrated for the Ca standard at 657 nm [1]. The short cycle time (˜2 ms) combined with only a moderate interrogation duty cycle (˜15 %) is thought to introduce excess, and potentially critically limiting technical noise due to the Dick effect---high-frequency noise on the laser oscillator is not averaged away but is instead down-sampled by aliasing. We will present results of two strategies employed to minimize this effect: the reduction of clock laser noise by filtering the master clock oscillator through a high-finesse optical cavity [2], and an optimization of the interrogation cycle to match our laser's noise spectrum.[4pt] [1] Oates et al., Optics Letters, 25(21), 1603--5 (2000)[0pt] [2] Nazarova et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 5(10), 1632--8 (2008)

  16. A new (Ba, Ca) (Ti, Zr)O3 based multiferroic composite with large magnetoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Naveed-Ul-Haq, M; Shvartsman, Vladimir V; Salamon, Soma; Wende, Heiko; Trivedi, Harsh; Mumtaz, Arif; Lupascu, Doru C

    2016-01-01

    The lead-free ferroelectric 0.5Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 - 0.5(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 (BCZT) is a promising component for multifunctional multiferroics due to its excellent room temperature piezoelectric properties. Having a composition close to the polymorphic phase boundary between the orthorhombic and tetragonal phases, it deserves a case study for analysis of its potential for modern electronics applications. To obtain magnetoelectric coupling, the piezoelectric phase needs to be combined with a suitable magnetostrictive phase. In the current article, we report on the synthesis, dielectric, magnetic, and magnetoelectric characterization of a new magnetoelectric multiferroic composite consisting of BCZT as a piezoelectric phase and CoFe2O4 (CFO) as the magnetostrictive phase. We found that this material is multiferroic at room temperature and manifests a magnetoelectric effect larger than that of BaTiO3 -CoFe2O4 bulk composites with similar content of the ferrite phase. PMID:27555563

  17. The study on the atomic force microscopy base nanoscale electrical discharge machining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ching; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes an innovative atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoscale electrical discharge machining (AFM-based nanoEDM) system which combines an AFM with a self-produced metallic probe and a high-voltage generator to create an atmospheric environment AFM-based nanoEDM system and a deionized water (DI water) environment AFM-based nanoEDM system. This study combines wire-cut processing and electrochemical tip sharpening techniques on a 40-µm thick stainless steel sheet to produce a high conductive AFM probes, the production can withstand high voltage and large current. The tip radius of these probes is approximately 40 nm. A probe test was executed on the AFM using probes to obtain nanoscales morphology of Si wafer surface. The silicon wafer was as a specimen to carry out AFM-base nanoEDM process in atmospheric and DI water environments by AFM-based nanoEDM system. After experiments, the results show that the atmospheric and DI water environment AFM-based nanoEDM systems operate smoothly. From experimental results, it can be found that the electric discharge depth of the silicon wafer at atmospheric environments is a mere 14.54 nm. In a DI water environment, the depth of electric discharge of the silicon wafer can reach 25.4 nm. This indicates that the EDM ability of DI water environment AFM-based nanoEDM system is higher than that of atmospheric environment AFM-based nanoEDM system. After multiple nanoEDM process, the tips become blunt. After applying electrochemical tip sharpening techniques, the tip radius can return to approximately 40 nm. Therefore, AFM probes produced in this study can be reused. PMID:21898457

  18. The study on the atomic force microscopy base nanoscale electrical discharge machining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ching; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes an innovative atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoscale electrical discharge machining (AFM-based nanoEDM) system which combines an AFM with a self-produced metallic probe and a high-voltage generator to create an atmospheric environment AFM-based nanoEDM system and a deionized water (DI water) environment AFM-based nanoEDM system. This study combines wire-cut processing and electrochemical tip sharpening techniques on a 40-µm thick stainless steel sheet to produce a high conductive AFM probes, the production can withstand high voltage and large current. The tip radius of these probes is approximately 40 nm. A probe test was executed on the AFM using probes to obtain nanoscales morphology of Si wafer surface. The silicon wafer was as a specimen to carry out AFM-base nanoEDM process in atmospheric and DI water environments by AFM-based nanoEDM system. After experiments, the results show that the atmospheric and DI water environment AFM-based nanoEDM systems operate smoothly. From experimental results, it can be found that the electric discharge depth of the silicon wafer at atmospheric environments is a mere 14.54 nm. In a DI water environment, the depth of electric discharge of the silicon wafer can reach 25.4 nm. This indicates that the EDM ability of DI water environment AFM-based nanoEDM system is higher than that of atmospheric environment AFM-based nanoEDM system. After multiple nanoEDM process, the tips become blunt. After applying electrochemical tip sharpening techniques, the tip radius can return to approximately 40 nm. Therefore, AFM probes produced in this study can be reused.

  19. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  20. The measurement of red blood cell volume change induced by Ca2+ based on full field quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Ji Yong; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Young

    2009-02-01

    We present the measurement of red blood cell (RBC) volume change induced by Ca2+ for a live cell imaging with full field quantitative phase microscopy (FFQPM). FFQPM is based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer combined with an inverted microscopy system. We present the effective method to obtain a clear image and an accurate volume of the cells. An edge detection technique is used to accurately resolve the boundary between the cell line and the suspension medium. The measurement of the polystyrene bead diameter and volume has been demonstrated the validity of our proposed method. The measured phase profile can be easily converted into thickness profile. The measured polystyrene bead volume and the simulated result are about 14.74 μm3 and 14.14 μm3, respectively. The experimental results of our proposed method agree well with the simulated results within less than 4 %. We have also measured the volume variation of a single RBC on a millisecond time scale. Its mean volume is 54.02 μm3 and its standard deviation is 0.52 μm3. With the proposed system, the shape and volume changes of RBC induced by the increased intracellular Ca2+ are measured after adding ionophore A23187. A discocyte RBC is deformed to a spherocyte due to the increased intracellular Ca2+ in RBC. The volume of the spherocyte is 47.88 μm3 and its standard deviation is 0.19 μm3. We have demonstrated that the volume measurement technique is easy, accurate, and robust method with high volume sensitivity (<0.0000452 μm3) and this provides the ability to study a biological phenomenon in Hematology.

  1. Field investigation source area ST58 old Quartermaster service station, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Liikala, T.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Source area ST58 is the site of the old Quartermaster service station at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The source area is one of several Source Evaluation Report sites being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Air Force as candidates for no further remedial action, interim removal action, or a remedial investigation/feasibility study under a Federal Facilities Agreement. The purpose of this work was to characterize source area ST58 and excavate the most contaminated soils for use in composting treatability studies. A field investigation was conducted to determine the nature and extent of soil contamination. The field investigation entailed a records search; grid node location, surface geophysical, and soil gas surveys; and test pit soil sampling. Soil excavation followed based on the results of the field investigation. The site was backfilled with clean soil. Results from this work indicate close spatial correlation between screening instruments, used during the field investigation and soil excavation, and laboratory analyses. Gasoline was identified as the main subsurface contaminant based on the soil gas surveys and test pit soil sampling. A center of contamination was located near the northcentral portion of the source area, and a center was located in the northwestern comer. The contamination typically occurred near or below a former soil horizon probably as a result of surface spills and leaks from discontinuities and/or breaks in the underground piping. Piping locations were delineated during the surface geophysical surveys and corresponded very well to unscaled drawings of the site. The high subsurface concentrations of gasoline detected in the northwestern comer of the source area probably reflect ground-water contamination and/or possibly floating product.

  2. Reactive Force Fields Based on Quantum Mechanics for Applications to Materials at Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duin, Adri C. T.; Zybin, Sergey V.; Chenoweth, Kimberley; Zhang, Luzheng; Han, Si-Ping; Strachan, Alejandro; Goddard, William A.

    2006-07-01

    Understanding the response of energetic materials (EM) to thermal or shock loading at the atomistic level demands a highly accurate description of the reaction dynamics of multimillion-atom systems to capture the complex chemical and mechanical behavior involved: nonequilibrium energy/mass transfer, molecule excitation and decomposition under high strain/heat rates, formation of defects, plastic flow, and phase transitions. To enable such simulations, we developed the ReaxFF reactive force fields based on quantum mechanics (QM) calculations of reactants, products, high-energy intermediates and transition states, but using functional forms suitable for large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of chemical reactions under extreme conditions. The elements of ReaxFF are: - charge distributions change instantaneously as atomic coordinates change, - all valence interactions use bond orders derived uniquely from the bond distances which in turn describe uniquely the energies and forces, - three body (angle) and four body (torsion and inversion) terms are allowed but not required, - a general "van der Waals" term describes short range Pauli repulsion and long range dispersion interactions, which with Coulomb terms are included between all pairs of atoms (no bond or angle exclusions), - no environmental distinctions are made of atoms involving the same element; thus every carbon has the same parameters whether in diamond, graphite, benzene, porphyrin, allyl radical, HMX or TATP. ReaxFF uses the same functional form and parameters for reactive simulations in hydrocarbons, polymers, metal oxides, and metal alloys, allowing mixtures of all these systems into one simulation. We will present an overview of recent progress in ReaxFF developments, including the extension of ReaxFF to nitramine-based (nitromethane, HMX) and peroxide-based (TATP) explosives. To demonstrate the versatility and transferability of ReaxFF, we also present applications to silicone polymer poly

  3. Miniature fiber-optic force sensor based on low-coherence Fabry-Pérot interferometry for vitreoretinal microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Iordachita, Iulian I.; He, Xingchi; Taylor, Russell H.; Kang, Jin U.

    2012-01-01

    During vitreoretinal surgery, the surgeon manipulates retinal tissue with tool-to-tissue interaction forces below the human sensory threshold. A force sensor (FS) integrated with conventional surgical tools may significantly improve the surgery outcome by providing tactile feedback to the surgeon. We designed and built a surgical tool integrated with a miniature FS with an outer diameter smaller than 1 mm for vitreoretinal surgery based on low-coherence Fabry–Pérot (FP) interferometry. The force sensing elements are located at the tool tip which is in direct contact with tissue during surgery and the FP cavity length is interrogated by a fiber-optic common-path phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. We have calibrated the FS's response to axial and lateral forces and conducted experiments to verify that our FS can simultaneously measure both axial and lateral force components. PMID:22567596

  4. Miniature fiber-optic force sensor based on low-coherence Fabry-Pérot interferometry for vitreoretinal microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Iordachita, Iulian I; He, Xingchi; Taylor, Russell H; Kang, Jin U

    2012-05-01

    During vitreoretinal surgery, the surgeon manipulates retinal tissue with tool-to-tissue interaction forces below the human sensory threshold. A force sensor (FS) integrated with conventional surgical tools may significantly improve the surgery outcome by providing tactile feedback to the surgeon. We designed and built a surgical tool integrated with a miniature FS with an outer diameter smaller than 1 mm for vitreoretinal surgery based on low-coherence Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometry. The force sensing elements are located at the tool tip which is in direct contact with tissue during surgery and the FP cavity length is interrogated by a fiber-optic common-path phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. We have calibrated the FS's response to axial and lateral forces and conducted experiments to verify that our FS can simultaneously measure both axial and lateral force components.

  5. Grasp and force based taxonomy of split-hook prosthetic terminal devices.

    PubMed

    Belter, Joseph T; Reynolds, Bo C; Dollar, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the use of the body-powered split-hook prosthetic terminal device, which is the most commonly used upper-limb prosthesis. We developed two taxonomies of split-hook use, one on grasp shape and one on force exertion, illustrating the functional capabilities and use cases of the device. Video captured from an amputee using a body-powered split-hook during a number of common activities was used to lend weight to the completeness of the classifications. These taxonomies serve to establish a common language and means of comparing the types of grasps achievable by simple terminal devices to those of advanced myoelectric terminal devices or even human hands. The first taxonomy categorizes the grasp type based on the contacts with the environment while the second is categorized by the method and limitation of force exertion. We discuss the difference between grasps capable of holding objects compared to those that are capable of acquiring objects and the importance of non-prehensile uses of the split-hook. The classification schemes lay the groundwork for further detailed study of split-hook use, and the discussion of the use cases described may help guide terminal device developers to create improved prostheses.

  6. A body-force based method to generate supersonic equilibrium turbulent boundary layer profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waindim, M.; Gaitonde, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We further develop a simple counterflow body force-based approach to generate an equilibrium spatially developing turbulent boundary layer suitable for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of viscous-inviscid interactions. The force essentially induces a small separated region in an incoming specified laminar boundary layer. The resulting unstable shear layer then transitions and breaks down to yield the desired unsteady profile. The effects of wall thermal conditions are explored to demonstrate the capability of the method for both fixed wall and adiabatic wall conditions. We then describe an efficient method to select parameters that ensure transition by examining precursor signatures using generalized stability variables. These precursors are shown to be evident in a computational domain spanning only a small region around the trip and can also be detected using 2D simulations. Finally, the method is tested for different Mach numbers ranging from 1.7 to 2.9, with emphasis on flow field surveys, Reynolds stresses, and energy spectra. These results provide guidance on boundary conditions for desired boundary layer thickness at each Mach number. The consequences of using a much lower Reynolds number in computation relative to experiment are evident at the higher Mach number, where a self sustaining turbulent boundary layer is more difficult to obtain.

  7. Improvement of Hand Movement on Visual Target Tracking by Assistant Force of Model-Based Compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, Junko; Sugi, Takenao; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    Human motor control is achieved by the appropriate motor commands generating from the central nerve system. A test of visual target tracking is one of the effective methods for analyzing the human motor functions. We have previously examined a possibility for improving the hand movement on visual target tracking by additional assistant force through a simulation study. In this study, a method for compensating the human hand movement on visual target tracking by adding an assistant force was proposed. Effectiveness of the compensation method was investigated through the experiment for four healthy adults. The proposed compensator precisely improved the reaction time, the position error and the variability of the velocity of the human hand. The model-based compensator proposed in this study is constructed by using the measurement data on visual target tracking for each subject. The properties of the hand movement for different subjects can be reflected in the structure of the compensator. Therefore, the proposed method has possibility to adjust the individual properties of patients with various movement disorders caused from brain dysfunctions.

  8. Nonlinear force-free extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field based on the magnetohydrodynamic relaxation method

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Choe, G. S.; Kim, K. S.; Pandey, V. S.; Shiota, D.; Kusano, K.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation code based on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation method. We extend the classical MHD relaxation method in two important ways. First, we introduce an algorithm initially proposed by Dedner et al. to effectively clean the numerical errors associated with ∇ · B . Second, the multigrid type method is implemented in our NLFFF to perform direct analysis of the high-resolution magnetogram data. As a result of these two implementations, we successfully extrapolated the high resolution force-free field introduced by Low and Lou with better accuracy in a drastically shorter time. We also applied our extrapolation method to the MHD solution obtained from the flux-emergence simulation by Magara. We found that NLFFF extrapolation may be less effective for reproducing areas higher than a half-domain, where some magnetic loops are found in a state of continuous upward expansion. However, an inverse S-shaped structure consisting of the sheared and twisted loops formed in the lower region can be captured well through our NLFFF extrapolation method. We further discuss how well these sheared and twisted fields are reconstructed by estimating the magnetic topology and twist quantitatively.

  9. Grasp and force based taxonomy of split-hook prosthetic terminal devices.

    PubMed

    Belter, Joseph T; Reynolds, Bo C; Dollar, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the use of the body-powered split-hook prosthetic terminal device, which is the most commonly used upper-limb prosthesis. We developed two taxonomies of split-hook use, one on grasp shape and one on force exertion, illustrating the functional capabilities and use cases of the device. Video captured from an amputee using a body-powered split-hook during a number of common activities was used to lend weight to the completeness of the classifications. These taxonomies serve to establish a common language and means of comparing the types of grasps achievable by simple terminal devices to those of advanced myoelectric terminal devices or even human hands. The first taxonomy categorizes the grasp type based on the contacts with the environment while the second is categorized by the method and limitation of force exertion. We discuss the difference between grasps capable of holding objects compared to those that are capable of acquiring objects and the importance of non-prehensile uses of the split-hook. The classification schemes lay the groundwork for further detailed study of split-hook use, and the discussion of the use cases described may help guide terminal device developers to create improved prostheses. PMID:25571512

  10. Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the AFMC Robins AFB facility located approximately 15 miles south of Macon, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 13 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative-description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  11. Compact metal probes: a solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R D; Sheremet, E; Müller, S; Gordan, O D; Villabona, A; Schulze, S; Hietschold, M; Zahn, D R T

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  12. Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sandusky, W.F.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Elliott, D.B.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost effective energy projects at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Patrick AFB which is located south of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume.2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance, and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value and value index of each ERO.

  13. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G. Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force–distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7–9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the ‘footprint’ of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6–9.7.

  14. Compact metal probes: A solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, R. D.; Sheremet, E.; Müller, S.; Gordan, O. D.; Villabona, A.; Schulze, S.; Hietschold, M.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  15. The Influence of Na2O on the Solidification and Crystallization Behavior of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Based Mold Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinxing; Wen, Guanghua; Sun, Qihao; Tang, Ping; Liu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    The reaction between [Al] and SiO2 sharply increased the Al2O3 and decreased SiO2 contents in mold flux during the continuous casting of high-Al steels. These changes converted original CaO-SiO2-based flux into CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based flux, promoting the crystallization and deteriorating the mold lubrication. Therefore, study on the solidification and crystallization behavior of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based mold flux, with the applicable fluidizers, is of importance. The effect of Na2O, predominantly used as the fluidizer in mold flux, on the solidification and crystallization behavior of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based mold flux needs to be investigated. In this study, a CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based mold flux containing 6.5 wt pct Li2O was designed; the effect of Na2O on the solidification and crystallization behavior of these mold fluxes was investigated using the single hot thermocouple technique (SHTT) and the double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT). Moreover, the slag film obtained by a heat flux simulator was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicate that the solid fraction of molten slag (Fs) and the crystalline fraction of solid slag (Fc) in the mold slag films decrease with increasing Na2O content from 0 to 2 wt pct. However, Fs and Fc increased when the Na2O content increased from 2 to 6 wt pct. The critical cooling rates initially decreases and then increases with increasing Na2O content. The XRD analysis results show that LiAlO2 and CaF2 were the basic crystals for all the mold fluxes. Increasing the Na2O content both inhibits the Ca2Al2SiO7 formation and promotes the production of Ca12Al14O33, indicating that the mold lubrication deteriorated because of the high melting-point phase formation of Ca2Al2SiO7 in the CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-based mold flux containing 6.5 wt pct Li2O, without Na2O. The strong crystallization tendency also deteriorated the mold lubrication for the mold flux with a higher Na2O content. Therefore, the addition of Na2O was less than 2 wt pct in

  16. Personal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel vapors and exhaust at air force bases.

    PubMed Central

    Pleil, J D; Smith, L B; Zelnick, S D

    2000-01-01

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and ground crew personnel during preflight operations and for maintenance personnel performing routine tasks. Personal exposure at an Air Force base occurs through occupational exposure for personnel involved with fuel and aircraft handling and/or through incidental exposure, primarily through inhalation of ambient fuel vapors. Because JP-8 is less volatile than its predecessor fuel (JP-4), contact with liquid fuel on skin and clothing may result in prolonged exposure. The slowly evaporating JP-8 fuel tends to linger on exposed personnel during their interaction with their previously unexposed colleagues. To begin to assess the relative exposures, we made ambient air measurements and used recently developed methods for collecting exhaled breath in special containers. We then analyzed for certain volatile marker compounds for JP-8, as well as for some aromatic hydrocarbons (especially benzene) that are related to long-term health risks. Ambient samples were collected by using compact, battery-operated, personal whole-air samplers that have recently been developed as commercial products; breath samples were collected using our single-breath canister method that uses 1-L canisters fitted with valves and small disposable breathing tubes. We collected breath samples from various groups of Air Force personnel and found a demonstrable JP-8 exposure for all subjects, ranging from slight elevations as compared to a control cohort to > 100 [mutilpe] the control values. This work suggests that further studies should be performed on specific issues to obtain pertinent exposure data. The data can be applied to assessments of health outcomes and to recommendations for changes in the use of personal protective

  17. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: Non-Gravitational Forces Based on its Detailed Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Horst Uwe; Mottola, Stefano; Skorov, Yuri; Davidsson, Björn; Gutiérrez, Pedro; Jorda, Laurent; Maquet, Lucie

    2015-11-01

    Non-gravitational forces caused by sublimation on a cometary nucleus influence its orbital parameters and its rotational properties. Based on thermal models and rough estimates of the nucleus shape properties such as its mass and density can be derived [1, 2]. The uncertainty of the nucleus shape influences the quality of the results. Changes of the angular momentum of the nucleus rotation are more strongly influenced by details of the shape and surface. The long term observations of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by OSIRIS [3] during the rendezvous with ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft result in a very detailed shape model [3]. We use a shape model with > 105 facets to simulate the distributed forces due to sublimation and to calculate their exerted torques. The determination of the overall activity and its spatial and timely distribution over the nucleus remains a major challenge. Early observations revealed that the rotation period had changed from its last perihelion passage in 2009 [4]. The detailed shape model along with thermal modeling makes it possible to calculate the diurnal activity of the facets [6, 7]. The net torque integrated over the whole surface causes a change in the angular momentum. We also calculate the forces acting on the motion of the nucleus. This can be monitored by determinations of the spacecraft positions during the Rosetta mission. We will compare our results with the traditional approach to calculate the non-gravitational forces [8].[1, 2] Davidsson, B. J. R. & Gutiérrez, P. J., Icarus, 168, 392, 2004, Icarus, 176, 453, 2005[3] H. U. Keller, C. Barbieri, P. Lamy, H. Rickman, R. Rodrigo, K.-P. Wenzel, H. Sierks, M. A’Hearn, F. Angrilli, M. Angulo, et al., SSR, 128 (1-4): 433-506, 2007.[4] Preusker, F., Scholten, F., Matz, K.-D., et al., Astronomy & Astrophysics, accepted, 2015[5] S. Mottola, S. Lowry, C. Snodgrass, P. Lamy, I. Toth, et al. A&A, 569: L2, Sept. 2014.[6] H. U. Keller, S. Mottola, B. Davidsson, S. Schr

  18. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinaman, Kurt C.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2000-01-01

    Dover Air Force Base in Kent County, Delaware, has many contaminated sites that are in active remediation. To assist in this remediation, a steady-state model of ground-water flow was developed to aid in understanding the hydrology of the system, and for use as a ground-watermanagement tool. This report describes the hydrology on which the model is based, a description of the model itself, and some applications of the model.Dover Air Force Base is underlain by unconsolidated sediments of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The primary units that were investigated include the upper Calvert Formation and the overlying Columbia Formation. The uppermost sand unit in the Calvert Formation at Dover Air Force Base is the Frederica aquifer, which is the deepest unit investigated in this report. A confining unit of clayey silt in the upper Calvert Formation separates the Frederica aquifer from the lower surficial aquifer, which is the basal Columbia Formation. North and northwest of Dover Air Force Base, the Frederica aquifer subcrops beneath the Columbia Formation and the upper Calvert Formation confining unit is absent. The Calvert Formation dips to the southeast. The Columbia Formation consists predominately of sands, silts, and gravels, although in places there are clay layers that separate the surficial aquifer into an upper and lower surficial aquifer. The areal extent of these clay layers has been mapped by use of gamma logs. Long-term hydrographs reveal substantial changes in both seasonal and annual ground-water recharge. These variations in recharge are related to temporal changes in evaporation, transpiration, and precipitation. The hydrographs show areas where extensive silts and clays are present in the surficial aquifer. In these areas, the vertical gradient between water levels in wells screened above and below the clays can be as large as several feet, and local ground-water highs typically form during normal recharge conditions. When drought conditions persist

  19. Force Concept Inventory-Based Multiple-Choice Test for Investigating Students' Representational Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieminen, Pasi; Savinainen, Antti; Viiri, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates students' ability to interpret multiple representations consistently (i.e., representational consistency) in the context of the force concept. For this purpose we developed the Representational Variant of the Force Concept Inventory (R-FCI), which makes use of nine items from the 1995 version of the Force Concept Inventory…

  20. Thin electrodes based on rolled Pb-Sn-Ca grids for VRLA batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, A.; Cruz, M.; Hernán, L.; Morales, J.; Sánchez, L.

    Electrodes 0.5 mm thick (i.e. much thinner than conventional ones) and suitable for lead-acid batteries were prepared by using a special pasting procedure that allows plate thickness to be readily controlled. Novel rolled grids of Pb-Sn-low Ca alloys (0.35 mm thick) were used as substrates. Preliminary galvanostatic corrosion tests of the grids revealed an increased corrosion rate relative to conventional casted grids of Pb-Sn alloys (1 mm thick). Cells made with these thin electrodes were cycled under different discharge regimes and the active material at different charge/discharge cycling stages was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analysis. At a depth of discharge (DOD) of 100%, the cell exhibited a premature capacity loss after the fifth cycle and delivered only a 20% of its nominal capacity after the 10th. By contrast, cycling performance of the electrode was significantly improved at a DOD of 60%. The capacity loss observed at a DOD of 100% can be ascribed to a rapid growth of PbSO 4 crystals reaching several microns in size. Such large crystals tend to deposit onto the grid surface and form an insulating layer that hinders electron transfer at the active material/grid interface. For this reason, the cell fails after few cycles in spite of the high PbO 2 content in the positive active material (PAM). On the other hand, at 60% DOD the submicronic particles produced after formation of the PAM retain their small size, thereby ensuring reversibility in the PbO 2⇔PbSO 4 transformation.