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Sample records for force measurement system

  1. Development of computerized masticatory force measurement system.

    PubMed

    Rane, Vivek; Hamde, Satish; Agrawal, Ankush

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Maximum Voluntary Bite Force (MVBF) in Indian population with normal occlusion and after treatment of mandibular angle fracture. This paper discusses the development of a sensor fork with modified load cell and computer-based bite force measuring system that generates force profile on the computer. This is a powerful diagnostic tool in response to the needs of dentists seeking an accurate way to dynamically measure occlusion. This study was carried out to evaluate the maximum voluntary bite force generated by the patients after the treatment of mandibular angle fracture. The in vivo measurements were repeated on the following day, week and two months later. The measurements of the device were highly repeatable. This development provides the cost effective and handy equipment for bite force measurement further, if again sensor thickness reduced, we will be able to get more close results of forces that are exactly generated during the mastication process. Our study shows a significant difference in mean bite force efficiency between the all the treatment weeks and increased with time at α = 0.05 level. The gender difference was statistically significant in the male and female.

  2. Measurement systems for cell adhesive forces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dennis W; García, Andrés J

    2015-02-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) involves integrin receptor-ligand binding and clustering to form focal adhesion (FA) complexes, which mechanically link the cell's cytoskeleton to the ECM and regulate fundamental cell signaling pathways. Although elucidation of the biochemical events in cell-matrix adhesive interactions is rapidly advancing, recent studies show that the forces underlying cell-matrix adhesive interactions are also critical to cell responses. Therefore, multiple measurement systems have been developed to quantify the spatial and temporal dynamics of cell adhesive forces, and these systems have identified how mechanical events influence cell phenotype and FA structure-function relationships under physiological and pathological settings. This review focuses on the development, methodology, and applications of measurement systems for probing (a) cell adhesion strength and (b) 2D and 3D cell traction forces.

  3. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  4. Development of a commercially viable piezoelectric force sensor system for static force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Luo, Xinwei; Liu, Jingcheng; Li, Min; Qin, Lan

    2017-09-01

    A compensation method for measuring static force with a commercial piezoelectric force sensor is proposed to disprove the theory that piezoelectric sensors and generators can only operate under dynamic force. After studying the model of the piezoelectric force sensor measurement system, the principle of static force measurement using a piezoelectric material or piezoelectric force sensor is analyzed. Then, the distribution law of the decay time constant of the measurement system and the variation law of the measurement system’s output are studied, and a compensation method based on the time interval threshold Δ t and attenuation threshold Δ {{u}th} is proposed. By calibrating the system and considering the influences of the environment and the hardware, a suitable Δ {{u}th} value is determined, and the system’s output attenuation is compensated based on the Δ {{u}th} value to realize the measurement. Finally, a static force measurement system with a piezoelectric force sensor is developed based on the compensation method. The experimental results confirm the successful development of a simple compensation method for static force measurement with a commercial piezoelectric force sensor. In addition, it is established that, contrary to the current perception, a piezoelectric force sensor system can be used to measure static force through further calibration.

  5. Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) Force Measurement System (FMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    An Electronics Engineer at the Glenn Research Center (GRC), requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) provide technical support for an evaluation of the existing force measurement system (FMS) at the GRC's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the intent of developing conceptual designs to improve the tunnel's force measurement capability in order to better meet test customer needs. This report contains the outcome of the NESC technical review.

  6. Development of cylindrical-type finger force measuring system using force sensors and its characteristics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Min; Yoon, Joungwon; Shin, Hee-Suk; Kim, Gab-Soon

    2012-02-01

    Some patients cannot use their hands because of the paralysis of their fingers. Their fingers can recover with rehabilitative training, and the extent of rehabilitation can be judged by grasping a cylindrical-object with their fingers. At present, the cylindrical-object used in hospitals is only a plastic cylinder, which cannot measure grasping force of the fingers. Therefore, doctors must judge the extent of rehabilitation by watching patients' fingers as they grasp the plastic cylinder. In this paper, the development of two cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems with four force sensors for left hand and right hand were developed. The developed finger force measuring system can measure the grasping force of patients' each finger (forefinger, middle finger, ring finger and little finger), and the measured results could be used to judge the rehabilitation extent of a finger patient. The grasping force tests of men and women were performed using the developed cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems. The tests confirm that the average finger forces of right hand and left hand for men were about 194 N and 179 N, and for women, 108 N and 95 N.

  7. Many-body force and mobility measurements in colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Jason W.

    We have extended a sensitive probe of colloidal interparticle forces, blinking optical tweezers, to allow measurements of forces among groups of more than two particles. This dissertation focuses on bridging the gap between microscopic pair interactions and bulk behavior in colloidal systems by using this technique to explore the regime of few-body interactions between micron-size polymer beads suspended in oil. Electrostatic forces and each component of the mobility tensor of small groups of colloidal particles are simultaneously measured using blinking optical tweezers. When the electrostatic screening length is longer than the inter-particle separation, forces are found to be non-pairwise additive. Both pair and multi-particle forces are well described by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation with constant potential boundary conditions. These findings may play an important role in understanding the structure and stability of a wide variety of systems, from micron-sized particles in oil to aqueous nanocolloids. The measurement technique presented here should be simple to further extend to systems of heterogeneous, non-spherical particles arranged in arbitrary three dimensional geometries.

  8. An Electromotive Force Measurement System for Alloy Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Changhu Xing; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban; Robert Mariani; J. Rory Kennedy

    2010-11-01

    The development of advanced nuclear fuels requires a better understanding of the transmutation and micro-structural evolution of the materials. Alloy fuels have the advantage of high thermal conductivity and improved characteristics in fuel-cladding chemical reaction. However, information on thermodynamic and thermophysical properties is limited. The objective of this project is to design and build an experimental system to measure the thermodynamic properties of solid materials from which the understanding of their phase change can be determined. The apparatus was used to measure the electromotive force (EMF) of several materials in order to calibrate and test the system. The EMF of chromel was measured from 100°C to 800°C and compared with theoretical values. Additionally, the EMF measurement of Ni-Fe alloy was performed and compared with the Ni-Fe phase diagram. The prototype system is to be modified eventually and used in a radioactive hot-cell in the future.

  9. A force plate system for measuring low-magnitude reaction forces in small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Handley, D E; Ross, J F; Carr, G J

    1998-07-01

    We present a force plate system which measures low-magnitude vertical reaction forces generated by small laboratory animals. The force plate mechanical design minimizes radiated transverse waves, acoustic reverberation, and standing waves caused by impacts on the force plate surface. A secondary force plate and PC-based software algorithm minimize floor vibrational artifact. The force plate was used to measure function of rats during two tests: forelimb/hindlimb hopping reaction and surface righting reaction. In control rats, forelimb hopping rate exceeded hindlimb hopping rate during 16 weeks of repeated testing. Subchronic intraperitoneal (i.p.) dosing of 10 mg/kg/day acrylamide produced a selective impairment of hindlimb hopping. In contrast, single doses of haloperidol (1-5 mg/kg, i.p.) slowed the righting reaction and produced a relatively selective impairment of forelimb hopping. The force plate system presents new opportunities for performing quantitative neurological assessments of small laboratory animals when previously such tests had been performed subjectively and qualitatively.

  10. Air Force Integrated Readiness Measurement System (AFIRMS). Economic Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-31

    DDN - Defense Data Network DOC - Designed Operational Capability DoD - Department of Defense EDS - European Distribution System EIFEL - NATO Command...only by the Air Force units identified in this document. b. Information may be required from EIFEL , a NATO system, or other Allied systems. (Refer to...1) Air Force Operations Resource Management System (AFORMS) (2) Weapon System Management Information System (WSMIS) (3) EIFEL (NATO Command and

  11. Diamagnetic Levitation Cantilever System for the Calibration of Normal Force Atomic Force Microscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jahn; Yi, Jin-Woo; Murphy, Colin; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    In this presentation we report a novel technique for normal force calibration for Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) adhesion measurements known as the diamagnetic normal force calibration (D-NFC) system. The levitation produced by the repulsion between a diamagnetic graphite sheet and a set of rare-earth magnets is used in order to produce an oscillation due to an unstable mechanical moment produced by a silicon cantilever supported on the graphite. The measurement of the natural frequency of this oscillation allows for the calculation of the stiffness of the system to three-digit accuracy. The D-NFC response was proven to have a high sensitivity for the structure of water molecules collected on its surface. This in turns allows for the study of the effects of coatings on the structure of surface water. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  12. Enclosed Electronic System for Force Measurements in Knee Implants

    PubMed Central

    Forchelet, David; Simoncini, Matteo; Arami, Arash; Bertsch, Arnaud; Meurville, Eric; Aminian, Kamiar; Ryser, Peter; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is a widely performed surgical technique. Soft tissue force balancing during the operation relies strongly on the experience of the surgeon in equilibrating tension in the collateral ligaments. Little information on the forces in the implanted prosthesis is available during surgery and post-operative treatment. This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of an instrumented insert performing force measurements in a knee prosthesis. The insert contains a closed structure composed of printed circuit boards and incorporates a microfabricated polyimide thin-film piezoresistive strain sensor for each condylar compartment. The sensor is tested in a mechanical knee simulator that mimics in-vivo conditions. For characterization purposes, static and dynamic load patterns are applied to the instrumented insert. Results show that the sensors are able to measure forces up to 1.5 times body weight with a sensitivity fitting the requirements for the proposed use. Dynamic testing of the insert shows a good tracking of slow and fast changing forces in the knee prosthesis by the sensors. PMID:25196007

  13. Enclosed electronic system for force measurements in knee implants.

    PubMed

    Forchelet, David; Simoncini, Matteo; Arami, Arash; Bertsch, Arnaud; Meurville, Eric; Aminian, Kamiar; Ryser, Peter; Renaud, Philippe

    2014-08-14

    Total knee arthroplasty is a widely performed surgical technique. Soft tissue force balancing during the operation relies strongly on the experience of the surgeon in equilibrating tension in the collateral ligaments. Little information on the forces in the implanted prosthesis is available during surgery and post-operative treatment. This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of an instrumented insert performing force measurements in a knee prosthesis. The insert contains a closed structure composed of printed circuit boards and incorporates a microfabricated polyimide thin-film piezoresistive strain sensor for each condylar compartment. The sensor is tested in a mechanical knee simulator that mimics in-vivo conditions. For characterization purposes, static and dynamic load patterns are applied to the instrumented insert. Results show that the sensors are able to measure forces up to 1.5 times body weight with a sensitivity fitting the requirements for the proposed use. Dynamic testing of the insert shows a good tracking of slow and fast changing forces in the knee prosthesis by the sensors.

  14. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  15. A force balance system for the measurement of skin friction drag force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. W.; Mcvey, E. S.

    1971-01-01

    Research on force balance instrumentation to measure the skin friction of hypersonic vehicles at extreme temperatures, high altitudes and in a vibration field is discussed. A rough overall summary and operating instructions for the equipment are presented.

  16. Force measuring valve assemblies, systems including such valve assemblies and related methods

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin George [Pocatello, ID; Garcia, Humberto Enrique [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael George [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-04-17

    Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include stroking a valve member and measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke. Methods of evaluating a fluid condition may include measuring a force acting on a valve member in the presence of fluid flow over a period of time and evaluating at least one of the frequency of changes in the measured force over the period of time and the magnitude of the changes in the measured force over the period of time to identify the presence of an anomaly in a fluid flow and, optionally, its estimated location. Methods of evaluating a valve condition may include directing a fluid flow through a valve while stroking a valve member, measuring a force acting on the valve member during the stroke, and comparing the measured force to a reference force. Valve assemblies and related systems are also disclosed.

  17. Development of a measuring system of contact force during braille reading using an optical 6-axis force sensor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Oouchi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Shimojo, M; Shimada, S

    2006-01-01

    A system with an optical 6-axis force sensor was developed to measure contact force during braille reading. In using this system, we encountered two problems. One is a variability of output values depending on the contact point. This was solved by using two transformation techniques. The other is that subjects read braille in a different manner from the usual. We compared two manners of braille reading, one-handed vs two-handed, and found a small reduction in reading speed. Using this system, we collected data from four braille readers and quantitatively showed more minute contact force trajectories than those in earlier studies.

  18. Design and Test of a Soft Plantar Force Measurement System for Gait Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Yulong; Duan, Zhengyong; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a plantar force measurement system. The MEMS pressure sensor, as the key sensing element, is designed, fabricated and embedded into a flexible silicon oil-filled bladder made of silicon rubber to constitute a single sensing unit. A conditioning circuit is designed for signal processing and data acquisition. The characteristics of the plantar force sensing unit are investigated by both static and dynamic tests. A comparison of characteristics between the proposed plantar force sensing unit and a commercial flexible force sensor is presented. A practical experiment of plantar force measurement has been carried out to validate the system. The results demonstrate that the proposed measurement system has a potential for success in the application of plantar force measurement during normal gait. PMID:23208558

  19. The design and implementation of a windowing interface pinch force measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tze-Yee; Chen, Yuanu-Joan; Chung, Chin-Teng; Hsiao, Ming-Heng

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a novel windowing interface pinch force measurement system that is basically based on an USB (Universal Series Bus) microcontroller which mainly processes the sensing data from the force sensing resistance sensors mounted on five digits. It possesses several friendly functions, such as the value and curve trace of the applied force by a hand injured patient displayed in real time on a monitoring screen, consequently, not only the physician can easily evaluate the effect of hand injury rehabilitation, but also the patients get more progressive during the hand physical therapy by interacting with the screen of pinch force measurement. In order to facilitate the pinch force measurement system and make it friendly, the detail hardware design and software programming flowchart are described in this paper. Through a series of carefully and detailed experimental tests, first of all, the relationship between the applying force and the FSR sensors are measured and verified. Later, the different type of pinch force measurements are verified by the oscilloscope and compared with the corresponding values and waveform traces in the window interface display panel to obtain the consistency. Finally, a windowing interface pinch force measurement system based on the USB microcontroller is implemented and demonstrated. The experimental results show the verification and feasibility of the designed system.

  20. Floating frame grounding system. [for wind tunnel static force measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a floating frame grounding system (FFGS) for the 40- by 80-foot low speed wind tunnel facility at the NASA Ames Research Center National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex is addresssed. When electrical faults are detected, the FFGS ensures a ground path for the fault current. In addition, the FFGS alerts the tunnel operator when a mechanical foul occurs.

  1. Air Force Integrated Readiness Measurement System (AFIRMS). Wing Database Specification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-30

    Description, Contract No. F33700-83-G-002005701, 8 April 1983. (Unclassified) z . AFR 700-3, Information Systems Requirements Processing, 30 November 1984. W...STATUS 3 4 72 1i1N AIRCRAFT PRESELECT INDICATOR 4 80 1920 11iN AIRCRAFT GEERATION FACTOR 4 80 1920 lip AIRCRAFT TAIL NMBER 5 80 2400 a󈧐 AIRMAN LAST NA...ACRFT + I ACRW + 34 RESOURCE) 20 38 4560 71E RESOURCE QUANTITY REQUIRED POR TOTAL ORDER 4 2280 54720 71F SORTIE AIRCRAFT RATE (60 DAY z 3 MW3) 4 180

  2. A wearable force plate system for the continuous measurement of triaxial ground reaction force in biomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko

    2010-08-01

    The ambulatory measurement of ground reaction force (GRF) and human motion under free-living conditions is convenient, inexpensive and never restricted to gait analysis in a laboratory environment and is therefore much desired by researchers and clinical doctors in biomedical applications. A wearable force plate system was developed by integrating small triaxial force sensors and three-dimensional (3D) inertial sensors for estimating dynamic triaxial GRF in biomechanical applications. The system, in comparison to existent systems, is characterized by being lightweight, thin and easy-to-wear. A six-axial force sensor (Nitta Co., Japan) was used as a verification measurement device to validate the static accuracy of the developed force plate. To evaluate the precision during dynamic gait measurements, we compared the measurements of the triaxial GRF and the center of pressure (CoP) by using the developed system with the reference measurements made using a stationary force plate and an optical motion analysis system. The root mean square (RMS) differences of the two transverse components (x- and y-axes) and the vertical component (z-axis) of the GRF were 4.3 ± 0.9 N, 6.0 ± 1.3 N and 12.1 ± 1.1 N, respectively, corresponding to 5.1 ± 1.1% and 6.5 ± 1% of the maximum of each transverse component and 1.3 ± 0.2% of the maximum vertical component of GRF. The RMS distance between the two systems' CoP traces was 3.2 ± 0.8 mm, corresponding to 1.2 ± 0.3% of the length of the shoe. Moreover, based on the results of the assessment of the influence of the system on natural gait, we found that gait was almost never affected. Therefore, the wearable system as an alternative device can be a potential solution for measuring CoP and triaxial GRF in non-laboratory environments.

  3. Development and application of a perioral force measurement system for infants with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixian; Zheng, Yaqi; Rong, Qiong; Wu, Guofeng

    2017-07-03

    Muscles converge or intertweave around the perioral area, and this can be treated with sequential therapy in infants with cleft lip and palate (CLP). The force of perioral muscles has a great influence on maxillary development and morphology. Perioral force in infants with CLP has not been well studied, and accurate and reliable measurement of perioral force in infants remains a challenge. This study aimed to investigate a new way to accurately and reliably measure perioral force in infants with unilateral CLP (UCLP) and explore the change before and after cheiloplasty. A perioral force measurement system was developed and applied to measure perioral force at labial frenum area and the commissures on both the normal and the cleft sides of four infants with UCLP before and after cheiloplasty. The results were analyzed using the SPSS 19.0 software. The perioral force measurement system appears to produce valid results in infants with UCLP. Before cheiloplasty, the perioral force of labial frenum area was 1.79 ± 0.94 g/cm(2) and that of commissure on the normal and cleft sides was 5.41 ± 1.01 g/cm(2) and 3.12 ± 1.55 g/cm(2), respectively (P < 0.05). After cheiloplasty, perioral force of labial frenum area was 12.73 ± 3.51 g/cm(2) and that of commissure on the normal and cleft sides was 7.64 ± 1.64 g/cm(2) and 7.27 ± 1.89 g/cm(2), respectively (P > 0.05). Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Design and Analysis of a Sensor System for Cutting Force Measurement in Machining Processes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qiaokang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Mao, Jianxu; Sun, Wei; Wang, Yaonan; Ge, Yunjian

    2016-01-01

    Multi-component force sensors have infiltrated a wide variety of automation products since the 1970s. However, one seldom finds full-component sensor systems available in the market for cutting force measurement in machine processes. In this paper, a new six-component sensor system with a compact monolithic elastic element (EE) is designed and developed to detect the tangential cutting forces Fx, Fy and Fz (i.e., forces along x-, y-, and z-axis) as well as the cutting moments Mx, My and Mz (i.e., moments about x-, y-, and z-axis) simultaneously. Optimal structural parameters of the EE are carefully designed via simulation-driven optimization. Moreover, a prototype sensor system is fabricated, which is applied to a 5-axis parallel kinematic machining center. Calibration experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of measuring cutting forces and moments with good linearity while minimizing coupling error. Both the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and calibration experimental studies validate the high performance of the proposed sensor system that is expected to be adopted into machining processes. PMID:26751451

  5. Design and Analysis of a Sensor System for Cutting Force Measurement in Machining Processes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiaokang; Zhang, Dan; Coppola, Gianmarc; Mao, Jianxu; Sun, Wei; Wang, Yaonan; Ge, Yunjian

    2016-01-07

    Multi-component force sensors have infiltrated a wide variety of automation products since the 1970s. However, one seldom finds full-component sensor systems available in the market for cutting force measurement in machine processes. In this paper, a new six-component sensor system with a compact monolithic elastic element (EE) is designed and developed to detect the tangential cutting forces Fx, Fy and Fz (i.e., forces along x-, y-, and z-axis) as well as the cutting moments Mx, My and Mz (i.e., moments about x-, y-, and z-axis) simultaneously. Optimal structural parameters of the EE are carefully designed via simulation-driven optimization. Moreover, a prototype sensor system is fabricated, which is applied to a 5-axis parallel kinematic machining center. Calibration experimental results demonstrate that the system is capable of measuring cutting forces and moments with good linearity while minimizing coupling error. Both the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and calibration experimental studies validate the high performance of the proposed sensor system that is expected to be adopted into machining processes.

  6. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  7. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  8. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  9. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-15

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO{sub 2} gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  10. Footbridge system identification using wireless inertial measurement units for force and response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownjohn, James Mark William; Bocian, Mateusz; Hester, David; Quattrone, Antonino; Hudson, William; Moore, Daniel; Goh, Sushma; Lim, Meng Sun

    2016-12-01

    With the main focus on safety, design of structures for vibration serviceability is often overlooked or mismanaged, resulting in some high profile structures failing publicly to perform adequately under human dynamic loading due to walking, running or jumping. A standard tool to inform better design, prove fitness for purpose before entering service and design retrofits is modal testing, a procedure that typically involves acceleration measurements using an array of wired sensors and force generation using a mechanical shaker. A critical but often overlooked aspect is using input (force) to output (response) relationships to enable estimation of modal mass, which is a key parameter directly controlling vibration levels in service. This paper describes the use of wireless inertial measurement units (IMUs), designed for biomechanics motion capture applications, for the modal testing of a 109 m footbridge. IMUs were first used for an output-only vibration survey to identify mode frequencies, shapes and damping ratios, then for simultaneous measurement of body accelerations of a human subject jumping to excite specific vibrations modes and build up bridge deck accelerations at the jumping location. Using the mode shapes and the vertical acceleration data from a suitable body landmark scaled by body mass, thus providing jumping force data, it was possible to create frequency response functions and estimate modal masses. The modal mass estimates for this bridge were checked against estimates obtained using an instrumented hammer and known mass distributions, showing consistency among the experimental estimates. Finally, the method was used in an applied research application on a short span footbridge where the benefits of logistical and operational simplicity afforded by the highly portable and easy to use IMUs proved extremely useful for an efficient evaluation of vibration serviceability, including estimation of modal masses.

  11. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  12. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  13. Measurement of external forces and torques on a large pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morenus, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Methods of measuring external forces and torques are discussed, in general and as applied to the Large Pointing System wind tunnel tests. The LPS tests were in two phases. The first test was a preliminary test of three models representing coelostat, heliostat, and on-gimbal telescope configurations. The second test explored the coelostat configuration in more detail. The second test used a different setup for measuring external loads. Some results are given from both tests.

  14. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  15. Force Measurement Improvements to the National Transonic Facility Sidewall Model Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodliff, Scott L.; Balakrishna, Sundareswara; Butler, David; Cagle, C. Mark; Chan, David; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II

    2016-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility is a transonic pressurized cryogenic facility. The development of the high Reynolds number semi-span capability has advanced over the years to include transonic active flow control and powered testing using the sidewall model support system. While this system can be used in total temperatures down to -250Â F for conventional unpowered configurations, it is limited to temperatures above -60Â F when used with powered models that require the use of the high-pressure air delivery system. Thermal instabilities and non-repeatable mechanical arrangements revealed several data quality shortfalls by the force and moment measurement system. Recent modifications to the balance cavity recirculation system have improved the temperature stability of the balance and metric model-to-balance hardware. Changes to the mechanical assembly of the high-pressure air delivery system, particularly hardware that interfaces directly with the model and balance, have improved the repeatability of the force and moment measurement system. Drag comparisons with the high-pressure air system removed will also be presented in this paper.

  16. Development of a Forced Oscillation System for Measuring Dynamic Derivatives of Fluidic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trieu, B. C.; Tyler, T. R.; Stewart, B. K.; Chamock, J. K.; Fisher, D. W.; Heim, E. H.; Brandon, J.; Grafton, S. B.

    2006-01-01

    A new Forced Oscillation System (FOS) has been designed and built at NASA Langley Research Center that provides new capabilities for aerodynamic researchers to investigate the dynamic derivatives of vehicle configurations. Test vehicles may include high performance and general aviation aircraft, re-entry spacecraft, submarines and other fluidic vehicles. The measured data from forced oscillation testing is used in damping characteristic studies and in simulation databases for control algorithm development and performance analyses. The newly developed FOS hardware provides new flexibility for conducting dynamic derivative studies. The design is based on a tracking principle where a desired motion profile is achieved via a fast closed-loop positional controller. The motion profile for the tracking system is numerically generated and thus not limited to sinusoidal motion. This approach permits non-traditional profiles such as constant velocity and Schroeder sweeps. Also, the new system permits changes in profile parameters including nominal offset angle, waveform, and associated parameters such as amplitude and frequency. Most importantly, the changes may be made remotely without halting the FOS and the tunnel. System requirements, system analysis, and the resulting design are addressed for a new FOS in the 12-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). The overall system including mechanical, electrical, and control subsystems is described. The design is complete, and the FOS has been built and installed in the 12-Foot LSWT. System integration and testing have verified design intent and safe operation. Currently it is being validated for wind-tunnel operations and aerodynamic testing. The system is a potential major enhancement to forced oscillation studies. The productivity gain from the motion profile automation will shorten the testing cycles needed for control surface and aircraft control algorithm development. The new motion capabilities also will serve as a test bed for

  17. System for measurement of small vibrations at material interfaces induced by electrostrictive forces

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, J.S.; Joines, W.T.

    1985-10-01

    The mechanisms of interaction of ELF and ELF-modulated RF fields with biological systems is presently an active area of research. Some models propose that field-induced forces may influence certain observed biological effects such as RF hearing and calcium ion efflux. To investigate the validity of the field-induced force model for the calcium-ion efflux effect, a system is needed which is capable of exposing samples to ELF fields or to ELF-modulated RF fields. At the same time the induced vibration caused by the forces of electrostriction must be monitored preferably by a noncontacting method. A microwave phase-sensitive receiver was designed to sense the small vibrations. Limitations on the receiver sensitivity imposed by phase noise is discussed. Phase noise measurement systems were designed and used to characterize the key receiver components. A limiting amplifier in the IF section of the receiver eliminates the need for knowledge of the reflection coefficient of the object of interest for quantitative vibration measurements.

  18. In Vitro System for Measuring Chordal Force Changes Following Mitral Valve Patch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ostli, B; Vester-Petersen, J; Askov, JB; Honge, JL; Levine, RA; Hagège, A; Nielsen, SL; Hasenkam, JM; Nygaard, H; Jensen, MO

    2013-01-01

    Background Attention towards optimization of mitral valve repair methods is increasing. Patch augmentation is one strategy utilized to correct functional mitral regurgitation or systolic anterior motion in complex mitral valve repairs. This article describes a system for investigating the redistribution of chordae tendineae tension as a reflection of altered stress distribution of the valve leaflet following patch augmentation. Methods and materials An in vitro test setup was constructed to hold native porcine mitral valves containing an annulus and papillary muscle positioning system. The alterations caused by patch augmentation should be visual from both the atrial and ventricular views. Ventricular pressure was regulated stepwise in a range of 0-150 mmHg. To test the system, the anterior mitral leaflet was extended by a pericardial patch sutured to the mid/basal part of the leaflet, and the chordae tendineae force was measured as the ventricular pressure was applied. Results The system demonstrated the capacity to hold native porcine mitral valves and introducing patch repairs according to clinical practice. The porcine mitral valve test setup indicated strong correlation between the forces in the mitral valve secondary chordae tendineae and the applied transvalvular pressure (R2 = 0.95). Conclusion This test setup proved the ability to obtain normal mid-systolic mitral valve function, secondary chordae force measurements, and important preservation of the visual access: Hence, obtaining the pressure-force relationship as well as identifying any shift of the secondary chordae insertion point on the anterior leaflet relative to the coaptation zone was made possible. PMID:26273417

  19. Accuracy and repeatability of the Pedar Mobile system in long-term vertical force measurements.

    PubMed

    Hurkmans, H L P; Bussmann, J B J; Benda, E; Verhaar, J A N; Stam, H J

    2006-01-01

    Portable insole pressure systems can be used to measure the vertical force during long-term (hours) measurements to determine the patient's amount of weight bearing during daily activities in the hospital and at home. Especially for long-term measurements, the amount and duration of loading pressure insoles can have a large influence on the accuracy, as previous studies found a time-dependent behavior after a relatively short period (minutes) of constant loading. Therefore, this study assessed the accuracy and repeatability of a portable capacitive insole system (Pedar, Novel(GmbH)) to measure vertical force during long-term loading. Static loading experiments were performed during which the Pedar insoles were loaded with 5 and 10 N/cm2 for 7 h. Dynamic loading experiments were performed with one Pedar insole which was cyclically loaded with 300, 500 and 1000 N during two sessions of 1200 load cycles. The static and dynamic experiments were repeated 3 days later. Accuracy, due to offset drift, decreased in time during the start of the static experiments (percent error: -1.9% to 0.3% at hour 0; 26.3% to 34% at hour 7). The percent error for the dynamic experiments ranged from -16% to -19%, from -3% to -7% and from -8% to approximately 0% when the insole was loaded with 300, 500 and 1000 N, respectively. The amount of drift ranged from 12 to 62 N for the 500 and 1000 N loads, respectively. The mean day-to-day percentage difference for the static and dynamic experiments ranged from -2.3% to 0.5%, and from -2.9% to 3.0%, respectively. The results indicate that drift correction is necessary for accurate assessment of vertical force by the Pedar Mobile system to determine the amount of weight bearing during long-term measurements.

  20. Single Cell Mass Measurement Using Drag Force Inside Lab-on-Chip Microfluidics System.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Single cell mass (SCM) is an intrinsic property of single cell, it arouses a great interest among scientists as cell mass depends on the synthesis of proteins, DNA replication, cell wall stiffness, cell cytoplasm density, cell growth, ribosome, and other analogous of organisms. To date, several great strides have been taken to the advancements of SCM measurement techniques. Nevertheless, more works are required to enable the technology to push frontier in deep analysis of SCM measurement, hence to elucidate intracellular properties. In this paper, we present a lab-on-chip microfluidics system for SCM measurement, related with the force required to drag a single cell and Newton's law of motion inside microfluidics channel. Drag force on the cell was generated by a pressure driven syringe micropump and the motion of the cell was measured using optical observation under an inverted microscope. This approach of measuring SCM was calibrated using known mass (77.3 pg) of a polystyrene particle of 5.2 μm diameter. Furthermore, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast cells of different sizes ([Formula: see text] diameter) for SCM measurement. Mass of 4.4 μm diameter of single yeast cell was measured as 2.12 pg which is in the range of previously reported single yeast cell mass (2-3 pg). In addition, we also studied the relation between SCM and single cell size. Results showed that single yeast cell mass increases exponentially with the increasing of single cell size.

  1. Single Cell Mass Measurement Using Drag ForceInside Lab-on-Chip Microfluidics System.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md; Ahmad, Mohd; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-12-22

    Single Cell Mass (SCM) is an intrinsic property of single cell, it arouses a great interest among scientists as cell mass depends on the synthesis of proteins, DNA replication, cell wall stiffness, cell cytoplasm density, cell growth, ribosome and other analogous of organisms. To date, several great strides have been taken to the advancements of SCM measurement techniques. Nevertheless, more works are required to enable the technology to push frontier in deep analysis of SCM measurement, hence to elucidate intracellular properties. In this paper, we present a Lab-on-Chip microfluidics system for SCM measurement, related with the force required to drag a single cell and Newton's law of motion inside microfluidics channel. Drag force on the cell was generated by a pressure driven syringe micropump and the motion of the cell was measured using optical observation under an inverted microscope. This approach of measuring SCM was calibrated using known mass (77.3 pg) of a polystyrene particle of 5.2 μm diameter. Furthermore, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast cells of different sizes (2-7 μm diameter) for SCM measurement. Mass of 4.4 μm diameter of single yeast cell was measured as 2.12 pg which is in the range of previously reported single yeast cell mass (2-3 pg). In addition, we also studied the relation between SCM and single cell size. Results showed that single yeast cell mass increases exponentially with the increasing of single cell size.

  2. High-precision horizontally directed force measurements for high dead loads based on a differential electromagnetic force compensation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyan, Suren; Rivero, Michel; Schleichert, Jan; Halbedel, Bernd; Fröhlich, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an application for realizing high-precision horizontally directed force measurements in the order of several tens of nN in combination with high dead loads of about 10 N. The set-up is developed on the basis of two identical state-of-the-art electromagnetic force compensation (EMFC) high precision balances. The measurement resolution of horizontally directed single-axis quasi-dynamic forces is 20 nN over the working range of  ±100 μN. The set-up operates in two different measurement modes: in the open-loop mode the mechanical deflection of the proportional lever is an indication of the acting force, whereas in the closed-loop mode it is the applied electric current to the coil inside the EMFC balance that compensates deflection of the lever to the offset zero position. The estimated loading frequency (cutoff frequency) of the set-up in the open-loop mode is about 0.18 Hz, in the closed-loop mode it is 0.7 Hz. One of the practical applications that the set-up is suitable for is the flow rate measurements of low electrically conducting electrolytes by applying the contactless technique of Lorentz force velocimetry. Based on a previously developed set-up which uses a single EMFC balance, experimental, theoretical and numerical analyses of the thermo-mechanical properties of the supporting structure are presented.

  3. Electromotive Force Measurements in the Ternary System Bi-In-Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Sabine; Li, Zuoan; Wang, C.-H.; Mikula, Adolf

    2010-12-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the ternary Bi-In-Zn system were determined with the electromotive force (EMF) method using a liquid electrolyte. Four different cross sections with constant In/Bi ratios of 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, and 9:1 were applied to measure the thermodynamic properties of the ternary system in the temperature range between the liquidus temperature of the alloys and 973 K (700 °C). Zinc was added in steps of 5 at. pct from 5 to 90 pct. The partial free energies of Zn in liquid Bi-In-Zn alloys were determined as a function of concentration and temperature. The integral Gibbs free energy and the integral enthalpy of the ternary system at 873 K (600 °C) were calculated by Gibbs-Duhem integration. The ternary interaction parameters were evaluated using the Redlich-Kister-Muggianu polynomials.

  4. Development of optical FBG force measurement system for the medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hoseok; Kim, Kiyoung; Suh, Jungwook; Lee, Jungju

    2010-03-01

    Haptic feedback plays a very important role in medical surgery. In minimally invasive surgery (MIS), however, very long and stiff bar of instruments take haptic feeling away from the surgeon. In minimally invasive robotic surgery (MIRS), moreover, haptic feelings are totally eliminated. Previous researchers have reported that the absence of force feedback increased the average force magnitude applied to the tissue by at least 50%, and increased the peakforce magnitude by at least a factor of two. Therefore, it is very important to provide haptic information in MIRS. Recently, many sensors are being developed for MIS or MIRS, but they have some obstacles in their application to real situations of medical surgery. The most critical problems are size limit and sterilizability. Optical fiber sensors are one of the most suitable sensors for this environment. Especially, optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor has one additional advantage than the other optical fiber sensors. FBG sensor is not influenced by intensity of light source. In this paper, we would like to present the initial results of study on the application of the FBG sensor to measure reflected forces in MIRS environments and then suggest the possibility of successful application to the MIRS systems.

  5. Development of optical FBG force measurement system for the medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hoseok; Kim, Kiyoung; Suh, Jungwook; Lee, Jungju

    2009-12-01

    Haptic feedback plays a very important role in medical surgery. In minimally invasive surgery (MIS), however, very long and stiff bar of instruments take haptic feeling away from the surgeon. In minimally invasive robotic surgery (MIRS), moreover, haptic feelings are totally eliminated. Previous researchers have reported that the absence of force feedback increased the average force magnitude applied to the tissue by at least 50%, and increased the peakforce magnitude by at least a factor of two. Therefore, it is very important to provide haptic information in MIRS. Recently, many sensors are being developed for MIS or MIRS, but they have some obstacles in their application to real situations of medical surgery. The most critical problems are size limit and sterilizability. Optical fiber sensors are one of the most suitable sensors for this environment. Especially, optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor has one additional advantage than the other optical fiber sensors. FBG sensor is not influenced by intensity of light source. In this paper, we would like to present the initial results of study on the application of the FBG sensor to measure reflected forces in MIRS environments and then suggest the possibility of successful application to the MIRS systems.

  6. Field measurements of efficiency and duct retrofit effectiveness in residential forced air distributions systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jump, D.A.; Walker, I.S.; Modera, M.P.

    1996-08-01

    Forced air distribution systems can have a significant impact on the energy consumed in residences. It is common practice in U.S. residential buildings to place such duct systems outside the conditioned space. This results in the loss of energy by leakage and conduction to the surroundings. In order to estimate the magnitudes of these losses, 24 houses in the Sacramento, California, area were tested before and after duct retrofitting. The systems in these houses included conventional air conditioning, gas furnaces, electric furnaces and heat pumps. The retrofits consisted of sealing and insulating the duct systems. The field testing consisted of the following measurements: leakage of the house envelopes and their ductwork, flow through individual registers, duct air temperatures, ambient temperatures, surface areas of ducts, and HVAC equipment energy consumption. These data were used to calculate distribution system delivery efficiency as well as the overall efficiency of the distribution system including all interactions with building load and HVAC equipment. Analysis of the test results indicate an average increase in delivery efficiency from 64% to 76% and a corresponding average decrease in HVAC energy use of 18%. This paper summarizes the pre- and post-retrofit efficiency measurements to evaluate the retrofit effectiveness, and includes cost estimates for the duct retrofits. The impacts of leak sealing and insulating will be examined separately. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Using optical tweezers for measuring the interaction forces between human bone cells and implant surfaces: System design and force calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Martin; Madgavkar, Ashwin; Stjerndahl, Maria; Wu, Yanrong; Tan, Weihong; Duran, Randy; Niehren, Stefan; Mustafa, Kamal; Arvidson, Kristina; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-07-15

    Optical tweezers were used to study the interaction and attachment of human bone cells to various types of medical implant materials. Ideally, the implant should facilitate cell attachment and promote migration of the progenitor cells in order to decrease the healing time. It is therefore of interest, in a controlled manner, to be able to monitor the cell adhesion process. Results from such studies would help foresee the clinical outcome of integrating medical implants. The interactions between two primary cell culture models, human gingival fibroblasts and bone forming human osteoblast cells, and three different implant materials, glass, titanium, and hydroxyapatite, were studied. A novel type of optical tweezers, which has a newly designed quadrant detector and a powerful 3 W laser was constructed and force calibrated using two different methods: one method in which the stiffness of the optical trap was obtained by monitoring the phase lag between the trap and the moved object when imposing a forced oscillation on the trapped object and another method in which the maximum trapping force was derived from the critical velocity at which the object escapes the trap. Polystyrene beads as well as cells were utilized for the calibrations. This is the first time that cells have been used directly for these types of force calibrations and, hence, direct measurements of forces exerted on cells can be performed, thus avoiding the difficulties often encountered when translating the results obtained from cell measurements to the calibrations obtained with reference materials. This more straightforward approach represents an advantage in comparison to established methods.

  8. Direct measurement of depletion and structural forces in a micellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richetti, P.; Kékicheff, P.

    1992-03-01

    The force as a function of separation is measured between two mica surfaces coated with adsorbed bilayers of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immersed in aqueous ionic micellar solutions of CTAB. At low separations double-layer forces are observed and arise soley from the dissociated counterions and free CTA+. At large separations, the repulsion is reduced and a secondary minimum in the interaction potential deepens when the micellar concentration is increased. Finally, at higher concentrations, structural effects superimpose an oscillatory force profile at further separations.

  9. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of intraarticular wrist joint biomechanics with a force controlled system.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Stefanie; Lutz, Martin; Arora, Rohit; Schmoelz, Werner

    2012-09-01

    Pathologies of the wrist, such as fractures or instabilities, can lead to alterations in joint biomechanics. Accurate treatment of these pathologies is a frequent challenge for the surgeon. For biomechanical investigations, a test-setup that applies physiological loading of the wrist joint is necessary. A force controlled test-bench with agonistic and antagonistic muscle forces was built to move six fresh frozen human upper extremities through flexion and extension of the wrist joint. Tendon forces, range of motion, intraarticular contact area and contact pressure of the lunate and scaphoid facet as well as tendon excursion were investigated and compared with the current literature. During wrist motion the extensors exerted double the force of the flexors. Capsulotomy and sensor insertion decreased the range of motion from 63.4° (SD 14.1) to 45.9° (SD 23.7). The ratio of force transmitted through the radius and ulna was 77:23 and pressure distribution between the scaphoid and lunate facet showed a 70:30 relationship. The obtained data indicate a good agreement with the available literature. Therefore, the force controlled test-bench in combination with intraarticular radiocarpal measurements can be used to investigate the influence of wrist pathologies on joint biomechanics.

  11. Method and system for measuring gate valve clearances and seating force

    DOEpatents

    Casada, Donald A.; Haynes, Howard D.; Moyers, John C.; Stewart, Brian K.

    1996-01-01

    Valve clearances and seating force, as well as other valve operational parameters, are determined by measuring valve stem rotation during opening and closing operations of a translatable gate valve. The magnitude of the stem rotation, and the relative difference between the stem rotation on opening and closing provides valuable data on the valve internals in a non-intrusive manner.

  12. Method and system for measuring gate valve clearances and seating force

    DOEpatents

    Casada, D.A.; Haynes, H.D.; Moyers, J.C.; Stewart, B.K.

    1996-01-30

    Valve clearances and seating force, as well as other valve operational parameters, are determined by measuring valve stem rotation during opening and closing operations of a translatable gate valve. The magnitude of the stem rotation, and the relative difference between the stem rotation on opening and closing provides valuable data on the valve internals in a non-intrusive manner. 8 figs.

  13. Traction Force Measurement Using Deformable Microposts.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianfa; Hawkins, Jamar; Sun, Yubing

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that mechanical forces strongly influence wound repair and fibrosis across multiple organ systems. Traction force is vital to the characterization of cellular responses to mechanical stimuli. Using hydrogel-based traction force microscopy, a FRET-based tension sensor, or microengineered cantilevers, the magnitude of traction forces can be measured. Here, we describe a traction force measurement methodology using a dense array of elastomeric microposts. This platform can be used to measure the traction force of a single cell or a colony of cells with or without geometric confinement.

  14. Hand-handle interface force and torque measurement system for pneumatic assembly tool operations: suggested enhancement to ISO 6544.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2007-05-01

    A hand-handle interface force and torque measurement system is introduced to fill the void acknowledged in the international standard ISO 6544, which governs pneumatic, assembly tool reaction torque and force measurement. This system consists of an instrumented handle with a sensor capable of measuring grip force and reaction hand moment when threaded, fastener-driving tools are used by operators. The handle is rigidly affixed to the tool in parallel to the original tool handle allowing normal fastener-driving operations with minimal interference. Demonstration of this proposed system was made with tools of three different shapes: pistol grip, right angle, and in-line. During tool torque buildup, the proposed system measured operators exerting greater grip force on the soft joint than on the hard joint. The system also demonstrated that the soft joint demanded greater hand moment impulse than the hard joint. The results demonstrate that the measurement system can provide supplemental data useful in exposure assessment with power hand tools as proposed in ISO 6544.

  15. High-Reynolds Number Active Blowing Semi-Span Force Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Rhew, Ray D.; Acheson, Michael J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent wind-tunnel tests at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility utilized high-pressure bellows to route air to the model for evaluating aircraft circulation control. The introduction of these bellows within the Sidewall Model Support System significantly impacted the performance of the external sidewall mounted semi-span balance. As a result of this impact on the semi-span balance measurement performance, it became apparent that a new capability needed to be built into the National Transonic Facility s infrastructure to allow for performing pressure tare calibrations on the balance in order to properly characterize its performance under the influence of static bellows pressure tare loads and bellows thermal effects. The objective of this study was to design both mechanical calibration hardware and an experimental calibration design that can be employed at the facility in order to efficiently and precisely perform the necessary loadings in order to characterize the semi-span balance under the influence of multiple calibration factors (balance forces/moments and bellows pressure/temperature). Using statistical design of experiments, an experimental design was developed allowing for strategically characterizing the behavior of the semi-span balance for use in circulation control and propulsion-type flow control testing at the National Transonic Facility.

  16. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  17. Uncertainty in NIST Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the uncertainty of force calibration measurements at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The uncertainty of the realization of force for the national deadweight force standards at NIST is discussed, as well as the uncertainties associated with NIST's voltage-ratio measuring instruments and with the characteristics of transducers being calibrated. The combined uncertainty is related to the uncertainty of dissemination for force transfer standards sent to NIST for calibration.

  18. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05), and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017), indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017). The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits. PMID:26694399

  19. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices.

    PubMed

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-12-15

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05), and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017), indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017). The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits.

  20. Measuring Your Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, David E.

    2005-01-01

    This article talks about the force behind education leaders. With all the challenges facing public education today, it is difficult to remain focused and to remember why one chartered this particular leadership course. Perhaps someone respected encouraged one to take this path long ago. Perhaps this kind of service to the nation and its future…

  1. Measuring Your Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, David E.

    2005-01-01

    This article talks about the force behind education leaders. With all the challenges facing public education today, it is difficult to remain focused and to remember why one chartered this particular leadership course. Perhaps someone respected encouraged one to take this path long ago. Perhaps this kind of service to the nation and its future…

  2. Review and Evaluation of Hand-Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ren G; Sinsel, Erik W; Welcome, Daniel E; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; McDowell, Thomas W; Wu, John Z

    2015-09-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study.

  3. Review and Evaluation of Hand–Arm Coordinate Systems for Measuring Vibration Exposure, Biodynamic Responses, and Hand Forces

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ren G.; Sinsel, Erik W.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; McDowell, Thomas W.; Wu, John Z.

    2015-01-01

    The hand coordinate systems for measuring vibration exposures and biodynamic responses have been standardized, but they are not actually used in many studies. This contradicts the purpose of the standardization. The objectives of this study were to identify the major sources of this problem, and to help define or identify better coordinate systems for the standardization. This study systematically reviewed the principles and definition methods, and evaluated typical hand coordinate systems. This study confirms that, as accelerometers remain the major technology for vibration measurement, it is reasonable to standardize two types of coordinate systems: a tool-based basicentric (BC) system and an anatomically based biodynamic (BD) system. However, these coordinate systems are not well defined in the current standard. Definition of the standard BC system is confusing, and it can be interpreted differently; as a result, it has been inconsistently applied in various standards and studies. The standard hand BD system is defined using the orientation of the third metacarpal bone. It is neither convenient nor defined based on important biological or biodynamic features. This explains why it is rarely used in practice. To resolve these inconsistencies and deficiencies, we proposed a revised method for defining the realistic handle BC system and an alternative method for defining the hand BD system. A fingertip-based BD system for measuring the principal grip force is also proposed based on an important feature of the grip force confirmed in this study. PMID:26929824

  4. Development of Wearable Sheet-Type Shear Force Sensor and Measurement System that is Insusceptible to Temperature and Pressure.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Shigeru; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Shirogane, Satoshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Umino, Tokio; Uehara, Ryo; Okamoto, Takuma; Igarashi, Hiroshi

    2017-07-31

    A sheet-type shear force sensor and a measurement system for the sensor were developed. The sensor has an original structure where a liquid electrolyte is filled in a space composed of two electrode-patterned polymer films and an elastic rubber ring. When a shear force is applied on the surface of the sensor, the two electrode-patterned films mutually move so that the distance between the internal electrodes of the sensor changes, resulting in current increase or decrease between the electrodes. Therefore, the shear force can be calculated by monitoring the current between the electrodes. Moreover, it is possible to measure two-dimensional shear force given that the sensor has multiple electrodes. The diameter and thickness of the sensor head were 10 mm and 0.7 mm, respectively. Additionally, we also developed a measurement system that drives the sensor, corrects the baseline of the raw sensor output, displays data, and stores data as a computer file. Though the raw sensor output was considerably affected by the surrounding temperature, the influence of temperature was drastically decreased by introducing a simple arithmetical calculation. Moreover, the influence of pressure simultaneously decreased after the same calculation process. A demonstrative measurement using the sensor revealed the practical usefulness for on-site monitoring.

  5. Measurement of Surface Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-16

    combination of these opposing forces, described by the DLVO theory [30,311 (named after Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek ), is the basis of a variety of...1988): 199. 18. van Blokland. P. H. G. M mnd Overbeek . 1. T. J. Chem Soc., Faraday Trans. 1 74 (1978)- Ifk ’. 19. Lee, C.-W., and Bard. A. J. J...and Overbeek . 1. T. G. Theory of the Stability of Lyophobic Colloids. Elsevier: Amsterdam, 1948. 32. Voropajeva. T.; Derjaguin. B.; and Kabanov. B

  6. Measurement of Subcellular Force Generation in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Matthew; Lamoureux, Phillip; Miller, Kyle E.

    2015-01-01

    Forces are important for neuronal outgrowth during the initial wiring of the nervous system and after trauma, yet subcellular force generation over the microtubule-rich region at the rear of the growth cone and along the axon has never, to our knowledge, been directly measured. Because previous studies have indicated microtubule polymerization and the microtubule-associated proteins Kinesin-1 and dynein all generate forces that push microtubules forward, a major question is whether the net forces in these regions are contractile or expansive. A challenge in addressing this is that measuring local subcellular force generation is difficult. Here we develop an analytical mathematical model that describes the relationship between unequal subcellular forces arranged in series within the neuron and the net overall tension measured externally. Using force-calibrated towing needles to measure and apply forces, in combination with docked mitochondria to monitor subcellular strain, we then directly measure force generation over the rear of the growth cone and along the axon of chick sensory neurons. We find the rear of the growth cone generates 2.0 nN of contractile force, the axon generates 0.6 nN of contractile force, and that the net overall tension generated by the neuron is 1.3 nN. This work suggests that the forward bulk flow of the cytoskeletal framework that occurs during axonal elongation and growth-cone pauses arises because strong contractile forces in the rear of the growth cone pull material forward. PMID:25762315

  7. Measuring lung function using sound waves: role of the forced oscillation technique and impulse oscillometry system.

    PubMed

    Brashier, Bill; Salvi, Sundeep

    2015-03-01

    Measuring lung function is an important component in the decision making process for patients with obstructive airways disease (OAD). Not only does it help in arriving at a specific diagnosis, but it also helps in evaluating severity so that appropriate pharmacotherapy can be instituted, it helps determine prognosis and it helps evaluate response to therapy. Spirometry is currently the most commonly performed lung function test in clinical practice and is considered to be the gold standard diagnostic test for asthma and COPD. However, spirometry is not an easy test to perform because the forceful expiratory and inspiratory manoeuvres require good patient co-operation. Children aged <5 years, elderly people and those with physical and cognitive limitations cannot perform spirometry easily.

  8. Force measurements on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seewald, F

    1929-01-01

    The most essential phenomena of aircraft should be classified according to their origin and then measured. Information can thus be obtained in a quicker, cheaper, and more reliable way than otherwise would be possible.

  9. Jaw bite force measurement device.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis; Ilies, Horea; O'Brien, Brendan; McManus, Anne; Larrow, Beau

    2012-08-01

    We describe a cost-effective device that uses an off-the-shelf force transducer to measure patient bite force as a diagnostic aid in determining dental implant size, number of implants, and prosthetic design for restoring partial edentulism. The main advantages of the device are its accuracy, simplicity, modularity, ease of manufacturing, and low cost.

  10. Normal and system lupus erythematosus red blood cell interactions studied by double trap optical tweezers: direct measurements of aggregation forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Eugeny V.; Zhdanov, Alexander G.; Rykova, Sophia Yu.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2012-02-01

    Direct measurements of aggregation forces in piconewton range between two red blood cells in pair rouleau are performed under physiological conditions using double trap optical tweezers. Aggregation and disaggregation properties of healthy and pathologic (system lupus erythematosis) blood samples are analyzed. Strong difference in aggregation speed and behavior is revealed using the offered method which is proposed to be a promising tool for SLE monitoring at single cell level.

  11. An fMRI-compatible force measurement system for the evaluation of the neural correlates of step initiation.

    PubMed

    de Lima-Pardini, Andrea Cristina; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Machado; Coelho, Daniel Boari; Boffino, Catarina Costa; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; de Oliveira Souza, Carolina; Brant, Rachael; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Cardoso, Ellison Fernando; Teixeira, Luis Augusto; Cohen, Rajal G; Horak, Fay Bahling; Amaro, Edson

    2017-02-23

    Knowledge of brain correlates of postural control is limited by the technical difficulties in performing controlled experiments with currently available neuroimaging methods. Here we present a system that allows the measurement of anticipatory postural adjustment of human legs to be synchronized with the acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The device is composed of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible force sensors able to measure the level of force applied by both feet. We tested the device in a group of healthy young subjects and a group of elderly subjects with Parkinson's disease using an event-related functional MRI (fMRI) experiment design. In both groups the postural behavior inside the magnetic resonance was correlated to the behavior during gait initiation outside the scanner. The system did not produce noticeable imaging artifacts in the data. Healthy young people showed brain activation patterns coherent with movement planning. Parkinson's disease patients demonstrated an altered pattern of activation within the motor circuitry. We concluded that this force measurement system is able to index both normal and abnormal preparation for gait initiation within an fMRI experiment.

  12. An fMRI-compatible force measurement system for the evaluation of the neural correlates of step initiation

    PubMed Central

    de Lima-Pardini, Andrea Cristina; de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Machado; Coelho, Daniel Boari; Boffino, Catarina Costa; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; de Oliveira Souza, Carolina; Brant, Rachael; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Cardoso, Ellison Fernando; Teixeira, Luis Augusto; Cohen, Rajal G.; Horak, Fay Bahling; Amaro, Edson

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of brain correlates of postural control is limited by the technical difficulties in performing controlled experiments with currently available neuroimaging methods. Here we present a system that allows the measurement of anticipatory postural adjustment of human legs to be synchronized with the acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The device is composed of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) compatible force sensors able to measure the level of force applied by both feet. We tested the device in a group of healthy young subjects and a group of elderly subjects with Parkinson’s disease using an event-related functional MRI (fMRI) experiment design. In both groups the postural behavior inside the magnetic resonance was correlated to the behavior during gait initiation outside the scanner. The system did not produce noticeable imaging artifacts in the data. Healthy young people showed brain activation patterns coherent with movement planning. Parkinson’s disease patients demonstrated an altered pattern of activation within the motor circuitry. We concluded that this force measurement system is able to index both normal and abnormal preparation for gait initiation within an fMRI experiment. PMID:28230070

  13. Measuring contact area, force, and pressure for bioengineering applications: using Fuji Film and TekScan systems.

    PubMed

    Bachus, Kent N; DeMarco, Alyssa L; Judd, Kyle T; Horwitz, Daniel S; Brodke, Darrel S

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the TekScan I-Scan Pressure Measurement System with two methods of analysis involving the Fuji Film Prescale Pressure Measuring System in estimating area, force and pressure. Fuji Film and TekScan sensors were alternately placed between a cylindrical peg and a finely ground steel base plate, and compressed with known forces. All Fuji stains were digitally scanned and analyzed. The Erase method of Fuji Film analysis consisted of manually removing portions of the image judged by the user to be outside the perimeter of the stain. The second method of Fuji Film analysis, termed the Threshold method, used the threshold tool to analyze only those pixels that were stained from loading. The TekScan system utilized special matrix-based sensors interfaced with a Windows compatible desktop computer that was equipped with specialized data acquisition hardware and analysis software. The data from this study did not support the hypothesis that all three methods would have accuracies within +/-5% of a known value, when estimating area, force and pressure. Specifically, the TekScan system was found to be more accurate than either of the Fuji Film methods when estimating area and pressure.

  14. Cooling Force Measurements at CELSIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Ga ring lnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-20

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  15. COOLING FORCE MEASUREMENTS IN CELSIUS.

    SciTech Connect

    GALNANDER, B.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; ET AL.

    2005-09-18

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  16. Floating chip mounting system driven by repulsive force of permanent magnets for multiple on-site SPR immunoassay measurements.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Tobita, Tatsuya; Miura, Toru; Iwasaki, Yuzuru; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Haga, Tsuneyuki; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-10-17

    We have developed a measurement chip installation/removal mechanism for a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay analysis instrument designed for frequent testing, which requires a rapid and easy technique for changing chips. The key components of the mechanism are refractive index matching gel coated on the rear of the SPR chip and a float that presses the chip down. The refractive index matching gel made it possible to optically couple the chip and the prism of the SPR instrument easily via elastic deformation with no air bubbles. The float has an autonomous attitude control function that keeps the chip parallel in relation to the SPR instrument by employing the repulsive force of permanent magnets between the float and a float guide located in the SPR instrument. This function is realized by balancing the upward elastic force of the gel and the downward force of the float, which experiences a leveling force from the float guide. This system makes it possible to start an SPR measurement immediately after chip installation and to remove the chip immediately after the measurement with a simple and easy method that does not require any fine adjustment. Our sensor chip, which we installed using this mounting system, successfully performed an immunoassay measurement on a model antigen (spiked human-IgG) in a model real sample (non-homogenized milk) that included many kinds of interfering foreign substances without any sample pre-treatment. The ease of the chip installation/removal operation and simple measurement procedure are suitable for frequent on-site agricultural, environmental and medical testing.

  17. Floating Chip Mounting System Driven by Repulsive Force of Permanent Magnets for Multiple On-Site SPR Immunoassay Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Tobita, Tatsuya; Miura, Toru; Iwasaki, Yuzuru; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Haga, Tsuneyuki; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a measurement chip installation/removal mechanism for a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunoassay analysis instrument designed for frequent testing, which requires a rapid and easy technique for changing chips. The key components of the mechanism are refractive index matching gel coated on the rear of the SPR chip and a float that presses the chip down. The refractive index matching gel made it possible to optically couple the chip and the prism of the SPR instrument easily via elastic deformation with no air bubbles. The float has an autonomous attitude control function that keeps the chip parallel in relation to the SPR instrument by employing the repulsive force of permanent magnets between the float and a float guide located in the SPR instrument. This function is realized by balancing the upward elastic force of the gel and the downward force of the float, which experiences a leveling force from the float guide. This system makes it possible to start an SPR measurement immediately after chip installation and to remove the chip immediately after the measurement with a simple and easy method that does not require any fine adjustment. Our sensor chip, which we installed using this mounting system, successfully performed an immunoassay measurement on a model antigen (spiked human-IgG) in a model real sample (non-homogenized milk) that included many kinds of interfering foreign substances without any sample pre-treatment. The ease of the chip installation/removal operation and simple measurement procedure are suitable for frequent on-site agricultural, environmental and medical testing. PMID:23202030

  18. Experimental system for in-situ measurement of temperature rise in animal tissue under exposure to acoustic radiation force impulse.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Naotaka; Ishiguro, Yasunao; Sasanuma, Hideki; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Iwaki

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) has recently been used for tissue elasticity measurement and imaging. On the other hand, it is predicted that a rise in temperature occurs. In-situ measurement of temperature rise in animal experiments is important, yet measurement using thermocouples has some problems such as position mismatch of the temperature measuring junction of the thermocouple and the focal point of ultrasound. Therefore, an in-situ measurement system for solving the above problems was developed in this study. The developed system is composed mainly of an ultrasound irradiation unit including a custom-made focused transducer with a through hole for inserting a thin-wire thermocouple, and a temperature measurement unit including the thermocouple. The feasibility of the developed system was evaluated by means of experiments using a tissue-mimicking material (TMM), a TMM containing a bone model or a chicken bone, and an extracted porcine liver. The similarity between the experimental results and the results of simulation using a finite element method (FEM) implied the reasonableness of in-situ temperature rise measured by the developed system. The developed system will become a useful tool for measuring in-situ temperature rise in animal experiments and obtaining findings with respect to the relationship between ultrasound irradiation conditions and in-situ temperature rise.

  19. Optimal output feedback control of linear systems in presence of forcing and measurement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of obtaining an optimal control law, which is constrained to be a linear feedback of the available measurements, for both continuous and discrete time linear systems subjected to additive white process noise and measurement noise was Necessary conditions are obtained for minimizing a quadratic performance function for both finite and infinite terminal time cases. The feedback gains are constrained to be time invariant for the infinite terminal time cases. For all the cases considered, algorithms are derived for generating sequences of feedback gain matrices which successively improve the performance function. A continuous time numerical example is included for the purpose of demonstration.

  20. Force Measurement Device for ARIANE 5 Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, O.; Braeken, R.

    2004-08-01

    ESTEC uses since 1991 a Force Measurement Device (FMD) for the measurement of dynamic mechanical forces and moments. This tool allows the determination of forces and moments applied to the test hardware at its interface to the test facilities during dynamic testing. Three forces and three moments are calculated from the measurements of eight tri-axial force links and used to either characterize the dynamic mechanical behaviour of the test item and/or to control forces and moments during vibration testing (force limited vibration control). The current FMD is limited to test items with an interface diameter of up to about 1.2 m (adapter already available) and a mass compatible with ARIANE 4 payloads. The limitations of the current system come from the maximum of eight tri-axial force links and from the analogue technique of the Signal Processing Unit (SPU) that allows only a limited number of geometric configurations for the mechanical interface. Following the success of the FMD during former test campaigns, e.g. ROSETTA STM + FM, the need for a FMD, compatible with ARIANE 5 payloads has been established. Therefore ESA decided to develop a new FMD system. The system will include a digital real time SPU with 72 force input channels, corresponding to 24 tri-axes force sensors or 72 mono axial force sensors. The SPU design will allow extending the number of force input channels to 144. The set-up of the FMD will be done via a standard PC interface. The user will enter for each force sensor the location and the measurement direction in the reference coordinate system. Based on the geometrical information and the maximum forces and moments expected the PC will calculate the optimum range settings for the charge-amplifiers and the corresponding matrix with weighting factors which will allow to perform a fast calculation of the six output forces and moments from the 72 (or 144) input forces. The six output channels with forces and moments can then be connected either to the

  1. Estimation of Prestress Force Distribution in Multi-Strand System of Prestressed Concrete Structures Using Field Data Measured by Electromagnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cho, Keunhee; Cho, Jeong-Rae; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Sung Yong; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Young-Hwan

    2016-08-18

    The recently developed smart strand can be used to measure the prestress force in the prestressed concrete (PSC) structure from the construction stage to the in-service stage. The higher cost of the smart strand compared to the conventional strand renders it unaffordable to replace all the strands by smart strands, and results in the application of only a limited number of smart strands in the PSC structure. However, the prestress forces developed in the strands of the multi-strand system frequently adopted in PSC structures differ from each other, which means that the prestress force in the multi-strand system cannot be obtained by simple proportional scaling using the measurement of the smart strand. Therefore, this study examines the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system to find the correlation between the prestress force measured by the smart strand and the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system. To that goal, the prestress force distribution was measured using electromagnetic sensors for various factors of the multi-strand system adopted on site in the fabrication of actual PSC girders. The results verified the possibility to assume normal distribution for the prestress force distribution per anchor head, and a method computing the mean and standard deviation defining the normal distribution is proposed. This paper presents a meaningful finding by proposing an estimation method of the prestress force based upon field-measured data of the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system of actual PSC structures.

  2. Air Force Integrated Readiness Measurement System (AFIRMS). HQ USAFE Database Specification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-30

    analog quantities to which meaning is or might be assigned. (JCS Pub 1) Decision (CENTO, DoD, IADB, NATO) In an estimate of the situation, a clear and...sustainability. Also, senior Air Force decision makers are supported during budget =: . deliberations and Air Force budget allocations. 33811 1-9 b...the five permitted on-line at any one time are maintained off-line. 4Sizing estimates comform to the assumption that the AFIRMS database architecture

  3. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid–DMSO–H2O system

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Alex M.; Donaldson, Stephen H.; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO–lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO–water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems. PMID:26261313

  4. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid-DMSO-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Alex M; Donaldson, Stephen H; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-08-25

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO-lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO-water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems.

  5. Contact sensing from force measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicchi, Antonio; Salisbury, J. K.; Brock, David L.

    1993-01-01

    This article addresses contact sensing (i.e., the problem of resolving the location of a contact, the force at the interface, and the moment about the contact normals). Called 'intrinsic' contact sensing for the use of internal force and torque measurements, this method allows for practical devices that provide simple, relevant contact information in practical robotic applications. Such sensors have been used in conjunction with robot hands to identify objects, determine surface friction, detect slip, augment grasp stability, measure object mass, probe surfaces, and control collision and for a variety of other useful tasks. This article describes the theoretical basis for their operation and provides a framework for future device design.

  6. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, Scott T.; Niemann, Ralph C.

    1999-01-01

    A device for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed.

  7. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

    1999-03-30

    A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  8. A Wearable Ground Reaction Force Sensor System and Its Application to the Measurement of Extrinsic Gait Variability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko

    2010-01-01

    Wearable sensors for gait analysis are attracting wide interest. In this paper, a wearable ground reaction force (GRF) sensor system and its application to measure extrinsic gait variability are presented. To validate the GRF and centre of pressure (CoP) measurements of the sensor system and examine the effectiveness of the proposed method for gait analysis, we conducted an experimental study on seven volunteer subjects. Based on the assessment of the influence of the sensor system on natural gait, we found that no significant differences were found for almost all measured gait parameters (p-values < 0.05). As for measurement accuracy, the root mean square (RMS) differences for the two transverse components and the vertical component of the GRF were 7.2% ± 0.8% and 9.0% ± 1% of the maximum of each transverse component and 1.5% ± 0.9% of the maximum vertical component of GRF, respectively. The RMS distance between both CoP measurements was 1.4% ± 0.2% of the length of the shoe. The area of CoP distribution on the foot-plate and the average coefficient of variation of the triaxial GRF, are the introduced parameters for analysing extrinsic gait variability. Based on a statistical analysis of the results of the tests with subjects wearing the sensor system, we found that the proposed parameters changed according to walking speed and turning (p-values < 0.05). PMID:22163468

  9. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  10. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  11. The Feasibility of Measuring the Contribution of Artificial Obstacle Systems to Force Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-06

    I ,«li«.i |i«la I ■..•iv.li This thesis focuses on the study of the contribution which artificial barriers make to the combat process. This...Fort Lcavenworth, Kansas 1975 ABSTRiCT ThiB thaslB foeus«« on th« atudy of tho oontrlbutioo which artiflolol barriers make to the oombat...freedom to employ other force assets in a manner which makes the delay useful. The resulting conclusion is that any attempt to assess the barrier

  12. Characterization of electrowetting processes through force measurements.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nathan B; Mishra, Pradeep; Volinsky, Alex A

    2010-04-01

    A new method of characterizing electrowetting is presented. In this method, the electrowetting actuation forces are measured rather than the contact angle. The forces on the liquid are measured by trapping a droplet between a flat nanoindenter tip and the test substrate. When voltage is applied to electrodes in the substrate, lateral and normal forces are exerted on the tip and measured by the nanoindenter transducer. Proper selection of the tip geometry permits direct prediction of the resulting in-plane lateral forces using analytical formulas derived from the Young-Lippmann equation. Experimental results show good agreement with both analytical and numerical predictions. Numerical modeling using SURFACE EVOLVER shows that the lateral forces are relatively insensitive to most alignment errors and that the analytical model is most accurate when the flat tip is close to the substrate. Evaporation of the test liquid can introduce modest errors in long measurements, but compensation methods are presented. As the droplet undergoes almost no movement, the fluid dynamics have minimal impact on the measured forces and transient electrowetting events are readily detected. Experimental results show significant response at frequencies up to 40 Hz. This setup is useful in measuring electrowetting responses at high speeds and in measuring system degradation processes.

  13. Impact of exacerbations on respiratory system impedance measured by a forced oscillation technique in COPD: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Takahiro; Kaneko, Masahiro; Tomioka, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    Forced oscillation technique (FOT) has been reported to be useful in the evaluation and management of obstructive lung disease, including COPD. To date, no data are available concerning long-term changes in respiratory system impedance measured by FOT. Additionally, although exacerbations have been reported to be associated with excessive lung function decline in COPD, the impact of exacerbations on the results of FOT has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal changes in respiratory system impedance and the influence of exacerbations thereon. Between March 2011 and March 2012, outpatients who attended Kobe City Medical Center West Hospital with a diagnosis of COPD were assessed for eligibility. Baseline patient characteristics (age, sex, body mass index, smoking history, current smoking status, COPD stage), lung function (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]), blood tests (neutrophils and eosinophils), FOT, and COPD assessment test results were collected at enrollment. Lung function and FOT were examined every 6 months until March 2016. Annual changes in FEV1 and FOT parameters were obtained from the slope of the linear regression curve. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on exacerbation history. Fifty-one of 58 patients with COPD were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up period was 57 (52-59) months. Twenty-five (49%) patients experienced exacerbations. A significant annual decline in FEV1 and respiratory system impedance were shown. Additionally, annual changes in FEV1, respiratory system resistance at 5 Hz, respiratory system reactance at 5 Hz, and resonant frequency were greater in patients with exacerbations than in those without exacerbations. Exacerbations of COPD lead not only to a decline in lung function but also to an increase in respiratory system impedance.

  14. Impact of exacerbations on respiratory system impedance measured by a forced oscillation technique in COPD: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kamada, Takahiro; Kaneko, Masahiro; Tomioka, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    Background Forced oscillation technique (FOT) has been reported to be useful in the evaluation and management of obstructive lung disease, including COPD. To date, no data are available concerning long-term changes in respiratory system impedance measured by FOT. Additionally, although exacerbations have been reported to be associated with excessive lung function decline in COPD, the impact of exacerbations on the results of FOT has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal changes in respiratory system impedance and the influence of exacerbations thereon. Methods Between March 2011 and March 2012, outpatients who attended Kobe City Medical Center West Hospital with a diagnosis of COPD were assessed for eligibility. Baseline patient characteristics (age, sex, body mass index, smoking history, current smoking status, COPD stage), lung function (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]), blood tests (neutrophils and eosinophils), FOT, and COPD assessment test results were collected at enrollment. Lung function and FOT were examined every 6 months until March 2016. Annual changes in FEV1 and FOT parameters were obtained from the slope of the linear regression curve. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on exacerbation history. Results Fifty-one of 58 patients with COPD were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up period was 57 (52–59) months. Twenty-five (49%) patients experienced exacerbations. A significant annual decline in FEV1 and respiratory system impedance were shown. Additionally, annual changes in FEV1, respiratory system resistance at 5 Hz, respiratory system reactance at 5 Hz, and resonant frequency were greater in patients with exacerbations than in those without exacerbations. Conclusion Exacerbations of COPD lead not only to a decline in lung function but also to an increase in respiratory system impedance. PMID:28223791

  15. Force measurements in skinned muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Hellam, D. C.; Podolsky, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    1. Isometric force was measured in skinned segments of frog semitendinosus muscle fibres exposed to solutions in which the calcium ion concentration was controlled with EGTA. 2. The threshold for force development, calculated from an apparent stability constant for the CaEGTA complex of 106.69 M-1 at pH 7·0, was generally close to pCa 7·5. Maximum force was reached at about pCa 6·0. 3. Maximum force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the fibres. 4. The rate of force development was slower than that expected from simple diffusion of a substance from the bathing solution into the fibre. The delay appears to be due to slow equilibration of the EGTA buffer system during calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 5. Addition of deoxycholate (DOC) to the bathing solution produced a reversible increase in the rate of force development. The steady force was also increased for values of pCa that gave less than maximum force, which shifted the force—pCa relation toward lower calcium concentrations by about 0·5 pCa unit. 6. The length—force relation in partially activated preparations is similar to that reported for electrically activated intact fibres. This result suggests that in the region of myofilament overlap the affinity of the binding sites for calcium is uniform along the length of the calciumbinding myofilament. PMID:5765859

  16. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  17. Estimation of Prestress Force Distribution in Multi-Strand System of Prestressed Concrete Structures Using Field Data Measured by Electromagnetic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Keunhee; Cho, Jeong-Rae; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Sung Yong; Kim, Young-Jin; Park, Young-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The recently developed smart strand can be used to measure the prestress force in the prestressed concrete (PSC) structure from the construction stage to the in-service stage. The higher cost of the smart strand compared to the conventional strand renders it unaffordable to replace all the strands by smart strands, and results in the application of only a limited number of smart strands in the PSC structure. However, the prestress forces developed in the strands of the multi-strand system frequently adopted in PSC structures differ from each other, which means that the prestress force in the multi-strand system cannot be obtained by simple proportional scaling using the measurement of the smart strand. Therefore, this study examines the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system to find the correlation between the prestress force measured by the smart strand and the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system. To that goal, the prestress force distribution was measured using electromagnetic sensors for various factors of the multi-strand system adopted on site in the fabrication of actual PSC girders. The results verified the possibility to assume normal distribution for the prestress force distribution per anchor head, and a method computing the mean and standard deviation defining the normal distribution is proposed. This paper presents a meaningful finding by proposing an estimation method of the prestress force based upon field-measured data of the prestress force distribution in the multi-strand system of actual PSC structures. PMID:27548172

  18. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, C.; Helden, L.; Gambassi, A.; Dietrich, S.; Bechinger, C.

    2008-01-01

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  19. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, C; Helden, L; Gambassi, A; Dietrich, S; Bechinger, C

    2008-01-10

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  20. Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  1. Measure Guideline. Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  2. Future Air Force systems.

    PubMed

    Tremaine, S A

    1986-10-01

    Planning for the future is under way in earnest at the Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It has been statistically established that it takes from 14-16 years from the generation of a new system idea to enter into engineering development. With this unpleasing, but realistic, schedule in mind, ASD has, during the last 3 years, been initiating long-term planning projects that are pre-starts for new system ideas. They are generated from throughout the Air Force and are locally managed and funded. Through this process, which spans from 12-14 months, specific and revolutionary new ideas for the systems of the future are generated. This article addresses more than a dozen specific new ideas in work at ASD today. These ideas range from a need to replace the C-130 type aircraft after the year 2000 to planning a follow-on to the B-18 well into the 21st century. Among other specific projects are investigation into an immortal fighter intended to be free of reliability and maintenance demands for an especially long period of operation, a new training system and advanced trainer to replace the T-38, a transatmospheric vehicle that could operate in the 100,000-500,000 foot flight region (30,480-152,400 m), and a new means of defending against hostile cruise missile launchers and cruise missiles. Other ideas are also addressed. The article concludes with emphasis on systems that can operate hypersonically in and out of the known atmosphere and greater use of airbreathing propulsion systems operating between Mach 3 and Mach 6.

  3. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  4. The preliminary checkout, evaluation and calibration of a 3-component force measurement system for calibrating propulsion simulators for wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The propulsion simulator calibration laboratory (PSCL) in which calibrations can be performed to determine the gross thrust and airflow of propulsion simulators installed in wind tunnel models is described. The preliminary checkout, evaluation and calibration of the PSCL's 3 component force measurement system is reported. Methods and equipment were developed for the alignment and calibration of the force measurement system. The initial alignment of the system demonstrated the need for more efficient means of aligning system's components. The use of precision alignment jigs increases both the speed and accuracy with which the system is aligned. The calibration of the force measurement system shows that the methods and equipment for this procedure can be successful.

  5. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  6. Flapping wing PIV and force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Benjamin H.

    Flapping wing aerodynamics has been of interest to engineers recently due in part to the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) MAV (Micro-Aerial Vehicle) initiative. MAVs are small unmanned aerial vehicles with length scales similar to birds and insects. Flapping wing MAVs would serve as mobile and stealthy sensing platforms capable of gathering intelligence in hazardous and physically inaccessible locations. Traditional means of lift and thrust generation become inefficient when scaled to these sizes, therefore a flapping wing propulsion system will be necessary. The design of a flapping wing MAV requires the ability to measure forces and velocities around the wing. Three components of velocity were measured in the wake of a two dimensional (2D) flapping airfoil model using a novel application of stereoscopic DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry). One component of force was measured using a newly proposed method outlined in the dissertation. The force measurement technique relies on a specific sequence of data acquisition, which has the benefit of reducing measurement uncertainty and noise. No experiments of this type have been conducted, and no direct aerodynamic force data exists for the low Reynolds numbers applicable to flapping wing MAVs. The well-established stereoscopic DPIV technique produces relatively low uncertainties while the new force measurement technique has not been previously tested. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that aerodynamic forces are attainable for chord Reynolds numbers as low as 1,000, which is significantly lower than previous studies. PIV measurements reveal symmetric and asymmetric wake topologies for a NACA 0012 and flat plate airfoil. A sinusoidally heaving flat plate airfoil produces highly deflected wakes for a wider range of flapping conditions than a NACA 0012 airfoil. Deflected wakes are of potentially interest since both lift and thrust components of force are developed. The flat plate also

  7. Predictability of Forced Lorenz Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baosheng; Ding, Ruiqiang; Li, Jianping; Zhong, Quanjia

    2017-04-01

    Based on the nonlinear local Lyapunov exponent (NLLE) approach, the influences of external forcing on the predictability are studied in the Lorenz systems with constant and quasi-periodic forces in this paper. The results indicate that for the Lorenz systems with constant and quasi-periodic forces, their predictability limits increase with the forcing strength. With the same magnitude and different directions, the constant or quasi-periodic forcing shows different effects on the predictability limit in the Lorenz system, and these effects become significant with the increase of the forcing strength. Generally speaking, the positive forcing leads to a higher predictability limit than the negative forcing. Therefore, when we think about the effects of positive and negative elements and phases in the atmosphere and ocean research, the predictability problems driven by different phases should be considered separately. In addition, the influences of constant and quasi-periodic forces on the predictability are different in the Lorenz system. The effect of the constant forcing on the predictability is mainly reflected in the linear phase of error growth, while the nonlinear phase should also be considered for the situation of the quasi-periodic forcing. The predictability limit of the system under constant forcing is longer than the system under quasi-periodic forcing. These results based on simple chaotic model could provide insight into the studies of the actual atmosphere predictability.

  8. A MEMS sensor for microscale force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majcherek, S.; Aman, A.; Fochtmann, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a new MEMS-based sensor device for microscale contact force measurements. A special MEMS cell was developed to reach higher lateral resolution than common steel-based load cells with foil-type strain gauges as mechanical-electrical converters. The design provided more than one normal force measurement point with spatial resolution in submillimeter range. Specific geometric adaption of the MEMS-device allowed adjustability of its measurement range between 0.5 and 5 N. The thin film nickel-chromium piezo resistors were used to achieve a mechanical-electrical conversion. The production process was realized by established silicon processing technologies such as deep reactive ion etching and vapor deposition (sputtering). The sensor was tested in two steps. Firstly, the sensor characteristics were carried out by application of defined loads at the measurement points by a push-pull tester. As a result, the sensor showed linear behavior. A measurement system analysis (MSA1) was performed to define the reliability of the measurement system. The measured force values had the maximal relative deviation of 1% to average value of 1.97 N. Secondly, the sensor was tested under near-industrial conditions. In this context, the thermal induced relaxation behavior of the electrical connector contact springs was investigated. The handling of emerging problems during the characterization process of the sensor is also described.

  9. Motion recognition from contact force measurement.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Takumi; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    Optical motion capture systems, which are used in broad fields of research, are costly; they need large installation space and calibrations. We find difficulty in applying it in typical homes and care centers. Therefore we propose to use low cost contact force measurement systems to develop rehabilitation and healthcare monitoring tools. Here, we propose a novel algorithm for motion recognition using the feature vector from force data solely obtained during a daily exercise program. We recognized 7 types of movement (Radio Exercises) of two candidates (mean age 22, male). The results show that the recognition rate of each motion has high score (mean: 86.9%). The results also confirm that there is a clustering of each movement in personal exercises data, and a similarity of the clustering even for different candidates thus that motion recognition is possible using contact force data.

  10. Fiber Bragg Grating based bite force measurement.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Sharath; Padma, Srivani; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Srinivas, Talabattula

    2016-09-06

    The present study reports an in vivo, novel methodology for the dynamic measurement of the bite force generated by individual tooth using a Fiber Bragg Grating Bite Force Recorder (FBGBFR). Bite force is considered as one of the major indicators of the functional state of the masticatory system, which is dependent on the craniomandibular structure comprising functional components such as muscles of mastication, joints and teeth. The proposed FBGBFR is an intra-oral device, developed for the transduction of the bite force exerted at the occlusal surface, into strain variations on a base plate, which in turn is sensed by the FBG sensor bonded over it. The FBGBFR is calibrated against a Micro Universal Testing Machine (UTM) for 0-900N range and the resolution of the developed FBGBFR is found to be 0.54N. 36 volunteers (20 males and 16 females) performed the bite force measurement test at molar, premolar and incisor tooth on either side of the dental arch and the obtained results show clinically relevant bite forces varying from 176N to 635N. The bite forces obtained from the current study for a substantial sample size, show that the bite forces increases along the dental arch from the incisors towards the molars and are found to be higher in male than in female. The FBG sensor element utilized in FBGBFR is electrically passive, which makes it a safe in vivo intra-oral device. Hence the FBGBFR is viable to be employed in clinical studies on biomechanics of oral function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    , velocity, and acceleration sensors. This research demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining induced drag and lift forces through the use of distributed sensor technology with measured strain data. An active induced drag control system thus can be designed using the two computed aerodynamic forces, induced drag and lift, to improve the fuel efficiency of an aircraft. Interpolation elements between structural finite element grids and the CFD grids and centroids are successfully incorporated with the unsteady aeroelastic computation scheme. The most critical technology for the success of the proposed approach is the robust on-line parameter estimator, since the least-squares curve fitting method depends heavily on aeroelastic system frequencies and damping factors.

  12. Determination of Gibbs Energy of Formation of Molybdenum-Boron Binary System by Electromotive Force Measurement Using Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Morishita, Masao; Yamamoto, Takeo; Furukawa, Kazuma

    2011-02-01

    The standard Gibbs energies of formation of Mo2B, αMoB, Mo2B5, and MoB4 in the molybdenum-boron binary system were determined by measuring electromotive forces of galvanic cells using an Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 solid oxide electrolyte. The results are as follows: begin{aligned} Updelta_{{f}} {{G}}^circ ( {{{Mo}}2 {{B}}} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} & = - 193100 + 44.10T ± 700( {1198{{ K to }}1323{{ K}}( {925^circ {{C to }}1050^circ {{C}}} )} ) \\ Updelta_{{f}} {{G}}^circ (α {{MoB}})/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} & = - 164000 + 26.45T ± 700( {1213{{ K to }}1328{{ K}}( {940^circ {{C to }}1055^circ {{C}}} )} ) \\ Updelta_{{f}} {{G}}^circ ( {{{Mo}}2 {{B}}5 } )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} & = - 622500 + 117.0T ± 3000( {1205{{ K to }}1294{{ K}}( {932^circ {{C to }}1021^circ {{C}}} )} ) \\ Updelta_{{f}} {{G}}^circ ( {{{MoB}}4 } )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} & = - 387300 + 93.53T ± 3000( {959{{ K to }}1153{{ K}}( {686^circ {{C to }}880^circ {{C}}} )} ) \\ where the standard pressure is 1 bar (100 kPa).

  13. The role of soft-tissue traction forces in bone segment transport for callus distraction : A force measurement cadaver study on eight human femora using a novel intramedullary callus distraction system.

    PubMed

    Horas, Konstantin; Schnettler, Reinhard; Maier, Gerrit; Schneider, Gaby; Horas, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    Callus distraction using bone segment transport systems is an applied process in the treatment of bone defects. However, complications such as muscle contractures, axial deviation and pin track infections occur in the treatment process using the currently available devices. Since successful treatment is influenced by the applied distraction force, knowledge of the biomechanical properties of the involved soft tissues is essential to improve clinical outcome and treatment strategies. To date, little data on distraction forces and the role of soft-tissue traction forces are available. The aim of this study was to assess traction forces generated by soft tissues during bone segment transport using a novel intramedullary callus distraction system on eight human femora. For traction force measurements, bone segment transport over 60-mm femoral defects was conducted under constant load measurement using 40- and 60-mm bone segments. The required traction forces for 60-mm bone segments were higher than forces for 40-mm bone segments. This study demonstrates that soft tissues are of relevance biomechanically in bone segment transport. The size of the bone segment and the selection of the region for osteotomy are of utmost importance in defining the treatment procedure.

  14. Measurement of Cantilever's Spring Constant with Cms Electrostatic Force Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Jui; Pan, Sheau-Shi; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Lin, Yi-Ching

    The mechanical property is one of the important parameters for evaluating micro/nano-scale materials. The measurement of micro/nano-mechanical property usually involves measurements of small displacement and force. To provide a traceable force standard in micro/nano-newton level, we have developed a force measurement system based on electrostatic sensing and actuation techniques. The system mainly consists of a monolithic flexure stage, a three-electrode capacitor and a digital controller. The three-electrode capacitor is utilized as a position sensor, and at the same time an electrostatic force actuator. The force under measurement is balanced by a compensation electrostatic force which is traceable to electrical and length standards. A commercial cantilever-type micro-force probe was used in this calibration experiment. The force probe was brought to contact with and press into the load button (a ruby sphere) of the force measurement system by a closed-loop controlled z-scanner. The spring constant was obtained from the average slope determined from measured force-displacement curves and was found to be (2.26 ± 0.01) N/m where the given uncertainty is one standard deviation. We have successfully demonstrated the calibration of the microforce probe using our self-developed electrostatic sensing and actuating force measurement system. The measured spring constant is consistent with the manufacturer's specification, and the relative standard deviation is less than 0.5%. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  15. Age and Sex Differences in Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computing Bar Chart Target-Pursuit System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the age and sex differences in controlled force exertion measured by the bar chart display in 207 males (age 42.1 [plus or minus] 19.8 years) and 249 females (age 41.7 [plus or minus] 19.1 years) aged 15 to 86 years. The subjects matched their submaximal grip strength to changing demand values, which appeared as a…

  16. Age and Sex Differences in Controlled Force Exertion Measured by a Computing Bar Chart Target-Pursuit System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the age and sex differences in controlled force exertion measured by the bar chart display in 207 males (age 42.1 [plus or minus] 19.8 years) and 249 females (age 41.7 [plus or minus] 19.1 years) aged 15 to 86 years. The subjects matched their submaximal grip strength to changing demand values, which appeared as a…

  17. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  18. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  19. Direct Measurement of Lateral Force Using Dual Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Ichikawa, Masaya; Miura, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed an experimental system to measure a piconewton lateral force using dual cantilevers which cross with each other. The resolution of the lateral force is estimated to be 3.3 p ± 0.2 pN, which is comparable to forces due to thermal fluctuation. This experimental apparatus works so easily that it will enable us to determine forces during nano-manipulation and nano-tribological measurements. PMID:22737001

  20. Entropic force and entanglement system

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2010-05-15

    We introduce the isothermal cavity, static holographic screen, and accelerating surface as holographic screen to study the entropic force in the presence of the Schwarzschild black hole. These may merge to provide a consistent holographic screen to define the entropic force on the stretched horizon near the event horizon. Considering the similarity between the stretched horizon of black hole and the entanglement system, we may define the entropic force in the entanglement system without referring to the source mass.

  1. Determination of Gibbs Energy of Mixing of Tungsten-Boron Binary System by Electromotive Force Measurement Using Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Morishita, Masao; Miyake, Yuta; Hiramatsu, Shusuke

    2017-02-01

    The thermodynamic properties for the tungsten-boron binary system were determined by measuring electromotive forces of galvanic cells using an Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 solid oxide electrolyte. Assuming that W2B and αWB are the stoichiometric compounds, and W2B5-x and W1-x B3 are the nonstoichiometric compounds having solubility widths of 0.670 ≤ X B ≤ 0.690 and 0.805 ≤ X B ≤ 0.822, respectively, they were treated as the intermediate phases of W0.667B0.333, αW0.50B0.50, W0.330B0.670 W0.310B0.690, and W0.195B0.805 W0.178B0.822. The Gibbs energies of mixing, ∆mix G, determined in the present study are listed as follows: Δ_{mix} G(W_{0.667} B_{0.333} )/{J} {mol}^{ - 1} = {-}78070 + 26.01T ± 70 [1305{-}1422{K}(1032{-}1149° C)], & Δ_{mix} G(α W_{0.50} B_{0.50} )/{J} {mol}^{ - 1} = {-}86140 + 20.19T ± 200 [1310{-}1399{K}(1037{-}1126° C)], & Δ_{mix} G(W_{0.330} B_{0.670} )/{J} {mol}^{ - 1} = {-}78910 + 18.11T ± 200 [1228{-}1410{K}(955{-}1137° C)], & Δ_{mix} G(W_{0.310} B_{0.690} )/{J} {mol}^{ - 1} = {-}77350 + 17.52T ± 500 [1228{-}1410{K}(955{-}1137° C)], & Δ_{mix} G(W_{0.195} B_{0.805} )/{J} {mol}^{ - 1} = {-}63920 + 12.08T ± 500 [1170{-}1340{K}(897{-}1067° C)], & Δ_{mix} G(W_{0.178} B_{0.822} )/{J} {mol}^{ - 1} = {-}60090 + 11.15T ± 200 [1170{-}1340{K}(897{-}1067° C)]. Using the thermodynamic properties determined in the present study, the composition-oxygen partial pressure diagram of the tungsten-boron-oxygen system was constructed under the conditions at 1273 K (1000 °C) and a total pressure of 1 bar (100 kPa). It is useful to understand the oxidation property of tungsten-boron binary alloys.

  2. Determination of Gibbs Energy of Mixing of Tungsten-Boron Binary System by Electromotive Force Measurement Using Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Morishita, Masao; Miyake, Yuta; Hiramatsu, Shusuke

    2017-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties for the tungsten-boron binary system were determined by measuring electromotive forces of galvanic cells using an Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 solid oxide electrolyte. Assuming that W2B and αWB are the stoichiometric compounds, and W2B5- x and W1- x B3 are the nonstoichiometric compounds having solubility widths of 0.670 ≤ X B ≤ 0.690 and 0.805 ≤ X B ≤ 0.822, respectively, they were treated as the intermediate phases of W0.667B0.333, αW0.50B0.50, W0.330B0.670 W0.310B0.690, and W0.195B0.805 W0.178B0.822. The Gibbs energies of mixing, ∆mix G, determined in the present study are listed as follows: Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.667} {B}_{0.333} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}78070 + 26.01T ± 70 [1305{-}1422{{ K}}(1032{-}1149°C)], Δ_{{mix}} G(α {W}_{0.50} {B}_{0.50} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}86140 + 20.19T ± 200 [1310{-}1399{{ K }}(1037{-}1126°C)], Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.330} {B}_{0.670} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}78910 + 18.11T ± 200 [1228{-}1410{{ K }}(955{-}1137°C)], ; Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.310} {B}_{0.690} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}77350 + 17.52T ± 500 [1228{-}1410{{ K }}(955{-}1137°C)], Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.195} {B}_{0.805} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}63920 + 12.08T ± 500 [1170{-}1340{{ K }}(897{-}1067°C)], Δ_{{mix}} G({W}_{0.178} {B}_{0.822} )/{{J}} {{mol}}^{ - 1} = {-}60090 + 11.15T ± 200 [1170{-}1340{{ K }}(897{-}1067°C)]. Using the thermodynamic properties determined in the present study, the composition-oxygen partial pressure diagram of the tungsten-boron-oxygen system was constructed under the conditions at 1273 K (1000 °C) and a total pressure of 1 bar (100 kPa). It is useful to understand the oxidation property of tungsten-boron binary alloys.

  3. Rigid two-axis MEMS force plate for measuring cellular traction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Jung, Uijin G.; Kan, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-10-01

    Cellular traction force is one of the important factors for understanding cell behaviors, such as spreading, migration and differentiation. Cells are known to change their behavior according to the mechanical stiffness of the environment. However, the measurement of cell traction forces on a rigid environment has remained difficult. This paper reports a micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) force plate that provides a cellular traction force measurement on a rigid substrate. Both the high force sensitivity and high stiffness of the substrate were obtained using piezoresistive sensing elements. The proposed force plate consists of a 70 µm  ×  15 µm  ×  5 µm base as the substrate for cultivating a bovine aortic smooth muscle cell, and the supporting beams with piezoresistors on the sidewall and the surface were used to measure the forces in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The spring constant and force resolution of the fabricated force plate in the horizontal direction were 0.2 N m-1 and less than 0.05 µN, respectively. The cell traction force was measured, and the traction force increased by approximately 1 µN over 30 min. These results demonstrate that the proposed force plate is applicable as an effective traction force measurement.

  4. Force optimized recoil control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, P. E.; Radkiewicz, R. J.; Gartner, R. F.

    1982-05-01

    Reduction of the recoil force of high rate of fire automatic guns was proven effective. This system will allow consideration of more powerful guns for use in both helicopter and armored personnel carrier applications. By substituting the large shock loads of firing guns with a nearly constant force, both vibration and fatigue problems that prevent mounting of powerful automatic guns is eliminated.

  5. Research on new dynamic force calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li

    2008-06-01

    Sinusoidal force calibration method based on electrodynamic shaker and interferometric system was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In that system a load mass are screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition F(t) = ma(t), where m is the total mass acting on the sensing element of the force transducer and a is the time and spatial-dependent acceleration of the mass, which is directly measured by a laser interferometer. This paper will introduce a new dynamic force calibration system developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electrodynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1N to 20kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. A new air bearing system is developed to increase the performance of shakers and an active vibration isolator is used to reduce enviromental disturbance to the interferometric system.

  6. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  7. Two techniques for measuring locomotion impact forces during zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.; Smith, Richard A.; Klute, Glenn K.; Mccaulley, James B.

    1993-01-01

    A load-cell-instrumented treadmill mated to a Kistler force plate was used to investigate two methods of force measurement instrumentation during treadmill ambulation in zero g, created by parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Current spaceflight treadmills do not have adequate instrumentation to determine the resultant foot impact force applied during restrained ambulation. Accurate measurement of foot-ground reaction forces is critical in attaining proper one-g loading, therefore ensuring proper musculoskeletal conditioning. Treadmill instrumentation and force plate measurements were compared for frequency response and linearity. Locomotion impact data were also collected under one-g laboratory settings and in Keplerian flight. The first resonant frequency for both techniques was found to be well above the primary frequency content of the locomotive forces. Peak impact forces measured by the two systems compared to within 10 percent.

  8. Comparison of Radiative Forcing Calculations Due to Mineral Dust from a Transport Model, Satellite Measurements and an Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Clark J.; Ginoux, Paul; Hsu, Christina; Joiner, Joanna; Chou, Ming-Dah

    1999-01-01

    This study uses information on mineral aerosol from a transport model to calculate global radiative forcing values. The transport model is driven by assimilated meteorology and outputs three-dimensional dust spatial information for various size ranges. The dust fields are input to an off-line radiative transfer calculation to obtain the direct radiative forcing due to the dust fields. During June, July and August of 1988 presence of dust 1) reduces the global net incoming radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) by 0.3 to 0.7 W/sq m and 2) reduces net incoming radiation at the earth's surface by 1.3 to 2.0 W/sq m. Over Africa our estimates of the reduction of radiation at the top of atmosphere compare well with TOA reductions derived from ERBE and TOMS satellite data. However, our heating rates are not consistent with analysis temperature increments produced by the assimilation system over regions of high aerosol loading. These increments are based on differences between temperature observations and temperatures from the assimilation general circulation model. One explanation is that the lower tropospheric temperatures retrieved by TOVS are being contaminated by mineral aerosol.

  9. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  10. Measurement of edgewise torque force in vitro.

    PubMed

    Steyn, C L

    1977-05-01

    The construction of a model for the measurement of palatal root torque is described. It was demonstrated that: 1. Halfway between the apex of a tooth and the arch wire the force was double that which was delivered at the apex. 2. The lateral incisors were subjected to appreciably more force than the central incisors. 3. The smaller the number of teeth acted upon, the greater the force they received.

  11. Laser safety evaluation and output measurements for the VITAL -2 Variable Intensity Tactical Aiming Light (laser) used with the Proforce M-4 system in force-on-force exercises.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-02-01

    A laser safety hazard evaluation and pertinent output measurements were performed (June 2003 through August 2003) on several VITAL-2 Variable Intensity Tactical Aiming Light--infrared laser, associated with the Proforce M-4 system used in force-on-force exercises. The VITAL-2 contains two diode lasers presenting 'Extended Source' viewing out to a range on the order of 1.3 meters before reverting to a 'Small Source' viewing hazard. Laser hazard evaluation was performed in concert with the ANSI Std. Z136.1-2000 for the safe use of lasers and the ANSI Std. Z136.6-2000 for the safe use of lasers outdoors. The results of the laser hazard analysis for the VITAL-2, indicates that this Tactical Aiming IR laser presents a Class 1 laser hazard to personnel in the area of use. Field measurements performed on 71 units confirmed that the radiant outputs were at all times below the Allowable Emission Limit and that the irradiance of the laser spot was at all locations below the Maximum Exposure Limit. This system is eye-safe and it may be used under current SNL policy in force-on-force exercises. The VITAL-2 Variable Intensity Tactical Aiming Light does not present a laser hazard greater than Class 1, to aided viewing with binoculars.

  12. Force measurement enabling precise analysis by dynamic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) makes it possible to investigate specific interactions between two molecules such as ligand-receptor pairs at the single-molecule level. In the DFS method based on the Bell-Evans model, the unbinding force applied to a molecular bond is increased at a constant rate, and the force required to rupture the molecular bond is measured. By analyzing the relationship between the modal rupture force and the logarithm of the loading rate, microscopic potential barrier landscapes and the lifetimes of bonds can be obtained. However, the results obtained, for example, in the case of streptavidin/biotin complexes, have differed among previous studies and some results have been inconsistent with theoretical predictions. In this study, using an atomic force microscopy technique that enables the precise analysis of molecular interactions on the basis of DFS, we investigated the effect of the sampling rate on DFS analysis. The shape of rupture force histograms, for example, was significantly deformed at a sampling rate of 1 kHz in comparison with that of histograms obtained at 100 kHz, indicating the fundamental importance of ensuring suitable experimental conditions for further advances in the DFS method.

  13. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  14. The hydrophobic force: measurements and methods.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico F; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2014-09-14

    The hydrophobic force describes the attraction between water-hating molecules (and surfaces) that draws them together, causing aggregation, phase separation, protein folding and many other inherent physical phenomena. Attempts have been made to isolate the range and magnitude of this interaction between extended surfaces for more than four decades, with wildly varying results. In this perspective, we critically analyse the application of common force-measuring techniques to the hydrophobic force conundrum. In doing so, we highlight possible interferences to these measurements and provide physical rationalisation where possible. By analysing the most recent measurements, new approaches to establishing the form of this force become apparent, and we suggest potential future directions to further refine our understanding of this vital, physical force.

  15. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  16. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  17. Measurement of non-monotonic Casimir forces between silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, L.; Wang, M.; Ng, C. Y.; Nikolic, M.; Chan, C. T.; Rodriguez, A. W.; Chan, H. B.

    2017-01-01

    Casimir forces are of fundamental interest because they originate from quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Apart from controlling this force via the optical properties of materials, a number of novel geometries have been proposed to generate repulsive and/or non-monotonic Casimir forces between bodies separated by vacuum gaps. Experimental realization of these geometries, however, is hindered by the difficulties in alignment when the bodies are brought into close proximity. Here, using an on-chip platform with integrated force sensors and actuators, we circumvent the alignment problem and measure the Casimir force between two surfaces with nanoscale protrusions. We demonstrate that the force depends non-monotonically on the displacement. At some displacements, the Casimir force leads to an effective stiffening of the nanomechanical spring. Our findings pave the way for exploiting the Casimir force in nanomechanical systems using structures of complex and non-conventional shapes.

  18. Micromechanical apparatus for measurement of forces

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, Danelle Mary; Allen, James Joe

    2004-05-25

    A new class of micromechanical dynamometers has been disclosed which are particularly suited to fabrication in parallel with other microelectromechanical apparatus. Forces in the microNewton regime and below can be measured with such dynamometers which are based on a high-compliance deflection element (e.g. a ring or annulus) suspended above a substrate for deflection by an applied force, and one or more distance scales for optically measuring the deflection.

  19. Instrument for measuring human biting force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopola, Harri K.; Mantyla, Olavi; Makiniemi, Matti; Mahonen, Kalevi; Virtanen, Kauko

    1995-02-01

    Alongside EMG activity, biting force is the primary parameter used for assessing the biting problems of dentulous patients and patients with dentures. In a highly conductive oral cavity, dielectric measurement methods are preferred, for safety reasons. The maximum biting force for patients with removable dentures is not more than 100 ... 300 N. We report here on an instrument developed for measuring human biting force which consists of three units: a mouthpiece, a signal processing and interface unit (SPI), and a PC. The mouthpiece comprises a sensor head of thickness 3.4 mm, width 20 mm and length 30 mm constructed of two stainless steel plates and with a fiber optic microbending sensor between them. This is connected to the SPI unit by a three-meter fiber optic cable, and the SPI unit to the PC by an RS connection. A computer program has been developed that includes measurement, display, zeroing, and calibration operations. The instrument measures biting force as a function of time and displays the time-dependent force profile and maximum force on a screen or plots it in hard copy. The dynamic measurement range of the mouthpiece is from 0 to 1000 N, and the resolution of the instrument is 10 N. The results of preliminary clinical measurements and repeatability tests are reported.

  20. Quantifying force networks in particulate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramár, Miroslav; Goullet, Arnaud; Kondic, Lou; Mischaikow, Konstantin

    2014-08-01

    We present mathematical models based on persistent homology for analyzing force distributions in particulate systems. We define three distinct chain complexes of these distributions: digital, position, and interaction, motivated by different types of data that may be available from experiments and simulations, e.g. digital images, location of the particles, and the forces between the particles, respectively. We describe how algebraic topology, in particular, homology allows one to obtain algebraic representations of the geometry captured by these complexes. For each complex we define an associated force network from which persistent homology is computed. Using numerical data obtained from discrete element simulations of a system of particles undergoing slow compression, we demonstrate how persistent homology can be used to compare the force distributions in different systems, and discuss the differences between the properties of digital, position, and interaction force networks. To conclude, we formulate well-defined measures quantifying differences between force networks corresponding to the different states of a system, and therefore allow to analyze in precise terms dynamical properties of force networks.

  1. Casimir force and in situ surface potential measurements on nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, Daniel; Fong, King Yan; Bhaskaran, Harish; Lamoreaux, Steve; Tang, Hong X

    2012-07-13

    We present Casimir force measurements in a sphere-plate configuration that consists of a high quality nanomembrane resonator and a millimeter sized gold coated sphere. The nanomembrane is fabricated from stoichiometric silicon nitride metallized with gold. A Kelvin probe method is used in situ to image the surface potentials to minimize the distance-dependent residual force. Resonance-enhanced frequency-domain measurements of the nanomembrane motion allow for very high resolution measurements of the Casimir force gradient (down to a force gradient sensitivity of 3  μN/m). Using this technique, the Casimir force in the range of 100 nm to 2  μm is accurately measured. Experimental data thus obtained indicate that the device system in the measured range is best described with the Drude model.

  2. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas; Mota, David F.

    2007-12-15

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models.

  3. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-07

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young's moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young's moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  4. Adhesion Force Measurements Using an Atomic Force Microscope Upgraded with a Linear Position Sensitive Detector

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M.; Stuart, J.; Pungor, A.; Dryden, P.

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), in addition to providing images on an atomic scale, can be used to measure the forces between surfaces and the AFM probe. The potential uses of mapping the adhesive forces on the surface include a spatial determination of surface energy and a direct identification of surface proteins through specific protein–ligand binding interactions. The capabilities of the AFM to measure adhesive forces can be extended by replacing the four-quadrant photodiode detection sensor with an external linear position sensitive detector and by utilizing a dedicated user-programmable signal generator and acquisiton system. Such an upgrade enables the microscope to measure in the larger dynamic range of adhesion forces, improves the sensitivity and linearity of the measurement, and eliminates the problems inherent to the multiple repetitious contacts between the AFM probe and the specimen surface. PMID:25125792

  5. Force based displacement measurement in micromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect

    O {close_quote}Shea, S. J.; Ng, C. K.; Tan, Y. Y.; Xu, Y.; Tay, E. H.; Chua, B. L.; Tien, N. C.; Tang, X. S.; Chen, W. T.

    2001-06-18

    We demonstrate how force detection methods based on atomic force microscopy can be used to measure displacement in micromechanical devices. We show the operation of a simple microfabricated accelerometer, the proof mass of which incorporates a tip which can be moved towards an opposing surface. Both noncontact operation using long range electrostatic forces and tapping mode operation are demonstrated. The displacement sensitivity of the present device using feedback to control the tip-surface separation is approximately 1 nm. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Measuring thermal rupture force distributions from an ensemble of trajectories.

    PubMed

    Swan, J W; Shindel, M M; Furst, E M

    2012-11-09

    Rupture, bond breaking, or extraction from a deep and narrow potential well requires considerable force while producing minimal displacement. In thermally fluctuating systems, there is not a single force required to achieve rupture, but a spectrum, as thermal forces can both augment and inhibit the bond breaking. We demonstrate measurement and interpretation of the distribution of rupture forces between pairs of colloidal particles bonded via the van der Waals attraction. The otherwise irreversible bond is broken by pulling the particles apart with optical tweezers. We show that an ensemble of the particle trajectories before, during and after the rupture event may be used to produce a high fidelity description of the distribution of rupture forces. This analysis is equally suitable for describing rupture forces in molecular and biomolecular contexts with a number of measurement techniques.

  7. Vehicle Lateral State Estimation Based on Measured Tyre Forces

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2009-01-01

    Future active safety systems need more accurate information about the state of vehicles. This article proposes a method to evaluate the lateral state of a vehicle based on measured tyre forces. The tyre forces of two tyres are estimated from optically measured tyre carcass deflections and transmitted wirelessly to the vehicle body. The two remaining tyres are so-called virtual tyre sensors, the forces of which are calculated from the real tyre sensor estimates. The Kalman filter estimator for lateral vehicle state based on measured tyre forces is presented, together with a simple method to define adaptive measurement error covariance depending on the driving condition of the vehicle. The estimated yaw rate and lateral velocity are compared with the validation sensor measurements. PMID:22291535

  8. Variable Acceleration Force Calibration System (VACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Landman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, force balances have been calibrated manually, using a complex system of free hanging precision weights, bell cranks, and/or other mechanical components. Conventional methods may provide sufficient accuracy in some instances, but are often quite complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four man-weeks to complete each full calibration. To ensure accuracy, gravity-based loading is typically utilized. However, this often causes difficulty when applying loads in three simultaneous, orthogonal axes. A complex system of levers, cranks, and cables must be used, introducing increased sources of systematic error, and significantly increasing the time and labor intensity required to complete the calibration. One aspect of the VACS is a method wherein the mass utilized for calibration is held constant, and the acceleration is changed to thereby generate relatively large forces with relatively small test masses. Multiple forces can be applied to a force balance without changing the test mass, and dynamic forces can be applied by rotation or oscillating acceleration. If rotational motion is utilized, a mass is rigidly attached to a force balance, and the mass is exposed to a rotational field. A large force can be applied by utilizing a large rotational velocity. A centrifuge or rotating table can be used to create the rotational field, and fixtures can be utilized to position the force balance. The acceleration may also be linear. For example, a table that moves linearly and accelerates in a sinusoidal manner may also be utilized. The test mass does not have to move in a path that is parallel to the ground, and no re-leveling is therefore required. Balance deflection corrections may be applied passively by monitoring the orientation of the force balance with a three-axis accelerometer package. Deflections are measured during each test run, and adjustments with respect to the true applied load can be made during the post-processing stage. This paper will

  9. Age and sex differences of controlled force exertion measured by a computer-generated quasi-random target-pursuit system.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Y; Demura, S; Hamazaki, H

    2010-09-01

    This study examined age and sex differences of controlled force exertion measured by a computer-generated quasi-random target-pursuit system in 207 males and 249 females aged 15 to 86 years. The participants matched submaximal grip exertion of their dominant hand to changing demand values, appearing as a moving quasi-random waveform on the display of a personal computer. They performed the test three times with 1-min intervals (one trial was 40 sec). The total sum of the percent of differences between the demand value and the grip exertion value for 25 sec was used as an evaluation parameter. The errors in controlled force exertion tended to increase constantly with age in both sexes. Significant linear regressions were identified, but there was no significant difference in the rate of increase in both sexes. Analysis of variance showed nonsignificant sex differences among means, except for those in individuals older than 60 years; significant differences between means in the groups older than the 40 yr.-old age group and the 20-24 yr.-old group were found in both sexes. Controlled force exertion did not show a significant sex difference and decreased gradually with age in both sexes, but decreased remarkably after 40 years of age.

  10. Measuring Molecular Forces Using Calibrated Optical Tweezers in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Adam G.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been instrumental in uncovering the mechanisms motor proteins use to generate and react to force. While optical traps have primarily been applied to purified, in vitro systems, emerging methods enable measurements in living cells where the actively fluctuating, viscoelastic environment and varying refractive index complicate calibration of the instrument. Here, we describe techniques to calibrate optical traps in living cells using the forced response to sinusoidal oscillations and spontaneous fluctuations, and to measure the forces exerted by endogenous ensembles of kinesin and dynein motor proteins as they transport cargoes in the cell. PMID:27844443

  11. Measuring Molecular Forces Using Calibrated Optical Tweezers in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Adam G; Goldman, Yale E

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been instrumental in uncovering the mechanisms motor proteins use to generate and react to force. While optical traps have primarily been applied to purified, in vitro systems, emerging methods enable measurements in living cells where the actively fluctuating, viscoelastic environment and varying refractive index complicate calibration of the instrument. Here, we describe techniques to calibrate optical traps in living cells using the forced response to sinusoidal oscillations and spontaneous fluctuations, and to measure the forces exerted by endogenous ensembles of kinesin and dynein motor proteins as they transport cargoes in the cell.

  12. Age and sex differences of controlled force exertion measured by a computer-generated sinusoidal target-pursuit system.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yoshinori; Demura, Shinichi

    2009-06-01

    This study examined age and sex differences of controlled force exertion in 207 males and 249 females aged 15 to 86 years. The subjects matched the submaximal grip strength of their dominant hand to changing demand values, appearing as a sinusoidal waveform on the display of a personal computer. The total difference (%) between the demand value and the grip exertion value for 25 sec was used as an evaluation parameter. Significant linear regressions were identified, but there was no significant difference in the rate of increase of both sexes. Analysis of variance showed insignificant differences among the means of both sexes, except for those of the 20-24yr-old group, and the differences between means of subjects greater than 50 years of age and 20 years of age increased in both sexes. Individual differences were almost the same in both sexes. The errors in controlled force exertion did not show a significant sex difference and tended to increase with age in both sexes. However, their rates of increase were significant only after 50 years of age.

  13. Simplified fundamental force and mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The watt balance relates force or mass to the Planck constant h, the metre and the second. It enables the forthcoming redefinition of the unit of mass within the SI by measuring the Planck constant in terms of mass, length and time with an uncertainty of better than 2 parts in 108. To achieve this, existing watt balances require complex and time-consuming alignment adjustments limiting their use to a few national metrology laboratories. This paper describes a simplified construction and operating principle for a watt balance which eliminates the need for the majority of these adjustments and is readily scalable using either electromagnetic or electrostatic actuators. It is hoped that this will encourage the more widespread use of the technique for a wide range of measurements of force or mass. For example: thrust measurements for space applications which would require only measurements of electrical quantities and velocity/displacement.

  14. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within +/-0.05% the entire system has an accuracy of +/-0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  15. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within .+-.0.05%, the entire system has an accuracy of a .+-.0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  16. Sensitivity of Force Specifications to the Errors in Measuring the Interface Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Force-Limited Random Vibration Testing has been applied in the last several years at NASA/GSFC for various programs at the instrument and system level. Different techniques have been developed over the last few decades to estimate the dynamic forces that the test article under consideration will encounter in the operational environment. Some of these techniques are described in the handbook, NASA-HDBK-7004, and the monograph, NASA-RP-1403. A key element in the ability to perform force-limited testing is multi-component force gauges. This paper will show how some measurement and calibration errors in force gauges are compensated for w en tie force specification is calculated. The resulting notches in the acceleration spectrum, when a random vibration test is performed, are the same as the notches produced during an uncompensated test that has no measurement errors. The paper will also present the results of tests that were used to validate this compensation. Knowing that the force specification can compensate for some measurement errors allows tests to continue after force gauge failures or allows dummy gauges to be used in places that are inaccessible.

  17. Sensitivity of Force Specifications to the Errors in Measuring the Interface Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Force-Limited Random Vibration Testing has been applied in the last several years at NASA/GSFC for various programs at the instrument and system level. Different techniques have been developed over the last few decades to estimate the dynamic forces that the test article under consideration will encounter in the operational environment. Some of these techniques are described in the handbook, NASA-HDBK-7004, and the monograph, NASA-RP-1403. A key element in the ability to perform force-limited testing is multi-component force gauges. This paper will show how some measurement and calibration errors in force gauges are compensated for w en tie force specification is calculated. The resulting notches in the acceleration spectrum, when a random vibration test is performed, are the same as the notches produced during an uncompensated test that has no measurement errors. The paper will also present the results of tests that were used to validate this compensation. Knowing that the force specification can compensate for some measurement errors allows tests to continue after force gauge failures or allows dummy gauges to be used in places that are inaccessible.

  18. Measurement methods in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Torre, Bruno; Canale, Claudio; Ricci, Davide; Braga, Pier Carlo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is introductory to the measurements: it explains different measurement techniques both for imaging and for force spectroscopy, on which most of the AFM experiments rely. It gives a general overview of the different techniques and of the output expected from the instrument; therefore it is, at a basic level, a good tool to properly start a new experiment. Concepts introduced in this chapter give the base for understanding the applications shown in the following chapters. Subheading 1 introduces the distinction between spectroscopy and imaging experiments and, within the last ones, between DC and AC mode. Subheading 2 is focused on DC mode (contact), explaining the topography and the lateral force channel. Subheading 3 introduces AC mode, both in noncontact and intermittent contact case. Phase imaging and force modulation are also discussed. Subheading 4 explains how the AFM can be used to measure local mechanical and adhesive properties of specimens by means of force spectroscopy technique. An overview on the state of the art and future trends in this field is also given.

  19. Trends of Measured Climate Forcing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.; Sato, Makiko; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The growth rate of climate forcing by measured greenhouse gases peaked near 1980 at almost 5 W/sq m per century. This growth rate has since declined to approximately equal to 3 W/sq m per century, largely because of cooperative international actions. We argue that trends can be reduced to the level needed for the moderate "alternative" climate scenario (approximately equal to 2 W/M2 per century for the next 50 years) by means of concerted actions that have other benefits, but the forcing reductions are not automatic "co-benefits" of actions that slow CO2 emissions. Current trends of climate forcings by aerosols remain very uncertain. Nevertheless, practical constraints on changes in emission levels suggest that global warming at a rate + 0.15 +/- 0.05 C per decade will occur over the next several decades.

  20. Electrostatic force microscopy studies of nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Stephen Wayne

    Electrostatic force microscopy has been used to study the electrostatic force on a nanometer length scale. The experimental techniques, implemented to measure electrostatic force, were based on established methods reported in the literature. These measurements were acquired using an electrostatic force microscope (EFM). The EFM consisted of a commercially available atomic force microscope (AFM) that was modified to measure the electrostatic interaction between an AFM tip and a sample substrate. In addition to modifying the commercial AFM, a homebuilt AFM/EFM was constructed at Purdue capable of making electrostatic measurements in an ultra high vacuum environment. After performing several experiments designed to test both the operation and the sensitivity of the EFM, extensive studies of several nanoscale systems were conducted. In particular, the EFM was used to measure the electrostatic potentials of a single nanometer-sized gold cluster and self-assembled arrays of encapsulated gold clusters. The surface potential of the array was found to be at a higher positive potential than the underlying gold substrate, indicating that the encapsulated clusters have a lower work function than bulk gold. In addition, the EFM was used to measure surface potential as a function of time for various LTG:GaAs substrates after the removal of the oxide layer. The behavior of the surface potential with respect to time was found to be dependent on the agent used for the oxide removal. Finally, the EFM was used to measure the surface potential of self-assembled monolayers chemisorb onto Au(111). The monolayers' surface potentials were found to depend on the molecular structure of the molecules forming the monolayer.

  1. Optical measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, Daniel J.

    1987-01-01

    Some of the areas of research conducted at Lewis on optical measurement techniques are described. Two laser anemometer systems developed at Lewis are used to illustrate the special instrumentation needs encountered in aeropropulsion research. Velocity measurements to be made through small viewing ports, close to surfaces within the propulsion system components, and in turbulent or highly-accelerating flows are some of the significant challenges. The application to research facilities of two advanced optical systems, the rainbow schlieren and the combustor viewing system, is presented. The calibration and verification of commercial optical measuring systems, such as droplet sizing systems, are also discussed. Calibration techniques capable of simulating moving droplets for flight-type sizing systems are being developed at Lewis. The presentation concludes with a brief look at the forces driving future research on optical instrumentation.

  2. Rail supporting transducer posts for three-dimensional force measurement.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Kobetic, R

    1997-12-01

    Parallel bars supported on transducer posts were designed, instrumented and calibrated to measure three-dimensional (3-D) forces applied to the rails. These instrumented rails were designed for measuring forces applied by paraplegic patients during development and evaluation of functional electrical stimulation (FES) patterns for standing, side stepping, and ascending and descending stairs. The focus of this study was on the adaptation of the system for measuring support forces during stair climbing and descent. The specific problems with crosstalk among the three axes, nonlinearity, and hysteresis were investigated. In this design, the crosstalk between axes was less than 5%, nonlinearity was less than 2% of full scale, and force accuracy was better than 5%.

  3. Flight Force Measurements on a Spacecraft to Launch Vehicle Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Daniel S.; Gordon, Scott A.

    2012-07-01

    For several years we had wanted to measure interface forces between a launch vehicle and the Payload. Finally in July 2006 a proposal was made and funded to evaluate the use of flight force measurements (FFM) to improve the loads process of a Spacecraft in its design and test cycle. A NASA/Industry team was formed, the core Team consisted of 20 people. The proposal identified two questions that this assessment would attempt to address by obtaining the flight forces. These questions were: 1) Is flight correlation and reconstruction with acceleration methods sufficient? 2) How much can the loads and therefore the design and qualification be reduced by having force measurements? The objective was to predict the six interface driving forces between the Spacecraft and the Launch Vehicle throughout the boost phase. Then these forces would be compared with reconstructed loads analyses for evaluation in an attempt to answer them. The paper will present the development of a strain based force measurement system and also an acceleration method, actual flight results, post flight evaluations and lessons learned.

  4. Forced free-shear layer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed three-dimensional three-component phase averaged measurements of the spanwise and streamwise vorticity formation and evolution in acoustically forced plane free-shear flows have been obtained. For the first time, phase-averaged measurements of all three velocity components have been obtained in both a mixing layer and a wake on three-dimensional grids, yielding the spanwise and streamwise vorticity distributions without invoking Taylor's hypothesis. Initially, two-frequency forcing was used to phase-lock the roll-up and first pairing of the spanwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer. The objective of this study was to measure the near-field vortical structure morphology in a mixing layer with 'natural' laminar initial boundary layers. For the second experiment the second and third subharmonics of the fundamental roll-up frequency were added to the previous two-frequency forcing in order to phase-lock the roll-up and first three pairings of the spanwise rollers in the mixing layer. The objective of this study was to determine the details of spanwise scale changes observed in previous time-averaged measurements and flow visualization of unforced mixing layers. For the final experiment, single-frequency forcing was used to phase-lock the Karman vortex street in a plane wake developing from nominally two-dimensional laminar initial boundary layers. The objective of this study was to compare measurements of the three-dimensional structure in a wake developing from 'natural' initial boundary layers to existing models of wake vortical structure.

  5. Molecular Architecture Studied by the Surface Forces Measurement.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Kazue

    2016-11-29

    This feature article reviews the surface forces measurement as a tool for studying molecular architecture chemistry. The history of the measurement is briefly described in the Introduction. The general overview covers specific features of the surface forces measurement as a tool for studying and using molecular architecture. This measurement is powerful for understanding interaction forces and for characterizing and discovering the phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces and soft complex matter. An apparatus for opaque samples was developed, which can be used to study not only opaque samples in various media but also electrochemical processes under various electrochemical potentials. Our studies of molecular architecture are reviewed; they include biological molecular recognition especially involved in the enzyme-substrate interaction; polyelectrolyte brushes exhibiting steric repulsion, which can be reproduced by the osmotic pressure of the counterions, and a density-dependent transition; the hydrogen-bonded molecular macrocluster formation of alcohol and carboxylic acids adsorbed on silica in nonpolar solvents such as cyclohexane; and surface forces between ferrocene-modified electrodes under various applied potentials. These studies demonstrate how the forces measurement is used to identify interacting species such as in biological systems to reveal unknown phenomena and to characterize soft complex matter and the effective potential of the electrodes. Readers will be introduced to the broad applications of the force measurement.

  6. Measurement-only topological quantum computation without forced measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Dua, Arpit; Jiang, Liang

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the measurement-only topological quantum computation (MOTQC) approach proposed by Bonderson et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 010501) where the braiding operation is shown to be equivalent to a series of topological charge ‘forced measurements’ of anyons. In a forced measurement, the charge measurement is forced to yield the desired outcome (e.g. charge 0) via repeatedly measuring charges in different bases. This is a probabilistic process with a certain success probability for each trial. In practice, the number of measurements needed will vary from run to run. We show that such an uncertainty associated with forced measurements can be removed by simulating the braiding operation using a fixed number of three measurements supplemented by a correction operator. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in practice we can avoid applying the correction operator in hardware by implementing it in software. Our findings greatly simplify the MOTQC proposal and only require the capability of performing charge measurements to implement topologically protected transformations generated by braiding exchanges without physically moving anyons.

  7. Robot arm force control through system linearization by nonlinear feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Bejczy, A. K.; Yun, Xiaoping

    1988-01-01

    Based on a differential geometric feedback linearization technique for nonlinear time-varying systems, a dynamic force control method for robot arms is developed. It uses active force-moment measurements at the robot wrist. The controller design fully incorporate the robot-arm dynamics and is so general that it can be reduced to pure position control, hybrid position/force control, pure force control. The controller design is independent of the tasks to be performed. Computer simulations show that the controller improves the position error by a factor of ten in cases in which position errors generate force measurements. A theorem on linearization of time-varying system is also presented.

  8. An Analysis of Performance Measurements Systems in the Air Force Logistics Command’s Aircraft Repair Depots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Maintenance Dats Collection System Figure IV-21. Depot Maintenanlce Data Systemns Network 115 rigid and their information is often quite outdated. The G037E...averaging 173 flow days, were scheduled for PDM at WR-ALC. For many years the PDM work package for the 270 C-141s in the fleet has been very stable and...directorate recently purchased a project management software package called Timeline. Timeline provides PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique

  9. Interface corrective force measurements in Boston brace treatment.

    PubMed

    van den Hout, J A A M; van Rhijn, L W; van den Munckhof, R J H; van Ooy, A

    2002-08-01

    Brace application has been reported to be effective in treating idiopathic adolescent scoliosis. The exact working mechanism of a thoracolumbo spinal orthosis is a result of different mechanisms and is not completely understood. One of the supposed working mechanisms is a direct compressive force working through the brace upon the body and thereby correcting the scoliotic deformity, achieving optimal fit of the individual orthosis. In this study we measured these direct forces exerted by the pads in a Boston brace in 16 patients with idiopathic adolescent scoliosis, using the electronic PEDAR measuring device (Novel, Munich, Germany). This is designed as an in-shoe measuring system consisting of two shoe insoles (size 8 1/2), wired to a computer, recording static and dynamic pressure distribution under the plantar surface of the foot. After positioning the inserts between the lumbar and thoracic pads and the body, we measured the forces acting upon the body in eight different postures. In all positions the mean corrective force through the lumbar brace pad was larger than the mean corrective force over the thoracic brace pad. Some changes in body posture resulted in statistically significant alterations in the exerted forces. There was no significant correlation between the magnitude of the compressive force over the lumbar and thoracic brace-pad and the degree of correction of the major curve. Comparing the corrective forces in a relatively new (<6 months) and old (>6 months) brace, there was no statistically relevant difference, although the corrective force was slightly larger in the new braces. We think that the use of this pressure measurement device is practicable and of value for studies of the working mechanism of brace treatment, and in the future it might be of help in achieving optimal fit of the individual orthosis.

  10. Measuring the force of drag on air sheared sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2012-11-01

    To blow a drop along or off of a surface (i.e. to shed the drop), the drag force on the drop (based on flow conditions, drop shape, and fluid properties) must overcome the adhesion force between the drop and the surface (based on surface tension, drop shape, and contact angle). While the shedding of sessile drops by shear flow has been studied [Milne, A. J. B. & Amirfazli, A. Langmuir 25, 14155 (2009).], no independent measurements of the drag or adhesion forces have been made. Likewise, analytic predictions are limited to hemispherical drops and low air velocities. We present, therefore, measurements of the drag force on sessile drops at air velocities up to the point of incipient motion. Measurements were made using a modified floating element shear sensor in a laminar low speed wind tunnel to record drag force over the surface with the drop absent, and over the combined system of the surface and drop partially immersed in the boundary layer. Surfaces of different wettabilities were used to study the effects of drop shape and contact angles, with drop volume ranged between approximately 10 and 100 microlitres. The drag force for incipient motion (which by definition equals the maximum of the adhesion force) is compared to simplified models for drop adhesion such as that of Furmidge

  11. Measurements of human force control during a constrained arm motion using a force-actuated joystick.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J; Gurfinkel, E V; Lipshits, M I; Droulez, J; Gurfinkel, V S

    1995-03-01

    1. When interacting with the environment, human arm movements may be prevented in certain directions (i.e., when sliding the hand along a surface) resulting in what is called a "constrained motion." In the directions that the movement is restricted, the subject is instead free to control the forces against the constraint. 2. Control strategies for constrained motion may be characterized by two extreme models. Under the active compliance model, an essentially feedback-based approach, measurements of contact force may be used in real time to modify the motor command and precisely control the forces generated against the constraint. Under the passive compliance model the motion would be executed in a feedforward manner, using an internal model of the constraint geometry. The feedforward model relies on the compliant behavior of the passive mechanical system to maintain contact while avoiding excessive contact forces. 3. Subjects performed a task in which they were required to slide the hand along a rigid surface. This task was performed in a virtual force environment in which contact forces were simulated by a two-dimensional force-actuated joystick. Unknown to the subject, the orientation of the surface constraint was varied from trial to trial, and contact force changes induced by these perturbations were measured. 4. Subjects showed variations in contact force correlated with the direction of the orientation perturbation. "Upward" tilts resulted in higher contact forces, whereas "downward" tilts resulted in lower contact forces. This result is consistent with a feedforward-based control of a passively compliant system. 5. Subject responses did not, however, correspond exactly to the predictions of a static analysis of a passive, feedforward-controlled system. A dynamic analysis reveals a much closer resemblance between a passive, feedforward model and the observed data. Numerical simulations demonstrate that a passive, dynamic system model of the movement captures

  12. Forces applied by cilia measured on explants from mucociliary tissue.

    PubMed

    Teff, Zvi; Priel, Zvi; Gheber, Levi A

    2007-03-01

    Forces applied by intact mucus-propelling cilia were measured for the first time that we know of using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrooptic system. The AFM probe was dipped into a field of beating cilia and its time-dependent deflection was recorded as it was struck by the cilia while the electrooptic system simultaneously and colocally measured the frequency to ensure that no perturbation was induced by the AFM probe. Using cilia from frog esophagus, we measured forces of approximately 0.21 nN per cilium during the effective stroke. This value, together with the known internal structure of these cilia, leads to the conclusion that most dynein arms along the length of the axoneme contribute to the effective stroke of these cilia.

  13. Analysis of the tractive force pattern on a knot by force measurement during laparoscopic knot tying.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Kenta; Yoshida, Kenji; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Yoshimoto, Syunsuke; Oshiro, Osamu; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2017-07-19

    Quantifying surgical skills assists novice surgeons when learning operative techniques. We measured the interaction force at a ligation point and clarified the features of the force pattern among surgeons with different skill levels during laparoscopic knot tying. Forty-four surgeons were divided into three groups based on experience: 13 novice (0-5 years), 16 intermediate (6-15 years), and 15 expert (16-30 years). To assess the tractive force direction and volume during knot tying, we used a sensor that measures six force-torque values (x-axis: Fx, y-axis: Fy, z-axis: Fz, and xy-axis: Fxy) attached to a slit Penrose drain. All participants completed one double knot and five single knot sequences. We recorded completion time, force volume (FV), maximum force (MF), time over 1.5 N, duration of non-zero force, and percentage time when vertical force exceeded horizontal force (PTz). There was a significant difference between groups for completion time (p = 0.007); FV (total: p = 0.002; Fx: p = 0.004, Fy: p = 0.007, Fxy: p = 0.004, Fz: p < 0.001, Fxy/Fz: p = 0.003), MF (total: p = 0.004; Fx: p = 0.015, Fy: p = 0.035, Fxy: p = 0.009, Fz: p = 0.001, Fxy/Fz: p = 0.041); time over 1.5 N (p = 0.002); duration of non-zero force (p = 0.029); and PTz (p < 0.001). PTz showed the only significant difference comparing intermediates with experts (intermediates: 13.7 ± 9.0, experts: 4.9 ± 3.2; p < 0.001). We clarified the characteristics of the force pattern at the ligation point during suturing by surgeons with three levels of experience using a force measurement system. We revealed that both force volume and force direction differed depending on surgeons' skill level during knot tying. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Application of evanescent wave optics to the determination of absolute distance in surface force measurements using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Huntington, S T; Hartley, P G; Katsifolis, J

    2003-04-01

    A combined scanning near field optical/atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to obtain surface force measurements between a near field sensing tip and a tapered optical fibre surface, whilst simultaneously detecting the intensity of the evanescent field emanating from the fibre. The tapered optical fibre acts as a compliant sample to demonstrate the possible use of the near field intensity measurement system in determining 'real' surface separations from normal AFM surface force measurements at sub-nanometer resolution between deformable surfaces.

  15. Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing: Calculations and Measurements from the Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Hignett, P.; Stowe, L. L.; Livingston, J. M.; Kinne, S.; Wong, J.; Chan, K. Roland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Radiative forcing is defined as the change in the net (downwelling minus upwelling) radiative flux at a given level in the atmosphere. This net flux is the radiative power density available to drive climatic processes in the earth-atmosphere system below that level. Recent research shows that radiative forcing by aerosol particles is a major source of uncertainty in climate predictions. To reduce those uncertainties, TARFOX was designed to determine direct (cloud-free) radiative forcing by the aerosols in one of the world's major industrial pollution plumes--that flowing from the east coast of the US over the Atlantic Ocean. TARFOX measured a variety of aerosol radiative effects (including direct forcing) while simultaneously measuring the chemical, physical, and optical properties of the aerosol particles causing those effects. The resulting data sets permit a wide variety of tests of the consistency, or closure, among the measurements and the models that link them. Because climate predictions use the same or similar model components, closure tests help to assess and reduce prediction uncertainties. In this work we use the TARFOX-determined aerosol, gas, and surface properties to compute radiative forcing for a variety of aerosol episodes, with inadvisable optical depths ranging from 0.07 to 0.6. We calculate forcing by several techniques with varying degrees of sophistication, in part to test the range of applicability of simplified techniques--which are often the only ones feasible in climate predictions by general circulation models (GCMs). We then compare computed forcing to that determined from: (1) Upwelling and downwelling fluxes (0.3-0.7 mm and 0.7-3.0 mm) measured by radiometers on the UK MRF C-130. and (2) Daily average cloud-free absorbed solar and emitted thermal radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere derived from the AVHRR radiometer on the NOAA- 14 satellite. The calculations and measurements all yield aerosol direct radiative forcing in the

  16. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  17. Microsystems for cellular force measurement: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayne Zheng, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xin

    2011-05-01

    Microsystems are providing key advances in studying single cell mechanical behavior. The mechanical interaction of cells with their extracellular matrix is fundamentally important for cell migration, division, phagocytosis and aptoptosis. This review reports the development of microsystems on studying cell forces. Microsystems provide advantages of studying single cells since the scale of cells is on the micron level. The components of microsystems provide culture, loading, guiding, trapping and on chip analysis of cellular mechanical forces. This paper gives overviews on how MEMS are advancing in the field of cell biomechno sensory systems. It presents different materials, and mode of studying cell mechanics. Finally, we comment on the future directions and challenges on the state of art techniques.

  18. An Operational Utility Assessment: Measuring the Effectiveness of the Joint Concept Technology Demonstration (JCTD), Joint Forces Protection Advance Security System (JFPASS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    systems can be used in other perimeter security systems. For example, the SC3000 utilizes an RFID tag placed on authorized vehicles (2007). Rather...grant access. These systems can even employ RFID tags that operate without batteries. Such passive systems reflect the RF signal back to the reader...UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicles UGS Unattended Ground Sensors UGV Unmanned Ground Vehicles USAFE United States Air Forces Europe

  19. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  20. Global estimate of aerosol direct radiative forcing from satellite measurements.

    PubMed

    Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Haywood, Jim; Reddy, M Shekar

    2005-12-22

    Atmospheric aerosols cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. Additional anthropogenic aerosols released into the atmosphere thus exert a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. The degree of present-day aerosol forcing is estimated from global models that incorporate a representation of the aerosol cycles. Although the models are compared and validated against observations, these estimates remain uncertain. Previous satellite measurements of the direct effect of aerosols contained limited information about aerosol type, and were confined to oceans only. Here we use state-of-the-art satellite-based measurements of aerosols and surface wind speed to estimate the clear-sky direct radiative forcing for 2002, incorporating measurements over land and ocean. We use a Monte Carlo approach to account for uncertainties in aerosol measurements and in the algorithm used. Probability density functions obtained for the direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere give a clear-sky, global, annual average of -1.9 W m(-2) with standard deviation, +/- 0.3 W m(-2). These results suggest that present-day direct radiative forcing is stronger than present model estimates, implying future atmospheric warming greater than is presently predicted, as aerosol emissions continue to decline.

  1. An analysis system for blade forced response

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H.W.D.; Kielb, R.E. )

    1993-10-01

    A frequent cause of turbomachinery blade failure is excessive resonant response. The most common excitation source is the nonuniform flow field generated by inlet distortion, wakes and/or pressure disturbances from adjacent blade rows. The standard method for dealing with this problem is to avoid resonant conditions using a Campbell diagram. Unfortunately, it is impossible to avoid all resonant conditions. Therefore, judgments based on past experience are used to determine the acceptability of the blade design. A new analysis system has been developed to predict blade forced response. The system provides a design tool, over and above the standard Campbell diagram approach, for predicting potential forced response problems. The incoming excitation sources are modeled using a semi-empirical rotor wake/vortex model for wake excitation, measured data for inlet distortion, and a quasi-three-dimensional Euler code for pressure disturbances. Using these aerodynamic stimuli, and the blade's natural frequencies and mode shapes from a finite element model, the unsteady aerodynamic modal forces and the aerodynamic damping are calculated. A modal response solution is then performed. This paper provides a basic description of the system, which includes: (1) models for the wake excitation, inlet distortion, and pressure disturbance; (2) a kernel function solution technique for unsteady aerodynamics; and (3) a modal aeroelastic solution using strip theory. Also, results of the two applications are presented.

  2. Phoretic Force Measurement for Microparticles Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. J.; Zheng, R.

    1999-01-01

    This theoretical and experimental investigation of the collisional interactions between gas molecules and solid and liquid surfaces of microparticles involves fundamental studies of the transfer of energy, mass and momentum between gas molecules and surfaces. The numerous applications include particle deposition on semiconductor surfaces and on surfaces in combustion processes, containerless processing, the production of nanophase materials, pigments and ceramic precursors, and pollution abatement technologies such as desulfurization of gaseous effluents from combustion processes. Of particular emphasis are the forces exerted on microparticles present in a nonuniform gas, that is, in gaseous surroundings involving temperature and concentration gradients. These so-called phoretic forces become the dominant forces when the gravitational force is diminished, and they are strongly dependent on the momentum transfer between gas molecules and the surface. The momentum transfer, in turn, depends on the gas and particle properties and the mean free path and kinetic energy of the gas molecules. The experimental program involves the particle levitation system shown. A micrometer size particle is held between two heat exchangers enclosed in a vacuum chamber by means of ac and dc electric fields. The ac field keeps the particle centered on the vertical axis of the chamber, and the dc field balances the gravitational force and the thermophoretic force. Some measurements of the thermophoretic force are presented in this paper.

  3. Time-Localization of Forced Oscillations in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.; Pierre, John W.

    2015-07-26

    In power systems forced oscillations occur, and identification of these oscillations is important for the proper operation of the system. Two of the parameters of interest in analyzing and addressing forced oscillations are the starting and ending points. To obtain estimates of these parameters, this paper proposes a time-localization algorithm based on the geometric analysis of the sample cross-correlation between the measured data and a complex sinusoid at the frequency of the forced oscillation. Results from simulated and measured synchrophasor data demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately estimate the starting and ending points of forced oscillations.

  4. Aquifer-System Compaction and Land Subsidence: Measurements, Analyses, and Simulations-the Holly Site, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Galloway, Devin L.

    2000-01-01

    Land subsidence resulting from ground-water-level declines has long been recognized as a problem in Antelope Valley, California. At Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), ground-water extractions have caused more than 150 feet of water-level decline, resulting in nearly 4 feet of subsidence. Differential land subsidence has caused sinklike depressions and earth fissures and has accelerated erosion of the playa lakebed surface of Rogers Lake at EAFB, adversely affecting the runways on the lakebed which are used for landing aircraft such as the space shuttles. Since 1990, about 0.4 foot of aquifer-system compaction has been measured at a deep (840 feet) borehole extensometer (Holly site) at EAFB. More than 7 years of paired ground-water-level and aquifer-system compaction measurements made at the Holly site were analyzed for this study. Annually, seasonal water-level fluctuations correspond to steplike variations in aquifer-system compaction; summer water-level drawdowns are associated with larger rates of compaction, and winter water-level recoveries are associated with smaller rates of compaction. The absence of aquifer-system expansion during recovery is consistent with the delayed drainage and resultant delayed, or residual, compaction of thick aquitards. A numerical one-dimensional MODFLOW model of aquitard drainage was used to refine estimates of aquifer-system hydraulic parameters that control compaction and to predict potential future compaction at the Holly site. The analyses and simulations of aquifer-system compaction are based on established theories of aquitard drainage. Historical ground-water-level and land-subsidence data collected near the Holly site were used to constrain simulations of aquifer-system compaction and land subsidence at the site for the period 1908?90, and ground-water-level and aquifer- system compaction measurements collected at the Holly site were used to constrain the model for the period 1990?97. Model results indicate that two thick

  5. Measuring molecular weight by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheiko, Sergei S; da Silva, Marcelo; Shirvaniants, David; LaRue, Isaac; Prokhorova, Svetlana; Moeller, Martin; Beers, Kathryn; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2003-06-04

    Absolute-molecular-weight distribution of cylindrical brush molecules were determined using a combination of the Langmuir Blodget (LB) technique and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The LB technique gives mass density of a monolayer, i.e., mass per unit area, whereas visualization of individual molecules by AFM enables accurate measurements of the molecular density, i.e., number of molecules per unit area. From the ratio of the mass density to the molecular density, one can determine the absolute value for the number average molecular weight. Assuming that the structure of brush molecules is uniform along the backbone, the length distribution should be virtually identical to the molecular weight distribution. Although we used only brush molecules for demonstration purpose, this approach can be applied for a large variety of molecular and colloidal species that can be visualized by a microscopic technique.

  6. A Simple Apparatus for Electrostatic Force Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the construction of an apparatus that demonstrates that electrostatic forces can be large and also gives some idea of dependence of electrostatic forces between charged parallel discs on potential differences and separation. (CS)

  7. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.

    1999-10-14

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a nonnegligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analog of Earnshaw's theorem, in which at the field-cooling position the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffnesses, independent of angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  8. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-06-01

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a non-negligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analogue of Earnshaw's theorem, in which the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffness at the field-cooling position, independent of the angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  9. DropBot: An open-source digital microfluidic control system with precise control of electrostatic driving force and instantaneous drop velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fobel, Ryan; Fobel, Christian; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2013-05-13

    We introduce DropBot: an open-source instrument for digital microfluidics (http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot). DropBot features two key functionalities for digital microfluidics: (1) real-time monitoring of instantaneous drop velocity (which we propose is a proxy for resistive forces), and (2) application of constant electrostatic driving forces through compensation for amplifier-loading and device capacitance. We anticipate that this system will enhance insight into failure modes and lead to new strategies for improved device reliability, and will be useful for the growing number of users who are adopting digital microfluidics for automated, miniaturized laboratory operation.

  10. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  11. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  12. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  13. Multiplexed force measurements on live cells with holographic optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Mejean, Cecile O.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Millman, Eleanor A.; Forscher, Paul; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe open-loop and closed-loop multiplexed force measurements using holographic optical tweezers. We quantify the performance of our novel video-based control system in a driven suspension of colloidal particles. We demonstrate our system's abilities with the measurement of the mechanical coupling between Aplysia bag cell growth cones and beads functionalized with the neuronal cell adhesion molecule, apCAM. We show that cells form linkages which couple beads to the underlying cytoskeleton. These linkages are intermittent, stochastic and heterogeneous across beads distributed near the leading edge of a single growth cone. PMID:19365444

  14. Prototypes of Cognitive Measures for Air Force Officers: Test Development and Item Banking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    AFHRL-TP-89-737 3, COPY AIR FORCE PROTOTYPES OF COGNITIVE MEASURES FOR AIR FORCE OFFICERS: TEST DEVELOPMENT AND ITEM BANKING DTIC f1 ELECTF H Frances...Jacobina Skinner MANPOWER AND PERSONNEL DIVISION R Brooks Air Force Base, Texas 78235-5601 E S O May 1990U Final Technical Paper for Period September 1987...November 1989 R C Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. E S LABORATORY AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND BROOKS AIR FORCE BASE, TEXAS

  15. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  16. Precision measurement of the Casimir force between metallic surfaces and the demonstration of the lateral Casimir force and temperature correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng

    The Casimir effect has recently become important because of its central role in modern physics. Despite its exclusively quantum nature, associated with the zero-point energy of a quantized field, the Casimir force between neutral metallic surfaces is a macroscopic phenomenon. Because the Casimir force increases rapidly with the distance between surfaces and strongly depends on the shape of the boundary, it plays a very important role in micro-electromechanical systems. The precision measurement of the Casimir force has also been advanced as a new powerful test for hypothetical long-range interactions, including corrections to the Newtonian gravitational law at small distances predicted by the unified gauge theories, supersymmetry, supergravity and string theory. This work develops new techniques to measure the Casimir force between a Au coated sphere and plate under different boundary conditions. At the heart of these techniques is the precision force measurement adapted to the Atomic Force Microscope. Calibrations of the necessary parameters have been developed. Here we report an improved precision measurement of the normal Casimir force. The experimental data are compared with a theory that has no adjustable parameters. Combined random and systematic error of order 2.5% of the Casimir force at the closest separation is achieved. We made the first demonstration of the lateral Casimir force between two sinusoidally corrugated surfaces. The obtained results are shown to be in good agreement with a complete theory taking into account the imperfectness of the boundary metal. This demonstration opens new opportunities for the use of the Casimir effect for lateral translation in microelectromechanical systems. We also developed a sensitive differential force measurement technique for measuring the temperature correction. A preliminary experiment investigating the temperature correction to the Casimir force is reported. With further improvement, this may be able to

  17. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  18. Measurement of dynamic bite force during mastication.

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Yamabe, Y; Torisu, T; Baad-Hansen, L; Murata, H; Svensson, P

    2012-05-01

    Efficient mastication of different types and size of food depends on fast integration of sensory information from mechanoreceptors and central control mechanisms of jaw movements and applied bite force. The neural basis underlying mastication has been studied for decades but little progress in understanding the dynamics of bite force has been made mainly due to technical limitations of bite force recorders. The aims of this study were to develop a new intraoral bite force recorder which would allow the study of natural mastication without an increase in the occlusal vertical dimension and subsequently to analyze the relation between electromyographic (EMG) activity of jaw-closing muscles, jaw movements and bite force during mastication of five different types of food. Customized force recorders based on strain gauge sensors were fitted to the upper and lower molar teeth on the preferred chewing side in fourteen healthy and dentate subjects (21-39 years), and recordings were carried out during voluntary mastication of five different kinds of food. Intraoral force recordings were successively obtained from all subjects. anova showed that impulse of bite force as well as integrated EMG was significantly influenced by food (P<0·05), while time-related parameters were significantly affected by chewing cycles (P<0·001). This study demonstrates that intraoral force recordings are feasible and can provide new information on the dynamics of human mastication with direct implications for oral rehabilitation. We also propose that the control of bite force during mastication is achieved by anticipatory adjustment and encoding of bolus characteristics.

  19. Measuring the Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreman, W.; Huysentruyt, R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a fast and simple method for measuring the magnetic force acting on a current-carrying conductor using a digital balance. Discusses the influence of current intensity and wire length on the magnetic force on the conductor. (JRH)

  20. Dynamometer for measuring machining forces in two perpendicular directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    Published report discusses development of two-component force dynamometer which is used for dynamic measurement of machining forces in cutting and thrust directions. Resulting data suggest that faster metal-cutting machines may be developed that have reduced vibrations.

  1. Force feedback systems in undersea manipulator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesch, A. J.; Bertsche, W. R.; Winget, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The manual control behavior of the operator with various levels of manipulator system complexity was studied in order to determine the relationships among control system dynamics, certain base engineering variables, controller designs and system performance. Based on the data obtained, a set of general transfer functions were prepared to provide a mathematical model of the various levels of potential force feedback fidelity as a function of force backlash present in alternate engineering designs.

  2. Measuring the efficacy of flunixin meglumine and meloxicam for lame sows using a GAITFour pressure mat and an embedded microcomputer-based force plate system.

    PubMed

    Pairis-Garcia, M D; Johnson, A K; Abell, C A; Coetzee, J F; Karriker, L A; Millman, S T; Stalder, K J

    2015-05-01

    Pain associated with lameness on farm is a negative affective state and has a detrimental impact on individual farm animal welfare. Animal pain can be managed utilizing husbandry tools and through pharmacological approaches. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including meloxicam and flunixin meglumine are compounds used in many species for pain management because they are easy to administer, long lasting, and cost-effective. Assessing an animal's biomechanical parameters using such tools as the embedded microcomputer-based force plate system and GAITFour pressure mat gait analysis walkway system provides an objective, sensitive, and precise means to detect animals in lame states. The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy of meloxicam and flunixin meglumine for pain mitigation in lame sows using the embedded microcomputer-based force plate system and GAITFour pressure mat gait analysis walkway system. Lameness was induced in 24 mature mixed-parity sows using a chemical synovitis model and compared 3 treatments: meloxicam (1.0 mg/kg per os), flunixin meglumine (2.2 mg/kg intramuscular) and sterile saline (intramuscular). Weight distribution (kg) for each foot was collected twice per second for a total of 5 min for each time point using the embedded microcomputer-based force plate system. Stride time, stride length, maximum pressure, activated sensors, and stance time were collected using 3 quality walks (readings) for each time point using the GAITFour pressure mat gait analysis walkway system. Sows administered flunixin meglumine or meloxicam tolerated more weight on their lame leg compared with saline sows (P < 0.005). Sows administered flunixin meglumine or meloxicam had smaller differences in stance time, maximum pressure, and activated sensors between the sound and lame legs compared with saline-treated sows between 37 and 60 h after lameness induction (P < 0.03). In conclusion, flunixin meglumine and meloxicam administration mitigated pain

  3. Heart cell contractions measured using a micromachined polysilicon force transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gisela; Pister, Kristofer S. J.; Roos, Kenneth P.

    1995-09-01

    A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) force transducer, with a volume less than one cubic millimeter, is being developed to measure forces generated by living, isolated cardiac muscle cells in order to resolve the complex mechanisms of muscle contraction. The force transducer consists of two movable clamps facing each other. Each clamp contains two vertical, parallel hinged polysilicon plates attached to a moveable shuttle, and the entire structure is suspended 2 micrometers above the substrate via support beams attached to the substrate at one end. Each end of a living rat heart cell is glued between a pair of vertical plates. Calcium is then introduced into the cell's nutrient bath and stimulates the cell to contract. Upon contraction the support beams bend, and the amount of deflection is translated to force via the known spring constant in the beams. Typcially the 70 micrometers long central portion of a 120 micrometers long cell will contract approximately 6-7 micrometers in full activating solution, resulting in forces up to 16 (mu) N. The average value obtained for Fmax per cross-sectional area was 21.8mN/mm2 which is comparable to the value found in other laboratories using standard transducer technology.

  4. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-07

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  5. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-02

    In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. Finally, the comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  6. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; ...

    2016-09-02

    In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements aremore » sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. Finally, the comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.« less

  7. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  8. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  9. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  10. 'System-Risk' Flood Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Kai; Ridder, Nina; Tavares da Costa, Ricardo; Diederen, Dirk; Viglione, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Current scientific methods and engineering practice in flood risk assessment do not consider the full complexity of flood risk systems. Fundamental spatio-temporal dependencies, interactions and feedbacks need to be addressed to comprehensively quantify the effects of measures at various levels, ranging from local technical to high-level policy options. As each flood is unique, each event offers an unparalleled opportunity to collect data and to gain insights into system's behavior under extreme conditions potentially revealing exceptional circumstances, unexpected failures and cascading effects, and thus a chance to learn and to improve methods and models. To make use of this the Marie-Skłodowska-Curie European Training Network 'System-Risk' (www.system-risk.eu) establishes a Flood Task Force (FTF) that aims to learn about successful practical approaches, but also potential pitfalls and failures in the management of real flood events. The FTF consists of an interdisciplinary group of researchers who will apply in situ their latest methods and knowledge of e.g. how the event developed, how the risk management responded, and what the consequences were. This multi-layered perspective is intended to deepen the understanding of the complexity of flood risk systems as for instance in terms of interactions between hazard, the natural and the built environment, societal institutions and coping capacities. This contribution gives an overview of the conceptual approach to the System-Risk FTF.

  11. Direct measurements of drag forces in C. elegans crawling locomotion.

    PubMed

    Rabets, Yegor; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Ryu, William S

    2014-10-21

    With a simple and versatile microcantilever-based force measurement technique, we have probed the drag forces involved in Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion. As a worm crawls on an agar surface, we found that substrate viscoelasticity introduces nonlinearities in the force-velocity relationships, yielding nonconstant drag coefficients that are not captured by original resistive force theory. A major contributing factor to these nonlinearities is the formation of a shallow groove on the agar surface. We measured both the adhesion forces that cause the worm's body to settle into the agar and the resulting dynamics of groove formation. Furthermore, we quantified the locomotive forces produced by C. elegans undulatory motions on a wet viscoelastic agar surface. We show that an extension of resistive force theory is able to use the dynamics of a nematode's body shape along with the measured drag coefficients to predict the forces generated by a crawling nematode.

  12. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  13. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  14. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Joseph L; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-06-03

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  15. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  16. Environmental Assessment for Kirtland Air Force Base Arsenic Compliance System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    have migrated from the area (Between Nov. 1-Feb. 28). Implementation of these burrowing owl avoidance measures would prevent any long-term impacts to...FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE ARSENIC COMPLIANCE SYSTEM September 2003 Prepared for 377th Air Base Wing Air...Kirtland Air Force Base Arsenic Compliance System 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  17. Subminiature transducers for measuring forces and deformation of heart muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Osher, J. V.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Duran, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    Two subminiature transducers, one measuring muscle forces and one measuring muscle displacement, can be inserted into heart muscle without interfering with it. Probe, approximately 1 mm (0.04 in), causes no damage to heart muscle. Probe can be rotated to different positions to measure muscle forces from various directions.

  18. Roughness in Surface Force Measurements: Extension of DLVO Theory To Describe the Forces between Hafnia Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Eom, Namsoon; Parsons, Drew F; Craig, Vincent S J

    2017-07-06

    The interaction between colloidal particles is commonly viewed through the lens of DLVO theory, whereby the interaction is described as the sum of the electrostatic and dispersion forces. For similar materials acting across a medium at pH values remote from the isoelectric point the theory typically involves an electrostatic repulsion that is overcome by dispersion forces at very small separations. However, the dominance of the dispersion forces at short separations is generally not seen in force measurements, with the exception of the interaction between mica surfaces. The discrepancy for silica surfaces has been attributed to hydration forces, but this does not explain the situation for titania surfaces where the dispersion forces are very much larger. Here, the interaction forces between very smooth hafnia surfaces have been measured using the colloid probe technique and the forces evaluated within the DLVO framework, including both hydration forces and the influence of roughness. The measured forces across a wide range of pH at different salt concentrations are well described with a single parameter for the surface roughness. These findings show that even small degrees of surface roughness significantly alter the form of the interaction force and therefore indicate that surface roughness needs to be included in the evaluation of surface forces between all surfaces that are not ideally smooth.

  19. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  20. Development of a Force Measurement Device for Lower-Body Muscular Strength Measuring of Skaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Ki; Lee, Jeong Tae

    This paper presents a force measurement system that can measure a lower-body muscular strength of skaters. The precise measurement and analysis of the left and right lower-body strength of skaters is necessary, because a left/right lower-body strength balance is helpful to improve the athletes' performance and to protect them from injury. The system is constructed with a skate sliding board, a couple of sensor-units with load cell, indicator and control box, guard, force pad, and support bracket. The developed force measurement system is calibrated by the calibration setup, and the uncertainty of the force sensing unit on the left is within 0.087% and the uncertainty of the force sensing unit on the right is within 0.109%. In order to check the feasibility of the developed measurement device, a kinematic analysis is conducted with skater. As a result, the subject shows the deviation of left and right of 12.1 N with respect to average strength and 39.1 N with respect to the maximum strength. This evaluation results are reliable enough to make it possible to measure a lower-body muscular strength of skaters. The use of this measurement system will be expected to correct the posture of skaters and record the sports dynamics data for each athlete. It is believed that through the development of this equipment, skaters in elementary, middle, high schools, colleges, and the professional level have the systematic training to compete with world-class skaters.

  1. Development of Field Excavator with Embedded Force Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K.; Creager, C.; Izadnegahdar, A.; Bauman, S.; Gallo, C.; Abel, P.

    2012-01-01

    A semi-intelligent excavation mechanism was developed for use with the NASA-built Centaur 2 rover prototype. The excavator features a continuously rotatable large bucket supported between two parallel arms, both of which share a single pivot axis near the excavator base attached to the rover. The excavator is designed to simulate the collection of regolith, such as on the Moon, and to dump the collected soil into a hopper up to one meter tall for processing to extract oxygen. Because the vehicle can be autonomous and the terrain is generally unknown, there is risk of damaging equipment or using excessive power when attempting to extract soil from dense or rocky terrain. To minimize these risks, it is critical for the rover to sense the digging forces and adjust accordingly. It is also important to understand the digging capabilities and limitations of the excavator. This paper discusses the implementation of multiple strain gages as an embedded force measurement system in the excavator's arms. These strain gages can accurately measure and resolve multi-axial forces on the excavator. In order to validate these sensors and characterize the load capabilities, a series of controlled excavation tests were performed at Glenn Research Center with the excavator at various depths and cut angles while supported by a six axis load cell. The results of these tests are both compared to a force estimation model and used for calibration of the embedded strain gages. In addition, excavation forces generated using two different types of bucket edge (straight vs. with teeth) were compared.

  2. Novel Method of Measuring Cantilever Deflection during an AFM Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hlady, V.; Pierce, M.; Pungor, A.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of a reflection interference contrast microscope (RICM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to monitor the cantilever–surface separation distance during force measurements using the streptavidin–biotin recognition pairs. The RICM showed that the cantilever loses contact with the surface before the final rupture of the adhesive bonds is measured by the AFM detection system. This finding suggests that the immobilization of biotin by physisorbed albumin and subsequent binding of streptavidin might have created a cross-linked protein network whose cohesion is tested by the AFM cantilever with the immobilized biotin ligands. PMID:25132721

  3. AFM force measurement on nano scale Polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guoyu; Zahra Fakhraai Team

    2014-03-01

    Large surface/volume ratio can significantly change the mechanical properties of polymer film with nanometer thickness. Intuitively, the average response contains a larger component of the liquid like layer on the surface compared with the bulk, which should lead to reduced elastic constant. But the ultra small length scale makes it challenging to directly measure the viscoelastic response of nanostructured polymers. When the film thickness is decreased, some measurement supports that the elastic moduli of amorphous polymer films also decreases , while others show the rubbery modulus stiffens. Though the indentation on millimeter and micrometer scale has become common, not much research has investigated the yield stress and strain on nano scale indentation, which contains much larger percentage and effect from the free surface layer. In this study, we use regular AFM tip to indent onto the surface of polystyrene nanodroplets, under various loading speeds to study relaxation times and mechanical response in these systems. . Thanks to the support from NBIC and NCF in U Penn.

  4. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  5. Force plate for measuring small animal forces by digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, M. Pilar; Bea, José Antonio; Andrés, Nieves; Osta, Rosario; Doblaré, Manuel

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents a force plate specially designed for measuring ground reaction forces in small animals. Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) is used to measure the plate deformation produced by the animal. Elasticity theory is used to obtain force magnitude and application position from the vertical displacement field measured with DSPI. The force plate has been tested with static weights of 5g and 10g at various locations on the plate. Some experiments with 20g body weight transgenic mice are also reported.

  6. Effect of gold oxide in measurements of colloidal force.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico F; Morfa, Anthony J; Grieser, Franz; Chan, Derek Y C; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2011-05-17

    Atomic force microscopy, contact-angle, and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were employed to investigate the presence and properties of gold oxide on the surface of gold metal. It was found that, in agreement with available literature, unoxidized gold surfaces were hydrophobic, whereas oxidation rendered the surface highly hydrophilic. The oxide could be removed with ethanol or base but appeared to be stable over long periods in water or salt solutions between pH 3 and 7. After oxidation, the oxide layer thickness, determined using ellipsometry, was consistent with an approximate monolayer of Au-O bonds at the gold surface. The presence of gold oxide was found to alter significantly the electrical double-layer characteristics of the gold surface below pH 6 and may explain the apparent inconsistencies in observed force behavior where gold is employed as well as aiding in design of future microfluidic systems which incorporate gold as a coating.

  7. Force dependency of biochemical reactions measured by single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Ionel; Kosuri, Pallav; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for using force-clamp spectroscopy to precisely quantify the effect of force on biochemical reactions. A calibrated force is used to control the exposure of reactive sites in a single polyprotein substrate composed of repeated domains. The use of polyproteins allows the identification of successful single-molecule recordings from unambiguous mechanical unfolding fingerprints. Biochemical reactions are then measured directly by detecting the length changes of the substrate held at a constant force. We present the layout of a force-clamp spectrometer along with protocols to design and conduct experiments. These experiments measure reaction kinetics as a function of applied force. We show sample data of the force dependency of two different reactions, protein unfolding and disulfide reduction. These data, which can be acquired in just a few days, reveal mechanistic details of the reactions that currently cannot be resolved by any other technique. PMID:23744288

  8. MEMS piezoresistive cantilever for the direct measurement of cardiomyocyte contractile force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Kenei; Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Hirayama Shoji, Kayoko; Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Shimoyama, Isao

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on a method to directly measure the contractile forces of cardiomyocytes using MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems)-based force sensors. The fabricated sensor chip consists of piezoresistive cantilevers that can measure contractile forces with high frequency (several tens of kHz) and high sensing resolution (less than 0.1 nN). Moreover, the proposed method does not require a complex observation system or image processing, which are necessary in conventional optical-based methods. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and evaluation of the proposed device and demonstrates the direct measurements of contractile forces of cardiomyocytes using the fabricated device.

  9. Medical Services: Armed Forces Medical Examiner System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Armed Forces Medical Examiner system Procedural Guide. 3–4. Forensic dental identification The Forensic Dentistry Section of the Department of Oral...Pathology at AFIP and special consultants in forensic dentistry to the surgeons general of the Armed Forces will serve as the principal advisers to the...a. Courses and programs. (1) Forensic dentistry /odontology. (2) Aerospace pathology. (3) Basic forensic pathology. (4) Advanced forensic pathology

  10. The Adhesive System and Anisotropic Shear Force of Guizhou Gastromyzontidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Wang, Jinrong; Ji, Chen

    2016-11-01

    The Guizhou gastromyzontidae (Beaufortia kweichowensis) can adhere to slippery and fouled surfaces in torrential streams. A unique adhesive system utilized by the fish was observed by microscope and CLSM as an attachment disc sealed by a round belt of micro bubbles. The system is effective in wet or underwater environments and can resist a normal pulling force up to 1000 times the fish’s weight. Moreover, a mechanism for passive anisotropic shear force was observed. The shear forces of the fish under different conditions were measured, showing that passive shear force plays an important role in wet environments. The adhesive system of the fish was compared with other biological adhesion principles, from which we obtained potential values for the system that refer to the unique micro sealing and enhanced adhesion in a wet environment.

  11. The Adhesive System and Anisotropic Shear Force of Guizhou Gastromyzontidae

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Wang, Jinrong; Ji, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The Guizhou gastromyzontidae (Beaufortia kweichowensis) can adhere to slippery and fouled surfaces in torrential streams. A unique adhesive system utilized by the fish was observed by microscope and CLSM as an attachment disc sealed by a round belt of micro bubbles. The system is effective in wet or underwater environments and can resist a normal pulling force up to 1000 times the fish’s weight. Moreover, a mechanism for passive anisotropic shear force was observed. The shear forces of the fish under different conditions were measured, showing that passive shear force plays an important role in wet environments. The adhesive system of the fish was compared with other biological adhesion principles, from which we obtained potential values for the system that refer to the unique micro sealing and enhanced adhesion in a wet environment. PMID:27849018

  12. Measurement of dynamic and static radiation force on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shigao; Silva, Glauber T; Kinnick, Randall R; Greenleaf, James F; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2005-05-01

    Dynamic radiation force from ultrasound has found increasing applications in elasticity imaging methods such as vibro-acoustography. Radiation force that has both static and dynamic components can be produced by interfering two ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies. This paper presents a method to measure both static and dynamic components of the radiation force on a sphere suspended by thin threads in water. Due to ultrasound radiation force, the sphere deflects to an equilibrant position and vibrates around it. The static radiation force is estimated from the deflection of the sphere. The dynamic radiation force is estimated from the calculated radiation impedance of the sphere and its vibration speed measured by a laser vibrometer. Experimental results on spheres of different size, vibrated at various frequencies, confirm the theoretical prediction that the dynamic and static radiation force on a sphere have approximately equal magnitudes [G. T. Silva, Phys. Rev. E 71, 056617 (2005)].

  13. Measurements of particle-wall interaction forces using simultaneous position and force detection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Bui, Ann A. M.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Carberry, David M.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-09-01

    Particle-wall interactions are important in biology, micromachining, coagulation studies, and many other areas of science. As a contactless tool, optical tweezers are ideal for measuring these kind of interactions. Here we will present a new method for calculating the non-optical forces acting on a trapped particle using simultaneous position and force detection. Analysis of the particle's Brownian motion when trapped gives a measure of all the forces experienced by the particle. In contrast, measuring only the light's momentum change directly gives the solely optical force. This is achieved measuring the changes in the scattered light. The difference between the forces recorded by the two techniques reveals the external forces acting on the trapped particle. Therefore, by trapping the particle close to a wall, one can study the particle-wall interaction force in details. The simulation were done using the optical tweezer toolbox [1] to find the optical force acting on a particle. The net force was calculated from a Brownian motion's statistics of a trapped particle in the presence of the exponential external force. By using the proposed method, we were able to successfully reconstruct the external force. The experiment was done on a trapped spherical PMMA particle (d=2.2um) close to the 3D-printed wall. For the particle-wall distance 0.7um the non-optical force is 100fN . The experiment and simulation results confirm the efficiency of the proposed method for an external force measurements. [1] Nieminen et al., J. Opt. A 9, S196-S203 (2007).

  14. Force Measurement on the GLAST Delta II Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Scott; Kaufman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the interface force measurement at spacecraft separation of GLAST Delta II. The contents include: 1) Flight Force Measurement (FFM) Background; 2) Team Members; 3) GLAST Mission Overview; 4) Methodology Development; 5) Ground Test Validation; 6) Flight Data; 7) Coupled Loads Simulation (VCLA & Reconstruction); 8) Basedrive Simulation; 9) Findings; and 10) Summary and Conclusions.

  15. Force measurements with the atomic force microscope: Technique, interpretation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Cappella, Brunero; Kappl, Michael

    2005-10-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is not only a tool to image the topography of solid surfaces at high resolution. It can also be used to measure force-versus-distance curves. Such curves, briefly called force curves, provide valuable information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness, Hamaker constant, adhesion and surface charge densities. For this reason the measurement of force curves has become essential in different fields of research such as surface science, materials engineering, and biology. Another application is the analysis of surface forces per se. Some of the most fundamental questions in colloid and surface science can be addressed directly with the AFM: What are the interactions between particles in a liquid? How can a dispersion be stabilized? How do surfaces in general and particles in particular adhere to each other? Particles and surfaces interactions have major implications for friction and lubrication. Force measurements on single molecules involving the rupture of single chemical bonds and the stretching of polymer chains have almost become routine. The structure and properties of confined liquids can be addressed since force measurements provide information on the energy of a confined liquid film. After the review of Cappella [B. Cappella, G. Dietler, Surf. Sci. Rep. 34 (1999) 1-104] 6 years of intense development have occurred. In 1999, the AFM was used only by experts to do force measurements. Now, force curves are used by many AFM researchers to characterize materials and single molecules. The technique and our understanding of surface forces has reached a new level of maturity. In this review we describe the technique of AFM force measurements. Important experimental issues such as the determination of the spring constant and of the tip radius are discussed. Current state of the art in analyzing force curves obtained under different conditions is presented. Possibilities, perspectives but also open questions and

  16. Recent Investments by NASA's National Force Measurement Technology Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Commo, Sean A.; Ponder, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    The National Force Measurement Technology Capability (NFMTC) is a nationwide partnership established in 2008 and sponsored by NASA's Aeronautics Evaluation and Test Capabilities (AETC) project to maintain and further develop force measurement capabilities. The NFMTC focuses on force measurement in wind tunnels and provides operational support in addition to conducting balance research. Based on force measurement capability challenges, strategic investments into research tasks are designed to meet the experimental requirements of current and future aerospace research programs and projects. This paper highlights recent and force measurement investments into several areas including recapitalizing the strain-gage balance inventory, developing balance best practices, improving calibration and facility capabilities, and researching potential technologies to advance balance capabilities.

  17. Impact of Thermal Gradients on Wind Tunnel Force Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hereford, James; Parker, Peter A.; Rhew, Ray D.

    1999-01-01

    In a wind tunnel facility, the direct measurement of forces and moments induced on the model are performed by a force measurement balance. The measurement balance is a precision-machined device that has strain gages at strategic locations to measure the strain (i.e., deformations) due to applied forces and moments. The strain gages convert the strain (and hence the applied force) to an electrical voltage that is measured by external meters. Thermal gradients can complicate the process, however. Thermal gradients on the balance cause differential expansion (or contraction) of various parts of the balance that induce a strain that is detected by the strain gages and is indistinguishable from an external applied force. The thermal gradients can result when testing is done at elevated temperatures or at cryogenic temperatures such as at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  18. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, L F; Schreppler, S; Kohler, J; Spethmann, N; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2016-07-15

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  19. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, L. F.; Schreppler, S.; Kohler, J.; Spethmann, N.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  20. Measuring Force-Induced Dissociation Kinetics of Protein Complexes Using Single-Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Manibog, K; Yen, C F; Sivasankar, S

    2017-01-01

    Proteins respond to mechanical force by undergoing conformational changes and altering the kinetics of their interactions. However, the biophysical relationship between mechanical force and the lifetime of protein complexes is not completely understood. In this chapter, we provide a step-by-step tutorial on characterizing the force-dependent regulation of protein interactions using in vitro and in vivo single-molecule force clamp measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM). While we focus on the force-induced dissociation of E-cadherins, a critical cell-cell adhesion protein, the approaches described here can be readily adapted to study other protein complexes. We begin this chapter by providing a brief overview of theoretical models that describe force-dependent kinetics of biomolecular interactions. Next, we present step-by-step methods for measuring the response of single receptor-ligand bonds to tensile force in vitro. Finally, we describe methods for quantifying the mechanical response of single protein complexes on the surface of living cells. We describe general protocols for conducting such measurements, including sample preparation, AFM force clamp measurements, and data analysis. We also highlight critical limitations in current technologies and discuss solutions to these challenges. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Contact force measurements and stress-induced anisotropy in granular materials.

    PubMed

    Majmudar, T S; Behringer, R P

    2005-06-23

    Interparticle forces in granular media form an inhomogeneous distribution of filamentary force chains. Understanding such forces and their spatial correlations, specifically in response to forces at the system boundaries, represents a fundamental goal of granular mechanics. The problem is of relevance to civil engineering, geophysics and physics, being important for the understanding of jamming, shear-induced yielding and mechanical response. Here we report measurements of the normal and tangential grain-scale forces inside a two-dimensional system of photoelastic disks that are subject to pure shear and isotropic compression. Various statistical measures show the underlying differences between these two stress states. These differences appear in the distributions of normal forces (which are more rounded for compression than shear), although not in the distributions of tangential forces (which are exponential in both cases). Sheared systems show anisotropy in the distributions of both the contact network and the contact forces. Anisotropy also occurs in the spatial correlations of forces, which provide a quantitative replacement for the idea of force chains. Sheared systems have long-range correlations in the direction of force chains, whereas isotropically compressed systems have short-range correlations regardless of the direction.

  2. Correct height measurement in noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sadewasser, Sascha; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch

    2003-12-31

    We demonstrate that topography measurements by noncontact atomic force microscopy are subject to residual electrostatic forces. On highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) with a submonolayer coverage of C60, we monitor the step height from C60 to HOPG as a function of dc bias between tip and sample. Because of the different contact potential of C60 and HOPG ( approximately 50 mV), the step height is strongly dependent on the dc bias. The presented results and additional simulations demonstrate clearly that for correct height measurements it is mandatory to use a Kelvin probe force microscopy method with active compensation of electrostatic forces.

  3. A measurable force driven by an excitonic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hakioğlu, T.; Özgün, Ege; Günay, Mehmet

    2014-04-21

    Free energy signatures related to the measurement of an emergent force (≈10{sup −9}N) due to the exciton condensate (EC) in Double Quantum Wells are predicted and experiments are proposed to measure the effects. The EC-force is attractive and reminiscent of the Casimir force between two perfect metallic plates, but also distinctively different from it by its driving mechanism and dependence on the parameters of the condensate. The proposed experiments are based on a recent experimental work on a driven micromechanical oscillator. Conclusive observations of EC in recent experiments also provide a strong promise for the observation of the EC-force.

  4. Measurement of Force-Dependent Release Rates of Cytoskeletal Motors.

    PubMed

    Can, Sinan; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers permit measuring motor-filament rupture forces with piconewton sensitivity. For deeper structural and mechanistic understanding of motors, different structural constraints can be induced by pulling motor proteins at various positions and manipulating the direction of the exerted force. Here, we present an optical-trapping approach to investigate the effect of the magnitude and direction of tension applied to the linker element of cytoskeletal motors on motor-filament interactions. Using this approach, force-dependent microtubule release rates of monomeric kinesins can be directly measured by pulling on kinesin's "neck linker" with a constant force.

  5. Measurement of axial forces via natural frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Samer H.; Reynolds, Don; EnChen, Shen; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents results from testing several suspender ropes of the Delaware Memorial Bridge using vibration measurements and a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) instrument called the Axial Load Monitor (ALM). The testing consisted of measuring the frequencies of suspender ropes and determining their tension levels. Results were compared to theoretical predictions. This paper presents the results of the testing and discusses the problems associated with vibration measurements on actual bridges.

  6. Tibial forces measured in vivo after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Slamin, John E; Colwell, Clifford W

    2006-02-01

    An instrumented tibial prosthesis was developed to measure forces in vivo after total tibial arthroplasty. This prosthesis was implanted in a 67-kg, 80-year-old man. The prosthesis measured forces at the 4 quadrants of the tibial tray. Tibial forces were measured postoperatively during rehabilitation, rising from a chair, standing, walking, and climbing stairs. By the sixth postoperative week, the peak tibial forces during walking averaged 2.2 times body weight (BW). Stair climbing increased from 1.9 times BW on day 6 to 2.5 times BW at 6 weeks. This represents the first direct in vivo measurement of tibial forces, which should lead to refined surgical techniques and enhanced prosthetic designs. Technical design improvements will enhance function, quality of life, and longevity of total knee arthroplasty.

  7. Micromechanical cohesion force measurements to determine cyclopentane hydrate interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Joshi, Sanjeev E; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2012-06-15

    Hydrate aggregation and deposition are critical factors in determining where and when hydrates may plug a deepwater flowline. We present the first direct measurement of structure II (cyclopentane) hydrate cohesive forces in the water, liquid hydrocarbon and gas bulk phases. For fully annealed hydrate particles, gas phase cohesive forces were approximately twice that obtained in a liquid hydrocarbon phase, and approximately six times that obtained in the water phase. Direct measurements show that hydrate cohesion force in a water-continuous bulk may be only the product of solid-solid cohesion. When excess water was present on the hydrate surface, gas phase cohesive forces increased by a factor of three, suggesting the importance of the liquid or quasi-liquid layer (QLL) in determining cohesive force. Hydrate-steel adhesion force measurements show that, when the steel surface is coated with hydrophobic wax, forces decrease up to 96%. As the micromechanical force technique is uniquely capable of measuring hydrate-surface forces with variable contact time, the present work contains significant implications for hydrate applications in flow assurance.

  8. Measurement of friction drag force on discontinuous glass and polymer fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresso, Riccardo; Munoz, David R.

    2000-09-01

    This article describes the development of a piezoelectric force transducer specially designed to measure the fluctuating drag force experienced by a discontinuous micro fiber immersed in a turbulent airflow. The newly designed measurement tool possesses a fundamental frequency of approximately 940 Hz with a resolution of 10-4 N. A correlation for the friction drag coefficient as a function of the Reynolds number was found. This equation is of similar form but with differing slope and intercept to that previously published for continuous fibers. Although the driving frequency of the flow system was underestimated, resulting in limited utility of the instrument to the fine scale forces imposed on micro fibers, the sensor provided a necessary measurement of average drag forces. It may also be a useful tool for measuring small forces with lower frequency excitation than observed among the micro fibers exposed to a turbulent air stream. This study represents a first attempt at measuring dynamic drag forces on discontinuous micro fibers.

  9. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lange, Manfred; van Vörden, Dennis; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip-sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111) √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force-distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle.

  10. High-speed force load in force measurement in liquid using scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zou, Qingze

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an inversion-based iterative feedforward-feedback (II-FF/FB) approach to achieve high-speed force load in force measurement of soft materials in liquid using scanning probe microscope (SPM). SPM force measurement under liquid environment is needed to interrogate a wide range of soft materials, particularly live biological samples. Moreover, when dynamic evolution of the sample occurs during the measurement, and/or measuring the rate-dependent viscoelasticity of the sample, the force measurement also needs to be acquired at high-speed. Precision force load in liquid, however, is challenged by adverse effects including the thermal drift effect, the reduction of the signal to noise ratio, the distributive hydrodynamic force effect, and the hysteresis and vibrational dynamics effects of the piezoelectric actuators (for positioning the probe relative to the sample), particularly during high-speed measurement. Thus, the main contribution of the article is the development of the II-FF/FB approach to tackle these challenges. The proposed method is illustrated through an experimental implementation to the force-curve measurement of a poly (dimethylsiloxane) sample in liquid at high-speed.

  11. Magnetic tweezers: micromanipulation and force measurement at the molecular level.

    PubMed Central

    Gosse, Charlie; Croquette, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Cantilevers and optical tweezers are widely used for micromanipulating cells or biomolecules for measuring their mechanical properties. However, they do not allow easy rotary motion and can sometimes damage the handled material. We present here a system of magnetic tweezers that overcomes those drawbacks while retaining most of the previous dynamometers properties. Electromagnets are coupled to a microscope-based particle tracking system through a digital feedback loop. Magnetic beads are first trapped in a potential well of stiffness approximately 10(-7) N/m. Thus, they can be manipulated in three dimensions at a speed of approximately 10 microm/s and rotated along the optical axis at a frequency of 10 Hz. In addition, our apparatus can work as a dynamometer relying on either usual calibration against the viscous drag or complete calibration using Brownian fluctuations. By stretching a DNA molecule between a magnetic particle and a glass surface, we applied and measured vertical forces ranging from 50 fN to 20 pN. Similarly, nearly horizontal forces up to 5 pN were obtained. From those experiments, we conclude that magnetic tweezers represent a low-cost and biocompatible setup that could become a suitable alternative to the other available micromanipulators. PMID:12023254

  12. Global modes in forced inhomogeneous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiria, Benjamin; Goujon-Durand, Sophie; Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2004-11-01

    We are studing the wake of a cylinder at moderate Reynolds number (Re=150) performing rotary oscillations around the axis. It has been experimentally shown (B. Thiria et al. (APS DFD 2004)) that the far wake always presents the same characteristics, if the forcing frequency is not too close to the natural vortex shedding frequency. Although the vortices are shed at the forcing frequency in the near wake, the system selects a different frequency which is close to the natural one. A complete study of the linear stability in the case of forced wakes, has shown a modification in the nature (magnitude and length) of the absolute instability region. For frequencies bigger than the unforced one, the absolute-convective instability transition presents in synchronised flows, is pushed back as a function of the forcing amplitude downstream of the cylinder, giving a new global mode shape for the second observed wake ( corresponding to the forcing having a stable behaviour). We will show that these different global modes, due to the effect of the forcing, present the scaling laws as a function of the Reynolds number, studied by Wesfreid, Goujon-Durand & Zielinska (1996) or Couairon & Chomaz (1999) in bluff body wakes.

  13. Measurement of Metal Cutting Forces at High Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Princehouse, David W.

    1996-03-01

    Proposed numerically-controlled milling machines will cut aluminum alloys with cutter tip speeds of up to 130 m/s (300 MPH). There are a variety of challenging technical problems to be solved--high power density motors, inverters, cutter/machine dynamics, servo control systems--and compelling reasons to do so. We measured time-varying cutting forces at these tip speeds with a 25.4-cm (10-in) diameter cutter turning at rates up to 167 Hz (10,000 RPM.) We took special care to measure and compensate for the dynamic response of the force transducer (a three-axis quartz-crystal milling dynamometer), extending the useful bandwidth of the measurements well into the mechanical resonances of the dynamometer. We instrumented a production milling machine on the factory floor and processed megabytes of data, obtaining results minutes after a cut was made. This case study shows how a physicist's background in mechanics, instrumentation, signal processing, and computing hardware and software can help advance the state of the art in aerospace manufacturing.

  14. Multiphase patterns in periodically forced oscillatory systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elphick, C.; Hagberg, A.; Meron, E.

    1999-05-01

    Periodic forcing of an oscillatory system produces frequency locking bands within which the system frequency is rationally related to the forcing frequency. We study extended oscillatory systems that respond to uniform periodic forcing at one quarter of the forcing frequency (the 4:1 resonance). These systems possess four coexisting stable states, corresponding to uniform oscillations with successive phase shifts of {pi}/2. Using an amplitude equation approach near a Hopf bifurcation to uniform oscillations, we study front solutions connecting different phase states. These solutions divide into two groups: {pi} fronts separating states with a phase shift of {pi} and {pi}/2 fronts separating states with a phase shift of {pi}/2. We find a type of front instability where a stationary {pi} front {open_quotes}decomposes{close_quotes} into a pair of traveling {pi}/2 fronts as the forcing strength is decreased. The instability is degenerate for an amplitude equation with cubic nonlinearities. At the instability point a continuous family of pair solutions exists, consisting of {pi}/2 fronts separated by distances ranging from zero to infinity. Quintic nonlinearities lift the degeneracy at the instability point but do not change the basic nature of the instability. We conjecture the existence of similar instabilities in higher 2n:1 resonances (n=3,4,{hor_ellipsis}) where stationary {pi} fronts decompose into {ital n} traveling {pi}/n fronts. The instabilities designate transitions from stationary two-phase patterns to traveling 2n-phase patterns. As an example, we demonstrate with a numerical solution the collapse of a four-phase spiral wave into a stationary two-phase pattern as the forcing strength within the 4:1 resonance is increased. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Forced response analysis of hydroelectric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alligné, S.; Silva, P. C. O.; Béguin, A.; Kawkabani, B.; Allenbach, P.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.

    2014-03-01

    At off-design operating points, Francis turbines develop cavitation vortex rope in the draft tube which may interact with the hydraulic system. Risk resonance assessment by means of eigenmodes computation of the system is usually performed. However, the system response to the excitation source induced by the cavitation vortex rope is not predicted in terms of amplitudes and phase. Only eigenmodes shapes with related frequencies and dampings can be predicted. Besides this modal analysis, the risk resonance assessment can be completed by a forced response analysis. This method allows identifying the contribution of each eigenmode into the system response which depends on the system boundary conditions and the excitation source location. In this paper, a forced response analysis of a Francis turbine hydroelectric power plant including hydraulic system, rotating train, electrical system and control devices is performed. First, the general methodology of the forced response analysis is presented and validated with time domain simulations. Then, analysis of electrical, hydraulic and hydroelectric systems are performed and compared to analyse the influence of control structures on pressure fluctuations induced by cavitation vortex rope.

  16. Measured force/current relations in solid magnetic thrust bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.; Wakefield, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    When magnetic bearings are employed in a pump, compressor, turbine, or other rotating machine, measurement of the current in the bearing coils provides knowledge of the forces imposed on the bearings. This can be a significant indicator of machine problems. Additionally, magnetic bearings can be utilized as a load cell for measuring impeller forces in test rigs. The forces supported by magnetic bearings are directly related to the currents, air gaps, and other parameters in the bearings. This paper discusses the current/force relation for magnetic thrust bearings. Force versus current measurements were made on a particular magnetic bearing in a test rig as the bearing coil currents were cycled at various time rates of change.d the quasi-static force versus current relations were measured for a variety of air gaps and currents. The thrust bearing exhibits a hysteresis effect, which creates a significant difference between the measured force when the current is increasing as compared to that when the current is decreasing. For design current loops, 0.95 A to 2.55 A, at the time rate of change of 0.1 A/s, the difference between increasing and decreasing current curves due to hysteresis ranged from 4 to 8%. If the bearing is operated in small trajectories about a fixed (nonzero) operation point on the F/I (force/current) curve, the scatter in the measurement error could be expected to be on the order of 4%. A quasi-static nonlinear current/force equation was developed to model the data and curve-fit parameters established for the measured data. The effects of coercive force and iron reluctance, obtained from conventional magnetic materials tests, were included to improve the model, but theoretically calculated values from simple magnetic circuit theory do not produce accurate results. Magnetic fringing, leakage, and other effects must be included.

  17. Agricultural Drainage Management Systems Task Force (ADMSTF)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Agricultural Drainage Management Systems (ADMS) Task Force was initiated during a Charter meeting in the fall of 2002 by dedicated professional employees of Federal, State, and Local Government Agencies and Universities. The Agricultural Drainage Management (ADM) Coalition was established in 200...

  18. Special Forces Interpersonal Performance Assessment System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Phase I interpersonal performance assessment system: selection of the target group , identification of performance dimensions, and performance scale...development. > Target Group Selection The U.S. Army Special Forces (SF) was chosen as the target group because interpersonal skills are critical for the...1 IDENTIFYING THE TARGET GROUP ................................................................................... 2 IDENTIFYING CRITICAL

  19. Molecular force sensors to measure stress in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2017-06-01

    Molecularly generated forces are essential for most activities of biological cells, but also for the maintenance of steady state or homeostasis. To quantitatively understand cellular dynamics in migration, division, or mechanically guided differentiation, it will be important to exactly measure stress fields within the cell and the extracellular matrix. Traction force microscopy and related techniques have been established to determine the stress transmitted from adherent cells to their substrates. However, different approaches are needed to directly assess the stress generated inside the cell. This has recently led to the development of novel molecular force sensors. In this topical review, we briefly mention methods used to measure cell-external forces, and then summarize and explain different designs for the measurement of cell-internal forces with their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  20. Piconewton force measurement using a nanometric photonic crystal diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wonuk; Digonnet, Michel J F

    2014-08-01

    A compact force fiber sensor capable of measuring forces at the piconewton level is reported. It consists of a miniature Fabry-Perot cavity fabricated at the tip a single-mode fiber, in which the external reflector is a compliant photonic-crystal diaphragm that deflects when subjected to a force. In the laboratory environment, this sensor was able to detect a force of only ∼4  pN generated by the radiation pressure of a laser beam. Its measured minimum detectable force (MDF) at 3 kHz was as weak as 1.3  pN/√Hz. In a quiet environment, the measured noise was ∼16 times lower, and the MDF predicted to be ∼76  fN/√Hz.

  1. Direct measurement of the forces generated by an undulatory microswimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Rafael; Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-11-01

    C. elegans is a millimeter-sized nematode which has served as a model organism in biology for several decades, primarily due to its simple anatomy. Employing an undulatory form of locomotion, this worm is capable of propelling itself through various media. Using a micropipette deflection technique, in conjunction with high speed imaging, we directly measure the time-varying forces generated by C. elegans. We observe excellent agreement between our measured forces and the predictions of resistive force theory, through which we determine the drag coefficients of the worm. We also perform the direct force measurements at controlled distances from a single solid boundary as well as between two solid boundaries. We extract the drag coefficients of the worm to quantify the influence of the boundary on the swimming and the hydrodynamic forces involved.

  2. Nanonewton force measurement using a modified Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahviliyan, Masoud; Charsooghi, Mohammad A.; Akhlaghi, Ehsan A.; Taghi Tavassoly, Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new method to measure forces in the nanonewton range. The method is based on modification of a Michelson interferometer in which the rigid mirrors are replaced with two thin rod-like mirrors. One of the rod-like mirrors is fixed at both ends and the other has one free end. As the mirror with free end deflects in response to an applied force the spatial interference pattern is changed. Analysis of the interference fringes provides a readout of the rod deflection and thereby the applied force. The device is calibrated by applying known forces to the mirror with a free end and measuring the resulting displacement. Two different methods, mechanical and electrostatic, are used for calibration. The precision of the measurements and the propagation of the calibration uncertainty are investigated. The results show that this optical method is a good candidate for detecting small forces in the nanonewton range.

  3. Detection of forced oscillations in power systems with multichannel methods

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.

    2015-09-30

    The increasing availability of high fidelity, geographically dispersed measurements in power systems improves the ability of researchers and engineers to study dynamic behaviors in the grid. One such behavior that is garnering increased attention is the presence of forced oscillations. Power system engineers are interested in forced oscillations because they are often symptomatic of the malfunction or misoperation of equipment. Though the resulting oscillation is not always large in amplitude, the root cause may be serious. In this report, multi-channel forced oscillation detection methods are developed. These methods leverage previously developed detection approaches based on the periodogram and spectral-coherence. Making use of geographically distributed channels of data is shown to improved detection performance and shorten the delay before an oscillation can be detected in the online environment. Results from simulated and measured power system data are presented.

  4. Specific antigen/antibody interactions measured by force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Dammer, U; Hegner, M; Anselmetti, D; Wagner, P; Dreier, M; Huber, W; Güntherodt, H J

    1996-01-01

    Molecular recognition between biotinylated bovine serum albumin and polyclonal, biotin-directed IG antibodies has been measured directly under various buffer conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was found that even highly structured molecules such as IgG antibodies preserve their specific affinity to their antigens when probed with an AFM in the force mode. We could measure the rupture force between individual antibody-antigen complexes. The potential and limitations of this new approach for the measurement of individual antigen/antibody interactions and some possible applications are discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:9172770

  5. From static to animated: Measuring mechanical forces in tissues.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Celeste M

    2017-01-02

    Cells are physical objects that exert mechanical forces on their surroundings as they migrate and take their places within tissues. New techniques are now poised to enable the measurement of cell-generated mechanical forces in intact tissues in vivo, which will illuminate the secret dynamic lives of cells and change our current perception of cell biology.

  6. Report of the Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Board of Directors for Community Colleges, Phoenix.

    The Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures was formed by the State Board of Directors for Community Colleges of Arizona to develop a statewide plan for systematically demonstrating the degree to which community colleges accomplish their diverse missions. Two subgroups were formed in the Task Force on transfer and college programs and…

  7. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Adam; Stannard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired 'short-range' force from the experimental observable (frequency shift) is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip-sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the 'on-minus-off' method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method.

  8. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired ‘short-range’ force from the experimental observable (frequency shift) is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip–sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the ‘on-minus-off’ method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method. PMID:24778964

  9. Contact position sensor using constant contact force control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Jay (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A force control system (50) and method are provided for controlling a position contact sensor (10) so as to produce a constant controlled contact force therewith. The system (50) includes a contact position sensor (10) which has a contact probe (12) for contacting the surface of a target to be measured and an output signal (V.sub.o) for providing a position indication thereof. An actuator (30) is provided for controllably driving the contact position sensor (10) in response to an actuation control signal (I). A controller (52) receives the position indication signal (V.sub.o) and generates in response thereto the actuation control signal (I) so as to provide a substantially constant selective force (F) exerted by the contact probe (12). The actuation drive signal (I) is generated further in response to substantially linear approximation curves based on predetermined force and position data attained from the sensor (10) and the actuator (30).

  10. Interpreting atomic force microscopy measurements of hydrodynamic and surface forces with nonlinear parametric estimation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Song; Manica, Rogerio; Tabor, Rico F; Chan, Derek Y C

    2012-10-01

    A nonlinear parameter estimation method has been developed to extract the separation-dependent surface force and cantilever spring constant from atomic force microscope data taken at different speeds for the interaction between a silica colloidal probe and plate in aqueous solution. The distinguishing feature of this approach is that it exploits information from the velocity dependence of the force-displacement data due to hydrodynamic interaction to provide an unbiased estimate of the functional form of the separation-dependent surface force. An assumed function for the surface force with unknown parameters is not required. In addition, the analysis also yields a consistent estimate of the in situ cantilever spring constant. In combination with data from static force measurements, this approach can further be used to quantify the extent of hydrodynamic slip.

  11. Measuring Air Force Contracting Customer Satisfaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    customers to determine the kind and quality of services they want and their level of satisfaction with existing services ; (c) post service ...Contracting’s customer service chain. A. WHAT IS A CUSTOMER ? Prior to developing a customer satisfaction measurement tool, it is necessary to define what...by servicing organizations to evaluate a customer’s experience. Correspondingly, organizations often use customer satisfaction

  12. Measuring Drag Force in Newtonian Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.; O'Donnell, Mary Kate; Fingerut, Jonathan; Habdas, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    The experiments described in this paper have two goals. The first goal is to show how students can perform simple but fundamental measurements of objects moving through simple liquids (such as water, oil, or honey). In doing so, students can verify Stokes' law, which governs the motion of spheres through simple liquids, and see how it fails at…

  13. Force Developments. The Measurement of Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-01-01

    14309 Prevention and Control of Cormmunicable Diseases oi Animals . 14689 Analysis to Identify Non-Divisional TOE Combat FSarvi~e Support Units Requiring...powerful tool for performing comparative analyses if experimentaion is properly de- signed and conducted. 4. Specifics in the Measurement .f

  14. Measuring Drag Force in Newtonian Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.; O'Donnell, Mary Kate; Fingerut, Jonathan; Habdas, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    The experiments described in this paper have two goals. The first goal is to show how students can perform simple but fundamental measurements of objects moving through simple liquids (such as water, oil, or honey). In doing so, students can verify Stokes' law, which governs the motion of spheres through simple liquids, and see how it fails at…

  15. Direct measurement of Vorticella contraction force by micropipette deflection.

    PubMed

    France, Danielle; Tejada, Jonathan; Matsudaira, Paul

    2017-02-01

    The ciliated protozoan Vorticella convallaria is noted for its exceptionally fast adenosine triphosphate-independent cellular contraction, but direct measurements of contractile force have proven difficult given the length scale, speed, and forces involved. We used high-speed video microscopy to image live Vorticella stalled in midcontraction by deflection of an attached micropipette. Stall forces correlate with both distance contracted and the resting stalk length. Estimated isometric forces range from 95 to 177 nanonewtons (nN), or 1.12 nN·μm(-1) of the stalk. Maximum velocity and work are also proportional to distance contracted. These parameters constrain proposed biochemical/physical models of the contractile mechanism.

  16. Measurement of agitation force in dissolution test and mechanical destructive force in disintegration test.

    PubMed

    Kamba, Masaharu; Seta, Yasuo; Takeda, Nao; Hamaura, Takeshi; Kusai, Akira; Nakane, Hisanori; Nishimura, Kenji

    2003-01-02

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the agitation force and mechanical destructive force on the drug dissolution of a tablet in the paddle rotation dissolution test and in the disintegration test. The agitation in the paddle method and the mechanical destructive force in the disintegration test were considered to be conclusive factors for drug dissolution. The dissolution rate of planar-constant-release tablets increased with increasing paddle rotation speed and increased with increasing distance from the center of the vessel bottom. Separately, the fluid resistance (agitation force) in the vessel was measured using a modified paddle method apparatus equipped with a fluid resistance sensor. The fluid resistance was 0.03 x 10(-3) N/(64 mm(2)) when the paddle rotation speed was 50 rpm at a position 4 mm away from the center. A considerable position-dependent change in agitation force intensity was seen with the fluid resistance sensor. The impulsive force (mechanical destructive force) in the disintegration test apparatus was measured using a modified basket-rack assembly with a strain gauge transducer. The fluid resistance was measured using the basket-rack assembly with a different sensor probe and amplifier. The impulsive force applied by the auxiliary disk was 0.31 N and the fluid resistance at the bottom of the basket-rack assembly was 1.66 x 10(-3) N/(64 mm(2)).

  17. An instrumented cylinder measuring pinch force and orientation

    PubMed Central

    Bourbonnais, Daniel; Frak, Victor; Pilon, Jean-François; Goyette, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background The function of a cylinder allowing simultaneous measurements of the opposition axis of the index finger and thumb of the hand and the magnitude of pinch force is described. Methods The apparatus is made of two half-cylinders that are bonded together through a 6-axis force/torque sensor and allows the measurement of 3D orthogonal forces and moments of force. The amplitude of the pinch force exerted on the cylinder by the fingers is defined as the resultant of the forces in the different axes. A software program was developed to measure the barycentre of the forces on the instrumented cylinder, allowing calculation of the angle of the opposition axis between the fingers and the location of the resulting pinch force on the cylinder, assuming that the pinch or grip forces are co-linear through the center of the cylinder. In order to assess the validity and reliability of the measurements, the cylinder was mounted on a milling table and seven calibrated weights (from 100 to 500 g) were successively applied perpendicularly to a 9*9 matrix of sites separated by 1 cm. With the exception of the extreme lateral parts of the cylinder, the dispersion of the calculated vertical position of the resulting force was always within 1 mm of the application point, suggesting a high reliability of these measurements. In addition, the errors in the angles of the applied force were calculated and found to be less than 2 degree with no clear patterns of variation across the different locations of the cylinder. Results The usefulness of the cylinder is demonstrated by evaluating the pinch force and the opposition axis in six healthy subjects lifting the cylinder from the table using three different orientations of their right hand. The magnitude of the grip force was not significantly different across orientations (45, 22 and -22 degrees relative to the midline of the subject) suggesting that force grip is controlled. Conclusion From these results, it has been concluded that

  18. Systems Engineering Measurement Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Systems Engineering Measurement Primer A Basic Introduction to Systems Engineering Measurement Concepts and Use Version 1.0 March 1998 This document...Federal Systems Garry Roedler Lockheed Martin Management & Data Systems Cathy Tilton The National Registry, Inc. E. Richard Widmann Raytheon Systems...IV 1. INTRODUCTION

  19. Force measurement-based discontinuity detection during friction stir welding

    DOE PAGES

    Shrivastava, Amber; Zinn, Michael; Duffie, Neil A.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Here, the objective of this work is to develop a method for detecting the creation of discontinuities (i.e., voids, volume defects) during friction stir welding. Friction stir welding is inherently cost effective, however, the need for significant weld inspection can make the process cost prohibitive. A new approach to weld inspection is required in which an in situ characterization of weld quality can be obtained, reducing the need for postprocess inspection. To this end, friction stir welds with subsurface voids and without voids were created. The subsurface voids were generated by reducing the friction stir tool rotation frequency and increasingmore » the tool traverse speed in order to create “colder” welds. Process forces were measured during welding, and the void sizes were measured postprocess by computerized tomography (i.e., 3D X-ray imaging). Two parameters, based on frequency domain content and time-domain average of the force signals, were found to be correlated with void size. Criteria for subsurface void detection and size prediction were developed and shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations. Furthermore, with the proper choice of data acquisition system and frequency analyzer the occurrence of subsurface voids can be detected in real time.« less

  20. Dynamic DNA Origami Device for Measuring Compressive Depletion Forces.

    PubMed

    Hudoba, Michael W; Luo, Yi; Zacharias, Angelita; Poirier, Michael G; Castro, Carlos E

    2017-07-25

    The ability to self-assemble nanodevices with programmed structural dynamics that can sense and respond to the local environment could enable transformative applications in fields including molecular robotics, nanomanufacturing, and nanomedicine. The responsive function of biomolecules is often driven by alterations in conformational distributions mediated by highly sensitive interactions with the local environment. Here, we mimic this approach by engineering inherent nanoscale structural dynamics (nanodynamics) into a DNA device that exhibits a distribution of conformations including two stable states separated by a transition state where the energy barrier height is on the scale of the thermal energy, kBT = 4.1 pN·nm, enabling spontaneous transitions between states. We further establish design principles to regulate the equilibrium and kinetic behavior by substituting a few DNA strand components. We use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements to show these nanodynamic properties are sensitive to sub-piconewton depletion forces in the presence of molecular crowding agents, and the device can measure depletion forces with a resolution of ∼100 fN. We anticipate that this approach of engineering nanodynamic DNA devices will enable molecular-scale systems that sense and respond to their local environment with extremely high sensitivity.

  1. Scaffolding students' understanding of force in pulley systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouinfar, Amy; Madsen, Adrian M.; Hoang, Tram Do Ngoc; Puntambekar, Sadhana; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Recent research results have found that students using virtual manipulatives perform as well or better on measures of conceptual understanding than their peers who used physical equipment. We report on a study with students in a conceptual physics laboratory using either physical or virtual manipulatives to investigate forces in pulley systems. Written materials guided students through a sequence of activities designed to scaffold their understanding of force in pulley systems. The activity sequences facilitated students' sense making by requiring them to make and test predictions about various pulley systems by building and comparing different systems. We investigate the ways in which students discuss force while navigating the scaffolding activities and how these discussions compare between the physical and virtual treatments.

  2. Measuring the complete force field of an optical trap.

    PubMed

    Jahnel, Marcus; Behrndt, Martin; Jannasch, Anita; Schäffer, Erik; Grill, Stephan W

    2011-04-01

    The use of optical traps to measure or apply forces on the molecular level requires a precise knowledge of the trapping force field. Close to the trap center, this field is typically approximated as linear in the displacement of the trapped microsphere. However, applications demanding high forces at low laser intensities can probe the light-microsphere interaction beyond the linear regime. Here, we measured the full nonlinear force and displacement response of an optical trap in two dimensions using a dual-beam optical trap setup with back-focal-plane photodetection. We observed a substantial stiffening of the trap beyond the linear regime that depends on microsphere size, in agreement with Mie theory calculations. Surprisingly, we found that the linear detection range for forces exceeds the one for displacement by far. Our approach allows for a complete calibration of an optical trap.

  3. Cutting force measurement of electrical jigsaw by strain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazup, L.; Varadine Szarka, A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a measuring method based on strain gauges for accurate specification of electric jigsaw's cutting force. The goal of the measurement is to provide an overall perspective about generated forces in a jigsaw's gearbox during a cutting period. The lifetime of the tool is affected by these forces primarily. This analysis is part of the research and development project aiming to develop a special linear magnetic brake for realizing automatic lifetime tests of electric jigsaws or similar handheld tools. The accurate specification of cutting force facilitates to define realistic test cycles during the automatic lifetime test. The accuracy and precision resulted by the well described cutting force characteristic and the possibility of automation provide new dimension for lifetime testing of the handheld tools with alternating movement.

  4. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    van Vörden, Dennis; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Summary Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111) √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force–distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle. PMID:22496993

  5. Time measurement techniques. [U.S. Air Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnaba, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The common time measurements as used by the U.S. Air Force Measurements and Standards Laboratory, Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center (AGMC), Newark Air Force Station, Ohio, are described. Electronic counter time interval measurements are emphasized since this is the most common time comparison measurement in use. The proper use and setting of controls will be covered along with helpful hints and common mistakes to be avoided. Applications of time measurements are described and some of these are timekeeping via Loran-C, TV Line-10, and WWV. Frequency determination using periodic time readings will also be discussed.

  6. Laser Photon Force Measurements using a CW Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry; Edwards, David L.; Carruth, M. Ralph, Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The photon force resulting from the non-damaging impact of laser derived photons on a metallic target was measured using a vacuum compatible microbalance. This experiment quantitatively verified that the force resulting from laser photons impacting a reflective surface is measurable and predictable. The photon wavelength is 1064 mn and the laser is a multi-mode 30OW Nd YAG continuous wave (CW) laser.

  7. Flight of a Rufous Hummingbird Robotic Model-Force Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Alarcon, Ramiro; Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo; Tobalske, Bret; Allen, James

    2008-11-01

    Aerodynamic force data was measured on a 2-DOF scaled robotic hummingbird model for both hovering and translational flight. Experiments were conducted in a large water channel facility at New Mexico State University. Reynolds and Strouhal numbers for the experiment are in the range of 3600 and 0.97, respectively. Forces are directly measured using strain gages and compared with phase-locked PIV results.

  8. Fat-Line Towed-Array Force Measurement Apparatus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-12

    No. 78872 n 3 FAT -LINE TOWED-ARRAY FORCE MEASUREMENT APPARATUS 4 5 STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST 6 The invention described herein may be...application. 16 17 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 18 (1) Field of the Invention 19 The present invention relates generally to fat -line towed- 2 0 arrays, and...more particularly to an apparatus for measuring the 21 force applied to fat -line towed-arrays during flushing cycles. 22 (2) Description of the

  9. Optical fibre bragg gratings based magnetic force measurement of magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa; Zhou, Jianhua

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic bearings are typical electromechanical systems of high performance. Current-displacement-force relationship between stator and rotor is an important research topic of magnetic bearings. The critical issue is to realize magnetic force online dynamic measurement. This paper presents a novel method on magnetic force measurement of magnetic bearings with optical fibre bragg gratings (FBG), which realizes a non-contact and online force measurement with simple configuration, good noise immunity even when the rotor is running. A novel micro force transducer is designed and fabricated, which is mounted within the stator magnetic pole. To obtain current-displacement-force relationship a FBG based magnetic force measurement test rig is setup to simulate magnetic bearing working states as the stator coils currents, air gap between stator and rotor, rotor speed is adjustable. Magnetic force is measured under three classifications of test conditions and test results are presented. The measurement data show good consistency with the theory analysis and calculation, which means that the FBG based magnetic force measurement is available and of good accuracy.

  10. The Optical Bichromatic Force in Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, Leland M.; Galica, Scott E.; Eyler, Edward E.

    2015-06-01

    The bichromatic optical force (BCF), which can greatly exceed radiative forces, seems ideal for laser slowing and cooling of molecules because it minimizes the effects of radiative decay. However, it relies on sustained coherences between optically coupled states, and molecules, with their many sublevels and decay pathways, present new challenges in maintaining these coherences compared with simple atoms. We have conducted extensive numerical simulations of BCFs in model molecular systems based on the B leftrightarrow X transition in CaF, and have begun experimental tests in a molecular beam. In our modeling, the effects of fine and hyperfine structure are examined using a simplified level scheme that is still sufficiently complete to include the major pathways leading to loss or decoherence. To circumvent optical pumping into coherent dark states we explore two possible schemes: (1) a skewed dc magnetic field, and (2) rapid optical polarization switching. The effects of repumping to compensate for out-of-system radiative decay are also examined. Our results verify that the BCF is a promising method for creating large forces in molecular beams while minimizing out-of-system radiative losses, and provide detailed guidance for experimental designs. Compared to a two-level atom, the peak force is reduced by about an order of magnitude, but there is little reduction in the velocity range over which the force is effective. Our experiments on deflection and slowing using the CaF B leftrightarrow X, (0-0) transition, still at an early stage, include studies of both the P11(1.5)/^PQ12(0.5) branch, a quasi-cycling configuration with extensive hfs, and the R11(0.5)/^RQ21(0.5) branch, which has a much simpler hfs but requires rotational repumping. Supported by the National Science Foundation

  11. High-resolution capacitance measurement and potentiometry by force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Yves; Abraham, David W.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1988-03-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness and high sensitivity of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for imaging surface dielectric properties and for potentiometry through the detection of electrostatic forces. Electric forces as small as 10-10 N have been measured, corresponding to a capacitance of 10-19 farad. The sensitivity of our AFM should ultimately allow us to detect capacitances as low as 8×10-22 F. The method enables us to detect the presence of dielectric material over Si, and to measure the voltage in a p-n junction with submicron spatial resolution.

  12. Acoustic force measurement in a dual-temperature resonant chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robey, Judith L.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1987-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force was measured for a dual-temperature resonant chamber. This rectangular chamber has its long dimension approximately 8.5 times the square cross-sectional dimension, and the opposite ends are at widely different temperatures. Force profiles were obtained for two hot end temperatures of 520 C and 760 C, while the cool end remained at approximately room temperature. Force magnitudes as high as 17 dyn for a sample 1.2 cm in diameter at 760 C and at 162-dB input level were measured.

  13. Quantitative measurements of shear displacement using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Weida; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Yonggang

    2016-03-21

    We report a method to quantitatively measure local shear deformation with high sensitivity using atomic force microscopy. The key point is to simultaneously detect both torsional and buckling motions of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers induced by the lateral piezoelectric response of the sample. This requires the quantitative calibration of torsional and buckling response of AFM. This method is validated by measuring the angular dependence of the in-plane piezoelectric response of a piece of piezoelectric α-quartz. The accurate determination of the amplitude and orientation of the in-plane piezoelectric response, without rotation, would greatly enhance the efficiency of lateral piezoelectric force microscopy.

  14. Does an instrumented treadmill correctly measure the ground reaction forces?

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Patrick A.; Gosseye, Thierry P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Since the 1990s, treadmills have been equipped with multi-axis force transducers to measure the three components of the ground reaction forces during walking and running. These measurements are correctly performed if the whole treadmill (including the motor) is mounted on the transducers. In this case, the acceleration of the treadmill centre of mass relative to the reference frame of the laboratory is nil. The external forces exerted on one side of the treadmill are thus equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the external forces exerted on the other side. However, uncertainty exists about the accuracy of these measures: due to friction between the belt and the tread-surface, due to the motor pulling the belt, some believe that it is not possible to correctly measure the horizontal components of the forces exerted by the feet on the belt. Here, we propose a simple model of an instrumented treadmill and we demonstrate (1) that the forces exerted by the subject moving on the upper part of the treadmill are accurately transmitted to the transducers placed under it and (2) that all internal forces – including friction – between the parts of the treadmill are cancelling each other. PMID:24285705

  15. MEMS-Based Flexible Force Sensor for Tri-Axial Catheter Contact Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hardik J; Sheng, Jun; Desai, Jaydev P

    2017-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a significant healthcare problem caused by the uneven and rapid discharge of electrical signals from pulmonary veins (PVs). The technique of radiofrequency (RF) ablation can block these abnormal electrical signals by ablating myocardial sleeves inside PVs. Catheter contact force measurement during RF ablation can reduce the rate of AFib recurrence, since it helps to determine effective contact of the catheter with the tissue, thereby resulting in effective power delivery for ablation. This paper presents the development of a three-dimensional (3D) force sensor to provide the real-time measurement of tri-axial catheter contact force. The 3D force sensor consists of a plastic cubic bead and five flexible force sensors. Each flexible force sensor was made of a PEDOT:PSS strain gauge and a PDMS bump on a flexible PDMS substrate. Calibration results show that the fabricated sensor has a linear response in the force range required for RF ablation. To evaluate its working performance, the fabricated sensor was pressed against gelatin tissue by a micromanipulator and also integrated on a catheter tip to test it within deionized water flow. Both experiments simulated the ventricular environment and proved the validity of applying the 3D force sensor in RF ablation.

  16. Friction force measurement during cochlear implant insertion: application to a force-controlled insertion tool design.

    PubMed

    Miroir, Mathieu; Nguyen, Yann; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Grayeli, Alexis Bozorg

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate force profiles during array insertion in human cochlea specimens and to evaluate a mechatronic inserter using a 1-axis force sensor. Today, the surgical challenge in cochlear implantation is the preservation of the anatomic structures and the residual hearing. In routine practice, the electrode array is inserted manually with a limited sensitive feedback. Hifocus 1J electrode arrays were studied. The bench test comprised a mechatronic inserter combined to a 1-axis force sensor between the inserter and the base of the array and a 6-axis force sensor beneath the cochlea model. Influence of insertion tube material, speed (0.15, 0.5, and 1.5 mm/s) and lubricant on frictions forces were studied (no-load). Different models were subsequently evaluated: epoxy scala tympani model and temporal bones. Frictions forces were lower in the plastic tube compared with those in the metal tube (0.09 ± 0.028 versus 0.14 ± 0.034 at 0.5 mm/s, p < 0.001) and with the use of hyaluronic acid gel. Speed did not influence frictions forces in our study. Insertion force profiles provided by the 1- and 6-axis force sensors were similar when friction forces inside the insertion tool (no-load measurements) were subtracted from the 1-axis sensor data in the epoxy and temporal bone models (mean error, 0.01 ± 0.001 N). Using a sensor included in the inserter, we were able to measure array insertion forces. This tool can be potentially used to provide real-time information to the surgeon during the procedure.

  17. Measuring Drag Force in Newtonian Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.; O'Donnell, Mary Kate; Fingerut, Jonathan; Habdas, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    The experiments described in this paper have two goals. The first goal is to show how students can perform simple but fundamental measurements of objects moving through simple liquids (such as water, oil, or honey). In doing so, students can verify Stokes' law, which governs the motion of spheres through simple liquids, and see how it fails at higher object speeds. Moreover, they can qualitatively study fluid patterns at various object speeds (Reynolds numbers). The second goal is to help students make connections between physics and other sciences. Specifically, the results of these experiments can be used to help students understand the role of fluid motion in determining the shape of an organism, or where it lives. At Saint Josephs University we have developed these experiments as part of a newly developed course in biomechanics where both physics and biology undergraduate students bring their ideas and expertise to enrich a shared learning environment.

  18. Air Force Enlisted Force Management: System Interactions and Synchronization Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    NCO noncommissioned officer NPS non-prior service OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense OSI Office of Special Investigations PFE Promotion Fitness Exam...of airmen with disciplinary or low performance issues. 44 Air Force Enlisted Force Management ness exam ( PFE ), score on the Skills Knowledge Test...serpentine logic trail: Suppose an AFSC has a difficult SKT or a difficult version of the PFE . Tests that are more difficult lead to a wider range of

  19. Nanonet force microscopy for measuring forces in single smooth muscle cells of the human aorta.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alexander; Chan, Patrick; Sheets, Kevin; Apperson, Matthew; Delaughter, Christopher; Gleason, Thomas G; Phillippi, Julie A; Nain, Amrinder

    2017-07-07

    A number of innovative methods exist to measure cell-matrix adhesive forces, but they have yet to accurately describe and quantify the intricate interplay of a cell and its fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM). In cardiovascular pathologies, such as aortic aneurysm, new knowledge on the involvement of cell-matrix forces could lead to elucidation of disease mechanisms. To better understand this dynamics, we measured primary human aortic single smooth muscle cell (SMC) forces using nanonet force microscopy in both inside-out (I-O intrinsic contractility) and outside-in (O-I external perturbation) modes. For SMC populations, we measured the I-O and O-I forces to be 12.9 ± 1.0 and 57.9 ± 2.5 nN, respectively. Exposure of cells to oxidative stress conditions caused a force decrease of 57 and 48% in I-O and O-I modes, respectively, and an increase in migration rate by 2.5-fold. Finally, in O-I mode, we cyclically perturbed cells at constant strain of varying duration to simulate in vivo conditions of the cardiac cycle and found that I-O forces decrease with increasing duration and O-I forces decreased by half at shorter cycle times. Thus our findings highlight the need to study forces exerted and felt by cells simultaneously to comprehensively understand force modulation in cardiovascular disease. © 2017 Hall et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    Treesearch

    Ryan Wagner; Robert Moon; Jon Pratt; Gordon Shaw; Arvind Raman

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale...

  1. Measurement of forces inside a three-dimensional pile of frictionless droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Long, S; Wang, Q; Dinsmore, A D

    2006-06-16

    We present systematic and detailed measurements of interparticle contact forces inside three-dimensional piles of frictionless liquid droplets. We measured long-range chainlike correlations of the directions and magnitudes of large forces, thereby establishing the presence of force chains in three dimensions. Our correlation definition provides a chain persistence length of 10 mean droplet diameters, decreasing as load is applied to the pile. We also measured the angles between contacts and showed that the chainlike arrangement arises from the balance of forces. Moreover, we found that piles whose height was comparable to the chain persistence length exhibited substantially greater strain hardening than did tall piles, which we attributed to the force chains. Together, the results establish a connection between the microscopic force network and the elastic response of meso- or macroscopic granular piles. The conclusions drawn here should be relevant in jammed systems generally, including concentrated emulsions and piles of sand or other heavy particles.

  2. An ergonomic, instrumented ultrasound probe for 6-axis force/torque measurement.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Matthew W; Anthony, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    An ergonomic, instrumented ultrasound probe has been developed for medical imaging applications. The device, which fits compactly in the hand of sonographers and permits rapid attachment & removal of the ultrasound probe, measures ultrasound probe-to-patient contact forces and torques in all six axes. The device was used to measure contact forces and torques applied by ten professional sonographers on five patients during thirty-six abdominal exams. Of the three contact forces, those applied along the probe axis were found to be largest, averaging 7.0N. Measurement noise was quantified for each axis, and found to be small compared with the axial force. Understanding the range of forces applied during ultrasound imaging enables the design of more accurate robotic imaging systems and could also improve understanding of the correlation between contact force and sonographer fatigue and injury.

  3. Quantitative measurements of force and displacement using an optical trap.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, R M; Finer, J T; Chu, S; Spudich, J A

    1996-01-01

    We combined a single-beam gradient optical trap with a high-resolution photodiode position detector to show that an optical trap can be used to make quantitative measurements of nanometer displacements and piconewton forces with millisecond resolution. When an external force is applied to a micron-sized bead held by an optical trap, the bead is displaced from the center of the trap by an amount proportional to the applied force. When the applied force is changed rapidly, the rise time of the displacement is on the millisecond time scale, and thus a trapped bead can be used as a force transducer. The performance can be enhanced by a feedback circuit so that the position of the trap moves by means of acousto-optic modulators to exert a force equal and opposite to the external force applied to the bead. In this case the position of the trap can be used to measure the applied force. We consider parameters of the trapped bead such as stiffness and response time as a function of bead diameter and laser beam power and compare the results with recent ray-optic calculations. PMID:8785341

  4. [Organization of rehabilitation and treatment measures in the armed forces of foreign countries].

    PubMed

    Trishkin, D V; Malykh, A B; Ponomarenko, G N; Merzlikin, A V

    2015-07-01

    The authors present an analysis of current state of rehabilitation and treatment system in the armed forces of foreign countries, and main directions of its development. The authors summarize an experience in the field of organization and carrying out of rehabilitation and treatment measures in the armed forces of foreign countries, and also define possible ways of how to apply gained experience in organizing sanatorium-resort provision for servicemen of Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  5. Novel Low-Cost Sensor for Human Bite Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Fastier-Wooller, Jarred; Phan, Hoang-Phuong; Dinh, Toan; Nguyen, Tuan-Khoa; Cameron, Andrew; Öchsner, Andreas; Dao, Dzung Viet

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a low cost and reliable maximal voluntary bite force sensor which can be manufactured in-house by using an acrylic laser cutting machine. The sensor has been designed for ease of fabrication, assembly, calibration, and safe use. The sensor is capable of use within an hour of commencing production, allowing for rapid prototyping/modifications and practical implementation. The measured data shows a good linear relationship between the applied force and the electrical resistance of the sensor. The output signal has low drift, excellent repeatability, and a large measurable range of 0 to 700 N. A high signal-to-noise response to human bite forces was observed, indicating the high potential of the proposed sensor for human bite force measurement. PMID:27509496

  6. The Kilogram and Measurements of Mass and Force

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Z. J.; Yaniv, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the facilities, measurement capabilities, and ongoing research activities in the areas of mass and force at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The first section of the paper is devoted to mass metrology and starts with a brief historical perspective on the developments that led to the current definition of the kilogram. An overview of mass measurement procedures is given with a brief discussion of current research on alternative materials for mass standards and surface profiles of the U.S. national prototype kilograms. A brief outlook into the future possible redefinition of the unit of mass based on fundamental principles is included. The second part of this paper focuses on the unit of force and describes the realization of the unit, measurement procedures, uncertainty in the realized force, facilities, and current efforts aimed at the realization of small forces. PMID:27500016

  7. NASA ATP Force Measurement Technology Capability Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2008-01-01

    The Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) initiated a strategic planning effort to re-vitalize the force measurement capability within NASA. The team responsible for developing the plan included members from three NASA Centers (Langley, Ames and Glenn) as well as members from the Air Force s Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC). After visiting and discussing force measurement needs and current capabilities at each participating facility as well as selected force measurement companies, a strategic plan was developed to guide future NASA investments. This paper will provide the details of the strategic plan and include asset management, organization and technology research and development investment priorities as well as efforts to date.

  8. Video measurements of instantaneous forces of flapping wing vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Alan; Mayhew, Michael; Black, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Flapping wings for small aerial vehicles have revolutionary potential for maneuverability and endurance. Ornithopters fail to achieve the performance of their biological equivalents, despite extensive research on how animals fly. Flapping wings produce peak forces due to the stroke reversal of the wing. This research demonstrates in-flight measurements of an ornithopter through the use of image processing, specifically measuring instantaneous forces. Results show that the oscillation about the flight path is significant, being about 20% of the mean velocity and up to 10 g's. Results match forces with deformations of the wing to contrast the timing and wing shape of the upstroke and the downstroke. Holding the vehicle fixed (e.g. wind tunnel testing or simulations) structural resonance is affected along with peak forces, also affecting lift. Non-contact, in-flight measurements are proposed as the best method for matching the flight conditions of flapping wing vehicles.

  9. Phoretic and Radiometric Force Measurements on Microparticles in Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. James

    1996-01-01

    Thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and radiometric forces on microparticles are being measured over a wide range of gas phase and particle conditions using electrodynamic levitation of single particles to simulate microgravity conditions. The thermophoretic force, which arises when a particle exists in a gas having a temperature gradient, is measured by levitating an electrically charged particle between heated and cooled plates mounted in a vacuum chamber. The diffusiophoretic force arising from a concentration gradient in the gas phase is measured in a similar manner except that the heat exchangers are coated with liquids to establish a vapor concentration gradient. These phoretic forces and the radiation pressure force acting on a particle are measured directly in terms of the change in the dc field required to levitate the particle with and without the force applied. The apparatus developed for the research and the experimental techniques are discussed, and results obtained by thermophoresis experiments are presented. The determination of the momentum and energy accommodation coefficients associated with molecular collisions between gases molecules and particles and the measurement of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and small particles are of particular interest.

  10. Measurement of laterally induced optical forces at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Rajaei, Mohsen; Almajhadi, Mohammad; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of laterally induced optical forces using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The lateral electric field distribution between a gold coated AFM probe and a single nano-aperture in a gold film is mapped by measuring the lateral optical force between the apex of the AFM probe and the nano-aperture. The fundamental torsional eigen-mode of an AFM cantilever probe was used to detect the laterally induced optical forces. We engineered the cantilever shape using focused ion beam milling to improve the detected signal to noise ratio. The measured distributions of lateral optical force agree well with electromagnetic simulations of the metal coated AFM probe interacting with the nano-aperture. This technique can be extended to simultaneously detect both lateral and longitudinal optical forces at the nanoscale by using an AFM cantilever as a multi-channel detector. This will enable simultaneous Photon Induced Force Microscopy detection of molecular responses with different incident field polarizations. The technique can be implemented on both cantilever and tuning fork based AFMs.

  11. The Canadian Forces trauma care system

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Homer

    2011-01-01

    According to the Trauma Association of Canada, a trauma system is a preplanned, organized and coordinated injury-control effort in a defined geographic area. An effective trauma system engages in comprehensive injury surveillance and prevention programs; delivers trauma care from the time of injury to recovery; engages in research, training and performance improvement; and establishes linkages with an all-hazards emergency preparedness program. To support Canada’s combat mission in Afghanistan, the Canadian Forces (CF) developed a comprehensive trauma system based around its trauma hospital — the Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit (R3MMU) at Kandahar Airfield. This article reviews the essential components of a modern trauma system, outlines the evidence that trauma systems improve care to injury victims and describes how the current CF trauma system was developed. PMID:22099323

  12. Frequency domain measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eischer, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    Stable frequency sources and signal processing blocks were characterized by their noise spectra, both discrete and random, in the frequency domain. Conventional measures are outlined, and systems for performing the measurements are described. Broad coverage of system configurations which were found useful is given. Their functioning and areas of application are discussed briefly. Particular attention is given to some of the potential error sources in the measurement procedures, system configurations, double-balanced-mixer-phase-detectors, and application of measuring instruments.

  13. Dielectrophoretic Force Imaging of Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Garth J.

    2004-03-01

    A new scanning probe microscopic technique is demonstrated, exploiting AC electrokinetic forces for real-time functional imaging of biological interfaces with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) describes the mobility of particles in radio-frequency AC electric fields and is related to the frequency-dependent polarizability. Similar to the forces in optical trapping, DEP interactions are greatest for large field gradients, such as those adjacent to highly curved electrodes. Moderate AC potentials (5 Vpp) are more than sufficient to induce surface forces strong enough for reliable feedback during imaging. Simply changing the AC frequency can change the nature of the DEP force from repulsive to attractive. By scanning the AC frequency, dielectrophoretic spectroscopy using light with a wavelength of ˜ 1/2 km can be performed with spatial resolution of a few nanometers (about 11 to 12 orders of magnitude below the diffraction-limit), representing a new level of achievement in near-field microscopy. Among other things, the facile applicability of DEP imaging in aqueous media is ideally suited for ultrahigh resolution microscopy of biological systems, including supported lipid bilayer membranes, immobilized organelles, and living cells.

  14. Measuring the Drag Force on a Falling Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the aerodynamic drag force on an object in flight is well known and has been described in this and other journals many times. At speeds less than about 1 m/s, the drag force on a sphere is proportional to the speed and is given by Stokes' law. At higher speeds, the drag force is proportional to the velocity squared and is usually small compared with the gravitational force if the object mass is large and its speed is low. In order to observe a significant effect, or to measure the terminal velocity, experiments are often conducted with very light objects such as a balloon or coffee filter3 or muffin cup,4 or are conducted in a liquid rather than in air. The effect of the drag force can also be increased by increasing the surface area of the object.

  15. Electrodynamic forces in tethered satellite systems. Part 1: System control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzer, Ehud; Kane, Thomas R.

    1994-10-01

    Part 1 of this work deals with the use of electrodynamic forces for control of tethered satellite system. A system formed by two massive end-bodies connected to each other by a current carrying tether is to be kept in an earth-pointing orientation by means of joint actions of thrusters on one of the end-bodies and electrodynamic forces acting on the tether.

  16. Calibration of holographic optical tweezers for force measurements on biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, Astrid; Forde, Nancy

    2009-05-01

    Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) modify the phase of a laser beam to create and dynamically position multiple optical traps independently in 3D; refractive micrometer-sized particles can be held in these traps to function as probing handles. HOTs offer the flexibility needed to probe the mechanics of complex systems such as cells or protein networks. Thus far, however, HOTs have not found wide use in biophysics, in large part due to lack of evidence as to how exerted forces vary as the positions of HOT traps are changed. To perform quantitative force measurements, parameters such as trap stiffness, range of trap steering, and minimum step size are of key importance. We find for our HOT setup that stiffness does not change significantly over a range of ˜25μm. In addition, we control and detect, using high-speed (>kHz) camera imaging, trap displacements to ˜1nm. Our results suggest that after full characterization HOTs can be successfully employed in quantitative experiments on biomaterials, e.g., probing elastomeric properties of structural protein networks.

  17. Directly measuring single-molecule heterogeneity using force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intriguing results of single-molecule experiments on proteins and nucleic acids is the discovery of functional heterogeneity: the observation that complex cellular machines exhibit multiple, biologically active conformations. The structural differences between these conformations may be subtle, but each distinct state can be remarkably long-lived, with interconversions between states occurring only at macroscopic timescales, fractions of a second or longer. Although we now have proof of functional heterogeneity in a handful of systems—enzymes, motors, adhesion complexes—identifying and measuring it remains a formidable challenge. Here, we show that evidence of this phenomenon is more widespread than previously known, encoded in data collected from some of the most well-established single-molecule techniques: atomic force microscopy or optical tweezer pulling experiments. We present a theoretical procedure for analyzing distributions of rupture/unfolding forces recorded at different pulling speeds. This results in a single parameter, quantifying the degree of heterogeneity, and also leads to bounds on the equilibration and conformational interconversion timescales. Surveying 10 published datasets, we find heterogeneity in 5 of them, all with interconversion rates slower than 10 s−1. Moreover, we identify two systems where additional data at realizable pulling velocities is likely to find a theoretically predicted, but so far unobserved crossover regime between heterogeneous and nonheterogeneous behavior. The significance of this regime is that it will allow far more precise estimates of the slow conformational switching times, one of the least understood aspects of functional heterogeneity. PMID:27317744

  18. Easy and direct method for calibrating atomic force microscopy lateral force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhua; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and tested a new, inexpensive, easy-to-make and easy-to-use calibration standard for atomic force microscopy (AFM) lateral force measurements. This new standard simply consists of a small glass fiber of known dimensions and Young’s modulus, which is fixed at one end to a substrate and which can be bent laterally with the AFM tip at the other end. This standard has equal or less error than the commonly used method of using beam mechanics to determine a cantilever’s lateral force constant. It is transferable, thus providing a universal tool for comparing the calibrations of different instruments. It does not require knowledge of the cantilever dimensions and composition or its tip height. This standard also allows direct conversion of the photodiode signal to force and, thus, circumvents the requirement for a sensor response (sensitivity) measurement. PMID:17614616

  19. Isoelectric point of fluorite by direct force measurements using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Assemi, Shoeleh; Nalaskowski, Jakub; Miller, Jan D; Johnson, William P

    2006-02-14

    Interaction forces between a fluorite (CaF2) surface and colloidal silica were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in 1 x 10(-3) M NaNO3 at different pH values. Forces between the silica colloid and fluorite flat were measured at a range of pH values above the isoelectric point (IEP) of silica so that the forces were mainly controlled by the fluorite surface charge. In this way, the IEP of the fluorite surface was deduced from AFM force curves at pH approximately 9.2. Experimental force versus separation distance curves were in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on long-range electrostatic interactions, allowing the potential of the fluorite surface to be estimated from the experimental force curves. AFM-deduced surface potentials were generally lower than the published zeta potentials obtained from electrokinetic methods for powdered samples. Differences in methodology, orientation of the fluorite, surface carbonation, and equilibration time all could have contributed to this difference.

  20. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Gregory P; Hidler, Joseph; Mirotznik, Mark S

    2012-10-03

    A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The metal housings were fabricated by several methods including laser micromachining, swaging, and hydroforming. Designs are presented that allow for simultaneous temperature and force measurements as well as for simultaneous resolution of multi-axis forces.The sensor was experimentally evaluated by hydrostatic loading and in vitro testing. A commercial hydraulic burst tester was used to provide uniform pressures on the sensor in order to establish the linearity, repeatability, and accuracy characteristics of the sensor. The in vitro experiments were performed in excised tendon and in a dynamic gait simulator to simulate biological conditions. In both experimental conditions, the sensor was found to be a sensitive and reliable method for acquiring minimally invasive measurements of soft tissue forces. Our results suggest that this sensor will prove useful in a variety of biomechanical measurements.

  1. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The metal housings were fabricated by several methods including laser micromachining, swaging, and hydroforming. Designs are presented that allow for simultaneous temperature and force measurements as well as for simultaneous resolution of multi-axis forces. The sensor was experimentally evaluated by hydrostatic loading and in vitro testing. A commercial hydraulic burst tester was used to provide uniform pressures on the sensor in order to establish the linearity, repeatability, and accuracy characteristics of the sensor. The in vitro experiments were performed in excised tendon and in a dynamic gait simulator to simulate biological conditions. In both experimental conditions, the sensor was found to be a sensitive and reliable method for acquiring minimally invasive measurements of soft tissue forces. Our results suggest that this sensor will prove useful in a variety of biomechanical measurements. PMID:23033868

  2. Support force measures of midsized men in seated positions.

    PubMed

    Bush, Tamara Reid; Hubbard, Robert P

    2007-02-01

    Two areas not well researched in the field of seating mechanics are the distribution of normal and shear forces, and how those forces change with seat position. The availability of these data would be beneficial for the design and development of office, automotive and medical seats. To increase our knowledge in the area of seating mechanics, this study sought to measure the normal and shear loads applied to segmental supports in 12 seated positions, utilizing three inclination angles and four levels of seat back articulation that were associated with automotive driving positions. Force data from six regions, including the thorax, sacral region, buttocks, thighs, feet, and hand support were gathered using multi-axis load cells. The sample contained 23 midsized subjects with an average weight of 76.7 kg and a standard deviation of 4.2 kg, and an average height of 1745 mm with a standard deviation of 19 mm. Results were examined in terms of seat back inclination and in terms of torso articulation for relationships between seat positions and support forces. Using a repeated measures analysis, significant differences (p<0.05) were identified for normal forces relative to all inclination angles except for forces occurring at the hand support. Other significant differences were observed between normal forces behind the buttocks, pelvis, and feet for torso articulations. Significant differences in the shear forces occurred under the buttocks and posterior pelvis during changes in seat back inclination. Significant differences in shear forces were also identified for torso articulations. These data suggest that as seat back inclination or torso articulation change, significant shifts in force distribution occur.

  3. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. Copyright © 2001 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  4. Topological and geometric measurements of force-chain structure.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Chad; Papadopoulos, Lia; Owens, Eli T; Daniels, Karen E; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-09-01

    Developing quantitative methods for characterizing structural properties of force chains in densely packed granular media is an important step toward understanding or predicting large-scale physical properties of a packing. A promising framework in which to develop such methods is network science, which can be used to translate particle locations and force contacts into a graph in which particles are represented by nodes and forces between particles are represented by weighted edges. Recent work applying network-based community-detection techniques to extract force chains opens the door to developing statistics of force-chain structure, with the goal of identifying geometric and topological differences across packings, and providing a foundation on which to build predictions of bulk material properties from mesoscale network features. Here we discuss a trio of related but fundamentally distinct measurements of the mesoscale structure of force chains in two-dimensional (2D) packings, including a statistic derived using tools from algebraic topology, which together provide a tool set for the analysis of force chain architecture. We demonstrate the utility of this tool set by detecting variations in force-chain architecture with pressure. Collectively, these techniques can be generalized to 3D packings, and to the assessment of continuous deformations of packings under stress or strain.

  5. Topological and geometric measurements of force-chain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Chad; Papadopoulos, Lia; Owens, Eli T.; Daniels, Karen E.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-09-01

    Developing quantitative methods for characterizing structural properties of force chains in densely packed granular media is an important step toward understanding or predicting large-scale physical properties of a packing. A promising framework in which to develop such methods is network science, which can be used to translate particle locations and force contacts into a graph in which particles are represented by nodes and forces between particles are represented by weighted edges. Recent work applying network-based community-detection techniques to extract force chains opens the door to developing statistics of force-chain structure, with the goal of identifying geometric and topological differences across packings, and providing a foundation on which to build predictions of bulk material properties from mesoscale network features. Here we discuss a trio of related but fundamentally distinct measurements of the mesoscale structure of force chains in two-dimensional (2D) packings, including a statistic derived using tools from algebraic topology, which together provide a tool set for the analysis of force chain architecture. We demonstrate the utility of this tool set by detecting variations in force-chain architecture with pressure. Collectively, these techniques can be generalized to 3D packings, and to the assessment of continuous deformations of packings under stress or strain.

  6. Force of Single Kinesin Molecules Measured With Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Scot C.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    1993-04-01

    Isometric forces generated by single molecules of the mechanochemical enzyme kinesin were measured with a laser-induced, single-beam optical gradient trap, also known as optical tweezers. For the microspheres used in this study, the optical tweezers was spring-like for a radius of 100 nanometers and had a maximum force region at a radius of ~150 nanometers. With the use of biotinylated microtubules and special streptavidin-coated latex microspheres as handles, microtubule translocation by single squid kinesin molecules was reversibly stalled. The stalled microtubules escaped optical trapping forces of 1.9 ± 0.4 piconewtons. The ability to measure force parameters of single macromolecules now allows direct testing of molecular models for contractility.

  7. Screw-in forces during instrumentation by various file systems.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Hong; Kwak, Sang Won; Kim, Sung-Kyo; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the maximum screw-in forces generated during the movement of various Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) file systems. Forty simulated canals in resin blocks were randomly divided into 4 groups for the following instruments: Mtwo size 25/0.07 (MTW, VDW GmbH), Reciproc R25 (RPR, VDW GmbH), ProTaper Universal F2 (PTU, Dentsply Maillefer), and ProTaper Next X2 (PTN, Dentsply Maillefer, n = 10). All the artificial canals were prepared to obtain a standardized lumen by using ProTaper Universal F1. Screw-in forces were measured using a custom-made experimental device (AEndoS-k, DMJ system) during instrumentation with each NiTi file system using the designated movement. The rotation speed was set at 350 rpm with an automatic 4 mm pecking motion at a speed of 1 mm/sec. The pecking depth was increased by 1 mm for each pecking motion until the file reach the working length. Forces were recorded during file movement, and the maximum force was extracted from the data. Maximum screw-in forces were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc comparison at a significance level of 95%. Reciproc and ProTaper Universal files generated the highest maximum screw-in forces among all the instruments while M-two and ProTaper Next showed the lowest (p < 0.05). Geometrical differences rather than shaping motion and alloys may affect the screw-in force during canal instrumentation. To reduce screw-in forces, the use of NiTi files with smaller cross-sectional area for higher flexibility is recommended.

  8. Screw-in forces during instrumentation by various file systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the maximum screw-in forces generated during the movement of various Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) file systems. Materials and Methods Forty simulated canals in resin blocks were randomly divided into 4 groups for the following instruments: Mtwo size 25/0.07 (MTW, VDW GmbH), Reciproc R25 (RPR, VDW GmbH), ProTaper Universal F2 (PTU, Dentsply Maillefer), and ProTaper Next X2 (PTN, Dentsply Maillefer, n = 10). All the artificial canals were prepared to obtain a standardized lumen by using ProTaper Universal F1. Screw-in forces were measured using a custom-made experimental device (AEndoS-k, DMJ system) during instrumentation with each NiTi file system using the designated movement. The rotation speed was set at 350 rpm with an automatic 4 mm pecking motion at a speed of 1 mm/sec. The pecking depth was increased by 1 mm for each pecking motion until the file reach the working length. Forces were recorded during file movement, and the maximum force was extracted from the data. Maximum screw-in forces were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc comparison at a significance level of 95%. Results Reciproc and ProTaper Universal files generated the highest maximum screw-in forces among all the instruments while M-two and ProTaper Next showed the lowest (p < 0.05). Conclusions Geometrical differences rather than shaping motion and alloys may affect the screw-in force during canal instrumentation. To reduce screw-in forces, the use of NiTi files with smaller cross-sectional area for higher flexibility is recommended. PMID:27847752

  9. Measurement of Force Balance Repeatability and Reproducibility in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, M. J.; Tuttle, D. G.; Houlden, H. P.; Graham, A. B.

    2004-01-01

    A recently published statistical approach for measuring and evaluating wind tunnel force balance repeatability and reproducibility is applied to three check standard tests in the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. Two different airframe models and force balances were used. The short-term repeatability and within-test reproducibility are separately estimated and correlations with tunnel parameters are carried out. Conjectures are presented for the development of scaling laws for predicting the repeatability and reproducibility of other force balance tests in the tunnel.

  10. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite

  11. Monitoring Coaxial-Probe Contact Force for Dielectric Properties Measurement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A means is described for measuring and monitoring the contact force applied to a material sample with an open-ended coaxial-line probe for purposes of measuring the dielectric properties of semisolid material samples such as fruit, vegetable and animal tissues. The equipment consists of a stainless...

  12. Capillary-force measurement on SiC surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-06-01

    Capillary forces have been measured by atomic force microscopy in the sphere-plate geometry, in a controlled humidity environment, between smooth silicon carbide and borosilicate glass spheres. The force measurements were performed as a function of the rms surface roughness ˜4-14 nm mainly due to sphere morphology, the relative humidity (RH) ˜0%-40%, the applied load on the cantilever, and the contact time. The pull-off force was found to decrease by nearly two orders of magnitude with increasing rms roughness from 8 to 14 nm due to formation of a few capillary menisci for the roughest surfaces, while it remained unchanged for rms roughness <8 nm implying fully wetted surface features leading to a single meniscus. The latter reached a steady state in less than 5 s for the smoothest surfaces, as force measurements versus contact time indicated for increased RH˜40%. Finally, the pull-off force increases and reaches a maximum with applied load, which is associated with plastic deformation of surface asperities, and decreases at higher loads.

  13. Measurement of noise and vibration in Canadian forces armoured vehicles.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ann M; Borland, Matthew J; Abel, Sharon M

    2007-04-01

    Noise and whole-body vibration measurements were made in the following Canadian Forces vehicles: LAV III, Bison and M113A2 ADATS (air defence anti-tank system). Measurements were made at different crew positions while the vehicles were driven at different speeds over rough terrain and paved roads. The participants completed a questionnaire at the end of each measurement session on their reactions to the noise and vibration. Noise levels were as high as 115 dBA in the ADATS, 102 dBA in the Bison and 96 dBA in the LAV III, exceeding the Canada Labour Code exposure limit of 87 dBA for 8 h(1)). A communications headset was found to be sufficient to reduce the noise exposure to safe levels in most cases. The vector sum vibration magnitudes for the LAV III and Bison were relatively low during highway driving (0.3 m/s(2) for both vehicles) compared to rough terrain (0.71 and 1.36 m/s(2), respectively). The ADATS vibration increased with driving speed (0.62 m/s(2) at 8 km/h and 1.26 m/s(2) at 32 km/h). The questionnaire responses indicated that half the crewmembers had difficulty communicating in vehicle noise, but were generally unaffected physically by vibration. The latter result may have been due to the relatively short exposure duration.

  14. Sensitivity of Force Specifications to the Errors in Measuring the Interface Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Force-Limited Random Vibration Testing has been applied in the last several years at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and other NASA centers for various programs at the instrument and spacecraft level. Different techniques have been developed over the last few decades to estimate the dynamic forces that the test article under consideration will encounter in the flight environment. Some of these techniques are described in the handbook, NASA-HDBK-7004, and the monograph, NASA-RP-1403. This paper will show the effects of some measurement and calibration errors in force gauges. In some cases, the notches in the acceleration spectrum when a random vibration test is performed with measurement errors are the same as the notches produced during a test that has no measurement errors. The paper will also present the results Of tests that were used to validate this effect. Knowing the effect of measurement errors can allow tests to continue after force gauge failures or allow dummy gauges to be used in places that are inaccessible to a force gage.

  15. Systemic risk measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Solange Maria; Silva, Thiago Christiano; Tabak, Benjamin Miranda; de Souza Penaloza, Rodrigo Andrés; de Castro Miranda, Rodrigo César

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present systemic risk measures based on contingent claims approach and banking sector multivariate density. We also apply network measures to analyze bank common risk exposure. The proposed measures aim to capture credit risk stress and its potential to become systemic. These indicators capture not only individual bank vulnerability, but also the stress dependency structure between them. Furthermore, these measures can be quite useful for identifying systemically important banks. The empirical results show that these indicators capture with considerable fidelity the moments of increasing systemic risk in the Brazilian banking sector in recent years.

  16. Temporomandibular joint forces measured at the condyle of Macaca arctoides.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Gibbs, C H; Mahan, P E; Richmond, A F; Laskin, J L

    1990-06-01

    Forces were measured at the articular surface of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle in two stump-tail monkeys (Macaca arctoides) during chewing, incisal biting, and drinking and also during aggressive behaviors. Force was measured with a thin piezoelectric foil transducer, which was cemented over the anterior and superior surfaces of the condyle. Wires from the upper and lower surfaces of the foil were insulated between two layers of Teflon tape and run subcutaneously to a telemetry unit, which was implanted in the upper back. Force applied across the foil by the condyle was detected by the telemetry unit and transmitted to an FM radio receiver outside the animal. The FM signals were received and demodulated, and a signal proportional to the force applied between the condyle and the TMJ fossa was displayed on a chart recorder. Data were collected over an 8-day period. The animals were not constrained. The TMJ was found to be load bearing. The greatest force of 39.0 lb (17.7 kg) was measured during feisty vocal aggression. Forces ranged as high as 34.5 lb (15.7 kg) during chewing and 28.5 lb (13.0 kg) during incisal biting. Forces were greater on the working (food) side than on the nonworking (balancing) side by average ratios of 1.4 to 2.6. A large unilateral interference at the most distal molar greatly disturbed chewing. It reduced TMJ forces by 50% or more, and the monkey refused to chew on the side opposite the interference.

  17. Note: Electrical resolution during conductive atomic force microscopy measurements under different environmental conditions and contact forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, M.; Porti, M.; Nafria, M.; Aymerich, X.; Whittaker, E.; Hamilton, B.

    2010-10-15

    Conductive atomic force microscopy experiments on gate dielectrics in air, nitrogen, and UHV have been compared to evaluate the impact of the environment on topography and electrical measurements. In current images, an increase of the lateral resolution and a reduction of the conductivity were observed in N{sub 2} and, especially, in UHV (where current depends also on the contact force). Both effects were related to the reduction/elimination of the water layer between the tip and the sample in N{sub 2}/UHV. Therefore, since current measurements are very sensitive to environmental conditions, these factors must be taken into consideration when comparisons between several experiments are performed.

  18. Space Acceleration Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2000-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement Systems (SAMS) Project develops and deploys the measurement systems for the Acceleration Measurement Program (AMP). At this time there are two types of measurement systems available, quasi-steady and vibratory. Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) and Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) are the current quasi-steady systems available. OARE has flown numerous times supporting STS missions. MAMS has been delivered to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for its deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). Vibratory measurements have been made and will be made by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS-I) Generation I, Space Acceleration Measurement System Generation II (SAMS-II), and Space Acceleration Measurement System Free Flyer or Generation III (SAMS-FF). SAMS-I supported 21 STS missions and has been retired. SAMS-II will be delivered to KSC to support ISS-6A launch (currently April 19, 2001). SAMS-FF has replaced SAMS-I in support of STS missions and has been deployed on sounding rockets, the KC-135 and ground facilities. SAMS-FF hardware shall be deployed on ISS in the future to provide a more compact solution.

  19. An aspect of denture base retention: direct measurement of force due to surface tension.

    PubMed

    Murray, M D; Darvell, B W

    1991-01-01

    A fixed-volume drop of liquid between a pair of parallel surfaces has been a common model for the denture-mucosa system. The reported one-term equation for the model, the derivation of which is suspect, implies that the acting force is inversely proportional to the square of the separation. Direct measurement of the force, however, showed that a better approximation is given by a two-term equation, with force varying as the inverse of the separation. The need for rigorous theoretical derivation is thereby emphasized. The experimental data suggest that a maximum retention force might occur for denture bases at separations of about 15 microns.

  20. Fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in wound healing: force generation and measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Wang, James H-C

    2011-11-01

    Fibroblasts are one of the most abundant cell types in connective tissues. These cells are responsible for tissue homeostasis under normal physiological conditions. When tissues are injured, fibroblasts become activated and differentiate into myofibroblasts, which generate large contractions and actively produce extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to facilitate wound closure. Both fibroblasts and myofibroblasts play a critical role in wound healing by generating traction and contractile forces, respectively, to enhance wound contraction. This review focuses on the mechanisms of force generation in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts and techniques for measuring such cellular forces. Such a topic was chosen specifically because of the dual effects that fibroblasts/myofibroblasts have in wound healing process- a suitable amount of force generation and matrix deposition is beneficial for wound healing; excessive force and matrix production, however, result in tissue scarring and even malfunction of repaired tissues. Therefore, understanding how forces are generated in these cells and knowing exactly how much force they produce may guide the development of optimal protocols for more effective treatment of tissue wounds in clinical settings. Copyright © 2009 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Elasticity measurement of breast cancer cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaoxian; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Yang, Hongqin; Lin, Juqiang; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical properties of living cells play an important role in understanding various cells' function and state. Therefore cell biomechanics is expected to become a useful tool for cancer diagnosis. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a square pyramid probe was performed to investigate cancerous (MCF-7) and benign (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cells. The new QITM mode was used to acquire high-resolution topographic images and elasticity of living cells. Furthermore, individual force curves were recorded at maximum loads of 0.2, 0.5 and 1 nN, and the dependence of cell's elasticity with loading force was discussed. It was showed that the cancerous cells exhibited smaller elasticity modulus in comparison to non-cancerous counterparts. The elasticity modulus increased as the loading force increased from 0.2 nN to 1 nN. This observation indicates that loading force affects the cell's apparent elasticity and it is important to choose the appropriate force applied to cells in order to distinguish normal and cancer cells. The results reveal that the mechanical properties of living cells measured by atomic force microscopy may be a useful indicator of cell type and disease.

  2. Force measurements in stiff, 3D, opaque granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Hall, Stephen A.; Andrade, José E.; Wright, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    We present results from two experiments that provide the first quantification of inter-particle force networks in stiff, 3D, opaque granular materials. Force vectors between all grains were determined using a mathematical optimization technique that seeks to satisfy grain equilibrium and strain measurements. Quantities needed in the optimization - the spatial location of the inter-particle contact network and tensor grain strains - were found using 3D X-ray diffraction and X-ray computed tomography. The statistics of the force networks are consistent with those found in past simulations and 2D experiments. In particular, we observe an exponential decay of normal forces above the mean and a partition of forces into strong and weak networks. In the first experiment, involving 77 single-crystal quartz grains, we also report on the temporal correlation of the force network across two sequential load cycles. In the second experiment, involving 1099 single-crystal ruby grains, we characterize force network statistics at low levels of compression.

  3. Measuring cellular traction forces on non-planar substrates

    PubMed Central

    Soiné, Jérôme R. D.; Hersch, Nils; Dreissen, Georg; Hampe, Nico; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Animal cells use traction forces to sense the mechanics and geometry of their environment. Measuring these traction forces requires a workflow combining cell experiments, image processing and force reconstruction based on elasticity theory. Such procedures have already been established mainly for planar substrates, in which case one can use the Green's function formalism. Here we introduce a workflow to measure traction forces of cardiac myofibroblasts on non-planar elastic substrates. Soft elastic substrates with a wave-like topology were micromoulded from polydimethylsiloxane and fluorescent marker beads were distributed homogeneously in the substrate. Using feature vector-based tracking of these marker beads, we first constructed a hexahedral mesh for the substrate. We then solved the direct elastic boundary volume problem on this mesh using the finite-element method. Using data simulations, we show that the traction forces can be reconstructed from the substrate deformations by solving the corresponding inverse problem with an L1-norm for the residue and an L2-norm for a zeroth-order Tikhonov regularization. Applying this procedure to the experimental data, we find that cardiac myofibroblast cells tend to align both their shapes and their forces with the long axis of the deformable wavy substrate. PMID:27708757

  4. A measurement of the maximal forces in plasmonic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Dae; Choi, Jun-Hee; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2015-10-23

    Plasmonic tweezers that are designed to trap nanoscale objects create many new possibilities for single-molecule targeted studies. Numerous novel designs of plasmonic nanostructures are proposed in order to attain stronger forces and weaker laser intensity. Most experiments have consisted only of immobilization observations--that is, particles stick when the laser is turned on and fall away when the laser is turned off. Studies of the exertable forces were only theoretical. A few studies have experimentally measured trap stiffness. However, as far as we know, no studies have addressed maximal forces. In this paper, we present a new experimental design in which the motion of the trapped particle can be monitored in either parallel or orthogonal directions to the plasmonic structure's symmetric axis. We measured maximal trapping force through such monitoring. Although stiffness would be useful for force-calibration or immobilization purposes, for which most plasmonic tweezers are used, we believe that the maximal endurable force is significant and thus, this paper presents this aspect.

  5. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces

    PubMed Central

    Munday, J. N.; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies1–3. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces4. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz5–7, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies8–11. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction12, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction13–15. PMID:19129843

  6. Application of sensing techniques to cellular force measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Wang, James H-C

    2010-01-01

    Cell traction forces (CTFs) are the forces produced by cells and exerted on extracellular matrix or an underlying substrate. CTFs function to maintain cell shape, enable cell migration, and generate and detect mechanical signals. As such, they play a vital role in many fundamental biological processes, including angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. Therefore, a close examination of CTFs can enable better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of such processes. To this end, various force-sensing techniques for CTF measurement have been developed over the years. This article will provide a concise review of these sensing techniques and comment on the needs for improved force-sensing technologies for cell mechanics and biology research.

  7. Capillary force on a tilted cylinder: Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sébastien; Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey

    2017-11-01

    The capillary force in situations where the liquid meniscus is asymmetric, such as the one around a tilted object, has been hitherto barely investigated even though these situations are very common in practice. In particular, the capillary force exerted on a tilted object may depend on the dipping angle i. We investigate experimentally the capillary force that applies on a tilted cylinder as a function of its dipping angle i, using a home-built tilting Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with custom made probes. A micrometric-size rod is glued at the end of an AFM cantilever of known stiffness, whose deflection is measured when the cylindrical probe is dipped in and retracted from reference liquids. We show that a torque correction is necessary to understand the measured deflection. We give the explicit expression of this correction as a function of the probes' geometrical parameters, so that its magnitude can be readily evaluated. The results are compatible with a vertical capillary force varying as 1/cosi, in agreement with a recent theoretical prediction. Finally, we discuss the accuracy of the method for measuring the surface tension times the cosine of the contact angle of the liquid on the probe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of transmitted blast force-time histories

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Benjamin Langhorst; Corey Cook; James Schondel; Dr. Henry S. Chu

    2010-03-01

    A simple, reliable, and cost effective method is presented for the measurement of transmitted force behind a panel subjected to blast loads. Sensors were designed for a specific blast environment and successfully used to measure transmitted blast force behind solid polyethylene plates of thickness 0.125 and 0.25 inches. Experimental data was collected and examined to reveal consistent differences in the response of different thicknesses of otherwise identical panels. Finally, recommendations are made for future design, construction and use of similar sensors.

  9. A novel transparent dielectric elastomer sensor for compressive force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yiming; Wan, Bile; Li, Guorui; Xie, Yuhan; Li, Tiefeng

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer sensors show great potential for wearable electronics and mechatronic applications. However, these sensors have some deficiencies in their appearance and low sensitivity to compressive force measurements. We demonstrate a novel dielectric elastomer sensor enabled by ionic liquid that has fully transparent appearance, low resistivity and the capacity of actuation at large-scale frequencies. We investigate the basic mechanical behaviors of the sensor experimentally. It is noted that the sensor has a remarkable sensitivity to measure compressive force, which is higher than the existing stacked dielectric elastomer sensors.

  10. Instrumented figure skating blade for measuring on-ice skating forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, S. A.; Smith, D. M.; Robinson, J. M.; Hawks, J. C.; Starbuck, P.; King, D. L.; Ridge, S. T.; Charles, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Competitive figure skaters experience substantial, repeated impact loading during jumps and landings. Although these loads, which are thought to be as high as six times body weight, can lead to overuse injuries, it is not currently possible to measure these forces on-ice. Consequently, efforts to improve safety for skaters are significantly limited. Here we present the development of an instrumented figure skating blade for measuring forces on-ice. The measurement system consists of strain gauges attached to the blade, Wheatstone bridge circuit boards, and a data acquisition device. The system is capable of measuring forces in the vertical and horizontal directions (inferior-superior and anterior-posterior directions, respectively) in each stanchion with a sampling rate of at least 1000 Hz and a resolution of approximately one-tenth of body weight. The entire system weighs 142 g and fits in the space under the boot. Calibration between applied and measured force showed excellent agreement (R > 0.99), and a preliminary validation against a force plate showed good predictive ability overall (R ≥ 0.81 in vertical direction). The system overestimated the magnitude of the first and second impact peaks but detected their timing with high accuracy compared to the force plate.

  11. Air Force Enlisted Force Management: System Interactions and Synchronization Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Defense OSI Office of Special Investigations PFE Promotion Fitness Exam PPBE Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution RAW AFPC’s Retrieval...Force Management ness exam ( PFE ), score on the Skills Knowledge Test (SKT), time in service (TIS), and time in grade (TIG).8 Promotion to E8 and E9 has...the PFE . Tests that are more difficult lead to a wider range of test scores. Within an AFSC, this tends to favor good testers by 8 E4s–E6s earn up to

  12. Wettability and surface forces measured by atomic force microscopy: the role of roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavoille, J.; Takadoum, J.; Martin, N.; Durand, D.

    2009-10-01

    Thin films of titanium, copper and silver with various roughnesses were prepared by physical vapour deposition technique: dc magnetron sputtering. By varying the deposition time from few minutes to one hour it was possible to obtain metallic films with surface roughness average ranging from 1 to 20 nm. The wettability of these films was studied by measuring the contact angle using the sessile drop method and surface forces were investigated using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) by measuring the pull-off force between the AFM tip and the surfaces. Experimental results have been mainly discussed in terms of metal surface reactivity, Young modulus of the materials and real surface of contact between the AFM tip and the film surfaces.

  13. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  14. Force-detecting gripper and force feedback system for neurosurgery applications.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Kagawa, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Junichiro; Hayashi, Yutaka; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2013-09-01

    For the application of less invasive robotic neurosurgery to the resection of deep-seated tumors, a prototype system of a force-detecting gripper with a flexible micromanipulator and force feedback to the operating unit will be developed. Gripping force applied on the gripper is detected by strain gauges attached to the gripper clip. The signal is transmitted to the amplifier by wires running through the inner tube of the manipulator. Proportional force is applied on the finger lever of the operating unit by the surgeon using a bilateral control program. A pulling force experienced by the gripper is also detected at the gripper clip. The signal for the pulling force is transmitted in a manner identical to that mentioned previously, and the proportional torque is applied on the touching roller of the finger lever of the operating unit. The surgeon can feel the gripping force as the resistance of the operating force of the finger and can feel the pulling force as the friction at the finger surface. A basic operation test showed that both the gripping force and pulling force were clearly detected in the gripping of soft material and that the operator could feel the gripping force and pulling force at the finger lever of the operating unit. A prototype of the force feedback in the microgripping manipulator system has been developed. The system will be useful for removing deep-seated brain tumors in future master-slave-type robotic neurosurgery.

  15. Forced and Moment Measurements with Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) to provide aerodynamic loads measurements has been a driving force behind the development of this measurement technique. To demonstrate the suitability of PSP for this purpose, it is necessary to show that PSP-derived pressures can be accurately integrated over the model surface. This cannot be done simply by demonstrating the accuracy of PSP as compared to pressure taps. PSP errors due to misregistration or temperature sensitivity may be high near model edges, where they will have a strong effect on moment measurements, but where pressure taps are rarely installed. A more suitable technique is to compare integrated PSP data over the entire model surface with balance and/or CFD results. This paper presents results from three experiments in which integrated PSP data is compared with balance and/or CFD data. This allows the usefulness of PSP for force and moment measurements, and by implication for loads measurements, to be assessed.

  16. A Simple Instrument for Measuring Surface Forces in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, James; Tromp, Rudolf; Haight, Richard; Ellis, Arthur

    2015-03-01

    We have constructed a simple instrument to measure the interaction force between two surfaces in solution, or in vacuum. Specifically, we measure the interaction between a lens and a thin silicon cantilever. Either the lens, or the cantilever (or both) can be coated with the species of interest. When the lens is brought close to the cantilever surface, the force of interaction causes the cantilever to bend. By measuring the deflection as a function of the distance between the lens and cantilever, the long-range interactions between the two surfaces can be determined. Our approach includes three important innovations. First, a commercial lens with a radius of ~ 1 cm is used for one surface. The relatively large radius of curvature enhances force sensitivity of the method. Second, we use optical interference (Newton's Rings) to determine the distance between lens and cantilever with ~ 1 nm accuracy. Third, we make use of thin crystalline cantilevers (100 μm thick) whose elastic properties can be easily measured. We have achieved a force sensitivity F / R better than 0.001 mN/m. I will discuss the theory of operation of the new instrument and describe measurements made on SiO2 and metal oxide surfaces in water.

  17. Standardized voluntary force measurement in a lower extremity rehabilitation robot.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Marc; Banz, Raphael; Dietz, Volker; Lünenburger, Lars

    2008-10-28

    Isometric force measurements in the lower extremity are widely used in rehabilitation of subjects with neurological movement disorders (NMD) because walking ability has been shown to be related to muscle strength. Therefore muscle strength measurements can be used to monitor and control the effects of training programs. A new method to assess isometric muscle force was implemented in the driven gait orthosis (DGO) Lokomat. To evaluate the capabilities of this new measurement method, inter- and intra-rater reliability were assessed. Reliability was assessed in subjects with and without NMD. Subjects were tested twice on the same day by two different therapists to test inter-rater reliability and on two separate days by the same therapist to test intra-rater reliability. Results showed fair to good reliability for the new measurement method to assess isometric muscle force of lower extremities. In subjects without NMD, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for inter-rater reliability ranged from 0.72 to 0.97 and intra-rater reliability from 0.71 to 0.90. In subjects with NMD, ICC ranged from 0.66 to 0.97 for inter-rater and from 0.50 to 0.96 for intra-rater reliability. Inter- and intra- rater reliability of an assessment method for measuring maximal voluntary isometric muscle force of lower extremities was demonstrated. We suggest that this method is a valuable tool for documentation and controlling of the rehabilitation process in patients using a DGO.

  18. Systematic review of ground reaction force measurements in cats.

    PubMed

    Schnabl, E; Bockstahler, B

    2015-10-01

    Although orthopaedic abnormalities in cats are frequently observed radiographically, they remain clinically underdiagnosed, and kinetic motion analysis, a fundamental aspect of orthopaedic research in dogs and horses, is not commonly performed. More information obtained with non-invasive measurement techniques to assess normal and abnormal gait in cats would provide a greater insight into their locomotion and biomechanics and improve the objective measurement of disease alterations and treatment modalities. In this systematic review, 12 previously performed studies that investigated ground reaction force measurements in cats during locomotion were evaluated. The aims of these studies, the measurement methods and equipment used, and the outcomes of parameters used to assess both sound and diseased cats are summarised and discussed. All reviewed studies used pressure sensitive walkways to gain data and all provided an acclimatisation period as a prerequisite for measurements. In sound cats during walking, the forelimb peak vertical force was greater than in the hindlimb and the peak vertical force in the hindlimb was greater in cats than in dogs. This review confirms that ground reaction forces can be used to evaluate lameness and treatment effects in the cat.

  19. Objective measurements of muscle force in a group of after-stroke patients with hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Pasternak-Mladzka, Irena; Mladzki, Zbigniew; Bedzinski, Romuald; Baran, Bogusława

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the strength of spastic muscles using Biodex System 3 within a group of patients with hemiparesis in after-stroke population. Measurements of the moments of force in elbow flexors and extensors of both spastic and non-spastic limbs were conducted under isostatic conditions. We analysed the values obtained for both limbs in order to determine the spasticity level on an Ashworth scale (0-4). The subjects were 10 patients with hemiparesis and varying spasticity selected from an after-stroke population. The analysis showed that spastic muscles activated less force than non-spastic muscles of the same patient. Furthermore, in a spastic limb, higher values of force were noted in the flexors than in the extensors of the elbow. In a non-spastic limb, the values of force were higher in the extensors of the elbow joint than in flexors. It is worth adding that the dynamics of force exposure, defined by a gradient of force, was much lower in spastic muscles than in non-spastic ones. Objective estimation of muscle force can be done by measuring the moments of force in particular groups of muscles upon the isokinetic contraction appearing. The repeatability of measurements may enable the kind of kinesitherapy to be determined as well as the assessment of the effectiveness of exercises in regard to force increase and dynamics of spastic muscles.

  20. Design and testing of an innovative measurement device for tyre-road contact forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheli, F.; Braghin, F.; Brusarosco, M.; Mancosu, F.; Sabbioni, E.

    2011-08-01

    The measurement of tyre-road contact forces is the first step towards the development of new control systems for improving vehicle safety and performances. Tyre-road contact forces measurement systems are very expensive and significantly modify the unsprung masses of the vehicle as well as the rotational inertia of the tyres. Thus, vehicle dynamics results are significantly affected. As a consequence, the measured contact forces do not correspond to the contact forces under real working conditions. A new low-cost tyre-road contact forces measurement system is proposed in this paper that can be applied to passenger cars. Its working principle is based on the measurement of three deformations of the wheel rim through strain gauges. The tyre-rim assembly is thus turned into a sensor for tyre-road contact forces. The influence of the strain gauges position onto the measurement results has been assessed through finite element simulations and experimental tests. It has been proven that, for a large variety of rims, the strain gauge position that leads to high signal-to-noise ratios is almost the same. A dynamic calibration procedure has been developed in order to allow the reconstruction of contact force and torque components once per wheel turn. The capability of the developed device to correctly estimate tyre-road contact forces has been assessed, in a first stage, through indoor laboratory experimental test on an MTS Flat-Trac ® testing machine. Results show that the implemented measuring system allows to reconstruct contact forces once per wheel turn with a precision that is comparable to that of existing high-cost measurement systems. Subsequently, outdoor tests with a vehicle having all four wheels equipped with the developed measuring device have also been performed. Reliability of the measurements provided by the developed sensor has been assessed by comparing the global measured longitudinal/lateral forces and the product of the measured longitudinal

  1. Stable force identification in structural dynamics using Kalman filtering and dummy-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naets, F.; Cuadrado, J.; Desmet, W.

    2015-01-01

    Many engineering applications require the knowledge of input forces to mechanical systems. However, in practice, it is quite difficult to measure these forces directly. In order to obtain an estimate of the input forces to structural systems, Kalman filtering based techniques have recently been introduced. These state-estimation techniques allow estimating the forces concurrent with the states of a system, based on a limited number of measurements. In practice, acceleration measurements are most convenient to use in structural dynamics applications. This paper proposes an analytical analysis of the stability of the Kalman based force estimation techniques and shows that only using acceleration measurements inherently leads to unreliable results. In order to circumvent this issue, the addition of dummy-measurements on a position level is proposed. These fictitious measurements dictate the estimator to return to an undeformed state and lead to a stable estimation approach. The proposed method is validated through both a numerical and a practical experiment. Both experiments show the inadequacy of the augmented Kalman filter based on only acceleration measurements to provide stable results. The estimator with dummy measurements on the other hand provides good results in the case of an unbiased external load.

  2. Dynamic force signal processing system of a robot manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uchiyama, M.; Kitagaki, K.; Hakomori, K.

    1987-01-01

    If dynamic noises such as those caused by the inertia forces of the hand can be eliminated from the signal of the force sensor installed on the wrist of the robot manipulator and if the necessary information of the external force can be detected with high sensitivity and high accuracy, a fine force feedback control for robots used in high speed and various fields will be possible. As the dynamic force sensing system, an external force estimate method with the extended Kalman filter is suggested and simulations and tests for a one axis force were performed. Later a dynamic signal processing system of six axes was composed and tested. The results are presented.

  3. The force module for the bending art system. Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Brandies, H; Orthuber, W; Ermert, M; Hussmanns, A

    1998-01-01

    The force module for the bending art system (BAS) is used to calculate the initial forces and moments expected to act on a tooth after changing arch wires. The present study analyses the accuracy of the force module on the basis of 10 patients treated with the BAS (with an average observation period of 10 months). An average of 6 arch wires (0.16" x 0.016" steel) were used on each jaw. The approximate pressure in the periodontium was determined and statistically evaluated from the force module readings. The resulting average pressure values for the molars ranged between 0.26 N/cm2 and 0.54 N/cm2. The value in the area of the incisors, cuspids and bicuspids ranged between 1.03 N/cm2 and 2.83 N/cm2. Maximum pressure was 8.02 N/cm2. The results are discussed from a clinical point of view on a case-to-case basis. They are plausible in and for themselves. The more severe the initial state of misalignment, the higher the pressure values. These forces can be reduced by increasing the number of arch wires or by altering the form of the archwire correspondingly. The computer-generated values should be confirmed by taking a direct measurement on the tooth. The force module is just the first step in providing a reproducible estimation of the forces acting on a tooth. Even if the calculated absolute values should still be judged with reservation, they are nevertheless suitable for providing a comparative evaluation of various treatment concepts with reference to the forces acting on the periodontium and can serve clinicians as a rapidly available decision-making aid.

  4. Measurement of impact force, simulation of fall and hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Gardner, T N; Simpson, A H; Booth, C; Sprukkelhorst, P; Evans, M; Kenwright, J; Evans, J G

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that the incidence of hip fracture in the elderly may be influenced by the type of floor covering commonly used in homes for the elderly. This study describes the development of a method for modelling a fall during a hip fracture event, to examine the influence of different floors on impact force. An impact transducer is dropped in free fall through a smooth plastic tube. The impactor nose of the transducer models the curvature of the greater trochanter, and a steel spring is used to simulate the compliance of the skeletal structure. A weight, which corresponds to one-sixteenth of average body mass, compresses the spring and applies force to the impactor nose on striking the floor. The temporal variation in the force of impact with the floor is measured by the transducer to within 0.41 percent (SD = 0.63%, n = 10). Five common floor coverings were tested over a concrete floor slab (vinyl, loop carpet and pile carpet--both with and without underpad). ANOVA analysis showed that the differences between mean forces for each floor covering were highly significant (p > 0.001), with the thicker coverings producing 7 percent lower forces. The transducer may be used to examine the correlation between impact force and fracture incidence for a variety of different floors in homes for the elderly.

  5. Force-Velocity Measurements of a Few Growing Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Brangbour, Coraline; du Roure, Olivia; Helfer, Emmanuèle; Démoulin, Damien; Mazurier, Alexis; Fermigier, Marc; Carlier, Marie-France; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The polymerization of actin in filaments generates forces that play a pivotal role in many cellular processes. We introduce a novel technique to determine the force-velocity relation when a few independent anchored filaments grow between magnetic colloidal particles. When a magnetic field is applied, the colloidal particles assemble into chains under controlled loading or spacing. As the filaments elongate, the beads separate, allowing the force-velocity curve to be precisely measured. In the widely accepted Brownian ratchet model, the transduced force is associated with the slowing down of the on-rate polymerization. Unexpectedly, in our experiments, filaments are shown to grow at the same rate as when they are free in solution. However, as they elongate, filaments are more confined in the interspace between beads. Higher repulsive forces result from this higher confinement, which is associated with a lower entropy. In this mechanism, the production of force is not controlled by the polymerization rate, but is a consequence of the restriction of filaments' orientational fluctuations at their attachment point. PMID:21541364

  6. Development of low temperature atomic force microscopy with an optical beam deflection system capable of simultaneously detecting the lateral and vertical forces.

    PubMed

    Arima, Eiji; Wen, Huanfei; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a very important tool for imaging and investigating the complex force interactions on sample surfaces with high spatial resolution. In the AFM, two types of detection systems of the tip-sample interaction forces have been used: an optical detection system and an electrical detection system. In optical detection systems, such as optical beam deflection system or optical fiber interferometer system, both the lateral and the vertical tip-sample forces can be measured simultaneously. In electrical detection systems, such as qPlus or Kolibri sensors, either the lateral or vertical forces can be measured. Simultaneous measurement of the lateral and vertical interaction forces effectively allows investigation of force interactions because the force is a vector with magnitude and direction. In this study, we developed a low-temperature, frequency-modulation AFM using an optical beam deflection system to simultaneously measure the vertical and lateral forces. In this system, the heat sources, such as a laser diode and a current-to-voltage converter, for measuring the photocurrent of the four-segmented photodiode are located outside the observation chamber to avoid a temperature increase of the AFM unit. The focused optical beam is three-dimensionally adjustable on the back side of the cantilever. We demonstrate low-noise displacement measurement of the cantilever and successful atomic resolution imaging using the vertical and lateral forces at low temperatures.

  7. Development of low temperature atomic force microscopy with an optical beam deflection system capable of simultaneously detecting the lateral and vertical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Eiji; Wen, Huanfei; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a very important tool for imaging and investigating the complex force interactions on sample surfaces with high spatial resolution. In the AFM, two types of detection systems of the tip-sample interaction forces have been used: an optical detection system and an electrical detection system. In optical detection systems, such as optical beam deflection system or optical fiber interferometer system, both the lateral and the vertical tip-sample forces can be measured simultaneously. In electrical detection systems, such as qPlus or Kolibri sensors, either the lateral or vertical forces can be measured. Simultaneous measurement of the lateral and vertical interaction forces effectively allows investigation of force interactions because the force is a vector with magnitude and direction. In this study, we developed a low-temperature, frequency-modulation AFM using an optical beam deflection system to simultaneously measure the vertical and lateral forces. In this system, the heat sources, such as a laser diode and a current-to-voltage converter, for measuring the photocurrent of the four-segmented photodiode are located outside the observation chamber to avoid a temperature increase of the AFM unit. The focused optical beam is three-dimensionally adjustable on the back side of the cantilever. We demonstrate low-noise displacement measurement of the cantilever and successful atomic resolution imaging using the vertical and lateral forces at low temperatures.

  8. Force Exertion Capacity Measurements in Haptic Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munih, Marko; Bardorfer, Ales; Ceru, Bojan; Bajd, Tadej; Zupan, Anton

    2010-01-01

    An objective test for evaluating functional status of the upper limbs (ULs) in patients with muscular distrophy (MD) is presented. The method allows for quantitative assessment of the UL functional state with an emphasis on force exertion capacity. The experimental measurement setup and the methodology for the assessment of maximal exertable force…

  9. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  10. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  11. Direct force-measuring transducer used in blood pressure research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eige, J. J.; Newgard, P. M.; Pressman, G. L.

    1965-01-01

    Direct force measuring transducer acts as an arterial tonometer, gives a direct readout to instrumentation, and is unaffected by ambient noise. It uses a semiconductor strain gage which is deflected by pressure pulses in the artery. The deflection changes the resistance of the gage and alters the voltage reading on the associated instrumentation.

  12. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  13. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  14. 21 CFR 890.1575 - Force-measuring platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Force-measuring platform. 890.1575 Section 890.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1575...

  15. Model Engine Performance Measurement From Force Balance Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeracki, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A large scale model representative of a low-noise, high bypass ratio turbofan engine was tested for acoustics and performance in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. This test was part of NASA's continuing Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. The low tip speed fan, nacelle, and an un-powered core passage (with core inlet guide vanes) were simulated. The fan blades and hub are mounted on a rotating thrust and torque balance. The nacelle, bypass duct stators, and core passage are attached to a six component force balance. The two balance forces, when corrected for internal pressure tares, measure the total thrust-minus-drag of the engine simulator. Corrected for scaling and other effects, it is basically the same force that the engine supports would feel, operating at similar conditions. A control volume is shown and discussed, identifying the various force components of the engine simulator thrust and definitions of net thrust. Several wind tunnel runs with nearly the same hardware installed are compared, to identify the repeatability of the measured thrust-minus-drag. Other wind tunnel runs, with hardware changes that affected fan performance, are compared to the baseline configuration, and the thrust and torque effects are shown. Finally, a thrust comparison between the force balance and nozzle gross thrust methods is shown, and both yield very similar results.

  16. Bite force measurements with hard and soft bite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Serra, C M; Manns, A E

    2013-08-01

    Bite force has been measured by different methods and over a wide variety of designs. In several instruments, the fact that bite surface has been manufactured with stiff materials might interfere in obtaining reliable data, by a more prompt activation of inhibitory reflex mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to compare the maximum voluntary bite force measured by a digital occlusal force gauge (GM10 Nagano Keiki, Japan) between different opponent teeth, employing semi-hard or soft bite surfaces. A sample of 34 young adults with complete natural dentition was studied. The original semi-hard bite surface was exchanged by a soft one, made of leather and rubber. Maximum voluntary bite force recordings were made for each tooth group and for both bite surfaces. Statistical analyses (Student's t-test) revealed significant differences, with higher scores while using the soft surface across sexes and tooth groups (P < 0·05). Differential activation of periodontal mechanoreceptors of a specific tooth group is mainly conditioned by the hardness of the bite surface; a soft surface induces greater activation of elevator musculature, while a hard one induces inhibition more promptly. Thus, soft bite surfaces are recommended for higher reliability in maximum voluntary bite force recordings.

  17. Noncontact intraoral measurement of force-related tooth mobility.

    PubMed

    Göllner, Matthias; Holst, Alexandra; Berthold, Christine; Schmitt, Johannes; Wichmann, Manfred; Holst, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to measure force-related tooth mobility. Vertical and horizontal anterior tooth mobility in 31 healthy periodontal subjects was measured by a noncontact optical measurement technique. The subjects continuously increased the force on each tooth by biting on a load cell. An automated software program recorded tooth displacement at 9-N intervals. Vertical and horizontal displacements were subsequently measured. The vector of tooth mobility in the buccal direction was calculated using the Pythagorean theorem. The average displacements over all subjects for each tooth were determined. Global differences were assessed with the Wilcoxon test. There were no significant differences between contralateral teeth overall load stages. There were no significant differences in tooth mobility between the central and lateral incisors except for in the horizontal direction. However, there were significant differences between central incisor and canine and lateral incisor and canine teeth.

  18. Harnessing bifurcations in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy to calibrate time-varying tip-sample force measurements.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2007-10-01

    Torsional harmonic cantilevers allow measurement of time-varying tip-sample forces in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy. Accuracy of these force measurements is important for quantitative nanomechanical measurements. Here we demonstrate a method to convert the torsional deflection signals into a calibrated force wave form with the use of nonlinear dynamical response of the tapping cantilever. Specifically the transitions between steady oscillation regimes are used to calibrate the torsional deflection signals.

  19. Ultrasonic linear measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic linear measurement system uses the travel time of surface waves along the perimeter of a three-dimensional curvilinear body to determine the perimeter of the curvilinear body. The system can also be used piece-wise to measure distances along plane surfaces. The system can be used to measure perimeters where use of laser light, optical means or steel tape would be extremely difficult, time consuming or impossible. It can also be used to determine discontinuities in surfaces of known perimeter or dimension.

  20. Measuring and Understanding Forces on Atomic Length Scales with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Jason Paul

    Most microscopes can be used with little understanding of how they work--much can be learned looking through a light microscope without ever knowing what a photon is or who Maxwell was--and the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is no exception. Many AFM images don't look much different from a mountainous landscape, and much is learned interpreting them as such; however, to really push a microscope to its limits means understanding the interactions creating the contrast in the picture. For a Scanning Electron Microscope, this means understanding how electrons interact with matter, for an AFM it means understanding forces. The focus of this thesis is understanding the forces acting (especially in liquids) between tip and sample in AFM and a better understanding the instrument itself. Chapters I, II and VI involve better characterizing and improving the most important part of the AFM, the tiny cantilever used to measure forces. Chapter I describes a solution to one of the most basic problems that must be solved before forces can be accurately measured--measuring the stiffness of these cantilevers. Many limitations in AFM are set by physical characteristics of the cantilever itself, such as resonance frequency, spring constant, and quality factor. If an external force can be applied to the cantilever, feedback can be used to improve these characteristics. Chapter II shows how to do this using a magnetically applied external force, which has the advantage of working in liquids. These physical characteristics also change drastically when the cantilever is immersed in fluid. The resonance frequency of common cantilevers drops by as much as a factor of six in going from air to water. Chapter VI studies these changes and shows how further miniaturization of cantilevers can improve imaging speeds and signal-to-noise ratio. Early in its career, the AFM was heralded as having atomic resolution, but as the field matured researchers realized that the contact area between tip and

  1. Detection of Periodic Forced Oscillations in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, Jim; Pierre, John W.

    2015-08-27

    An algorithm for the detection and frequency estimation of forced oscillations in power systems is proposed. The method operates by comparing the periodogram of synchrophasor measurements to a detection threshold. This threshold is established by deriving a general expression for the distribution of the periodogram and is related to the algorithm's probabilities of false alarm and detection. Unlike classic detection algorithms designed for use with white Gaussian noise, the proposed algorithm uses a detection threshold that varies with frequency to account for the colored nature of synchrophasor measurements. Further, a detection scheme based on multiple segments of data is proposed to improve the algorithm's performance as a monitoring tool in the online environment. A design approach that helps to ensure that the best-available probability of detection from any one detection segment is constantly increasing with the duration of the forced oscillation is also developed. Results from application of the detection algorithm to simulated and measured power system data suggest that the algorithm provides the expected detection performance and can be used to detect forced oscillations in practical monitoring of power systems.

  2. Pressure Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the $600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  3. Pressure Measurement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the 600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  4. Friction of ice measured using lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Inoue, Takahito; Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-03-15

    The friction of nanometer thin ice films grown on mica substrates is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Friction was found to be of similar magnitude as the static friction of ice reported in macroscopic experiments. The possible existence of a lubricating film of water due to pressure melting, frictional heating, and surface premelting is discussed based on the experimental results using noncontact, contact, and lateral force microscopy. We conclude that AFM measures the dry friction of ice due to the low scan speed and the squeezing out of the water layer between the sharp AFM tip and the ice surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Aerodynamics of Dragonfly in Hover: Force measurements and PIV results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xinyan; Hu, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    We useda pair of dynamically scaled robotic dragonfly model wings to investigate the aerodynamic effects of wing-wing interaction in dragonflies. We follow the wing kinematics of real dragonflies in hover, while systematically varied the phase difference between the forewing and hindwing. Instantaneous aerodynamic forces and torques were measured on both wings, while flow visualization and PIV results were obtained. The results show that, in hovering flight, wing-wing interaction causes force reduction for both wings at most of the phase angle differences except around 0 degree (when the wings are beating in-phase).

  6. Air Force Officer Evaluation System Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    supervisor-subordinate relationships, and most private sector organizations ti"-n supervisors to give such feedback. AIR FORCE CULTURE o There exists...Alternative OER designs should reflect and sustain the larger Air Force culture ; 0 Within the Air Force, the alternative OER designs should encourage change...given the Air Force history and culture favoring "firewalling*, there is substantial risk that this approach would meet considerable resistance to

  7. Joint force protection advanced security system (JFPASS) "the future of force protection: integrate and automate"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Carlos E.; Fagan, Joe E.

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Defense (DoD) defines 'force protection' as "preventive measures taken to mitigate hostile actions against DoD personnel (to include family members), resources, facilities, and critical information." Advanced technologies enable significant improvements in automating and distributing situation awareness, optimizing operator time, and improving sustainability, which enhance protection and lower costs. The JFPASS Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) demonstrates a force protection environment that combines physical security and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) defense through the application of integrated command and control and data fusion. The JFPASS JCTD provides a layered approach to force protection by integrating traditional sensors used in physical security, such as video cameras, battlefield surveillance radars, unmanned and unattended ground sensors. The optimization of human participation and automation of processes is achieved by employment of unmanned ground vehicles, along with remotely operated lethal and less-than-lethal weapon systems. These capabilities are integrated via a tailorable, user-defined common operational picture display through a data fusion engine operating in the background. The combined systems automate the screening of alarms, manage the information displays, and provide assessment and response measures. The data fusion engine links disparate sensors and systems, and applies tailored logic to focus the assessment of events. It enables timely responses by providing the user with automated and semi-automated decision support tools. The JFPASS JCTD uses standard communication/data exchange protocols, which allow the system to incorporate future sensor technologies or communication networks, while maintaining the ability to communicate with legacy or existing systems.

  8. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Reynier, Yvan; Yazami, Rachid; Fultz, Brent T.

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  9. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  10. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  11. Photothermally excited force modulation microscopy for broadband nanomechanical property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan Killgore, Jason P.

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate photothermally excited force modulation microscopy (PTE FMM) for mechanical property characterization across a broad frequency range with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Photothermal excitation allows for an AFM cantilever driving force that varies smoothly as a function of drive frequency, thus avoiding the problem of spurious resonant vibrations that hinder piezoelectric excitation schemes. A complication of PTE FMM is that the sub-resonance cantilever vibration shape is fundamentally different compared to piezoelectric excitation. By directly measuring the vibrational shape of the cantilever, we show that PTE FMM is an accurate nanomechanical characterization method. PTE FMM is a pathway towards the characterization of frequency sensitive specimens such as polymers and biomaterials with frequency range limited only by the resonance frequency of the cantilever and the low frequency limit of the AFM.

  12. Arterial stiffness measurements with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; McAleavey, Stephen A.; Gallippi, Caterina M.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a new method of imaging the mechanical properties of tissues based on very brief (<1msec) and localized applications of acoustic radiation force and the ultrasonic measurement of local tissues' responses to that force. Initial results with this technique demonstrate its ability to image mechanical properties of the medial and adventitial layers within ex vivo and in vivo arteries, and to distinguish hard and soft atherosclerotic plaques from normal vessel wall. We have labeled this method Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging. We describe studies to utilize this technique in the characterization of diffuse and focal atherosclerosis. We describe phantom trials and finite element simulations which explore the fundamental resolution and contrast achievable with this method. We describe in vivo and ex vivo trials in the popliteal, femoral and brachial arteries to assess the relationship between the mechanical properties of healthy and diseased arteries provided by this method and those obtained by alternative methods.

  13. Development and testing of an integrated smart tool holder for four-component cutting force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhengyou; Lu, Yong; Li, Jianguang

    2017-09-01

    Cutting force measurement is a significant requirement for monitoring and controlling the machining processes. Hence, various methods of measuring the cutting force have been proposed by many researchers. In this study, an innovative integrated smart tool holder system based on capacitive sensors is designed, constructed and tested, which is capable of measuring triaxial cutting force and a torque simultaneously in a wireless environment system. A standard commercial tool holder is modified to make itself be the force sensing element that has advantages of simple structure and easy machining. Deformable beams are created in the tool holder, and the tiny deformations of which used to calculate the four-component cutting force are detected by six high precision capacitive sensors. All the sensors and other electronics, like data acquisition and transmitting unit, and wireless power unit, are incorporated into the tool holder as a whole system. The device is intended to be used in a rotating spindle such as in milling and drilling processes. Eventually, the static and dynamic characteristics of the smart tool holder have been determined by a series of tests. Cutting tests have also been carried out and the results show it is stable and practical to measure the cutting force in milling and drilling processes.

  14. Current measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, D.A.; Appelhans, A.D.; Olson, J.E.

    1997-09-09

    A current measuring system is disclosed comprising a current measuring device having a first electrode at ground potential, and a second electrode; a current source having an offset potential of at least three hundred volts, the current source having an output electrode; and a capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the output electrode of the current source and having a second electrode electrically connected to the second electrode of the current measuring device. 4 figs.

  15. Current measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.

    1997-01-01

    A current measuring system comprising a current measuring device having a first electrode at ground potential, and a second electrode; a current source having an offset potential of at least three hundred volts, the current source having an output electrode; and a capacitor having a first electrode electrically connected to the output electrode of the current source and having a second electrode electrically connected to the second electrode of the current measuring device.

  16. Measurement of turbine blade-tip rotordynamic excitation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Jaroux, B.; Song, S.J.; Yoo, S.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents results of a program to investigate the magnitude, original, and parametric variations of destabilizing forces that arise in high power turbines due to blade-tip leakage effects. Five different unshrouded turbine configurations and one configuration shrouded with a labyrinth seal were tested with static offsets of the turbine shaft. The forces along and perpendicular to the offset were measured directly with a dynamometer, and were also inferred from velocity triangles and pressure distributions obtained form detailed flow surveys. These two routes yielded values in fair agreement in all case. For unshrouded turbines, the cross-forces are seen to originate mainly ({approximately} 2/3) from the classical Alford mechanism (nonuniform work extraction due to varying blade efficiency with tip gap) and about 1/3 from a slightly skewed hub pressure pattern. The direct forces arise mainly (3/4) from this pressure pattern, with the rest due to a slight skewness of the Alford mechanism. The pressure nonuniformity (lower pressures near the widest gap) is seen to arise from a large-scale redistribution of the substantially when the gap is reduced from 3.0 to 1.9 percent of blade height, probably due to viscous blade-tip effects. The forces also increase when the hub gap between stator and rotor decreases. The force coefficient decreases with operating flow coefficient. In the case of the shrouded turbine, most of the forces arise from rest appears to come from uneven work extraction (Alford mechanism). Their level is about 50 percent higher than in the unshrouded cases.

  17. Measurement of the Casimir force between dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Decca, R S; López, D; Fischbach, E; Krause, D E

    2003-08-01

    The first precise measurement of the Casimir force between dissimilar metals is reported. The attractive force, between a Cu layer evaporated on a microelectromechanical torsional oscillator and an Au layer deposited on an Al2O3 sphere, was measured dynamically with a noise level of 6 fN/sqrt[Hz]. Measurements were performed for separations in the 0.2-2 micro m range. The results agree to better than 1% in the 0.2-0.5 micro m range with a theoretical model that takes into account the finite conductivity and roughness of the two metals. The observed discrepancies, which are much larger than the experimental precision, can be attributed to a lack of a complete characterization of the optical properties of the specific samples used in the experiment.

  18. Dynamic Force Sensing Using an Optically Trapped Probing System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanan; Cheng, Peng; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptive observer that is implemented to enable real-time dynamic force sensing and parameter estimation in an optically trapped probing system. According to the principle of separation of estimation and control, the design of this observer is independent of that of the feedback controller when operating within the linear range of the optical trap. Dynamic force sensing, probe steering/clamping, and Brownian motion control can, therefore, be developed separately and activated simultaneously. The adaptive observer utilizes the measured motion of the trapped probe and input control effort to recursively estimate the probe–sample interaction force in real time, along with the estimation of the probing system’s trapping bandwidth. This capability is very important to achieving accurate dynamic force sensing in a time-varying process, wherein the trapping dynamics is nonstationary due to local variations of the surrounding medium. The adaptive estimator utilizes the Kalman filter algorithm to compute the time-varying gain in real time and minimize the estimation error for force probing. A series of experiments are conducted to validate the design of and assess the performance of the adaptive observer. PMID:24382944

  19. Micromechanical cohesion force between gas hydrate particles measured under high pressure and low temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Ram; Sum, Amadeu K

    2015-04-07

    To prevent hydrate plugging conditions in the transportation of oil/gas in multiphase flowlines, one of the key processes to control is the agglomeration/deposition of hydrate particles, which are determined by the cohesive/adhesive forces. Previous studies reporting measurements of the cohesive/adhesive force between hydrate particles used cyclopentane hydrate particles in a low-pressure micromechanical force apparatus. In this study, we report the cohesive forces of particles measured in a new high-pressure micromechanical force (MMF) apparatus for ice particles, mixed (methane/ethane, 74.7:25.3) hydrate particles (Structure II), and carbon dioxide hydrate particles (Structure I). The cohesive forces are measured as a function of the contact time, contact force, temperature, and pressure, and determined from pull-off measurements. For the measurements performed of the gas hydrate particles in the gas phase, the determined cohesive force is about 30-35 mN/m, about 8 times higher than the cohesive force of CyC5 hydrates in the liquid CyC5, which is about 4.3 mN/m. We show from our results that the hydrate structure (sI with CO2 hydrates and sII with CH4/C2H6 hydrates) has no influence on the cohesive force. These results are important in the deposition of a gas-dominated system, where the hydrate particles formed in the liquid phase can then stick to the hydrate deposited in the wall exposed to the gas phase.

  20. Apparatus for measuring the thermal Casimir force at large distances.

    PubMed

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-12-12

    We describe a Casimir apparatus based on a differential force measurement between a Au-coated sphere and a planar slab divided in two regions, one of which is made of high-resistivity (dielectric) Si, and the other of Au. The crucial feature of the setup is a semitransparent plane parallel conducting overlayer, covering both regions. The setup offers two important advantages over existing Casimir setups. On one hand, it leads to a large amplification of the difference between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions that are currently used to compute the thermal Casimir force. On the other hand, thanks to the screening power of the overlayer, it is in principle immune from electrostatic forces caused by potential patches on the plates surfaces, that plague present large distance Casimir experiments. If a semitransparent conductive overlayer with identical patch structure over the Au-Si regions of the plate can be manufactured, similar to the opaque overlayers used in recent searches of non-Newtonian gravitational forces based on the isoelectronic technique, the way will be paved for a clear observation of the thermal Casimir force up to separations of several microns, and an unambiguous discrimination between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions.

  1. Apparatus for Measuring the Thermal Casimir Force at Large Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    We describe a Casimir apparatus based on a differential force measurement between a Au-coated sphere and a planar slab divided in two regions, one of which is made of high-resistivity (dielectric) Si, and the other of Au. The crucial feature of the setup is a semitransparent plane parallel conducting overlayer, covering both regions. The setup offers two important advantages over existing Casimir setups. On one hand, it leads to a large amplification of the difference between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions that are currently used to compute the thermal Casimir force. On the other hand, thanks to the screening power of the overlayer, it is in principle immune from electrostatic forces caused by potential patches on the plates surfaces, that plague present large distance Casimir experiments. If a semitransparent conductive overlayer with identical patch structure over the Au-Si regions of the plate can be manufactured, similar to the opaque overlayers used in recent searches of non-Newtonian gravitational forces based on the isoelectronic technique, the way will be paved for a clear observation of the thermal Casimir force up to separations of several microns, and an unambiguous discrimination between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions.

  2. Digital capacitance measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The hardware phase of a digital capacitance measuring system is presented with the major emphasis placed on the electrical design and operation. Test results are included of the three units fabricated. The system's interface is applicable to existing requirements for the space shuttle vehicle.

  3. Integrating Space Systems Operations at the Marine Expeditionary Force Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Corps Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Enterprise MEF Marine Expeditionary Force METOC Meteorological and Oceanographic MEU Marine...SYSTEMS OPERATIONS AT THE MARINE EXPEDITIONARY FORCE LEVEL by Robert R. Garcia June 2015 Thesis Advisor: Charles Racoosin Second Reader...AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTEGRATING SPACE SYSTEMS OPERATIONS AT THE MARINE EXPEDITIONARY FORCE LEVEL 5. FUNDING

  4. Stress Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under the Aircraft Structural Integrity program, Langley Research Center and Stress Photonics developed an infrared-based stress measurement system for use in nondestructive evaluation of materials and structures. Stress Photonics commercialized the technology in the DeltaTherm 1000 system, used to compare designs and detect cracks in structures, especially for aging aircraft and bridges. The system combines digital signal processing technology with a special infrared camera to provide instantaneous thermal images and live differential images.

  5. Force protection demining system (FPDS) detection subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachery, Karen N.; Schultz, Gregory M.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2005-06-01

    This study describes the U.S. Army Force Protection Demining System (FPDS); a remotely-operated, multisensor platform developed for reliable detection and neutralization of both anti-tank and anti-personnel landmines. The ongoing development of the prototype multisensor detection subsystem is presented, which integrates an advanced electromagnetic pulsed-induction array and ground penetrating synthetic aperture radar array on a single standoff platform. The FPDS detection subsystem is mounted on a robotic rubber-tracked vehicle and incorporates an accurate and precise navigation/positioning module making it well suited for operation in varied and irregular terrains. Detection sensors are optimally configured to minimize interference without loss in sensitivity or performance. Mine lane test data acquired from the prototype sensors are processed to extract signal- and image-based features for automatic target recognition. Preliminary results using optimal feature and classifier selection indicate the potential of the system to achieve high probabilities of detection while minimizing false alarms. The FPDS detection software system also exploits modern multi-sensor data fusion algorithms to provide real-time detection and discrimination information to the user.

  6. Chapter 16: Magnetic manipulation for force measurements in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tim O'Brien, E; Cribb, Jeremy; Marshburn, David; Taylor, Russell M; Superfine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Life is a mechanical process. Cells, tissues, and bodies must act within their environments to grow, divide, move, communicate, and defend themselves. The stiffness and viscosity of cells and biologic materials will vary depending upon a wide variety of variables including for example environmental conditions, activation of signaling pathways, stage of development, gene expression. By pushing and pulling cells or materials such as mucus or extracellular matrix, one can learn about their mechanical properties. By varying the conditions, signaling pathways or genetic background, one can also assess how the response of the cell or material is modulated by that pathway. Magnetic particles are available commercially in many useful sizes, magnetic contents, and surface chemistries. The variety of surface chemistries allow forces to be applied to a specimen through specific linkages such as receptors or particular proteins, allowing the biologist to ask fundamental questions about the role of those linkages in the transduction of force or motion. In this chapter, we discuss the use of a magnetic system designed to apply a wide range of forces and force patterns fully integrated into a high numerical aperture inverted fluorescence microscope. Fine, thin and flat magnetic poles allow the use of high magnification microscope objectives, and flexible software to control the direction and pattern of applied forces supports a variety of experimental situations. The system can be coupled with simple video acquisition for medium-bandwidth, two-dimensional particle tracking. Alternatively, the system can be coupled with a laser tracking and position feedback system for higher resolution, high bandwidth, three-dimensional tracking.

  7. Use of force-measuring transducers in manipulator control. I - Theory. II - Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, John; Kress, Reid

    Two types of control structures for teleoperated manipulators are investigated using force-measuring transducers with each type targeting specific properties of the manipulator. One approach is to measure torque in the drive train of the manipulator to increase backdriveability, sensitivity, and stiffness. The second is to measure the forces and torques at the wrist of the manipulator. This force/torque vector is then employed in a stiffness control algorithm which resolves dissimilar kinematics and increases sensitivity. It is shown that torque feedback can be used to reduce the apparent friction in a manipulator drive train caused by gear boxes, bearings, and transmissions. For teleoperated systems, drive-train torque feedback yields improved backdriveability, better sensitivity, and improved stiffness. Cartesian stiffness control allows the operator to specify the relationship between force and displacement in any direction at the manipulator end effector.

  8. Evaluation of intermolecular forces in a circulating system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiuquan; Liu, Mei; Yang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Intercellular interactions, which are mediated by a variety of complex intercellular molecules through the processes of formation and dissociation of molecular bonds, play a critical role in regulating cellular functions in biological systems. Various approaches are applied to evaluate intercellular or molecular bonding forces. To quantify the intermolecular interaction forces, flow chamber has become a meaningful technique as it can ultimately mimic the cellular microenvironment in vivo under physiological flow conditions. Hydrodynamic forces are usually used to predict the intercellular forces down to the single molecular level. However, results show that only using hydrodynamic force will overestimate up to 30% of the receptor-ligand strength when the non-specific forces such as Derjaguin-Landau-Verway-Overbeek (DLVO) forces become un-neglected. Due to the nature of high ion concentration in the physiological condition, electrostatic force is largely screened which will cause DLVO force unbalanced. In this study, we propose to take account of the DLVO force, including van der Waals (VDW) force and electrostatic force, to predict the intermolecular forces of a cell doublet and cell-substrate model in a circulating system. Results also show that the DLVO force has a nonlinear effect as the cell-cell or cell-substrate distance changes. In addition, we used the framework of high accuracy hydrodynamic theories proved in colloidal systems. It is concluded that DLVO force could not be ignored in quantitative studies of molecular interaction forces in circulating system. More accurate prediction of intercellular forces needs to take account of both hydrodynamic force and DLVO force. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measuring red blood cell aggregation forces using double optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Heloise P; Fontes, Adriana; Thomaz, André; Castro, Vagner; Cesar, Carlos L; Barjas-Castro, Maria L

    2013-04-01

    Classic immunohematology approaches, based on agglutination techniques, have been used in manual and automated immunohematology laboratory routines. Red blood cell (RBC) agglutination depends on intermolecular attractive forces (hydrophobic bonds, Van der Walls, electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds) and repulsive interactions (zeta potential). The aim of this study was to measure the force involved in RBC aggregation using double optical tweezers, in normal serum, in the presence of erythrocyte antibodies and associated to agglutination potentiator solutions (Dextran, low ionic strength solution [LISS] and enzymes). The optical tweezers consisted of a neodymium:yattrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam focused through a microscope equipped with a minicam, which registered the trapped cell image in a computer where they could be analyzed using a software. For measuring RBC aggregation, a silica bead attached to RBCs was trapped and the force needed to slide one RBC over the other, as a function of the velocities, was determined. The median of the RBC aggregation force measured in normal serum (control) was 1 × 10(-3) (0.1-2.5) poise.cm. The samples analyzed with anti-D showed 2 × 10(-3) (1.0-4.0) poise.cm (p < 0.001). RBC diluted in potentiator solutions (Dextran 0.15%, Bromelain and LISS) in the absence of erythrocyte antibodies, did not present agglutination. High adherence was observed when RBCs were treated with papain. Results are in agreement with the imunohematological routine, in which non-specific results are not observed when using LISS, Dextran and Bromelain. Nevertheless, false positive results are frequently observed in manual and automated microplate analyzer using papain enzyme. The methodology proposed is simple and could provide specific information with the possibility of meansuration regarding RBC interaction.

  10. Digital design and fabrication of simulation model for measuring orthodontic force.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Peng-Yuan; Zhang, Qiao-Fang; Zhang, Jian-Xing; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) forces are the key factors for determining movement of teeth during orthodontic treatment. Designing precise forces and torques on tooth before treatment can result accurate tooth movements, but it is too difficult to realize. In orthodontic biomechanical systems, the periodontal tissues, including bones, teeth, and periodontal ligaments (PDL), are affected by braces, and measuring the forces applied on the teeth by braces should be based on a simulated model composed of these three types of tissues. This study explores the design and fabrication of a simulated oral model for 3D orthodontic force measurements. Based on medical image processing, tissue reconstruction, 3D printing, and PDL simulation and testing, a model for measuring force was designed and fabricated, which can potentially be used for force prediction, design of treatment plans, and precise clinical operation. The experiment illustrated that bi-component silicones with 2:8 ratios had similar mechanical properties to PDL, and with a positioning guide, the teeth were assembled in the mandible sockets accurately, and so a customized oral model for 3D orthodontic force measurement was created.

  11. Patterned hydrogels for simplified measurement of cell traction forces.

    PubMed

    Polio, Samuel R; Smith, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    To understand mechanobiology, a quantitative understanding of how cells interact mechanically with their environment is needed. Cell mechanics is important to study as they play a role in cell behaviors ranging from cell signaling to epithelial to mesenchymal transition in physiological processes such as development and cancer. To study changes in cell contractile behavior, numerous quantitative measurement techniques have been developed based on the measurement of deformations of a substrate from an initial state. Herein, we present details on a technique we have developed for the measurements of 2D cellular traction forces with the goal of facilitating adaptation of this technique by other investigators. This technique is flexible in that it utilizes well-studied methods for microcontact printing and fabrication of polyacrylamide hydrogels to generate regular arrays of patterns that can be transferred onto the hydrogels. From the deformation of the arrays, an automated algorithm can be used to quantitatively determine the traction forces exerted by the cells onto the adhesion points. The simplicity and flexibility of this technique make it a useful contribution to our toolbox for measurement of cell traction forces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Methodology and Implementation of Forced Oscillation Technique for Respiratory Mechanics Measurement].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengbo; Ni, Lu; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Deyu; Wang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is a noninvasive method for respiratory mechanics measurement. For the FOT, external signals (e.g. forced oscillations around 4-40 Hz) are used to drive the respiratory system, and the mechanical characteristic of the respiratory system can be determined with the linear system identification theory. Thus, respiratory mechanical properties and components at different frequency and location of the airway can be explored by specifically developed forcing waveforms. In this paper, the theory, methodology and clinical application of the FOT is reviewed, including measure ment theory, driving signals, models of respiratory system, algorithm for impedance identification, and requirement on apparatus. Finally, the future development of this technique is also discussed.

  13. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from -{{25}\\circ} to {{25}\\circ} at intervals of {{5}\\circ} . The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 dB. Simulation studies

  14. Preliminarily measurement and analysis of sawing forces in fresh cadaver mandible using reciprocating saw for reality-based haptic feedback.

    PubMed

    Yua, Dedong; Zhengb, Xiaohu; Chenc, Ming; Shend, Steve G F

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to preliminarily measure and analyze the cutting forces in fresh Chinese cadaver mandible using a clinically widely used reciprocating saw for reality-based haptic feedback. Eight mandibles were taken from fresh Chinese cadavers, 4 females and 4 males, aged between 59 and 95 years. A set of sawing experiments, using a surgery Stryker micro-reciprocating saw and Kistler piezoelectric dynamometer, was carried out by a CNC machining center. Under different vibration frequencies of saw and feeding rates measured from orthognathic surgery, sawing forces were recorded by a signal acquisition system. Remarkably different sawing forces were measured from different cadavers. Feed and vibration frequency of the reciprocating saw could determine the cutting forces only on 1 body. To reduce the impact of bone thickness changes on the cutting force measurements, all the cutting force data should be converted to the force of unit cutting length. The vibration frequency of haptic feedback system is determined by main cutting forces. Fast Fourier transform method can be used to calculate the frequency of this system. To simulate surgery in higher fidelity, all the sawing forces from the experiment should be amended by experienced surgeons before use in virtual reality surgery simulator. Sawing force signals of different ages for force feedback were measured successfully, and more factors related to the bone mechanical properties, such as bone density, should be concerned in the future.

  15. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-11

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials.

  16. Combined alternating gradient force magnetometer and susceptometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, M.; Mendizábal Vázquez, I. de; Aroca, C.

    2015-01-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a new system that combines the performances of two different types of magnetic characterization systems, Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometers (AGFM) and susceptometers. The flexibility of our system is demonstrated by its capability to be used as any of them, AGFM or susceptometer, without any modification in the experimental set-up because of the electronics we have developed. Our system has a limit of sensitivity lower than 5 × 10{sup −7} emu. Moreover, its main advantage is demonstrated by the possibility of measuring small quantities of materials under DC or AC magnetic fields that cannot properly be measured with a commercial vibrating sample magnetometers or AGFM.

  17. Buckling and kinking force measurements on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; Mickelson, W.; Kis, A.; Zettl, A.

    2007-11-01

    Using an atomic force microscope operated inside a transmission electron microscope, we have studied the forces involved in buckling and kinking an individual multiwalled carbon nanotube while observing its structure. In particular, we have measured an individual nanotube’s asymptotic critical buckling load and critical kinking load. The buckling results are well described by classical elastic theory, while the observed kinking behavior requires a more involved analysis. Repeated buckling measurements on the same nanotube indicate an extremely high degree of elasticity and set a lower bound on the nanotube’s yield strength of 1.7GPa , higher than the yield strength of steel. Plastic deformation of the nanotube was eventually observed following kinking.

  18. Evaluation of the sensing block method for dynamic force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinghui; Chen, Hao; Li, Wenzhao; Song, Li

    2017-01-01

    Sensing block method was proposed for the dynamic force measurement by Tanimura et al. in 1994. Comparing with the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, it can provide a much longer measuring time for the dynamic properties test of materials. However, the signals recorded by sensing block are always accompanied with additional oscillations. Tanimura et al. discussed the effect of force rising edge on the test results, whereas more research is still needed. In this paper, some more dominant factors have been extracted through dimensional analysis. The finite element simulation has been performed to assess these factors. Base on the analysis and simulation, some valuable results are obtained and some criterions proposed in this paper can be applied in design or selection of the sensing block.

  19. A method of measuring finger force with the Kin-Com dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Kondo, I; Fukuda, M; Souma, M; Oda, A; Iwata, M; Saito, S; Bar-Or, O

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the force of a finger could be measured with a new system based on an attachment to the Kin-Com dynamometer, and to define the reproducibility of the finger force measurement. Eleven male subjects (age, 27.6 +/- 6.12 years) took part. All were free of orthopedic problems in the tested hand. Mean forces of the index and little finger for concentric and eccentric motion were measured using the new system. Overall coefficients of variation (OCVs) were calculated as an index of reproducibility. The reproducibility of force curves was considered good when an OCV was less than 20%. The OCVs for mean force of the index finger and for eccentric motion of the little finger were less than the 20% standard, at 10.7 and 14.0, respectively. The OCV for concentric motion of the little finger was greater than 20%. The findings suggest that measurement of finger force is feasible with the new Kin-Com attachment.

  20. Dynamic Forces in Spur Gears - Measurement, Prediction, and Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Rebbechi, Brian; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1996-01-01

    Measured and computed values for dynamic loads in spur gears were compared to validate a new version of the NASA gear dynamics code DANST-PC. Strain gage data from six gear sets with different tooth profiles were processed to determine the dynamic forces acting between the gear teeth. Results demonstrate that the analysis code successfully simulates the dynamic behavior of the gears. Differences between analysis and experiment were less than 10 percent under most conditions.

  1. Measurement of Multiple Blade Rate Unsteady Propeller Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    Report I 0 Measurement of Multiple Blade Rate Unsteady Propeller Forces _ by Stuart D. Jessup DTIC SELECTE JUN07 1990 00 U,);i -,,I-ll lll ll mml~ CODE...blade rat and multiple axia wake inflow harmonics. The axial wake distributions weret meaured using a Piot tube. Unsteady propeller bearing thrust and...diameter EAR Propeller expanded area ratio f Maximum camber of section J Advance coefficient, Vvm/nD K Integer multiple of blade number KT Thrust

  2. Coefficients of variation of ground reaction force measurement in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tichy, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Gait analysis has been extensively performed in dogs and horses; however, very little is known about feline biomechanics. It was, therefore, the aim of this study to determine the coefficient of variation (CV) among three ground reaction force (GRF) measurements taken for 15 client-owned European shorthaired cats without a training period and a short acclimatisation time. Gait was measured as each cat walked across a pressure-sensitive walkway, and measurements were made three times over a multi-week period (range: 2 to 17 weeks). The parameters evaluated were peak vertical force (PFz), vertical impulse (IFz), stance phase duration (SPD), step length (SL), paw contact area (PCA) and symmetry index (SI%) of the front and hind limbs. After averaging each of the values from the three measurements, the CV and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for all parameters. PFz showed the lowest CV (~ 3%), while IFz showed the highest CV (~11%) when normalised to body mass. When the GRFs were normalised to total force, the CV of PFz dropped to ~2% and that of IFz dropped to ~3%. The CV of SL and PCA were lower (~6% respectively ~5%) compared to the CV for SPD (~10%). The SI% for both PFz and IFz were comparable to the values reported in the gait analysis literature for dogs. Results of the current study indicate that gait analysis of cats using pressure-sensitive walkways produces reliable data and is a promising approach for evaluation of lameness. The results also suggest that PFz may be a more reliable parameter than IFz and that normalisation to percent of total force may aid in interpretation of the evaluated data. PMID:28355209

  3. Video integrated measurement system.

    PubMed

    Spector, B; Eilbert, L; Finando, S; Fukuda, F

    1982-06-01

    A Video Integrated Measurement (VIM) System is described which incorporates the use of various noninvasive diagnostic procedures (moire contourography, electromyography, posturometry, infrared thermography, etc.), used individually or in combination, for the evaluation of neuromusculoskeletal and other disorders and their management with biofeedback and other therapeutic procedures. The system provides for measuring individual diagnostic and therapeutic modes, or multiple modes by split screen superimposition, of real time (actual) images of the patient and idealized (ideal-normal) models on a video monitor, along with analog and digital data, graphics, color, and other transduced symbolic information. It is concluded that this system provides an innovative and efficient method by which the therapist and patient can interact in biofeedback training/learning processes and holds considerable promise for more effective measurement and treatment of a wide variety of physical and behavioral disorders.

  4. Arctic Climate Forcing Observations to Improve Earth System Models: Measurements at High Frequency, Fine Spatial Resolution, and Climatically Relevant Spatial Scales with the use of the Recently Deployed NGEE-Arctic Tram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, J. B.; Serbin, S.; Dafflon, B.; Raz Yaseef, N.; Torn, M. S.; Cook, P. J.; Lewin, K. F.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve the representation of the land surface and subsurface properties and their associated feedbacks with climate forcings, climate change, and drivers in Earth System Models (ESMs), detailed observations need to be made at climatically relevant spatial and temporal scales. Pan-Arctic spatial heterogeneity and temporal variation present major challenges to the current generation of ESMs. To enable highly spatially resolved and high temporal frequency measurements for the independent validation of modeled energy and greenhouse gas surface fluxes at core to intermediate scales, we have developed, tested, and deployed an automated observational platform, the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE)-Arctic Tram. The NGEE-Arctic Tram, installed on the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) near Barrow, AK in mid May 2014, consists of 65 meters of elevated track and a fully automated cart carrying a suite of radiation and remote sensing instrumentation. The tram transect is located within the NGEE eddy covariance tower footprint to help better understand the relative contribution of different landforms (e.g. low center vs high center polygonal tundra and associated vegetation) to the overall energy budget of the footprint. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), soil moisture, and soil temperature sensors are acquired autonomously and co-located with the tram to link subsurface properties with surface observations. To complement the high frequency and fine spatial resolution of the tram, during the summer field seasons of 2013 and 2014 a portable version of the NGEE-Arctic Tram (also know as the portable energy pole or PEP); was used to characterize surface albedo, NDVI, surface temperature, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) across two ~500 m BEO transects co-located with subsurface ERT and ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements. In addition, a ~ 3 Km transect across three drained thaw-lake basins (DTLB) of different climate

  5. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  6. Development of walking analysis system consisting of mobile force plate and motion sensor.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Wataru; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Aikawa, Masataka; Shiojima, Kouzou; Tsuchiya, Youtaro; Inoue, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    In walking analysis, which is one useful method for efficient physical rehabilitation, the ground reaction force, the center of pressure, and the body orientation data are measured during walking. In the past, these data were measured by a 3D motion analysis system consisting of high-speed cameras and force plates, which must be installed in the floor. However, a conventional 3D motion analysis system can measure the ground reaction force and the center of pressure just on force plates during a few steps. In addition, the subjects' stride lengths are limited because they have to walk on the center of the force plate. These problems can be resolved by converting conventional devices into wearable devices. We used a measuring device consisting of portable force plates and motion sensors. We developed a walking analysis system that calculates the ground reaction force, the center of pressure, and the body orientations and measured a walking subject to estimate this system. We simultaneously used a conventional 3D motion analysis system to compare with our development system and showed its validity for measurements of ground reaction force and the center of pressure.

  7. Radial force development during root growth measured by photoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Hartmann, Christian; Genet, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical and topological properties of a soil like the global porosity and the distribution of void sizes greatly affect the development of a plant root, which in turn affects the shoot development. In particular, plant roots growing in heterogeneous medium like sandy soils or cracked substrates have to adapt their morphology and exert radial forces depending on the pore size in which they penetrate. We propose a model experiment in which a pivot root (chick-pea seeds) of millimetric diameter has to grow in a size-controlled gap δ (δ ranging 0.5-2.3 mm) between two photoelastic grains. By time-lapse imaging, we continuously monitored the root growth and the development of optical fringes in the photoelastic neighbouring grains when the root enters the gap. Thus we measured simultaneously and in situ the root morphological changes (length and diameter growth rates, circumnutation) as well as the radial forces the root exerts. Radial forces were increasing in relation with gap constriction and experiment duration but a levelling of the force was not observed, even after 5 days and for narrow gaps. The inferred mechanical stress was consistent with the turgor pressure of compressed cells. Therefore our set-up could be a basis for testing mechanical models of cellular growth.

  8. Measurement of Forces and Moments Transmitted to the Residual Limb

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this...to assist in prescribing components, to evaluate amputee rehabilitation progress, and to develop specifications for components capable of battle...after complete charge Minimum Sampling Time 10msec Figure 1-2. Picture of Force Sensor System Figure 1-3. Dialog Box of Windows Program

  9. Sensorimotor System Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bryan L.; Myers, Joseph B.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of currently available sensorimotor assessment techniques. Data Sources: We drew information from an extensive review of the scientific literature conducted in the areas of proprioception, neuromuscular control, and motor control measurement. Literature searches were conducted using MEDLINE for the years 1965 to 1999 with the key words proprioception, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve conduction testing, electromyography, muscle dynamometry, isometric, isokinetic, kinetic, kinematic, posture, equilibrium, balance, stiffness, neuromuscular, sensorimotor, and measurement. Additional sources were collected using the reference lists of identified articles. Data Synthesis: Sensorimotor measurement techniques are discussed with reference to the underlying physiologic mechanisms, influential factors and locations of the variable within the system, clinical research questions, limitations of the measurement technique, and directions for future research. Conclusions/Recommendations: The complex interactions and relationships among the individual components of the sensorimotor system make measuring and analyzing specific characteristics and functions difficult. Additionally, the specific assessment techniques used to measure a variable can influence attained results. Optimizing the application of sensorimotor research to clinical settings can, therefore, be best accomplished through the use of common nomenclature to describe underlying physiologic mechanisms and specific measurement techniques. PMID:16558672

  10. Validity and reliability of the T-Scan(®) III for measuring force under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Cerna, M; Ferreira, R; Zaror, C; Navarro, P; Sandoval, P

    2015-07-01

    Although measuring bite force is an important indicator of the health of the masticatory system, few commercially available transducers have been validated for routine clinical use. T-Scan(®) III Occlusal Analysis System allows to record the bite force distribution, indicating its relative intensity and occlusal timing. Nevertheless, even fewer studies have evaluated the validity and reliability of the latest generation of the T-Scan(®) occlusal analysis system. To determine the validity and reliability of the T-Scan(®) III system when measuring total absolute bite force under laboratory conditions. Known forces were applied to 18 T-Scan(®) III sensors, which were classified into two groups differentiated by their production series. Both Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to assess the system's reliability and validity. Considering all the sensors studied, a substantial level (Lin's CCC 0·969) and a very good level of reliability (CCI 0·994) were obtained. When evaluating the validity of the system, a poor (Lin's CCC 0·530) and moderate (ICC 0·693) agreement were also obtained. The main factor that negatively influenced the validity of the T-Scan(®) III under these study conditions was the significant difference in the behaviour of the two sensor groups. The T-Scan(®) III showed a high degree of reliability when used to perform consecutive measurements. However, the system showed an insufficient degree of validity for measuring absolute force when estimating total occlusal force under laboratory conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Instrumented Bolts Would Measure Shear Forces In Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, James Wayne; Mcwithey, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    Bolts instrumented with strain gauges used to measure shear forces. Bolts installed in multiple-bolt lap joints to obtain data on distribution of stresses and deformations in and around joints. Strain gauges indicate share of applied load borne by each individual bolt. In original application, bolted panels made of advanced refractory composite materials designed to withstand use at temperatures up to 4,000 degrees F. Also applicable to other joint materials and measurement of shear loads in other connections such as, shear loads on shafts in pulleys or gears.

  12. Use of piezoelectric multicomponent force measuring devices in fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, A.; Stefan, K.

    1979-01-01

    The characterisitics of piezoelectric multicomponent transducers are discussed, giving attention to the advantages of quartz over other materials. The main advantage of piezoelectric devices in aerodynamic studies is their ability to indicate rapid changes in the values of physical parameters. Problems in the accuracy of measurments by piezoelectric devices can be overcome by suitable design approaches. A practical example is given of how such can be utilized to measure rapid fluctuations of fluid forces exerted on a circular cylinder mounted in a water channel.

  13. Instrumented Bolts Would Measure Shear Forces In Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, James Wayne; Mcwithey, Robert R.

    1994-01-01

    Bolts instrumented with strain gauges used to measure shear forces. Bolts installed in multiple-bolt lap joints to obtain data on distribution of stresses and deformations in and around joints. Strain gauges indicate share of applied load borne by each individual bolt. In original application, bolted panels made of advanced refractory composite materials designed to withstand use at temperatures up to 4,000 degrees F. Also applicable to other joint materials and measurement of shear loads in other connections such as, shear loads on shafts in pulleys or gears.

  14. Dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Wang, Z.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents both measured and calculated magnetic-force data. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares the results with predictions calculated by a nonlinear-dynamics computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic-suspension system type vehicle model were obtained by experimental observation and computer simulation of a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway that consists of a pair of L-shaped aluminum conductors attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  15. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Omur E; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2016-02-12

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip's vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential's nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator's response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement.

  16. Grasping force measurement of a 6-DOF haptic device for human-computer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. C.; Wang, Zengfu; Ge, Yu

    2003-04-01

    A haptic interface device has been presented for human-computer-interaction (HCI) in this paper, which uses a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensor for six axis force and torque (F/T) measurement. With this device, the user could grasp a moveable handle to interact with simulated 3D environments in real-time for production design, simulation and predication. As a human-computer-interface device, its work mainly depend on the 6 DOF force and torque applied by the user to the handle. The 6DOF sensor structure and its measurement principle are given in our work in detail. The whole system is consisted by signal amplifiers, control motors, integrated 6 DOF force sensor and power supplies needed for operation.

  17. Clinical Application of Insertion Force Sensor System for Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Noriaki; Miyachi, Shigeru; Izumi, Takashi; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Marui, Naoki; Ota, Keisuke; Tajima, Hayato; Shintai, Kazunori; Ito, Masashi; Imai, Tasuku; Nishihori, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2017-09-01

    In endovascular embolization for intracranial aneurysms, it is important to properly control the coil insertion force. However, the force can only be subjectively detected by the subtle feedback experienced by neurointerventionists at their fingertips. The authors envisioned a system that would objectively sense and quantify that force. In this article, coil insertion force was measured in cases of intracranial aneurysm using this sensor, and its actual clinical application was investigated. The sensor consists of a hemostatic valve (Y-connector). A little flexure was intentionally added in the device, and it creates a bend in the delivery wire. The sensor measures the change in the position of the bent wire depending on the insertion force and translates it into a force value. Using this, embolization was performed for 10 unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The sensor adequately recorded the force, and it reflected the operators' usual clinical experience. The presence of the sensor did not affect the procedures. The sensor enabled the operators to objectively note and evaluate the insertion force and better cooperative handling was possible. Additionally, other members of the intervention team shared the information. Force records demonstrated the characteristic patterns according to every stage of coiling (framing, filling, and finishing). The force sensor system adequately measured coil insertion force in intracranial aneurysm coil embolization procedures. The safety of this sensor was demonstrated in clinical application for the limited number of patients. This system is useful adjunct for assisting during coil embolization for an intracranial aneurysm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Single Molecule Force Measurement for Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Sotaro

    2008-04-01

    The ribosome is a molecular machine that translates the genetic code described on the messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence through repetitive cycles of transfer RNA (tRNA) selection, peptide bond formation and translocation. Although the detailed interactions between the translation components have been revealed by extensive structural and biochemical studies, it is not known how the precise regulation of macromolecular movements required at each stage of translation is achieved. Here we demonstrate an optical tweezer assay to measure the rupture force between a single ribosome complex and mRNA. The rupture force was compared between ribosome complexes assembled on an mRNA with and without a strong Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence. The removal of the SD sequence significantly reduced the rupture force, indicating that the SD interactions contribute significantly to the stability of the ribosomal complex on the mRNA in a pre-peptidyl transfer state. In contrast, the post-peptidyl transfer state weakened the rupture force as compared to the complex in a pre-peptidyl transfer state and it was the same for both the SD-containing and SD-deficient mRNAs. The results suggest that formation of the first peptide bond destabilizes the SD interaction, resulting in the weakening of the force with which the ribosome grips an mRNA. This might be an important requirement to facilitate movement of the ribosome along mRNA during the first translocation step. In this article, we discuss about the above new results including the introduction of the ribosome translation mechanism and the optical tweezer method.

  19. Measurement of finger joint angles and maximum finger forces during cylinder grip activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, J W; Rim, K

    1991-03-01

    Finger joint angles and finger forces during maximal cylindrical grasping were measured using multi-camera photogrammetry and pressure-sensitive sheets, respectively. The experimental data were collected from four healthy subjects gripping cylinders of five different sizes. For joint angles, an image analysis system was used to digitize slides showing markers. During the calibration of the camera system, both the nonlinear least square and the direct linear transform methods were applied and compared, the former providing the fewer errors; it was used to determine joint angles. Data were collected from the pressure-sensitive grip films by using the same image analysis system as used in the collection of the joint angle data. The method of using pressure-sensitive sheets provided an estimation of the weighted centre of the phalangeal forces. Results indicate that finger flexion angles at the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints gradually increase as cylinder diameter decreases, but that at the distal interphalangeal joint the angle remains constant throughout all cylinder sizes. It was also found that most of the radio-ulnar deviation and the axial rotation angles at the finger joints deviate from zero, but the deviations are small. For the force measurement, it was found that total finger force increases as cylinder size decreases, and the phalangeal force centres are not located at the mid-points of the phalanges. The data obtained in this experiment would be useful for muscle force predictions and for the design of handles.

  20. Optical measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, Daniel J.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the areas of research conducted at the LeRC on optical measurement techniques for propulsion systems research are described. Most of the optical techniques used to measure gas parameters depend on very inefficient light scattering principles and, therefore, require the high light intensities provided by lasers. Significant advances in laser technology, together with the availability of sensitive photodetection systems, provide much of the impetus for research in optical diagnostics techniques. The goal of the research is to enhance the capabilities of nonintrusive research instrumentation to meet the special needs of aeropropulsion research. Optical techniques are being used to validate analytical codes and to verify the performance of aeropropulsion components and systems.

  1. Frequency-dependent viscoelasticity measurement by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Wong, Kenneth Kar Ho; de Bruyn, John R.; Hutter, Jeffrey L.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a new technique for investigating viscoelastic properties of soft materials using the atomic force microscope. A small oscillatory voltage is added to the deflection signal of the atomic force microscope causing a vertical oscillatory sample motion. Monitoring the amplitude and phase of this motion allows determination of the viscous and elastic moduli of the sample as a function of frequency during contact imaging. This technique is applied to suspended poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers and poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels, giving results similar to those measured using traditional static methods. However, the moduli of both the fibers and the hydrogels show a significant frequency dependence. The Young's modulus of the fibers increases with frequency, while for the viscoelastic hydrogels, the storage modulus dominates the mechanical response at low frequency whereas the loss modulus dominates at high frequency.

  2. Dynamics and stability of mechanical systems with follower forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, G.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph on problems of stability of equilibrium of mechanical systems with follower forces is presented. Concepts of stability and criteria of stability are reviewed briefly, together with means of analytical specification of follower forces. Nondissipative systems with two degrees of freedom are discussed, and destabilizing effects due to various types of dissipative forces both in discrete and continuous systems, are treated. The analyses are accompanied by some quantative experiments and observations on demonstrational laboratory models.

  3. In situ measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.

    1980-11-24

    A multipurpose in situ underground measurement system comprising a plurality of long electrical resistance elements in the form of rigid reinforcing bars, each having an open loop hairpin configuration of shorter length than the other resistance elements. The resistance elements are arranged in pairs in a unitized structure, and grouted in place in the underground volume. Measurement means are provided for obtaining for each pair the electrical resistance of each element and the difference in electrical resistance of the paired elements, which difference values may be used in analytical methods involving resistance as a function of temperature. A scanner means sequentially connects the resistance-measuring apparatus to each individual pair of elements. A source of heating current is also selectively connectable for heating the elements to an initial predetermined temperature prior to electrical resistance measurements when used as an anemometer.

  4. Possibility of measuring thermal effects in the Casimir force

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2010-09-15

    We analyze the possibility of measuring small thermal effects in the Casimir force between metal test bodies in configurations of a sphere above a plate and two parallel plates. For the sphere-plate geometry used in many experiments, we investigate the applicability of the proximity force approximation (PFA) to calculation of thermal effects in the Casimir force and its gradient. It is shown that for real metals the two formulations of the PFA used in the literature lead to relative differences in the results obtained being less than a small parameter equal to the ratio of separation distance to sphere radius. For ideal metals, PFA results for the thermal correction are obtained and compared with available exact results. It is emphasized that in the experimental region in the zeroth order of the small parameter already mentioned, the thermal Casimir force and its gradient calculated using the PFA (and thermal corrections in their own right) coincide with the respective exact results. For real metals, available exact results are outside the application region of the PFA. However, the exact results are shown to converge with the PFA results when the small parameter goes down to experimental values. We arrive at the conclusion that the large thermal effects predicted by the Drude-model approach, if they exist, could be measured in both static and dynamic experiments in sphere-plate and plate-plate configurations. As for the small thermal effects predicted by the plasma-model approach, the static experiment in the configuration of two parallel plates is found to be the best for their observation.

  5. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  6. Application of Optical Forces in Microphotonic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    University of Southern California Contracts and Grants 3720 S. Flower Street Los Angeles, CA 90089 -0701 2 ABSTRACT Application of optical forces in...Coupled Resonators," in Slow Light: Science and Applications( CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2009). 47 30 [25]. S. Fan, S. Sandhu, C. Otey, and M. Povinelli...24]. J. D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics (Wiley, New York, 1999). 98 81 [25]. V. A. Parsegian, Van der Waals forces : a handbook for

  7. Gravitational Force and the Cardiovascular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D. R.; Olszowka, A. J.; Rokitka, M. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiovascular responses to changes in gravitational force are considered. Man is ideally suited to his 1-g environment. Although cardiovascular adjustments are required to accommodate to postural changes and exercise, these are fully accomplished for short periods (min). More challenging stresses are those of short-term microgravity (h) and long-term microgravity (days) and of gravitational forces greater than that of Earth. The latter can be simulated in the laboratory and quantitative studies can be conducted.

  8. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials. This work is a partial contribution of the USDA Forest Service and NIST, agencies of the US government, and is not subject to copyright.

  9. Systems and methods of detecting force and stress using tetrapod nanocrystal

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Charina L.; Koski, Kristie J.; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2013-08-20

    Systems and methods of detecting force on the nanoscale including methods for detecting force using a tetrapod nanocrystal by exposing the tetrapod nanocrystal to light, which produces a luminescent response by the tetrapod nanocrystal. The method continues with detecting a difference in the luminescent response by the tetrapod nanocrystal relative to a base luminescent response that indicates a force between a first and second medium or stresses or strains experienced within a material. Such systems and methods find use with biological systems to measure forces in biological events or interactions.

  10. Harmonic force microscope: A new tool for biomolecular identification and material characterization based on nanomechanical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ozgur

    At the molecular level, physical and chemical properties of materials are tightly coupled to the mechanical properties. The potential of mechanics for interacting with matter at the nanoscale has been largely unexplored due to lack of instruments capable of performing mechanical measurements at nanometer length scales. This thesis describes nanomechanical sensing techniques and applications based on time-resolved tip-sample force measurements in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy. Tapping mode is the most successful operation mode of atomic force microscopes. Theoretical calculations presented in the first part of this thesis show that time variations of the tip-sample forces in the tapping-mode depend on the physical and chemical properties of the sample and therefore, have the potential to be used for nanomechanical measurements. Unfortunately, the force-sensing probe of the tapping-mode atomic force microscope, the vibrating cantilever, is limited in its response to the variations of forces in time within a period of oscillations. We are describing two types of special micromachined cantilevers that enable measurements of time variations of tip-sample forces: the harmonic cantilever and the coupled torsional cantilever. These special cantilevers allow sensitive mechanical measurements at the nanoscale and single molecular level. The operation of these cantilevers does not require any modifications to the existing atomic force microscopy systems. With the nanomechanical sensing techniques we have developed, we investigated phase transformations of sub-micron domains of composite polymers and observed their glass transitions for the first time. Conventional measurements on bulk properties of these samples do not provide information on the physical changes at the nanoscale. Studies on nucleic acids attached to a surface, a configuration commonly used in DNA microarray technology, showed that the hybridized DNA molecules can be detected at the single molecule

  11. Measurement error in grip and pinch force measurements in patients with hand injuries.

    PubMed

    Schreuders, Ton A R; Roebroeck, Marij E; Goumans, Janine; van Nieuwenhuijzen, Johan F; Stijnen, Theo H; Stam, Henk J

    2003-09-01

    There is limited documentation of measurement error of grip and pinch force evaluation methods. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine indexes of measurement error for intraexaminer and interexaminer measurements of grip and pinch force in patients with hand injuries and (2) to investigate whether the measurement error differs between measurements of the injured and noninjured hands and between experienced and inexperienced examiners. The subjects were a consecutive sample of 33 patients with hand injuries who were seen in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Repeated measurements were taken of grip and pinch force, with a short break of 2 to 3 minutes between sessions. For the grip force in 2 handle positions (distance between handles of 4.6 and 7.2 cm, respectively), tip pinch (with the index finger on top and the thumb below, with the other fingers flexed) and key pinch force (with the thumb on top and the radial side of the index finger below) data were obtained on both hands of the subjects by an experienced examiner and an inexperienced examiner. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard errors of measurement (SEMs), and associated smallest detectable differences (SDDs) were calculated and compared with data from previous studies. The reliability of the measurements was expressed by ICCs between .82 and .97. For grip force measurements (in the second handle position) by the experienced examiner, an SDD of 61 N was found. For tip pinch and key pinch, these values were 12 N and 11 N, respectively. For measurements by the inexperienced examiner, SDDs of 56 N for grip force and 13 N and 18 N for tip pinch and key pinch were found. Based on the SEMs and SDDs, in individual patients only relatively large differences in grip and pinch force measurements can be adequately detected between consecutive measurements. Measurement error did not differ between injured and

  12. Laser angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.; Wilbert, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a laser angle measurement system is described. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the mode. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. Optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures are included, and the results of a demonstration test are given.

  13. Measurement Technology System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-29

    Abstract The Measurement Technology System (MTS) is a complex robotic system mated to a state of the art LEICA Laser Tracker/Scanner to provide...Tracker could maintain both a “ laser lock” on one of the four reflectors as well as a valid “6 DoF”, which is accomplished when the Tracker can...Manually “Tweaking” to preserve Laser Lock and “6 DoF”  Integrating the MTS Application with the Robot Motion Programs The full scale MTS was

  14. Unaccounted-for gas project. Measurement Task Force (orifice meter studies). Volume 2B. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Godkin, B.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Wlasenko, R.G.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The study was aimed at determining unaccounted-for (UAF) gas volumes resulting from operating Pacific Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission and distribution systems during 1987. Activities and methods are described and results are presented for research conducted on orifice meter accuracy. The Measurement Task Force determined that orifice metering inaccuracies were the largest single contributor to 1987 UAF.

  15. Measurement of solution viscosity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nabil; Nino, Diego F.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2001-06-01

    We report on studies aimed at employing the atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the viscosity of aqueous solutions. At ambient temperature, the AFM cantilever undergoes thermal fluctuations that are highly sensitive to the local environment. Here, we present measurements of the cantilever's resonant frequency in aqueous solutions of glycerol, sucrose, ethanol, sodium chloride, polyethylene glycol, and bovine plasma albumin. The measurements revealed that variations in the resonant frequency of the cantilever in the different solutions are largely dependent on the viscosity of the medium. An application of this technique is to monitor the progression of a chemical reaction where a change in viscosity is expected to occur. An example is demonstrated through monitoring of the hydrolysis of double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid by DNase I.

  16. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  17. A force measuring treadmill in clinical gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Dierick, Frédéric; Penta, Massimo; Renaut, David; Detrembleur, Christine

    2004-12-01

    This preliminary study presents the development and testing of an instrumented treadmill device measuring the ground reaction forces (GRFs) and the feasibility of using this force measuring treadmill (FMT) in clinical gait analysis. A commercially available treadmill was modified and fitted out with three-dimensional strain-gauge force transducers. Tests of linearity, centre of pressure position (CoP), cross talk, natural frequency, background noises, and belt speed were undertaken in order to assess the performance of the FMT. In addition, the GRFs and segmental kinematics were recorded while healthy subjects and patients walked on the FMT, in order to compute the net ankle joint moments and the body centre of mass (CMb) kinematics and mechanics. The preliminary results of technical tests were satisfactory with an error less than 10% and dynamic tests in healthy subjects corresponded to the literature. The results of patients were clearly disturbed, demonstrating the ability of the FMT to discriminate pathological gaits from normal ones. We concluded that the GRFs measurements obtained from the FMT seem valid and the clinical assessment of net joint moments and CMb kinematics and mechanics seem feasible. The FMT could be useful device for clinical research and routine gait analysis since it allows gaining some extra room and quickly collecting the GRFs during a large number of successive gait cycles and over a wide range of steady-state gait speeds. However, more work is needed in this area in order to confirm the present results, collect reference data and validate the methodology across pathologies.

  18. Contractile force measured in unskinned isolated adult rat heart fibres.

    PubMed

    Brady, A J; Tan, S T; Ricchiuti, N V

    1979-12-13

    A number of investigators have succeeded in preparing isolated cardiac cells by enzymatic digestion which tolerate external [Ca2+] in the millimolar range. However, a persistent problem with these preparations is that, unlike in situ adult ventricular fibres, the isolated fibres usually beat spontaneously. This spontaneity suggests persistent ionic leakage not present in situ. A preferable preparation for mechanical and electrical studies would be one which is quiescent but excitable in response to electrical stimulation and which does not undergo contracture with repeated stimulation. We report here a modified method of cardiac fibre isolation and perfusion which leaves the fibre membrane electrically excitable and moderately resistant to mechanical stress so that the attachment of suction micropipettes to the fibre is possible for force measurement and length control. Force generation in single isolated adult rat heart fibres is consistent with in situ contractile force. The negative staircase effect (treppe) characteristic of adult not heart tissue is present with increased frequency of stimulation. Isometric developed tension increases with fibre length as in in situ ventricular tissue.

  19. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  20. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  1. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  2. System for Measuring Capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNichol, Randal S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system has been developed for detecting the level of a liquid in a tank wherein a capacitor positioned in the tank has spaced plates which are positioned such that the dielectric between the plates will be either air or the liquid, depending on the depth of the liquid in the tank. An oscillator supplies a sine wave current to the capacitor and a coaxial cable connects the capacitor to a measuring circuit outside the tank. If the cable is very long or the capacitance to be measured is low, the capacitance inherent in the coaxial cable will prevent an accurate reading. To avoid this problem, an inductor is connected across the cable to form with the capacitance of the cable a parallel resonant circuit. The impedance of the parallel resonant circuit is infinite, so that attenuation of the measurement signal by the stray cable capacitance is avoided.

  3. Contour measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.; Deaton, E. T., Jr.; Campbell, R. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A measurement system for measuring the departures from a straight line of discrete track sections of a track along a coal face in a mine employing a vehicle having a pair of spaced wheel assemblies which align with the track is presented. A reference arm pivotally connects between the wheel assemblies, and there is indicating means for measuring the angle of pivot between the arm and each of the wheel assemblies. The length of the device is less than the length of a track section, and thus when one of the wheel assemblies is on one track section and one is on an adjoining track section, the sum of the indicated angles will be indicative of the angle between track sections. Thus, from the length of a track section and angle, the departure of each track section from the line may be calculated.

  4. The exclusion problem in seasonally forced epidemiological systems.

    PubMed

    Greenman, J V; Adams, B

    2015-02-21

    The pathogen exclusion problem is the problem of finding control measures that will exclude a pathogen from an ecological system or, if the system is already disease-free, maintain it in that state. To solve this problem we work within a holistic control theory framework which is consistent with conventional theory for simple systems (where there is no external forcing and constant controls) and seamlessly generalises to complex systems that are subject to multiple component seasonal forcing and targeted variable controls. We develop, customise and integrate a range of numerical and algebraic procedures that provide a coherent methodology powerful enough to solve the exclusion problem in the general case. An important aspect of our solution procedure is its two-stage structure which reveals the epidemiological consequences of the controls used for exclusion. This information augments technical and economic considerations in the design of an acceptable exclusion strategy. Our methodology is used in two examples to show how time-varying controls can exploit the interference and reinforcement created by the external and internal lag structure and encourage the system to 'take over' some of the exclusion effort. On-off control switching, resonant amplification, optimality and controllability are important issues that emerge in the discussion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Atomic force microscopy probing in the measurement of cell mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Kirmizis, Dimitrios; Logothetidis, Stergios

    2010-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used incrementally over the last decade in cell biology. Beyond its usefulness in high resolution imaging, AFM also has unique capabilities for probing the viscoelastic properties of living cells in culture and, even more, mapping the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties, providing thus an indirect indicator of the structure and function of the underlying cytoskeleton and cell organelles. AFM measurements have boosted our understanding of cell mechanics in normal and diseased states and provide future potential in the study of disease pathophysiology and in the establishment of novel diagnostic and treatment options. PMID:20463929

  6. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that

  7. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  8. Blade Vibration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that an advanced noncontacting stress measurement system (NSMS) could improve classification of blade vibration response in terms of mistuning and closely spaced modes. The Phase II work confirmed the microwave sensor design process, modified the sensor so it is compatible as an upgrade to existing NSMS, and improved and finalized the NSMS software. The result will be stand-alone radar/tip timing radar signal conditioning for current conventional NSMS users (as an upgrade) and new users. The hybrid system will use frequency data and relative mode vibration levels from the radar sensor to provide substantially superior capabilities over current blade-vibration measurement technology. This frequency data, coupled with a reduced number of tip timing probes, will result in a system capable of detecting complex blade vibrations that would confound traditional NSMS systems. The hardware and software package was validated on a compressor rig at Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI). Finally, the hybrid radar/tip timing NSMS software package and associated sensor hardware will be installed for use in the NASA Glenn spin pit test facility.

  9. Stable dynamics in forced systems with sufficiently high/low forcing frequency.

    PubMed

    Bartuccelli, M; Gentile, G; Wright, J A

    2016-08-01

    We consider parametrically forced Hamiltonian systems with one-and-a-half degrees of freedom and study the stability of the dynamics when the frequency of the forcing is relatively high or low. We show that, provided the frequency is sufficiently high, Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem may be applied even when the forcing amplitude is far away from the perturbation regime. A similar result is obtained for sufficiently low frequency, but in that case we need the amplitude of the forcing to be not too large; however, we are still able to consider amplitudes which are outside of the perturbation regime. In addition, we find numerically that the dynamics may be stable even when the forcing amplitude is very large, well beyond the range of validity of the analytical results, provided the frequency of the forcing is taken correspondingly low.

  10. Operations Research in a New Spanish Air Force Planning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Until nowadays, when any Air Force felt that a weapon system was obsolete, they studied the potential market , or they built up a system that fulfilled...for a new weapons system which will cover all the requirements. If the weapon system already exists in the national or foreign market , then the system...medium transport. This can be an important factor to be considered but, sometimes, the Spanish Air Force has to look at the for- eign markets for the

  11. Measurement of interactions between protein layers adsorbed on silica by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Delgado, J. J.; Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Galisteo-González, F.; Gálvez-Ruiz, M. J.; Feiler, A.; Rutland, M. W.

    2004-07-01

    The present work, using an atomic force microscope and the colloid probe technique, investigates the interaction forces between bovine serum albumin (BSA) layers and between apoferritin layers adsorbed on silica surfaces. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different pH values and NaCl concentrations. Similar behaviours have been found with both proteins. Electrostatic and steric forces dominate the interactions between the protein layers at low NaCl concentrations. However, a very strange behaviour is found as a function of pH at high NaCl concentrations. The results obtained under these conditions could be explained if the presence of hydration forces in these systems is assumed.

  12. Measuring shear force transmission across a biomimetic glycocalyx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Isabel; Young, Dylan; Scrimgeour, Jan

    Human blood vessels are lined with a low-density polymer brush known as the glycocalyx. This brush plays an active role in defining the mechanical and biochemical environment of the endothelial cell in the blood vessel wall. In addition, it is involved in the detection of mechanical stimuli, such as the shear stress from blood flowing in the vessel. In this work, we construct a biomimetic version of the glycocalyx on top of a soft deformable substrate in order to measure its ability to modulate the effects of shear stress at the endothelial cell surface. The soft substrate is stamped on to a glass substrate and then enclosed inside a microfluidic device that generates a controlled flow over the substrate. The hydrogel chemistry has been optimized so that it reliably stamps into a defined shape and has consistent mechanical properties. Fluorescent microbeads embedded in the gel allow measurement of the surface deformation, and subsequently, calculation of the shear force at the surface of the soft substrate. We investigate the effect of the major structural elements of the glycocalyx, hyaluronic acid and charged proteoglycans, on the magnitude of the shear force transmitted to the surface of the hydrogel.

  13. Absolute rotation detection by Coriolis force measurement using optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we present an application of the optomechanical cavities for absolute rotation detection. Two optomechanical cavities, one in each arm, are placed in a Michelson interferometer. The interferometer is placed on a rotating table and is moved with a uniform velocity of \\dot{\\bar{y}} with respect to the rotating table. The Coriolis force acting on the interferometer changes the length of the optomechanical cavity in one arm, while the length of the optomechanical cavity in the other arm is not changed. The phase shift corresponding to the change in the optomechanical cavity length is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of the absolute rotation. An analytic expression for the minimum detectable rotation rate corresponding to the standard quantum limit of measurable Coriolis force in the interferometer is derived. Squeezing technique is discussed to improve the rotation detection sensitivity by a factor of \\sqrt{{γ }m/{ω }m} at 0 K temperature, where {γ }m and {ω }m are the damping rate and angular frequency of the mechanical oscillator. The temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  14. High performance target measurement flights from Vandenberg Air Force Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalfant, C. P.; Rosen, H.; Jerger, J. H.

    A description is presented of a new launch facility which is being prepared for the High Performance Target Measurement (HPTEM) booster at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). A deactivated Atlas launch complex is currently being modified to allow the rocket to be launched from a semisilo. The underground launch operations building will contain a new control center and instrumentation room. Attention is given to the Multi-Spectral Measurement Program (MSMP), details concerning the launch facility, and a target and flight safety trajectory analysis. Construction and modification of the facility is scheduled to be completed in mid-1983. The first HPTEM launch is planned to occur in April 1984. The HPTEM launch facility can also be utilized to launch Aries I (single stage) and Aries II (two-stage) probes with minor modification.

  15. Development of a quartz tuning-fork-based force sensor for measurements in the tens of nanoNewton force range during nanomanipulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oiko, V. T. A. Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D.; Martins, B. V. C.; Silva, P. C.

    2014-03-15

    Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1–100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently, applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 5–40 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.

  16. Review of Measurements of the Aerosol Global Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. L.

    2004-12-01

    Of all the ways that anthropogenic aerosols are suspected of impacting the Earth's energy balance, direct shortwave forcing during clear-sky conditions (DF) is by far the most straightforward to measure and understand. So, how well do we know this quantity? Model-based estimates of DF have treated individual anthropogenic components, but this approach is not practical for global satellite observations, which inherently sense the total aerosol and cannot readily detect chemical composition. In conjunction with members of the "A-Train" science teams, an observational strategy is being developed that attacks the DF problem in terms of three observable parameters: mid-visible aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction of optical depth (FMF) - which is taken as a proxy for anthropogenic fraction - and radiative forcing efficiency per unit optical depth (RFE). This talk will assess knowledge of each parameter. AOD is rather well known, with a long history of observations by multiple satellites and an extensive validation program in place. FMF (deduced from the wavelength dependence of AOD) is routinely reported by satellites, but these data have unknown accuracy, due to the absence of a validation program, and show discontinuities at land/ocean boundaries indicative of artifacts. Many investigators have combined AOD measurements with satellite measurements of broadband flux to estimate RFE over the oceans. These studies suffer from limited coverage (a few percent of the ocean) and a lack of collocated, sub-orbital measurements sufficient to diagnose the causes of RFE variation (such as differences in ambient relative humidity or aerosol single scattering albedo). Covariation among these three parameters has not yet been assessed. Summarizing, the lower limit on uncertainty in DF is about a factor of three and the upper limit is unknown. New and enhanced satellite sensors offer the potential for greatly reduced uncertainty in the near future. However, achieving this

  17. A novel collagen gel-based measurement technique for quantitation of cell contraction force

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianrong; Li, Li; Siow, Richard C. M.; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Cell contraction force plays an important role in wound healing, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis. This study describes a novel method to quantify single cell contraction force in vitro using human aortic adventitial fibroblasts embedded in a collagen gel. The technique is based on a depth sensing nano-indentation tester to measure the thickness and elasticity of collagen gels containing stimulated fibroblasts and a microscopy imaging system to estimate the gel area. In parallel, a simple theoretical model has been developed to calculate cell contraction force based on the measured parameters. Histamine (100 µM) was used to stimulate fibroblast contraction while the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-7 (25 µM) was used to inhibit cell contraction. The collagen matrix used in the model provides a physiological environment for fibroblast contraction studies. Measurement of changes in collagen gel elasticity and thickness arising from histamine treatments provides a novel convenient technique to measure cell contraction force within a collagen matrix. This study demonstrates that histamine can elicit a significant increase in contraction force of fibroblasts embedded in collagen, while the Young's modulus of the gel decreases due to the gel degradation. PMID:25977960

  18. A novel collagen gel-based measurement technique for quantitation of cell contraction force.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tianrong; Li, Li; Siow, Richard C M; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2015-05-06

    Cell contraction force plays an important role in wound healing, inflammation,angiogenesis and metastasis. This study describes a novel method to quantify single cell contraction force in vitro using human aortic adventitial fibroblasts embedded in a collagen gel. The technique is based on a depth sensing nano-indentation tester to measure the thickness and elasticity of collagen gels containing stimulated fibroblasts and a microscopy imaging system to estimate the gel area. In parallel, a simple theoretical model has been developed to calculate cell contraction force based on the measured parameters. Histamine (100 mM) was used to stimulate fibroblast contraction while the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-7 (25 mM) was used to inhibit cell contraction. The collagen matrix used in the model provides a physiological environment for fibroblast contraction studies. Measurement of changes in collagen gel elasticity and thickness arising from histamine treatments provides a novel convenient technique to measure cell contraction force within a collagen matrix. This study demonstrates that histamine can elicit a significant increase in contraction force of fibroblasts embedded in collagen,while the Young's modulus of the gel decreases due to the gel degradation.

  19. Force-assisted ultrasound imaging system through dual force sensing and admittance robot control.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ting-Yun; Zhang, Haichong K; Finocchi, Rodolfo; Taylor, Russell H; Boctor, Emad M

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been a gold standard for clinical diagnoses due to its unique advantages compared to other imaging modalities including: low cost, noninvasiveness, and safeness to the human body. However, the ultrasound scanning process requires applying a large force over extended periods of time, often in uncomfortable postures in order to maintain the desired orientation. This physical requirement over sonographers' careers often leads to musculoskeletal pain and strain injuries. To address this problem, we propose a cooperatively controlled robotic ultrasound system to reduce the force sonographers apply. The proposed system consists of two key components: a six-axis robotic arm that holds and actuates the ultrasound probe, and a dual force sensor setup that enables cooperative control and adaptive force assistance. With the admittance force control, the robotic arm complies with the motion of the operator, while assisting with force during the scanning. We validated the system through a user study involving expert sonographers and lay people and demonstrated 32-73% reduction in human applied force and 8- 18% improvement in image stability. These results indicate that the system has the potential to not only reduce the burden on the sonographer, but also provide more stable ultrasound scanning.

  20. Air Force Modification Programs - Interaction of Air Force Logistics Command and Air Force Systems Command.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    12 II. Previous Studies and Analyses............12 III. The Lessons Learned Program .............16 IV. Informal Interviews..................19...anything is wrong, and to identify ways to 4 0 fix the problems. This was done by requesting a printout from the AFSC/AFLC Lessons Learned program and...resolving potential problems, other than suggesting the program manager consult the Lessons Learned program managed by the Air Force Acquisition Logistics

  1. An Information System for the Peruvian Air Force Hospital.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    INFORMATION SYSTEM IN THE PERUVIAN AIR FORCE HOSPITAL ------------------------------- 21 A. THE USE OF COMPUTER CENTER IN THE NEW SYSTEM...29 4. Pharmacy System -------------------------- 31 5. Financial System ------------------------ 32 VI. REACTION AGAINST A NEW SYSTEM...problems that all new Systems bring when implemented, especially with the use of a computer, and reactions of the medical personnel to the innovation of

  2. Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Clear Air Force Station, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ballistic Missile Early Warning System - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. SUMP MEASURING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettos, N; Athneal Marzolf, A; Casandra Robinson, C; James Fiscus, J; Daniel Krementz, D; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26

    The process sumps in H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS) collect leaks from process tanks and jumpers. To prevent build-up of fissile material the sumps are frequently flushed which generates liquid waste and is prone to human error. The development of inserts filled with a neutron poison will allow a reduction in the frequency of flushing. Due to concrete deterioration and deformation of the sump liners the current dimensions of the sumps are unknown. Knowledge of these dimensions is necessary for development of the inserts. To solve this problem a remote Sump Measurement System was designed, fabricated, and tested to aid development of the sump inserts.

  4. Measurement of Hand/Handrim Grip Forces in Two Different One Arm Drive Wheelchairs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to explore the total and regional grip forces in the hand when propelling two different manual one arm drive wheelchairs: the Neater Uni-wheelchair (NUW) and a foot steered Action3 wheelchair. Methods. 17 nondisabled users were randomly assigned to each wheelchair to drive around an indoor obstacle course. The Grip, a multiple sensor system taking continuous measurement of handgrip force, was attached to the propelling hand. Total grip force in each region of the hand and total grip force across the whole hand were calculated per user per wheelchair. Results. The Action3 with foot steering only generated significantly greater total grip force in straight running compared to the NUW and also in the fingers and thumb in straight running. Conclusions. The results suggest that the Action3 with foot steering generated greater grip forces which may infer a greater potential for repetitive strain injury in the upper limb. Further work is required to explore whether the difference in grip force is of clinical significance in a disabled population. PMID:25045684

  5. Lightweight-compact variable-gap undulator with force cancellation system based on multipole monolithic magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinjo, Ryota; Kagamihata, Akihiro; Seike, Takamitsu; Kishimoto, Hikaru; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    A lightweight-compact variable-gap undulator (LCVGU) having the force-cancellation system based on the multipole monolithic magnets (MMMs) has been developed. The LCVGU is free from the heavy mechanical frames, which is a fundamental element specific to conventional variable-gap undulators (VGUs) because of a strong attractive force, and thus the cost and time for construction and installation are expected to be significantly reduced; the MMMs counteract the strong attractive force in a cost-effective manner. Results of mechanical tests and magnetic-field measurements of two prototype LCVGUs equipped with the proposed force cancellation system have revealed the comparable performance with the conventional VGUs.

  6. Lightweight-compact variable-gap undulator with force cancellation system based on multipole monolithic magnets.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Ryota; Kagamihata, Akihiro; Seike, Takamitsu; Kishimoto, Hikaru; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    A lightweight-compact variable-gap undulator (LCVGU) having the force-cancellation system based on the multipole monolithic magnets (MMMs) has been developed. The LCVGU is free from the heavy mechanical frames, which is a fundamental element specific to conventional variable-gap undulators (VGUs) because of a strong attractive force, and thus the cost and time for construction and installation are expected to be significantly reduced; the MMMs counteract the strong attractive force in a cost-effective manner. Results of mechanical tests and magnetic-field measurements of two prototype LCVGUs equipped with the proposed force cancellation system have revealed the comparable performance with the conventional VGUs.

  7. Verification of joint input-state estimation for force identification by means of in situ measurements on a footbridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, K.; Nimmen, K. Van; Lourens, E.; Rezayat, A.; Guillaume, P.; Roeck, G. De; Lombaert, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a verification of a joint input-state estimation algorithm using data obtained from in situ experiments on a footbridge. The estimation of the input and the system states is performed in a minimum-variance unbiased way, based on a limited number of response measurements and a system model. A dynamic model of the footbridge is obtained using a detailed finite element model that is updated using a set of experimental modal characteristics. The joint input-state estimation algorithm is used for the identification of two impact, harmonic, and swept sine forces applied to the bridge deck. In addition to these forces, unknown stochastic forces, such as wind loads, are acting on the structure. These forces, as well as measurement errors, give rise to uncertainty in the estimated forces and system states. Quantification of the uncertainty requires determination of the power spectral density of the unknown stochastic excitation, which is identified from the structural response under ambient loading. The verification involves comparing the estimated forces with the actual, measured forces. Although a good overall agreement is obtained between the estimated and measured forces, modeling errors prohibit a proper distinction between multiple forces applied to the structure for the case of harmonic and swept sine excitation.

  8. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  9. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  10. Parameters affecting the adhesion strength between a living cell and a colloid probe when measured by the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Cathy E; Pyo, Nayoung; Tanaka, Saaya; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kanda, Yoichi; Higashitani, Ko

    2006-03-15

    In this study, we used the colloid probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique to investigate the adhesion force between a living cell and a silica colloid particle in a Leibovitz's L-15 medium (L-15). The L-15 liquid maintained the pharmaceutical conditions necessary to keep the cells alive in the outside environment during the AFM experiment. The force curves in such a system showed a steric repulsion in the compression force curve, due to the compression of the cells by the colloid probe, and an adhesion force in the decompression force curve, due to binding events between the cell and the probe. We also investigated for the first time how the position on the cell surface, the strength of the pushing force, and the residence time of the probe at the cell surface individually affected the adhesion force between a living cell and a 6.84 microm diameter silica colloid particle in L-15. The position of measuring the force on the cell surface was seen not to affect the value of the maximum adhesion force. The loading force was also seen not to notably affect the value of the maximum adhesion force, if it was small enough not to pierce and damage the cell. The residence time of the probe at the cell surface, however, clearly affected the adhesion force, where a longer residence time gave a larger maximum force. From these results, we could conclude that the AFM force measurements should be made using a loading force small enough not to damage the cell and a fixed residence time, when comparing results of different systems.

  11. Preparation and Friction Force Microscopy Measurements of Immiscible, Opposing Polymer Brushes

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Sissi; Kutnyanszky, Edit; Müser, Martin H.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-01-01

    Solvated polymer brushes are well known to lubricate high-pressure contacts, because they can sustain a positive normal load while maintaining low friction at the interface. Nevertheless, these systems can be sensitive to wear due to interdigitation of the opposing brushes. In a recent publication, we have shown via molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy experiments, that using an immiscible polymer brush system terminating the substrate and the slider surfaces, respectively, can eliminate such interdigitation. As a consequence, wear in the contacts is reduced. Moreover, the friction force is two orders of magnitude lower compared to traditional miscible polymer brush systems. This newly proposed system therefore holds great potential for application in industry. Here, the methodology to construct an immiscible polymer brush system of two different brushes each solvated by their own preferred solvent is presented. The procedure how to graft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) from a flat surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is described. PNIPAM is solvated in water and PMMA in acetophenone. Via friction force AFM measurements, it is shown that the friction for this system is indeed reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to the miscible system of PMMA on PMMA solvated in acetophenone. PMID:25590429

  12. In-Situ-measurement of restraining forces during forming of rectangular cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, M.; Liewald, M.

    2016-11-01

    This contribution introduces a new method for evaluating the restraining forces during forming of rectangular cups with the goal of eliminating the disadvantages of the currently used scientifically established measurement procedures. With this method forming forces are measured indirectly by the elastic deformation of die structure caused by locally varying tribological system. Therefore, two sensors were integrated into the punch, which measure the restraining forces during the forming process. Furthermore, it was possible to evaluate the effects of different lubricants showing the time dependent trend as a function of stroke during the forming of the materials DP600 and DC04. A main advantage of this testing method is to get real friction corresponding data out of the physical deep drawing process as well as the measurement of real acting restraining forces at different areas of the deep drawing part by one single test. Measurement results gained by both sensors have been integrated into LS-Dyna simulation in which the coefficient of friction was regarded as a function of time. The simulated and deep drawn parts afterwards are analysed and compared to specific areas with regard to locally measured thickness of part. Results show an improvement of simulation quality when using locally varying, time dependent coefficients of friction compared to commonly used constant values.

  13. Acoustic power measurement of high intensity focused ultrasound in medicine based on radiation force.

    PubMed

    Shou, Wende; Huang, Xiaowei; Duan, Shimei; Xia, Rongmin; Shi, Zhonglong; Geng, Xiaoming; Li, Faqi

    2006-12-22

    How to measure the acoustic power of HIFU is one of the most important tasks in its medical application. In the paper a whole series of formula for calculating the radiation force related to the acoustic power radiated by a single element focusing transducer and by the focusing transducer array were given. Various system of radiation force balance (RFB) to measure the acoustic power of HIFU in medicine were designed and applied in China. In high power experiments, the dependence of radiation force acting the absorbing target on the target position at the beam axis of focusing transducer was fined. There is a peak value of "radiation force" acting the absorbing target in the focal region when the acoustic power through the focal plane exceeds some threshold. In order to avoid this big measurement error caused by the 'peak effect' in focal region, the distance between the absorbing target of RFB and the focusing transducer or transducer array was defined to be equal to or less than 0.7 times of the focal length in the National Standard of China for the measurements of acoustic power and field characteristics of HIFU. More than six different therapeutic equipments of HIFU have been examined by RFB for measuring the acoustic power since 1998. These results show that RFB with the absorbing target is valid in the acoustic power range up to 500W with good linearity for the drive voltage squared of focusing transducer or array. The uncertainty of measurement is within +/-15%.

  14. A technique for conditioning and calibrating force-sensing resistors for repeatable and reliable measurement of compressive force.

    PubMed

    Hall, Rick S; Desmoulin, Geoffrey T; Milner, Theodore E

    2008-12-05

    Miniature sensors that could measure forces applied by the fingers and hand without interfering with manual dexterity or range of motion would have considerable practical value in ergonomics and rehabilitation. In this study, techniques have been developed to use inexpensive pressure-sensing resistors (FSRs) to accurately measure compression force. The FSRs are converted from pressure-sensing to force-sensing devices. The effects of nonlinear response properties and dependence on loading history are compensated by signal conditioning and calibration. A fourth-order polynomial relating the applied force to the current voltage output and a linearly weighted sum of prior outputs corrects for sensor hysteresis and drift. It was found that prolonged (>20h) shear force loading caused sensor gain to change by approximately 100%. Shear loading also had the effect of eliminating shear force effects on sensor output, albeit only in the direction of shear loading. By applying prolonged shear loading in two orthogonal directions, the sensors were converted into pure compression sensors. Such preloading of the sensor is, therefore, required prior to calibration. The error in compression force after prolonged shear loading and calibration was consistently <5% from 0 to 30N and <10% from 30 to 40N. This novel method of calibrating FSRs for measuring compression force provides an inexpensive tool for biomedical and industrial design applications where measurements of finger and hand force are needed.

  15. Measurement of cricoid pressure force during simulated Sellick's manoeuvre.

    PubMed

    Andruszkiewicz, Paweł; Zawadka, Mateusz; Kosińska, Anna; Walczak-Wieteska, Paulina; Majerowicz, Kalina

    2017-09-27

    Cricoid pressure is a standard anaesthetic procedure used to reduce the risk of aspiration of gastric contents during the induction of general anaesthesia. However, for several years its validity has been questioned. There still remains the question of whether we perform it correctly. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the theoretical knowledge of Sellick's manoeuvre, as well an assessment of practical skill related with it when simulated on a model of the upper airway. The study was performed on a cohort of anaesthetists and anaesthetic nurses working in various hospitals in the Warsaw area. Measurements were taken on an upper airway model placed on an electronic kitchen scale. Participants were asked to perform Sellick's manoeuvre in the way they do it in their clinical practice. The test was done twice. Both the position and pressures applied on the model were documented. Knowledge concerning current recommendations of cricoid force was noted. 206 subjects participated in the study. Only 49% (n = 101) properly identified cricoid cartilage during their application of Sellick's manoeuvre. Application of the correct pressure on the model of the airway was noted in 16.5% (n = 34) during the first attempt and in 20.4% (n = 42) during the second attempt. The median force applied during simulated Sellick's manoeuvrewas 36 N (IQR: 26-55) in the first attempt, and 38 (IQR 25-55) in the second attempt. Sellick's manoeuvre was performed incorrectly in many cases. Half of the participants of our study applied the pressure in the wrong place while the majority of them used an inappropriate amount of force. Thus, the application of cricoid pressure in patients should be preceded with simulation training.

  16. New IABG Force Measurement Device: Design, Properties and First Use in Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albersdorfer, Konrad

    2012-07-01

    The knowledge of the actual interface forces and moments between test article and shaker is of great value for the performance of a vibration test on any space hardware. For this reason, IABG developed a new Force Measurement Device (FMD) to be used for dynamic spacecraft testing on their large shaker systems. A state-of-the-art hardware and software provide extremely accurate on-line signals of the resulting forces and moments, which can be directly applied in the real-time vibration control process. The basic FMD configuration consists of two plates, which are connected by sixteen tri-axial load cells as the force link, the corresponding measurement amplifiers and an electronic unit, the so-called FPU (force processing unit). The FPU is responsible for A/D conversion, application of mathematical operations and finally D/A conversion of the resulting variables. Standard outputs are six analogue signals for the sum forces and overall moments. However, any other kind of signal processing (e.g. group-wise summation) is possible, because the system bears up to twenty analogue output channels. Of course, the individual force signals as well as offline processing of the time histories are available, too. The FMD has successfully been used during the dynamic qualification of the LISA Pathfinder Launch Composite Module (LCM) on IABG’s 320kN Multi Shaker System in April 2011. During this test campaign, the following important properties could be demonstrated: High mechanical stiffness, good linearity and low cross-talk, high accuracy and signal quality, reliable analogue signals for automatic notching. These key properties - with or without additional features - make the FMD a desirable tool for primary notching during S/C testing with its inherent contribution to test safety. This paper describes the design and functionality of the FMD, and gives a short review on its first use during a spacecraft testing.

  17. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2010-12-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  18. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2011-05-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  19. Measurement of Force of Bow Holding and Contact Force between Bow Hair and String in Violin Playing by Pressure Measuring Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2001-09-01

    The force of bow holding and the contact force between bow hair and string in violin playing were measured by a pressure measuring film for the first time. It was scientifically identified that relaxed bowing was important for achieving a good violin tone. The proposed measurement manner may be helpful for objective evaluation of the bowing skill of amateur violinists.

  20. Analysis of the traction forces in different skull traction systems.

    PubMed

    Nyström, B; Allard, H; Karlsson, H

    1988-03-01

    During transportation of patients under skull traction, swinging of the weights produces acceleration forces that not only can cause pain and discomfort for the patient, but also can cause worsening of the cervical fracture or dislocation. Skull traction systems also involve friction forces. In a system with one pulley, the friction forces were 10 to 21.5% of the weight applied but, in a system with three pulleys (Stryker SurgiBed 965), they were as much as 65%. A new spring traction device that permits traction during transportation showed better physical characteristics than the hanging weight systems.