Science.gov

Sample records for force measurement system

  1. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  2. Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) Force Measurement System (FMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    An Electronics Engineer at the Glenn Research Center (GRC), requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) provide technical support for an evaluation of the existing force measurement system (FMS) at the GRC's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the intent of developing conceptual designs to improve the tunnel's force measurement capability in order to better meet test customer needs. This report contains the outcome of the NESC technical review.

  3. A new transducer system for direct motor unit force measurement.

    PubMed

    Turkawski, S J; van Ruijven, L J; van Kuyen, M; Schreurs, A W; Weijs, W A

    1996-11-01

    A new transducer was developed for in situ measurement of the force vector in a complex muscle. The transducer measures the magnitude, and the line of action of a force in a single plane. The dynamic range of the transducer is 0-5 N. This range includes the small forces developed by an active motor unit and the relatively large passive force of a whole muscle. In this study we present the details of the transducer design and specifications, and describe its application in the measurement of motor unit forces of the rabbit masseter muscle. PMID:8894930

  4. Diamagnetic Levitation Cantilever System for the Calibration of Normal Force Atomic Force Microscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jahn; Yi, Jin-Woo; Murphy, Colin; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    In this presentation we report a novel technique for normal force calibration for Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) adhesion measurements known as the diamagnetic normal force calibration (D-NFC) system. The levitation produced by the repulsion between a diamagnetic graphite sheet and a set of rare-earth magnets is used in order to produce an oscillation due to an unstable mechanical moment produced by a silicon cantilever supported on the graphite. The measurement of the natural frequency of this oscillation allows for the calculation of the stiffness of the system to three-digit accuracy. The D-NFC response was proven to have a high sensitivity for the structure of water molecules collected on its surface. This in turns allows for the study of the effects of coatings on the structure of surface water. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  5. A voice coil motor based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shengdong; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Liangzhou; Zhou, Liping; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    In tactile scanning profiler, the measuring force would change in a wide range when it was used for profile measurement in a large range, which could possibly destroy the measured surface. To solve the problem, measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was needed. In the paper, a voice coil motor-based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was designed. In the design, a low stiffness coefficient spring was used to provide contact force, while a voice coil motor (VCM) to balance the spring force so that the contact force could be kept for constant measuring force. A VCM was designed specially, and for active measuring force control, a precision current source circuit under the control of a DSP unit was designed to drive the VCM. The performance of voice coil motor based measuring force control system had been tested, and its good characteristics were verified.

  6. Enclosed Electronic System for Force Measurements in Knee Implants

    PubMed Central

    Forchelet, David; Simoncini, Matteo; Arami, Arash; Bertsch, Arnaud; Meurville, Eric; Aminian, Kamiar; Ryser, Peter; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a widely performed surgical technique. Soft tissue force balancing during the operation relies strongly on the experience of the surgeon in equilibrating tension in the collateral ligaments. Little information on the forces in the implanted prosthesis is available during surgery and post-operative treatment. This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of an instrumented insert performing force measurements in a knee prosthesis. The insert contains a closed structure composed of printed circuit boards and incorporates a microfabricated polyimide thin-film piezoresistive strain sensor for each condylar compartment. The sensor is tested in a mechanical knee simulator that mimics in-vivo conditions. For characterization purposes, static and dynamic load patterns are applied to the instrumented insert. Results show that the sensors are able to measure forces up to 1.5 times body weight with a sensitivity fitting the requirements for the proposed use. Dynamic testing of the insert shows a good tracking of slow and fast changing forces in the knee prosthesis by the sensors. PMID:25196007

  7. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  8. Force measuring optical tweezers system for long time measurements of P pili stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Magnus; Fällman, Erik; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2006-02-01

    A force-measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and long time measurements of the elongation and retraction of bacterial fimbriae from Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) under strain are presented. The instrumentation is presented in some detail. Special emphasis is given to measures taken to reduce the influence of noise and drifts in the system and from the surrounding, which makes long term force measurements possible. Individual P pili from UPEC bacteria were used as a biological model system for repetitive unfolding and refolding cycles of bacterial fimbriae under equilibrium conditions. P pili have evolved into a three-dimensional helix-like structure, the PapA rod, that can be successively and significantly elongated and/or unfolded when exposed to external forces. The instrumentation is used for characterization of the force-vs.-elongation response of the PapA rod of individual P pili, with emphasis on the long time stability of the forced unfolding and refolding of the helical structure of the PapA rod. The results show that the PapA rod is capable of withstanding extensive strain, leading to a complete unfolding of the helical structure, repetitive times during the life cycle of a bacterium without any noticeable alteration of the mechanical properties of the P pili. This function is believed to be importance for UPEC bacteria in vivo since it provides a close contact to a host cell (which is an initial step of invasion) despite urine cleaning attempts.

  9. Development of a measuring system of contact force during braille reading using an optical 6-axis force sensor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Oouchi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Shimojo, M; Shimada, S

    2006-01-01

    A system with an optical 6-axis force sensor was developed to measure contact force during braille reading. In using this system, we encountered two problems. One is a variability of output values depending on the contact point. This was solved by using two transformation techniques. The other is that subjects read braille in a different manner from the usual. We compared two manners of braille reading, one-handed vs two-handed, and found a small reduction in reading speed. Using this system, we collected data from four braille readers and quantitatively showed more minute contact force trajectories than those in earlier studies.

  10. Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin George; Garcia, Humberto Enrique; McKellar, Michael George

    2012-04-17

    Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

  11. The design and implementation of a windowing interface pinch force measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tze-Yee; Chen, Yuanu-Joan; Chung, Chin-Teng; Hsiao, Ming-Heng

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a novel windowing interface pinch force measurement system that is basically based on an USB (Universal Series Bus) microcontroller which mainly processes the sensing data from the force sensing resistance sensors mounted on five digits. It possesses several friendly functions, such as the value and curve trace of the applied force by a hand injured patient displayed in real time on a monitoring screen, consequently, not only the physician can easily evaluate the effect of hand injury rehabilitation, but also the patients get more progressive during the hand physical therapy by interacting with the screen of pinch force measurement. In order to facilitate the pinch force measurement system and make it friendly, the detail hardware design and software programming flowchart are described in this paper. Through a series of carefully and detailed experimental tests, first of all, the relationship between the applying force and the FSR sensors are measured and verified. Later, the different type of pinch force measurements are verified by the oscilloscope and compared with the corresponding values and waveform traces in the window interface display panel to obtain the consistency. Finally, a windowing interface pinch force measurement system based on the USB microcontroller is implemented and demonstrated. The experimental results show the verification and feasibility of the designed system.

  12. Floating frame grounding system. [for wind tunnel static force measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a floating frame grounding system (FFGS) for the 40- by 80-foot low speed wind tunnel facility at the NASA Ames Research Center National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex is addresssed. When electrical faults are detected, the FFGS ensures a ground path for the fault current. In addition, the FFGS alerts the tunnel operator when a mechanical foul occurs.

  13. A wearable force plate system for the continuous measurement of triaxial ground reaction force in biomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko

    2010-08-01

    The ambulatory measurement of ground reaction force (GRF) and human motion under free-living conditions is convenient, inexpensive and never restricted to gait analysis in a laboratory environment and is therefore much desired by researchers and clinical doctors in biomedical applications. A wearable force plate system was developed by integrating small triaxial force sensors and three-dimensional (3D) inertial sensors for estimating dynamic triaxial GRF in biomechanical applications. The system, in comparison to existent systems, is characterized by being lightweight, thin and easy-to-wear. A six-axial force sensor (Nitta Co., Japan) was used as a verification measurement device to validate the static accuracy of the developed force plate. To evaluate the precision during dynamic gait measurements, we compared the measurements of the triaxial GRF and the center of pressure (CoP) by using the developed system with the reference measurements made using a stationary force plate and an optical motion analysis system. The root mean square (RMS) differences of the two transverse components (x- and y-axes) and the vertical component (z-axis) of the GRF were 4.3 ± 0.9 N, 6.0 ± 1.3 N and 12.1 ± 1.1 N, respectively, corresponding to 5.1 ± 1.1% and 6.5 ± 1% of the maximum of each transverse component and 1.3 ± 0.2% of the maximum vertical component of GRF. The RMS distance between the two systems' CoP traces was 3.2 ± 0.8 mm, corresponding to 1.2 ± 0.3% of the length of the shoe. Moreover, based on the results of the assessment of the influence of the system on natural gait, we found that gait was almost never affected. Therefore, the wearable system as an alternative device can be a potential solution for measuring CoP and triaxial GRF in non-laboratory environments.

  14. A micropillar-based on-chip system for continuous force measurement of C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Ali; Nock, Volker; Johari, Shazlina; Blaikie, Richard; Chen, XiaoQi; Wang, Wenhui

    2012-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a well-established model organism and has been gaining interest particularly related to worm locomotion and the investigation of the relationship between muscle arms and the motion pattern of the nematode. In this paper, we report on a micropillar-based on-chip system which is capable of quantifying multi-point locomotive forces of a moving C. elegans. A Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device was microfabricated to allow C. elegans to move in a matrix of micropillars in a channel, and an image processing method was developed to resolve the worm force from the bending pillars. The current micropillar-based system is able to measure force with a resolution of 2.07 µN for body width of 80 µm. Initial experiments have been conducted to collect a maximum force level for thirteen wild type worm samples. A maximum force level of 61.94 µN was observed from 1571 data points, based on which an average maximum force level was 32.61 µN for multi-point measurements. The demonstrated capabilities of the system can be an enabling technology that allows biologist to gain a better understanding of subtle force patterns of C. elegans and worm muscle development.

  15. Evaluation of a force plate system for measuring center of pressure in railroad ballast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Merryweather, Andrew; Bloswick, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Traditional biomechanical analyses have focused primarily on the human gait across hard, flat surfaces and provide little information about human locomotion as a function of work environment or terrain. The purpose of this study was evaluation of a force plate system for measure of center of pressure (COP) in railroad ballast by comparing its accuracy across three surface conditions (hard surface, mainline ballast and walking ballast) with two configurations (level and 7° cross-slope). Custom walkways and an isolation fixture were developed to rigidly attach a force plate beneath ballast surfaces to collect the COP. The difference in COP location (ΔCOPx, y, z) between the force plate system and a calibration system (motion capture derived) were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results indicate that the effects of surface condition and configuration were not significant for ΔCOPx, y, z and no differences were found among the three surface conditions during pairwise comparison, though ΔCOPx, y, z were different between the center and corners of the force plate in ballasts for both level and cross-slope configurations. The system presented in this study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring the COP by using an isolation-fixture force plate to expand the scope of biomechanical studies on ballast surfaces that are level or cross-slope. PMID:27131198

  16. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  17. Design and Analysis of a Sensor System for Cutting Force Measurement in Machining Processes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qiaokang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Mao, Jianxu; Sun, Wei; Wang, Yaonan; Ge, Yunjian

    2016-01-01

    Multi-component force sensors have infiltrated a wide variety of automation products since the 1970s. However, one seldom finds full-component sensor systems available in the market for cutting force measurement in machine processes. In this paper, a new six-component sensor system with a compact monolithic elastic element (EE) is designed and developed to detect the tangential cutting forces Fx, Fy and Fz (i.e., forces along x-, y-, and z-axis) as well as the cutting moments Mx, My and Mz (i.e., moments about x-, y-, and z-axis) simultaneously. Optimal structural parameters of the EE are carefully designed via simulation-driven optimization. Moreover, a prototype sensor system is fabricated, which is applied to a 5-axis parallel kinematic machining center. Calibration experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of measuring cutting forces and moments with good linearity while minimizing coupling error. Both the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and calibration experimental studies validate the high performance of the proposed sensor system that is expected to be adopted into machining processes. PMID:26751451

  18. Design and Analysis of a Sensor System for Cutting Force Measurement in Machining Processes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiaokang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Mao, Jianxu; Sun, Wei; Wang, Yaonan; Ge, Yunjian

    2016-01-07

    Multi-component force sensors have infiltrated a wide variety of automation products since the 1970s. However, one seldom finds full-component sensor systems available in the market for cutting force measurement in machine processes. In this paper, a new six-component sensor system with a compact monolithic elastic element (EE) is designed and developed to detect the tangential cutting forces Fx, Fy and Fz (i.e., forces along x-, y-, and z-axis) as well as the cutting moments Mx, My and Mz (i.e., moments about x-, y-, and z-axis) simultaneously. Optimal structural parameters of the EE are carefully designed via simulation-driven optimization. Moreover, a prototype sensor system is fabricated, which is applied to a 5-axis parallel kinematic machining center. Calibration experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of measuring cutting forces and moments with good linearity while minimizing coupling error. Both the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and calibration experimental studies validate the high performance of the proposed sensor system that is expected to be adopted into machining processes.

  19. Design and Analysis of a Sensor System for Cutting Force Measurement in Machining Processes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiaokang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Mao, Jianxu; Sun, Wei; Wang, Yaonan; Ge, Yunjian

    2016-01-01

    Multi-component force sensors have infiltrated a wide variety of automation products since the 1970s. However, one seldom finds full-component sensor systems available in the market for cutting force measurement in machine processes. In this paper, a new six-component sensor system with a compact monolithic elastic element (EE) is designed and developed to detect the tangential cutting forces Fx, Fy and Fz (i.e., forces along x-, y-, and z-axis) as well as the cutting moments Mx, My and Mz (i.e., moments about x-, y-, and z-axis) simultaneously. Optimal structural parameters of the EE are carefully designed via simulation-driven optimization. Moreover, a prototype sensor system is fabricated, which is applied to a 5-axis parallel kinematic machining center. Calibration experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of measuring cutting forces and moments with good linearity while minimizing coupling error. Both the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and calibration experimental studies validate the high performance of the proposed sensor system that is expected to be adopted into machining processes. PMID:26751451

  20. Bite force measurement system using pressure-sensitive sheet and silicone impression material.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuya; Fuwa, Yuji; Kurosawa, Masahiro; Kondo, Takamasa; Goto, Shigemi

    2009-03-01

    This study was conducted to reduce the bias in measured values caused by the thickness of materials used in occlusal examinations. To this end, a silicone impression material for bite force measurement and an experimental model of a simplified stomatognathic system were employed in this study. By means of this experimental model, results showed that the effect of bias toward the posterior arch could be reduced in the anterior-posterior distribution of bite forces and in the occlusal contact areas due to the thickness of the materials used in occlusal examinations.

  1. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  2. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value. PMID:26827362

  3. Footbridge system identification using wireless inertial measurement units for force and response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, James Mark William; Bocian, Mateusz; Hester, David; Quattrone, Antonino; Hudson, William; Moore, Daniel; Goh, Sushma; Lim, Meng Sun

    2016-12-01

    With the main focus on safety, design of structures for vibration serviceability is often overlooked or mismanaged, resulting in some high profile structures failing publicly to perform adequately under human dynamic loading due to walking, running or jumping. A standard tool to inform better design, prove fitness for purpose before entering service and design retrofits is modal testing, a procedure that typically involves acceleration measurements using an array of wired sensors and force generation using a mechanical shaker. A critical but often overlooked aspect is using input (force) to output (response) relationships to enable estimation of modal mass, which is a key parameter directly controlling vibration levels in service. This paper describes the use of wireless inertial measurement units (IMUs), designed for biomechanics motion capture applications, for the modal testing of a 109 m footbridge. IMUs were first used for an output-only vibration survey to identify mode frequencies, shapes and damping ratios, then for simultaneous measurement of body accelerations of a human subject jumping to excite specific vibrations modes and build up bridge deck accelerations at the jumping location. Using the mode shapes and the vertical acceleration data from a suitable body landmark scaled by body mass, thus providing jumping force data, it was possible to create frequency response functions and estimate modal masses. The modal mass estimates for this bridge were checked against estimates obtained using an instrumented hammer and known mass distributions, showing consistency among the experimental estimates. Finally, the method was used in an applied research application on a short span footbridge where the benefits of logistical and operational simplicity afforded by the highly portable and easy to use IMUs proved extremely useful for an efficient evaluation of vibration serviceability, including estimation of modal masses.

  4. Measurement of external forces and torques on a large pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morenus, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Methods of measuring external forces and torques are discussed, in general and as applied to the Large Pointing System wind tunnel tests. The LPS tests were in two phases. The first test was a preliminary test of three models representing coelostat, heliostat, and on-gimbal telescope configurations. The second test explored the coelostat configuration in more detail. The second test used a different setup for measuring external loads. Some results are given from both tests.

  5. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  6. Testing the retention of attachments for implant overdentures - validation of an original force measurement system.

    PubMed

    Fromentin, O; Lassauzay, C; Abi Nader, S; Feine, J; de Albuquerque Junior, R F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate an original portable device to measure attachment retention of implant overdentures both in the lab and in clinical settings. The device was built with a digital force measurement gauge (Imada) secured to a vertical wheel stand associated with a customized support to hold and position the denture in adjustable angulations. Sixteen matrix and patrix cylindrical stud attachments (Locator) were randomly assigned as in vitro test specimens. Attachment abutments were secured in an implant analogue hung to the digital force gauge or to the load cell of a traction machine used as the gold standard (Instron Universal Testing Machine). Matrices were secured in a denture duplicate attached to the customized support, permitting reproducibility of their position on both pulling devices. Attachment retention in the axial direction was evaluated by measuring maximum dislodging force or peak load during five consecutive linear dislodgments of each attachment on both devices. After a wear simulation, retention was measured again at several time periods. The peak load measurements with the customized Imada device were similar to those obtained with the gold standard Instron machine. These findings suggest that the proposed portable device can provide accurate information on the retentive properties of attachment systems for removable dental prostheses.

  7. Force Measurement Improvements to the National Transonic Facility Sidewall Model Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodliff, Scott L.; Balakrishna, Sundareswara; Butler, David; Cagle, C. Mark; Chan, David; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II

    2016-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility is a transonic pressurized cryogenic facility. The development of the high Reynolds number semi-span capability has advanced over the years to include transonic active flow control and powered testing using the sidewall model support system. While this system can be used in total temperatures down to -250Â F for conventional unpowered configurations, it is limited to temperatures above -60Â F when used with powered models that require the use of the high-pressure air delivery system. Thermal instabilities and non-repeatable mechanical arrangements revealed several data quality shortfalls by the force and moment measurement system. Recent modifications to the balance cavity recirculation system have improved the temperature stability of the balance and metric model-to-balance hardware. Changes to the mechanical assembly of the high-pressure air delivery system, particularly hardware that interfaces directly with the model and balance, have improved the repeatability of the force and moment measurement system. Drag comparisons with the high-pressure air system removed will also be presented in this paper.

  8. Development of a Forced Oscillation System for Measuring Dynamic Derivatives of Fluidic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trieu, B. C.; Tyler, T. R.; Stewart, B. K.; Chamock, J. K.; Fisher, D. W.; Heim, E. H.; Brandon, J.; Grafton, S. B.

    2006-01-01

    A new Forced Oscillation System (FOS) has been designed and built at NASA Langley Research Center that provides new capabilities for aerodynamic researchers to investigate the dynamic derivatives of vehicle configurations. Test vehicles may include high performance and general aviation aircraft, re-entry spacecraft, submarines and other fluidic vehicles. The measured data from forced oscillation testing is used in damping characteristic studies and in simulation databases for control algorithm development and performance analyses. The newly developed FOS hardware provides new flexibility for conducting dynamic derivative studies. The design is based on a tracking principle where a desired motion profile is achieved via a fast closed-loop positional controller. The motion profile for the tracking system is numerically generated and thus not limited to sinusoidal motion. This approach permits non-traditional profiles such as constant velocity and Schroeder sweeps. Also, the new system permits changes in profile parameters including nominal offset angle, waveform, and associated parameters such as amplitude and frequency. Most importantly, the changes may be made remotely without halting the FOS and the tunnel. System requirements, system analysis, and the resulting design are addressed for a new FOS in the 12-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). The overall system including mechanical, electrical, and control subsystems is described. The design is complete, and the FOS has been built and installed in the 12-Foot LSWT. System integration and testing have verified design intent and safe operation. Currently it is being validated for wind-tunnel operations and aerodynamic testing. The system is a potential major enhancement to forced oscillation studies. The productivity gain from the motion profile automation will shorten the testing cycles needed for control surface and aircraft control algorithm development. The new motion capabilities also will serve as a test bed for

  9. Development of a Hybrid Atomic Force Microscopic Measurement System Combined with White Light Scanning Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system’s dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system’s good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method. PMID:22368463

  10. High-precision horizontally directed force measurements for high dead loads based on a differential electromagnetic force compensation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyan, Suren; Rivero, Michel; Schleichert, Jan; Halbedel, Bernd; Fröhlich, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an application for realizing high-precision horizontally directed force measurements in the order of several tens of nN in combination with high dead loads of about 10 N. The set-up is developed on the basis of two identical state-of-the-art electromagnetic force compensation (EMFC) high precision balances. The measurement resolution of horizontally directed single-axis quasi-dynamic forces is 20 nN over the working range of  ±100 μN. The set-up operates in two different measurement modes: in the open-loop mode the mechanical deflection of the proportional lever is an indication of the acting force, whereas in the closed-loop mode it is the applied electric current to the coil inside the EMFC balance that compensates deflection of the lever to the offset zero position. The estimated loading frequency (cutoff frequency) of the set-up in the open-loop mode is about 0.18 Hz, in the closed-loop mode it is 0.7 Hz. One of the practical applications that the set-up is suitable for is the flow rate measurements of low electrically conducting electrolytes by applying the contactless technique of Lorentz force velocimetry. Based on a previously developed set-up which uses a single EMFC balance, experimental, theoretical and numerical analyses of the thermo-mechanical properties of the supporting structure are presented.

  11. Single Cell Mass Measurement Using Drag Force Inside Lab-on-Chip Microfluidics System.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Single cell mass (SCM) is an intrinsic property of single cell, it arouses a great interest among scientists as cell mass depends on the synthesis of proteins, DNA replication, cell wall stiffness, cell cytoplasm density, cell growth, ribosome, and other analogous of organisms. To date, several great strides have been taken to the advancements of SCM measurement techniques. Nevertheless, more works are required to enable the technology to push frontier in deep analysis of SCM measurement, hence to elucidate intracellular properties. In this paper, we present a lab-on-chip microfluidics system for SCM measurement, related with the force required to drag a single cell and Newton's law of motion inside microfluidics channel. Drag force on the cell was generated by a pressure driven syringe micropump and the motion of the cell was measured using optical observation under an inverted microscope. This approach of measuring SCM was calibrated using known mass (77.3 pg) of a polystyrene particle of 5.2 μm diameter. Furthermore, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast cells of different sizes ([Formula: see text] diameter) for SCM measurement. Mass of 4.4 μm diameter of single yeast cell was measured as 2.12 pg which is in the range of previously reported single yeast cell mass (2-3 pg). In addition, we also studied the relation between SCM and single cell size. Results showed that single yeast cell mass increases exponentially with the increasing of single cell size.

  12. Single Cell Mass Measurement Using Drag Force Inside Lab-on-Chip Microfluidics System.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Single cell mass (SCM) is an intrinsic property of single cell, it arouses a great interest among scientists as cell mass depends on the synthesis of proteins, DNA replication, cell wall stiffness, cell cytoplasm density, cell growth, ribosome, and other analogous of organisms. To date, several great strides have been taken to the advancements of SCM measurement techniques. Nevertheless, more works are required to enable the technology to push frontier in deep analysis of SCM measurement, hence to elucidate intracellular properties. In this paper, we present a lab-on-chip microfluidics system for SCM measurement, related with the force required to drag a single cell and Newton's law of motion inside microfluidics channel. Drag force on the cell was generated by a pressure driven syringe micropump and the motion of the cell was measured using optical observation under an inverted microscope. This approach of measuring SCM was calibrated using known mass (77.3 pg) of a polystyrene particle of 5.2 μm diameter. Furthermore, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast cells of different sizes ([Formula: see text] diameter) for SCM measurement. Mass of 4.4 μm diameter of single yeast cell was measured as 2.12 pg which is in the range of previously reported single yeast cell mass (2-3 pg). In addition, we also studied the relation between SCM and single cell size. Results showed that single yeast cell mass increases exponentially with the increasing of single cell size. PMID:26761952

  13. System for measurement of headband force in hearing protection devices and audiometric equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamas-Llamas, Osvaldo; Razo-Razo, Jose-Noe

    2002-11-01

    Application force influences audiometric results and hearing protection devices (HPD) attenuation performance. In HPD attenuation testing it is neccessary to know the application force. Audiometric studies are being conducted with standardized values of the application force. Design and results of a measurement device for bands and headbands application force are presented. Error analysis in the range from 1N to 30N is carried out and the associated measurement uncertainty is estimated. The device provides settings for test distances from 70 mm to 140 mm (vertical axis), and 115 mm to 195 mm (horizontal axis), as required in most of the available standards related with HPD and audiometric equipment.

  14. Using optical tweezers for measuring the interaction forces between human bone cells and implant surfaces: System design and force calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Martin; Madgavkar, Ashwin; Stjerndahl, Maria; Wu, Yanrong; Tan, Weihong; Duran, Randy; Niehren, Stefan; Mustafa, Kamal; Arvidson, Kristina; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-07-15

    Optical tweezers were used to study the interaction and attachment of human bone cells to various types of medical implant materials. Ideally, the implant should facilitate cell attachment and promote migration of the progenitor cells in order to decrease the healing time. It is therefore of interest, in a controlled manner, to be able to monitor the cell adhesion process. Results from such studies would help foresee the clinical outcome of integrating medical implants. The interactions between two primary cell culture models, human gingival fibroblasts and bone forming human osteoblast cells, and three different implant materials, glass, titanium, and hydroxyapatite, were studied. A novel type of optical tweezers, which has a newly designed quadrant detector and a powerful 3 W laser was constructed and force calibrated using two different methods: one method in which the stiffness of the optical trap was obtained by monitoring the phase lag between the trap and the moved object when imposing a forced oscillation on the trapped object and another method in which the maximum trapping force was derived from the critical velocity at which the object escapes the trap. Polystyrene beads as well as cells were utilized for the calibrations. This is the first time that cells have been used directly for these types of force calibrations and, hence, direct measurements of forces exerted on cells can be performed, thus avoiding the difficulties often encountered when translating the results obtained from cell measurements to the calibrations obtained with reference materials. This more straightforward approach represents an advantage in comparison to established methods.

  15. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  16. Wave system fitting: A new method for force measurements in shock tunnels with long test duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Changtong; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Chun; Jiang, Zonglin

    2015-10-01

    Force measurements in shock tunnels are difficult due to the existence of vibrations excited by a sudden aerodynamic loading. Accelerometer inertia compensation could reduce its negative effect to some extent, but has inherent problems. A new signal decomposition method, wave system fitting (WSF), is proposed to remove vibration waves of low frequency. The WSF is accelerometer-free. It decomposes the balance signal and can separate vibration waves without the influence on the DC component, and it does work no matter the cycle of the sample signal is complete or not. As a standard signal post-processing tool in JF-12, the application results show that it works reliably with high accuracy, and it can also explain puzzling signals encountered in JF-12. WSF method is especially useful and irreplaceable whenever only a few cycles of a periodic signal could be obtained, as is usual for shock tunnels.

  17. Method and system for measuring gate valve clearances and seating force

    DOEpatents

    Casada, Donald A.; Haynes, Howard D.; Moyers, John C.; Stewart, Brian K.

    1996-01-01

    Valve clearances and seating force, as well as other valve operational parameters, are determined by measuring valve stem rotation during opening and closing operations of a translatable gate valve. The magnitude of the stem rotation, and the relative difference between the stem rotation on opening and closing provides valuable data on the valve internals in a non-intrusive manner.

  18. Method and system for measuring gate valve clearances and seating force

    DOEpatents

    Casada, D.A.; Haynes, H.D.; Moyers, J.C.; Stewart, B.K.

    1996-01-30

    Valve clearances and seating force, as well as other valve operational parameters, are determined by measuring valve stem rotation during opening and closing operations of a translatable gate valve. The magnitude of the stem rotation, and the relative difference between the stem rotation on opening and closing provides valuable data on the valve internals in a non-intrusive manner. 8 figs.

  19. High-Reynolds Number Active Blowing Semi-Span Force Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Rhew, Ray D.; Acheson, Michael J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent wind-tunnel tests at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility utilized high-pressure bellows to route air to the model for evaluating aircraft circulation control. The introduction of these bellows within the Sidewall Model Support System significantly impacted the performance of the external sidewall mounted semi-span balance. As a result of this impact on the semi-span balance measurement performance, it became apparent that a new capability needed to be built into the National Transonic Facility s infrastructure to allow for performing pressure tare calibrations on the balance in order to properly characterize its performance under the influence of static bellows pressure tare loads and bellows thermal effects. The objective of this study was to design both mechanical calibration hardware and an experimental calibration design that can be employed at the facility in order to efficiently and precisely perform the necessary loadings in order to characterize the semi-span balance under the influence of multiple calibration factors (balance forces/moments and bellows pressure/temperature). Using statistical design of experiments, an experimental design was developed allowing for strategically characterizing the behavior of the semi-span balance for use in circulation control and propulsion-type flow control testing at the National Transonic Facility.

  20. Development of a probing system for a micro-coordinate measuring machine by utilizing shear-force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, So; Kodama, Issei; Gao, Wei

    2014-06-01

    This paper introduces a newly developed probing system for a micro-coordinate measurement machine (micro-CMM) based on an interaction force generated by the water layer on the surface of the measuring object. In order to measure the dimensions of the micrometric structures, a probing system using a nanopipette ball stylus has been developed. A glass microsphere with diameter of 9 µm is used as a stylus tip of the probing system. The glass nanopipette, which is fabricated from a capillary glass tube by a thermal pulling process, is employed as a stylus shaft to improve the fixation strength of the stylus tip. The approach between the stylus tip and the surface of the measuring object can be detected by utilizing the method of shear-force detection. The stylus is oscillated in the lateral direction at its resonant frequency to detect an interaction force owing to the viscoelasticity of the meniscus layer existing on the surface of the measuring object. The oscillation amplitude is decreased by the shear-force applied to the stylus tip. In this study, the basic characteristics of the probing system including sensitivity, resolution and reproducibility are investigated. The experimental result of dimensional measurement of micrometer-scale structure is presented.

  1. Measuring Your Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, David E.

    2005-01-01

    This article talks about the force behind education leaders. With all the challenges facing public education today, it is difficult to remain focused and to remember why one chartered this particular leadership course. Perhaps someone respected encouraged one to take this path long ago. Perhaps this kind of service to the nation and its future…

  2. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05), and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017), indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017). The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits. PMID:26694399

  3. Measuring lung function using sound waves: role of the forced oscillation technique and impulse oscillometry system.

    PubMed

    Brashier, Bill; Salvi, Sundeep

    2015-03-01

    Measuring lung function is an important component in the decision making process for patients with obstructive airways disease (OAD). Not only does it help in arriving at a specific diagnosis, but it also helps in evaluating severity so that appropriate pharmacotherapy can be instituted, it helps determine prognosis and it helps evaluate response to therapy. Spirometry is currently the most commonly performed lung function test in clinical practice and is considered to be the gold standard diagnostic test for asthma and COPD. However, spirometry is not an easy test to perform because the forceful expiratory and inspiratory manoeuvres require good patient co-operation. Children aged <5 years, elderly people and those with physical and cognitive limitations cannot perform spirometry easily. PMID:26306104

  4. Measuring lung function using sound waves: role of the forced oscillation technique and impulse oscillometry system.

    PubMed

    Brashier, Bill; Salvi, Sundeep

    2015-03-01

    Measuring lung function is an important component in the decision making process for patients with obstructive airways disease (OAD). Not only does it help in arriving at a specific diagnosis, but it also helps in evaluating severity so that appropriate pharmacotherapy can be instituted, it helps determine prognosis and it helps evaluate response to therapy. Spirometry is currently the most commonly performed lung function test in clinical practice and is considered to be the gold standard diagnostic test for asthma and COPD. However, spirometry is not an easy test to perform because the forceful expiratory and inspiratory manoeuvres require good patient co-operation. Children aged <5 years, elderly people and those with physical and cognitive limitations cannot perform spirometry easily.

  5. COOLING FORCE MEASUREMENTS IN CELSIUS.

    SciTech Connect

    GALNANDER, B.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; ET AL.

    2005-09-18

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  6. Normal and system lupus erythematosus red blood cell interactions studied by double trap optical tweezers: direct measurements of aggregation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Eugeny V.; Zhdanov, Alexander G.; Rykova, Sophia Yu.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2012-02-01

    Direct measurements of aggregation forces in piconewton range between two red blood cells in pair rouleau are performed under physiological conditions using double trap optical tweezers. Aggregation and disaggregation properties of healthy and pathologic (system lupus erythematosis) blood samples are analyzed. Strong difference in aggregation speed and behavior is revealed using the offered method which is proposed to be a promising tool for SLE monitoring at single cell level.

  7. Floating chip mounting system driven by repulsive force of permanent magnets for multiple on-site SPR immunoassay measurements.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Tobita, Tatsuya; Miura, Toru; Iwasaki, Yuzuru; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Haga, Tsuneyuki; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-10-17

    We have developed a measurement chip installation/removal mechanism for a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay analysis instrument designed for frequent testing, which requires a rapid and easy technique for changing chips. The key components of the mechanism are refractive index matching gel coated on the rear of the SPR chip and a float that presses the chip down. The refractive index matching gel made it possible to optically couple the chip and the prism of the SPR instrument easily via elastic deformation with no air bubbles. The float has an autonomous attitude control function that keeps the chip parallel in relation to the SPR instrument by employing the repulsive force of permanent magnets between the float and a float guide located in the SPR instrument. This function is realized by balancing the upward elastic force of the gel and the downward force of the float, which experiences a leveling force from the float guide. This system makes it possible to start an SPR measurement immediately after chip installation and to remove the chip immediately after the measurement with a simple and easy method that does not require any fine adjustment. Our sensor chip, which we installed using this mounting system, successfully performed an immunoassay measurement on a model antigen (spiked human-IgG) in a model real sample (non-homogenized milk) that included many kinds of interfering foreign substances without any sample pre-treatment. The ease of the chip installation/removal operation and simple measurement procedure are suitable for frequent on-site agricultural, environmental and medical testing.

  8. Estimation of Prestress Force Distribution in Multi-Strand System of Prestressed Concrete Structures Using Field Data Measured by Electromagnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cho, Keunhee; Cho, Jeong-Rae; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Sung Yong; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Young-Hwan

    2016-08-18

    The recently developed smart strand can be used to measure the prestress force in the prestressed concrete (PSC) structure from the construction stage to the in-service stage. The higher cost of the smart strand compared to the conventional strand renders it unaffordable to replace all the strands by smart strands, and results in the application of only a limited number of smart strands in the PSC structure. However, the prestress forces developed in the strands of the multi-strand system frequently adopted in PSC structures differ from each other, which means that the prestress force in the multi-strand system cannot be obtained by simple proportional scaling using the measurement of the smart strand. Therefore, this study examines the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system to find the correlation between the prestress force measured by the smart strand and the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system. To that goal, the prestress force distribution was measured using electromagnetic sensors for various factors of the multi-strand system adopted on site in the fabrication of actual PSC girders. The results verified the possibility to assume normal distribution for the prestress force distribution per anchor head, and a method computing the mean and standard deviation defining the normal distribution is proposed. This paper presents a meaningful finding by proposing an estimation method of the prestress force based upon field-measured data of the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system of actual PSC structures.

  9. Contact sensing from force measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicchi, Antonio; Salisbury, J. K.; Brock, David L.

    1993-01-01

    This article addresses contact sensing (i.e., the problem of resolving the location of a contact, the force at the interface, and the moment about the contact normals). Called 'intrinsic' contact sensing for the use of internal force and torque measurements, this method allows for practical devices that provide simple, relevant contact information in practical robotic applications. Such sensors have been used in conjunction with robot hands to identify objects, determine surface friction, detect slip, augment grasp stability, measure object mass, probe surfaces, and control collision and for a variety of other useful tasks. This article describes the theoretical basis for their operation and provides a framework for future device design.

  10. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

    1999-03-30

    A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  11. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, Scott T.; Niemann, Ralph C.

    1999-01-01

    A device for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed.

  12. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid-DMSO-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Alex M; Donaldson, Stephen H; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-08-25

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO-lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO-water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems.

  13. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid–DMSO–H2O system

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Alex M.; Donaldson, Stephen H.; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO–lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO–water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems. PMID:26261313

  14. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  15. A wearable ground reaction force sensor system and its application to the measurement of extrinsic gait variability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko

    2010-01-01

    Wearable sensors for gait analysis are attracting wide interest. In this paper, a wearable ground reaction force (GRF) sensor system and its application to measure extrinsic gait variability are presented. To validate the GRF and centre of pressure (CoP) measurements of the sensor system and examine the effectiveness of the proposed method for gait analysis, we conducted an experimental study on seven volunteer subjects. Based on the assessment of the influence of the sensor system on natural gait, we found that no significant differences were found for almost all measured gait parameters (p-values < 0.05). As for measurement accuracy, the root mean square (RMS) differences for the two transverse components and the vertical component of the GRF were 7.2% ± 0.8% and 9.0% ± 1% of the maximum of each transverse component and 1.5% ± 0.9% of the maximum vertical component of GRF, respectively. The RMS distance between both CoP measurements was 1.4% ± 0.2% of the length of the shoe. The area of CoP distribution on the foot-plate and the average coefficient of variation of the triaxial GRF, are the introduced parameters for analysing extrinsic gait variability. Based on a statistical analysis of the results of the tests with subjects wearing the sensor system, we found that the proposed parameters changed according to walking speed and turning (p-values < 0.05).

  16. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  17. A clamping force measurement system for monitoring the condition of bolted joints on railway track joints and points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfa, B.; Horler, G.; Thobiani, F. Al; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    Many industrial structures associated with railway infrastructures rely on a large number of bolted joint connections to ensure safe and reliable operation of the track and trackside furniture. Significant sums of money are spent annually to repair the damage caused by bolt failures and to maintain the integrity of bolted structures. In the UK, Network Rail (the organization responsible for rail network maintenance and safety) conducts corrective and preventive maintenance manually on 26,000 sets of points (each having approximately 30 bolted joints per set), in order to ensure operational success and safety for the travelling public. Such manual maintenance is costly, disruptive, unreliable and prone to human error. The aim of this work is to provide a means of automatically measuring the clamping force of each individual bolted joint, by means of an instrumented washer. This paper describes the development of a sensor means to be used in the washer, which satisfies the following criteria. Sense changes in the clamping force of the joint and report this fact. Provide compatibility with the large dynamic range of clamping force. Satisfy the limitations in terms of physical size. Provide the means to electronically interface with the washer. Provide a means of powering the washer in situ. Provide a solution at an acceptable cost. Specifically the paper focuses on requirements 1, 2 and 3 and presents the results that support further development of the proposed design and the realization of a pre-prototype system. In the paper, various options for the force sensing element (strain gage, capacitor, piezo-resistive) have been compared, using design optimization techniques. As a result of the evaluation, piezo-resistive sensors in concert with a proprietary force attenuation method, have been found to offer the best performance and cost trade-off The performance of the novel clamping force sensor has been evaluated experimentally and the results show that a smart washer

  18. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  19. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  20. Design and realization of controllable measuring force profilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen; Wang, Shuzhen; Chang, Suping

    2010-08-01

    In this paper the mechanical model of measuring rod of traditional stylus profilometer is established and the analysis results show that the measuring force is changed with rotation angle of the measuring rod. The impact on profile measurement of unsteady measuring force and the necessity of measuring surface of different materials with different constant measuring force are also discussed. The mechanical relations between the measuring rod and the surface are simplified by the structural change of measuring rod and a gravity center adjustment device. A voice coil motor (VCM) is added into the measuring system to control the measuring force. By adjusting the current in the coil of the VCM in real time, the measuring force can be controlled. With the controllable force, different workpieces can be measured by using different constant measuring force and the measurement results of different workpieces are given.

  1. Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  2. Measure Guideline. Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  3. Estimation of Prestress Force Distribution in Multi-Strand System of Prestressed Concrete Structures Using Field Data Measured by Electromagnetic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Keunhee; Cho, Jeong-Rae; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Sung Yong; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Young-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The recently developed smart strand can be used to measure the prestress force in the prestressed concrete (PSC) structure from the construction stage to the in-service stage. The higher cost of the smart strand compared to the conventional strand renders it unaffordable to replace all the strands by smart strands, and results in the application of only a limited number of smart strands in the PSC structure. However, the prestress forces developed in the strands of the multi-strand system frequently adopted in PSC structures differ from each other, which means that the prestress force in the multi-strand system cannot be obtained by simple proportional scaling using the measurement of the smart strand. Therefore, this study examines the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system to find the correlation between the prestress force measured by the smart strand and the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system. To that goal, the prestress force distribution was measured using electromagnetic sensors for various factors of the multi-strand system adopted on site in the fabrication of actual PSC girders. The results verified the possibility to assume normal distribution for the prestress force distribution per anchor head, and a method computing the mean and standard deviation defining the normal distribution is proposed. This paper presents a meaningful finding by proposing an estimation method of the prestress force based upon field-measured data of the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system of actual PSC structures. PMID:27548172

  4. Estimation of Prestress Force Distribution in Multi-Strand System of Prestressed Concrete Structures Using Field Data Measured by Electromagnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cho, Keunhee; Cho, Jeong-Rae; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Sung Yong; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Young-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The recently developed smart strand can be used to measure the prestress force in the prestressed concrete (PSC) structure from the construction stage to the in-service stage. The higher cost of the smart strand compared to the conventional strand renders it unaffordable to replace all the strands by smart strands, and results in the application of only a limited number of smart strands in the PSC structure. However, the prestress forces developed in the strands of the multi-strand system frequently adopted in PSC structures differ from each other, which means that the prestress force in the multi-strand system cannot be obtained by simple proportional scaling using the measurement of the smart strand. Therefore, this study examines the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system to find the correlation between the prestress force measured by the smart strand and the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system. To that goal, the prestress force distribution was measured using electromagnetic sensors for various factors of the multi-strand system adopted on site in the fabrication of actual PSC girders. The results verified the possibility to assume normal distribution for the prestress force distribution per anchor head, and a method computing the mean and standard deviation defining the normal distribution is proposed. This paper presents a meaningful finding by proposing an estimation method of the prestress force based upon field-measured data of the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system of actual PSC structures. PMID:27548172

  5. The preliminary checkout, evaluation and calibration of a 3-component force measurement system for calibrating propulsion simulators for wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The propulsion simulator calibration laboratory (PSCL) in which calibrations can be performed to determine the gross thrust and airflow of propulsion simulators installed in wind tunnel models is described. The preliminary checkout, evaluation and calibration of the PSCL's 3 component force measurement system is reported. Methods and equipment were developed for the alignment and calibration of the force measurement system. The initial alignment of the system demonstrated the need for more efficient means of aligning system's components. The use of precision alignment jigs increases both the speed and accuracy with which the system is aligned. The calibration of the force measurement system shows that the methods and equipment for this procedure can be successful.

  6. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    , velocity, and acceleration sensors. This research demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining induced drag and lift forces through the use of distributed sensor technology with measured strain data. An active induced drag control system thus can be designed using the two computed aerodynamic forces, induced drag and lift, to improve the fuel efficiency of an aircraft. Interpolation elements between structural finite element grids and the CFD grids and centroids are successfully incorporated with the unsteady aeroelastic computation scheme. The most critical technology for the success of the proposed approach is the robust on-line parameter estimator, since the least-squares curve fitting method depends heavily on aeroelastic system frequencies and damping factors.

  7. Calibration of lateral force measurements in atomic force microscopy with a piezoresistive force sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Hui; Vitard, Julien; Haliyo, Sinan; Regnier, Stephane

    2008-03-15

    We present here a method to calibrate the lateral force in the atomic force microscope. This method makes use of an accurately calibrated force sensor composed of a tipless piezoresistive cantilever and corresponding signal amplifying and processing electronics. Two ways of force loading with different loading points were compared by scanning the top and side edges of the piezoresistive cantilever. Conversion factors between the lateral force and photodiode signal using three types of atomic force microscope cantilevers with rectangular geometries (normal spring constants from 0.092 to 1.24 N/m and lateral stiffness from 10.34 to 101.06 N/m) were measured in experiments using the proposed method. When used properly, this method calibrates the conversion factors that are accurate to {+-}12.4% or better. This standard has less error than the commonly used method based on the cantilever's beam mechanics. Methods such of this allow accurate and direct conversion between lateral forces and photodiode signals without any knowledge of the cantilevers and the laser measuring system.

  8. Determination of Gibbs Energy of Formation of Molybdenum-Boron Binary System by Electromotive Force Measurement Using Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Morishita, Masao; Yamamoto, Takeo; Furukawa, Kazuma

    2011-02-01

    The standard Gibbs energies of formation of Mo2B, αMoB, Mo2B5, and MoB4 in the molybdenum-boron binary system were determined by measuring electromotive forces of galvanic cells using an Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 solid oxide electrolyte. The results are as follows: begin{aligned} Updelta_{{f}} {{G}}^circ ( {{{Mo}}2 {{B}}} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} & = - 193100 + 44.10T ± 700( {1198{{ K to }}1323{{ K}}( {925^circ {{C to }}1050^circ {{C}}} )} ) \\ Updelta_{{f}} {{G}}^circ (α {{MoB}})/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} & = - 164000 + 26.45T ± 700( {1213{{ K to }}1328{{ K}}( {940^circ {{C to }}1055^circ {{C}}} )} ) \\ Updelta_{{f}} {{G}}^circ ( {{{Mo}}2 {{B}}5 } )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} & = - 622500 + 117.0T ± 3000( {1205{{ K to }}1294{{ K}}( {932^circ {{C to }}1021^circ {{C}}} )} ) \\ Updelta_{{f}} {{G}}^circ ( {{{MoB}}4 } )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} & = - 387300 + 93.53T ± 3000( {959{{ K to }}1153{{ K}}( {686^circ {{C to }}880^circ {{C}}} )} ) \\ where the standard pressure is 1 bar (100 kPa).

  9. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  10. Age and Sex Differences in Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computing Bar Chart Target-Pursuit System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the age and sex differences in controlled force exertion measured by the bar chart display in 207 males (age 42.1 [plus or minus] 19.8 years) and 249 females (age 41.7 [plus or minus] 19.1 years) aged 15 to 86 years. The subjects matched their submaximal grip strength to changing demand values, which appeared as a…

  11. Force measurements in aerodynamics using piezoelectric multicomponent force transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewe, G.

    The present paper is concerned with a device for the measurement of steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces in a wind tunnel test. The paper represents a continuation of an article written by Schewe (1982) about a multicomponent balance consisting of piezoelectric force transducers for a high-pressure wind tunnel. Advantages of the piezoelectric force-measuring technique compared to other techniques are related to the high rigidity of the quartz crystal sensor elements, taking into account low interference (cross talk) for multicomponent measurements, high natural frequency, and broad dynamic range. It is pointed out that the limitations with respect to quasi-static measurements imposed by the drift of the zero point are not as extensive as generally believed, while drift correction methods improve the measurement accuracy.

  12. Force Measurements in Vibration and Acoustic Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of triaxial, piezoelectric force gages and the associated signal processing is a precursor to several dynamics testing innovations. This new technology is applicable to spacecraft programs that JPL manages. An application of force measurement is force limiting (when testing spacecraft in random vibration tests). Base-drive and acoustic modal testing is a potential application.

  13. Interaction of cement model systems with superplasticizers investigated by atomic force microscopy, zeta potential, and adsorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Lucia; Kaufmann, Josef; Winnefeld, Frank; Plank, Johann

    2010-07-01

    Polyelectrolyte-based dispersants are commonly used in a wide range of industrial applications to provide specific workability to colloidal suspensions. Their working mechanism is based on adsorption onto the surfaces of the suspended particles. The adsorbed polymer layer can exercise an electrostatic and/or a steric effect which is responsible for achieving dispersion. This study is focused on the dispersion forces induced by polycarboxylate ether-based superplasticizers (PCEs) commonly used in concrete. They are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) applying standard silicon nitride tips exposed to solutions with different ionic compositions in a wet cell. Adsorption isotherms and zeta potential analysis were performed to characterize polymer displacement in the AFM system on nonreactive model substrates (quartz, mica, calcite, and magnesium oxide) in order to avoid the complexity of cement hydration products. The results show that PCE is strongly adsorbed by positively charged materials. This fact reveals that, being silicon nitride naturally positively charged, in most cases the superplasticizer adsorbs preferably on the silicon nitride tip than on the AFM substrate. However, the force-distance curves displayed repulsive interactions between tip and substrates even when polymer was poorly adsorbed on both. These observations allow us to conclude that the dispersion due to PCE strongly depends on the particle charge. It differs between colloids adsorbing and not adsorbing PCE, and leads to different forces acting between the particles.

  14. Rigid two-axis MEMS force plate for measuring cellular traction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Jung, Uijin G.; Kan, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-10-01

    Cellular traction force is one of the important factors for understanding cell behaviors, such as spreading, migration and differentiation. Cells are known to change their behavior according to the mechanical stiffness of the environment. However, the measurement of cell traction forces on a rigid environment has remained difficult. This paper reports a micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) force plate that provides a cellular traction force measurement on a rigid substrate. Both the high force sensitivity and high stiffness of the substrate were obtained using piezoresistive sensing elements. The proposed force plate consists of a 70 µm  ×  15 µm  ×  5 µm base as the substrate for cultivating a bovine aortic smooth muscle cell, and the supporting beams with piezoresistors on the sidewall and the surface were used to measure the forces in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The spring constant and force resolution of the fabricated force plate in the horizontal direction were 0.2 N m-1 and less than 0.05 µN, respectively. The cell traction force was measured, and the traction force increased by approximately 1 µN over 30 min. These results demonstrate that the proposed force plate is applicable as an effective traction force measurement.

  15. Progress toward photon force-based sensors: a system identification approach based on laser intensity modulation for measurement of the axial force constant of a single-beam gradient photon force t

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin J. H.; David, Robert; Graham, Matthew R.; Hunter, Ian W.

    1999-08-01

    New sensor technologies with the sensitivity and specificity capable of detecting biological and chemical agents at low concentration are of increasing importance for many environmental monitoring applications. We propose a potentially new class of microsensors that exploits the mechanical dynamics of a micrometer-sized particle held in a 3D optical force trap formed by a focused laser beam. Modulation of the laser trapping power axially perturbs the microparticle from its equilibrium position and permits measurement of the mechanical compliance transfer function (force input, displacement output) characterizing the particle micromechanical dynamics. In a mechanically homogeneous and isotropic environment, the particle motion is readily modeled as a forced harmonic oscillator; however, physico-chemical interactions between the particle and its surroundings impose external forces that modify the compliance transfer function. Our preliminary measurements indicate < 10 ppm changes in mass of a trapped microparticle can be detected with this method, suggesting possible applications as a chemical/biological sensor or for solubility measurements of microparticles.

  16. Force optimized recoil control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. E.; Radkiewicz, R. J.; Gartner, R. F.

    1982-05-01

    Reduction of the recoil force of high rate of fire automatic guns was proven effective. This system will allow consideration of more powerful guns for use in both helicopter and armored personnel carrier applications. By substituting the large shock loads of firing guns with a nearly constant force, both vibration and fatigue problems that prevent mounting of powerful automatic guns is eliminated.

  17. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  18. Trends of measured climate forcing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, James E.; Sato, Makiko

    2001-12-01

    * National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY 10025; and Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University Earth Institute, New York, NY 10025 Contributed by James E. Hansen, October 16, 2001 The growth rate of climate forcing by measured greenhouse gases peaked near 1980 at almost 5 W/m2 per century. This growth rate has since declined to 3 W/m2 per century, largely because of cooperative international actions. We argue that trends can be reduced to the level needed for the moderate "alternative" climate scenario (≈2 W/m2 per century for the next 50 years) by means of concerted actions that have other benefits, but the forcing reductions are not automatic "co-benefits" of actions that slow CO2 emissions. Current trends of climate forcings by aerosols remain very uncertain. Nevertheless, practical constraints on changes in emission levels suggest that global warming at a rate +0.15 ± 0.05°C per decade will occur over the next several decades.

  19. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  20. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Goodman, Miriam B.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-04-01

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or "clamps" the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of μN force and nm up to tens of μm displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  1. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  2. Laser safety evaluation and output measurements for the VITAL -2 Variable Intensity Tactical Aiming Light (laser) used with the Proforce M-4 system in force-on-force exercises.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-02-01

    A laser safety hazard evaluation and pertinent output measurements were performed (June 2003 through August 2003) on several VITAL-2 Variable Intensity Tactical Aiming Light--infrared laser, associated with the Proforce M-4 system used in force-on-force exercises. The VITAL-2 contains two diode lasers presenting 'Extended Source' viewing out to a range on the order of 1.3 meters before reverting to a 'Small Source' viewing hazard. Laser hazard evaluation was performed in concert with the ANSI Std. Z136.1-2000 for the safe use of lasers and the ANSI Std. Z136.6-2000 for the safe use of lasers outdoors. The results of the laser hazard analysis for the VITAL-2, indicates that this Tactical Aiming IR laser presents a Class 1 laser hazard to personnel in the area of use. Field measurements performed on 71 units confirmed that the radiant outputs were at all times below the Allowable Emission Limit and that the irradiance of the laser spot was at all locations below the Maximum Exposure Limit. This system is eye-safe and it may be used under current SNL policy in force-on-force exercises. The VITAL-2 Variable Intensity Tactical Aiming Light does not present a laser hazard greater than Class 1, to aided viewing with binoculars.

  3. Retention force measurement of telescopic crowns.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Stefan; Stark, Helmut; Mues, Sebastian; Keilig, Ludger; Schrader, Anja; Enkling, Norbert

    2010-10-01

    This study deals with the determination of the retentive force between primary and secondary telescopic crowns under clinical conditions. Forty-three combined fixed-removable prostheses with a total of 140 double crowns were used for retention force measurement of the telescopic crowns prior to cementation. The crowns had a preparation of 1-2°. A specifically designed measuring device was used. The retentive forces were measured with and without lubrication by a saliva substitute. The measured values were analyzed according to the type of tooth (incisors, canines, premolars, and molars). Additionally, a comparison between lubricated and unlubricated telescopic crowns was done. As maximum retention force value 29.98 N was recorded with a telescopic crown on a molar, while the minimum of 0.08 N was found with a specimen on a canine. The median value of retention force of all telescopic crowns reached 1.93 N with an interquartile distance of 4.35 N. No statistically significant difference between lubricated and unlubricated specimens was found. The results indicate that retention force values of telescopic crowns, measured in clinical practice, are often much lower than those cited in the literature. The measurements also show a wide range. Whether this proves to be a problem for the patient's quality of life or not can however only be established by a comparison of the presented results with a follow-up study involving measurement of intraoral retention and determination by e.g. oral health impact profile.

  4. Gage measures electrical connector pin retention force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The retention force of a female connector pin is measured by observing the action of a calibrated spring in a gage consisting of housing, a plunger terminating in a male subminiature connector pin, and the tension spring.

  5. Micromechanical apparatus for measurement of forces

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, Danelle Mary; Allen, James Joe

    2004-05-25

    A new class of micromechanical dynamometers has been disclosed which are particularly suited to fabrication in parallel with other microelectromechanical apparatus. Forces in the microNewton regime and below can be measured with such dynamometers which are based on a high-compliance deflection element (e.g. a ring or annulus) suspended above a substrate for deflection by an applied force, and one or more distance scales for optically measuring the deflection.

  6. Forces in rotary motion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilsch, Markus K.; Elliott, Gregory K.

    2008-09-01

    In many coating chambers substrates are moved by simple or planetary rotary motion systems. Isaac Newton already taught that an object in uniform motion tends to stay in uniform motion unless acted upon by a net external force. To move a substrate on a rotary trajectory, centripetal and gravitational forces must act upon the substrate. The substrate must be somehow confined. Confinement options range from firm attachment to a fixture to loose placement in a pocket. Depending on the rotary motion pattern, a loosely held substrate may slide once against a confinement boundary and then stay, or may constantly slide around. 'Rattling around' may be undesirable as it could lead to edge destruction, debris formation, precession of the substrate, and other adverse effects. Firm attachment is advantageous in most cases, but often adds process complexity. We examine the forces present on substrates in typical rotary motion systems and discuss the implications of different confinement methods.

  7. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas; Mota, David F.

    2007-12-15

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models.

  8. An ABS control logic based on wheel force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, D.; Galvagno, E.; Ondrak, V.; van Leeuwen, B.; Vigliani, A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents an anti-lock braking system (ABS) control logic based on the measurement of the longitudinal forces at the hub bearings. The availability of force information allows to design a logic that does not rely on the estimation of the tyre-road friction coefficient, since it continuously tries to exploit the maximum longitudinal tyre force. The logic is designed by means of computer simulation and then tested on a specific hardware in the loop test bench: the experimental results confirm that measured wheel force can lead to a significant improvement of the ABS performances in terms of stopping distance also in the presence of road with variable friction coefficient.

  9. Reliable measurements of interfacial slip by colloid probe atomic force microscopy. II. Hydrodynamic force measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liwen; Attard, Phil; Neto, Chiara

    2011-06-01

    Here we report a new study on the boundary conditions for the flow of a simple liquid in a confined geometry obtained by measuring hydrodynamic drainage forces with colloid probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). In this work, we provide experimental data obtained using a best practice experimental protocol and fitted with a new theoretical calculation (Zhu, L.; Attard, P.; Neto, C. Langmuir 2010, submitted for publication, preceding paper). We investigated the hydrodynamic forces acting on a silica colloid probe approaching a hydrophobized silicon surface in a single-component viscous Newtonian liquid (di-n-octylphthalate), a partially wetting system. The measured average slip lengths were in the range of 24-31 nm at approach velocities of between 10 and 80 μm/s. Using our experimental approach, the presence of nanoparticle contaminants in the system can be indentified, which is important because it has been shown that nanoparticles lead to a large apparent slip length. Under our stringent control of experimental conditions, the measurement of the slip length is reproducible and independent of the spring constant of the cantilever.

  10. Biomolecular interactions measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, O H; Snel, M M; Cambi, A; Greve, J; De Grooth, B G; Figdor, C G

    2000-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is nowadays frequently applied to determine interaction forces between biological molecules. Starting with the detection of the first discrete unbinding forces between ligands and receptors by AFM only several years ago, measurements have become more and more quantitative. At the same time, theories have been developed to describe and understand the dynamics of the unbinding process and experimental techniques have been refined to verify this theory. In addition, the detection of molecular recognition forces has been exploited to map and image the location of binding sites. In this review we discuss the important contributions that have led to the development of this field. In addition, we emphasize the potential of chemically well-defined surface modification techniques to further improve reproducible measurements by AFM. This increased reproducibility will pave the way for a better understanding of molecular interactions in cell biology.

  11. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young's moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young's moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  12. Measuring pulsatile forces on the human cranium.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Cory S; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Midha, Rajiv; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic stresses in the cranium caused by pulsation of the brain play an important role in the design of materials for cranioplasty, as well as craniofacial development. However, these stresses have never been quantified. In this study, the force in the epidural space against the cranium was measured intraoperatively in 10 patients using a miniature force probe. Heart and ventilatory rates computed from the force tracing correlated closely with the corresponding measured values in the patients, confirming that the forces measured were indeed a result of brain pulsation. The mean outward systolic normal and tangential stresses were 54.2 kilo-Pascals (kPa) and 345.4 kPa, respectively. The systolic shear stress was 199.8 kPa. Through mechanotransduction, these stresses play a role in cranial development. The calculated yield stress of a cranioplasty repair was 0.4 MPa, which is within one order of magnitude of the known strength of common calcium-phosphate cements. This indicates a possible relation of these pulsatile forces and occult failure of calcium-phosphate cement cranioplasties through material fatigue.

  13. Measuring forces between protein fibers by microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Wang, J C; Briehl, R W; Turner, M S

    2005-04-01

    We propose a general scheme for measuring the attraction between mechanically frustrated semiflexible fibers by measuring their thermal fluctuations and shape. We apply this analysis to a system of sickle hemoglobin (HbS) fibers that laterally attract one another. These fibers appear to "zip" together before reaching mechanical equilibrium due to the existence of cross-links into a dilute fiber network. We are also able to estimate the rigidities of the fibers. These rigidities are found to be consistent with sickle hemoglobin "single" fibers 20 nm in diameter, despite recent experiments indicating that fiber bundling sometimes occurs. Our estimate of the magnitude of the interfiber attraction for HbS fibers is in the range 8 +/- 7 kBT/microm, or 4 +/- 3 k(B)T/microm if the fibers are assumed, a priori to be single fibers (such an assumption is fully consistent with the data). This value is sufficient to bind the fibers, overcoming entropic effects, although extremely chemically weak. Our results are compared to models for the interfiber attraction that include depletion and van der Waals forces. This technique should also facilitate a similar analysis of other filamentous protein assembles in the future, including beta-amyloid, actin, and tubulin.

  14. Vehicle lateral state estimation based on measured tyre forces.

    PubMed

    Tuononen, Ari J

    2009-01-01

    Future active safety systems need more accurate information about the state of vehicles. This article proposes a method to evaluate the lateral state of a vehicle based on measured tyre forces. The tyre forces of two tyres are estimated from optically measured tyre carcass deflections and transmitted wirelessly to the vehicle body. The two remaining tyres are so-called virtual tyre sensors, the forces of which are calculated from the real tyre sensor estimates. The Kalman filter estimator for lateral vehicle state based on measured tyre forces is presented, together with a simple method to define adaptive measurement error covariance depending on the driving condition of the vehicle. The estimated yaw rate and lateral velocity are compared with the validation sensor measurements. PMID:22291535

  15. Vehicle Lateral State Estimation Based on Measured Tyre Forces

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2009-01-01

    Future active safety systems need more accurate information about the state of vehicles. This article proposes a method to evaluate the lateral state of a vehicle based on measured tyre forces. The tyre forces of two tyres are estimated from optically measured tyre carcass deflections and transmitted wirelessly to the vehicle body. The two remaining tyres are so-called virtual tyre sensors, the forces of which are calculated from the real tyre sensor estimates. The Kalman filter estimator for lateral vehicle state based on measured tyre forces is presented, together with a simple method to define adaptive measurement error covariance depending on the driving condition of the vehicle. The estimated yaw rate and lateral velocity are compared with the validation sensor measurements. PMID:22291535

  16. Direct measurements of the frequency-dependent dielectrophoresis force.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Junio, Joseph; Ou-Yang, H Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the phenomenon of directed motion of electrically polarizable particles in a nonuniform electric field, is promising for applications in biochemical separation and filtration. For colloidal particles in suspension, the relaxation of the ionic species in the shear layer gives rise to a frequency-dependent, bidirectional DEP force in the radio frequency range. However, quantification methods of the DEP force on individual particles with the pico-Newton resolution required for the development of theories and design of device applications are lacking. We report the use of optical tweezers as a force sensor and a lock-in phase-sensitive technique for analysis of the particle motion in an amplitude modulated DEP force. The coherent detection and sensing scheme yielded not only unprecedented sensitivity for DEP force measurements, but also provided a selectivity that clearly distinguishes the pure DEP force from all the other forces in the system, including electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, heat-induced convection, and Brownian forces, all of which can hamper accurate measurements through other existing methods. Using optical tweezers-based force transducers already developed in our laboratory, we have results that quantify the frequency-dependent DEP force and the crossover frequency of individual particles with this new experimental method. PMID:19693384

  17. Variable Acceleration Force Calibration System (VACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Landman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, force balances have been calibrated manually, using a complex system of free hanging precision weights, bell cranks, and/or other mechanical components. Conventional methods may provide sufficient accuracy in some instances, but are often quite complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four man-weeks to complete each full calibration. To ensure accuracy, gravity-based loading is typically utilized. However, this often causes difficulty when applying loads in three simultaneous, orthogonal axes. A complex system of levers, cranks, and cables must be used, introducing increased sources of systematic error, and significantly increasing the time and labor intensity required to complete the calibration. One aspect of the VACS is a method wherein the mass utilized for calibration is held constant, and the acceleration is changed to thereby generate relatively large forces with relatively small test masses. Multiple forces can be applied to a force balance without changing the test mass, and dynamic forces can be applied by rotation or oscillating acceleration. If rotational motion is utilized, a mass is rigidly attached to a force balance, and the mass is exposed to a rotational field. A large force can be applied by utilizing a large rotational velocity. A centrifuge or rotating table can be used to create the rotational field, and fixtures can be utilized to position the force balance. The acceleration may also be linear. For example, a table that moves linearly and accelerates in a sinusoidal manner may also be utilized. The test mass does not have to move in a path that is parallel to the ground, and no re-leveling is therefore required. Balance deflection corrections may be applied passively by monitoring the orientation of the force balance with a three-axis accelerometer package. Deflections are measured during each test run, and adjustments with respect to the true applied load can be made during the post-processing stage. This paper will

  18. Simplified fundamental force and mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The watt balance relates force or mass to the Planck constant h, the metre and the second. It enables the forthcoming redefinition of the unit of mass within the SI by measuring the Planck constant in terms of mass, length and time with an uncertainty of better than 2 parts in 108. To achieve this, existing watt balances require complex and time-consuming alignment adjustments limiting their use to a few national metrology laboratories. This paper describes a simplified construction and operating principle for a watt balance which eliminates the need for the majority of these adjustments and is readily scalable using either electromagnetic or electrostatic actuators. It is hoped that this will encourage the more widespread use of the technique for a wide range of measurements of force or mass. For example: thrust measurements for space applications which would require only measurements of electrical quantities and velocity/displacement.

  19. Genetically encoded force sensors for measuring mechanical forces in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    There are three sources of free energy for cells: chemical potential, electrical potential and mechanical potential. There is little known about the last one since there have not been simple ways to measure stress in proteins in cells. we have now developed genetically encoded force sensors to assess the stress in fibrous proteins in living cells. These FReT based fluorescence sensors can be read out at video rates and provide real time maps of the stress distribution in cells, tissues and animals. The sensors can be inserted into specific proteins and in general do not disturb the normal function or anatomy. The original sensors used mutant GFPs linked by elastic linkers. These sensors provide a linear output with applied stress but the response is linear in strain. To improve contrast and dynamic range we have now developed a new class of sensors that are smaller making them less invasive, and have much higher intrinsic sensitivity since force modulates the angle between the donor and acceptor much more than the distance between them. Known as cpstFRET, the probe shows improved biocompatibility, wider dynamic range and higher sensitivity. PMID:21966553

  20. Atomic force microscopy measurements of intermolecular binding forces.

    PubMed

    Misevic, Gradimir N; Karamanos, Yannis; Misevic, Nikola J

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of intermolecular binding strength between a single pair of complementary cell adhesion molecules in physiological solutions provided the first quantitative evidence for their cohesive function. This novel AFM-based nanobiotechnology opens a molecular mechanic approach for studying structure- to function-related properties of any type of individual biological macromolecules. The presented example of Porifera cell adhesion glyconectin proteoglycans showed that homotypic carbohydrate to carbohydrate interactions between two primordial proteoglycans can hold the weight of 1,600 cells. Thus, glyconectin type carbohydrates, as the most peripheral cell surface molecules of sponges (today's simplest living Metazoa), are proposed to be the primary cell adhesive molecules essential for the evolution of the multicellularity.

  1. Sensitivity of Force Specifications to the Errors in Measuring the Interface Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Force-Limited Random Vibration Testing has been applied in the last several years at NASA/GSFC for various programs at the instrument and system level. Different techniques have been developed over the last few decades to estimate the dynamic forces that the test article under consideration will encounter in the operational environment. Some of these techniques are described in the handbook, NASA-HDBK-7004, and the monograph, NASA-RP-1403. A key element in the ability to perform force-limited testing is multi-component force gauges. This paper will show how some measurement and calibration errors in force gauges are compensated for w en tie force specification is calculated. The resulting notches in the acceleration spectrum, when a random vibration test is performed, are the same as the notches produced during an uncompensated test that has no measurement errors. The paper will also present the results of tests that were used to validate this compensation. Knowing that the force specification can compensate for some measurement errors allows tests to continue after force gauge failures or allows dummy gauges to be used in places that are inaccessible.

  2. Trends of measured climate forcing agents

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James E.; Sato, Makiko

    2001-01-01

    The growth rate of climate forcing by measured greenhouse gases peaked near 1980 at almost 5 W/m2 per century. This growth rate has since declined to ≈3 W/m2 per century, largely because of cooperative international actions. We argue that trends can be reduced to the level needed for the moderate “alternative” climate scenario (≈2 W/m2 per century for the next 50 years) by means of concerted actions that have other benefits, but the forcing reductions are not automatic “co-benefits” of actions that slow CO2 emissions. Current trends of climate forcings by aerosols remain very uncertain. Nevertheless, practical constraints on changes in emission levels suggest that global warming at a rate +0.15 ± 0.05°C per decade will occur over the next several decades. PMID:11752424

  3. Trends of Measured Climate Forcing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.; Sato, Makiko; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The growth rate of climate forcing by measured greenhouse gases peaked near 1980 at almost 5 W/sq m per century. This growth rate has since declined to approximately equal to 3 W/sq m per century, largely because of cooperative international actions. We argue that trends can be reduced to the level needed for the moderate "alternative" climate scenario (approximately equal to 2 W/M2 per century for the next 50 years) by means of concerted actions that have other benefits, but the forcing reductions are not automatic "co-benefits" of actions that slow CO2 emissions. Current trends of climate forcings by aerosols remain very uncertain. Nevertheless, practical constraints on changes in emission levels suggest that global warming at a rate + 0.15 +/- 0.05 C per decade will occur over the next several decades.

  4. Dynamics of gecko locomotion: a force-measuring array to measure 3D reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhendong; Wang, Zhouyi; Ji, Aihong

    2011-03-01

    Measuring the interaction between each foot of an animal and the substrate is one of the most effective ways to understand the dynamics of legged locomotion. Here, a new facility - the force-measuring array (FMA) - was developed and applied to measure 3D reaction forces of geckos on different slope surfaces. The FMA consists of 16 3D sensors with resolution to the mN level. At the same time the locomotion behaviour of geckos freely moving on the FMA was recorded by high speed camera. The reaction forces acting on the gecko's individual feet measured by the FMA and correlated with locomotion behaviour provided enough information to reveal the mechanical and dynamic secrets of gecko locomotion. Moreover, dynamic forces were also measured by a force platform and correlated with locomotion behaviour. The difference between the forces measured by the two methods is discussed. From the results we conclude that FMA is the best way to obtain true reaction forces acting on the gecko's individual feet.

  5. Flight Force Measurements on a Spacecraft to Launch Vehicle Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Daniel S.; Gordon, Scott A.

    2012-07-01

    For several years we had wanted to measure interface forces between a launch vehicle and the Payload. Finally in July 2006 a proposal was made and funded to evaluate the use of flight force measurements (FFM) to improve the loads process of a Spacecraft in its design and test cycle. A NASA/Industry team was formed, the core Team consisted of 20 people. The proposal identified two questions that this assessment would attempt to address by obtaining the flight forces. These questions were: 1) Is flight correlation and reconstruction with acceleration methods sufficient? 2) How much can the loads and therefore the design and qualification be reduced by having force measurements? The objective was to predict the six interface driving forces between the Spacecraft and the Launch Vehicle throughout the boost phase. Then these forces would be compared with reconstructed loads analyses for evaluation in an attempt to answer them. The paper will present the development of a strain based force measurement system and also an acceleration method, actual flight results, post flight evaluations and lessons learned.

  6. Deconvolution Kalman filtering for force measurements of revolving wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vester, R.; Percin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.

    2016-09-01

    The applicability of a deconvolution Kalman filtering approach is assessed for the force measurements on a flat plate undergoing a revolving motion, as an alternative procedure to correct for test setup vibrations. The system identification process required for the correct implementation of the deconvolution Kalman filter is explained in detail. It is found that in the presence of a relatively complex forcing history, the DK filter is better suited to filter out structural test rig vibrations than conventional filtering techniques that are based on, for example, low-pass or moving-average filtering. The improvement is especially found in the characterization of the generated force peaks. Consequently, more reliable force data is obtained, which is vital to validate semi-empirical estimation models, but is also relevant to correlate identified flow phenomena to the force production.

  7. Interface corrective force measurements in Boston brace treatment.

    PubMed

    van den Hout, J A A M; van Rhijn, L W; van den Munckhof, R J H; van Ooy, A

    2002-08-01

    Brace application has been reported to be effective in treating idiopathic adolescent scoliosis. The exact working mechanism of a thoracolumbo spinal orthosis is a result of different mechanisms and is not completely understood. One of the supposed working mechanisms is a direct compressive force working through the brace upon the body and thereby correcting the scoliotic deformity, achieving optimal fit of the individual orthosis. In this study we measured these direct forces exerted by the pads in a Boston brace in 16 patients with idiopathic adolescent scoliosis, using the electronic PEDAR measuring device (Novel, Munich, Germany). This is designed as an in-shoe measuring system consisting of two shoe insoles (size 8 1/2), wired to a computer, recording static and dynamic pressure distribution under the plantar surface of the foot. After positioning the inserts between the lumbar and thoracic pads and the body, we measured the forces acting upon the body in eight different postures. In all positions the mean corrective force through the lumbar brace pad was larger than the mean corrective force over the thoracic brace pad. Some changes in body posture resulted in statistically significant alterations in the exerted forces. There was no significant correlation between the magnitude of the compressive force over the lumbar and thoracic brace-pad and the degree of correction of the major curve. Comparing the corrective forces in a relatively new (<6 months) and old (>6 months) brace, there was no statistically relevant difference, although the corrective force was slightly larger in the new braces. We think that the use of this pressure measurement device is practicable and of value for studies of the working mechanism of brace treatment, and in the future it might be of help in achieving optimal fit of the individual orthosis.

  8. Measuring the force of drag on air sheared sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2012-11-01

    To blow a drop along or off of a surface (i.e. to shed the drop), the drag force on the drop (based on flow conditions, drop shape, and fluid properties) must overcome the adhesion force between the drop and the surface (based on surface tension, drop shape, and contact angle). While the shedding of sessile drops by shear flow has been studied [Milne, A. J. B. & Amirfazli, A. Langmuir 25, 14155 (2009).], no independent measurements of the drag or adhesion forces have been made. Likewise, analytic predictions are limited to hemispherical drops and low air velocities. We present, therefore, measurements of the drag force on sessile drops at air velocities up to the point of incipient motion. Measurements were made using a modified floating element shear sensor in a laminar low speed wind tunnel to record drag force over the surface with the drop absent, and over the combined system of the surface and drop partially immersed in the boundary layer. Surfaces of different wettabilities were used to study the effects of drop shape and contact angles, with drop volume ranged between approximately 10 and 100 microlitres. The drag force for incipient motion (which by definition equals the maximum of the adhesion force) is compared to simplified models for drop adhesion such as that of Furmidge

  9. Forces Applied by Cilia Measured on Explants from Mucociliary Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Zvi; Priel, Zvi; Gheber, Levi A.

    2007-01-01

    Forces applied by intact mucus-propelling cilia were measured for the first time that we know of using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrooptic system. The AFM probe was dipped into a field of beating cilia and its time-dependent deflection was recorded as it was struck by the cilia while the electrooptic system simultaneously and colocally measured the frequency to ensure that no perturbation was induced by the AFM probe. Using cilia from frog esophagus, we measured forces of ∼0.21 nN per cilium during the effective stroke. This value, together with the known internal structure of these cilia, leads to the conclusion that most dynein arms along the length of the axoneme contribute to the effective stroke of these cilia. PMID:17142280

  10. Measuring Forces of Bacterial Biofilms on Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Benjamin; Gordon, Vernita

    2010-10-01

    Biofilms are multicellular aggregates of microorganisms with distinct gene expression and often complex spatial structure. Understanding the forces exerted by bacterial biofilms on their substrates could help in understanding damage they cause in industrial settings and to living tissue in biofilm infections. Here we propose a series of experiments to study the forces between biofilms and substrates using rheological and micro-rheological techniques. Polystyrene tracer beads embedded in agar gels can be mapped over the course of biofilm development, and these timelapse motions will show the strain in the substrate. Meanwhile, measurements of the Brownian motion of selected tracer beads can yield information about the microstructure of the agar. For instance, the extent of the Brownian motion will be increased if the agar is stretched apart or broken down. Additionally, tracers in the biofilms themselves would permit the study of the rheology of the biofilms throughout their development.

  11. Leukocyte-endothelium interaction: measurement by laser tweezers force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Kang; Chiu, Jeng-Jiann; Lee, Ming-Rou; Chou, Shih-Chin; Chen, Li-Jing; Hwang, Ned H C

    2006-09-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium is an initial step of many inflammatory diseases. Although the atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of leukocyte-endothelial interaction have been recently introduced. with cell adhesion force unbinding curves (CAFUC). We obtained pico-Newton force in the initial interaction between a single living THP-1 cell and HUVEC monolayer using a custom-built laser tweezers (LT) system. The measured quantities included the non-linear force-distance relationship, and the effect of yielding in cell detachment. It is possible to introduce a time scale into the LT cell-detachment experiments for further exploration and more detailed information on the viscoelastic properties of living cells. PMID:16960761

  12. Designing an experiment to measure cellular interaction forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlinden, Niall; Glass, David G.; Millington, Owain R.; Wright, Amanda J.

    2013-09-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful tool in Life Science research and is becoming common place in many microscopy laboratories and facilities. The force applied by the laser beam on the trapped object can be accurately determined allowing any external forces acting on the trapped object to be deduced. We aim to design a series of experiments that use an optical trap to measure and quantify the interaction force between immune cells. In order to cause minimum perturbation to the sample we plan to directly trap T cells and remove the need to introduce exogenous beads to the sample. This poses a series of challenges and raises questions that need to be answered in order to design a set of effect end-point experiments. A typical cell is large compared to the beads normally trapped and highly non-uniform - can we reliably trap such objects and prevent them from rolling and re-orientating? In this paper we show how a spatial light modulator can produce a triple-spot trap, as opposed to a single-spot trap, giving complete control over the object's orientation and preventing it from rolling due, for example, to Brownian motion. To use an optical trap as a force transducer to measure an external force you must first have a reliably calibrated system. The optical trapping force is typically measured using either the theory of equipartition and observing the Brownian motion of the trapped object or using an escape force method, e.g. the viscous drag force method. In this paper we examine the relationship between force and displacement, as well as measuring the maximum displacement from equilibrium position before an object falls out of the trap, hence determining the conditions under which the different calibration methods should be applied.

  13. Microsystems for cellular force measurement: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayne Zheng, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xin

    2011-05-01

    Microsystems are providing key advances in studying single cell mechanical behavior. The mechanical interaction of cells with their extracellular matrix is fundamentally important for cell migration, division, phagocytosis and aptoptosis. This review reports the development of microsystems on studying cell forces. Microsystems provide advantages of studying single cells since the scale of cells is on the micron level. The components of microsystems provide culture, loading, guiding, trapping and on chip analysis of cellular mechanical forces. This paper gives overviews on how MEMS are advancing in the field of cell biomechno sensory systems. It presents different materials, and mode of studying cell mechanics. Finally, we comment on the future directions and challenges on the state of art techniques.

  14. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  15. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  16. Phoretic Force Measurement for Microparticles Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. J.; Zheng, R.

    1999-01-01

    This theoretical and experimental investigation of the collisional interactions between gas molecules and solid and liquid surfaces of microparticles involves fundamental studies of the transfer of energy, mass and momentum between gas molecules and surfaces. The numerous applications include particle deposition on semiconductor surfaces and on surfaces in combustion processes, containerless processing, the production of nanophase materials, pigments and ceramic precursors, and pollution abatement technologies such as desulfurization of gaseous effluents from combustion processes. Of particular emphasis are the forces exerted on microparticles present in a nonuniform gas, that is, in gaseous surroundings involving temperature and concentration gradients. These so-called phoretic forces become the dominant forces when the gravitational force is diminished, and they are strongly dependent on the momentum transfer between gas molecules and the surface. The momentum transfer, in turn, depends on the gas and particle properties and the mean free path and kinetic energy of the gas molecules. The experimental program involves the particle levitation system shown. A micrometer size particle is held between two heat exchangers enclosed in a vacuum chamber by means of ac and dc electric fields. The ac field keeps the particle centered on the vertical axis of the chamber, and the dc field balances the gravitational force and the thermophoretic force. Some measurements of the thermophoretic force are presented in this paper.

  17. Time-Localization of Forced Oscillations in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.; Pierre, John W.

    2015-07-26

    In power systems forced oscillations occur, and identification of these oscillations is important for the proper operation of the system. Two of the parameters of interest in analyzing and addressing forced oscillations are the starting and ending points. To obtain estimates of these parameters, this paper proposes a time-localization algorithm based on the geometric analysis of the sample cross-correlation between the measured data and a complex sinusoid at the frequency of the forced oscillation. Results from simulated and measured synchrophasor data demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately estimate the starting and ending points of forced oscillations.

  18. A Simple Apparatus for Electrostatic Force Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the construction of an apparatus that demonstrates that electrostatic forces can be large and also gives some idea of dependence of electrostatic forces between charged parallel discs on potential differences and separation. (CS)

  19. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.

    1999-10-14

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a nonnegligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analog of Earnshaw's theorem, in which at the field-cooling position the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffnesses, independent of angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  20. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  1. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  2. Use of force-measuring transducers in manipulator control

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates two types of control structures for mechanical manipulators using force-measuring transducers with each type targeting specific properties of the manipulator. One approach is to measure torque in the drive train of the manipulator to increase backdrivability, sensitivity, and stiffness. The second approach is to measure the forces and torques at the wrist of the manipulator. This force/torque vector is then used in a stiffness control algorithm which resolves dissimilar kinematics and increases sensitivity. Experiments with the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show how drive-train torque feedback can reduce the apparent friction in a manipulator drive train resulting from friction in gear boxes, bearings, and transmission components. For robotic operation, drive-train torque feedback can yield a significantly stiffer drive train. For teleoperated systems, drive-train torque feedback translates into improved backdrivability, better sensitivity, and improved stiffness. A 6-axis, wrist-mounted force-torque sensor was used in a Cartesian stiffness control algorithm implemented on the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research Manipulator (CESARm) located at ORNL. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Air Force Training for Instructional Systems Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Ronald R.

    Detailed information is provided about the Air Force Instructional System Development (ISD) Model to supplement the 1979 AECT presentation made in New Orleans. Information of interest to instructional systems designers includes (1) a short overview of the Air Force ISD model, (2) an extended example which demonstrates the Air Training Command…

  4. Aquifer-System Compaction and Land Subsidence: Measurements, Analyses, and Simulations-the Holly Site, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Galloway, Devin L.

    2000-01-01

    Land subsidence resulting from ground-water-level declines has long been recognized as a problem in Antelope Valley, California. At Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), ground-water extractions have caused more than 150 feet of water-level decline, resulting in nearly 4 feet of subsidence. Differential land subsidence has caused sinklike depressions and earth fissures and has accelerated erosion of the playa lakebed surface of Rogers Lake at EAFB, adversely affecting the runways on the lakebed which are used for landing aircraft such as the space shuttles. Since 1990, about 0.4 foot of aquifer-system compaction has been measured at a deep (840 feet) borehole extensometer (Holly site) at EAFB. More than 7 years of paired ground-water-level and aquifer-system compaction measurements made at the Holly site were analyzed for this study. Annually, seasonal water-level fluctuations correspond to steplike variations in aquifer-system compaction; summer water-level drawdowns are associated with larger rates of compaction, and winter water-level recoveries are associated with smaller rates of compaction. The absence of aquifer-system expansion during recovery is consistent with the delayed drainage and resultant delayed, or residual, compaction of thick aquitards. A numerical one-dimensional MODFLOW model of aquitard drainage was used to refine estimates of aquifer-system hydraulic parameters that control compaction and to predict potential future compaction at the Holly site. The analyses and simulations of aquifer-system compaction are based on established theories of aquitard drainage. Historical ground-water-level and land-subsidence data collected near the Holly site were used to constrain simulations of aquifer-system compaction and land subsidence at the site for the period 1908?90, and ground-water-level and aquifer- system compaction measurements collected at the Holly site were used to constrain the model for the period 1990?97. Model results indicate that two thick

  5. Measurement of cell traction forces with ImageJ.

    PubMed

    Martiel, Jean-Louis; Leal, Aldo; Kurzawa, Laetitia; Balland, Martial; Wang, Irene; Vignaud, Timothée; Tseng, Qingzong; Théry, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of cell traction forces requires three key steps: cell plating on a deformable substrate, measurement of substrate deformation, and the numerical estimation of the corresponding cell traction forces. The computing steps to measure gel deformation and estimate the force field have somehow limited the adoption of this method in cell biology labs. Here we propose a set of ImageJ plug-ins so that every lab equipped with a fluorescent microscope can measure cell traction forces.

  6. DropBot: An open-source digital microfluidic control system with precise control of electrostatic driving force and instantaneous drop velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fobel, Ryan; Fobel, Christian; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2013-05-13

    We introduce DropBot: an open-source instrument for digital microfluidics (http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot). DropBot features two key functionalities for digital microfluidics: (1) real-time monitoring of instantaneous drop velocity (which we propose is a proxy for resistive forces), and (2) application of constant electrostatic driving forces through compensation for amplifier-loading and device capacitance. We anticipate that this system will enhance insight into failure modes and lead to new strategies for improved device reliability, and will be useful for the growing number of users who are adopting digital microfluidics for automated, miniaturized laboratory operation.

  7. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  8. Contact force structure and force chains in 3D sheared granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, Karen; Jettestuen, Espen; Abe, Steffen

    2010-05-01

    Faults often exhibit accumulations of granular debris, ground up to create a layer of rock flour or fault gouge separating the rigid fault walls. Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments of sheared granular materials, suggest that applied loads are preferentially transmitted across such systems by transient force networks that carry enhanced forces. The characterisation of such features is important since their nature and persistence almost certainly influence the macroscopic mechanical stability of these systems and potentially that of natural faults. 3D numerical simulations of granular shear are a valuable investigation tool since they allow us to track individual particle motions, contact forces and their evolution during applied shear, that are difficult to view directly in laboratory experiments or natural fault zones. In characterising contact force distributions, it is important to use global structure measures that allow meaningful comparisons of granular systems having e.g. different grain size distributions, as may be expected at different stages of a fault's evolution. We therefore use a series of simple measures to characterise the structure, such as distributions and correlations of contact forces that can be mapped onto a force network percolation problem as recently proposed by Ostojic and coworkers for 2D granular systems. This allows the use of measures from percolation theory to both define and characterise the force networks. We demonstrate the application of this method to 3D simulations of a sheared granular material. Importantly, we then compare our measure of the contact force structure with macroscopic frictional behaviour measured at the boundaries of our model to determine the influence of the force networks on macroscopic mechanical stability.

  9. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  10. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  11. Toward Standardized Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-Based Ultrasound Elasticity Measurements With Robotic Force Control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shalki; Lily, Kuo; Sen, H. Tutkun; Iordachita, Iulian; Kazanzides, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acoustic radiation force (ARF)-based approaches to measure tissue elasticity require transmission of a focused high-energy acoustic pulse from a stationary ultrasound probe and ultrasound-based tracking of the resulting tissue displacements to obtain stiffness images or shear wave speed estimates. The method has established benefits in biomedical applications such as tumor detection and tissue fibrosis staging. One limitation, however, is the dependence on applied probe pressure, which is difficult to control manually and prohibits standardization of quantitative measurements. To overcome this limitation, we built a robot prototype that controls probe contact forces for shear wave speed quantification. Methods The robot was evaluated with controlled force increments applied to a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo abdominal tissue from three human volunteers. Results The root-mean-square error between the desired and measured forces was 0.07 N in the phantom and higher for the fatty layer of in vivo abdominal tissue. The mean shear wave speeds increased from 3.7 to 4.5 m/s in the phantom and 1.0 to 3.0 m/s in the in vivo fat for compressive forces ranging from 2.5 to 30 N. The standard deviation of shear wave speeds obtained with the robotic approach were low in most cases (< 0.2 m/s) and comparable to that obtained with a semiquantitative landmark-based method. Conclusion Results are promising for the introduction of robotic systems to control the applied probe pressure for ARF-based measurements of tissue elasticity. Significance This approach has potential benefits in longitudinal studies of disease progression, comparative studies between patients, and large-scale multidimensional elasticity imaging. PMID:26552071

  12. Feasibility of measuring antigen-antibody interaction forces using a scanning force microscope.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J K; Hlady, V

    1999-08-31

    The molecular affinity scanning force microscopy (MASFM) described in this study was developed in an effort to test the possibility of antigen-antibody binding measurement using force-separation distance profiles. The MASFM configuration was comprised of a spherical glass bead as an MASFM probe, to which the fluorescein antigen has been covalently attached, and a silicon dioxide-based substrate, to which the antifluorescyl IgG antibody was covalently bound. The bead was glued to the tip of a commercial SFM cantilever. Adhesion forces have been measured between two different specific antigen-antibody pairs and between nonspecific surfaces bearing only glycidoxypropylsilane immobilization chemistry. In force-separation (F-s) measurements, nonspecific forces displayed relatively few force discontinuities and mean adhesion forces lower than those found for specific antigen-antibody measurements. Force-separation profiles measured between specific antigen-antibody pairs showed many discontinuities and had higher mean forces. Positive controls revealed that the mean forces were slightly reduced by the addition of free ligand. The magnitude of mean forces did not correlate with the respective activation enthalpies of the proteins, as would be expected. At lower force values the force histograms for the specific pairs and for positive controls were indistinguishable. None of the force-separation data sets could fit a Poisson discrete-force model. This statistical analysis showed a large relative contribution from nonspecific interactions. It is concluded that the use of the large sphere as an SFM probe is counterproductive: while the large sphere does sample a larger number of specific interactions during each measurement, it also samples at the same time a large proportion of nonspecific forces. The presence of the nonspecific force contributions is likely due to the deformation of the polymerized GPS spacer layer which is thought to be delaminated from the surface upon

  13. Dynamometer for measuring machining forces in two perpendicular directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    Published report discusses development of two-component force dynamometer which is used for dynamic measurement of machining forces in cutting and thrust directions. Resulting data suggest that faster metal-cutting machines may be developed that have reduced vibrations.

  14. Measuring the Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreman, W.; Huysentruyt, R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a fast and simple method for measuring the magnetic force acting on a current-carrying conductor using a digital balance. Discusses the influence of current intensity and wire length on the magnetic force on the conductor. (JRH)

  15. A Simple Method for Measuring Linguopalatal Contact Force During Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Ryunosuke; Matsumuta, Masafumi; Niikawa, Takuya; Nohara, Kanji; Tachimura, Takashi; Wada, Takeshi; Chihara, Kunihiro

    This paper proposes a using probe for measuring of contact force between tongue and palatal, during speech. We developed a 0.03 mm-thick stainless steel tongue force probe with a 3x5 mm force sensor at the tip. Linguopalatal contact force was measured by inserting the probe into the oral cavity. Contact force was measured at the following three locations. Based on the coordinate and measurement obtained at the three points, the action point of tongue force was calculated by the weighted mean. Linguopalatal contact force was measured in four adult men and women without articulation disorder and in three adult men with articulation disorders. Results showed that the action point of tongue force in subjects with articulation disorders was further toward the pharynx than that in subjects without articulation disorders. Linguopalatal contact pressure was then measured again by asking the subjects with articulation disorders to wear a palatal augmentation prosthesis (PAP) to compensate for insufficient linguopalatal contact force. The action point of tongue force became better approximated to that of subjects without articulation disorders. Given these results, our simple method for measuring linguopalatal contact force using a tongue force probe appears to be a promising tool for speech therapists treating articulation disorders.

  16. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  17. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  18. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  19. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  20. Direct force measurement of single DNA-peptide interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji W; Shin, Dongjin; Kwak, June M; Seog, Joonil

    2013-06-01

    The selective interactions between DNA and miniature (39 residues) engineered peptide were directly measured at the single-molecule level by using atomic force microscopy. This peptide (p007) contains an α-helical recognition site similar to leucine zipper GCN4 and specifically recognizes the ATGAC sequence in the DNA with nanomolar affinity. The average rupture force was 42.1 pN, which is similar to the unbinding forces of the digoxigenin-antidigoxigenin complex, one of the strongest interactions in biological systems. The single linear fit of the rupture forces versus the logarithm of pulling rates showed a single energy barrier with a transition state located at 0.74 nm from the bound state. The smaller koff compared with that of other similar systems was presumably due to the increased stability of the helical structure by putative folding residues in p007. This strong sequence-specific DNA-peptide interaction has a potential to be utilized to prepare well-defined mechanically stable DNA-protein hybrid nanostructures.

  1. Heart cell contractions measured using a micromachined polysilicon force transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gisela; Pister, Kristofer S. J.; Roos, Kenneth P.

    1995-09-01

    A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) force transducer, with a volume less than one cubic millimeter, is being developed to measure forces generated by living, isolated cardiac muscle cells in order to resolve the complex mechanisms of muscle contraction. The force transducer consists of two movable clamps facing each other. Each clamp contains two vertical, parallel hinged polysilicon plates attached to a moveable shuttle, and the entire structure is suspended 2 micrometers above the substrate via support beams attached to the substrate at one end. Each end of a living rat heart cell is glued between a pair of vertical plates. Calcium is then introduced into the cell's nutrient bath and stimulates the cell to contract. Upon contraction the support beams bend, and the amount of deflection is translated to force via the known spring constant in the beams. Typcially the 70 micrometers long central portion of a 120 micrometers long cell will contract approximately 6-7 micrometers in full activating solution, resulting in forces up to 16 (mu) N. The average value obtained for Fmax per cross-sectional area was 21.8mN/mm2 which is comparable to the value found in other laboratories using standard transducer technology.

  2. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-07

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  3. Direct measurements of drag forces in C. elegans crawling locomotion.

    PubMed

    Rabets, Yegor; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Ryu, William S

    2014-10-21

    With a simple and versatile microcantilever-based force measurement technique, we have probed the drag forces involved in Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion. As a worm crawls on an agar surface, we found that substrate viscoelasticity introduces nonlinearities in the force-velocity relationships, yielding nonconstant drag coefficients that are not captured by original resistive force theory. A major contributing factor to these nonlinearities is the formation of a shallow groove on the agar surface. We measured both the adhesion forces that cause the worm's body to settle into the agar and the resulting dynamics of groove formation. Furthermore, we quantified the locomotive forces produced by C. elegans undulatory motions on a wet viscoelastic agar surface. We show that an extension of resistive force theory is able to use the dynamics of a nematode's body shape along with the measured drag coefficients to predict the forces generated by a crawling nematode.

  4. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  5. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  6. Casimir forces in systems near jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Justin; Liétor-Santos, Juan-José

    Casimir forces arise when long-ranged fluctuations are geometrically confined between two surfaces. In most cases these fluctuations are quantum or thermal in nature, such as those near a classical critical point, yet this is not a requirement. The T = 0 jamming transition in frictionless, granular systems shares many properties with classical critical points, such as a diverging correlation length, although it has recently been identified as a unique example of a random first-order transition (RFOT). Here we show the existence of Casimir forces between two pinned particles immersed in systems near the frictionless jamming transition. We observe two components to the total force: a short-ranged, depletion force and a long-ranged, repulsive Casimir force. The Casimir force dominates when the pinned particles are much larger than the ambient jammed particles. In this case, we find that particles with the largest forces have the least number of contacts, and that these particles are clustered between the pinned particles, giving rise to a repulsive force which is independent of system preparation and inter-particle potential. We acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1455086.

  7. Force measurements with optical tweezers inside living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, Josep; Farré, Arnau; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Martín-Badosa, Estela; Montes-Usategui, Mario

    2014-09-01

    The force exerted by optical tweezers can be measured by tracking the momentum changes of the trapping beam, a method which is more general and powerful than traditional calibration techniques as it is based on first principles, but which has not been brought to its full potential yet, probably due to practical difficulties when combined with high-NA optical traps, such as the necessity to capture a large fraction of the scattered light. We show that it is possible to measure forces on arbitrary biological objects inside cells without an in situ calibration, using this approach. The instrument can be calibrated by measuring three scaling parameters that are exclusively determined by the design of the system, thus obtaining a conversion factor from volts to piconewtons that is theoretically independent of the physical properties of the sample and its environment. We prove that this factor keeps valid inside cells as it shows good agreement with other calibration methods developed in recent years for viscoelastic media. Finally, we apply the method to measuring the stall forces of kinesin and dynein in living A549 cells.

  8. Compact cantilever force probe for plasma pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2007-12-15

    A simple, compact cantilever force probe (CFP) has been developed for plasma pressure measurements. It is based on the pull-in phenomenon well known in microelectromechanical-system electrostatic actuators. The probe consists of a thin (25 {mu}m) titanium foil cantilever (38 mm of length and 14 mm of width) and a fixed electrode separated by a 0.75 mm gap. The probe is shielded by brass box and enclosed into boron nitride housing with a 9 mm diameter window for exposing part of cantilever surface to the plasma. When the voltage is applied between the cantilever and the electrode, an attractive electrostatic force is counterbalanced by cantilever restoring spring force. At some threshold (pull-in) voltage the system becomes unstable and the cantilever abruptly pulls toward the fixed electrode until breakdown occurs between them. The threshold voltage is sensitive to an additional externally applied force, while a simple detection of breakdown occurrence can be used to measure that threshold voltage value. The sensitivity to externally applied forces obtained during calibration is 0.28 V/{mu}N (17.8 V/Pa for pressure). However, the resolution of the measurements is {+-}0.014 mN ({+-}0.22 Pa) due to the statistical scattering in measured pull-in voltages. The diagnostic temporal resolution is {approx}10 ms, being determined by the dynamics of pull-in process. The probe has been tested in the tokamak ISTTOK edge plasma, and a plasma force of {approx}0.07 mN (plasma pressure {approx}1.1 Pa) has been obtained near the leading edge of the limiter. This value is in a reasonable agreement with the estimations using local plasma parameters measured by electrical probes. The use of the described CFP is limited by a heat flux of Q{approx}10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} due to uncontrollable rise of the cantilever temperature ({delta}T{approx}20 deg. C) during CFP response time.

  9. Lorentz force velocimetry based on time-of-flight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viré, Axelle; Knaepen, Bernard; Thess, André

    2010-12-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a contactless technique for the measurement of liquid metal flowrates. It consists of measuring the force acting upon a magnetic system and arising from the interaction between an external magnetic field and the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. In this study, a new design is proposed so as to make the measurement independent of the fluid's electrical conductivity. It is made of one or two coils placed around a circular pipe. The forces produced on each coil are recorded in time as the liquid metal flows through the pipe. It is highlighted that the auto- or cross-correlation of these forces can be used to determine the flowrate. The reliability of the flowmeter is first investigated with a synthetic velocity profile associated with a single vortex ring, which is convected at a constant speed. This configuration is similar to the movement of a solid rod and enables a simple analysis of the flowmeter. Then, the flowmeter is applied to a realistic three-dimensional turbulent flow. In both cases, the influence of the coil radii, coil separation, and sign of the coil-carrying currents is systematically assessed. The study is entirely numerical and uses a second-order finite volume method. Two sets of simulations are performed. First, the equations of motion are solved without accounting for the effect of the magnetic field on the flow (kinematic simulations). Second, the Lorentz force is explicitly added to the momentum balance (dynamic simulations), and the influence of the external magnetic field on the flow is then quantified.

  10. Muscle forces during locomotion in kangaroo rats: force platform and tendon buckle measurements compared.

    PubMed

    Biewener, A A; Blickhan, R; Perry, A K; Heglund, N C; Taylor, C R

    1988-07-01

    The muscle forces and stresses occurring during normal locomotor activity in kangaroo rats are compared with the peak isometric force developed by the same muscles in situ. Two methods were used simultaneously to determine the stresses (force/cross-sectional area) acting in the ankle extensors during steady-speed hopping and during jumps when animals were startled: a direct measurement using a force buckle surgically implanted around a tendon; and an indirect measurement using a force platform/ciné analysis technique. We obtained essentially the same values with the two techniques. We found that at slow speeds (0.7 m s-1) the ankle extensor muscles of kangaroo rats exerted 20% of the maximum isometric force developed when the muscles were stimulated via the tibial nerve. This increased to 53% at higher speeds (1.9 m s-1). At the animals's preferred hopping speed (1.5 m s-1), peak force was approximately 40% of maximum isometric force. In jumps when animals were startled, peak forces as high as 175% of the maximal elicited isometric force were recorded. These high forces always occurred when the muscles were being stretched. It appears that kangaroo rats utilize nearly the entire range of muscle force possible during normal locomotor events (i.e. up to 175% of maximum isometric force when muscles are stretched).

  11. The coordinate system for force control.

    PubMed

    Saha, Devjani J; Hu, Xiao; Perreault, Eric; Murray, Wendy; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2015-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to establish the coordinate frame for force control by observing how parameters of force that are not explicitly specified by a motor task vary across the workspace. We asked subjects to apply a force of a specific magnitude with their hand. Subjects could complete the task by applying forces in any direction of their choice in the transverse plane. They were tested with the arm in seven different configurations. To estimate whether contact forces are represented in extrinsic or intrinsic coordinates, we applied the parallel transport method of differential geometry to the net joint torques applied during the task. This approach allowed us to compare the force variability observed at different arm configurations with the force variability that would be expected if the control system were applying an invariant pattern of joint torques at the tested configurations. The results indicate that for the majority of the subjects, the predominant pattern was consistent with an invariant representation in joint coordinates. However, two out of eleven subjects also demonstrated a preference for extrinsic representation. These findings suggest that the central nervous system can represent contact forces in both coordinate frames, with a prevalence toward intrinsic representations.

  12. The coordinate system for force control.

    PubMed

    Saha, Devjani J; Hu, Xiao; Perreault, Eric; Murray, Wendy; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2015-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to establish the coordinate frame for force control by observing how parameters of force that are not explicitly specified by a motor task vary across the workspace. We asked subjects to apply a force of a specific magnitude with their hand. Subjects could complete the task by applying forces in any direction of their choice in the transverse plane. They were tested with the arm in seven different configurations. To estimate whether contact forces are represented in extrinsic or intrinsic coordinates, we applied the parallel transport method of differential geometry to the net joint torques applied during the task. This approach allowed us to compare the force variability observed at different arm configurations with the force variability that would be expected if the control system were applying an invariant pattern of joint torques at the tested configurations. The results indicate that for the majority of the subjects, the predominant pattern was consistent with an invariant representation in joint coordinates. However, two out of eleven subjects also demonstrated a preference for extrinsic representation. These findings suggest that the central nervous system can represent contact forces in both coordinate frames, with a prevalence toward intrinsic representations. PMID:25479739

  13. Force regulation in multiple-manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Murphy, Steve H.

    1992-01-01

    A new intuitively appealing interpretation of the internal force in a multiple-arm system is presented. The static gravity-free case is considered where internal force has a well-founded physical meaning. The case is extended to the general dynamic case by removing the inertial force through balancing it with the minimum amount of contact force. The remaining component in the contact force is considered to be the sole contributor to the inertial force. Existing techniques for force control can be used to obtain various stabilizing force set point control laws. Particular attention is given to the motion control strategy for multiple arm systems. Three types of control laws, feedback linearization, arms-as-actuators, and passive control, are addressed. The first two techniques provide simplified control tuning but require much model information. The latter approach is considered to be very robust with respect to the model, but good transient performance is more challenging to obtain. It is suggested to combine one of the model-based approaches with the passive control approach.

  14. Subminiature transducers for measuring forces and deformation of heart muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Osher, J. V.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Duran, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    Two subminiature transducers, one measuring muscle forces and one measuring muscle displacement, can be inserted into heart muscle without interfering with it. Probe, approximately 1 mm (0.04 in), causes no damage to heart muscle. Probe can be rotated to different positions to measure muscle forces from various directions.

  15. Measuring the Forces Between Magnetic Dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-09-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  16. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  17. Development of Field Excavator with Embedded Force Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K.; Creager, C.; Izadnegahdar, A.; Bauman, S.; Gallo, C.; Abel, P.

    2012-01-01

    A semi-intelligent excavation mechanism was developed for use with the NASA-built Centaur 2 rover prototype. The excavator features a continuously rotatable large bucket supported between two parallel arms, both of which share a single pivot axis near the excavator base attached to the rover. The excavator is designed to simulate the collection of regolith, such as on the Moon, and to dump the collected soil into a hopper up to one meter tall for processing to extract oxygen. Because the vehicle can be autonomous and the terrain is generally unknown, there is risk of damaging equipment or using excessive power when attempting to extract soil from dense or rocky terrain. To minimize these risks, it is critical for the rover to sense the digging forces and adjust accordingly. It is also important to understand the digging capabilities and limitations of the excavator. This paper discusses the implementation of multiple strain gages as an embedded force measurement system in the excavator's arms. These strain gages can accurately measure and resolve multi-axial forces on the excavator. In order to validate these sensors and characterize the load capabilities, a series of controlled excavation tests were performed at Glenn Research Center with the excavator at various depths and cut angles while supported by a six axis load cell. The results of these tests are both compared to a force estimation model and used for calibration of the embedded strain gages. In addition, excavation forces generated using two different types of bucket edge (straight vs. with teeth) were compared.

  18. Force dependency of biochemical reactions measured by single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Popa, Ionel; Kosuri, Pallav; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Fernandez, Julio M

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for using force-clamp spectroscopy to precisely quantify the effect of force on biochemical reactions. A calibrated force is used to control the exposure of reactive sites in a single polyprotein substrate composed of repeated domains. The use of polyproteins allows the identification of successful single-molecule recordings from unambiguous mechanical unfolding fingerprints. Biochemical reactions are then measured directly by detecting the length changes of the substrate held at a constant force. We present the layout of a force-clamp spectrometer along with protocols to design and conduct experiments. These experiments measure reaction kinetics as a function of applied force. We show sample data of the force dependency of two different reactions, protein unfolding and disulfide reduction. These data, which can be acquired in just a few days, reveal mechanistic details of the reactions that currently cannot be resolved by any other technique.

  19. Force dependency of biochemical reactions measured by single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Ionel; Kosuri, Pallav; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for using force-clamp spectroscopy to precisely quantify the effect of force on biochemical reactions. A calibrated force is used to control the exposure of reactive sites in a single polyprotein substrate composed of repeated domains. The use of polyproteins allows the identification of successful single-molecule recordings from unambiguous mechanical unfolding fingerprints. Biochemical reactions are then measured directly by detecting the length changes of the substrate held at a constant force. We present the layout of a force-clamp spectrometer along with protocols to design and conduct experiments. These experiments measure reaction kinetics as a function of applied force. We show sample data of the force dependency of two different reactions, protein unfolding and disulfide reduction. These data, which can be acquired in just a few days, reveal mechanistic details of the reactions that currently cannot be resolved by any other technique. PMID:23744288

  20. Measurement of Casimir Force between Monolithic Silicon Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lu; Chan, Ho Bun; Zou, Jie; Marcet, Zsolt; Bao, Yiliang; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Reid, Homer; McCauley, Alexander; Johnson, Steven; Kravchenko, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    We present measurements of the Casimir force between silicon components in a near-planar geometry. We create the device from a silicon-on-insulator wafer using microfabrication. It contains a force-sensing micromechanical beam and an electrostatic comb actuator for controlling the distance. The two lithographically-defined micromechanical components are on the same silicon substrate and are automatically aligned after fabrication. Thus, we can achieve a high degree of parallelism between the two interacting surfaces. We employ a magneto-motive technique to measure the shift in the resonance frequency of the force sensing beam. Periodic Lorentz forces are exerted on the beam when an ac current is applied in a perpendicular magnetic field. As the movable electrode is pushed towards the silicon beam by the comb drives, the Casimir force increases. The force gradient is proportional to the resonance frequency shift of the beam. After the calibration using electrostatic forces and balancing the residual voltage, we measure the Casimir force gradient. Our results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical calculations, considering possible contributions of patch potentials. Apart from providing a compact platform for Casimir force measurements, this scheme also opens new opportunities for the measurement of Casimir force in complex geometries.

  1. Development of a Force Measurement Device for Lower-Body Muscular Strength Measuring of Skaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Ki; Lee, Jeong Tae

    This paper presents a force measurement system that can measure a lower-body muscular strength of skaters. The precise measurement and analysis of the left and right lower-body strength of skaters is necessary, because a left/right lower-body strength balance is helpful to improve the athletes' performance and to protect them from injury. The system is constructed with a skate sliding board, a couple of sensor-units with load cell, indicator and control box, guard, force pad, and support bracket. The developed force measurement system is calibrated by the calibration setup, and the uncertainty of the force sensing unit on the left is within 0.087% and the uncertainty of the force sensing unit on the right is within 0.109%. In order to check the feasibility of the developed measurement device, a kinematic analysis is conducted with skater. As a result, the subject shows the deviation of left and right of 12.1 N with respect to average strength and 39.1 N with respect to the maximum strength. This evaluation results are reliable enough to make it possible to measure a lower-body muscular strength of skaters. The use of this measurement system will be expected to correct the posture of skaters and record the sports dynamics data for each athlete. It is believed that through the development of this equipment, skaters in elementary, middle, high schools, colleges, and the professional level have the systematic training to compete with world-class skaters.

  2. Discrete electron forces in a nanoparticle-tunnel junction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Y.; Trudeau, P.-E.; Dhirani, A.-A.; Leathem, B.; Shieh, B.

    2003-06-01

    According to the "orthodox" model for single electron tunneling, sudden changes in current-voltage characteristics of nanoparticle (NP)-tunnel junction (TJ) systems ["Coulomb blockade" (CB) and "Coulomb staircase" (CS) phenomena] arise fundamentally due to charge quantization. We have embedded NPs (˜2.5 nm in diameter) in the TJ of a hybrid scanning tunneling-atomic force microscope and have simultaneously measured current and forces generated in the system. We discuss an application to micromechanical switching actuated by single electrons. We also show that CB and CS phenomena are in fact associated with steplike changes in force, directly confirming the discrete charge nature of the phenomena.

  3. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  4. Force Measurement on the GLAST Delta II Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Scott; Kaufman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the interface force measurement at spacecraft separation of GLAST Delta II. The contents include: 1) Flight Force Measurement (FFM) Background; 2) Team Members; 3) GLAST Mission Overview; 4) Methodology Development; 5) Ground Test Validation; 6) Flight Data; 7) Coupled Loads Simulation (VCLA & Reconstruction); 8) Basedrive Simulation; 9) Findings; and 10) Summary and Conclusions.

  5. Recent Investments by NASA's National Force Measurement Technology Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Commo, Sean A.; Ponder, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    The National Force Measurement Technology Capability (NFMTC) is a nationwide partnership established in 2008 and sponsored by NASA's Aeronautics Evaluation and Test Capabilities (AETC) project to maintain and further develop force measurement capabilities. The NFMTC focuses on force measurement in wind tunnels and provides operational support in addition to conducting balance research. Based on force measurement capability challenges, strategic investments into research tasks are designed to meet the experimental requirements of current and future aerospace research programs and projects. This paper highlights recent and force measurement investments into several areas including recapitalizing the strain-gage balance inventory, developing balance best practices, improving calibration and facility capabilities, and researching potential technologies to advance balance capabilities.

  6. Impact of Thermal Gradients on Wind Tunnel Force Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hereford, James; Parker, Peter A.; Rhew, Ray D.

    1999-01-01

    In a wind tunnel facility, the direct measurement of forces and moments induced on the model are performed by a force measurement balance. The measurement balance is a precision-machined device that has strain gages at strategic locations to measure the strain (i.e., deformations) due to applied forces and moments. The strain gages convert the strain (and hence the applied force) to an electrical voltage that is measured by external meters. Thermal gradients can complicate the process, however. Thermal gradients on the balance cause differential expansion (or contraction) of various parts of the balance that induce a strain that is detected by the strain gages and is indistinguishable from an external applied force. The thermal gradients can result when testing is done at elevated temperatures or at cryogenic temperatures such as at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  7. A device for measuring compression force in mammography.

    PubMed

    Thiele, D L; Simeoni, R J; Panaretos, S

    1993-03-01

    Compression in mammography is an accepted technique for improving image quality and reducing dose, but excessive compression can cause pain and other undesirable effects. Therefore, maximum compression force should be measured in a quality assurance programme. A compression force meter, based on a load cell design, has been constructed and used to make compression force measurements on three GE Senographe 600T mammography machines. These measurements show that the conversion from pneumatic pressure (as indicated on the machine) to applied compression force is given by Compression Force (N) = (79.0 +/- 0.9) x Pneumatic Pressure (bars) + (12.2 +/- 4.0). Using this equation and pneumatic pressure settings on nine GE Senographe 600T units in our quality assurance programme, the maximum compression force in clinical use ranges from 102 to 150 N with a mean of 126 N. This is lower than guidelines used in the United States and the United Kingdom. PMID:8470999

  8. Force Balances in Systems of Cylindrical Polyelectrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Stephen L.; McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed analysis is made of the model system of two parallel cylindrical polyelectrolytes which contain ionizable groups on their surfaces and are immersed in an ionic bathing medium. The interaction between the cylinders is examined by considering the interplay between repulsive electrostatic forces and attractive forces of electrodynamic origin. The repulsive force arises from the screened coulomb interaction between the surface charge distributions on the cylinders and has been treated by developing a solution to the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The boundary condition at the cylinder surfaces is determined as a self-consistent functional of the potential, with the input consisting of the density of ionizable groups and their dissociation constants. It is suggested that a reasonably accurate representation for the form of the attractive force can be obtained by performing a pairwise summation of the individual interatomic forces. A quantitative estimate is obtained using a Hamaker constant chosen on the basis of rigorous calculations on simpler systems. It is found that a balance exists between these repulsive and attractive forces at separations in good agreement with those observed in arrays of tobacco mosaic virus and in the A band myosin lattice in striated muscle. The behavior of the balance point as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the bathing medium closely parallels that seen experimentally. PMID:4696760

  9. Interatomic force in systems with multibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A

    2010-07-01

    The system of particles (atoms) interacting via multibody interatomic potential of general form is considered. Possible variants of partition for the total force acting on a single particle into pair contributions are discussed. Two definitions for the force acting between a pair of particles are compared. The forces coincide only if the particles interact via pair or embedded-atom potentials. However in literature both definitions are used in order to determine Cauchy stress tensor. A simplest example of pure shear for perfect square lattice is analyzed. Two methods for stress calculation are considered. It is observed that, at least in the particular case, stresses calculated using classical continuum mechanics definition do not depend on the way of partition for the total force. In contrast, Hardy's definition gives different results depending on the radius of localization function. The differences strongly depend on the way of the partition.

  10. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiencies at Surface from the shortwave Irradiance Measurements in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum S, N.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to affect the radiation balance of the Earth-Atmospheric system directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly by affecting the lifetime and albedo of the clouds. Continuous and simultaneous measurements of short wave global irradiance in combination with synchronous spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements (from 340 nm to 1640 nm in 8 channels), for a period of 1 year from June 2012 to May 2013, were used for the determination of the surface direct aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies under cloud free conditions in Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61o E, 7m MSL), a coastal location in United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the Arabian Peninsula. The Rotating Shadow band Pyranometer (RSP, LI-COR) was used for the irradiance measurements (in the spectral region 400-1100 nm), whereas the AOD measurements were carried out using CIMEL Sunphotometer (CE 318-2, under AERONET program). The differential method, which is neither sensitive to calibration uncertainties nor model assumptions, has been employed for estimating forcing efficiencies from the changes in the measured fluxes. The forcing efficiency, which quantifies the net change in irradiance per unit change in AOD, is an appropriate parameter for the characterization of the aerosol radiative effects even if the microphysical and optical properties of the aerosols are not completely understood. The corresponding forcing values were estimated from the forcing efficiencies. The estimated radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies exhibited strong monthly variations. The forcing efficiencies (absolute magnitudes) were highest during March, and showed continuous decrease thereafter to reach the lowest value during September. In contrast, the forcing followed a slightly different pattern of variability, with the highest solar dimming during April ( -60 W m-2) and the minimum during February ( -20 W m-2). The results indicate that the aerosol

  11. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, L. F.; Schreppler, S.; Kohler, J.; Spethmann, N.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  12. A measurable force driven by an excitonic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hakioğlu, T.; Özgün, Ege; Günay, Mehmet

    2014-04-21

    Free energy signatures related to the measurement of an emergent force (≈10{sup −9}N) due to the exciton condensate (EC) in Double Quantum Wells are predicted and experiments are proposed to measure the effects. The EC-force is attractive and reminiscent of the Casimir force between two perfect metallic plates, but also distinctively different from it by its driving mechanism and dependence on the parameters of the condensate. The proposed experiments are based on a recent experimental work on a driven micromechanical oscillator. Conclusive observations of EC in recent experiments also provide a strong promise for the observation of the EC-force.

  13. A non-integral, axial-force measuring element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringel, M.; Levin, D.; Seginer, A.

    1989-10-01

    A new approach to the measurement of the axial force is presented. A nonintegral axial-force measuring element, housed within the wind-tunnel model, avoids the interactions that are caused by nonlinear elastic phenomena characteristic of integral balances. The new design overcomes other problems, such as friction, misalignment and relative motion between metric elements, that plagued previous attempts at separate measurement of the axial force. Calibration and test results prove the ability of the new approach to duplicate and even surpass the results of much more complicated and expensive integral balances. The advantages of the new design make it the best known solution for particular measurement problems.

  14. Interlaboratory comparison of traceable atomic force microscope pitch measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Chernoff, Donald A.; Wang, Shihua; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Tan, Siew Leng; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Advanced Surface Microscopy (ASM), and the National Metrology Centre (NMC) of the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) in Singapore have completed a three-way interlaboratory comparison of traceable pitch measurements using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The specimen being used for this comparison is provided by ASM and consists of SiO2 lines having a 70 nm pitch patterned on a silicon substrate. NIST has a multifaceted program in atomic force microscope (AFM) dimensional metrology. One component of this effort is a custom in-house metrology AFM, called the calibrated AFM (C-AFM). The NIST C-AFM has displacement metrology for all three axes traceable to the 633 nm wavelength of the iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser - a recommended wavelength for realization of the SI (Système International d'Unités, or International System of Units) meter. NIST used the C-AFM to participate in this comparison. ASM used a commercially available AFM with an open-loop scanner, calibrated by a 144 nm pitch transfer standard. In a prior collaboration with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute, ASM's transfer standard was calibrated using PTB's traceable optical diffractometry instrument. Thus, ASM's measurements are also traceable to the SI meter. NMC/A*STAR used a large scanning range metrological atomic force microscope (LRM-AFM). The LRM-AFM integrates an AFM scanning head into a nano-stage equipped with three built-in He-Ne laser interferometers so that its measurement related to the motion on all three axes is directly traceable to the SI meter. The measurements for this interlaboratory comparison have been completed and the results are in agreement within their expanded uncertainties and at the level of a few parts in 104.

  15. NASA Langley Research Center Force and Strain Measurement Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.

    1999-01-01

    Direct measurements of forces and moments are some of the most important data acquired during aerodynamic testing. This paper deals with the force and strain measurement capabilities at the Langley Research Center (LaRC). It begins with a progressive history of LaRC force measurement developments beginning in the 1940's and ends with the center's current capabilities. Various types of force and moment transducers used at LaRC are discussed including six-component sting mounted balances, semi-span balances, hinge moment balances, flow-through balances, rotor balances, and many other unique transducers. Also discussed are some unique strain-gage applications, such as those used in extreme environments. The final topics deal with the LaRC's ability to perform custom calibrations and our current levels of effort in the area of force and strain measurement.

  16. Linear versus nonlinear response of a forced wave turbulence system.

    PubMed

    Cadot, Olivier; Touzé, Cyril; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2010-10-01

    A vibrating plate is set into a chaotic state of wave turbulence by a forcing having periodic and random components. Both components are weighted in order to explore continuously intermediate forcing from the periodic to the random one, but keeping constant its rms value. The transverse velocity of the plate is measured at the application point of the force. It is found that whatever the detail of the forcing is, the velocity spectra exhibit a universal cascade for frequencies larger than the forcing frequency range. In contrast, the velocity spectra strongly depend on the nature of the forcing within the range of forcing frequencies. The coherence function is used to extract the contribution of the velocity fluctuations that display a linear relationship with the forcing. The nonlinear contribution to the velocity fluctuations is found to be almost constant, about 55% of the total velocity fluctuations whatever the nature of the forcing from random to periodic. On the other hand, the nonlinear contribution to the fluctuations of the injected power depends on the nature of the forcing; it is significantly larger for the periodic forcing (60%) and decreases continuously as the randomness is increased, reaching a value of 40% for the pure random forcing. For all the cases of intermediate forcing from random to periodic, a simple model of the velocity response recovers in a fairly good agreement the probability density function of the injected power. The consequence of the existence of a linear-response component is discussed in the context of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem validation in experiments of out-of-equilibrium systems. PMID:21230369

  17. Magnetic tweezers: micromanipulation and force measurement at the molecular level.

    PubMed Central

    Gosse, Charlie; Croquette, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Cantilevers and optical tweezers are widely used for micromanipulating cells or biomolecules for measuring their mechanical properties. However, they do not allow easy rotary motion and can sometimes damage the handled material. We present here a system of magnetic tweezers that overcomes those drawbacks while retaining most of the previous dynamometers properties. Electromagnets are coupled to a microscope-based particle tracking system through a digital feedback loop. Magnetic beads are first trapped in a potential well of stiffness approximately 10(-7) N/m. Thus, they can be manipulated in three dimensions at a speed of approximately 10 microm/s and rotated along the optical axis at a frequency of 10 Hz. In addition, our apparatus can work as a dynamometer relying on either usual calibration against the viscous drag or complete calibration using Brownian fluctuations. By stretching a DNA molecule between a magnetic particle and a glass surface, we applied and measured vertical forces ranging from 50 fN to 20 pN. Similarly, nearly horizontal forces up to 5 pN were obtained. From those experiments, we conclude that magnetic tweezers represent a low-cost and biocompatible setup that could become a suitable alternative to the other available micromanipulators. PMID:12023254

  18. Force field measurements within the exclusion zone of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Shuo; Chung, Wei-Ju; Hsu, Ian C; Wu, Chien-Ming; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Water molecules play critical roles in many biological functions, such as protein dynamics, enzymatic activities, and cellular responses. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering studies have shown that water molecules bind to specific sites on surfaces and form localized clusters. However, most current experimental techniques cannot measure dynamic behaviors of ordered water molecules on cell-size (10 μm) scale. Recently, the long-distance effect of structured water has been demonstrated by Pollack and his colleagues. Namely, there is a structured water layer near the hydrophilic surface that can exclude solutes (Zheng et al, Adv Colloid Interface Sci 127:19-27, 2006; Pollack 2006, Adv Colloid Interface Sci 103:173-196, 2003). The repelling forces of water clusters inside this exclusion region are investigated in this study. With a laser tweezers system, we found the existence of an unexpected force fields inside the solute-free exclusion zone near a Nafion surface. Our results suggest that the water clusters could transduce mechanical signals on the micrometer range within the exclusion zone. This unexpected inhomogeneous force field near the hydrophilic surface would provide a new insight into cellular activities, leading to a potential new physical chemistry mechanism for cell biology. PMID:23277674

  19. Multiphase patterns in periodically forced oscillatory systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elphick, C.; Hagberg, A.; Meron, E.

    1999-05-01

    Periodic forcing of an oscillatory system produces frequency locking bands within which the system frequency is rationally related to the forcing frequency. We study extended oscillatory systems that respond to uniform periodic forcing at one quarter of the forcing frequency (the 4:1 resonance). These systems possess four coexisting stable states, corresponding to uniform oscillations with successive phase shifts of {pi}/2. Using an amplitude equation approach near a Hopf bifurcation to uniform oscillations, we study front solutions connecting different phase states. These solutions divide into two groups: {pi} fronts separating states with a phase shift of {pi} and {pi}/2 fronts separating states with a phase shift of {pi}/2. We find a type of front instability where a stationary {pi} front {open_quotes}decomposes{close_quotes} into a pair of traveling {pi}/2 fronts as the forcing strength is decreased. The instability is degenerate for an amplitude equation with cubic nonlinearities. At the instability point a continuous family of pair solutions exists, consisting of {pi}/2 fronts separated by distances ranging from zero to infinity. Quintic nonlinearities lift the degeneracy at the instability point but do not change the basic nature of the instability. We conjecture the existence of similar instabilities in higher 2n:1 resonances (n=3,4,{hor_ellipsis}) where stationary {pi} fronts decompose into {ital n} traveling {pi}/n fronts. The instabilities designate transitions from stationary two-phase patterns to traveling 2n-phase patterns. As an example, we demonstrate with a numerical solution the collapse of a four-phase spiral wave into a stationary two-phase pattern as the forcing strength within the 4:1 resonance is increased. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Measuring the thermodynamic properties of saturated solid solutions in the Ag2Te-Bi-Bi2Te3 system by the electromotive force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorenko, M. V.; Moroz, M. V.; Demchenko, P. Yu.

    2015-08-01

    The temperature dependence of the electromotive force (EMF) of Ag|AgI|glass Ag2GeS3|D galvanic elements (where Ag, D are galvanic element electrodes, D is equilibrium three-phase alloys in the Ag2Te-Bi-Bi2Te3 system, AgI|glass Ag2GeS3 is a two-layer membrane with purely ionic (Ag+) conductivity) is studied in the range of 490-550 K. Analytical equations are obtained for the temperature dependences of the Gibbs energies of the formation of saturated solid solutions of the Bi14Te6, Bi2Te, BiTe, and Bi2Te phases from elements in the Ag2Te-Bi-Bi2Te3 system. E( T) analytical equations are used to calculate the standardstate thermodynamic functions of saturated solid solutions of the Bi14Te6, Bi2Te, BiTe, and Bi2Te3 phases in the Ag2Te-Bi-Bi2Te3 system.

  1. Forced response analysis of hydroelectric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alligné, S.; Silva, P. C. O.; Béguin, A.; Kawkabani, B.; Allenbach, P.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.

    2014-03-01

    At off-design operating points, Francis turbines develop cavitation vortex rope in the draft tube which may interact with the hydraulic system. Risk resonance assessment by means of eigenmodes computation of the system is usually performed. However, the system response to the excitation source induced by the cavitation vortex rope is not predicted in terms of amplitudes and phase. Only eigenmodes shapes with related frequencies and dampings can be predicted. Besides this modal analysis, the risk resonance assessment can be completed by a forced response analysis. This method allows identifying the contribution of each eigenmode into the system response which depends on the system boundary conditions and the excitation source location. In this paper, a forced response analysis of a Francis turbine hydroelectric power plant including hydraulic system, rotating train, electrical system and control devices is performed. First, the general methodology of the forced response analysis is presented and validated with time domain simulations. Then, analysis of electrical, hydraulic and hydroelectric systems are performed and compared to analyse the influence of control structures on pressure fluctuations induced by cavitation vortex rope.

  2. Measurement and analysis of forces in grinding of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanmir, S.; Hwang, T.; Whitenton, E.P.; Job, L.S.; Evans, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Using an instrumented surface grinder, the two components of grinding forces (normal and tangential) were measured for different types of silicon nitride ceramics. The influences of grinding parameters, such as down feed and table speed, and grinding fluids on forces were determined. In addition to these measurements, the specific grinding energy defined as the energy per unit volume of removed material was calculated. This parameter and the measured forces were then analyzed to determine possible correlations with mechanical properties of the silicon nitrides. It was found that, in general, the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy increase with the hardness. Both the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy were influenced by the grinding fluid and the grinding parameters. The implication of these results on the mechanisms of material removal in grinding of silicon nitride and the possible tribological effects are discussed.

  3. Direct measurement of the forces generated by an undulatory microswimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Rafael; Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-11-01

    C. elegans is a millimeter-sized nematode which has served as a model organism in biology for several decades, primarily due to its simple anatomy. Employing an undulatory form of locomotion, this worm is capable of propelling itself through various media. Using a micropipette deflection technique, in conjunction with high speed imaging, we directly measure the time-varying forces generated by C. elegans. We observe excellent agreement between our measured forces and the predictions of resistive force theory, through which we determine the drag coefficients of the worm. We also perform the direct force measurements at controlled distances from a single solid boundary as well as between two solid boundaries. We extract the drag coefficients of the worm to quantify the influence of the boundary on the swimming and the hydrodynamic forces involved.

  4. Piconewton force measurement using a nanometric photonic crystal diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wonuk; Digonnet, Michel J F

    2014-08-01

    A compact force fiber sensor capable of measuring forces at the piconewton level is reported. It consists of a miniature Fabry-Perot cavity fabricated at the tip a single-mode fiber, in which the external reflector is a compliant photonic-crystal diaphragm that deflects when subjected to a force. In the laboratory environment, this sensor was able to detect a force of only ∼4  pN generated by the radiation pressure of a laser beam. Its measured minimum detectable force (MDF) at 3 kHz was as weak as 1.3  pN/√Hz. In a quiet environment, the measured noise was ∼16 times lower, and the MDF predicted to be ∼76  fN/√Hz. PMID:25078221

  5. Sensor for direct measurement of interaction forces in probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degertekin, F. L.; Onaran, A. G.; Balantekin, M.; Lee, W.; Hall, N. A.; Quate, C. F.

    2005-11-01

    We introduce a sensor for direct measurement of tip-sample interaction forces in probe microscopy. The sensor uses a micromachined membrane structure built on a transparent substrate with an integrated diffraction grating for optical interferometric detection, and a built-in electrostatic actuator. To demonstrate our concept for this sensor, we measured the force curves between an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tip and a micromachined aluminum sensor membrane built on a quartz substrate. We also measured transient interaction forces exerted on the sensor membrane during each cycle of the vibrating AFM cantilever. These agree well with the temporal response of the sensor to a short force pulse applied by our integrated electrostatic actuator. With the addition of an integrated tip, this structure may be used for scanning probe microscopy with a bandwidth limited by the membrane dynamics.

  6. Measuring Drag Force in Newtonian Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.; O'Donnell, Mary Kate; Fingerut, Jonathan; Habdas, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    The experiments described in this paper have two goals. The first goal is to show how students can perform simple but fundamental measurements of objects moving through simple liquids (such as water, oil, or honey). In doing so, students can verify Stokes' law, which governs the motion of spheres through simple liquids, and see how it fails at…

  7. Agricultural Drainage Management Systems Task Force (ADMSTF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Drainage Management Systems (ADMS) Task Force was initiated during a Charter meeting in the fall of 2002 by dedicated professional employees of Federal, State, and Local Government Agencies and Universities. The Agricultural Drainage Management (ADM) Coalition was established in 200...

  8. Report of the Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Board of Directors for Community Colleges, Phoenix.

    The Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures was formed by the State Board of Directors for Community Colleges of Arizona to develop a statewide plan for systematically demonstrating the degree to which community colleges accomplish their diverse missions. Two subgroups were formed in the Task Force on transfer and college programs and…

  9. What Does the Force Concept Inventory Actually Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Douglas; Heller, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) is a 29-question, multiple-choice test designed to assess students' Newtonian and non-Newtonian conceptions of force. Presents an analysis of FCI results as one way to determine what the inventory actually measures. (LZ)

  10. Detection of forced oscillations in power systems with multichannel methods

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.

    2015-09-30

    The increasing availability of high fidelity, geographically dispersed measurements in power systems improves the ability of researchers and engineers to study dynamic behaviors in the grid. One such behavior that is garnering increased attention is the presence of forced oscillations. Power system engineers are interested in forced oscillations because they are often symptomatic of the malfunction or misoperation of equipment. Though the resulting oscillation is not always large in amplitude, the root cause may be serious. In this report, multi-channel forced oscillation detection methods are developed. These methods leverage previously developed detection approaches based on the periodogram and spectral-coherence. Making use of geographically distributed channels of data is shown to improved detection performance and shorten the delay before an oscillation can be detected in the online environment. Results from simulated and measured power system data are presented.

  11. Contact position sensor using constant contact force control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Jay (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A force control system (50) and method are provided for controlling a position contact sensor (10) so as to produce a constant controlled contact force therewith. The system (50) includes a contact position sensor (10) which has a contact probe (12) for contacting the surface of a target to be measured and an output signal (V.sub.o) for providing a position indication thereof. An actuator (30) is provided for controllably driving the contact position sensor (10) in response to an actuation control signal (I). A controller (52) receives the position indication signal (V.sub.o) and generates in response thereto the actuation control signal (I) so as to provide a substantially constant selective force (F) exerted by the contact probe (12). The actuation drive signal (I) is generated further in response to substantially linear approximation curves based on predetermined force and position data attained from the sensor (10) and the actuator (30).

  12. Quantum metrology. Optically measuring force near the standard quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Schreppler, Sydney; Spethmann, Nicolas; Brahms, Nathan; Botter, Thierry; Barrios, Maryrose; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2014-06-27

    The Heisenberg uncertainty principle sets a lower bound on the noise in a force measurement based on continuously detecting a mechanical oscillator's position. This bound, the standard quantum limit, can be reached when the oscillator subjected to the force is unperturbed by its environment and when measurement imprecision from photon shot noise is balanced against disturbance from measurement back-action. We applied an external force to the center-of-mass motion of an ultracold atom cloud in a high-finesse optical cavity and measured the resulting motion optically. When the driving force is resonant with the cloud's oscillation frequency, we achieve a sensitivity that is a factor of 4 above the standard quantum limit and consistent with theoretical predictions given the atoms' residual thermal disturbance and the photodetection quantum efficiency.

  13. Measuring Drag Force in Newtonian Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.; O'Donnell, Mary Kate; Fingerut, Jonathan; Habdas, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    The experiments described in this paper have two goals. The first goal is to show how students can perform simple but fundamental measurements of objects moving through simple liquids (such as water, oil, or honey). In doing so, students can verify Stokes' law, which governs the motion of spheres through simple liquids, and see how it fails at higher object speeds. Moreover, they can qualitatively study fluid patterns at various object speeds (Reynolds numbers). The second goal is to help students make connections between physics and other sciences. Specifically, the results of these experiments can be used to help students understand the role of fluid motion in determining the shape of an organism, or where it lives. At Saint Josephs University we have developed these experiments as part of a newly developed course in biomechanics where both physics and biology undergraduate students bring their ideas and expertise to enrich a shared learning environment.

  14. Laser Photon Force Measurements using a CW Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry; Edwards, David L.; Carruth, M. Ralph, Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The photon force resulting from the non-damaging impact of laser derived photons on a metallic target was measured using a vacuum compatible microbalance. This experiment quantitatively verified that the force resulting from laser photons impacting a reflective surface is measurable and predictable. The photon wavelength is 1064 mn and the laser is a multi-mode 30OW Nd YAG continuous wave (CW) laser.

  15. Flight of a Rufous Hummingbird Robotic Model-Force Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Alarcon, Ramiro; Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo; Tobalske, Bret; Allen, James

    2008-11-01

    Aerodynamic force data was measured on a 2-DOF scaled robotic hummingbird model for both hovering and translational flight. Experiments were conducted in a large water channel facility at New Mexico State University. Reynolds and Strouhal numbers for the experiment are in the range of 3600 and 0.97, respectively. Forces are directly measured using strain gages and compared with phase-locked PIV results.

  16. Surface force measurement of ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Amemiya, Hironao; Kobayashi, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) has advantages such as room-temperature operation, high through-put, and high resolution. In the UV-NIL process, the mold needs a release coating material to prevent adhesion of the transfer resin. Usually, fluorinated silane coupling agents are used as release coating materials. To evaluate the release property, surface force analyzer equipment was used. This equipment can measure the surface forces between release-coated or noncoated mold material surfaces and UV-cured resin surfaces in the solid state. Lower surface forces were measured when a release coating was used on the mold material surface.

  17. Video measurements of instantaneous forces of flapping wing vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Alan; Mayhew, Michael; Black, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Flapping wings for small aerial vehicles have revolutionary potential for maneuverability and endurance. Ornithopters fail to achieve the performance of their biological equivalents, despite extensive research on how animals fly. Flapping wings produce peak forces due to the stroke reversal of the wing. This research demonstrates in-flight measurements of an ornithopter through the use of image processing, specifically measuring instantaneous forces. Results show that the oscillation about the flight path is significant, being about 20% of the mean velocity and up to 10 g's. Results match forces with deformations of the wing to contrast the timing and wing shape of the upstroke and the downstroke. Holding the vehicle fixed (e.g. wind tunnel testing or simulations) structural resonance is affected along with peak forces, also affecting lift. Non-contact, in-flight measurements are proposed as the best method for matching the flight conditions of flapping wing vehicles.

  18. NASA ATP Force Measurement Technology Capability Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2008-01-01

    The Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) initiated a strategic planning effort to re-vitalize the force measurement capability within NASA. The team responsible for developing the plan included members from three NASA Centers (Langley, Ames and Glenn) as well as members from the Air Force s Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC). After visiting and discussing force measurement needs and current capabilities at each participating facility as well as selected force measurement companies, a strategic plan was developed to guide future NASA investments. This paper will provide the details of the strategic plan and include asset management, organization and technology research and development investment priorities as well as efforts to date.

  19. The Kilogram and Measurements of Mass and Force

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Z. J.; Yaniv, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the facilities, measurement capabilities, and ongoing research activities in the areas of mass and force at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The first section of the paper is devoted to mass metrology and starts with a brief historical perspective on the developments that led to the current definition of the kilogram. An overview of mass measurement procedures is given with a brief discussion of current research on alternative materials for mass standards and surface profiles of the U.S. national prototype kilograms. A brief outlook into the future possible redefinition of the unit of mass based on fundamental principles is included. The second part of this paper focuses on the unit of force and describes the realization of the unit, measurement procedures, uncertainty in the realized force, facilities, and current efforts aimed at the realization of small forces. PMID:27500016

  20. Novel Low-Cost Sensor for Human Bite Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Fastier-Wooller, Jarred; Phan, Hoang-Phuong; Dinh, Toan; Nguyen, Tuan-Khoa; Cameron, Andrew; Öchsner, Andreas; Dao, Dzung Viet

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a low cost and reliable maximal voluntary bite force sensor which can be manufactured in-house by using an acrylic laser cutting machine. The sensor has been designed for ease of fabrication, assembly, calibration, and safe use. The sensor is capable of use within an hour of commencing production, allowing for rapid prototyping/modifications and practical implementation. The measured data shows a good linear relationship between the applied force and the electrical resistance of the sensor. The output signal has low drift, excellent repeatability, and a large measurable range of 0 to 700 N. A high signal-to-noise response to human bite forces was observed, indicating the high potential of the proposed sensor for human bite force measurement. PMID:27509496

  1. The Kilogram and Measurements of Mass and Force.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Z J; Yaniv, S L

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the facilities, measurement capabilities, and ongoing research activities in the areas of mass and force at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The first section of the paper is devoted to mass metrology and starts with a brief historical perspective on the developments that led to the current definition of the kilogram. An overview of mass measurement procedures is given with a brief discussion of current research on alternative materials for mass standards and surface profiles of the U.S. national prototype kilograms. A brief outlook into the future possible redefinition of the unit of mass based on fundamental principles is included. The second part of this paper focuses on the unit of force and describes the realization of the unit, measurement procedures, uncertainty in the realized force, facilities, and current efforts aimed at the realization of small forces.

  2. Novel Low-Cost Sensor for Human Bite Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Fastier-Wooller, Jarred; Phan, Hoang-Phuong; Dinh, Toan; Nguyen, Tuan-Khoa; Cameron, Andrew; Öchsner, Andreas; Dao, Dzung Viet

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a low cost and reliable maximal voluntary bite force sensor which can be manufactured in-house by using an acrylic laser cutting machine. The sensor has been designed for ease of fabrication, assembly, calibration, and safe use. The sensor is capable of use within an hour of commencing production, allowing for rapid prototyping/modifications and practical implementation. The measured data shows a good linear relationship between the applied force and the electrical resistance of the sensor. The output signal has low drift, excellent repeatability, and a large measurable range of 0 to 700 N. A high signal-to-noise response to human bite forces was observed, indicating the high potential of the proposed sensor for human bite force measurement. PMID:27509496

  3. Phoretic and Radiometric Force Measurements on Microparticles in Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. James

    1996-01-01

    Thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and radiometric forces on microparticles are being measured over a wide range of gas phase and particle conditions using electrodynamic levitation of single particles to simulate microgravity conditions. The thermophoretic force, which arises when a particle exists in a gas having a temperature gradient, is measured by levitating an electrically charged particle between heated and cooled plates mounted in a vacuum chamber. The diffusiophoretic force arising from a concentration gradient in the gas phase is measured in a similar manner except that the heat exchangers are coated with liquids to establish a vapor concentration gradient. These phoretic forces and the radiation pressure force acting on a particle are measured directly in terms of the change in the dc field required to levitate the particle with and without the force applied. The apparatus developed for the research and the experimental techniques are discussed, and results obtained by thermophoresis experiments are presented. The determination of the momentum and energy accommodation coefficients associated with molecular collisions between gases molecules and particles and the measurement of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and small particles are of particular interest.

  4. Easy and direct method for calibrating atomic force microscopy lateral force measurements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenhua; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2007-06-01

    We have designed and tested a new, inexpensive, easy-to-make and easy-to-use calibration standard for atomic force microscopy (AFM) lateral force measurements. This new standard simply consists of a small glass fiber of known dimensions and Young's modulus, which is fixed at one end to a substrate and which can be bent laterally with the AFM tip at the other end. This standard has equal or less error than the commonly used method of using beam mechanics to determine a cantilever's lateral force constant. It is transferable, thus providing a universal tool for comparing the calibrations of different instruments. It does not require knowledge of the cantilever dimensions and composition or its tip height. This standard also allows direct conversion of the photodiode signal to force and, thus, circumvents the requirement for a sensor response (sensitivity) measurement.

  5. Easy and direct method for calibrating atomic force microscopy lateral force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhua; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and tested a new, inexpensive, easy-to-make and easy-to-use calibration standard for atomic force microscopy (AFM) lateral force measurements. This new standard simply consists of a small glass fiber of known dimensions and Young’s modulus, which is fixed at one end to a substrate and which can be bent laterally with the AFM tip at the other end. This standard has equal or less error than the commonly used method of using beam mechanics to determine a cantilever’s lateral force constant. It is transferable, thus providing a universal tool for comparing the calibrations of different instruments. It does not require knowledge of the cantilever dimensions and composition or its tip height. This standard also allows direct conversion of the photodiode signal to force and, thus, circumvents the requirement for a sensor response (sensitivity) measurement. PMID:17614616

  6. Young's moduli of surface-bound liposomes by atomic force microscopy force measurements.

    PubMed

    Brochu, Heïdi; Vermette, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Mechanical properties of layers of intact liposomes attached by specific interactions on solid surfaces were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements. Force-distance measurements using colloidal probe tips were obtained over liposome layers and used to calculate Young's moduli by using the Hertz contact theory. A classical Hertz model and a modified Hertz one have been used to extract Young's moduli from AFM force curves. The modified model, proposed by Dimitriadis, is correcting for the finite sample thickness since Hertz's classical model is assuming that the sample is infinitely thick. Values for Young's moduli of 40 and 8 kPa have been obtained using the Hertz model for one and three layers of intact liposomes, respectively. Young's moduli of approximately 3 kPa have been obtained using the corrected Hertz model for both one and three layers of surface-bound liposomes. Compression work performed by the colloidal probe to compress these liposome layers has also been calculated.

  7. On unsteady-motion theory of magnetic force for maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Energy Technology

    1995-12-14

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. This paper presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance our understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique is a useful tool for measuring motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  8. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. PMID:12203646

  9. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature.

  10. Measuring the Drag Force on a Falling Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the aerodynamic drag force on an object in flight is well known and has been described in this and other journals many times. At speeds less than about 1 m/s, the drag force on a sphere is proportional to the speed and is given by Stokes' law. At higher speeds, the drag force is proportional to the velocity squared and is usually small compared with the gravitational force if the object mass is large and its speed is low. In order to observe a significant effect, or to measure the terminal velocity, experiments are often conducted with very light objects such as a balloon or coffee filter3 or muffin cup,4 or are conducted in a liquid rather than in air. The effect of the drag force can also be increased by increasing the surface area of the object.

  11. [Organization of rehabilitation and treatment measures in the armed forces of foreign countries].

    PubMed

    Trishkin, D V; Malykh, A B; Ponomarenko, G N; Merzlikin, A V

    2015-07-01

    The authors present an analysis of current state of rehabilitation and treatment system in the armed forces of foreign countries, and main directions of its development. The authors summarize an experience in the field of organization and carrying out of rehabilitation and treatment measures in the armed forces of foreign countries, and also define possible ways of how to apply gained experience in organizing sanatorium-resort provision for servicemen of Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. PMID:26821455

  12. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The metal housings were fabricated by several methods including laser micromachining, swaging, and hydroforming. Designs are presented that allow for simultaneous temperature and force measurements as well as for simultaneous resolution of multi-axis forces. The sensor was experimentally evaluated by hydrostatic loading and in vitro testing. A commercial hydraulic burst tester was used to provide uniform pressures on the sensor in order to establish the linearity, repeatability, and accuracy characteristics of the sensor. The in vitro experiments were performed in excised tendon and in a dynamic gait simulator to simulate biological conditions. In both experimental conditions, the sensor was found to be a sensitive and reliable method for acquiring minimally invasive measurements of soft tissue forces. Our results suggest that this sensor will prove useful in a variety of biomechanical measurements. PMID:23033868

  13. Viscosity effects on hydrodynamic drainage force measurements involving deformable bodies.

    PubMed

    Dagastine, Raymond R; Webber, Grant B; Manica, Rogerio; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz; Chan, Derek Y C

    2010-07-20

    Dynamic force measurements have been made between an oil drop and a silica particle in surfactant and sucrose solutions with viscosities that range up to 50 times that of water. These conditions provide variations in the shear rate and the relative time scales of droplet deformation and hydrodynamic drainage in a soft matter system. The results obtained indicate that soft deformable boundaries have a natural response that limits the maximum shear rate that can be sustained in thin films compared to shear rates that can be attained in films bounded by rigid boundaries. In addition, to extend boundary slip studies on rigid surfaces, we use a smooth deformable droplet surface to probe the dependence of the boundary slip on fluid viscosity without the added complications of surface roughness or heterogeneity. Imposing a Navier slip model to characterize possible slip at the deformable oil-sucrose solution interface gives results that are consistent with a slip length of no larger than 10 nm over the range of solution viscosity studied, although an immobile (zero slip length) condition at the oil-sucrose solution interface is perfectly adequate. In high viscosity solutions, cantilever motion at high scan rates induces a significant cantilever deflection. A method has been developed to account for this effect in order to extract the correct dynamic force between the deformable drop and the particle. PMID:20578751

  14. Support force measures of midsized men in seated positions.

    PubMed

    Bush, Tamara Reid; Hubbard, Robert P

    2007-02-01

    Two areas not well researched in the field of seating mechanics are the distribution of normal and shear forces, and how those forces change with seat position. The availability of these data would be beneficial for the design and development of office, automotive and medical seats. To increase our knowledge in the area of seating mechanics, this study sought to measure the normal and shear loads applied to segmental supports in 12 seated positions, utilizing three inclination angles and four levels of seat back articulation that were associated with automotive driving positions. Force data from six regions, including the thorax, sacral region, buttocks, thighs, feet, and hand support were gathered using multi-axis load cells. The sample contained 23 midsized subjects with an average weight of 76.7 kg and a standard deviation of 4.2 kg, and an average height of 1745 mm with a standard deviation of 19 mm. Results were examined in terms of seat back inclination and in terms of torso articulation for relationships between seat positions and support forces. Using a repeated measures analysis, significant differences (p<0.05) were identified for normal forces relative to all inclination angles except for forces occurring at the hand support. Other significant differences were observed between normal forces behind the buttocks, pelvis, and feet for torso articulations. Significant differences in the shear forces occurred under the buttocks and posterior pelvis during changes in seat back inclination. Significant differences in shear forces were also identified for torso articulations. These data suggest that as seat back inclination or torso articulation change, significant shifts in force distribution occur.

  15. Suture Forces in Undersized Mitral Annuloplasty: Novel Device and Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Andrew; Pierce, Eric; Lee, Madonna; Jensen, Morten; Aoki, Chikashi; Takebayashi, Satoshi; Gorman, Robert; Gorman, Joseph; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Demonstrate the first use of a novel technology for quantifying suture forces on annuloplasty rings to better understand the mechanisms of ring dehiscence. Description: Force transducers were developed, attached to a size 24 Physio™ ring, and implanted in the mitral annulus of an ovine animal. Ring suture forces were measured after implantation and for cardiac cycles reaching peak left ventricular pressures (LVP) of 100, 125, and 150 mmHg. Evaluation: After implanting the undersized ring to the flaccid annulus, the mean suture force was 2.0±0.6 N. During cyclic contraction, anterior ring suture forces were greater than posterior ring suture forces at peak LVPs of 100 mmHg (4.9±2.0 N vs. 2.1±1.1 N), 125 mmHg (5.4±2.3 N vs. 2.3±1.2 N), and 150 mmHg (5.7±2.4 N vs. 2.4±1.1 N). The largest force was 7.4 N at 150 mmHg. Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrate trends in annuloplasty suture forces and their variation with location and LVP. Future studies will significantly contribute to clinical knowledge by elucidating the mechanisms of ring dehiscence while improving annuloplasty ring design and surgical repair techniques. PMID:24996707

  16. Air Force geographic information and analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Henney, D.A.; Jansing, D.S.; Durfee, R.C.; Margle, S.M.; Till, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    A microcomputer-based geographic information and analysis system (GIAS) was developed to assist Air Force planners with environmental analysis, natural resources management, and facility and land-use planning. The system processes raster image data, topological data structures, and geometric or vector data similar to that produced by computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) systems, integrating the data where appropriate. Data types included Landsat imagery, scanned images of base maps, digitized point and chain features, topographic elevation data, USGS stream course data, highway networks, railroad networks, and land use/land cover information from USGS interpreted aerial photography. The system is also being developed to provide an integrated display and analysis capability with base maps and facility data bases prepared on CADD systems. 3 refs.

  17. Sensitivity of Force Specifications to the Errors in Measuring the Interface Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Force-Limited Random Vibration Testing has been applied in the last several years at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and other NASA centers for various programs at the instrument and spacecraft level. Different techniques have been developed over the last few decades to estimate the dynamic forces that the test article under consideration will encounter in the flight environment. Some of these techniques are described in the handbook, NASA-HDBK-7004, and the monograph, NASA-RP-1403. This paper will show the effects of some measurement and calibration errors in force gauges. In some cases, the notches in the acceleration spectrum when a random vibration test is performed with measurement errors are the same as the notches produced during a test that has no measurement errors. The paper will also present the results Of tests that were used to validate this effect. Knowing the effect of measurement errors can allow tests to continue after force gauge failures or allow dummy gauges to be used in places that are inaccessible to a force gage.

  18. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  19. Capillary-force measurement on SiC surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, M; Svetovoy, V B; Palasantzas, G

    2016-06-01

    Capillary forces have been measured by atomic force microscopy in the sphere-plate geometry, in a controlled humidity environment, between smooth silicon carbide and borosilicate glass spheres. The force measurements were performed as a function of the rms surface roughness ∼4-14 nm mainly due to sphere morphology, the relative humidity (RH) ∼0%-40%, the applied load on the cantilever, and the contact time. The pull-off force was found to decrease by nearly two orders of magnitude with increasing rms roughness from 8 to 14 nm due to formation of a few capillary menisci for the roughest surfaces, while it remained unchanged for rms roughness <8 nm implying fully wetted surface features leading to a single meniscus. The latter reached a steady state in less than 5 s for the smoothest surfaces, as force measurements versus contact time indicated for increased RH∼40%. Finally, the pull-off force increases and reaches a maximum with applied load, which is associated with plastic deformation of surface asperities, and decreases at higher loads. PMID:27415337

  20. Capillary-force measurement on SiC surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-06-01

    Capillary forces have been measured by atomic force microscopy in the sphere-plate geometry, in a controlled humidity environment, between smooth silicon carbide and borosilicate glass spheres. The force measurements were performed as a function of the rms surface roughness ˜4-14 nm mainly due to sphere morphology, the relative humidity (RH) ˜0%-40%, the applied load on the cantilever, and the contact time. The pull-off force was found to decrease by nearly two orders of magnitude with increasing rms roughness from 8 to 14 nm due to formation of a few capillary menisci for the roughest surfaces, while it remained unchanged for rms roughness <8 nm implying fully wetted surface features leading to a single meniscus. The latter reached a steady state in less than 5 s for the smoothest surfaces, as force measurements versus contact time indicated for increased RH˜40%. Finally, the pull-off force increases and reaches a maximum with applied load, which is associated with plastic deformation of surface asperities, and decreases at higher loads.

  1. Capillary-force measurement on SiC surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, M; Svetovoy, V B; Palasantzas, G

    2016-06-01

    Capillary forces have been measured by atomic force microscopy in the sphere-plate geometry, in a controlled humidity environment, between smooth silicon carbide and borosilicate glass spheres. The force measurements were performed as a function of the rms surface roughness ∼4-14 nm mainly due to sphere morphology, the relative humidity (RH) ∼0%-40%, the applied load on the cantilever, and the contact time. The pull-off force was found to decrease by nearly two orders of magnitude with increasing rms roughness from 8 to 14 nm due to formation of a few capillary menisci for the roughest surfaces, while it remained unchanged for rms roughness <8 nm implying fully wetted surface features leading to a single meniscus. The latter reached a steady state in less than 5 s for the smoothest surfaces, as force measurements versus contact time indicated for increased RH∼40%. Finally, the pull-off force increases and reaches a maximum with applied load, which is associated with plastic deformation of surface asperities, and decreases at higher loads.

  2. Note: Electrical resolution during conductive atomic force microscopy measurements under different environmental conditions and contact forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, M.; Porti, M.; Nafria, M.; Aymerich, X.; Whittaker, E.; Hamilton, B.

    2010-10-15

    Conductive atomic force microscopy experiments on gate dielectrics in air, nitrogen, and UHV have been compared to evaluate the impact of the environment on topography and electrical measurements. In current images, an increase of the lateral resolution and a reduction of the conductivity were observed in N{sub 2} and, especially, in UHV (where current depends also on the contact force). Both effects were related to the reduction/elimination of the water layer between the tip and the sample in N{sub 2}/UHV. Therefore, since current measurements are very sensitive to environmental conditions, these factors must be taken into consideration when comparisons between several experiments are performed.

  3. Numerical study of the hydrodynamic drag force in atomic force microscopy measurements undertaken in fluids.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Méndez, J V; Alonso-Rasgado, M T; Faria, E Correia; Flores-Johnson, E A; Snook, R D

    2014-11-01

    When atomic force microscopy (AFM) is employed for in vivo study of immersed biological samples, the fluid medium presents additional complexities, not least of which is the hydrodynamic drag force due to viscous friction of the cantilever with the liquid. This force should be considered when interpreting experimental results and any calculated material properties. In this paper, a numerical model is presented to study the influence of the drag force on experimental data obtained from AFM measurements using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The model provides quantification of the drag force in AFM measurements of soft specimens in fluids. The numerical predictions were compared with experimental data obtained using AFM with a V-shaped cantilever fitted with a pyramidal tip. Tip velocities ranging from 1.05 to 105 μm/s were employed in water, polyethylene glycol and glycerol with the platform approaching from a distance of 6000 nm. The model was also compared with an existing analytical model. Good agreement was observed between numerical results, experiments and analytical predictions. Accurate predictions were obtained without the need for extrapolation of experimental data. In addition, the model can be employed over the range of tip geometries and velocities typically utilized in AFM measurements.

  4. Direct thrust force measurement of pulse detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Mazlan Abdul; Faiz, M. Z. Ahmad; Saqr, Khalid M.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we present the result of High-Speed Reacting Flow Laboratory (HiREF) pulse detonation engine (PDE) experimental study on direct thrust measurement. The thrust force generated by the repetitive detonation from a 50 mm inner diameter and 600 mm length tube was directly measured using load cell. Shchelkin spiral was used as an accelerator for the Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) phenomenon. Propane-oxygen at stoichiometric condition was used as the combustible fuel-air mixture for the PDE. The PDE was operated at the operation frequency of 3Hz during the test. The amount of thrust force that was measured during the test reaching up to 70N. These values of thrust force were found to be fluctuating and its combustion phenomenon has been analyzed and discussed.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of human joint force, surface electromyograms, and functional MRI-measured brain activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J Z; Dai, T H; Elster, T H; Sahgal, V; Brown, R W; Yue, G H

    2000-08-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been increasingly used in studying human brain function given its non-invasive feature and good spatial resolution. However, difficulties in acquiring data from peripheral (e.g. information from muscle) during fMRI studies of motor function hinder interpretation of fMRI data and designing more sophisticated investigations. Here we describe a system that was designed to concurrently measure handgrip force, surface electromyograms (EMG) of finger flexor and extensor muscles, and fMRI of human brain. The system included a pressure transducer built in a hydraulic environment, a heavily shielded EMG recording element, and a visual feedback structure for online monitoring of force and/or EMG signal, by the subject positioned in the scanner during an fMRI experiment. System evaluation and subsequent fMRI motor function studies have indicated that by using this system, high quality force and EMG signals can be recorded without sacrificing the quality of the fMRI data. PMID:10967361

  6. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces.

    PubMed

    Munday, J N; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction. PMID:19129843

  7. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces

    PubMed Central

    Munday, J. N.; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies1–3. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces4. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz5–7, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies8–11. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction12, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction13–15. PMID:19129843

  8. Bacterial turgor pressure can be measured by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoldi, Markus; Fritz, Monika; Bäuerlein, Edmund; Radmacher, Manfred; Sackmann, Erich; Boulbitch, Alexei

    2000-07-01

    We report a study of the deformability of a bacterial wall with an atomic force microscope (AFM). A theoretical expression is derived for the force exerted by the wall on the cantilever as a function of the depths of indentation generated by the AFM tip. Evidence is provided that this reaction force is a measure for the turgor pressure of the bacterium. The method was applied to magnetotactic bacteria of the species Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. Force curves were generated on the substrate and on the bacteria while scanning laterally. With the mechanical properties so gained we obtained the spring constant of the bacterium as a whole. Making use of our theoretical results we determined the turgor pressure to be in the range of 85 to 150 kPa.

  9. Measurement of transmitted blast force-time histories

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Benjamin Langhorst; Corey Cook; James Schondel; Dr. Henry S. Chu

    2010-03-01

    A simple, reliable, and cost effective method is presented for the measurement of transmitted force behind a panel subjected to blast loads. Sensors were designed for a specific blast environment and successfully used to measure transmitted blast force behind solid polyethylene plates of thickness 0.125 and 0.25 inches. Experimental data was collected and examined to reveal consistent differences in the response of different thicknesses of otherwise identical panels. Finally, recommendations are made for future design, construction and use of similar sensors.

  10. A novel transparent dielectric elastomer sensor for compressive force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yiming; Wan, Bile; Li, Guorui; Xie, Yuhan; Li, Tiefeng

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer sensors show great potential for wearable electronics and mechatronic applications. However, these sensors have some deficiencies in their appearance and low sensitivity to compressive force measurements. We demonstrate a novel dielectric elastomer sensor enabled by ionic liquid that has fully transparent appearance, low resistivity and the capacity of actuation at large-scale frequencies. We investigate the basic mechanical behaviors of the sensor experimentally. It is noted that the sensor has a remarkable sensitivity to measure compressive force, which is higher than the existing stacked dielectric elastomer sensors.

  11. Drag force measurement: A means for determining hysteresis loss

    SciTech Connect

    Garshelis, Ivan J.; Tollens, Stijn P. L.; Kari, Ryan J.; Vandenbossche, Lode P.; Dupre, Luc R.

    2006-04-15

    A method for determining hysteresis losses in thin strips of soft magnetic materials is described. It is based on the measurement of a drag force which arises with the movement of the sample through the strong field existing in the space near a permanent magnet. Not associated with macro eddy currents, the force is shown to originate from the magnetic hysteresis of the material, having, in fact, an amplitude equal to the product of hysteresis loss and the area of the sample cross section. Correlation within 18% with the measurements made by conventional methods is shown for a wide range of experimental materials.

  12. Electro-optic force measurement application using phase-modulated optical polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Salari, Ezzatollah; Spiegelberg, Stephen H.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of a high sensitivity, large dynamic range force transducer capable of measuring transient force changes in tension and compression. Conventional force transducers typically rely on the deformation of strain gauges, or on servo-mechanical load cells. While strain gauge transducers exhibit a rapid response time, they are subject to electrical noise, and typically have a minimum useful limit of approximately 10-5 N. Servo-mechanical transducers have poor response times and exhibit compliance in the axis of deformation that is unacceptable for many applications. The research objective is to develop a novel force transducer based on the change in optical properties with loading of a pre-stressed polymer. The concept utilizes a pre-stressed polymer material as a linkage to which a force would be applied either in compression or tension. The molecular deformation of the polymer linkage will be analyzed using miniature optical components arranged as a phase-modulated polarimeter capable of birefringence measurements on the order of 10-9. Calibration of the measured birefringence with known loads provides the necessary calibration parameters. The instrument is capable of directional force measurements and is extremely accurate for measuring low-level forces. Since the force transducer is based on optical techniques, it would be resistant to electronic noise, and would allow measurement of rapidly changing loads. The best available force transducers capable of measuring transient responses have a lower resolution of approximately 10-5 N. Research with the rheology of fluids, transient flows of pharmaceuticals in combinatorial research, biological tissue response, and biomimetic adhesive research often require force measurements below this range. Although ultra-microbalances exist that have sensitivities well below this range, the averaging techniques employed that allow these measurements make them unsuitable for

  13. Dynamic force measurements for a high bar using 3D motion capturing.

    PubMed

    Cagran, C; Huber, P; Müller, W

    2010-03-01

    The displacement of a calibrated horizontal bar is used as a measure for forces acting on the bar itself during dynamic performances in artistic gymnastics. The high bar is loaded with known forces and the displacement is monitored by means of a Vicon motion capturing system. The calibration results are fitted according to the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. After calibration, forces can straightforwardly be measured by multiplication of the bar displacement with the determined fit parameter. This approach is also able to account for non-central force application (two hands on the bar) and the effect of the bar's inertia. Uncertainties in measured forces are assessed to be +/-25 N plus an additional 1% for the unknown weight distribution between the two hands. PMID:19906379

  14. A laboratory apparatus to measure clast-bed contact forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.

    2007-12-01

    Glacier dynamics, sediment transport, and erosion are controlled in part by processes occurring at the interface between basal ice and bedrock. One critical parameter is the contact force between a clast and the bedrock. This force affects many processes such as basal friction which regulates sliding speed, slip resistance which influences basal shear stress and may cause micro-seismic events associated with slip instabilities, abrasion which controls rates of erosion, landscape evolution, and production of sediments. Despite field and laboratory evidences indicating that contact forces may be up to one order of magnitude higher than estimated from leading theories, no studies have yet measured with precision the magnitude of contact forces and how contact forces vary as a function of key glaciological variables such as basal melt rate and effective pressure. An apparatus was designed to make two independent measurements: (1) the contact force between a clast and a hard bed as a function of melt rate and effective pressure; (2) the drag force on an identical clast away from the bed as a function of the ice speed. The contact force differs from the drag force because of the presence of the bed which modifies the ice flow field. Measurement (2) is necessary to estimate the rheological properties of the ice and to quantify wall- (bed) effects on the drag force. The apparatus consists of a hydraulic press that pressurizes an ice cylinder, 24~cm high and 20~cm in diameter, to 1.0 - 1.5~MPa. The ice cylinder is contained inside a polycarbonate vessel. Above and below the ice cylinder are three disks: an aluminum disk sandwiched between two Delrin disks. The aluminum disks are hollow and used to circulate a fluid at a controlled temperature. The Delrin disks are used to isolate the ice from the cold room and to control the flow of heat to the ice block. The ice is kept at the melting temperature by circulating a fluid in channels inside the polycarbonate vessel and in the

  15. A Simple Instrument for Measuring Surface Forces in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, James; Tromp, Rudolf; Haight, Richard; Ellis, Arthur

    2015-03-01

    We have constructed a simple instrument to measure the interaction force between two surfaces in solution, or in vacuum. Specifically, we measure the interaction between a lens and a thin silicon cantilever. Either the lens, or the cantilever (or both) can be coated with the species of interest. When the lens is brought close to the cantilever surface, the force of interaction causes the cantilever to bend. By measuring the deflection as a function of the distance between the lens and cantilever, the long-range interactions between the two surfaces can be determined. Our approach includes three important innovations. First, a commercial lens with a radius of ~ 1 cm is used for one surface. The relatively large radius of curvature enhances force sensitivity of the method. Second, we use optical interference (Newton's Rings) to determine the distance between lens and cantilever with ~ 1 nm accuracy. Third, we make use of thin crystalline cantilevers (100 μm thick) whose elastic properties can be easily measured. We have achieved a force sensitivity F / R better than 0.001 mN/m. I will discuss the theory of operation of the new instrument and describe measurements made on SiO2 and metal oxide surfaces in water.

  16. Instrumented figure skating blade for measuring on-ice skating forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, S. A.; Smith, D. M.; Robinson, J. M.; Hawks, J. C.; Starbuck, P.; King, D. L.; Ridge, S. T.; Charles, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Competitive figure skaters experience substantial, repeated impact loading during jumps and landings. Although these loads, which are thought to be as high as six times body weight, can lead to overuse injuries, it is not currently possible to measure these forces on-ice. Consequently, efforts to improve safety for skaters are significantly limited. Here we present the development of an instrumented figure skating blade for measuring forces on-ice. The measurement system consists of strain gauges attached to the blade, Wheatstone bridge circuit boards, and a data acquisition device. The system is capable of measuring forces in the vertical and horizontal directions (inferior-superior and anterior-posterior directions, respectively) in each stanchion with a sampling rate of at least 1000 Hz and a resolution of approximately one-tenth of body weight. The entire system weighs 142 g and fits in the space under the boot. Calibration between applied and measured force showed excellent agreement (R > 0.99), and a preliminary validation against a force plate showed good predictive ability overall (R ≥ 0.81 in vertical direction). The system overestimated the magnitude of the first and second impact peaks but detected their timing with high accuracy compared to the force plate.

  17. Bite force in patients with functional disturbances of the masticatory system.

    PubMed

    Helkimo, E; Carlsson, G E; Carmeli, Y

    1975-10-01

    In thirty patients (24 women and 6 men) treated because of dysfunction of the masticatory system at the department of Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Gothenburg, bite force was registered before, during and after treatment had been completed. In the controls, thirty-six dental students and trainee dental nurses, with no dysfunction of the masticatory system, bite force was registered on two occasions. Bite force was measured between the first molars on each side and between the central incisors. Also finger force was registered. The force measurements were made at five different levels, increasing from very weak to maximum force. Repeated tests of bite force in the control group, made at intervals of about 1 week, gave almost identical results. Bite force in the patient group was lower than in the control group at the first registration but increased with palliation of the symptoms during treatment. There was no significant difference in bite force between the affected and the unaffected side.

  18. Measuring and Understanding Forces on Atomic Length Scales with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Jason Paul

    Most microscopes can be used with little understanding of how they work--much can be learned looking through a light microscope without ever knowing what a photon is or who Maxwell was--and the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is no exception. Many AFM images don't look much different from a mountainous landscape, and much is learned interpreting them as such; however, to really push a microscope to its limits means understanding the interactions creating the contrast in the picture. For a Scanning Electron Microscope, this means understanding how electrons interact with matter, for an AFM it means understanding forces. The focus of this thesis is understanding the forces acting (especially in liquids) between tip and sample in AFM and a better understanding the instrument itself. Chapters I, II and VI involve better characterizing and improving the most important part of the AFM, the tiny cantilever used to measure forces. Chapter I describes a solution to one of the most basic problems that must be solved before forces can be accurately measured--measuring the stiffness of these cantilevers. Many limitations in AFM are set by physical characteristics of the cantilever itself, such as resonance frequency, spring constant, and quality factor. If an external force can be applied to the cantilever, feedback can be used to improve these characteristics. Chapter II shows how to do this using a magnetically applied external force, which has the advantage of working in liquids. These physical characteristics also change drastically when the cantilever is immersed in fluid. The resonance frequency of common cantilevers drops by as much as a factor of six in going from air to water. Chapter VI studies these changes and shows how further miniaturization of cantilevers can improve imaging speeds and signal-to-noise ratio. Early in its career, the AFM was heralded as having atomic resolution, but as the field matured researchers realized that the contact area between tip and

  19. A forced inflated parachute system to explore earth environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Koh-Ichiro; Hinada, Motoki; Hashimoto, Yasuo; Tokunaga, Yoshiyuki; Namiki, Michiyoshi; Saito, Shinji; Nakata, Atsushi; Takasaki, Masanori; Kawashima, Nobuki

    A new parachute system is being developed in order to study the lower thermosphere and mesosphere of the earth, the region left fairly unexplored so far because conventional in-situ measurement technique can not be properly applied in these regions. After the system is ejected from a rocket at the height of 120-130 km, the parachute of the system is forced to inflate. It, however still gains the falling velocity down to 85 km and only below this level the velocity is gradually reduced. In order to reduce the falling velocity to values less than 500 m/sec., the total weight of the system should be less than 5 kg. This includes telemetry system, battery and scientific instruments plus the parachute . Part of the system is conductive so that the system can be tracked from the ground by a radar in order to obtain wind information which is closely related to the geophysical parameters to be measured.

  20. Measurement of impact force, simulation of fall and hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Gardner, T N; Simpson, A H; Booth, C; Sprukkelhorst, P; Evans, M; Kenwright, J; Evans, J G

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that the incidence of hip fracture in the elderly may be influenced by the type of floor covering commonly used in homes for the elderly. This study describes the development of a method for modelling a fall during a hip fracture event, to examine the influence of different floors on impact force. An impact transducer is dropped in free fall through a smooth plastic tube. The impactor nose of the transducer models the curvature of the greater trochanter, and a steel spring is used to simulate the compliance of the skeletal structure. A weight, which corresponds to one-sixteenth of average body mass, compresses the spring and applies force to the impactor nose on striking the floor. The temporal variation in the force of impact with the floor is measured by the transducer to within 0.41 percent (SD = 0.63%, n = 10). Five common floor coverings were tested over a concrete floor slab (vinyl, loop carpet and pile carpet--both with and without underpad). ANOVA analysis showed that the differences between mean forces for each floor covering were highly significant (p > 0.001), with the thicker coverings producing 7 percent lower forces. The transducer may be used to examine the correlation between impact force and fracture incidence for a variety of different floors in homes for the elderly.

  1. Direct measurement of single-molecule visco-elasticity in atomic force microscope force-extension experiments.

    PubMed

    Bippes, Christian A; Humphris, Andrew D L; Stark, Martin; Müller, Daniel J; Janovjak, Harald

    2006-02-01

    Measuring the visco-elastic properties of biological macromolecules constitutes an important step towards the understanding of dynamic biological processes, such as cell adhesion, muscle function, or plant cell wall stability. Force spectroscopy techniques based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) are increasingly used to study the complex visco-elastic response of (bio-)molecules on a single-molecule level. These experiments either require that the AFM cantilever is actively oscillated or that the molecule is clamped at constant force to monitor thermal cantilever motion. Here we demonstrate that the visco-elasticity of single bio-molecules can readily be extracted from the Brownian cantilever motion during conventional force-extension measurements. It is shown that the characteristics of the cantilever determine the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and time resolution. Using a small cantilever, the visco-elastic properties of single dextran molecules were resolved with a time resolution of 8.3 ms. The presented approach can be directly applied to probe the dynamic response of complex bio-molecular systems or proteins in force-extension experiments. PMID:16237549

  2. Force Exertion Capacity Measurements in Haptic Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munih, Marko; Bardorfer, Ales; Ceru, Bojan; Bajd, Tadej; Zupan, Anton

    2010-01-01

    An objective test for evaluating functional status of the upper limbs (ULs) in patients with muscular distrophy (MD) is presented. The method allows for quantitative assessment of the UL functional state with an emphasis on force exertion capacity. The experimental measurement setup and the methodology for the assessment of maximal exertable force…

  3. Ultra-sensitive force measurement using optically levitated microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, Alexander; Moore, David; Gratta, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated a novel technique for measuring microscopic forces acting on optically levitated dielectric microspheres. The radiation field at the focus of a laser beam is used to levitate a microsphere in a harmonic trap where its displacement can be determined by the pattern of scattered light. Optical levitation isolates the microsphere from the surrounding environment at high vacuum, making thermal noise negligible. We have demonstrated a preliminary sensitivity of 5 ×10-17NHz - 1 / 2 for forces acting on 5 μm microspheres and expect to be able to improve this by several orders of magnitude once non-fundamental sources of noise are eliminated. The electric charge of a microsphere can be determined by applying an electric field and measuring the resulting force. We have demonstrated the ability to discharge the microspheres with single electron precision, which eliminates the most significant electrostatic backgrounds from force measurements. As a demonstration of this technique we have searched for the presence of unknown charged particles with charge > 5 ×10-5 e bound in our microspheres. Here we discuss the apparatus, the charged particle search, and outline our plans for future measurements including gravity at μm length scales.

  4. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  5. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  6. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  7. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  8. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  9. A transducer for measuring force on surgical sutures

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Thomas H.; Cheetham, Jonathan; Rawlinson, Jeremy J.; Soderholm, L. Vince; Ducharme, Norm G.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate, both in vitro and in an ex vivo model, a technique for the measurement of forces exerted on surgical sutures. For this purpose, a stainless steel E-type buckle force transducer was designed and constructed. A strain gauge was mounted on the central beam of the transducer to measure transducer deformation. The transducer was tested and calibrated on a single strand of surgical suture during cyclic loading. Further validation was performed using a previously published cadaveric model of laryngoplasty in the horse. Linear regression of transducer output with actual force during calibration tests resulted in mean R2 values of 1.00, 0.99, and 0.99 for rising slope, falling slope, and overall slope, respectively. The R2 was not less than 0.96 across an average of 75 cycles per test. The difference between rising slope and falling slope was 4%. Over 45 846 samples, the predicted force from transducer output showed a mean error of 4%. In vitro validation produced an adjusted R2 of 0.99 when the force on the suture was regressed against translaryngeal pressure in a mixed-effects model. E-type buckle force transducers showed a highly linear output over a physiological force range when applied to surgical suture in vitro and in an ex vivo model of laryngoplasty. With appropriate calibration and short-term in vivo implantation, these transducers may advance our knowledge of the mechanisms of success and failure of techniques, such as laryngoplasty, that use structural suture implants. PMID:21197230

  10. Measured capillary forces on spheres at particle-laden interfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Şenbil, Nesrin; Dinsmore, A D

    2015-07-01

    We measure capillary forces on particles at fluid interfaces in order to assess the key parameters that yield effective stabilizing particles. In our experiments, a millimeter-scale particle is attached to a cantilever, which is used to pull the particle perpendicular to the interface. Simultaneously, we image from the side to measure the cantilever's deflection and thus the pulling force, as well as the height of the particle and the shape of the interface. We find that the peak force on a particle at an interface crowded with other particles is consistently smaller than the force at a clean interface. This result is independent of the difference in fluid mass densities, the material of the target sphere, and the capillary charge of the free particles. We attribute the force reduction to the perturbation of interface shape due to the constraints at the boundaries of the free particles. The results should be helpful in designing particles to stabilize droplets in new oil dispersants or in other applications. PMID:26035631

  11. Designing an optical bendloss sensor for clinical force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linders, David R.; Wang, Wei-Chih; Nuckley, David J.

    2009-03-01

    In current physical medicine, specific manual forces are applied to patients for diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation, but these forces remain largely qualitiative. No universal tool exists to measure these forces and display them in real-time. To provide real-time quantitative feedback to clinicians, we have developed a disposable glove with a force sensor embedded in the fingertips or palm. The sensor is based on the fiberoptic bendloss effect whereby light intensity from an infrared source is attenuated as the fiber is bent between a series of corrugated teeth. The sensor fabricated has a very low profile (10 × 7 × 1 mm) and has demonstrated high sensitivity, accuracy, range, and durability. Forces as low as 0.1 N and up to 90 N have been measured with high signal to noise ratios. Good agreement with theoretical predictions of bendloss has been demonstrated. Current trials have obtained data from 20 ACL reconstruction patients demonstrating a significant increase in range of motion recovery for patients who consistently stretch at home over those who do not.

  12. Development of low temperature atomic force microscopy with an optical beam deflection system capable of simultaneously detecting the lateral and vertical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Eiji; Wen, Huanfei; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a very important tool for imaging and investigating the complex force interactions on sample surfaces with high spatial resolution. In the AFM, two types of detection systems of the tip-sample interaction forces have been used: an optical detection system and an electrical detection system. In optical detection systems, such as optical beam deflection system or optical fiber interferometer system, both the lateral and the vertical tip-sample forces can be measured simultaneously. In electrical detection systems, such as qPlus or Kolibri sensors, either the lateral or vertical forces can be measured. Simultaneous measurement of the lateral and vertical interaction forces effectively allows investigation of force interactions because the force is a vector with magnitude and direction. In this study, we developed a low-temperature, frequency-modulation AFM using an optical beam deflection system to simultaneously measure the vertical and lateral forces. In this system, the heat sources, such as a laser diode and a current-to-voltage converter, for measuring the photocurrent of the four-segmented photodiode are located outside the observation chamber to avoid a temperature increase of the AFM unit. The focused optical beam is three-dimensionally adjustable on the back side of the cantilever. We demonstrate low-noise displacement measurement of the cantilever and successful atomic resolution imaging using the vertical and lateral forces at low temperatures.

  13. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing using Satellite and Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Christopher, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    Over the industrial period, aerosols have increased due to human activities and their effects on climate are the largest source of uncertainty in the current IPCC estimates of global climate forcing due to human activities. Inhomogeneous distribution of aerosols in space and time poses a challenge in their characterization and requires global measurements to assess their effects and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this paper we use global measurements from both satellite and ground based observations for one year time period to estimate the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and discuss the associated uncertainties. For this, aerosol properties (optical depth) derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a federation of ground-based remote sensing instruments, are used in this paper in conjunction with measurements of the TOA shortwave flux from CERES instrument (onboard Terra satellite). High spectral and spatial resolution observations from Imager (MODIS) will be used to identify clear sky conditions within CERES foot print and GOCART results will also be used for separating aerosol types. Global aerosol forcing and corresponding radiative forcing efficiencies will be presented as a function of major aerosol types [including anthropogenic (sulfate, soot, black carbon) and natural (dust) aerosols], region and season. This study should serve as a useful constraint for both numerical modeling simulations and satellite based estimates of SWARF.

  14. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Using Satellite and Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Christopher, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    Over the industrial period, aerosols have increased due to human activities and their effects on climate are the largest source of uncertainty in the current IPCC estimates of global climate forcing due to human activities. Inhomogeneous distribution of aerosols in space and time poses a challenge in characterizing their properties and requires global measurements to assess their effects and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this paper we use global measurements from both satellite and ground based observations for one year time period to estimate the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and discuss the associated uncertainties. For this, aerosol properties (optical depth) derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a federation of ground-based remote sensing instruments, are used in this paper in conjunction with measurements of the TOA shortwave flux from CERES instrument (onboard Terra satellite). High spectral and spatial resolution observations from Imager (MODIS) is used to identify clear sky conditions within CERES foot print and GOCART results will also be used for separating aerosol types. Global aerosol forcing and corresponding radiative forcing efficiencies will be presented as a function of major aerosol types [including anthropogenic (sulfate, soot, black carbon) and natural (dust) aerosols], region and season. This study should serve as a useful constraint for both numerical modeling simulations and satellite based estimates of SWARF.

  15. Joint force protection advanced security system (JFPASS) "the future of force protection: integrate and automate"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Carlos E.; Fagan, Joe E.

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Defense (DoD) defines 'force protection' as "preventive measures taken to mitigate hostile actions against DoD personnel (to include family members), resources, facilities, and critical information." Advanced technologies enable significant improvements in automating and distributing situation awareness, optimizing operator time, and improving sustainability, which enhance protection and lower costs. The JFPASS Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) demonstrates a force protection environment that combines physical security and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) defense through the application of integrated command and control and data fusion. The JFPASS JCTD provides a layered approach to force protection by integrating traditional sensors used in physical security, such as video cameras, battlefield surveillance radars, unmanned and unattended ground sensors. The optimization of human participation and automation of processes is achieved by employment of unmanned ground vehicles, along with remotely operated lethal and less-than-lethal weapon systems. These capabilities are integrated via a tailorable, user-defined common operational picture display through a data fusion engine operating in the background. The combined systems automate the screening of alarms, manage the information displays, and provide assessment and response measures. The data fusion engine links disparate sensors and systems, and applies tailored logic to focus the assessment of events. It enables timely responses by providing the user with automated and semi-automated decision support tools. The JFPASS JCTD uses standard communication/data exchange protocols, which allow the system to incorporate future sensor technologies or communication networks, while maintaining the ability to communicate with legacy or existing systems.

  16. Atomic force microscopy measurement of leukocyte-endothelial interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Chen, Aileen; De Leon, Dina; Li, Hong; Noiri, Eisei; Moy, Vincent T; Goligorsky, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium is a key initiating step in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we present real-time force measurements of the interaction between monocytic human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) cells and a monolayer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The detachment of HL-60-HUVEC conjugates involved a series of rupture events with force transitions of 40-100 pN. The integrated force of these rupture events provided a quantitative measure of the adhesion strength on a whole cell level. The AFM measurements revealed that HL-60 adhesion is heightened in the borders formed by adjacent HUVECs. The average force and mechanical work required to detach a single HL-60 from the borders of a tumor necrosis factor-alpha-activated HUVEC layer were twice as high as those of the HUVEC bodies. HL-60 adhesion to the monolayer was significantly reduced by a monoclonal antibody against beta1-integrins and partially inhibited by antibodies against selectins ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 but was not affected by anti-alphaVbeta3. Interestingly, adhesion was also inhibited in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 approximately 100 nM) by a cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide. This effect was mediated via interfering with the VLA-4-VCAM-1 binding. In parallel measurements, transmigration of HL-60 cells across a confluent HUVEC monolayer was inhibited by the cRGD peptide and by both anti-beta1 and anti-alphaVbeta3 antibodies. In conclusion, these data demonstrate the role played by beta1-integrins in leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and transmigration and the role played by alphaVbeta3 in transmigration, thus underscoring the high efficacy of cRGD peptide in blocking both the adhesion and transmigration of monocytes. PMID:12969892

  17. Photothermally excited force modulation microscopy for broadband nanomechanical property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan Killgore, Jason P.

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate photothermally excited force modulation microscopy (PTE FMM) for mechanical property characterization across a broad frequency range with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Photothermal excitation allows for an AFM cantilever driving force that varies smoothly as a function of drive frequency, thus avoiding the problem of spurious resonant vibrations that hinder piezoelectric excitation schemes. A complication of PTE FMM is that the sub-resonance cantilever vibration shape is fundamentally different compared to piezoelectric excitation. By directly measuring the vibrational shape of the cantilever, we show that PTE FMM is an accurate nanomechanical characterization method. PTE FMM is a pathway towards the characterization of frequency sensitive specimens such as polymers and biomaterials with frequency range limited only by the resonance frequency of the cantilever and the low frequency limit of the AFM.

  18. Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Shana; Gilchrist, Laura; Sander, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most commonly reported impairments after breast cancer treatment affecting anywhere from 16-73% of breast cancer survivors Despite the high reported incidence of pain from cancer and its treatments, the ability to evaluate cancer pain continues to be difficult due to the complexity of the disease and the subjective experience of pain. The Oncology Section Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force was created to evaluate the evidence behind clinical outcome measures of pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods The authors systematically reviewed the literature for pain outcome measures published in the research involving women diagnosed with breast cancer. The goal was to examine the reported psychometric properties that are reported in the literature in order to determine clinical utility. Results Visual Analog Scale, Numeric Rating Scale, Pressure Pain Threshold, McGill Pain Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form, Brief Pain Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory – Short Form were highly recommended by the Task Force. The Task Force was unable to recommend two measures for use in the breast cancer population at the present time. Conclusions A variety of outcome measures were used to measure pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. When assessing pain in women with breast cancer, researchers and clinicians need to determine whether a unidimensional or multidimensional tool is most appropriate as well as whether the tool has strong psychometric properties. PMID:25346950

  19. Performance Measurement Analysis System

    1989-06-01

    The PMAS4.0 (Performance Measurement Analysis System) is a user-oriented system designed to track the cost and schedule performance of Department of Energy (DOE) major projects (MPs) and major system acquisitions (MSAs) reporting under DOE Order 5700.4A, Project Management System. PMAS4.0 provides for the analysis of performance measurement data produced from management control systems complying with the Federal Government''s Cost and Schedule Control Systems Criteria.

  20. AERIAL MEASURING SYSTEM IN JAPAN

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Craig; Colton, David

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency’s Aerial Measuring System deployed personnel and equipment to partner with the U.S. Air Force in Japan to conduct multiple aerial radiological surveys. These were the first and most comprehensive sources of actionable information for U.S. interests in Japan and provided early confirmation to the government of Japan as to the extent of the release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Generation Station. Many challenges were overcome quickly during the first 48 hours; including installation and operation of Aerial Measuring System equipment on multiple U.S. Air Force Japan aircraft, flying over difficult terrain, and flying with talented pilots who were unfamiliar with the Aerial Measuring System flight patterns. These all combined to make for a dynamic and non-textbook situation. In addition, the data challenges of the multiple and on-going releases, and integration with the Japanese government to provide valid aerial radiological survey products that both military and civilian customers could use to make informed decisions, was extremely complicated. The Aerial Measuring System Fukushima response provided insight in addressing these challenges and gave way to an opportunity for the expansion of the Aerial Measuring System’s mission beyond the borders of the US.

  1. Dynamic Force Sensing Using an Optically Trapped Probing System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanan; Cheng, Peng; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptive observer that is implemented to enable real-time dynamic force sensing and parameter estimation in an optically trapped probing system. According to the principle of separation of estimation and control, the design of this observer is independent of that of the feedback controller when operating within the linear range of the optical trap. Dynamic force sensing, probe steering/clamping, and Brownian motion control can, therefore, be developed separately and activated simultaneously. The adaptive observer utilizes the measured motion of the trapped probe and input control effort to recursively estimate the probe–sample interaction force in real time, along with the estimation of the probing system’s trapping bandwidth. This capability is very important to achieving accurate dynamic force sensing in a time-varying process, wherein the trapping dynamics is nonstationary due to local variations of the surrounding medium. The adaptive estimator utilizes the Kalman filter algorithm to compute the time-varying gain in real time and minimize the estimation error for force probing. A series of experiments are conducted to validate the design of and assess the performance of the adaptive observer. PMID:24382944

  2. Force protection demining system (FPDS) detection subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachery, Karen N.; Schultz, Gregory M.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2005-06-01

    This study describes the U.S. Army Force Protection Demining System (FPDS); a remotely-operated, multisensor platform developed for reliable detection and neutralization of both anti-tank and anti-personnel landmines. The ongoing development of the prototype multisensor detection subsystem is presented, which integrates an advanced electromagnetic pulsed-induction array and ground penetrating synthetic aperture radar array on a single standoff platform. The FPDS detection subsystem is mounted on a robotic rubber-tracked vehicle and incorporates an accurate and precise navigation/positioning module making it well suited for operation in varied and irregular terrains. Detection sensors are optimally configured to minimize interference without loss in sensitivity or performance. Mine lane test data acquired from the prototype sensors are processed to extract signal- and image-based features for automatic target recognition. Preliminary results using optimal feature and classifier selection indicate the potential of the system to achieve high probabilities of detection while minimizing false alarms. The FPDS detection software system also exploits modern multi-sensor data fusion algorithms to provide real-time detection and discrimination information to the user.

  3. Measuring red blood cell aggregation forces using double optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Heloise P; Fontes, Adriana; Thomaz, André; Castro, Vagner; Cesar, Carlos L; Barjas-Castro, Maria L

    2013-04-01

    Classic immunohematology approaches, based on agglutination techniques, have been used in manual and automated immunohematology laboratory routines. Red blood cell (RBC) agglutination depends on intermolecular attractive forces (hydrophobic bonds, Van der Walls, electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds) and repulsive interactions (zeta potential). The aim of this study was to measure the force involved in RBC aggregation using double optical tweezers, in normal serum, in the presence of erythrocyte antibodies and associated to agglutination potentiator solutions (Dextran, low ionic strength solution [LISS] and enzymes). The optical tweezers consisted of a neodymium:yattrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam focused through a microscope equipped with a minicam, which registered the trapped cell image in a computer where they could be analyzed using a software. For measuring RBC aggregation, a silica bead attached to RBCs was trapped and the force needed to slide one RBC over the other, as a function of the velocities, was determined. The median of the RBC aggregation force measured in normal serum (control) was 1 × 10(-3) (0.1-2.5) poise.cm. The samples analyzed with anti-D showed 2 × 10(-3) (1.0-4.0) poise.cm (p < 0.001). RBC diluted in potentiator solutions (Dextran 0.15%, Bromelain and LISS) in the absence of erythrocyte antibodies, did not present agglutination. High adherence was observed when RBCs were treated with papain. Results are in agreement with the imunohematological routine, in which non-specific results are not observed when using LISS, Dextran and Bromelain. Nevertheless, false positive results are frequently observed in manual and automated microplate analyzer using papain enzyme. The methodology proposed is simple and could provide specific information with the possibility of meansuration regarding RBC interaction.

  4. Micromechanical cohesion force between gas hydrate particles measured under high pressure and low temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Ram; Sum, Amadeu K

    2015-04-01

    To prevent hydrate plugging conditions in the transportation of oil/gas in multiphase flowlines, one of the key processes to control is the agglomeration/deposition of hydrate particles, which are determined by the cohesive/adhesive forces. Previous studies reporting measurements of the cohesive/adhesive force between hydrate particles used cyclopentane hydrate particles in a low-pressure micromechanical force apparatus. In this study, we report the cohesive forces of particles measured in a new high-pressure micromechanical force (MMF) apparatus for ice particles, mixed (methane/ethane, 74.7:25.3) hydrate particles (Structure II), and carbon dioxide hydrate particles (Structure I). The cohesive forces are measured as a function of the contact time, contact force, temperature, and pressure, and determined from pull-off measurements. For the measurements performed of the gas hydrate particles in the gas phase, the determined cohesive force is about 30-35 mN/m, about 8 times higher than the cohesive force of CyC5 hydrates in the liquid CyC5, which is about 4.3 mN/m. We show from our results that the hydrate structure (sI with CO2 hydrates and sII with CH4/C2H6 hydrates) has no influence on the cohesive force. These results are important in the deposition of a gas-dominated system, where the hydrate particles formed in the liquid phase can then stick to the hydrate deposited in the wall exposed to the gas phase.

  5. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  6. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-11

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials. PMID:21992899

  7. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-11

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials.

  8. Evaluation of intermolecular forces in a circulating system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiuquan; Liu, Mei; Yang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Intercellular interactions, which are mediated by a variety of complex intercellular molecules through the processes of formation and dissociation of molecular bonds, play a critical role in regulating cellular functions in biological systems. Various approaches are applied to evaluate intercellular or molecular bonding forces. To quantify the intermolecular interaction forces, flow chamber has become a meaningful technique as it can ultimately mimic the cellular microenvironment in vivo under physiological flow conditions. Hydrodynamic forces are usually used to predict the intercellular forces down to the single molecular level. However, results show that only using hydrodynamic force will overestimate up to 30% of the receptor-ligand strength when the non-specific forces such as Derjaguin-Landau-Verway-Overbeek (DLVO) forces become un-neglected. Due to the nature of high ion concentration in the physiological condition, electrostatic force is largely screened which will cause DLVO force unbalanced. In this study, we propose to take account of the DLVO force, including van der Waals (VDW) force and electrostatic force, to predict the intermolecular forces of a cell doublet and cell-substrate model in a circulating system. Results also show that the DLVO force has a nonlinear effect as the cell-cell or cell-substrate distance changes. In addition, we used the framework of high accuracy hydrodynamic theories proved in colloidal systems. It is concluded that DLVO force could not be ignored in quantitative studies of molecular interaction forces in circulating system. More accurate prediction of intercellular forces needs to take account of both hydrodynamic force and DLVO force.

  9. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from -{{25}\\circ} to {{25}\\circ} at intervals of {{5}\\circ} . The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 dB. Simulation studies

  10. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Reyhan; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2016-08-21

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] at intervals of [Formula: see text]. The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 d

  11. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Reyhan; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2016-08-21

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] at intervals of [Formula: see text]. The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 d

  12. Use of force-measuring transducers in manipulator control. I - Theory. II - Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, John; Kress, Reid

    Two types of control structures for teleoperated manipulators are investigated using force-measuring transducers with each type targeting specific properties of the manipulator. One approach is to measure torque in the drive train of the manipulator to increase backdriveability, sensitivity, and stiffness. The second is to measure the forces and torques at the wrist of the manipulator. This force/torque vector is then employed in a stiffness control algorithm which resolves dissimilar kinematics and increases sensitivity. It is shown that torque feedback can be used to reduce the apparent friction in a manipulator drive train caused by gear boxes, bearings, and transmissions. For teleoperated systems, drive-train torque feedback yields improved backdriveability, better sensitivity, and improved stiffness. Cartesian stiffness control allows the operator to specify the relationship between force and displacement in any direction at the manipulator end effector.

  13. Saharan Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing Measured from Space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Ramanathan, V.

    2004-07-01

    This study uses data collected from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments to determine Saharan dust broadband shortwave aerosol radiative forcing over the Atlantic Ocean near the African coast (15° 25°N, 45° 15°W). The clear-sky aerosol forcing is derived directly from these data, without requiring detailed information about the aerosol properties that are not routinely observed such as chemical composition, microphysical properties, and their height variations. To determine the diurnally averaged Saharan dust radiative forcing efficiency (i.e., broadband shortwave forcing per unit optical depth at 550 nm, W m-2 τ-1a), two extreme seasons are juxtaposed: the high-dust months [June August (JJA)] and the low-dust months [November January (NDJ)]. It is found that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) diurnal mean forcing efficiency is -35 ± 3 W m-2 τ-1a for JJA, and -26 ± 3 W m-2 τ-1a for NDJ. These efficiencies can be fit by reducing the spectrally varying aerosol single-scattering albedo such that its value at 550 nm is reduced from 0.95 ± 0.04 for JJA to about 0.86 ± 0.04 for NDJ. The lower value for the low-dust months might be influenced by biomass-burning aerosols that were transported into the study region from equatorial Africa. Although the high-dust season has a greater (absolute value of the) TOA forcing efficiency, the low-dust season may have a greater surface forcing efficiency. Extrapolations based on model calculations suggest the surface forcing efficiencies to be about -65 W m-2 τ-1a for the high-dust season versus -81 W m-2 τ-1a for the low-dust season. These observations indicate that the aerosol character within a region can be readily modified, even immediately adjacent to a powerful source region such as the Sahara. This study provides important observational constraints for models of dust radiative forcing.


  14. An Integrated Compact Unit for Wide Range Micro-Newton Force Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, M. A. Salam; Tohmyoh, Hironori; Saka, Masumi

    Wide range compact sensor is preferably sought for force sensing in testing of micro objects or local area of macro objects with the observation of high resolution microscope. This paper presents the design and development of an integrated passive cantilever type force sensing unit with the specificities of range variation, interchangeability of components and compact size by incorporating with cantilever, probe and a capacitive sensor for measurement of large range micro-newton forces in wide scope of application. In the design, the tactile force at the probe perpendicularly attached to the cantilever is converted as cantilever deflection, which is measured by the capacitive sensor. In connection to a tiny capacitive sensor a compatible cantilever with double-beam structure is considered. Cantilever length variation facility is incorporated in the unit for obtaining different force measurement ranges by using the same cantilever. Characterization of the cantilever is performed against a standard load cell. The force resolution with a typical cantilever is estimated as 10 nN. The elastic property of human hair is efficiently determined by testing with the combination of a digital microscope and the developed sensor system. The utility of the unit for different resolution/range by the interchangeability of cantilevers is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that this integrated force sensing unit achieves good sensitivity and linearity, and wide measurement range.

  15. Vision-based force measurement using neural networks for biological cell microinjection.

    PubMed

    Karimirad, Fatemeh; Chauhan, Sunita; Shirinzadeh, Bijan

    2014-03-21

    This paper presents a vision-based force measurement method using an artificial neural network model. The proposed model is used for measuring the applied load to a spherical biological cell during micromanipulation process. The devised vision-based method is most useful when force measurement capability is required, but it is very challenging or even infeasible to use a force sensor. Artificial neural networks in conjunction with image processing techniques have been used to estimate the applied load to a cell. A bio-micromanipulation system capable of force measurement has also been established in order to collect the training data required for the proposed neural network model. The geometric characterization of zebrafish embryos membranes has been performed during the penetration of the micropipette prior to piercing. The geometric features are extracted from images using image processing techniques. These features have been used to describe the shape and quantify the deformation of the cell at different indentation depths. The neural network is trained by taking the visual data as the input and the measured corresponding force as the output. Once the neural network is trained with sufficient number of data, it can be used as a precise sensor in bio-micromanipulation setups. However, the proposed neural network model is applicable for indentation of any other spherical elastic object. The results demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. The outcomes of this study could be useful for measuring force in biological cell micromanipulation processes such as injection of the mouse oocyte/embryo. PMID:24411067

  16. Vision-based force measurement using neural networks for biological cell microinjection.

    PubMed

    Karimirad, Fatemeh; Chauhan, Sunita; Shirinzadeh, Bijan

    2014-03-21

    This paper presents a vision-based force measurement method using an artificial neural network model. The proposed model is used for measuring the applied load to a spherical biological cell during micromanipulation process. The devised vision-based method is most useful when force measurement capability is required, but it is very challenging or even infeasible to use a force sensor. Artificial neural networks in conjunction with image processing techniques have been used to estimate the applied load to a cell. A bio-micromanipulation system capable of force measurement has also been established in order to collect the training data required for the proposed neural network model. The geometric characterization of zebrafish embryos membranes has been performed during the penetration of the micropipette prior to piercing. The geometric features are extracted from images using image processing techniques. These features have been used to describe the shape and quantify the deformation of the cell at different indentation depths. The neural network is trained by taking the visual data as the input and the measured corresponding force as the output. Once the neural network is trained with sufficient number of data, it can be used as a precise sensor in bio-micromanipulation setups. However, the proposed neural network model is applicable for indentation of any other spherical elastic object. The results demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. The outcomes of this study could be useful for measuring force in biological cell micromanipulation processes such as injection of the mouse oocyte/embryo.

  17. Dynamic Forces in Spur Gears - Measurement, Prediction, and Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Rebbechi, Brian; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1996-01-01

    Measured and computed values for dynamic loads in spur gears were compared to validate a new version of the NASA gear dynamics code DANST-PC. Strain gage data from six gear sets with different tooth profiles were processed to determine the dynamic forces acting between the gear teeth. Results demonstrate that the analysis code successfully simulates the dynamic behavior of the gears. Differences between analysis and experiment were less than 10 percent under most conditions.

  18. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, M.; Mendizábal Vázquez, I. de; Aroca, C.

    2015-01-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10{sup −7} emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM.

  19. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Ranchal, R; de Mendizábal Vázquez, I; Cobos, P; Aroca, C

    2015-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10(-7) emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM.

  20. [Methodology and Implementation of Forced Oscillation Technique for Respiratory Mechanics Measurement].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengbo; Ni, Lu; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Deyu; Wang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a noninvasive method for respiratory mechanics measurement. For the FOT, external signals (e.g. forced oscillations around 4-40 Hz) are used to drive the respiratory system, and the mechanical characteristic of the respiratory system can be determined with the linear system identification theory. Thus, respiratory mechanical properties and components at different frequency and location of the airway can be explored by specifically developed forcing waveforms. In this paper, the theory, methodology and clinical application of the FOT is reviewed, including measure ment theory, driving signals, models of respiratory system, algorithm for impedance identification, and requirement on apparatus. Finally, the future development of this technique is also discussed. PMID:27066685

  1. [Methodology and Implementation of Forced Oscillation Technique for Respiratory Mechanics Measurement].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengbo; Ni, Lu; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Deyu; Wang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a noninvasive method for respiratory mechanics measurement. For the FOT, external signals (e.g. forced oscillations around 4-40 Hz) are used to drive the respiratory system, and the mechanical characteristic of the respiratory system can be determined with the linear system identification theory. Thus, respiratory mechanical properties and components at different frequency and location of the airway can be explored by specifically developed forcing waveforms. In this paper, the theory, methodology and clinical application of the FOT is reviewed, including measure ment theory, driving signals, models of respiratory system, algorithm for impedance identification, and requirement on apparatus. Finally, the future development of this technique is also discussed.

  2. Radial force development during root growth measured by photoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Hartmann, Christian; Genet, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical and topological properties of a soil like the global porosity and the distribution of void sizes greatly affect the development of a plant root, which in turn affects the shoot development. In particular, plant roots growing in heterogeneous medium like sandy soils or cracked substrates have to adapt their morphology and exert radial forces depending on the pore size in which they penetrate. We propose a model experiment in which a pivot root (chick-pea seeds) of millimetric diameter has to grow in a size-controlled gap δ (δ ranging 0.5-2.3 mm) between two photoelastic grains. By time-lapse imaging, we continuously monitored the root growth and the development of optical fringes in the photoelastic neighbouring grains when the root enters the gap. Thus we measured simultaneously and in situ the root morphological changes (length and diameter growth rates, circumnutation) as well as the radial forces the root exerts. Radial forces were increasing in relation with gap constriction and experiment duration but a levelling of the force was not observed, even after 5 days and for narrow gaps. The inferred mechanical stress was consistent with the turgor pressure of compressed cells. Therefore our set-up could be a basis for testing mechanical models of cellular growth.

  3. Systemic risk measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Solange Maria; Silva, Thiago Christiano; Tabak, Benjamin Miranda; de Souza Penaloza, Rodrigo Andrés; de Castro Miranda, Rodrigo César

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present systemic risk measures based on contingent claims approach and banking sector multivariate density. We also apply network measures to analyze bank common risk exposure. The proposed measures aim to capture credit risk stress and its potential to become systemic. These indicators capture not only individual bank vulnerability, but also the stress dependency structure between them. Furthermore, these measures can be quite useful for identifying systemically important banks. The empirical results show that these indicators capture with considerable fidelity the moments of increasing systemic risk in the Brazilian banking sector in recent years.

  4. Use of piezoelectric multicomponent force measuring devices in fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, A.; Stefan, K.

    1979-01-01

    The characterisitics of piezoelectric multicomponent transducers are discussed, giving attention to the advantages of quartz over other materials. The main advantage of piezoelectric devices in aerodynamic studies is their ability to indicate rapid changes in the values of physical parameters. Problems in the accuracy of measurments by piezoelectric devices can be overcome by suitable design approaches. A practical example is given of how such can be utilized to measure rapid fluctuations of fluid forces exerted on a circular cylinder mounted in a water channel.

  5. Phase separated BEC for high-sensitivity force measurement.

    PubMed

    Bhongale, S G; Timmermans, Eddy

    2008-05-01

    A trapped, phase separated, two component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) can be configured to give a single BEC bubble that floats freely in the surrounding BEC. We point out that this system gives a unique template to carry out mesoscopic quantum studies and to detect weak forces. We demonstrate the detection capabilities by proposing and studying a "quantum level" for fundamental quantum fluctuation studies and for mapping the potential energy landscape near a surface with exquisite accuracy.

  6. Single Molecule Force Measurement for Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Sotaro

    2008-04-01

    The ribosome is a molecular machine that translates the genetic code described on the messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence through repetitive cycles of transfer RNA (tRNA) selection, peptide bond formation and translocation. Although the detailed interactions between the translation components have been revealed by extensive structural and biochemical studies, it is not known how the precise regulation of macromolecular movements required at each stage of translation is achieved. Here we demonstrate an optical tweezer assay to measure the rupture force between a single ribosome complex and mRNA. The rupture force was compared between ribosome complexes assembled on an mRNA with and without a strong Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence. The removal of the SD sequence significantly reduced the rupture force, indicating that the SD interactions contribute significantly to the stability of the ribosomal complex on the mRNA in a pre-peptidyl transfer state. In contrast, the post-peptidyl transfer state weakened the rupture force as compared to the complex in a pre-peptidyl transfer state and it was the same for both the SD-containing and SD-deficient mRNAs. The results suggest that formation of the first peptide bond destabilizes the SD interaction, resulting in the weakening of the force with which the ribosome grips an mRNA. This might be an important requirement to facilitate movement of the ribosome along mRNA during the first translocation step. In this article, we discuss about the above new results including the introduction of the ribosome translation mechanism and the optical tweezer method.

  7. Frequency-dependent viscoelasticity measurement by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Wong, Kenneth Kar Ho; de Bruyn, John R.; Hutter, Jeffrey L.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a new technique for investigating viscoelastic properties of soft materials using the atomic force microscope. A small oscillatory voltage is added to the deflection signal of the atomic force microscope causing a vertical oscillatory sample motion. Monitoring the amplitude and phase of this motion allows determination of the viscous and elastic moduli of the sample as a function of frequency during contact imaging. This technique is applied to suspended poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers and poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels, giving results similar to those measured using traditional static methods. However, the moduli of both the fibers and the hydrogels show a significant frequency dependence. The Young's modulus of the fibers increases with frequency, while for the viscoelastic hydrogels, the storage modulus dominates the mechanical response at low frequency whereas the loss modulus dominates at high frequency.

  8. Interaction forces between red cells agglutinated by antibody. II. Measurement of hydrodynamic force of breakup.

    PubMed Central

    Tha, S P; Shuster, J; Goldsmith, H L

    1986-01-01

    The expressions derived in the previous paper for the respective normal, F3, and shear forces, Fshear, acting along and perpendicular to the axis of a doublet of rigid spheres, were used to determine the hydrodynamic forces required to separate two red cell spheres of antigenic type B crosslinked by the corresponding antibody. Cells were sphered and swollen in isotonic buffered glycerol containing 8 X 10(-5) M sodium dodecyl sulfate, fixed in 0.085% glutaraldehyde, and suspended in aqueous glycerol (viscosity: 15-34 mPa s), containing 0.15 M NaCl and anti-B antibody from human hyperimmune antiserum at concentrations from 0.73 to 3.56 vol%. After incubating and mixing for 12 h, doublets were observed through a microscope flowing in a 178-micron tube by gravity feed between two reservoirs. Using a traveling microtube apparatus, the doublets were tracked in a constantly accelerating flow and the translational and rotational motions were recorded on videotape until breakup occurred. From a frame by frame replay of the tape, the radial position, velocity and orientation of the doublet were obtained and the normal and shear forces of separation at breakup computed. Both forces increased significantly with increasing antiserum concentration, the mean values of F3 increasing from 0.060 to 0.197 nN, and Fshear from 0.023 to 0.072 nN. There was no significant effect of glycerol viscosity on the forces of separation. It was not possible to determine whether the shear or normal force was responsible for doublet separation. Measurements of the mean dimensionless period of rotation, TG, of doublets in suspensions containing 0.73 and 2.40% antiserum undergoing steady flow were also made to test whether the spheres were rigidly linked or capable of some independent rotation. A fairly narrow distribution in TG about the value 15.64, predicted for rigidly-linked doublets, was obtained at both antiserum concentrations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3801572

  9. Dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Wang, Z.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents both measured and calculated magnetic-force data. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares the results with predictions calculated by a nonlinear-dynamics computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic-suspension system type vehicle model were obtained by experimental observation and computer simulation of a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway that consists of a pair of L-shaped aluminum conductors attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  10. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  11. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  12. Gravitational Force and the Cardiovascular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D. R.; Olszowka, A. J.; Rokitka, M. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to changes in gravitational force are considered. Man is ideally suited to his 1-g environment. Although cardiovascular adjustments are required to accommodate to postural changes and exercise, these are fully accomplished for short periods (min). More challenging stresses are those of short-term microgravity (h) and long-term microgravity (days) and of gravitational forces greater than that of Earth. The latter can be simulated in the laboratory and quantitative studies can be conducted.

  13. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials. This work is a partial contribution of the USDA Forest Service and NIST, agencies of the US government, and is not subject to copyright.

  14. Dynamics and stability of mechanical systems with follower forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, G.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph on problems of stability of equilibrium of mechanical systems with follower forces is presented. Concepts of stability and criteria of stability are reviewed briefly, together with means of analytical specification of follower forces. Nondissipative systems with two degrees of freedom are discussed, and destabilizing effects due to various types of dissipative forces both in discrete and continuous systems, are treated. The analyses are accompanied by some quantative experiments and observations on demonstrational laboratory models.

  15. Measurement of solution viscosity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nabil; Nino, Diego F.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2001-06-01

    We report on studies aimed at employing the atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the viscosity of aqueous solutions. At ambient temperature, the AFM cantilever undergoes thermal fluctuations that are highly sensitive to the local environment. Here, we present measurements of the cantilever's resonant frequency in aqueous solutions of glycerol, sucrose, ethanol, sodium chloride, polyethylene glycol, and bovine plasma albumin. The measurements revealed that variations in the resonant frequency of the cantilever in the different solutions are largely dependent on the viscosity of the medium. An application of this technique is to monitor the progression of a chemical reaction where a change in viscosity is expected to occur. An example is demonstrated through monitoring of the hydrolysis of double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid by DNase I.

  16. Rheology of fluids measured by correlation force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Robbins, Brian; Honig, Christopher D. F.; Walz, John Y.; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2012-04-01

    We describe a method, correlation force spectrometry (CFS), which characterizes fluids through measurement of the correlations between the thermally stimulated vibrations of two closely spaced micrometer-scale cantilevers in fluid. We discuss a major application: measurement of the rheological properties of fluids at high frequency and high spatial resolution. Use of CFS as a rheometer is validated by comparison between experimental data and finite element modeling of the deterministic ring-down of cantilevers using the known viscosity of fluids. The data can also be accurately fitted using a harmonic oscillator model, which can be used for rapid rheometric measurements after calibration. The method is non-invasive, uses a very small amount of fluid, and has no actively moving parts. It can also be used to analyze the rheology of complex fluids. We use CFS to show that (non-Newtonian) aqueous polyethylene oxide solution can be modeled approximately by incorporating an elastic spring between the cantilevers.

  17. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  18. Are Protein Force Fields Getting Better? A Systematic Benchmark on 524 Diverse NMR Measurements.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Kyle A; Lin, Yu-Shan; Das, Rhiju; Pande, Vijay S

    2012-04-10

    Recent hardware and software advances have enabled simulation studies of protein systems on biophysically-relevant timescales, often revealing the need for improved force fields. Although early force field development was limited by the lack of direct comparisons between simulation and experiment, recent work from several labs has demonstrated direct calculation of NMR observables from protein simulations. Here we quantitatively evaluate recent molecular dynamics force fields against a suite of 524 chemical shift and J coupling ((3)JH(N)H(α), (3)JH(N)C(β), (3)JH(α)C', (3)JH(N)C', and (3)JH(α)N) measurements on dipeptides, tripeptides, tetra-alanine, and ubiquitin. Of the force fields examined (ff96, ff99, ff03, ff03*, ff03w, ff99sb*, ff99sb-ildn, ff99sb-ildn-phi, ff99sb-ildn-nmr, CHARMM27, OPLS-AA), two force fields (ff99sb-ildn-phi, ff99sb-ildn-nmr) combining recent side chain and backbone torsion modifications achieve high accuracy in our benchmark. For the two optimal force fields, the calculation error is comparable to the uncertainty in the experimental comparison. This observation suggests that extracting additional force field improvements from NMR data may require increased accuracy in J coupling and chemical shift prediction. To further investigate the limitations of current force fields, we also consider conformational populations of dipeptides, which were recently estimated using vibrational spectroscopy.

  19. Stable dynamics in forced systems with sufficiently high/low forcing frequency.

    PubMed

    Bartuccelli, M; Gentile, G; Wright, J A

    2016-08-01

    We consider parametrically forced Hamiltonian systems with one-and-a-half degrees of freedom and study the stability of the dynamics when the frequency of the forcing is relatively high or low. We show that, provided the frequency is sufficiently high, Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem may be applied even when the forcing amplitude is far away from the perturbation regime. A similar result is obtained for sufficiently low frequency, but in that case we need the amplitude of the forcing to be not too large; however, we are still able to consider amplitudes which are outside of the perturbation regime. In addition, we find numerically that the dynamics may be stable even when the forcing amplitude is very large, well beyond the range of validity of the analytical results, provided the frequency of the forcing is taken correspondingly low. PMID:27586604

  20. Stable dynamics in forced systems with sufficiently high/low forcing frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartuccelli, M.; Gentile, G.; Wright, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider parametrically forced Hamiltonian systems with one-and-a-half degrees of freedom and study the stability of the dynamics when the frequency of the forcing is relatively high or low. We show that, provided the frequency is sufficiently high, Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem may be applied even when the forcing amplitude is far away from the perturbation regime. A similar result is obtained for sufficiently low frequency, but in that case we need the amplitude of the forcing to be not too large; however, we are still able to consider amplitudes which are outside of the perturbation regime. In addition, we find numerically that the dynamics may be stable even when the forcing amplitude is very large, well beyond the range of validity of the analytical results, provided the frequency of the forcing is taken correspondingly low.

  1. Ultrasonic linear measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic linear measurement system uses the travel time of surface waves along the perimeter of a three-dimensional curvilinear body to determine the perimeter of the curvilinear body. The system can also be used piece-wise to measure distances along plane surfaces. The system can be used to measure perimeters where use of laser light, optical means or steel tape would be extremely difficult, time consuming or impossible. It can also be used to determine discontinuities in surfaces of known perimeter or dimension.

  2. The exclusion problem in seasonally forced epidemiological systems.

    PubMed

    Greenman, J V; Adams, B

    2015-02-21

    The pathogen exclusion problem is the problem of finding control measures that will exclude a pathogen from an ecological system or, if the system is already disease-free, maintain it in that state. To solve this problem we work within a holistic control theory framework which is consistent with conventional theory for simple systems (where there is no external forcing and constant controls) and seamlessly generalises to complex systems that are subject to multiple component seasonal forcing and targeted variable controls. We develop, customise and integrate a range of numerical and algebraic procedures that provide a coherent methodology powerful enough to solve the exclusion problem in the general case. An important aspect of our solution procedure is its two-stage structure which reveals the epidemiological consequences of the controls used for exclusion. This information augments technical and economic considerations in the design of an acceptable exclusion strategy. Our methodology is used in two examples to show how time-varying controls can exploit the interference and reinforcement created by the external and internal lag structure and encourage the system to 'take over' some of the exclusion effort. On-off control switching, resonant amplification, optimality and controllability are important issues that emerge in the discussion.

  3. Systems and methods of detecting force and stress using tetrapod nanocrystal

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Charina L.; Koski, Kristie J.; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2013-08-20

    Systems and methods of detecting force on the nanoscale including methods for detecting force using a tetrapod nanocrystal by exposing the tetrapod nanocrystal to light, which produces a luminescent response by the tetrapod nanocrystal. The method continues with detecting a difference in the luminescent response by the tetrapod nanocrystal relative to a base luminescent response that indicates a force between a first and second medium or stresses or strains experienced within a material. Such systems and methods find use with biological systems to measure forces in biological events or interactions.

  4. Direct force measurement between bio-colloidal Giardia lamblia cysts and colloidal silicate glass particles.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Anne-Mari J; Considine, Robert F; Dixon, David R; Fong, Celesta; Drummond, Calum J

    2012-12-11

    Force-separation measurements between Giardia lamblia cysts and an inorganic oxide (silicate glass) have been obtained by using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The cysts are compressible on the scale of the loads applied during force measurement, with the surface compressibility expressed in terms of an interfacial spring constant (K(int)). The force of interaction prior to this Hookean region, on approach, is long-range and repulsive. The long-range force has been compared to models of the electrical double layer as well as an electrosteric layer. The comparison has led to the conclusion that the cyst surface can be described as a polyelectrolyte brush at intermediate separations (5-115 nm from linear compliance) with an electrical double layer often observed at larger separations. The dependence of the interaction force on surface retraction suggests that tethering between the cyst and siliceous surface can occur. The variation of the interaction with pH and upon variation with ionic strength has also been assessed. The information gained from the measurement of the interaction between G. lamblia and this model sandlike surface informs water treatment processes. Similar studies have been performed by us for the Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocyst system to which this work is compared.

  5. Near real-time measurement of forces applied by an optical trap to a rigid cylindrical object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Joseph; Hoeprich, David; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    An automated data acquisition and processing system is established to measure the force applied by an optical trap to an object of unknown composition in real time. Optical traps have been in use for the past 40 years to manipulate microscopic particles, but the magnitude of applied force is often unknown and requires extensive instrument characterization. Measuring or calculating the force applied by an optical trap to nonspherical particles presents additional difficulties which are also overcome with our system. Extensive experiments and measurements using well-characterized objects were performed to verify the system performance.

  6. Measuring shear force transmission across a biomimetic glycocalyx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Isabel; Young, Dylan; Scrimgeour, Jan

    Human blood vessels are lined with a low-density polymer brush known as the glycocalyx. This brush plays an active role in defining the mechanical and biochemical environment of the endothelial cell in the blood vessel wall. In addition, it is involved in the detection of mechanical stimuli, such as the shear stress from blood flowing in the vessel. In this work, we construct a biomimetic version of the glycocalyx on top of a soft deformable substrate in order to measure its ability to modulate the effects of shear stress at the endothelial cell surface. The soft substrate is stamped on to a glass substrate and then enclosed inside a microfluidic device that generates a controlled flow over the substrate. The hydrogel chemistry has been optimized so that it reliably stamps into a defined shape and has consistent mechanical properties. Fluorescent microbeads embedded in the gel allow measurement of the surface deformation, and subsequently, calculation of the shear force at the surface of the soft substrate. We investigate the effect of the major structural elements of the glycocalyx, hyaluronic acid and charged proteoglycans, on the magnitude of the shear force transmitted to the surface of the hydrogel.

  7. Precision volume measuring system

    SciTech Connect

    Klevgard, P.A.

    1984-11-01

    An engineering study was undertaken to calibrate and certify a precision volume measurement system that uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) to ratio a known to an unknown volume. The constant-temperature, computer-controlled system was tested for thermodynamic instabilities, for precision (0.01%), and for bias (0.01%). Ratio scaling was used to optimize the quartz crystal pressure transducer calibration.

  8. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Reynier, Yvan; Yazami, Rachid; Fultz, Brent T.

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  9. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  10. Current measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.

    1997-01-01

    A current measuring system comprising a current measuring device having a first electrode at ground potential, and a second electrode; a current source having an offset potential of at least three hundred volts, the current source having an output electrode; and a capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the output electrode of the current source and having a second electrode electrically connected to the second electrode of the current measuring device.

  11. Current measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, D.A.; Appelhans, A.D.; Olson, J.E.

    1997-09-09

    A current measuring system is disclosed comprising a current measuring device having a first electrode at ground potential, and a second electrode; a current source having an offset potential of at least three hundred volts, the current source having an output electrode; and a capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the output electrode of the current source and having a second electrode electrically connected to the second electrode of the current measuring device. 4 figs.

  12. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip’s vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential’s nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator’s response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement.

  13. Atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy investigations and adhesion force measurements for elucidation of tungsten removal mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, D.J.; Cecchi, J.L.; Hetherington, D.L.

    1999-09-01

    We investigated various interactions between alumina and tungsten films that occur during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Atomic force microscopy surface topography measurements of post-CMP tungsten indicate that the roughness of the tungsten is independent of polish pressure and rotation rate. Pure mechanical abrasion is therefore an unlikely mechanism of material removal during CMP. Transmission electron microscopy images corroborate these results. The adhesion force between alumina and tungsten was measured in solution. The adhesive force increased with KIO{sub 3} concentration. Friction forces were measured in solution using lateral force microscopy. The friction force in buffered solutions was independent of KIO{sub 3} concentration. These results indicate that interactions other than purely mechanical interactions exist during CMP. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  14. Development of a quartz tuning-fork-based force sensor for measurements in the tens of nanoNewton force range during nanomanipulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oiko, V. T. A. Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D.; Martins, B. V. C.; Silva, P. C.

    2014-03-15

    Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1–100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently, applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 5–40 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.

  15. Measuring Teacher Value Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Russell; Lied, Terry

    The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the psychometric properties of a measure of teacher value systems. Three value systems were defined as values associated with (1) the pursuit of truth, (2) social and interpersonal relations, and (3) authority and its exercise. The scale was taken through three stages of development and field…

  16. Digital capacitance measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The hardware phase of a digital capacitance measuring system is presented with the major emphasis placed on the electrical design and operation. Test results are included of the three units fabricated. The system's interface is applicable to existing requirements for the space shuttle vehicle.

  17. Development and evaluation of a new bicycle instrument for measurements of pedal forces and power output in cycling.

    PubMed

    Stapelfeldt, B; Mornieux, G; Oberheim, R; Belli, A; Gollhofer, A

    2007-04-01

    Determination of pedal forces is a prerequisite to analyse cycling performance capability from a biomechanical point of view. Comparing existing pedal force measurement systems, there are methodological or practical limitations regarding the requirements of scientific sports performance research and enhancement. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and to validate a new bicycle instrument that enables pedal forces as well as power output measurements with a free choice of pedal system. The instrument (Powertec-System) is based on force transducer devices, using the Hall-Effect and being mounted between the crank and the pedal. Validation of the method was evaluated by determining the accuracy, the cross talk effect, the influence of lateral forces, the reproducibility and, finally, a possible drift under static conditions. Dynamic tests were conducted to validate the power output measurement in reference to the SRM-System. The mean error of the present system was -0.87 +/- 4.09 % and -1.86 +/- 6.61 % for, respectively, the tangential and radial direction. Cross talk, lateral force influence, reproducibility and drift mean values were < +/- 7 %, < or = 2.4 %, < 0.8 % and 0.02 N x min (-1), respectively. In dynamic conditions, the power output measurement error could be kept below 2.35 %. In conclusion, this method offers the possibility for both valid pedal forces and power output measurements. Moreover, the instrument allows measurements with every pedal system. This method has an interesting potential for biomechanical analyses in cycling research and performance enhancement.

  18. A technique for conditioning and calibrating force-sensing resistors for repeatable and reliable measurement of compressive force.

    PubMed

    Hall, Rick S; Desmoulin, Geoffrey T; Milner, Theodore E

    2008-12-01

    Miniature sensors that could measure forces applied by the fingers and hand without interfering with manual dexterity or range of motion would have considerable practical value in ergonomics and rehabilitation. In this study, techniques have been developed to use inexpensive pressure-sensing resistors (FSRs) to accurately measure compression force. The FSRs are converted from pressure-sensing to force-sensing devices. The effects of nonlinear response properties and dependence on loading history are compensated by signal conditioning and calibration. A fourth-order polynomial relating the applied force to the current voltage output and a linearly weighted sum of prior outputs corrects for sensor hysteresis and drift. It was found that prolonged (>20h) shear force loading caused sensor gain to change by approximately 100%. Shear loading also had the effect of eliminating shear force effects on sensor output, albeit only in the direction of shear loading. By applying prolonged shear loading in two orthogonal directions, the sensors were converted into pure compression sensors. Such preloading of the sensor is, therefore, required prior to calibration. The error in compression force after prolonged shear loading and calibration was consistently <5% from 0 to 30N and <10% from 30 to 40N. This novel method of calibrating FSRs for measuring compression force provides an inexpensive tool for biomedical and industrial design applications where measurements of finger and hand force are needed.

  19. Stress Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under the Aircraft Structural Integrity program, Langley Research Center and Stress Photonics developed an infrared-based stress measurement system for use in nondestructive evaluation of materials and structures. Stress Photonics commercialized the technology in the DeltaTherm 1000 system, used to compare designs and detect cracks in structures, especially for aging aircraft and bridges. The system combines digital signal processing technology with a special infrared camera to provide instantaneous thermal images and live differential images.

  20. Lateral force calibration of an atomic force microscope with a diamagnetic levitation spring system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.; Kim, K.-S.; Rydberg, A.

    2006-06-15

    A novel diamagnetic lateral force calibrator (D-LFC) has been developed to directly calibrate atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever-tip or -bead assemblies. This enables an AFM to accurately measure the lateral forces encountered in friction or biomechanical-testing experiments at a small length scale. In the process of development, deformation characteristics of the AFM cantilever assemblies under frictional loading have been analyzed and four essential response variables, i.e., force constants, of the assembly have been identified. Calibration of the lateral force constant and the 'crosstalk' lateral force constant, among the four, provides the capability of measuring absolute AFM lateral forces. The D-LFC is composed of four NdFeB magnets and a diamagnetic pyrolytic graphite sheet, which can calibrate the two constants with an accuracy on the order of 0.1%. Preparation of the D-LFC and the data processing required to get the force constants is significantly simpler than any other calibration methods. The most up-to-date calibration technique, known as the 'wedge method', calibrates mainly one of the two constants and, if the crosstalk effect is properly analyzed, is primarily applicable to a sharp tip. In contrast, the D-LFC can calibrate both constants simultaneously for AFM tips or beads with any radius of curvature. These capabilities can extend the applicability of AFM lateral force measurement to studies of anisotropic multiscale friction processes and biomechanical behavior of cells and molecules under combined loading. Details of the D-LFC method as well as a comparison with the wedge method are provided in this article.

  1. Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behunin, R. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Decca, R. S.; Genet, C.; Jung, I. W.; Lambrecht, A.; Liscio, A.; López, D.; Reynaud, S.; Schnoering, G.; Voisin, G.; Zeng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy at normal pressure was performed by two different groups on the same Au-coated planar sample used to measure the Casimir interaction in a sphere-plane geometry. The obtained voltage distribution was used to calculate the separation dependence of the electrostatic pressure Pres(D ) in the configuration of the Casimir experiments. In the calculation it was assumed that the potential distribution in the sphere has the same statistical properties as the measured one, and that there are no correlation effects on the potential distributions due to the presence of the other surface. The result of this calculation, using the currently available knowledge, is that Pres(D ) does not explain the magnitude or the separation dependence of the difference Δ P (D ) between the measured Casimir pressure and the one calculated using a Drude model for the electromagnetic response of Au. We discuss in the conclusions the points which have to be checked out by future work, including the influence of pressure and a more accurate determination of the patch distribution, in order to confirm these results.

  2. Measurement of Hand/Handrim Grip Forces in Two Different One Arm Drive Wheelchairs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to explore the total and regional grip forces in the hand when propelling two different manual one arm drive wheelchairs: the Neater Uni-wheelchair (NUW) and a foot steered Action3 wheelchair. Methods. 17 nondisabled users were randomly assigned to each wheelchair to drive around an indoor obstacle course. The Grip, a multiple sensor system taking continuous measurement of handgrip force, was attached to the propelling hand. Total grip force in each region of the hand and total grip force across the whole hand were calculated per user per wheelchair. Results. The Action3 with foot steering only generated significantly greater total grip force in straight running compared to the NUW and also in the fingers and thumb in straight running. Conclusions. The results suggest that the Action3 with foot steering generated greater grip forces which may infer a greater potential for repetitive strain injury in the upper limb. Further work is required to explore whether the difference in grip force is of clinical significance in a disabled population. PMID:25045684

  3. Stability enhancement of an atomic force microscope for long-term force measurement including cantilever modification for whole cell deformation.

    PubMed

    Weafer, P P; McGarry, J P; van Es, M H; Kilpatrick, J I; Ronan, W; Nolan, D R; Jarvis, S P

    2012-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in the study of both morphology and mechanical properties of living cells under physiologically relevant conditions. However, quantitative experiments on timescales of minutes to hours are generally limited by thermal drift in the instrument, particularly in the vertical (z) direction. In addition, we demonstrate the necessity to remove all air-liquid interfaces within the system for measurements in liquid environments, which may otherwise result in perturbations in the measured deflection. These effects severely limit the use of AFM as a practical tool for the study of long-term cell behavior, where precise knowledge of the tip-sample distance is a crucial requirement. Here we present a readily implementable, cost effective method of minimizing z-drift and liquid instabilities by utilizing active temperature control combined with a customized fluid cell system. Long-term whole cell mechanical measurements were performed using this stabilized AFM by attaching a large sphere to a cantilever in order to approximate a parallel plate system. An extensive examination of the effects of sphere attachment on AFM data is presented. Profiling of cantilever bending during substrate indentation revealed that the optical lever assumption of free ended cantilevering is inappropriate when sphere constraining occurs, which applies an additional torque to the cantilevers "free" end. Here we present the steps required to accurately determine force-indentation measurements for such a scenario. Combining these readily implementable modifications, we demonstrate the ability to investigate long-term whole cell mechanics by performing strain controlled cyclic deformation of single osteoblasts.

  4. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2011-05-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  5. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2010-12-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  6. Measurement of optical trapping forces by use of the two-photon-excited fluorescence of microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kachynski, A V; Kuzmin, A N; Pudavar, H E; Kaputa, D S; Cartwright, A N; Prasad, P N

    2003-12-01

    A novel technique for the calibration of laser trapping systems that utilizes two-photon-excited fluorescence of commercial dye-stained microspheres has been demonstrated. The trapping forces as well as the trapping efficiency have been measured for various liquid environments and trapping depths. The trapping efficiency in water was found to decrease with an increase of trapping depths because of the enlargement of the trapping beam waist caused by aberrations of the optical system.

  7. Objective measurement of knee extension force based on computer adaptive testing.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Avi; Marcus, Etgar; Mizrahi, Joseph

    2007-02-01

    False impairment is encountered when tested subjects either unintentionally or deliberately put an artificial upper limit on their force, in which case their true capacity cannot be disclosed in a straight forward measurement. The aim of this study was to develop a computer adaptive testing (CAT) system for directing subjects into generating greater forces than they intended. The system was tested on eleven cooperative female subjects who volunteered to take part in this study. The CAT consisted of interactive testing cycles, each containing a series of isometric tasks of differing intensities. While fulfilling these tasks, the tested subjects were asked to take care not to exceed a self-selected upper force limit (F(ssl)) that they were previously trained to memorize (order of 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction). Visual feedback, displaying the applied force exertions, was provided to the tested subjects but was modified by re-scaling the display in an un-anticipated manner. To confirm the subject's ability to remember her F(ssl), repeatability of joint memory was tested one week after the CAT. The CAT results were successful in causing ten out of the eleven tested participants to exert a higher force than they intended to. Additionally, the CAT algorithm caused a statistically significant higher force than the repeatability test. These results demonstrate the potential of CAT methods in improving the clinical evaluation of muscle strength, particularly in those cases where the subject's cooperation is not sufficient.

  8. Verification of joint input-state estimation for force identification by means of in situ measurements on a footbridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, K.; Nimmen, K. Van; Lourens, E.; Rezayat, A.; Guillaume, P.; Roeck, G. De; Lombaert, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a verification of a joint input-state estimation algorithm using data obtained from in situ experiments on a footbridge. The estimation of the input and the system states is performed in a minimum-variance unbiased way, based on a limited number of response measurements and a system model. A dynamic model of the footbridge is obtained using a detailed finite element model that is updated using a set of experimental modal characteristics. The joint input-state estimation algorithm is used for the identification of two impact, harmonic, and swept sine forces applied to the bridge deck. In addition to these forces, unknown stochastic forces, such as wind loads, are acting on the structure. These forces, as well as measurement errors, give rise to uncertainty in the estimated forces and system states. Quantification of the uncertainty requires determination of the power spectral density of the unknown stochastic excitation, which is identified from the structural response under ambient loading. The verification involves comparing the estimated forces with the actual, measured forces. Although a good overall agreement is obtained between the estimated and measured forces, modeling errors prohibit a proper distinction between multiple forces applied to the structure for the case of harmonic and swept sine excitation.

  9. Preparation and Friction Force Microscopy Measurements of Immiscible, Opposing Polymer Brushes

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Sissi; Kutnyanszky, Edit; Müser, Martin H.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-01-01

    Solvated polymer brushes are well known to lubricate high-pressure contacts, because they can sustain a positive normal load while maintaining low friction at the interface. Nevertheless, these systems can be sensitive to wear due to interdigitation of the opposing brushes. In a recent publication, we have shown via molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy experiments, that using an immiscible polymer brush system terminating the substrate and the slider surfaces, respectively, can eliminate such interdigitation. As a consequence, wear in the contacts is reduced. Moreover, the friction force is two orders of magnitude lower compared to traditional miscible polymer brush systems. This newly proposed system therefore holds great potential for application in industry. Here, the methodology to construct an immiscible polymer brush system of two different brushes each solvated by their own preferred solvent is presented. The procedure how to graft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) from a flat surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is described. PNIPAM is solvated in water and PMMA in acetophenone. Via friction force AFM measurements, it is shown that the friction for this system is indeed reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to the miscible system of PMMA on PMMA solvated in acetophenone. PMID:25590429

  10. Preparation and friction force microscopy measurements of immiscible, opposing polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Sissi; Kutnyanszky, Edit; Müser, Martin H; Vancso, G Julius

    2014-12-24

    Solvated polymer brushes are well known to lubricate high-pressure contacts, because they can sustain a positive normal load while maintaining low friction at the interface. Nevertheless, these systems can be sensitive to wear due to interdigitation of the opposing brushes. In a recent publication, we have shown via molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy experiments, that using an immiscible polymer brush system terminating the substrate and the slider surfaces, respectively, can eliminate such interdigitation. As a consequence, wear in the contacts is reduced. Moreover, the friction force is two orders of magnitude lower compared to traditional miscible polymer brush systems. This newly proposed system therefore holds great potential for application in industry. Here, the methodology to construct an immiscible polymer brush system of two different brushes each solvated by their own preferred solvent is presented. The procedure how to graft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) from a flat surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is described. PNIPAM is solvated in water and PMMA in acetophenone. Via friction force AFM measurements, it is shown that the friction for this system is indeed reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to the miscible system of PMMA on PMMA solvated in acetophenone.

  11. Measurement of Centaur/Orbiter multiple reaction forces in a full-scale test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mole, Philip J.; Griffin, Stan A.

    1986-01-01

    A multiple component load cell for measuring load is described, and its capability and reliability are evaluated by utilizing it to measure the reaction forces between the Centaur and Centaur Support Structure. The system employs 11 six-component balances in a single test rig to react a combination of loads. The vehicle and balance loads, procedures for fabricating each balance, and the assembly of the balances are discussed. The calibration and testing of the balances are examined. It is noted that the multiple component load cell system is a cost-effective method for obtaining an accurate measurement of friction effects and primary loads.

  12. Real-time transverse force sensing using fiber Bragg grating through direct Stokes parameters measurement.

    PubMed

    Su, Yang; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Baofu; Zhou, Hua

    2015-12-14

    Characteristics of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) transverse force sensor based on Stokes parameters are presented. Real-time force measurement is achieved through direct measurement of the Stokes parameters at single wavelength. A proportional relationship and linear fit are found between Stokes parameters and applied force. The sensitivity and dynamic range dependence on the state of polarization (SOP) of the incident light is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A maximum sensitivity of 0.037/N is experimentally achieved and it can be improved further by adjusting the incident SOP. This design significantly reduces system complexity and improves data processing speed, which has great practical value in real-time FBG sensing applications. PMID:26699020

  13. Measurement of forces due to liquid motion in a propellant tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Berry, R. L.; Demchak, L. J.; Craig, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to develop an analytical model capable of predicting the forces acting on a tank caused by large-amplitude propellant motion. This effort contributed to an analysis of the influence of propellant dynamics on separation of the External Tank from the space shuttle orbiter. This paper is concerned with an experimental investigation that aided in development and verification of the analytical model. A scaling approach was developed that allowed the liquid motion to be simulated in subscale tanks. Liquid reorientation forces were measured using two test systems. One operated in the low-gravity environment produced in a drop tower and the second operated aboard the KC-135 'zero-g' test aircraft. The manner of liquid motion, influence of various factors, and the measured forces are discussed.

  14. Partnership for the Revitalization of National Wind Tunnel Force Measurement Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Skelley, Marcus L.; Woike, Mark R.; Bader, Jon B.; Marshall, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Lack of funding and lack of focus on research over the past several years, coupled with force measurement capabilities being decentralized and distributed across the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research centers, has resulted in a significant erosion of (1) capability and infrastructure to produce and calibrate force measurement systems; (2) NASA s working knowledge of those systems; and (3) the quantity of high-quality, full-capability force measurement systems available for use in aeronautics testing. Simultaneously, and at proportional rates, the capability of industry to design, manufacture, and calibrate these test instruments has been eroding primarily because of a lack of investment by the aeronautics community. Technical expertise in this technology area is a core competency in aeronautics testing; it is highly specialized and experience-based, and it represents a niche market for only a few small precision instrument shops in the United States. With this backdrop, NASA s Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) chartered a team to examine the issues and risks associated with the problem, focusing specifically on strain- gage balances. The team partnered with the U.S. Air Force s Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) to exploit their combined capabilities and take a national level government view of the problem. This paper describes the team s approach, its findings, and its recommendations, and the current status for revitalizing the government s balance capability with respect to designing, fabricating, calibrating, and using the instruments.

  15. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  16. Gravitational force and the cardiovascular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D. R.; Olszowka, A. J.; Rokitka, M. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-based simulation studies have been conducted to clarify the problems of the cardiovascular adaptation to alterations in gravitational force. Simulated microgravity experiments resulted in increases in cardiac stretch, urine flow, and sodium excretion, which were accompanied by lower plasma renin, aldosterone, and ADH. There appears to be a decrease in plasma volume as well as in sympathetic tone after 2-3 days of 0 Gz. Complete adjustment to 0 Gz is found within 8 h without a decrease in plasma volume, when subjects are allowed to dehydrate mildly.

  17. Self-Assembled DNA Structures for Molecular Force Measurement: A Magnetically Actuated Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, M.; Lauback, S.; Miller, C.; Peace, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding molecular forces is important to comprehend many of the underlying properties of molecular machines and biological processes. The relevant forces in these cases often lie in the picoNewton range, and thus experiments on individual biomolecules must integrate techniques capable of measuring such forces. A mechanical system to measure molecular forces associated with interacting DNA strands is being developed by using self-assembled DNA nanostructures and super-paramagnetic beads. The DNA nanostructure consists of single-stranded DNA molecules which can be folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides, i.e., staples, via programmed molecular self-assembly. These nanostructures can be polymerized into micron-scale filaments. By functionalizing the filament ends with bispecific conjugate staples, the structure can be attached to a surface as well as labeled with magnetic beads in order to apply a force on the system. External magnetic fields provide the means to maneuver and manipulate the magnetically labeled DNA structures. Preliminary findings associated with the DNA constructs and their manipulation lay the groundwork to establish real-time control of DNA nanodevices with micromanipulation.

  18. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuliang Bi, Shusheng; Wang, Huimin

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  19. A productivity measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, R.H.; Blain, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The system for measuring productivity of the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Drafting Group was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Productivity Measurement System, built on relational data base management software, provides up-to-date information on the productivity of the Drafting Group, the drafting units, and the individual Drafters. The system was developed using data collected in the Drafters Time and Activities Log and Task Baseline Agreement (TBA) that was input to the data base. Using these data, an average usage rate in hours per square foot of drawing, CAD and Manual, was established. This provided a benchmark for management reports that are depicted graphically for ease of trend analyses. In addition, the system provides each drafter an indicator as to where they stand in relation to their peers, and all of the information provided leads to more accurate drafting estimates. 11 figs.

  20. Radiometry spot measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Harry H.; Lawn, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    The radiometry spot measurement system (RSMS) has been designed for use in the Diffusive And Radiative Transport in Fires (DARTFire) experiment, currently under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The RSMS can measure the radiation emitted from a spot of specific size located on the surface of a distant radiation source within a controlled wavelength range. If the spot is located on a blackbody source, its radiation and temperature can be measured directly or indirectly by the RSMS. This report presents computer simulation results used to verify RSMS performance.

  1. Sensor Prototype to Evaluate the Contact Force in Measuring with Coordinate Measuring Arms

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Eduardo; Telenti, Alejandro; Patiño, Hector; González-Madruga, Daniel; Martínez-Pellitero, Susana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and evaluation tests of an integrated force sensor prototype for portable Coordinate Measuring Arms (CMAs or AACMMs). The development is based on the use of strain gauges located on the surface of the CMAs’ hard probe. The strain gauges as well as their cables and connectors have been protected with a custom case, made by Additive Manufacturing techniques (Polyjet 3D). The same method has been selected to manufacture an ergonomic handle that includes trigger mechanics and the electronic components required for synchronizing the trigger signal when probing occurs. The paper also describes the monitoring software that reads the signals in real time, the calibration procedure of the prototype and the validation tests oriented towards increasing knowledge of the forces employed in manual probing. Several experiments read and record the force in real time comparing different ways of probing (discontinuous and continuous contact) and measuring different types of geometric features, from single planes to exterior cylinders, cones, or spheres, through interior features. The probing force is separated into two components allowing the influence of these strategies in probe deformation to be known. The final goal of this research is to improve the probing technique, for example by using an operator training programme, allowing extra-force peaks and bad contacts to be minimized or just to avoid bad measurements. PMID:26057038

  2. Sensor Prototype to Evaluate the Contact Force in Measuring with Coordinate Measuring Arms.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Eduardo; Telenti, Alejandro; Patiño, Hector; González-Madruga, Daniel; Martínez-Pellitero, Susana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and evaluation tests of an integrated force sensor prototype for portable Coordinate Measuring Arms (CMAs or AACMMs). The development is based on the use of strain gauges located on the surface of the CMAs' hard probe. The strain gauges as well as their cables and connectors have been protected with a custom case, made by Additive Manufacturing techniques (Polyjet 3D). The same method has been selected to manufacture an ergonomic handle that includes trigger mechanics and the electronic components required for synchronizing the trigger signal when probing occurs. The paper also describes the monitoring software that reads the signals in real time, the calibration procedure of the prototype and the validation tests oriented towards increasing knowledge of the forces employed in manual probing. Several experiments read and record the force in real time comparing different ways of probing (discontinuous and continuous contact) and measuring different types of geometric features, from single planes to exterior cylinders, cones, or spheres, through interior features. The probing force is separated into two components allowing the influence of these strategies in probe deformation to be known. The final goal of this research is to improve the probing technique, for example by using an operator training programme, allowing extra-force peaks and bad contacts to be minimized or just to avoid bad measurements. PMID:26057038

  3. Sensor Prototype to Evaluate the Contact Force in Measuring with Coordinate Measuring Arms.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Eduardo; Telenti, Alejandro; Patiño, Hector; González-Madruga, Daniel; Martínez-Pellitero, Susana

    2015-06-05

    This paper describes the design, development and evaluation tests of an integrated force sensor prototype for portable Coordinate Measuring Arms (CMAs or AACMMs). The development is based on the use of strain gauges located on the surface of the CMAs' hard probe. The strain gauges as well as their cables and connectors have been protected with a custom case, made by Additive Manufacturing techniques (Polyjet 3D). The same method has been selected to manufacture an ergonomic handle that includes trigger mechanics and the electronic components required for synchronizing the trigger signal when probing occurs. The paper also describes the monitoring software that reads the signals in real time, the calibration procedure of the prototype and the validation tests oriented towards increasing knowledge of the forces employed in manual probing. Several experiments read and record the force in real time comparing different ways of probing (discontinuous and continuous contact) and measuring different types of geometric features, from single planes to exterior cylinders, cones, or spheres, through interior features. The probing force is separated into two components allowing the influence of these strategies in probe deformation to be known. The final goal of this research is to improve the probing technique, for example by using an operator training programme, allowing extra-force peaks and bad contacts to be minimized or just to avoid bad measurements.

  4. Sensorimotor System Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bryan L.; Myers, Joseph B.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of currently available sensorimotor assessment techniques. Data Sources: We drew information from an extensive review of the scientific literature conducted in the areas of proprioception, neuromuscular control, and motor control measurement. Literature searches were conducted using MEDLINE for the years 1965 to 1999 with the key words proprioception, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve conduction testing, electromyography, muscle dynamometry, isometric, isokinetic, kinetic, kinematic, posture, equilibrium, balance, stiffness, neuromuscular, sensorimotor, and measurement. Additional sources were collected using the reference lists of identified articles. Data Synthesis: Sensorimotor measurement techniques are discussed with reference to the underlying physiologic mechanisms, influential factors and locations of the variable within the system, clinical research questions, limitations of the measurement technique, and directions for future research. Conclusions/Recommendations: The complex interactions and relationships among the individual components of the sensorimotor system make measuring and analyzing specific characteristics and functions difficult. Additionally, the specific assessment techniques used to measure a variable can influence attained results. Optimizing the application of sensorimotor research to clinical settings can, therefore, be best accomplished through the use of common nomenclature to describe underlying physiologic mechanisms and specific measurement techniques. PMID:16558672

  5. Possibility of measuring the Abraham force using whispering gallery modes

    SciTech Connect

    Brevik, I.; Ellingsen, S. A.

    2010-06-15

    Critical experimental tests of the time-dependent Abraham force in phenomenological electrodynamics are scarce. In this paper, we analyze the possibility of making use of intensity-modulated whispering gallery modes in a microresonator for this purpose. Systems of this kind appear attractive, as the strong concentration of electromagnetic fields near the rim of the resonator serves to enhance the Abraham torque exerted by the field. We analyze mainly spherical resonators, although as an introductory step we consider also the cylinder geometry. The orders of magnitude of the Abraham torques are estimated by inserting reasonable and common values for the various input parameters. As expected, the predicted torques turn out to be very small, although probably not beyond reach experimentally. Our main idea is essentially a generalization of the method used by G. B. Walker et al.[Can. J. Phys. 53, 2577 (1975)] for low-frequency fields, to the optical case.

  6. Relativistic tidal forces and the possibility of measuring them

    SciTech Connect

    Mashhoon, B.; Theiss, D.S.

    1982-11-22

    The relativistic corrections to the Newtonian tidal accelerations generated by a rotating system are studied. The possibility of testing the relativistic theory of gravitation by measuring such effects in a laboratory in orbit around the Earth is considered. A recent proposal to measure a rotation-dependent tidal acceleration as an alternative to the Stanford gyroscope experiment is critically examined and it is shown that such an experiment does not circumvent the basic difficulties associated with the gyroscope experiment.

  7. A Comparison of Ground Reaction Forces Determined by Portable Force-Plate and Pressure-Insole Systems in Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Kosuke; Scheiber, Peter; Müller, Erich

    2011-01-01

    For the determination of ground reaction forces in alpine skiing, pressure insole (PI) systems and portable force plate (FP) systems are well known and widely used in previous studies. The purposes of this study were 1) to provide reference data for the vertical component of the ground reaction forces (vGRF) during alpine skiing measured by the PI and FP systems, and 2) to analyze whether the differences in the vGRF measured by the PI and the FP depend on a skier’s level, skiing mode and pitch. Ten expert and ten intermediate level skiers performed 10 double turns with the skiing technique “Carving in Short Radii” as High Dynamic Skiing mode and “Parallel Ski Steering in Long Radii” as Low Dynamic Skiing mode on both the steep (23 °) and the flat (15 °) slope twice. All subjects skied with both the PI and the FP system simultaneously. During the outside phase, the mean vGRF and the maximum vGRF determined by the FP are greater than the PI (p < 0.01). Additionally during the inside phase, the mean vGRF determined by the FP were greater than the PI (p < 0.01). During the edge changing phases, the mean vGRF determined by the FP were greater than the PI (p < 0.01). However, the minimum vGRF during the edge changing phases determined by the FP were smaller than the PI (p < 0.01) in the High-Steep skiing modes of Experts and Intermediates (p < 0.001). We have found that generally, the PI system underestimates the total vGRF compared to the FP system. However, this difference depends not only the phase in the turn (inside, outside, edge changing), but also is affected by the skier’s level, the skiing mode performed and pitch. Key points Typically, during the steering phases of the ski turns the total vGRFs measured by the pressure-insole system were lower compared to the portable force-plate system. However, in some skiing modes during the edge changing phase, the pressure-insole system overestimates the total vGRF compared to the portable force-plate system

  8. Wavenumber Locking And Pattern Formation In Spatially Forced Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hagberg, Aric; Meron, Ehud; Manor, Rotem

    2008-01-01

    We study wavenumber locking and pattern formation resulting from weak spatially periodic one-dimensional forcing of two-dimensional systems. We consider systems that support stationary or traveling stripe patterns in the absence of the forcing, and assume that the one-dimensional forcing is aligned with the direction of the stripe patterns. When the forcing wavenumber is about twice as large as the wavenumber of the unforced system we find that the forcing can either select or stabilize a resonant stripe solution at half the forcing wavenumber, or create a new resonant solution. When the wavenumber mismatch is high we find that the wave-vector component of the pattern in the direction of the forcing can stilI lock at half the forcing wavenumber, but a wave-vector component in the orthogonal direction develops to compensate for the total wavenumber. As a result stationary two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns form. When the unforced system supports traveling waves resonant rectangular patterns remain stationary but the oblique patterns travel in a direction orthogonal to the traveling-waves.

  9. Wood stove with safety forced air system

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, A.J.; Thulman, R.D.

    1982-08-03

    A high efficiency, air-tight wood stove has a firebox with front, side, rear, top and bottom walls, primary air introducing means for admitting combustion air into the firebox, air flow means adjacent the bottom of the firebox for directing a flow of air upwardly across at least one firebox wall, at least one supplemental air inlet for diverting a portion of the air from the air flow means into the firebox, fan means for forcing air through the air flow means and through the supplemental air inlet, the size of the primary air introducing means being chosen to automatically restrict the combustion in the firebox if the fan means stops to maintain the temperature of the stove and surroundings at safe levels.

  10. Four-phase patterns in forced oscillatory systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, A. L.; Hagberg, A.; Ardelea, A.; Swinney, H. L.; Meron, E.

    2000-09-01

    We investigate pattern formation in self-oscillating systems forced by an external periodic perturbation. Experimental observations and numerical studies of reaction-diffusion systems and an analysis of an amplitude equation are presented. The oscillations in each of these systems entrain to rational multiples of the perturbation frequency for certain values of the forcing frequency and amplitude. We focus on the subharmonic resonant case where the system locks at one-fourth the driving frequency, and four-phase rotating spiral patterns are observed at low forcing amplitudes. The spiral patterns are studied using an amplitude equation for periodically forced oscillating systems. The analysis predicts a bifurcation (with increasing forcing) from rotating four-phase spirals to standing two-phase patterns. This bifurcation is also found in periodically forced reaction-diffusion equations, the FitzHugh-Nagumo and Brusselator models, even far from the onset of oscillations where the amplitude equation analysis is not strictly valid. In a Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical system periodically forced with light we also observe four-phase rotating spiral wave patterns. However, we have not observed the transition to standing two-phase patterns, possibly because with increasing light intensity the reaction kinetics become excitable rather than oscillatory. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Four-phase patterns in forced oscillatory systems

    PubMed

    Lin; Hagberg; Ardelea; Bertram; Swinney; Meron

    2000-09-01

    We investigate pattern formation in self-oscillating systems forced by an external periodic perturbation. Experimental observations and numerical studies of reaction-diffusion systems and an analysis of an amplitude equation are presented. The oscillations in each of these systems entrain to rational multiples of the perturbation frequency for certain values of the forcing frequency and amplitude. We focus on the subharmonic resonant case where the system locks at one-fourth the driving frequency, and four-phase rotating spiral patterns are observed at low forcing amplitudes. The spiral patterns are studied using an amplitude equation for periodically forced oscillating systems. The analysis predicts a bifurcation (with increasing forcing) from rotating four-phase spirals to standing two-phase patterns. This bifurcation is also found in periodically forced reaction-diffusion equations, the FitzHugh-Nagumo and Brusselator models, even far from the onset of oscillations where the amplitude equation analysis is not strictly valid. In a Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical system periodically forced with light we also observe four-phase rotating spiral wave patterns. However, we have not observed the transition to standing two-phase patterns, possibly because with increasing light intensity the reaction kinetics become excitable rather than oscillatory. PMID:11088896

  12. Four-phase patterns in forced oscillatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A. L.; Hagberg, A.; Ardelea, A.; Bertram, M.; Swinney, H. L.; Meron, E.

    2000-09-01

    We investigate pattern formation in self-oscillating systems forced by an external periodic perturbation. Experimental observations and numerical studies of reaction-diffusion systems and an analysis of an amplitude equation are presented. The oscillations in each of these systems entrain to rational multiples of the perturbation frequency for certain values of the forcing frequency and amplitude. We focus on the subharmonic resonant case where the system locks at one-fourth the driving frequency, and four-phase rotating spiral patterns are observed at low forcing amplitudes. The spiral patterns are studied using an amplitude equation for periodically forced oscillating systems. The analysis predicts a bifurcation (with increasing forcing) from rotating four-phase spirals to standing two-phase patterns. This bifurcation is also found in periodically forced reaction-diffusion equations, the FitzHugh-Nagumo and Brusselator models, even far from the onset of oscillations where the amplitude equation analysis is not strictly valid. In a Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical system periodically forced with light we also observe four-phase rotating spiral wave patterns. However, we have not observed the transition to standing two-phase patterns, possibly because with increasing light intensity the reaction kinetics become excitable rather than oscillatory.

  13. Development of a shear measurement sensor for measuring forces at human-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Kuen; Kim, Seong Guk; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Hyung Joo; Ryu, Jeicheong; Lim, Dohyung; Ko, Chang-Yong; Kim, Han Sung

    2014-12-01

    Measuring shear force is crucial for investigating the pathology and treatment of pressure ulcers. In this study, we introduced a bi-axial shear transducer based on strain gauges as a new shear sensor. The sensor consisted of aluminum and polyvinyl chloride plates placed between quadrangular aluminum plates. On the middle plate, two strain gauges were placed orthogonal to one another. The shear sensor (54 mm × 54 mm × 4.1 mm), which was validated by using standard weights, displayed high accuracy and precision (measurement range, -50 to 50 N; sensitivity, 0.3N; linear relationship, R(2)=0.9625; crosstalk error, 0.635% ± 0.031%; equipment variation, 4.183). The shear force on the interface between the human body and a stand-up wheelchair was measured during sitting or standing movements, using two mats (44.8 cm × 44.8 cm per mat) that consisted of 24 shear sensors. Shear forces on the sacrum and ischium were almost five times higher (15.5 N at last posture) than those on other sites (3.5 N on average) during experiments periods. In conclusion, the proposed shear sensor may be reliable and useful for measuring the shear force on human-machine interfaces. PMID:25445984

  14. Development of a shear measurement sensor for measuring forces at human-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Kuen; Kim, Seong Guk; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Hyung Joo; Ryu, Jeicheong; Lim, Dohyung; Ko, Chang-Yong; Kim, Han Sung

    2014-12-01

    Measuring shear force is crucial for investigating the pathology and treatment of pressure ulcers. In this study, we introduced a bi-axial shear transducer based on strain gauges as a new shear sensor. The sensor consisted of aluminum and polyvinyl chloride plates placed between quadrangular aluminum plates. On the middle plate, two strain gauges were placed orthogonal to one another. The shear sensor (54 mm × 54 mm × 4.1 mm), which was validated by using standard weights, displayed high accuracy and precision (measurement range, -50 to 50 N; sensitivity, 0.3N; linear relationship, R(2)=0.9625; crosstalk error, 0.635% ± 0.031%; equipment variation, 4.183). The shear force on the interface between the human body and a stand-up wheelchair was measured during sitting or standing movements, using two mats (44.8 cm × 44.8 cm per mat) that consisted of 24 shear sensors. Shear forces on the sacrum and ischium were almost five times higher (15.5 N at last posture) than those on other sites (3.5 N on average) during experiments periods. In conclusion, the proposed shear sensor may be reliable and useful for measuring the shear force on human-machine interfaces.

  15. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  16. Early warning signals of tipping points in periodically forced systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Mark S.; Bathiany, Sebastian; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2016-04-01

    The prospect of finding generic early warning signals of an approaching tipping point in a complex system has generated much interest recently. Existing methods are predicated on a separation of timescales between the system studied and its forcing. However, many systems, including several candidate tipping elements in the climate system, are forced periodically at a timescale comparable to their internal dynamics. Here we use alternative early warning signals of tipping points due to local bifurcations in systems subjected to periodic forcing whose timescale is similar to the period of the forcing. These systems are not in, or close to, a fixed point. Instead their steady state is described by a periodic attractor. For these systems, phase lag and amplification of the system response can provide early warning signals, based on a linear dynamics approximation. Furthermore, the Fourier spectrum of the system's time series reveals harmonics of the forcing period in the system response whose amplitude is related to how nonlinear the system's response is becoming with nonlinear effects becoming more prominent closer to a bifurcation. We apply these indicators as well as a return map analysis to a simple conceptual system and satellite observations of Arctic sea ice area, the latter conjectured to have a bifurcation type tipping point. We find no detectable signal of the Arctic sea ice approaching a local bifurcation.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of aerodynamic forces and kinematics in flapping wings of tethered locust.

    PubMed

    Shkarayev, Sergey; Kumar, Rajeev

    2015-12-01

    Aerodynamic and inertial forces and corresponding kinematics of flapping wings of locusts, Schistocerca americana, were investigated in a low-speed wind tunnel. The experimental setup included live locusts mounted on microbalance synchronized with a high-speed video system. Simultaneous measurements of wing kinematics and forces were carried out on three locusts at 7° angle of attack and velocities of 0 m s(-1) and 4 m s(-1). Time variations of flapping and pitching angles exhibit similar patterns in fore- and hindwings and among the animals. Significant tip to root variations in pitching angle are found in both wings. The locusts have much larger flapping and pitching amplitudes in still air causing larger oscillations in inertial forces. Inertial forces are added to the lift and thrust on one part of the stroke, resulting in higher reaction forces and subtracted on the other part. Plots of the lift demonstrate similar trends with and without the wind. The global maxima and peak-to-peak amplitudes in lift are about the same in both tests. However, local minima are significantly lower in still air, resulting in much smaller stroke-averaged lift. Amplitudes of thrust force oscillations are much higher in still air; consequently, the stroke-averaged thrust is higher compared to the non-zero freestream velocity case. PMID:26496206

  18. Simultaneous measurement of aerodynamic forces and kinematics in flapping wings of tethered locust.

    PubMed

    Shkarayev, Sergey; Kumar, Rajeev

    2015-10-23

    Aerodynamic and inertial forces and corresponding kinematics of flapping wings of locusts, Schistocerca americana, were investigated in a low-speed wind tunnel. The experimental setup included live locusts mounted on microbalance synchronized with a high-speed video system. Simultaneous measurements of wing kinematics and forces were carried out on three locusts at 7° angle of attack and velocities of 0 m s(-1) and 4 m s(-1). Time variations of flapping and pitching angles exhibit similar patterns in fore- and hindwings and among the animals. Significant tip to root variations in pitching angle are found in both wings. The locusts have much larger flapping and pitching amplitudes in still air causing larger oscillations in inertial forces. Inertial forces are added to the lift and thrust on one part of the stroke, resulting in higher reaction forces and subtracted on the other part. Plots of the lift demonstrate similar trends with and without the wind. The global maxima and peak-to-peak amplitudes in lift are about the same in both tests. However, local minima are significantly lower in still air, resulting in much smaller stroke-averaged lift. Amplitudes of thrust force oscillations are much higher in still air; consequently, the stroke-averaged thrust is higher compared to the non-zero freestream velocity case.

  19. In vivo motion and force measurement of surgical needle intervention during prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Podder, Tarun; Clark, Douglas; Sherman, Jason; Fuller, Dave; Messing, Edward; Rubens, Deborah; Strang, John; Brasacchio, Ralph; Liao, Lydia; Ng, W.-S.; Yu Yan

    2006-08-15

    In this paper, we present needle insertion forces and motion trajectories measured during actual brachytherapy needle insertion while implanting radioactive seeds in the prostate glands of 20 different patients. The needle motion was captured using ultrasound images and a 6 degree-of-freedom electromagnetic-based position sensor. Needle velocity was computed from the position information and the corresponding time stamps. From in vivo data we found the maximum needle insertion forces to be about 15.6 and 8.9 N for 17 gauge (1.47 mm) and 18 gauge (1.27 mm) needles, respectively. Part of this difference in insertion forces is due to the needle size difference (17G and 18G) and the other part is due to the difference in tissue properties that are specific to the individual patient. Some transverse forces were observed, which are attributed to several factors such as tissue heterogeneity, organ movement, human factors in surgery, and the interaction between the template and the needle. However, theses insertion forces are significantly responsible for needle deviation from the desired trajectory and target movement. Therefore, a proper selection of needle and modulated velocity (translational and rotational) may reduce the tissue deformation and target movement by reducing insertion forces and thereby improve the seed delivery accuracy. The knowledge gleaned from this study promises to be useful for not only designing mechanical/robotic systems but also developing a predictive deformation model of the prostate and real-time adaptive controlling of the needle.

  20. Structure of force networks in tapped particulate systems of disks and pentagons. I. Clusters and loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugnaloni, Luis A.; Carlevaro, C. Manuel; Kramár, M.; Mischaikow, K.; Kondic, L.

    2016-06-01

    The force network of a granular assembly, defined by the contact network and the corresponding contact forces, carries valuable information about the state of the packing. Simple analysis of these networks based on the distribution of force strengths is rather insensitive to the changes in preparation protocols or to the types of particles. In this and the companion paper [Kondic et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062903 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062903], we consider two-dimensional simulations of tapped systems built from frictional disks and pentagons, and study the structure of the force networks of granular packings by considering network's topology as force thresholds are varied. We show that the number of clusters and loops observed in the force networks as a function of the force threshold are markedly different for disks and pentagons if the tangential contact forces are considered, whereas they are surprisingly similar for the network defined by the normal forces. In particular, the results indicate that, overall, the force network is more heterogeneous for disks than for pentagons. Such differences in network properties are expected to lead to different macroscale response of the considered systems, despite the fact that averaged measures (such as force probability density function) do not show any obvious differences. Additionally, we show that the states obtained by tapping with different intensities that display similar packing fraction are difficult to distinguish based on simple topological invariants.

  1. Structure of force networks in tapped particulate systems of disks and pentagons. I. Clusters and loops.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Carlevaro, C Manuel; Kramár, M; Mischaikow, K; Kondic, L

    2016-06-01

    The force network of a granular assembly, defined by the contact network and the corresponding contact forces, carries valuable information about the state of the packing. Simple analysis of these networks based on the distribution of force strengths is rather insensitive to the changes in preparation protocols or to the types of particles. In this and the companion paper [Kondic et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062903 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062903], we consider two-dimensional simulations of tapped systems built from frictional disks and pentagons, and study the structure of the force networks of granular packings by considering network's topology as force thresholds are varied. We show that the number of clusters and loops observed in the force networks as a function of the force threshold are markedly different for disks and pentagons if the tangential contact forces are considered, whereas they are surprisingly similar for the network defined by the normal forces. In particular, the results indicate that, overall, the force network is more heterogeneous for disks than for pentagons. Such differences in network properties are expected to lead to different macroscale response of the considered systems, despite the fact that averaged measures (such as force probability density function) do not show any obvious differences. Additionally, we show that the states obtained by tapping with different intensities that display similar packing fraction are difficult to distinguish based on simple topological invariants. PMID:27415342

  2. Structure of force networks in tapped particulate systems of disks and pentagons. I. Clusters and loops.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Carlevaro, C Manuel; Kramár, M; Mischaikow, K; Kondic, L

    2016-06-01

    The force network of a granular assembly, defined by the contact network and the corresponding contact forces, carries valuable information about the state of the packing. Simple analysis of these networks based on the distribution of force strengths is rather insensitive to the changes in preparation protocols or to the types of particles. In this and the companion paper [Kondic et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062903 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062903], we consider two-dimensional simulations of tapped systems built from frictional disks and pentagons, and study the structure of the force networks of granular packings by considering network's topology as force thresholds are varied. We show that the number of clusters and loops observed in the force networks as a function of the force threshold are markedly different for disks and pentagons if the tangential contact forces are considered, whereas they are surprisingly similar for the network defined by the normal forces. In particular, the results indicate that, overall, the force network is more heterogeneous for disks than for pentagons. Such differences in network properties are expected to lead to different macroscale response of the considered systems, despite the fact that averaged measures (such as force probability density function) do not show any obvious differences. Additionally, we show that the states obtained by tapping with different intensities that display similar packing fraction are difficult to distinguish based on simple topological invariants.

  3. Force Transmission Control in Multilateral System for Teletraining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Seiichiro; Suzuyama, Toshiyuki; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    Recently, skill preservation of an expert has been a serious problem of the medical or production fields. It is difficult to acquire a human motion including touching motion by the conventional visual-based system. A touching motion is inherently bilateral, since an action is always accompanied by a reaction. A bilateral force feedback control is necessary to acquire the human's skill. This paper proposes a haptic teletraining system by multilateral force feedback control. Since the multilateral control transmits haptic information among three or more remote systems, it is possible to train remote trainee by one skilled trainer simultaneously. In the proposed haptic teletraining system, each local system consists of a master-slave system. Since a touching motion is subject to the “law of action and reaction”, it is possible to decompose the force information into action force and reaction force by using the bilateral control. Thus the skilled motion by a trainer is acquired and saved as a digital database integrated with his haptic information. The proposed system is applied to one-trainer/two-trainee system. As a result, a motion including contact with the environment is transmitted and trained with vivid force feedback. The experimental results show viability of the proposed method.

  4. Measurement of nonlinear normal modes using multi-harmonic stepped force appropriation and free decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.

    2016-08-01

    Nonlinear Normal Modes (NNMs) offer tremendous insight into the dynamic behavior of a nonlinear system, extending many concepts that are familiar in linear modal analysis. Hence there is interest in developing methods to experimentally and numerically determine a system's NNMs for model updating or simply to characterize its dynamic response. Previous experimental work has shown that a mono-harmonic excitation can be used to isolate a system's dynamic response in the neighborhood of a NNM along the main backbones of a system. This work shows that a multi-harmonic excitation is needed to isolate a NNM when well separated linear modes of a structure couple to produce an internal resonance. It is shown that one can tune the multiple harmonics of the input excitation using a plot of the input force versus the response velocity until the area enclosed by the force-velocity curve is minimized. Once an appropriated NNM is measured, one can increase the force level and retune the frequency to obtain a NNM at a higher amplitude or remove the excitation and measure the structure's decay down a NNM backbone. This work explores both methods using simulations and measurements of a nominally-flat clamped-clamped beam excited at a single point with a magnetic force. Numerical simulations are used to validate the method in a well defined environment and to provide comparison with the experimentally measured NNMs. The experimental results seem to produce a good estimate of two NNMs along their backbone and part of an internal resonance branch. Full-field measurements are then used to further explore the couplings between the underlying linear modes along the identified NNMs.

  5. Development of a precision indentation and scratching system with a tool force and displacement control module.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Kihwan; Bang, Jinhyeok; Cho, Nahmgyoo; Han, Chang-Soo; Choi, Nak-Sam

    2007-04-01

    This article presents a tip-based micropatterning system with a precision device for measuring the machine force and the tool path. The machine force is obtained by a tool control module with a leaf spring and a capacitive displacement sensor. It is controlled to provide a force that ranges from 80 microN to 8 N. The force sensing unit, which is part of the module, is mounted on a PZT (PbZrTi) driven in-feed motion stage with a resolution of 1 nm. The work piece is set on an X-Y motion stage, and the position can be controlled with a tool path accuracy of 5 nm. Micropatterning and precision indentation experiments were performed, while the machined surfaces were examined by atomic force microscopy. From these results, the feasibility of the system for precise force-displacement control was verified for application in tip-based precision machining.

  6. Estimation of Prestress Force Distribution in the Multi-Strand System of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Keunhee; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Jeong-Rae; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Young-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Prestressed concrete (PSC) is one of the most reliable, durable and widely used construction materials, which overcomes the weakness of concrete in tension by the introduction of a prestress force. Smart strands enabling measurement of the prestress force have recently been developed to maintain PSC structures throughout their lifetime. However, the smart strand cannot give a representative indication of the whole prestress force when used in multi-strand systems since each strand sustains a different prestress force. In this paper, the actual distribution of the prestress force in a multi-strand system is examined using elastomagnetic (EM) sensors to develop a method for tracking representative indicators of the prestress force using smart strands. PMID:26083230

  7. A Solar System Survey of Forced Librations in Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, R. L.; Bills, B. G.

    2003-01-01

    Physical librations in longitude are forced periodic variations of a body's rotation rate. If the torque producing the librations can be calculated, then observations of the phase and amplitude of librations can provide information on mass distribution, and effective strength of the body. In the near future prospects for observing physical librations look quite promising. Radio interferometric observations of Venus and Mercury may yield sufficiently accurate rotational observations that librations there may be visible. Range measurements from Earth to networks of landed instrument packages on Mars are likely to yield librational data there as well. We compute expected libration amplitudes from physical and orbital parameters of a set of planets and satellites partially motivated by a desire to identify candidates for future observations. Solar system bodies occupy one of three general rotation states: non-resonant states, resonant states, and the synchronous resonant state. Analytical treatments of forced librations were initially motivated by the Moon. Lunar librations were predicted by Newton, first detected telescopically by Bessel, and definitively resolved through lunar laser ranging which has led to quite thorough analysis of of librations for the synchronous case. The synchronous resonant state is commonly observed among satellites. The only known body to exist in a non-synchronous resonance is Mercury which exists in a 3:2 resonance, completing three rotations for every two revolutions about the sun. The analysis of Goldreich and Peale has lead to improved understanding of the general case of half integer resonance states. The dynamics of forced librations in non-resonant rotators has received less attention. While there are few cases in which non-resonant forced librations have been observed, Earth is an important exception, and current observing techniques may have the capacity to detect them on Venus. A comprehensive observing program spanning a range of

  8. Urban search and rescue medical teams: FEMA Task Force System.

    PubMed

    Barbera, J A; Lozano, M

    1993-01-01

    Recent national and international disasters involving collapsed structures and trapped casualties (Mexico City; Armenia; Iran; Philippines; Charleston, South Carolina; Loma Prieta, California; and others) have provoked a heightened national concern for the development of an adequate capability to respond quickly and effectively to this type of calamity. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has responded to this need by developing an Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) Response System, a national system of multi-disciplinary task forces for rapid deployment to the site of a collapsed structure incident. Each 56-person task force includes a medical team capable of providing advanced emergency medical care both for task force members and for victims located and reached by the sophisticated search, rescue, and technical components of the task force. This paper reviews the background and development of urban search and rescue, and describes the make-up and function of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Task Force medical teams.

  9. Measuring the Drag Force on a Falling Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the aerodynamic drag force on an object in flight is well known and has been described in this and other journals many times. At speeds less than about 1 m/s, the drag force on a sphere is proportional to the speed and is given by Stokes' law. At higher speeds, the drag force is proportional to the velocity squared and is…

  10. Unbinding forces and energies between a siRNA molecule and a dendrimer measured by force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dumitru, Andra C; Herruzo, Elena T; Rausell, Estrella; Ceña, Valentin; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-12-21

    We have measured the intermolecular forces between small interference RNA (siRNA) and polyamidoamine dendrimers at the single molecular level. A single molecule force spectroscopy approach has been developed to measure the unbinding forces and energies between a siRNA molecule and polyamidoamine dendrimers deposited on a mica surface in a buffer solution. We report three types of unbinding events which are characterized by forces and free unbinding energies, respectively, of 28 pN, 0.709 eV; 38 pN, 0.722 eV; and 50 pN, 0.724 eV. These events reflect different possible electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of one or two dendrimers and the negatively charged phosphate groups of a single siRNA. We have evidence of a high binding affinity of siRNA towards polyamidoamine dendrimers that leads to a 45% probability of measuring specific unbinding events.

  11. Measurement of unsteady pressures in rotating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kienappel, K.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of the experimental determination of unsteady periodic pressure distributions in rotating systems are reported. An indirect method is discussed, and the effects of the centrifugal force and the transmission behavior of the pressure measurement circuit were outlined. The required correction procedures are described and experimentally implemented in a test bench. Results show that the indirect method is suited to the measurement of unsteady nonharmonic pressure distributions in rotating systems.

  12. View of building 11070 showing vents and forced air system ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of building 11070 showing vents and forced air system on east side, looking southwest. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Maintenance Shop, C Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  13. Measure and characterization of lameness in gestating sows using force plate, kinematic, and accelerometer methods.

    PubMed

    Conte, S; Bergeron, R; Gonyou, H; Brown, J; Rioja-Lang, F C; Connor, L; Devillers, N

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to assess sows' lameness by measuring weight distribution on limbs using a force plate made up of 4 individual platforms each resting on 4 single-ended beam load cells. The weight was recorded at an average rate of 14 readings per s over a 15 min period. Ten sows (5 lame sows and 5 sound sows) were weighed twice on 2 different days to assess the repeatability of the measure. Sixty-one sows were then selected in 2 different sites and visually scored for lameness, using a 3-point scoring system (0=normal gait; 1=abnormal gait, and/or stiffness; and 2=shortened stride, and/or the sow puts less weight or avoids putting weight on 1 leg). Various measures were recorded from each sow using the force plate (percentage of weight, the ratio between the weights applied by contralateral legs, weight shifting, and amplitude of weight bearing and weight removing), kinematics (speed, stride length, swing time, stance time, foot height, and carpal and tarsal joints angle average and amplitude), and accelerometers (time spent standing during 24 h, frequency of stepping behavior during feeding, and latency to lie down after feed delivery). The within-sow CV for each measure taken from the force plate were lower than 15%, which reflects a good repeatability. Among force plate measures, only the weight shifting frequency and the ratio between the weights applied by contralateral legs differed between lameness scores. Sows that scored 2 had a higher frequency of weight shifting for fore legs (P=0.0003) and hind legs (P=0.0007) than sows scored 0 and 1. The ratio between the weights applied by contralateral legs decreased with the increase of lameness score for the hind limbs (P=0.014). However, these measures also differed between sites (P<0.01). These differences may be due to various reasons, including but not limited to genetics and housing systems. Nevertheless, the results suggest that force plate measures such as the asymmetry in the weight applied between a

  14. Kinetic analysis of ski turns based on measured ground reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Vaverka, Frantisek; Vodickova, Sona; Elfmark, Milan

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to devise a method of kinetic analysis of the ground reaction force that enables the durations and magnitudes of forces acting during the individual phases of ski turns to be described exactly. The method is based on a theoretical analysis of physical forces acting during the ski turn. Two elementary phases were defined: (1) preparing to turn (initiation) and (2) actual turning, during which the center of gravity of the skier-ski system moves along a curvilinear trajectory (steering). The starting point of the turn analysis is a dynamometric record of the resultant acting ground reaction force applied perpendicularly on the ski surface. The method was applied to six expert skiers. They completed a slalom course comprising five gates arranged on the fall line of a 26° slope at a competition speed using symmetrical carving turns (30 evaluated turns). A dynamometric measurement system was placed on the carving skis (168 cm long, radius 16 m, data were recorded at 100 Hz). MATLAB procedures were used to evaluate eight variables during each turn: five time variables and three force variables. Comparison of the turn analysis results between individuals showed that the method is useful for answering various research questions associated with ski turns.

  15. Contact force measurement of instruments for force-feedback on a surgical robot: acceleration force cancellations based on acceleration sensor readings.

    PubMed

    Shimachi, Shigeyuki; Kameyama, Fumie; Hakozaki, Yoshihide; Fujiwara, Yasunori

    2005-01-01

    For delicate operations conducted using surgical robot systems, surgeons need to receive information regarding the contact forces on the tips of surgical instruments. For the detection of this contact force, one of the authors previously proposed a new method, called the overcoat method, in which the instrument is supported by sensors positioned on the overcoat pipe. This method requires cancellation of the acceleration forces of the instrument/holder attached to the overcoat sensor. In the present report, the authors attempt to use acceleration sensors to obtain the acceleration forces of the instrument/holder. The new cancellation method provides a force-detection accuracy of approximately 0.05-0.1 N for a dynamic response range of up to approximately 20 Hz, compared to approximately 1 Hz, which was achieved by using acceleration forces based on the theoretical robot motion.

  16. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  17. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  18. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  19. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  20. System for Measuring Capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNichol, Randal S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system has been developed for detecting the level of a liquid in a tank wherein a capacitor positioned in the tank has spaced plates which are positioned such that the dielectric between the plates will be either air or the liquid, depending on the depth of the liquid in the tank. An oscillator supplies a sine wave current to the capacitor and a coaxial cable connects the capacitor to a measuring circuit outside the tank. If the cable is very long or the capacitance to be measured is low, the capacitance inherent in the coaxial cable will prevent an accurate reading. To avoid this problem, an inductor is connected across the cable to form with the capacitance of the cable a parallel resonant circuit. The impedance of the parallel resonant circuit is infinite, so that attenuation of the measurement signal by the stray cable capacitance is avoided.

  1. Inverse combustion force estimation based on response measurements outside the combustion chamber and signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Mohd. Nor, Mohd. Jailani; Kamal Ariffin, Ahmad; Abdullah, Shahrir

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to vibration has various physiological effects on vehicle passengers. Engine is one of the main sources of vehicle vibration. The major causes of engine vibration are combustion forces transmitted through the pistons and connection rods. Evaluation of sources is the first step to attenuate this vibration. Assessment of these sources is not an easy task because internal parts of machinery are not accessible. Often, instrumentation for such systems is costly, time consuming and some modifications would be necessary. Aim of the first part of this paper was to validate an inverse technique and carry out mobility analysis on a vehicle crankshaft to achieve matrix of Frequency Response Functions (FRFs). Outcomes were implemented to reconstruct the applied force for single and multiple-input systems. In the second part, the validated inverse technique and FRFs were used to estimate piston forces of an operating engine. Bearings of crankshaft were chosen as nearest accessible parts to piston connecting rods. Accelerometers were connected to the bearings for response measurement during an ideal engine operation. These responses together with FRFs, which were estimated in the previous part, were utilised in the inverse technique. Tikhonov regularization was used to solve the ill-conditioned inverse system. Two methods, namely L-curve criterion and Generalized Cross Validation (GCV), were employed to find the regularization parameter for the Tikhonov method. The inverse problem was solved and piston forces applied to crankpins were estimated. Results were validated by pressure measurement inside a cylinder and estimating the corresponding combustion force. This validation showed that inverse technique and measurement outcomes were roughly in agreement. In presence of various noise, L-curve criterion conduces to more robust results compared to the GCV method. But in the absence of high correlation between sources ( f>600 HzHz), the GCV technique leads to more accurate

  2. Dynamic force measurement of rearrangements in a 2D network of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkley, Solomon; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between two liquid droplets in an immiscible liquid is well understood. However, the emulsions relevant to biological and industrial processes involve high concentrations of these droplets, and multi-body effects cannot be ignored. As droplets rearrange in response to a disturbance, the importance of individual pair-wise interactions between droplets changes with the geometry of neighbours. Here we report on an experimental setup consisting of a two- dimensional network of monodisperse droplets stabilized with a surfactant. The system is studied with micropipette deflection, which permits direct measurement of forces along with simultaneous imaging of the droplet network. One micropipette is used to apply a tensile or compressive force to the droplet cluster, while a second pipette acts as a force-transducing cantilever, deflecting in response to rearrangements of the droplets.

  3. On the tip calibration for accurate modulus measurement by contact resonance atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Passeri, D; Rossi, M; Vlassak, J J

    2013-05-01

    Accurate quantitative elastic modulus measurements using contact resonance atomic force microscopy require the calibration of geometrical and mechanical properties of the tip as well as the choice of a suitable model for describing the cantilever-tip-sample system. In this work, we demonstrate with both simulations and experiments that the choice of the model influences the results of the calibration. Neglecting lateral force results in the underestimation of the tip indentation modulus and in the overestimation of the tip-sample contact radius. We propose a new approach to the calibration and data analysis, where lateral forces and cantilever inclination are neglected (which simplifies the calculations) and the tip parameters are assumed as fictitious.

  4. Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.

    2003-11-01

    Closing registers in forced air heating systems and leaving some rooms in a house unconditioned has been suggested as a method of quickly saving energy for California consumers. This study combined laboratory measurements of the changes in duct leakage as registers are closed together with modeling techniques to estimate the changes in energy use attributed to closing registers. The results of this study showed that register closing led to increased energy use for a typical California house over a wide combination of climate, duct leakage and number of closed registers. The reduction in building thermal loads due to conditioning only a part of the house was offset by increased duct system losses; mostly due to increased duct leakage. Therefore, the register closing technique is not recommended as a viable energy saving strategy for California houses with ducts located outside conditioned space. The energy penalty associated with the register closing technique was found to be minimized if registers furthest from the air handler are closed first because this tends to only affect the pressures and air leakage for the closed off branch. Closing registers nearer the air handler tends to increase the pressures and air leakage for the whole system. Closing too many registers (more than 60%) is not recommended because the added flow resistance severely restricts the air flow though the system leading to safety concerns. For example, furnaces may operate on the high-limit switch and cooling systems may suffer from frozen coils.

  5. Merging Psychophysical and Psychometric Theory to Estimate Global Visual State Measures from Forced-Choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massof, Robert W.; Schmidt, Karen M.; Laby, Daniel M.; Kirschen, David; Meadows, David

    2013-09-01

    Visual acuity, a forced-choice psychophysical measure of visual spatial resolution, is the sine qua non of clinical visual impairment testing in ophthalmology and optometry patients with visual system disorders ranging from refractive error to retinal, optic nerve, or central visual system pathology. Visual acuity measures are standardized against a norm, but it is well known that visual acuity depends on a variety of stimulus parameters, including contrast and exposure duration. This paper asks if it is possible to estimate a single global visual state measure from visual acuity measures as a function of stimulus parameters that can represent the patient's overall visual health state with a single variable. Psychophysical theory (at the sensory level) and psychometric theory (at the decision level) are merged to identify the conditions that must be satisfied to derive a global visual state measure from parameterised visual acuity measures. A global visual state measurement model is developed and tested with forced-choice visual acuity measures from 116 subjects with no visual impairments and 560 subjects with uncorrected refractive error. The results are in agreement with the expectations of the model.

  6. A Biomechanical Assessment of Hand/Arm Force with Pneumatic Nail Gun Actuation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Brian D.; Albers, James; Hudock, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    A biomechanical model is presented, and combined with measurements of tip press force, to estimate total user hand force associated with two pneumatic nail gun trigger systems. The contact actuation trigger (CAT) can fire a nail when the user holds the trigger depressed first and then “bumps” the nail gun tip against the workpiece. With a full sequential actuation trigger (SAT) the user must press the tip against the workpiece prior to activating the trigger. The SAT is demonstrably safer in reducing traumatic injury risk, but increases the duration (and magnitude) of tip force exertion. Time integrated (cumulative) hand force was calculated for a single user from measurements of the tip contact force with the workpiece and transfer time between nails as inputs to a static model of the nail gun and workpiece in two nailing task orientations. The model shows the hand force dependence upon the orientation of the workpiece in addition to the trigger system. Based on standard time allowances from work measurement systems (i.e. Methods-Time Measurement - 1) it is proposed that efficient application of hand force with the SAT in maintaining tip contact can reduce force exertion attributable to the sequential actuation trigger to 2–8% (horizontal nailing) and 9–20% (vertical nailing) of the total hand/arm force. The present model is useful for considering differences in cumulative hand/arm force exposure between the SAT and CAT systems and may explain the appeal of the CAT trigger in reducing the user’s perception of muscular effort. PMID:26321780

  7. Electrostatic forces in muscle and cylindrical gel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Millman, B.M.; Nickel, B.G.

    1980-10-01

    Repulsive pressure has been measured as a function of lattice spacing in gels of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and in the filament lattice of vertebrate striated muscle. External pressures up to ten atm have been applied to these lattices by an osmotic stress method. Numerical solutions to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation in hexagonal lattices have been obtained and compared to the TMV and muscle data. The theoretical curves using values for kappa calculated from the ionic strength give a good fit to experimental data from TMV gels, and an approximate fit to that from the muscle lattice, provided that a charge radius for the muscle thick filaments of approx. 16 nm is assumed. Variations in ionic strength, sarcomere length and state of the muscle give results which agree qualitatively with the theory, though a good fit between experiment and theory in the muscle case will clearly require consideration of other types of forces. We conclude that Poisson-Boltzmann theory can provide a good first approximation to the long-range electrostatic forces operating in such biological gel systems.

  8. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  9. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction. PMID:25424490

  10. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F Stefan

    2014-11-26

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction.

  11. Repulsive force support system feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W.; Abdelsalam, M. K.; Eyssa, Y. M.; Mcintosh, G. E.

    1987-01-01

    A new concept in magnetic levitation and control is introduced for levitation above a plane. A set of five vertical solenoid magnets mounted flush below the plane supports and controls the model in five degrees of freedom. The compact system of levitation coils is contained in a space 2.4 m (96 in) diameter by 1 m (40 in) deep with the top of the levitation system 0.9 m (36 in) below the center line of the suspended model. The levitated model has a permanent magnet core held in position by the five parallel superconductive solenoids symmetrically located in a circle. The control and positioning system continuously corrects for model position in five dimensions using computer current pulses superimposed on the levitation coil base currents. The conceptual designs include: superconductive and Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet model cores and levitation solenoids of either superconductive, cryoresistive, or room temperature windings.

  12. Measuring stall forces in vivo with optical tweezers through light momentum changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, J.; Farré, A.; López-Quesada, C.; Fernández, X.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2011-10-01

    The stall forces of processive molecular motors have been widely studied previously in vitro. Even so, in vivo experiments are required for determining the actual performance of each molecular motor in its natural environment. We report the direct measurement of light momentum changes in single beam optical tweezers as a suitable technique for measuring forces inside living cells, where few alternatives exist. The simplicity of this method, which does not require force calibration for each trapped object, makes it convenient for measuring the forces involved in fast dynamic biological processes such us intracellular traffic. Here we present some measurements of the stall force of processive molecular motors inside living Allium cepa cells.

  13. Collective behaviors of the Casimir force in microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H. B.; Yelton, J.

    2013-01-23

    Our goal was to explore the strong dependence of the Casimir force on the shape of the interacting bodies. We made significant progress and measured the Casimir force on silicon surface with rectangular corrugation and showed that the results agree with theoretical calculations, provided that the optical properties of silicon are taken into account. Furthermore, we performed measurement of the Casimir force within a single chip for the first time, between a doubly clamped beam and a movable, on-chip electrode at liquid helium temperature. This experiment represents a new way of studying the Casimir effect, a significant advance from the conventional approach of placing an external surface close to a force transducer.

  14. Quantification of hand grasp force using a pressure mapping system.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Jon W; Corvese, Russel J; Woolley, Charles; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use a pressure sensor to measure the force distribution and contact area of the hand when gripping, pushing, and pulling a cylinder. Data was collected from 10 subjects with no hand impairments and from 1 subject with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Subjects grasped an aluminum cylinder wrapped with a Tekscan pressure sensor and performed each trial at 25%, 50%, and 100% maximum voluntary exertion. A relationship was found between increasing exertion and increasing hand area with increasing hand contact area. The force distribution maps showed the thenar region of the hand exerts the most force during pushing while the metacarpal joint line exerts the highest force during pulling. The third and fourth phalange were found to exert the highest phalange force during gripping. The force distribution maps from the RA subject showed higher thumb forces and distal phalange forces, relative to the entire phalange, compared to the non-impaired subjects. This suggests that the RA subject compensates for the lack of phalange function with the regions of the hand that still function. Future studies should sample individuals with a larger hand area range and sample more individuals with RA.

  15. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James; Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Samuel; Mihalusova, Mariana

    2003-03-01

    We have commissioned a superconducting solenoid based apparatus designed to exert strong magnetic body forces on biological specimens and other organic materials in ambient environmental conditions for extended periods. In its room temperature bore, it can produce a maximum magnetic field-field gradient product of 16 T^2-cm-1 which is sufficient to levitate frog embryos Xenopus Laevis[1]. We will discuss how we are applying these magnetic body forces to probe the known influences of gravitational forces on frog embryos and the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. In the process, we will describe a novel method for measuring the diamagnetic susceptibilities of specimens such as paramecia.

  16. Measuring the elastic properties of living cells with atomic force microscopy indentation.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Joanna L; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful and versatile tool for probing the mechanical properties of biological samples. This chapter describes the procedures for using AFM indentation to measure the elastic moduli of living cells. We include step-by-step instructions for cantilever calibration and data acquisition using a combined AFM/optical microscope system, as well as a detailed protocol for data analysis. Our protocol is written specifically for the BioScope™ Catalyst™ AFM system (Bruker AXS Inc.); however, most of the general concepts can be readily translated to other commercial systems.

  17. Sliding/rolling phobic droplets along a fiber: measurement of interfacial forces.

    PubMed

    Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Bergen, Tanja; Becker, Thomas; O'Leary, Rebecca A; Kasper, Gerhard; Mullins, Benjamin J

    2012-02-21

    Phobic droplet-fiber systems possess complex geometries, which have made full characterization of such systems difficult. This work has used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure droplet-fiber forces for oil droplets on oleophobic fibers over a range of fiber diameters. The work adapted a previous method and a theoretical model developed by the authors for philic droplet-fiber systems. A Bayesian statistical model was also used to account for the influence of surface roughness on the droplet-fiber force. In general, it has been found that the force required to move a liquid droplet along an oleophobic filter fiber will be less than that required to move a droplet along an oleophilic fiber. However, because of the effects of pinning and/or wetting behavior, this difference may be less than would otherwise be expected. Droplets with a greater contact angle (~110°) were observed to roll along the fiber, whereas droplets with a lesser contact angle (<90°) would slide. PMID:22260243

  18. Sliding/rolling phobic droplets along a fiber: measurement of interfacial forces.

    PubMed

    Mead-Hunter, Ryan; Bergen, Tanja; Becker, Thomas; O'Leary, Rebecca A; Kasper, Gerhard; Mullins, Benjamin J

    2012-02-21

    Phobic droplet-fiber systems possess complex geometries, which have made full characterization of such systems difficult. This work has used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure droplet-fiber forces for oil droplets on oleophobic fibers over a range of fiber diameters. The work adapted a previous method and a theoretical model developed by the authors for philic droplet-fiber systems. A Bayesian statistical model was also used to account for the influence of surface roughness on the droplet-fiber force. In general, it has been found that the force required to move a liquid droplet along an oleophobic filter fiber will be less than that required to move a droplet along an oleophilic fiber. However, because of the effects of pinning and/or wetting behavior, this difference may be less than would otherwise be expected. Droplets with a greater contact angle (~110°) were observed to roll along the fiber, whereas droplets with a lesser contact angle (<90°) would slide.

  19. Thermal noise limitations to force measurements with torsion pendulums: Applications to the measurement of the Casimir force and its thermal correction

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, S.K.; Buttler, W.T.

    2005-03-01

    A general analysis of thermal noise in torsion pendulums is presented. The specific case where the torsion angle is kept fixed by electronic feedback is analyzed. This analysis is applied to a recent experiment that employed a torsion pendulum to measure the Casimir force. The ultimate limit to the distance at which the Casimir force can be measured to high accuracy is discussed, and in particular we elaborate on the prospects for measuring the thermal correction.

  20. Temperature dependence of levitation force and its relaxation in a HTS levitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Xing-Yi; Zhou, You-He

    2010-03-01

    Using a modified Gifford-McMahon refrigerator to cool the cylindrical bulk YBaCuO superconductor within the region of 100-10 K, and using an updated high-temperature superconductor (HTS) maglev measurement system, the levitation force and its time relaxation at different temperatures between a YBaCuO bulk superconductor and a permanent magnet (PM) have been measured under zero-field cooling. It is found that decrease the cooling temperature of HTS can decrease the hysteresis of magnetization and increase the maximum levitation force of each hysteresis loop. For the relaxation of levitation force, if the temperature is continually lowered to 10 K after the relaxation measurement at given cooling temperature is performed for 600 s, the levitation force will continue to decrease sharply with the lowering of temperature even though it will get stable if the temperature is not lowered. Our results shown in this work are a benefit to the understanding of levitation systems.

  1. SUMP MEASURING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettos, N; Athneal Marzolf, A; Casandra Robinson, C; James Fiscus, J; Daniel Krementz, D; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26

    The process sumps in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS) collect leaks from process tanks and jumpers. To prevent build-up of fissile material the sumps are frequently flushed which generates liquid waste and is prone to human error. The development of inserts filled with a neutron poison will allow a reduction in the frequency of flushing. Due to concrete deterioration and deformation of the sump liners the current dimensions of the sumps are unknown. Knowledge of these dimensions is necessary for development of the inserts. To solve this problem a remote Sump Measurement System was designed, fabricated, and tested to aid development of the sump inserts.

  2. Atomic Force Microscope Conductivity Measurements on Single Ferritin Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2003-10-01

    We will present electrical measurement on the conductivity of ferritin molecules by conductive AFM. The high stability of ferritin relative to other proteins makes them attractive for nanotechnology applications such as nanoscale batteries. Ferritins are very stable, biological molecules found widely distributed in nature that are responsible for metabolic control of iron in living systems. Ferritins consist of 24 protein subunits that are arrayed to form spherical molecules 12 nm in external diameter with a hollow interior about 8 nm in diameter. The hollow ferritin interior can be filled with up to 4500 iron atoms as Fe(OH)3. Ferritin molecules were self assembled on gold surfaces to form a single ferritin monolayer. AFM was used to study this assembly on atomically flat gold surfaces. Conductivity of the ferritin protein shell of single ferritin molecule was investigated by conductive AFM and compared to conductivity measurements on films of ferritin molecules.

  3. Visualized Multiprobe Electrical Impedance Measurements with STM Tips Using Shear Force Feedback Control.

    PubMed

    Botaya, Luis; Coromina, Xavier; Samitier, Josep; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here we devise a multiprobe electrical measurement system based on quartz tuning forks (QTFs) and metallic tips capable of having full 3D control over the position of the probes. The system is based on the use of bent tungsten tips that are placed in mechanical contact (glue-free solution) with a QTF sensor. Shear forces acting in the probe are measured to control the tip-sample distance in the Z direction. Moreover, the tilting of the tip allows the visualization of the experiment under the optical microscope, allowing the coordination of the probes in X and Y directions. Meanwhile, the metallic tips are connected to a current-voltage amplifier circuit to measure the currents and thus the impedance of the studied samples. We discuss here the different aspects that must be addressed when conducting these multiprobe experiments, such as the amplitude of oscillation, shear force distance control, and wire tilting. Different results obtained in the measurement of calibration samples and microparticles are presented. They demonstrate the feasibility of the system to measure the impedance of the samples with a full 3D control on the position of the nanotips. PMID:27231911

  4. Visualized Multiprobe Electrical Impedance Measurements with STM Tips Using Shear Force Feedback Control

    PubMed Central

    Botaya, Luis; Coromina, Xavier; Samitier, Josep; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here we devise a multiprobe electrical measurement system based on quartz tuning forks (QTFs) and metallic tips capable of having full 3D control over the position of the probes. The system is based on the use of bent tungsten tips that are placed in mechanical contact (glue-free solution) with a QTF sensor. Shear forces acting in the probe are measured to control the tip-sample distance in the Z direction. Moreover, the tilting of the tip allows the visualization of the experiment under the optical microscope, allowing the coordination of the probes in X and Y directions. Meanwhile, the metallic tips are connected to a current–voltage amplifier circuit to measure the currents and thus the impedance of the studied samples. We discuss here the different aspects that must be addressed when conducting these multiprobe experiments, such as the amplitude of oscillation, shear force distance control, and wire tilting. Different results obtained in the measurement of calibration samples and microparticles are presented. They demonstrate the feasibility of the system to measure the impedance of the samples with a full 3D control on the position of the nanotips. PMID:27231911

  5. Haptic control of the hand force feedback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisco, Giuseppe M.; Ortiz, Massimiliano; Barbagli, Frederico; Avizzano, Carlo A.; Bergamasco, Massimo

    1999-11-01

    The Hand Force Feedback System is an anthropomorphic haptic interface for the replication of the forces arising during grasping and fine manipulation operations. It is composed of four independent finger dorsal exoskeletons which wrap up four fingers of the human hand (the little finger is excluded). Each finger possesses three electrically actuated DOF placed in correspondence with the human finger flexion axes and a passive DOF allowing finger abduction movements.

  6. Direct Measurements of Drag Forces in C. elegans Crawling Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Rabets, Yegor; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Ryu, William S.

    2014-01-01

    With a simple and versatile microcantilever-based force measurement technique, we have probed the drag forces involved in Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion. As a worm crawls on an agar surface, we found that substrate viscoelasticity introduces nonlinearities in the force-velocity relationships, yielding nonconstant drag coefficients that are not captured by original resistive force theory. A major contributing factor to these nonlinearities is the formation of a shallow groove on the agar surface. We measured both the adhesion forces that cause the worm’s body to settle into the agar and the resulting dynamics of groove formation. Furthermore, we quantified the locomotive forces produced by C. elegans undulatory motions on a wet viscoelastic agar surface. We show that an extension of resistive force theory is able to use the dynamics of a nematode’s body shape along with the measured drag coefficients to predict the forces generated by a crawling nematode. PMID:25418179

  7. An atomic force microscope operating at hypergravity for in situ measurement of cellular mechano-response.

    PubMed

    van Loon, J J W A; van Laar, M C; Korterik, J P; Segerink, F B; Wubbels, R J; de Jong, H A A; van Hulst, N F

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel atomic force microscope (AFM) system, operational in liquid at variable gravity, dedicated to image cell shape changes of cells in vitro under hypergravity conditions. The hypergravity AFM is realized by mounting a stand-alone AFM into a large-diameter centrifuge. The balance between mechanical forces, both intra- and extracellular, determines both cell shape and integrity. Gravity seems to be an insignificant force at the level of a single cell, in contrast to the effect of gravity on a complete (multicellular) organism, where for instance bones and muscles are highly unloaded under near weightless (microgravity) conditions. However, past space flights and ground based cell biological studies, under both hypogravity and hypergravity conditions have shown changes in cell behaviour (signal transduction), cell architecture (cytoskeleton) and proliferation. Thus the role of direct or indirect gravity effects at the level of cells has remained unclear. Here we aim to address the role of gravity on cell shape. We concentrate on the validation of the novel AFM for use under hypergravity conditions. We find indications that a single cell exposed to 2 to 3 x g reduces some 30-50% in average height, as monitored with AFM. Indeed, in situ measurements of the effects of changing gravitational load on cell shape are well feasible by means of AFM in liquid. The combination provides a promising technique to measure, online, the temporal characteristics of the cellular mechano-response during exposure to inertial forces. PMID:19220689

  8. Performance enhancement of a Lorentz force velocimeter using a buoyancy-compensated magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Leineweber, J.; Resagk, C.

    2015-07-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a highly feasible method for measuring flow rate in a pipe or a duct. This method has been established for liquid metal flows but also for electrolytes such as saltwater. A decrease in electrical conductivity of the medium causes a decrease of the Lorentz force which needs to be resolved, affecting the accuracy of the measurement. We use an electrical force compensation (EFC) balance for the determination of the tiny force signals in a test channel filled with electrolyte solution. It is used in a 90°-rotated orientation with a magnet system hanging vertically on its load bar. The thin coupling elements of its parallel guiding system limit the mass of the magnets to 1 kg. To overcome this restriction, which limits the magnetic flux density and hence the Lorentz forces, a weight force compensation mechanism is developed. Therefore, different methods such as air bearing are conceivable, but for the elimination of additional horizontal force components which would disturb the force signal, only compensation by lift force provided by buoyancy is reasonable. We present a swimming body setup that will allow larger magnet systems than before, because a large amount of the weight force will be compensated by this lift force. Thus the implementation of this concept has to be made with respect to hydrodynamical and mechanical stability. This is necessary to avoid overturning of the swimming body setup and to prevent inelastic deformation. Additionally, the issue will be presented and discussed whether thermal convection around the lifting body diminishes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) significantly or not.

  9. Hydrodynamic corrections to contact resonance atomic force microscopy measurements of viscoelastic loss tangenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Ryan C.; Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method to improve accuracy in measurements of nanoscale viscoelastic material properties with contact resonance atomic force microscope methods. Through the use of the two-dimensional hydrodynamic function, we obtain a more precise estimate of the fluid damping experienced by the cantilever-sample system in contact resonance experiments, leading to more accurate values for the tip-sample damping and related material properties. Specifically, we consider the damping and added mass effects generated by both the proximity of the cantilever to the sample surface and the frequency dependence on the hydrodynamic loading of the system. The theoretical correction method is implemented on experimental contact resonance measurements. The measurements are taken on a thin polystyrene film and are used to determine the viscoelastic loss tangent, tan δ, of the material. The magnitude of the corrections become significant on materials with low tan δ (<0.1) and are especially important for measurements made with the first flexural mode of vibration.

  10. Repeatability of measurements: Non-Hermitian observables and quantum Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-08-01

    A noncommuting measurement transfers, via the apparatus, information encoded in a system's state to the external "observer." Classical measurements determine properties of physical objects. In the quantum realm, the very same notion restricts the recording process to orthogonal states as only those are distinguishable by measurements. Therefore, even a possibility to describe physical reality by means of non-Hermitian operators should volens nolens be excluded as their eigenstates are not orthogonal. Here, we show that non-Hermitian operators with real spectra can be treated within the standard framework of quantum mechanics. Furthermore, we propose a quantum canonical transformation that maps Hermitian systems onto non-Hermitian ones. Similar to classical inertial forces this map is accompanied by an energetic cost, pinning the system on the unitary path.

  11. Optimum control forces for multibody systems with intermittent motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ider, Sitki Kemal; Amirouche, F. M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to address the continuity of motion when a dynamical system is suddenly subjected to constraint conditions. Motion discontinuity due to the initial constraint violation is avoided by prior control forces that adjust the motion and yield velocity and acceleration consistent at the point of application of the constraint. The optimum control forces are determined for a specified control interval. The method proposed provides an optimum adjustment of the system's motion and assures that the stresses developed at the system components are kept within acceptable limits. The procedures developed will be illustrated making use of inequality constraints applied to obstacle avoidance problems in robotics.

  12. Measurements of the force fields within an acoustic standing wave using holographic optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Bassindale, P. G.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Phillips, D. B.; Barnes, A. C.

    2014-04-21

    Direct measurement of the forces experienced by micro-spheres in an acoustic standing wave device have been obtained using calibrated optical traps generated with holographic optical tweezers. A micro-sphere, which is optically trapped in three dimensions, can be moved through the acoustic device to measure forces acting upon it. When the micro-sphere is subjected to acoustic forces, it's equilibrium position is displaced to a position where the acoustic forces and optical forces are balanced. Once the optical trapping stiffness has been calibrated, observation of this displacement enables a direct measurement of the forces acting upon the micro-sphere. The measured forces are separated into a spatially oscillating component, attributed to the acoustic radiation force, and a constant force, attributed to fluid streaming. As the drive conditions of the acoustic device were varied, oscillating forces (>2.5 pN{sub pp}) and streaming forces (<0.2 pN) were measured. A 5 μm silica micro-sphere was used to characterise a 6.8 MHz standing wave, λ = 220 μm, to a spatial resolution limited by the uncertainty in the positioning of the micro-sphere (here to within 2 nm) and with a force resolution on the order of 10 fN. The results have application in the design and testing of acoustic manipulation devices.

  13. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    PubMed Central

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1540693

  14. Force-Field Analysis: A Functional Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Stanley G.

    1977-01-01

    Force field analysis combines the advantages of the basic organization, objectivity, and science of systems theory and systems methods, with a simplicity and clarity that allows its mastery by policy-makers and administrators who are not specialists in engineering, data processing, or programming. (Author/IRT)

  15. Role of silver ions in destabilization of intermolecular adhesion forces measured by atomic force microscopy in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chaw, K C; Manimaran, M; Tay, Francis E H

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the potential use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a tool to measure the intermolecular forces in biofilm structures and to study the effect of silver ions on sessile Staphylococcus epidermidis cell viability and stability. We propose a strategy of destabilizing the biofilm matrix by reducing the intermolecular forces within the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) using a low concentration (50 ppb) of silver ions. Our AFM studies on the intermolecular forces within the EPSs of S. epidermidis RP62A and S.epidermidis 1457 biofilms suggest that the silver ions can destabilize the biofilm matrix by binding to electron donor groups of the biological molecules. This leads to reductions in the number of binding sites for hydrogen bonds and electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and, hence, the destabilization of the biofilm structure.

  16. Method of simultaneous measurement of two direction force and temperature using FBG sensor head.

    PubMed

    Kisała, Piotr; Cięszczyk, Sławomir

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a method for measuring two components of bending force and temperature using one sensor head. Indirect inference based on the spectra of two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) placed on a cantilever beam is used. The method was developed during work on the inverse problem of determining a nonuniform stress distribution based on FBG spectra. A gradient in the FBG stress profile results in a characteristic shape of its reflective spectrum. The simultaneous measurements of force and temperature were possible through the use of an appropriate layout of the sensor head. The spectral characteristics of the sensor's gratings do not retain full symmetry, which is due to the geometry of the sensor's head and the related difference in the distribution of the axial stress of the gratings. In the proposed approach, the change in width of the sum of the normalized transmission spectra was used to determine the value of the applied force. In the presented method, an increase in the sensitivity of this change to the force is obtained relative to the other known systems. A change in the spectral width was observed for an increase in bending forces from 0 to 150 N. The sensitivity coefficient of the spectral width to force, defined as the ratio of the change of the spectral half-width to the change in force was 2.6e-3  nm/N for the first grating and 1.2e-3  nm/N for the second grating. However, the sensitivity of the whole sensor system was 5.8e-3  nm/N, which is greater than the sum of the sensitivities of the individual gratings. For the purpose of this work, a station with a thermal chamber has been designed with a bracket on which fiber optic transducers have been mounted for use in further measurements. The sensor head in this experiment is considered to be a universal device with potential applications in other types of optical sensors, and it can be treated as a module for development through its multiplication on a single optical fiber. PMID

  17. Determination of External Forces in Alpine Skiing Using a Differential Global Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2013-01-01

    In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS). The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD) were −26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and −6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force) allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions. PMID:23917257

  18. Determination of external forces in alpine skiing using a differential global navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2013-08-02

    In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS). The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD) were -26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and -6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force) allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions.

  19. Measurement of the Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in a Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian; Skor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow systems play vital roles in the design of some current and anticipated space applications of two-phase systems which include: thermal management systems, transfer line flow in cryogenic storage, space nuclear power facilities, design and operation of thermal bus, life support systems, propulsion systems, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and space processes for pharmaceutical applications. The design of two-phase flow systems for space applications requires a clear knowledge of the behaviors of the dispersed phase (bubble), its interaction with the continuous phase (liquid) and its effect on heat and mass transfer processes, The need to understand the bubble generation process arises from the fact that for all space applications, the size and distribution of bubbles are extremely crucial for heat and mass transfer control. One important force in two-phase flow systems is the lift force on a bubble or particle in a liquid shear flow. The shear lift is usually overwhelmed by buoyancy in normal gravity, but it becomes an important force in reduced gravity. Since the liquid flow is usually sheared because of the confining wall, the trajectories of bubbles and particles injected into the liquid flow are affected by the shear lift in reduced gravity. A series of experiments are performed to investigate the lift force on a bubble in a liquid shear flow and its effect on the detachment of a bubble from a wall under low gravity conditions. Experiments are executed in a Poiseuille flow in a channel. An air-water system is used in these experiments that are performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. A bubble is injected into the shear flow from a small injector and the shear lift is measured while the bubble is held stationary relative to the fluid. The trajectory of the bubble prior, during and after its detachment from the injector is investigated. The measured shear lift force is calculated from the trajectory of the bubble at the detachment point. These

  20. Influence of force systems on archwire-bracket combinations.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Robert P

    2005-03-01

    Orthodontic forces and couples are presented for the 3 principal directions and planes by using simplified free-body diagrams, equilibrium principles, and equivalent force systems. These simplified free-body diagrams show only the forces and couples applied by the practitioner to a single tooth or a group of teeth-minus any frictional effects associated with appliances. By using equilibrium principles, these forces and couples are resisted by each root in an equal but opposite manner. When an equivalent force system is produced at the center of resistance, the simplified free-body diagram requires only 1 force and 1 couple at the center of resistance of a tooth or a group of teeth because the reactions are the same but opposite in magnitude. This approach not only is much easier to comprehend but also facilitates the conceptualization of tooth mechanics with regard to centers of rotation. Specific examples of this approach include cases in which a tooth is labially or lingually displaced, intruded or extruded, bodily translated, or bodily rotated, as well as the combined effects of translation and rotation with and without auxiliary appliances or friction. PMID:15775948

  1. Force identification of dynamic systems using virtual work principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xun; Ou, Jinping

    2015-02-01

    One of the key inverse problems for estimating dynamic forces acting on a structure is to determine the force expansion and the corresponding solving method. This paper presents a moving least square (MLS) method for fitting dynamic forces, which improves the existing traditional methods. The simulation results show that the force expansion order has a tiny effect on the types of forces, which indicates the MLS method's excellent ability for local approximation and noise immunity as well as good fitting function. Then, the differential equation of motion for the system is transformed into an integral equation by using the virtual work principle, which can eliminate the structural acceleration response without introducing the calculation error. Besides, the transformation derives an expression of velocity by integrating by parts, which diminishes the error propagation of the velocity. Hence, the integral equation of motion for the system has a strong constraint to noise with zero mean value. Finally, this paper puts forward an optimization method to solve the equation. The numerical stability can be enhanced as the matrix inversion calculation is avoided. Illustrative examples involving different types of forces demonstrate that the transformation of the differential equation proposed through virtual work principle can eliminate interference efficiently and is robust for dynamic calculation.

  2. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active

  3. High-resolution micromechanical measurement in real time of forces exerted by living cells

    PubMed Central

    Swierczewski, Robert; Hedley, John; Redfern, Chris P. F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to compare uniaxial traction forces exerted by different cell types using a novel sensor design and to test the dependence of measured forces on cytoskeletal integrity. The sensor design detects forces generated between 2 contact points by cells spanning a gap. The magnitude of these forces varied according to cell type and were dependent on cytoskeletal integrity. The response time for drug-induced cytoskeletal disruption also varied between cell types: dermal fibroblasts exerted the greatest forces and had the slowest drug response times; EBV-transformed epithelial cells also had slow cytoskeletal depolymerisation times but exerted the lowest forces overall. Conversely, lung epithelial tumor cells exerted low forces but had the fastest depolymerisation drug response. These results provide proof of principle for a new design of force-measurement sensor based on optical interferometry, an approach that can be used to study cytoskeletal dynamics in real time. PMID:26645140

  4. Measuring equilibrants with a bracket-mounted force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingman, Robert; Maddox, David

    1999-03-01

    One of the important concepts in introductory physics is vectors and their addition. We have developed a method that restores simplicity to teaching the idea of adding several forces, and does it with an experimental error of one percent or less.

  5. Force-displacement measurements of earlywood bordered pits using a mesomechanical tester.

    PubMed

    Zelinka, Samuel L; Bourne, Keith J; Hermanson, John C; Glass, Samuel V; Costa, Adriana; Wiedenhoeft, Alex C

    2015-10-01

    The elastic properties of pit membranes are reported to have important implications in understanding air-seeding phenomena in gymnosperms, and pit aspiration plays a large role in wood technological applications such as wood drying and preservative treatment. Here we present force-displacement measurements for pit membranes of circular bordered pits, collected on a mesomechanical testing system. The system consists of a quartz microprobe attached to a microforce sensor that is positioned and advanced with a micromanipulator mounted on an inverted microscope. Membrane displacement is measured from digital image analysis. Unaspirated pits from earlywood of never-dried wood of Larix and Pinus and aspirated pits from earlywood of dried wood of Larix were tested to generate force-displacement curves up to the point of membrane failure. Two failure modes were observed: rupture or tearing of the pit membrane by the microprobe tip, and the stretching of the pit membrane until the torus was forced out of the pit chamber through the pit aperture without rupture, a condition we refer to as torus prolapse.

  6. Force Measurement Using Non-Restrained Models In A Shock Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanno, Hideyuki; Sato, Kazuo; Komuro, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Massahiro; Itoh, Katsuhiro; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Laurence, Stuart; Hannemann, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    A novel force measurement technique has been developed at the impulsive facility HIEST, in which the test model is completely non-restrained for the duration of the test, so it experiences free-flight conditions for a period on the order of milliseconds. This technique was demonstrated with a three-component aerodynamic force measurement with a blunted cone of total length 318 mm and a total mass of 22 kg. At the beginning of the wind tunnel test, the blunted cone test model was suspended from electromagnets fixed on the test-section ceiling. The model was released when a triggering signal arrived from the tunnel start signal. The model then fell so that it met the hypersonic test flow just as it arrived in the test section, and made a soft landing on a model catcher with four hydraulic shock absorbers. A miniature model-onboard data-logger, which was a key technology for this technique, was also developed in order to store the measured data. The data-logger was designed to be small enough to be instrumented in test models, with an overall size of 50 mm x 70 mm x 50 mm, including batteries. Since the logger was designed to measure force and pressure, it includes six piezoelectric amplifiers and four piezoresistive amplifiers, as well as high-speed analog-digital converters, which digitize the measured data with 16-bit resolution. The logger’s sampling rate and sample size are 500 kHz and 200 ms, respectively. The logger waits for a trigger signal (accelerometer output) and then starts to take measurements. The trigger threshold and pre-trigger delay time can be adjusted arbitrarily. Measured data is stored to static memory for transfer to a PC via a USB interface after a wind tunnel test. To demonstrate the entire measurement system, wind tunnel experiments were conducted in HIEST. In the present wind tunnel test campaign, records of pressure and axial force were obtained under conditions of H0 = 4 MJ/kg, P0 = 14 MPa. This demonstrated that the system worked

  7. Method of generating and measuring static small force using down-slope component of gravity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yusaku

    2007-06-01

    A method of generating and measuring static small forces at the micro-Newton level is proposed. In the method, the down-slope component of gravity acting on a mass on an inclined plane is used as a static force. To realize a linear motion of the mass with a small friction, an aerostatic linear bearing is used. The forces acting on the mass, such as the down-slope component of gravity and the dynamic frictional force, are determined by the levitation mass method. In an experiment, a static small force of approximately 183 microN is generated and measured with a standard uncertainty of approximately 2 microN.

  8. Structure of force networks in tapped particulate systems of disks and pentagons. II. Persistence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondic, L.; Kramár, M.; Pugnaloni, Luis A.; Carlevaro, C. Manuel; Mischaikow, K.

    2016-06-01

    In the companion paper [Pugnaloni et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062902 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062902], we use classical measures based on force probability density functions (PDFs), as well as Betti numbers (quantifying the number of components, related to force chains, and loops), to describe the force networks in tapped systems of disks and pentagons. In the present work, we focus on the use of persistence analysis, which allows us to describe these networks in much more detail. This approach allows us not only to describe but also to quantify the differences between the force networks in different realizations of a system, in different parts of the considered domain, or in different systems. We show that persistence analysis clearly distinguishes the systems that are very difficult or impossible to differentiate using other means. One important finding is that the differences in force networks between disks and pentagons are most apparent when loops are considered: the quantities describing properties of the loops may differ significantly even if other measures (properties of components, Betti numbers, force PDFs, or the stress tensor) do not distinguish clearly or at all the investigated systems.

  9. Structure of force networks in tapped particulate systems of disks and pentagons. II. Persistence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondic, L; Kramár, M; Pugnaloni, Luis A; Carlevaro, C Manuel; Mischaikow, K

    2016-06-01

    In the companion paper [Pugnaloni et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062902 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062902], we use classical measures based on force probability density functions (PDFs), as well as Betti numbers (quantifying the number of components, related to force chains, and loops), to describe the force networks in tapped systems of disks and pentagons. In the present work, we focus on the use of persistence analysis, which allows us to describe these networks in much more detail. This approach allows us not only to describe but also to quantify the differences between the force networks in different realizations of a system, in different parts of the considered domain, or in different systems. We show that persistence analysis clearly distinguishes the systems that are very difficult or impossible to differentiate using other means. One important finding is that the differences in force networks between disks and pentagons are most apparent when loops are considered: the quantities describing properties of the loops may differ significantly even if other measures (properties of components, Betti numbers, force PDFs, or the stress tensor) do not distinguish clearly or at all the investigated systems. PMID:27415343

  10. Structure of force networks in tapped particulate systems of disks and pentagons. II. Persistence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondic, L; Kramár, M; Pugnaloni, Luis A; Carlevaro, C Manuel; Mischaikow, K

    2016-06-01

    In the companion paper [Pugnaloni et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 062902 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062902], we use classical measures based on force probability density functions (PDFs), as well as Betti numbers (quantifying the number of components, related to force chains, and loops), to describe the force networks in tapped systems of disks and pentagons. In the present work, we focus on the use of persistence analysis, which allows us to describe these networks in much more detail. This approach allows us not only to describe but also to quantify the differences between the force networks in different realizations of a system, in different parts of the considered domain, or in different systems. We show that persistence analysis clearly distinguishes the systems that are very difficult or impossible to differentiate using other means. One important finding is that the differences in force networks between disks and pentagons are most apparent when loops are considered: the quantities describing properties of the loops may differ significantly even if other measures (properties of components, Betti numbers, force PDFs, or the stress tensor) do not distinguish clearly or at all the investigated systems.

  11. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A FORCE-REFLECTING TELEOPERATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    For certain applications, such as space servicing, undersea operations, and hazardous material handling tasks in nuclear reactors, the environments can be uncertain, complex, and hazardous. Lives may be in danger if humans were to work under these conditions. As a result, a man-machine system--a teleoperator system--has been developed to work in these types of environments. In a typical teleoperator system, the actual system operates at a remote site; the operator located away from this system usually receives visual information from a video image and/or graphical animation on the computer screen. Additional feedback, such as aural and force information, can significantly enhance performance of the system. Force reflection is a type of feedback in which forces experienced by the remote manipulator are fed back to the manual controller. Various control methods have been proposed for implementation on a teleoperator system. In order to examine different control schemes, a one Degree-Of-Freedom (DOF) Force-Reflecting Manual Controller (FRMC) is constructed and integrated into a PC. The system parameters are identified and constructed as a mathematical model. The Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) and fuzzy logic controllers are developed and tested experimentally. Numerical simulation results obtained from the mathematical model are compared with those of experimental data for both types of controllers. In addition, the concept of a telesensation system is introduced. A telesensation system is an advanced teleoperator system that attempts to provide the operator with sensory feedback. In this context, a telesensation system integrates the use of a Virtual Reality (VR) unit, FRMC, and Graphical User Interface (GUI). The VR unit is used to provide the operator with a 3-D visual effect. Various commercial VR units are reviewed and features compared for use in a telesensation system. As for the FRMC, the conceptual design of a 3-DOF FRMC is developed in an effort to

  12. Evading surface and detector frequency noise in harmonic oscillator measurements of force gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Eric W.; Lee, SangGap; Hickman, Steven A.; Harrell, Lee E.; Marohn, John A.

    2010-07-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a method of measuring small force gradients acting on a harmonic oscillator in which the force-gradient signal of interest is used to parametrically up-convert a forced oscillation below resonance into an amplitude signal at the oscillator's resonance frequency. The approach, which we demonstrate in a mechanically detected electron spin resonance experiment, allows the force-gradient signal to evade detector frequency noise by converting a slowly modulated frequency signal into an amplitude signal.

  13. Measurement of wheelchair contact force with a low cost bench test.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C A; Dedini, F G; Corrêa, F C; Eckert, J J; Becker, M

    2016-02-01

    In mechanical engineering, it is well established that contact between the tire and the ground is a key parameter in characterizing the dynamic behavior of vehicles and an important factor in design control. Therefore, it is an important part of dynamic simulation models for vehicles, including wheelchairs. This work presents a bench test designed to experimentally monitor and measure the forces transmitted to the ground by a moving wheel. The test bench is composed of a table and a track with a fixed wheel structure and powertrain system. The table is an integrated structure that measures the longitudinal and lateral forces produced by tire contact. This table allows characterization of the tire and tests the tire under varying loads at different slip and camber angles. Additionally, the test bench can also be used to evaluate other tires, such as caster tires. The performances of the new device are illustrated, and the results show the differences between tires, which are related to the dynamic behaviors of wheelchair model. Finally, preliminary experiments performed using the test bench have shown that it is able to monitor and measure the forces generated by the contact between the tire and the ground. PMID:26732696

  14. Thin-film dielectric elastomer sensors to measure the contraction force of smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araromi, O.; Poulin, A.; Rosset, S.; Favre, M.; Giazzon, M.; Martin-Olmos, C.; Liley, M.; Shea, H.

    2015-04-01

    The development of thin-film dielectric elastomer strain sensors for the characterization of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is presented here. Smooth muscle disorders are an integral part of diseases such as asthma and emphysema. Analytical tools enabling the characterization of SMC function i.e. contractile force and strain, in a low-cost and highly parallelized manner are necessary for toxicology screening and for the development of new and more effective drugs. The main challenge with the design of such tools is the accurate measurement of the extremely low contractile cell forces expected as a result of SMC monolayer contraction (as low as ~ 100 μN). Our approach utilizes ultrathin (~5 μm) and soft elastomer membranes patterned with elastomer-carbon composite electrodes, onto which the SMCs are cultured. The cell contraction induces an in-plane strain in the elastomer membrane, predicted to be in the order 1 %, which can be measured via the change in the membrane capacitance. The cell force can subsequently be deduced knowing the mechanical properties of the elastomer membrane. We discuss the materials and fabrication methods selected for our system and present preliminary results indicating their biocompatibility. We fabricate functional capacitive senor prototypes with good signal stability over the several hours (~ 0.5% variation). We succeed in measuring in-plane strains of 1 % with our fabricated devices with good repeatability and signal to noise ratio.

  15. Kinetic peak vertical force measurement in cats afflicted by coxarthritis: data management and acquisition protocols.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Maxim; Guillot, Martin; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Troncy, Eric

    2013-08-01

    The management of the peak vertical force (PVF) measurement needs to be determined in coxarthritis cats. Six privately-owned coxarthritis cats were conditioned to trot across a floor mat-based plantar force measurement system. Hind limbs PVF was measured on level ground at day one (D1), D8, D42, and D84. Measurements were repeated after 10 min treadmill exercise (D1), trotting on an inclined (13°) plane (D42) and after stair climbing exercise (D84). Test-retest reliability between D1 and D8 was good (intraclass coefficient of correlation of 0.8). Coefficients of dispersion (within-subject and between-subject) were <15% using the lowest hind limb PVF value. Only stair climbing exercise positively affected sample and effect size estimates. To limit the dispersion of data, the measurement of PVF should be managed using the lowest hind limb PVF value. In addition, PVF should be measured following stair climbing to optimise sample and effect sizes and to preserve statistical power.

  16. Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozzi, K. L.; Long, C. J.; McAleer, C. W.; Smith, A. S. T.; Hickman, J. J.

    2013-08-01

    Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney's thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney's equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases.

  17. Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, K L; Long, C J; McAleer, C W; Smith, A S T; Hickman, J J

    2013-08-19

    Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney's thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney's equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases. PMID:24046483

  18. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-04-06

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach.

  19. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach. PMID:27058545

  20. Development of a Microforce Sensor and Its Array Platform for Robotic Cell Microinjection Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Zhou, Yunlei; Lin, Yuzi; Wang, Lingyun; Xi, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Robot-assisted cell microinjection, which is precise and can enable a high throughput, is attracting interest from researchers. Conventional probe-type cell microforce sensors have some real-time injection force measurement limitations, which prevent their integration in a cell microinjection robot. In this paper, a novel supported-beam based cell micro-force sensor with a piezoelectric polyvinylidine fluoride film used as the sensing element is described, which was designed to solve the real-time force-sensing problem during a robotic microinjection manipulation, and theoretical mechanical and electrical models of the sensor function are derived. Furthermore, an array based cell-holding device with a trapezoidal microstructure is micro-fabricated, which serves to improve the force sensing speed and cell manipulation rates. Tests confirmed that the sensor showed good repeatability and a linearity of 1.82%. Finally, robot-assisted zebrafish embryo microinjection experiments were conducted. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor working with the robotic cell manipulation system. Moreover, the sensing structure, theoretical model, and fabrication method established in this study are not scale dependent. Smaller cells, e.g., mouse oocytes, could also be manipulated with this approach. PMID:27058545

  1. Measuring the force of punches and kicks among combat sport athletes using a modified punching bag with an embedded accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Buśko, Krzysztof; Staniak, Zbigniew; Szark-Eckardt, Mirosława; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Mazur-Różycka, Joanna; Łach, Patrycja; Michalski, Radosław; Gajewski, Jan; Górski, Michał

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to design a new system to measure punching and kicking forces as well as reaction times in combat sport athletes. In addition, the study examined whether there were any intergender differences in the force of punches thrown by boxers and kicking forces delivered by taekwondo athletes. Boxers (male, n = 13; female, n = 7) were examined for the force of single straight punches and taekwondo athletes (male, n = 14; female, n = 14) for force of single Apdolio and Dwit Chagi kicks. The punching bag was equipped with acceleration transducers and gyroscopes embedded in a cylinder covered with a layer to absorb shock as well as a set of colour signal diodes. Value of the punching bag's acceleration was used for calculating: strike force; the punching location on the bag; and time of a strike. The relative error of force calculation was 3%; the relative error in acceleration measurement was less than 1%. The force of a straight rear-hand punch was greater than the force of a lead-hand punch among male and female boxers. The force of Apdolio kick delivered with a rear leg was greater compared to a lead leg among female and male taekwondo athletes. Significant gender differences were noticed in the force in both types of kicks. In boxers, intergender differences were reported only for the force of a punch thrown with the rear hand. Based on these findings, it was concluded that the modified punching bag is a good diagnostic tool for combat sports.

  2. Comparison of optical and electrical measurements of the pantograph-catenary contact force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocciolone, Marco; Bucca, Giuseppe; Collina, Andrea; Comolli, Lorenzo

    2010-09-01

    In railway engineering the monitoring of contact force between pantograph and catenary gives information about the interaction between the two systems and it is useful to check the status of the overhead line. Indeed the failure of the catenary is one of the main causes of out of order problems. This study was conducted in a test campaign on an underground train instrumented with sensors able to monitor the line status. One of the more important measured quantities is the pantograph contact force, and two measurement systems were implemented: one optical and another electrical. The optical one was based on FBG sensors applied on the pantograph collector strip; the electrical one was based on two load cells positioned at the sides of the collector strip. The in-line measurements show that the optical solution is very promising, providing very reliable results that can be successfully used in the monitoring application, allowing the determination of the critical point in the line. The thermal compensation of any FBG sensors is a known problem and here is no exception: a thermal compensator was used to get also mean value measurements and the results are discussed.

  3. Towards traceable mechanical properties measurement of silicon nanopillars using contact resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Brand, U.

    2014-05-01

    For the purpose of nondestructive determination of the mechanical properties of nano-scale materials including nanowires, nanoparticles, etc., an extended AFM-based materials testing method, the contact resonance force microscopy (CR-FM), is applied. This CR-FM method features high lateral (dimensional) resolution and low test force (down to subnanonewton). It can be employed for not only hard materials, but also soft materials or weak structures, like silicon nano-pillars. In this method, the elastic material properties are deduced by experimental measurement of the resonance frequency shift of an AFM cantilever before and after mechanical contact with the specimen under test. Numerical and analytical investigations of the key issues of this method, including (1) body stiffness of nanopillars, (2) tip-surface mechanical interaction and (3) theoretical measurement resolution, have been carried out, in order to prepare the design and the development of the experimental system. To improve the measurement uncertainty of this method, a MEMSbased cantilever stiffness calibration approach and an interferometric cantilever deflection measurement system have been developed.

  4. Are External Knee Load and EMG Measures Accurate Indicators of Internal Knee Contact Forces during Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Andrew J.; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Besier, Thor F.; Lloyd, David G.; Colwell, Clifford W.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is believed to be a critical factor in the development and treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, the contact forces to which the knee articular surfaces are subjected during daily activities cannot be measured clinically. Thus, the ability to predict internal knee contact forces accurately using external measures (i.e., external knee loads and muscle EMG signals) would be clinically valuable. This study quantifies how well external knee load and EMG measures predict internal knee contact forces during gait. A single subject with a force-measuring tibial prosthesis and post-operative valgus alignment performed four gait patterns (normal, medial thrust, walking pole, and trunk sway) to induce a wide range of external and internal knee joint loads. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess how much of the variability in internal contact forces was accounted for by variability in the external measures. Though the different gait patterns successfully induced significant changes in the external and internal quantities, changes in external measures were generally weak indicators of changes in total, medial, and lateral contact force. Our results suggest that when total contact force may be changing, caution should be exercised when inferring changes in knee contact forces based on observed changes in external knee load and EMG measures. Advances in musculoskeletal modeling methods may be needed for accurate estimation of in vivo knee contact forces. PMID:23280647

  5. Direct measurement of depletion and hydrodynamic forces in solutions of a reversible supramolecular polymer.

    PubMed

    Knoben, W; Besseling, N A M; Stuart, M A Cohen

    2007-05-22

    In this paper, the investigation of surface forces in semidilute solutions of a nonadsorbing hydrogen-bonded reversible supramolecular polymer is described. Colloidal probe atomic force microscopy was used for direct measurement of depletion forces. Hydrodynamic drag on the AFM cantilever with the colloidal probe was measured both far away from and close to the planar substrate surface. The results indicate that the presence of the depletion layer causes slip at the surfaces with a large apparent slip length. Our analysis explains how the presence of slip enables the measurement of (relatively weak) depletion forces in solutions with a high viscosity by significantly reducing the hydrodynamic forces. The range and magnitude of the measured depletion forces are qualitatively in agreement with previous experiments and theoretical predictions. Due to the relatively large experimental error, no quantitative conclusions can be drawn. Depletion-induced phase separation of suspensions of stearylated silica particles was also observed. Phase separation becomes more pronounced with increasing polymer concentration.

  6. Two measures of performance in a peg-in-hole manipulation task with force feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The results are described from two manipulators on a peg-in-hole task, which is part of a continued effort to develop models for human performance with remote manipulators. Task difficulty is varied by changing the diameter of the peg to be inserted in a 50 mm diameter hole. An automatic measuring system records the distance between the tool being held by the manipulator and the receptacle into which it is to be inserted. The data from repeated insertions are processed by computer to determine task times, accumulated distances, and trajectories. Experiments with both the MA-11 cable-connected master-slave manipulator common to hot cell work and the MA-23 servo-controlled manipulator (with and without force feedback) are described. Comparison of these results with previous results of the Ames Manipulator shows that force feedback provides a consistent advantage.

  7. Sting-free Unsteady Flowfield, Base Pressure and Force Measurements on Axisymmetric Bluff-Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideo; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kunimasu, Tetsuya

    2006-11-01

    To avoid interference of model support, flowfields as well as aerodynamic force and base pressure on blunt short cylinders in axial flow were measured at Re=100,000 with the JAXA 60cm magnetic suspension and balance system. The fineness ratio ranged from 1.27 to 1.79. A digital telemeter system was developed for the base pressure measurement, and the velocity field was obtained using a PIV system. Vortices along separating shear layer and shear layer flappings with or without reattachment on the wall were observed. Downstream the cylinder in the azimuthal plane, PIV snapshots showed large-scale motion of longitudinal vortices. These instantaneous flowfields presented excellent axisymmetry when they were ensemble-averaged. Mean base pressure agreed with the drag variation at different fineness ratios. The present magnetic suspension and balance system allowed evaluation of low frequency unsteady aerodynamic force vector from feedback current to the coils and the detected small model movement. Base pressure fluctuations were compared with the drag fluctuations and discussed in light of overall flowfield phenomena.

  8. Coordinate measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Carlisle, Keith

    2003-04-08

    An apparatus and method is utilized to measure relative rigid body motion between two bodies by measuring linear motion in the principal axis and linear motion in an orthogonal axis. From such measurements it is possible to obtain displacement, departure from straightness, and angular displacement from the principal axis of a rigid body.

  9. Force control of a multi-arm robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, Thomas E.; Soloway, Donald I.

    1988-01-01

    A force-compensated control method for multiple manipulators is presented that allows coordinated manipulation of a jointly grasped object. In this scheme, each arm independently carries out the motions required to realize the desired motion of a prescribed point on the manipulated object. The approach has been implemented and demonstrated on a laboratory system consisting of two industrial, computer-controller manipulators.

  10. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements. PMID:20355449

  11. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements.

  12. The height of biomolecules measured with the atomic force microscope depends on electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, D J; Engel, A

    1997-01-01

    In biological applications of atomic force microscopy, the different surface properties of the biological sample and its support become apparent. Observed height differences between the biomolecule and its supporting surface are thus not only of structural origin, but also depend on the different sample-tip and support-tip interactions. This can result in negative or positive contributions to the measured height, effects that are described by the DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) theory. Experimental verification shows that the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample can strongly influence the result obtained. To overcome this problem, pH and electrolyte concentration of the buffer solution have to be adjusted to screen out electrostatic forces. Under these conditions, the tip comes into direct contact with the surface of support and biological system, even when low forces required to prevent sample deformation are applied. In this case, the measured height can be related to the thickness of the native biological structure. The observed height dependence of the macromolecules on electrolyte concentration makes it possible to estimate surface charge densities. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:9284330

  13. A Measurement of the Force between Two Current-Carrying Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the force acting between two parallel, current-carrying wires is known as Ampère's experiment. A mechanical balance was historically employed to measure that force. We report a simple experiment based on an electronic precision balance that is useful in clearly showing students the existence of this interaction and how to…

  14. A protocol for variable-resolution first-order reversal curve (FORC) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Heslop, D.; Roberts, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams are being increasingly used in rock and environmental magnetism, including for detection of biomagnetic signals in sediments. Resolution can be a major barrier to obtaining high-quality FORC diagrams and timeconsuming measurements that employ small field steps are necessary to resolve the finest features of a FORC distribution. We present a new experimental protocol with irregularly spaced field steps that allow different parts of a FORC diagram to be measured at different resolutions. Larger numbers of measurements can, therefore, be made in key regions of a FORC distribution to resolve diagnostic features at higher resolution. Specification of the field steps in the irregular measurement grid is based on major hysteresis properties; no a priori knowledge concerning the underlying FORC distribution is required. FORC diagrams obtained with conventional measurements and with our new measurement protocol give consistent results. Because of its variable resolution, the irregular protocol provides a clear representation of finescale features produced by quasi-reversible superparamagnetic and non-interacting singledomain particles. Although the proposed irregular measurement protocol is not as efficient at suppressing noise as recently developed post-processing techniques (e.g., VARIFORC, Egli [2013]), it enables efficient high-resolution analysis for relatively strongly magnetized samples where measurement noise is not detrimental to FORC distribution estimation.

  15. Measuring the elasticity of plant cells with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of biological materials impact their functions. This is most evident in plants where the cell wall contains each cell's contents and connects each cell to its neighbors irreversibly. Examining the physical properties of the plant cell wall is key to understanding how plant cells, tissues, and organs grow and gain the shapes important for their respective functions. Here, we present an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation method for examining the elasticity of plant cells at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue level. We describe the important areas of experimental design to be considered when planning and executing these types of experiments and provide example data as illustration.

  16. Interfacial aqueous solutions dielectric constant measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Ceotto, G.; de Souza, E. F.

    2000-08-01

    The exchange of the volume of a region of the electric double layer of a mica surface immersed in aqueous solutions, with a dielectric constant ɛDL, by a nanosized radius tip, with a dielectric constant ɛTip, is responsible for the repulsion at large distances from the surface (starting at ˜100 nm, diffuse layer) and followed by an attraction when the tip is immersed in the inner layer (˜10 nm). The calculated dielectric constant as a function of the distance to the charged interface obtained by fitting the force versus distance curves, allows the mapping of the inner layer dielectric constant profiles with a nanometer resolution.

  17. Measurement of cell adhesion force by vertical forcible detachment using an arrowhead nanoneedle and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Seunghwan; Hashizume, Yui; Mishima, Mari; Kawamura, Ryuzo; Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed a method to measure cell adhesion force by detaching cell using an arrowhead nanoneedle and AFM. • A nanofilm consisting of fibronectin and gelatin was formed on cell surface to reinforce the cell cortex. • By the nanofilm lamination, detachment efficiencies of strongly adherent cell lines were improved markedly. - Abstract: The properties of substrates and extracellular matrices (ECM) are important factors governing the functions and fates of mammalian adherent cells. For example, substrate stiffness often affects cell differentiation. At focal adhesions, clustered–integrin bindings link cells mechanically to the ECM. In order to quantitate the affinity between cell and substrate, the cell adhesion force must be measured for single cells. In this study, forcible detachment of a single cell in the vertical direction using AFM was carried out, allowing breakage of the integrin–substrate bindings. An AFM tip was fabricated into an arrowhead shape to detach the cell from the substrate. Peak force observed in the recorded force curve during probe retraction was defined as the adhesion force, and was analyzed for various types of cells. Some of the cell types adhered so strongly that they could not be picked up because of plasma membrane breakage by the arrowhead probe. To address this problem, a technique to reinforce the cellular membrane with layer-by-layer nanofilms composed of fibronectin and gelatin helped to improve insertion efficiency and to prevent cell membrane rupture during the detachment process, allowing successful detachment of the cells. This method for detaching cells, involving cellular membrane reinforcement, may be beneficial for evaluating true cell adhesion forces in various cell types.

  18. Radiation force produced by time reversal acoustic focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2003-10-01

    An ultrasonic induced radiation force is an efficient tool for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and evaluating tissue viscoelastic properties, which are closely related to tissue functional state and abnormalities. Time Reversal Acoustic Focusing System (TRA FS) can provide efficient ultrasound focusing in highly inhomogeneous media. Furthermore, numerous reflections from boundaries, which distort focusing in conventional ultrasound focusing systems and are viewed as a significant technical hurdle, lead to an improvement of the focusing ability of the TRA system. In this work the TRA FS field structure and radiation force in a transcranial phantom were investigated. A simple TRA FS comprising a plane piezoceramic transducer attached to an external resonator such as an aluminum block was acoustically coupled to the tested transcranial phantom. A custom-designed compact electronic unit for TRA FS provided receiving, digitizing, storing, time reversing and transmitting of acoustic signals in a wide frequency range from 0.01 to 10 MHz. The radiation force produced by ultrasonic pulses was investigated as a function of the transmitted ultrasound temporal parameters. The simplest TRA FS provided focusing of 500 kHz ultrasound pulses and the generation of a radiation force with an efficacy hardly achievable using conventional sophisticated phased array transmitters. [Work supported by NIH.

  19. Force Measurement Services at Kebs: AN Overview of Equipment, Procedures and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangi, J. O.; Maranga, S. M.; Nganga, S. P.; Mutuli, S. M.

    This paper describes the facilities, instrumentation and procedures currently used in the force laboratory at the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS) for force measurement services. The laboratory uses the Force Calibration Machine (FCM) to calibrate force-measuring instruments. The FCM derives its traceability via comparisons using reference transfer force transducers calibrated by the Force Standard Machines (FSM) of a National Metrology Institute (NMI). The force laboratory is accredited to ISO/IEC 17025 by the Germany Accreditation Body (DAkkS). The accredited measurement scope of the laboratory is 1 MN to calibrate force transducers in both compression and tension modes. ISO 376 procedures are used while calibrating force transducers. The KEBS reference transfer standards have capacities of 10, 50, 300 and 1000 kN to cover the full range of the FCM. The uncertainty in the forces measured by the FCM were reviewed and determined in accordance to the new EURAMET calibration guide. The relative expanded uncertainty of force W realized by FCM was evaluated in a range from 10 kN-1 MN, and was found to be 5.0 × 10-4 with the coverage factor k being equal to 2. The overall normalized error (En) of the comparison results was also found to be less than 1. The accredited Calibration and Measurement Capability (CMC) of the KEBS force laboratory was based on the results of those intercomparisons. The FCM enables KEBS to provide traceability for the calibration of class ‘1’ force instruments as per the ISO 376.

  20. Instrument for spatially resolved simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Spethmann, A. Trottenberg, T. Kersten, H.

    2015-01-15

    The article presents a device for spatially resolved and simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams, especially in beams composed of ions and neutral atoms. The forces are exerted by the impinging beam particles on a plane circular conductive target plate of 20 mm diameter mounted on a pendulum with electromagnetic force compensation. The force measurement in the micronewton range is achieved by electromagnetic compensation by means of static Helmholtz coils and permanent magnets attached to the pendulum. Exemplary measurements are performed in the 1.2 keV beam of a broad beam ion source. The simultaneous measurements of forces and currents onto the same target are compared with each other and with Faraday cup measurements.

  1. Force-reflective teleoperated system with shared and compliant control capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szakaly, Z.; Kim, W. S.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    The force-reflecting teleoperator breadboard is described. It is the first system among available Research and Development systems with the following combined capabilities: (1) The master input device is not a replica of the slave arm. It is a general purpose device which can be applied to the control of different robot arms through proper mathematical transformations. (2) Force reflection generated in the master hand controller is referenced to forces and moments measured by a six DOF force-moment sensor at the base of the robot hand. (3) The system permits a smooth spectrum of operations between full manual, shared manual and automatic, and full automatic (called traded) control. (4) The system can be operated with variable compliance or stiffness in force-reflecting control. Some of the key points of the system are the data handling and computing architecture, the communication method, and the handling of mathematical transformations. The architecture is a fully synchronized pipeline. The communication method achieves optimal use of a parallel communication channel between the local and remote computing nodes. A time delay box is also implemented in this communication channel permitting experiments with up to 8 sec time delay. The mathematical transformations are computed faster than 1 msec so that control at each node can be operated at 1 kHz servo rate without interpolation. This results in an overall force-reflecting loop rate of 200 Hz.

  2. A Solar System Survey of Forced Librations in Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornstock, Robert L.; Bills, Bruce G.

    2003-01-01

    Forced librations are periodic rotational rate variations due to gravitational interactions with an orbital partner. We have developed an analytic theory capable of calculating expected amplitudes of forced librations for nonresonant rotators as well as for bodies existing in a spin-orbit resonance. The theory has been applied to 34 solar system bodies, including terrestrial planets, planetary satellites, and the asteroid Eros. Parameters governing libration amplitude are the body s orbital eccentricity, moment difference, and the ratio of its spin rate to its orbital rate. In each case the largest libration amplitude is associated with the forcing frequency 2 (p - 1) n, where n is the orbital mean motion and p is the spin/orbit rate ratio. This dominant frequency is simply semidiurnal as seen from the position of the torquing body. The maximum libration angular amplitude is 1.3 x 10(exp -2) radians for Thebe, and the maximum mean equatorial displacement is 1.4 km for Mimas.

  3. Adhesion forces in interactive mixtures for dry powder inhalers--evaluation of a new measuring method.

    PubMed

    Lohrmann, Maike; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Urbanetz, Nora Anne; Lippold, Bernhard Christian

    2007-09-01

    Dry powder inhalers mostly contain carrier based formulations where micronized drug particles are adhered to coarse carrier particles. The performance of the dry powder inhaler depends on the inhaler device, the inhalation manoeuvre and the formulation. The most important factor influencing the behaviour of the formulation is the adhesion force acting between the active ingredient and the carrier particles, which can be measured using different methods, for example the centrifuge technique or atomic force microscopy. In this study the tensile strength method, usually applied to determine cohesion forces between powder particles of one material, is optimized for adhesion force measurements between powder particles of unlike materials. Adhesion force measurements between the carrier materials lactose or mannitol and the drug substance salbutamol sulphate using the tensile strength method and the atomic force microscopy show higher values with increasing relative humidity. Consequently, the fine particle fraction determined using the Next Generation Impactor decreases with increasing relative humidity as a result of the enhanced interparticle interactions.

  4. Sensor-less force-reflecting macro-micro telemanipulation systems by piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Amini, H; Farzaneh, B; Azimifar, F; Sarhan, A A D

    2016-09-01

    This paper establishes a novel control strategy for a nonlinear bilateral macro-micro teleoperation system with time delay. Besides position and velocity signals, force signals are additionally utilized in the control scheme. This modification significantly improves the poor transparency during contact with the environment. To eliminate external force measurement, a force estimation algorithm is proposed for the master and slave robots. The closed loop stability of the nonlinear micro-micro teleoperation system with the proposed control scheme is investigated employing the Lyapunov theory. Consequently, the experimental results verify the efficiency of the new control scheme in free motion and during collision between the slave robot and the environment of slave robot with environment, and the efficiency of the force estimation algorithm. PMID:27329852

  5. Sensor-less force-reflecting macro-micro telemanipulation systems by piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Amini, H; Farzaneh, B; Azimifar, F; Sarhan, A A D

    2016-09-01

    This paper establishes a novel control strategy for a nonlinear bilateral macro-micro teleoperation system with time delay. Besides position and velocity signals, force signals are additionally utilized in the control scheme. This modification significantly improves the poor transparency during contact with the environment. To eliminate external force measurement, a force estimation algorithm is proposed for the master and slave robots. The closed loop stability of the nonlinear micro-micro teleoperation system with the proposed control scheme is investigated employing the Lyapunov theory. Consequently, the experimental results verify the efficiency of the new control scheme in free motion and during collision between the slave robot and the environment of slave robot with environment, and the efficiency of the force estimation algorithm.

  6. Load measurement system with load cell lock-out mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thang; Carroll, Monty; Liu, Jonathan

    1995-05-01

    In the frame work of the project Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX), a Load Measurement System was developed and fabricated to measure the impingement force of Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) jets. The Load Measurement System is a force sensing system that measures any combination of normal and shear forces up to 40 N (9 lbf) in the normal direction and 22 N (5 lbf) in the shear direction with an accuracy of +/- 0.04 N (+/- 0.01 lbf) Since high resolution is required for the force measurement, the Load Measurement System is built with highly sensitive load cells. To protect these fragile load cells in the non-operational mode from being damaged due to flight loads such as launch and landing loads of the Shuttle vehicle, a motor driven device known as the Load Cell Lock-Out Mechanism was built. This Lock-Out Mechanism isolates the load cells from flight loads and re-engages the load cells for the force measurement experiment once in space. With this highly effective protection system, the SPIFEX load measurement experiment was successfully conducted on STS-44 in September 1994 with all load cells operating properly and reading impingement forces as expected.

  7. Development and validation of a method to directly measure the cable force during the hammer throw.

    PubMed

    Brice, Sara M; Ness, Kevin F; Rosemond, Doug; Lyons, Keith; Davis, Mark

    2008-05-01

    The development of cable force during hammer-throw turns is crucial to the throw distance. In this paper, we present a method that is capable of measuring cable force in real time and, as it does not interfere with technique, it is capable of providing immediate feedback to coaches and athletes during training. A strain gauge was mounted on the wires of three hammers to measure the tension in the wire and an elite male hammer thrower executed three throws with each hammer. The output from the gauges was recorded by a data logger positioned on the lower back of the thrower. The throws were captured by three high-speed video cameras and the three-dimensional position of the hammer's head was determined by digitizing the images manually. The five best throws were analysed. The force acting on the hammer's head was calculated from Newton's second law of motion and this was compared with the force measured via the strain gauge. Qualitatively the time dependence of the two forces was essentially the same, although the measured force showed more detail in the troughs of the force-time curves. Quantitatively the average difference between the measured and calculated forces over the five throws was 76 N, which corresponds to a difference of 3.8% for a cable force of 2000 N.

  8. Side-Wall Measurement using Tilt-Scanning Method in Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Ken; Gonda, Satoshi; Koyanagi, Hajime; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Hosaka, Sumio

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a novel atomic force microscope (AFM) measurement technique which can examine sidewalls of fine patterns on wafers. This technique uses a sharpen tip tilted at an angle in combination with digital probing mode operation, and is thus referred as “tilt-step-in” mode operation. This method allows one to measure sidewall shape moving along tilted tip axis. We analyzed the slip condition between the tip and the sample using a simple spring-mass system model and finite element method (FEM) with several parameters, such as moving direction, stiffness of tip and cantilever, sidewall angle and frictional coefficient. To verify this method, we then measured several reference samples with perpendicular sidewalls and 105° undercuts. By using this technique three dimensional (3-D) images of low-k etch structure of semiconductor device patterns with 88° sidewall and line edge roughness of ArF resist were clearly observed.

  9. Space Acceleration Measurement System-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS-II) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  10. Optical tomography system for laboratory turbulence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMackin, Lenore J.; Pierson, Robert E.; Hugo, Ronald J.; Truman, C. Randall

    1998-10-01

    We describe the design and operation of a high speed optical tomography system for measuring 2D images of a dynamic phase object at a rate of 5 kHz. Data from a set of eight Hartmann wavefront sensors is back-projected to produce phase images showing the details of the inner structure of a heated air flow. Series of reconstructions at different downstream locations illustrate the development of flow structure and the effect of acoustic flow forcing.

  11. On the correct interpretation of measured force and calculation of material stress in biaxial tests.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D R; McGarry, J P

    2016-01-01

    Biaxial tests are commonly used to investigate the mechanical behaviour of soft biological tissues and polymers. In the current paper we uncover a fundamental problem associated with the calculation of material stress from measured force in standard biaxial tests. In addition to measured forces, localised unmeasured shear forces also occur at the clamps and the inability to quantify such forces has significant implications for the calculation of material stress from simplified force-equilibrium relationships. Unmeasured shear forces are shown to arise due to two distinct competing contributions: (1) negative shear force due to stretching of the orthogonal clamp, and (2) positive shear force as a result of material Poisson-effect. The clamp shear force is highly dependent on the specimen geometry and the clamp displacement ratio, as consequently, is the measured force-stress relationship. Additionally in this study we demonstrate that commonly accepted formulae for the estimation of material stress in the central region of a cruciform specimen are highly inaccurate. A reliable empirical correction factor for the general case of isotropic materials must be a function of specimen geometry and the biaxial clamp displacement ratio. Finally we demonstrate that a correction factor for the general case of non-linear anisotropic materials is not feasible and we suggest the use of inverse finite element analysis as a practical means of interpreting experimental data for such complex materials. PMID:26327453

  12. On the correct interpretation of measured force and calculation of material stress in biaxial tests.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D R; McGarry, J P

    2016-01-01

    Biaxial tests are commonly used to investigate the mechanical behaviour of soft biological tissues and polymers. In the current paper we uncover a fundamental problem associated with the calculation of material stress from measured force in standard biaxial tests. In addition to measured forces, localised unmeasured shear forces also occur at the clamps and the inability to quantify such forces has significant implications for the calculation of material stress from simplified force-equilibrium relationships. Unmeasured shear forces are shown to arise due to two distinct competing contributions: (1) negative shear force due to stretching of the orthogonal clamp, and (2) positive shear force as a result of material Poisson-effect. The clamp shear force is highly dependent on the specimen geometry and the clamp displacement ratio, as consequently, is the measured force-stress relationship. Additionally in this study we demonstrate that commonly accepted formulae for the estimation of material stress in the central region of a cruciform specimen are highly inaccurate. A reliable empirical correction factor for the general case of isotropic materials must be a function of specimen geometry and the biaxial clamp displacement ratio. Finally we demonstrate that a correction factor for the general case of non-linear anisotropic materials is not feasible and we suggest the use of inverse finite element analysis as a practical means of interpreting experimental data for such complex materials.

  13. Developing accurate molecular mechanics force fields for conjugated molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Do, Hainam; Troisi, Alessandro

    2015-10-14

    A rapid method to parameterize the intramolecular component of classical force fields for complex conjugated molecules is proposed. The method is based on a procedure of force matching with a reference electronic structure calculation. It is particularly suitable for those applications where molecular dynamics simulations are used to generate structures that are therefore analysed by electronic structure methods, because it is possible to build force fields that are consistent with electronic structure calculations that follow classical simulations. Such applications are commonly encountered in organic electronics, spectroscopy of complex systems and photobiology (e.g. photosynthetic systems). We illustrate the method by parameterizing the force fields of a molecule used in molecular semiconductors (2,2-dicyanovinyl-capped S,N-heteropentacene or DCV-SN5), a polymeric semiconductor (thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole TT-DPP) and a chromophore embedded in a protein environment (15,16-dihydrobiliverdin or DBV) where several hundreds of parameters need to be optimized in parallel.

  14. Calibration procedure of measuring system for vehicle wheel load estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluziewicz, M.; Maniowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The calibration procedure of wheel load measuring system is presented. Designed method allows estimation of selected wheel load components while the vehicle is in motion. Mentioned system is developed to determine friction forces between tire and road surface, basing on measured internal reaction forces in wheel suspension mechanism. Three strain gauge bridges and three-component piezoelectric load cell are responsible for internal force measurement in suspension components, two wire sensors are measuring displacements. External load is calculated via kinematic model of suspension mechanism implemented in Matlab environment. In the described calibration procedure, internal reactions are measured on a test stand while the system is loaded by a force of known direction and value.

  15. Comparisons of Force Measurement Methods for DBD Plasma Actuators in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ashpis, David E.

    2009-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the force induced by both single (one electrode insulated) and double (both electrodes insulated) dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators in quiescent air. We have shown that, for single barrier actuators with cylindrical exposed electrodes, as the electrode diameter decrease the force efficiencies increase much faster than a previously reported linear trend. This behavior has been experimentally verified using two different measurement techniques: stagnation probe measurements of the induced flow velocity and direct measurement of the force using an electronic balance. Actuators with rectangular cross-section exposed electrodes do not show the same rapid increase at small thicknesses. We have also shown that the induced force is independent of the material used for the exposed electrode. The same techniques have shown that the induced force of a double barrier actuator increases with decreasing narrow electrode diameter.

  16. Force Measurements of Single and Double Barrier DBD Plasma Actuators in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ashpis, David E.

    2008-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the force induced by both single (one electrode insulated) and double (both electrodes insulated) dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators in quiescent air. We have shown that, for single barrier actuators, as the electrode diameter decreased below those values previously studied the induced Force increases exponentially rather than linearly. This behavior has been experimentally verified using two different measurement techniques: stagnation probe measurements of the induced flow velocity and direct measurement of the force using an electronic balance. In addition, we have shown the the induced force is independent of the material used for the exposed electrode. The same techniques have shown that the induced force of a double barrier actuator increases with decreasing narrow electrode diameter.

  17. Aerodynamic force measurement on a large-scale model in a short duration test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tanno, H.; Kodera, M.; Komuro, T.; Sato, K.; Takahasi, M.; Itoh, K.

    2005-03-01

    A force measurement technique has been developed for large-scale aerodynamic models with a short test time. The technique is based on direct acceleration measurements, with miniature accelerometers mounted on a test model suspended by wires. Measuring acceleration at two different locations, the technique can eliminate oscillations from natural vibration of the model. The technique was used for drag force measurements on a 3 m long supersonic combustor model in the HIEST free-piston driven shock tunnel. A time resolution of 350 {mu}s is guaranteed during measurements, whose resolution is enough for ms order test time in HIEST. To evaluate measurement reliability and accuracy, measured values were compared with results from a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical simulation. The difference between measured values and numerical simulation values was less than 5%. We conclude that this measurement technique is sufficiently reliable for measuring aerodynamic force within test durations of 1 ms.

  18. Telerobotic-assisted bone-drilling system using bilateral control with feed operation scaling and cutting force scaling

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Yusuke; Kawana, Hiromasa; Usuda, Shin; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2012-01-01

    Background Drilling is used in the medical field, especially in oral surgery and orthopaedics. In recent years, oral surgery involving dental implants has become more common. However, the risky drilling process causes serious accidents. To prevent these accidents, supporting systems such as robotic drilling systems are required. Methods A telerobotic-assisted drilling system is proposed. An acceleration-based four-channel bilateral control system is implemented in linear actuators in a master–slave system for drill feeding. A reaction force observer is used instead of a force sensor for measuring cutting force. Cutting force transmits from a cutting material to a surgeon, who may feel a static cutting resistance force and vigorous cutting vibrations, via the master–slave system. Moreover, position scaling and force scaling are achieved. Scaling functions are used to achieve precise drilling and hazard detection via force sensation. Results Cutting accuracy and reproducibility of the cutting force were evaluated by angular velocity/position error and frequency analysis of the cutting force, respectively, and errors were > 2.0 rpm and > 0.2 mm, respectively. Spectrum peaks of the cutting vibration were at the theoretical vibration frequencies of 30, 60 and 90 Hz. Conclusions The proposed telerobotic-assisted drilling system achieved precise manipulation of the drill feed and vivid feedback from the cutting force. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22271710

  19. Measurements of dispersion forces between colloidal latex particles with the atomic force microscope and comparison with Lifshitz theory

    SciTech Connect

    Elzbieciak-Wodka, Magdalena; Ruiz-Cabello, F. Javier Montes; Trefalt, Gregor; Maroni, Plinio; Borkovec, Michal; Popescu, Mihail N.

    2014-03-14

    Interaction forces between carboxylate colloidal latex particles of about 2 μm in diameter immersed in aqueous solutions of monovalent salts were measured with the colloidal probe technique, which is based on the atomic force microscope. We have systematically varied the ionic strength, the type of salt, and also the surface charge densities of the particles through changes in the solution pH. Based on these measurements, we have accurately measured the dispersion forces acting between the particles and estimated the apparent Hamaker constant to be (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup −21} J at a separation distance of about 10 nm. This value is basically independent of the salt concentration and the type of salt. Good agreement with Lifshitz theory is found when roughness effects are taken into account. The combination of retardation and roughness effects reduces the value of the apparent Hamaker constant and its ionic strength dependence with respect to the case of ideally smooth surfaces.

  20. Thermophoretic forces on DNA measured with a single-molecule spring balance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jonas N; Lüscher, Christopher J; Marie, Rodolphe; Thamdrup, Lasse H; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2014-12-31

    We stretch a single DNA molecule with thermophoretic forces and measure these forces with a spring balance: the DNA molecule itself. It is an entropic spring which we calibrate, using as a benchmark its Brownian motion in the nanochannel that contains and prestretches it. This direct measurement of the thermophoretic force in a static configuration finds forces up to 130 fN. This is eleven times stronger than the force experienced by the same molecule in the same thermal gradient in bulk, where the molecule shields itself. Our stronger forces stretch the middle of the molecule up to 80% of its contour length. We find the Soret coefficient per unit length of DNA at various ionic strengths. It agrees, with novel precision, with results obtained in bulk for DNA too short to shield itself and with the thermodynamic model of thermophoresis.

  1. Thermophoretic forces on DNA measured with a single-molecule spring balance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jonas N; Lüscher, Christopher J; Marie, Rodolphe; Thamdrup, Lasse H; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2014-12-31

    We stretch a single DNA molecule with thermophoretic forces and measure these forces with a spring balance: the DNA molecule itself. It is an entropic spring which we calibrate, using as a benchmark its Brownian motion in the nanochannel that contains and prestretches it. This direct measurement of the thermophoretic force in a static configuration finds forces up to 130 fN. This is eleven times stronger than the force experienced by the same molecule in the same thermal gradient in bulk, where the molecule shields itself. Our stronger forces stretch the middle of the molecule up to 80% of its contour length. We find the Soret coefficient per unit length of DNA at various ionic strengths. It agrees, with novel precision, with results obtained in bulk for DNA too short to shield itself and with the thermodynamic model of thermophoresis. PMID:25615393

  2. Measurement and modeling on hydrodynamic forces and deformation of an air bubble approaching a solid sphere in liquids.

    PubMed

    Shahalami, Mansoureh; Wang, Louxiang; Wu, Chu; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe; Chan, Derek Y C

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between bubbles and solid surfaces is central to a broad range of industrial and biological processes. Various experimental techniques have been developed to measure the interactions of bubbles approaching solids in a liquid. A main challenge is to accurately and reliably control the relative motion over a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions and at the same time to determine the interaction forces, bubble-solid separation and bubble deformation. Existing experimental methods are able to focus only on one of the aspects of this problem, mostly for bubbles and particles with characteristic dimensions either below 100 μm or above 1 cm. As a result, either the interfacial deformations are measured directly with the forces being inferred from a model, or the forces are measured directly with the deformations to be deduced from the theory. The recently developed integrated thin film drainage apparatus (ITFDA) filled the gap of intermediate bubble/particle size ranges that are commonly encountered in mineral and oil recovery applications. Equipped with side-view digital cameras along with a bimorph cantilever as force sensor and speaker diaphragm as the driver for bubble to approach a solid sphere, the ITFDA has the capacity to measure simultaneously and independently the forces and interfacial deformations as a bubble approaches a solid sphere in a liquid. Coupled with the thin liquid film drainage modeling, the ITFDA measurement allows the critical role of surface tension, fluid viscosity and bubble approach speed in determining bubble deformation (profile) and hydrodynamic forces to be elucidated. Here we compare the available methods of studying bubble-solid interactions and demonstrate unique features and advantages of the ITFDA for measuring both forces and bubble deformations in systems of Reynolds numbers as high as 10. The consistency and accuracy of such measurement are tested against the well established Stokes-Reynolds-Young-Laplace model

  3. Measurement and modeling on hydrodynamic forces and deformation of an air bubble approaching a solid sphere in liquids.

    PubMed

    Shahalami, Mansoureh; Wang, Louxiang; Wu, Chu; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe; Chan, Derek Y C

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between bubbles and solid surfaces is central to a broad range of industrial and biological processes. Various experimental techniques have been developed to measure the interactions of bubbles approaching solids in a liquid. A main challenge is to accurately and reliably control the relative motion over a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions and at the same time to determine the interaction forces, bubble-solid separation and bubble deformation. Existing experimental methods are able to focus only on one of the aspects of this problem, mostly for bubbles and particles with characteristic dimensions either below 100 μm or above 1 cm. As a result, either the interfacial deformations are measured directly with the forces being inferred from a model, or the forces are measured directly with the deformations to be deduced from the theory. The recently developed integrated thin film drainage apparatus (ITFDA) filled the gap of intermediate bubble/particle size ranges that are commonly encountered in mineral and oil recovery applications. Equipped with side-view digital cameras along with a bimorph cantilever as force sensor and speaker diaphragm as the driver for bubble to approach a solid sphere, the ITFDA has the capacity to measure simultaneously and independently the forces and interfacial deformations as a bubble approaches a solid sphere in a liquid. Coupled with the thin liquid film drainage modeling, the ITFDA measurement allows the critical role of surface tension, fluid viscosity and bubble approach speed in determining bubble deformation (profile) and hydrodynamic forces to be elucidated. Here we compare the available methods of studying bubble-solid interactions and demonstrate unique features and advantages of the ITFDA for measuring both forces and bubble deformations in systems of Reynolds numbers as high as 10. The consistency and accuracy of such measurement are tested against the well established Stokes-Reynolds-Young-Laplace model

  4. Pollution Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Research Ventures, Inc.'s visiplume is a portable, microprocessor-controlled air pollution monitor for measuring sulfur dioxide emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants, and facilities that manufacture sulfuric acid. It observes smokestack plumes at a distance from the stack obviating the expense and difficulty of installing sample collectors in each stack and later analyzing the samples.

  5. Real-time intermembrane force measurements and imaging of lipid domain morphology during hemifusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Kristiansen, Kai; Donaldson, Stephen H., Jr.; Cadirov, Nicholas; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is the core process in membrane trafficking and is essential for cellular transport of proteins and other biomacromolecules. During protein-mediated membrane fusion, membrane proteins are often excluded from the membrane-membrane contact, indicating that local structural transformations in lipid domains play a major role. However, the rearrangements of lipid domains during fusion have not been thoroughly examined. Here using a newly developed Fluorescence Surface Forces Apparatus (FL-SFA), migration of liquid-disordered clusters and depletion of liquid-ordered domains at the membrane-membrane contact are imaged in real time during hemifusion of model lipid membranes, together with simultaneous force-distance and lipid membrane thickness measurements. The load and contact time-dependent hemifusion results show that the domain rearrangements decrease the energy barrier to fusion, illustrating the significance of dynamic domain transformations in membrane fusion processes. Importantly, the FL-SFA can unambiguously correlate interaction forces and in situ imaging in many dynamic interfacial systems.

  6. Electrostatic forces in the Poisson-Boltzmann systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Cai, Qin; Ye, Xiang; Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2013-09-01

    Continuum modeling of electrostatic interactions based upon numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation has been widely used in structural and functional analyses of biomolecules. A limitation of the numerical strategies is that it is conceptually difficult to incorporate these types of models into molecular mechanics simulations, mainly because of the issue in assigning atomic forces. In this theoretical study, we first derived the Maxwell stress tensor for molecular systems obeying the full nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. We further derived formulations of analytical electrostatic forces given the Maxwell stress tensor and discussed the relations of the formulations with those published in the literature. We showed that the formulations derived from the Maxwell stress tensor require a weaker condition for its validity, applicable to nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann systems with a finite number of singularities such as atomic point charges and the existence of discontinuous dielectric as in the widely used classical piece-wise constant dielectric models. PMID:24028101

  7. 10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the test stand deck to east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Occlusal forces during chewing and swallowing as measured by sound transmission.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, C H; Mahan, P E; Lundeen, H C; Brehnan, K; Walsh, E K; Holbrook, W B

    1981-10-01

    Forces during the phase of occlusal contact during chewing and swallowing are surprisingly high (36.2% and 41%), about 40% of the subject's maximum biting force. Previous studies using transducers in fixed partial dentures measured only a portion of the total force and have given the impression that chewing forces are much less than the data reported in this study. The importance of occlusal stability in the intercuspal position is of utmost clinical significance. Steep anterior guidance does not appear to expose the teeth to extreme lateral forces. The gliding contacts of the teeth while entering and leaving the intercuspal position have been shown to be of short duration and low magnitude when compared with the forces generated in the intercuspal position. During chewing, the peak occlusal force occurred well after the peak EMG activity. EMG activity by itself does not directly correlate with the force generated during chewing. The sound transmission method for measuring interjaw force during chewing, which was developed as part of this project, proved to be practical for research purposes. No intraoral devices are required, and the time relationship to force is accurate to within 15 ms.

  9. Pilot study of a device for measuring instrument forces during endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    White, Paul S; Nassif, Ramez; Saleh, Hesham; Drew, Timothy

    2004-03-01

    ESS is a form of minimal access surgery that includes different tasks and manoeuvres requiring sophisticated psychomotor coordination with varying levels of force application. The avoidance of complications is partially dependent upon reducing surgical force application when operating against vital barriers such as the skull base and the medial orbital wall. The study of the surgical forces in endoscopic sinus surgery offers the potential for surgeons to identify the appropriate application of the instrument forces and torques necessary to conduct safe surgery. We have developed Sinoforce, a sinus surgery force-measuring instrument, which comprises modified Blakesley forceps fitted with specialized force sensors The instrument produces a real-time visual display of the various forces applied by the surgeon to the forceps during endoscopic ethmoidectomy. A pilot study was conducted using four cadaveric head specimens. We measured the force needed to break through the different parts of the ethmoidal bony labyrinth and skull base. Comparable forces were needed to break through the ethmoidal bulla and uncinate process. However, a force of > 2 kg, exceeding the forceps calibration, was needed to break through the different parts of the skull base. In this article we describe the new forceps, present our preliminary results and explore the potential benefits of this new instrument.

  10. Deformation of Polymer Composites in Force Protection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarian, Oshin

    Systems used for protecting personnel, vehicles and infrastructure from ballistic and blast threats derive their performance from a combination of the intrinsic properties of the constituent materials and the way in which the materials are arranged and attached to one another. The present work addresses outstanding issues in both the intrinsic properties of high-performance fiber composites and the consequences of how such composites are integrated into force protection systems. One aim is to develop a constitutive model for the large-strain intralaminar shear deformation of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber-reinforced composite. To this end, an analytical model based on a binary representation of the constituent phases is developed and validated using finite element analyses. The model is assessed through comparisons with experimental measurements on cross-ply composite specimens in the +/-45° orientation. The hardening behavior and the limiting tensile strain are attributable to rotations of fibers in the plastic domain and the effects of these rotations on the internal stress state. The model is further assessed through quasi-static punch experiments and dynamic impact tests using metal foam projectiles. The finite element model based on this model accurately captures both the back-face deflection-time history and the final plate profile (especially the changes caused by fiber pull-in). A separate analytical framework for describing the accelerations caused by head impact during, for example, the secondary collision of a vehicle occupant with the cabin interior during an external event is also presented. The severity of impact, characterized by the Head Injury Criterion (HIC), is used to assess the efficacy of crushable foams in mitigating head injury. The framework is used to identify the optimal foam strength that minimizes the HIC for prescribed mass and velocity, subject to constraints on foam thickness. The predictive capability of

  11. Measurement of strut chordal forces of the tricuspid valve using miniature C ring transducers.

    PubMed

    Troxler, Lauren G; Spinner, Erin M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2012-04-01

    Tricuspid valve (TV) leaflets, papillary muscles (PM), and tendinous chords must work together to ensure proper coaptation. Alterations in valvular mechanics, including chordal forces, may lead to improper coaptation resulting in tricuspid regurgitation. Little is known about TV mechanics as right-sided heart diseases have been overlooked. We sought to fill this gap by understanding the role of TV strut chords with the objective to understand how strut chordal force varies depending on papillary muscle (PM) origin and leaflet attachment in the normal state. Additionally we investigated how these forces are altered with abnormal geometry. Porcine TVs (n=18) were studied in a right-heart simulator capable of reproducing physiological and pathological conditions. Miniature force transducers were placed on strut chords to measure forces throughout the cardiac cycle. In the normal state, chordal force depended upon PM attachment in which chords branching from the septal PM (SPM) carried significantly less force compared to those branching from the anterior PM (APM) (p≤0.05). Annular dilatation resulted in significant increase in chordal force (p≤0.05) on all strut chords. Severe PM displacement led to increased chordal force in chords attaching the APM to the posterior leaflet as well as chords attaching the PPM to the septal leaflet. Elevated chordal force due to isolated annular dilatation was further increased only with addition of apical displacement of the APM. These results provide initial knowledge of TV chordal force mechanics and may be applied to future studies on TV repair techniques. PMID:22284427

  12. Forced vibration of flexible body systems. A dynamic stiffness method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. S.; Lin, J. C.

    1993-10-01

    Due to the development of high speed machinery, robots, and aerospace structures, the research of flexible body systems undergoing both gross motion and elastic deformation has seen increasing importance. The finite element method and modal analysis are often used in formulating equations of motion for dynamic analysis of the systems which entail time domain, forced vibration analysis. This study develops a new method based on dynamic stiffness to investigate forced vibration of flexible body systems. In contrast to the conventional finite element method, shape functions and stiffness matrices used in this study are derived from equations of motion for continuum beams. Hence, the resulting shape functions are named as dynamic shape functions. By applying the dynamic shape functions, the mass and stiffness matrices of a beam element are derived. The virtual work principle is employed to formulate equations of motion. Not only the coupling of gross motion and elastic deformation, but also the stiffening effect of axial forces is taken into account. Simulation results of a cantilever beam, a rotating beam, and a slider crank mechanism are compared with the literature to verify the proposed method.

  13. The development of a two-component force dynamometer and tool control system for dynamic machine tool research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, I. A.

    1973-01-01

    The development is presented of a tooling system that makes a controlled sinusoidal oscillation simulating a dynamic chip removal condition. It also measures the machining forces in two mutually perpendicular directions without any cross sensitivity.

  14. Voltage-dependent membrane displacements measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mosbacher, J; Langer, M; Hörber, J K; Sachs, F

    1998-01-01

    Cells use polar molecules in the membrane to sense changes in the transmembrane potential. The opening of voltage-gated ion channels and membrane bending due to the inverse flexoelectric effect are two examples of such electromechanical coupling. We have looked for membrane motions in an electric field using atomic (or scanning) force microscopy (AFM) with the intent of studying voltage-dependent conformational changes of ion channels. Voltage-clamped HEK293 cells were either untransfected controls or transfected with Shaker K+ channels. Using a +/- 10-mV peak-peak AC carrier stimulus, untransfected cells moved 0.5-15 nm normal to the plane of the membrane. These movements tracked the voltage at frequencies >1 kHz with a phase lead of 60-120 degrees, as expected of a displacement current. The movement was outward with depolarization, but the holding potential only weakly influenced the amplitude of the movement. In contrast, cells transfected with a noninactivating mutant of Shaker K+channels showed similar movements, but these were sensitive to the holding potential; decreasing with depolarization between -80 and 0 mV. Searching for artifactual origins of these movements, we used open or sealed pipettes and AFM cantilever placements just above the cells. These results were negative, suggesting that the observed movements were produced by the cell membrane rather than by movement of the patch pipette, or by acoustic or electrical interactions of the membrane with the AFM tip. In control cells, the electrical motor may arise from the flexoelectric effect, where changes in potential induce changes in curvature. In transfected cells, it appears that channel-specific movements also occurred. These experiments demonstrate that the AFM may be able to exploit voltage-dependent movements as a source of contrast for imaging membrane components. The electrically induced motility will cause twitching during action potentials, and may have physiological consequences. PMID

  15. Parallel force measurement with a polymeric microbeam array using an optical microscope and micromanipulator.

    PubMed

    Sasoglu, F Mert; Bohl, Andrew J; Allen, Kathleen B; Layton, Bradley E

    2009-01-01

    An image analysis method and its validation are presented for tracking the displacements of parallel mechanical force sensors. Force is measured using a combination of beam theory, optical microscopy, and image analysis. The primary instrument is a calibrated polymeric microbeam array mounted on a micromanipulator with the intended purpose of measuring traction forces on cell cultures or cell arrays. One application is the testing of hypotheses involving cellular mechanotransduction mechanisms. An Otsu-based image analysis code calculates displacement and force on cellular or other soft structures by using edge detection and image subtraction on digitally captured optical microscopy images. Forces as small as 250+/-50 nN and as great as 25+/-2.5 microN may be applied and measured upon as few as one or as many as hundreds of structures in parallel. A validation of the method is provided by comparing results from a rigid glass surface and a compliant polymeric surface.

  16. Update: Partnership for the Revitalization of National Wind Tunnel Force Measurement Technology Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) chartered a team to examine the issues and risks associated with the lack of funding and focus on force measurement over the past several years, focusing specifically on strain-gage balances. NASA partnered with the U.S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) to exploit their combined capabilities and take a national level government view of the problem and established the National Force Measurement Technology Capability (NFMTC) project. This paper provides an update on the team's status for revitalizing the government's balance capability with respect to designing, fabricating, calibrating, and using the these critical measurement devices.

  17. OCT system for plant measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Kishiwaki, Daisuke; Ito, Masafumi; Honda, Toshio; Okamura, Yasuyuki

    2005-09-01

    An Optical coherence tomography system (OCT system) was developed to measure physiological response inside plant. This system has a unique optical scanner of wide scanning range of 40mm to adapt the OCT measurement to irregular features and many breeds of plant samples. To use in the outdoor field, which plants volunteers, the system should be compact, stable, and have high repetition frequency of measurement. We designed the OCT system with the original optical scanner and optical fiber optics for the purpose. The transmittance and reflectance characteristics of the plant leaves were examined to check the water absorption. The SLD-light of the wavelength of 830nm was selected for the measurement light source. Various kinds of plant samples were measured to evaluate the system performance and its adaptive flexibility. Cell structure of plant surface, its change due to the water content, and growth monitoring of plant tissue were measured. The concrete application was also demonstrated.

  18. Apparatus for measuring the force of gravity on freely falling electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witteborn, F. C.; Fairbank, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus and data analysis technique for measuring the gravitational force on freely falling electrons are described. The measurement required that all forces acting on the electrons be uniform and measurable to about ten to the negative 11th power eV/m. The electrical force along the axis of the 5-cm-diam, vertical copper tube used in the experiment was found to be about six times ten to the negative 11th power eV/m when the tube was cooled to 4.2 K. Forces on electrons due to magnetic field gradients were reduced well below the electrical ones by selecting only ground state electrons for measurement. The absence, at 4.2 K, of much stronger electric fields, which were expected to arise from the patch effect and from differential lattice components, contrasts strongly with measurements of electric fields near metal surfaces made at room temperature.

  19. For whom the cells pull: Hydrogel and micropost devices for measuring traction forces.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Denisin, Aleksandra K; Wilson, Robin E; Pruitt, Beth L

    2016-02-01

    While performing several functions, adherent cells deform their surrounding substrate via stable adhesions that connect the intracellular cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. The traction forces that deform the substrate are studied in mechanotrasduction because they are affected by the mechanics of the extracellular milieu. We review the development and application of two methods widely used to measure traction forces generated by cells on 2D substrates: (i) traction force microscopy with polyacrylamide hydrogels and (ii) calculation of traction forces with arrays of deformable microposts. Measuring forces with these methods relies on measuring substrate displacements and converting them into forces. We describe approaches to determine force from displacements and elaborate on the necessary experimental conditions for this type of analysis. We emphasize device fabrication, mechanical calibration of substrates and covalent attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to substrates as key features in the design of experiments to measure cell traction forces with polyacrylamide hydrogels or microposts. We also report the challenges and achievements in integrating these methods with platforms for the mechanical stimulation of adherent cells. The approaches described here will enable new studies to understand cell mechanical outputs as a function of mechanical inputs and advance the understanding of mechanotransduction mechanisms.

  20. Measurement of Vocal Fold Collision Forces during Phonation: Methods and Preliminary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Heather E.; Howe, Robert D.; Zeitels, Steven M.; Kobler, James B.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    Forces applied to vocal fold tissue as the vocal folds collide may cause tissue injury that manifests as benign organic lesions. A novel method for measuring this quantity in humans in vivo uses a low-profile force sensor that extends along the length and depth of the glottis. Sensor design facilitates its placement and stabilization so that…