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Sample records for force microscope cantilevers

  1. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  2. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  3. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-10

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  4. Lorentz force actuation of a heated atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Prater, Craig B.; King, William P.

    2012-02-01

    We report Lorentz force-induced actuation of a silicon microcantilever having an integrated resistive heater. Oscillating current through the cantilever interacts with the magnetic field around a NdFeB permanent magnet and induces a Lorentz force that deflects the cantilever. The same current induces cantilever heating. With AC currents as low as 0.2 mA, the cantilever can be oscillated as much as 80 nm at resonance with a DC temperature rise of less than 5 °C. By comparison, the AC temperature variation leads to a thermomechanical oscillation that is about 1000 times smaller than the Lorentz deflection at the cantilever resonance. The cantilever position in the nonuniform magnetic field affects the Lorentz force-induced deflection, with the magnetic field parallel to the cantilever having the largest effect on cantilever actuation. We demonstrate how the cantilever actuation can be used for imaging, and for measuring the local material softening temperature by sensing the contact resonance shift.

  5. Lateral force microscope calibration using a modified atomic force microscope cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, M. G.

    2007-10-15

    A proof-of-concept study is presented for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and associated calibration procedure that provide a path for quantitative friction measurement using a lateral force microscope (LFM). The calibration procedure is based on the method proposed by Feiler et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2746 (2000)] but allows for calibration and friction measurements to be carried out in situ and with greater precision. The modified AFM cantilever is equipped with lateral lever arms that facilitate the application of normal and lateral forces, comparable to those acting in a typical LFM friction experiment. The technique allows the user to select acceptable precision via a potentially unlimited number of calibration measurements across the full working range of the LFM photodetector. A microfabricated version of the cantilever would be compatible with typical commercial AFM instrumentation and allow for common AFM techniques such as topography imaging and other surface force measurements to be performed.

  6. Atomic force microscope cantilever calibration using a focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2012-07-20

    A calibration method is presented for determining the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, which is a modification of the established Cleveland added mass technique. A focused ion beam (FIB) is used to remove a well-defined volume from a cantilever with known density, substantially reducing the uncertainty usually present in the added mass method. The technique can be applied to any type of AFM cantilever; but for the lowest uncertainty it is best applied to silicon cantilevers with spring constants above 0.7 N m(-1), where uncertainty is demonstrated to be typically between 7 and 10%. Despite the removal of mass from the cantilever, the calibration method presented does not impair the probes' ability to acquire data. The technique has been extensively tested in order to verify the underlying assumptions in the method. This method was compared to a number of other calibration methods and practical improvements to some of these techniques were developed, as well as important insights into the behavior of FIB modified cantilevers. These results will prove useful to research groups concerned with the application of microcantilevers to nanoscience, in particular for cases where maintaining pristine AFM tip condition is critical.

  7. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-07-15

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  8. Modular apparatus for electrostatic actuation of common atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Long, Christian J; Cannara, Rachel J

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric actuation of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers often suffers from spurious mechanical resonances in the loop between the signal driving the cantilever and the actual tip motion. These spurious resonances can reduce the accuracy of AFM measurements and in some cases completely obscure the cantilever response. To address these limitations, we developed a specialized AFM cantilever holder for electrostatic actuation of AFM cantilevers. The holder contains electrical contacts for the AFM cantilever chip, as well as an electrode (or electrodes) that may be precisely positioned with respect to the back of the cantilever. By controlling the voltages on the AFM cantilever and the actuation electrode(s), an electrostatic force is applied directly to the cantilever, providing a near-ideal transfer function from drive signal to tip motion. We demonstrate both static and dynamic actuations, achieved through the application of direct current and alternating current voltage schemes, respectively. As an example application, we explore contact resonance atomic force microscopy, which is a technique for measuring the mechanical properties of surfaces on the sub-micron length scale. Using multiple electrodes, we also show that the torsional resonances of the AFM cantilever may be excited electrostatically, opening the door for advanced dynamic lateral force measurements with improved accuracy and precision.

  9. Modular apparatus for electrostatic actuation of common atomic force microscope cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Christian J.; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2015-07-15

    Piezoelectric actuation of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers often suffers from spurious mechanical resonances in the loop between the signal driving the cantilever and the actual tip motion. These spurious resonances can reduce the accuracy of AFM measurements and in some cases completely obscure the cantilever response. To address these limitations, we developed a specialized AFM cantilever holder for electrostatic actuation of AFM cantilevers. The holder contains electrical contacts for the AFM cantilever chip, as well as an electrode (or electrodes) that may be precisely positioned with respect to the back of the cantilever. By controlling the voltages on the AFM cantilever and the actuation electrode(s), an electrostatic force is applied directly to the cantilever, providing a near-ideal transfer function from drive signal to tip motion. We demonstrate both static and dynamic actuations, achieved through the application of direct current and alternating current voltage schemes, respectively. As an example application, we explore contact resonance atomic force microscopy, which is a technique for measuring the mechanical properties of surfaces on the sub-micron length scale. Using multiple electrodes, we also show that the torsional resonances of the AFM cantilever may be excited electrostatically, opening the door for advanced dynamic lateral force measurements with improved accuracy and precision.

  10. Note: Lateral force microscope calibration using multiple location pivot loading of rectangular cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2010-02-15

    This note outlines a calibration method for atomic force microscope friction measurement that uses the ''pivot'' method of [Bogdanovic et al., Colloids Surf. B 19, 397 (2000)] to generate optical lever sensitivities for known torque applied to rectangular cantilevers. We demonstrate the key calibration parameter to be a linear function of the position at which it is determined along the length of the cantilevers. In this way the optical lever system can be calibrated for cantilever torque by applying loads at locations along the length of a cantilever, away from the integrated tip, so that issues such as tip damage or interference can be avoided.

  11. Note: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using only their resonant frequency and quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2014-11-15

    A simplified method for calibrating atomic force microscope cantilevers was recently proposed by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012); Sec. III D] that relies solely on the resonant frequency and quality factor of the cantilever in fluid (typically air). This method eliminates the need to measure the hydrodynamic function of the cantilever, which can be time consuming given the wide range of cantilevers now available. Using laser Doppler vibrometry, we rigorously assess the accuracy of this method for a series of commercially available cantilevers and explore its performance under non-ideal conditions. This shows that the simplified method is highly accurate and can be easily implemented to perform fast, robust, and non-invasive spring constant calibration.

  12. Strong electromechanical coupling of an atomic force microscope cantilever to a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Steven D; Cockins, Lynda; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter; Clerk, Aashish A

    2010-01-08

    We present theoretical and experimental results on the mechanical damping of an atomic force microscope cantilever strongly coupled to a self-assembled InAs quantum dot. When the cantilever oscillation amplitude is large, its motion dominates the charge dynamics of the dot which in turn leads to nonlinear, amplitude-dependent damping of the cantilever. We observe highly asymmetric line shapes of Coulomb blockade peaks in the damping that reflect the degeneracy of energy levels on the dot. Furthermore, we predict that excited state spectroscopy is possible by studying the damping versus oscillation amplitude, in analogy with varying the amplitude of an ac gate voltage.

  13. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J.; Monty, Jason P.; Marusic, Ivan; Wei Xingzhan; Mulvaney, Paul; Crawford, Simon A.; Friend, James R.

    2012-10-15

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  14. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Sanelli, Julian A; Adamson, Brian D; Monty, Jason P; Wei, Xingzhan; Crawford, Simon A; Friend, James R; Marusic, Ivan; Mulvaney, Paul; Bieske, Evan J

    2012-10-01

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  15. A direct micropipette-based calibration method for atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoyu; Yu, Yan; Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we describe a direct method for calibrating atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers with the micropipette aspiration technique (MAT). A closely fitting polystyrene bead inside a micropipette is driven by precisely controlled hydrostatic pressures to apply known loads on the sharp tip of AFM cantilevers, thus providing a calibration at the most functionally relevant position. The new method is capable of calibrating cantilevers with spring constants ranging from 0.01 to hundreds of newtons per meter. Under appropriate loading conditions, this new method yields measurement accuracy and precision both within 10%, with higher performance for softer cantilevers. Furthermore, this method may greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of calibration for colloidal probes. PMID:19566228

  16. A direct micropipette-based calibration method for atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyu; Yu, Yan; Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2009-06-01

    In this report, we describe a direct method for calibrating atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers with the micropipette aspiration technique (MAT). A closely fitting polystyrene bead inside a micropipette is driven by precisely controlled hydrostatic pressures to apply known loads on the sharp tip of AFM cantilevers, thus providing a calibration at the most functionally relevant position. The new method is capable of calibrating cantilevers with spring constants ranging from 0.01 to hundreds of newtons per meter. Under appropriate loading conditions, this new method yields measurement accuracy and precision both within 10%, with higher performance for softer cantilevers. Furthermore, this method may greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of calibration for colloidal probes.

  17. Atomic force microscope cantilever spring constant evaluation for higher mode oscillations: A kinetostatic method

    SciTech Connect

    Tseytlin, Yakov M.

    2008-02-15

    Our previous study of the particle mass sensor has shown a large ratio (up to thousands) between the spring constants of a rectangular cantilever in higher mode vibration and at the static bending or natural mode vibration. This has been proven by us through the derived nodal point position equation. That solution is good for a cantilever with the free end in noncontact regime and the probe shifted from the end to an effective section and contacting a soft object. Our further research shows that the same nodal position equation with the proper frequency equations may be used for the same spring constant ratio estimation if the vibrating at higher mode cantilever's free end has a significant additional mass clamped to it or that end is in permanent contact with an elastic or hard measurand object (reference cantilever). However, in the latter case, the spring constant ratio is much smaller (in tens) than in other mentioned cases at equal higher (up to fourth) vibration modes. We also present the spring constant ratio for a vibrating at higher eigenmode V-shaped cantilever, which is now in wide use for atomic force microscopy. The received results on the spring constant ratio are in good (within a few percent) agreement with the theoretical and experimental data published by other researchers. The knowledge of a possible spring constant transformation is important for the proper calibration and use of an atomic force microscope with vibrating cantilever in the higher eigenmodes for measurement and imaging with enlarged resolution.

  18. Microdrops on atomic force microscope cantilevers: evaporation of water and spring constant calibration.

    PubMed

    Bonaccurso, Elmar; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-01-13

    The evaporation of water drops with radii approximately 20 microm was investigated experimentally by depositing them onto atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers and measuring the deflection versus time. Because of the surface tension of the liquid, the Laplace pressure inside the drop, and the change of interfacial stress at the solid-liquid interface, the cantilever is deflected by typically a few hundred nanometers. The experimental results are in accordance with an analytic theory developed. The evaporation process could be monitored with high accuracy even at the last stage of evaporation because (1) cantilever deflections can be measured with nanometer resolution and (2) the time resolution, given by the inverse of the resonance frequency of the cantilever of approximately 0.3 ms, is much faster than the typical evaporation time of 1 s. Experimental results indicate that evaporation of the last thin layer of water is significantly slower than the rest of the drop, which can be due to surface forces. This drop-on-cantilever system can also be used to analyze the drop impact dynamics on a surface and to determine the spring constant of cantilevers.

  19. Note: Improved calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using multiple reference cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2015-05-15

    Overall precision of the simplified calibration method in J. E. Sader et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012), Sec. III D, is dominated by the spring constant of the reference cantilever. The question arises: How does one take measurements from multiple reference cantilevers, and combine these results, to improve uncertainty of the reference cantilever’s spring constant and hence the overall precision of the method? This question is addressed in this note. Its answer enables manufacturers to specify of a single set of data for the spring constant, resonant frequency, and quality factor, from measurements on multiple reference cantilevers. With this data set, users can trivially calibrate cantilevers of the same type.

  20. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  1. Near-Field Acoustical Imaging using Lateral Bending Mode of Atomic Force Microscope Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, A.; Rabe, U.; Rödel, J.; Arnold, W.

    Scanning probe microscopy techniques enable one to investigate surface properties such as contact stiffness and friction between the probe tip and a sample with nm resolution. So far the bending and the torsional eigenmodes of an atomic force microscope cantilever have been used to image variations of elasticity and shear elasticity, respectively. Such images are near-field images with the resolution given by the contact radius typically between 10 nm and 50 nm. We show that the flexural modes of a cantilever oscillating in the width direction and parallel to the sample surface can also be used for imaging. Additional to the dominant in-plane component of the oscillation, the lateral modes exhibit a vertical component as well, provided there is an asymmetry in the cross-section of the cantilever or in its suspension. The out-of-plane deflection renders the lateral modes detectable by the optical position sensors used in atomic force microscopes. We studied cracks which were generated by Vickers indents, in submicro- and nanocrystalline ZrO2. Images of the lateral contact stiffness were obtained by vibrating the cantilever close to a contact-resonance frequency. A change in contact stiffness causes a shift of the resonant frequency and hence a change of the cantilever vibration amplitude. The lateral contact-stiffness images close to the crack faces display a contrast that we attribute to altered elastic properties indicating a process zone. This could be caused by a stress-induced phase transformation during crack propagation. Using the contact mode of an atomic force microscope, we measured the crack-opening displacement as a function of distance from the crack tip, and we determined the crack-tip toughness Ktip. Furthermore, K1c was inferred from the length of radial cracks of Vickers indents that were measured using classical scanning acoustic microscopy

  2. A virtual instrument to standardise the calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Borgani, Riccardo; Gibson, Christopher T; Haviland, David B; Higgins, Michael J; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul; Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Thorén, Per-Anders; Tran, Jim; Zhang, Heyou; Zhang, Hongrui; Zheng, Tian

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) users often calibrate the spring constants of cantilevers using functionality built into individual instruments. This calibration is performed without reference to a global standard, hindering the robust comparison of force measurements reported by different laboratories. Here, we describe a virtual instrument (an internet-based initiative) whereby users from all laboratories can instantly and quantitatively compare their calibration measurements to those of others-standardising AFM force measurements-and simultaneously enabling non-invasive calibration of AFM cantilevers of any geometry. This global calibration initiative requires no additional instrumentation or data processing on the part of the user. It utilises a single website where users upload currently available data. A proof-of-principle demonstration of this initiative is presented using measured data from five independent laboratories across three countries, which also allows for an assessment of current calibration.

  3. A virtual instrument to standardise the calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John E.; Borgani, Riccardo; Gibson, Christopher T.; Haviland, David B.; Higgins, Michael J.; Kilpatrick, Jason I.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul; Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Thorén, Per-Anders; Tran, Jim; Zhang, Heyou; Zhang, Hongrui; Zheng, Tian

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) users often calibrate the spring constants of cantilevers using functionality built into individual instruments. This calibration is performed without reference to a global standard, hindering the robust comparison of force measurements reported by different laboratories. Here, we describe a virtual instrument (an internet-based initiative) whereby users from all laboratories can instantly and quantitatively compare their calibration measurements to those of others—standardising AFM force measurements—and simultaneously enabling non-invasive calibration of AFM cantilevers of any geometry. This global calibration initiative requires no additional instrumentation or data processing on the part of the user. It utilises a single website where users upload currently available data. A proof-of-principle demonstration of this initiative is presented using measured data from five independent laboratories across three countries, which also allows for an assessment of current calibration.

  4. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  5. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  6. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  7. Atomic Force Microscope Cantilever Flexural Stiffness Calibration: Toward a Standard Traceable Method

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Richard S.; Reitsma, Mark G.; Kramar, John A.; Pratt, Jon R.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the atomic force microscope into a useful tool for measuring mechanical properties of surfaces at the nanoscale has spurred the need for more precise and accurate methods for calibrating the spring constants of test cantilevers. Groups within international standards organizations such as the International Organization for Standardization and the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) are conducting studies to determine which methods are best suited for these calibrations and to try to improve the reproducibility and accuracy of these measurements among different laboratories. This paper expands on a recent mini round robin within VAMAS Technical Working Area 29 to measure the spring constant of a single batch of triangular silicon nitride cantilevers sent to three international collaborators. Calibration techniques included reference cantilever, added mass, and two forms of thermal methods. Results are compared to measurements traceable to the International System of Units provided by an electrostatic force balance. A series of guidelines are also discussed for procedures that can improve the running of round robins in atomic force microscopy. PMID:26989594

  8. Enhancing amplitudes of higher-order eigenmodes of atomic force microscope cantilevers by laser for better mass sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Chu Manh; Duy Vy, Nguyen; Dat, Le Tri; Iida, Takuya

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of an atomic force microscope cantilever under various irradiation configurations of a laser. By conveying a stream of photons and its momenta, the laser beam whose geometrical intensity profile has a Gaussian form will exert a nonuniform radiation pressure on the cantilever surface and modify its vibration. The dependences of cantilever modeshapes on the laser spot position and waist reveal a possibility of diminishing or exciting a specific eigenmode. For cantilevers of ˜200 µm length, the vibration amplitude of higher-order eigenmodes can be increased 4-5 times. This implies the change in cantilever effective mass once the interaction with the ambient is taken into account. The study gives a deeper understanding of soft cantilever dynamics in liquids and can be applied in the modern measurement configuration where high frequencies are required.

  9. Topography imaging with a heated atomic force microscope cantilever in tapping mode.

    PubMed

    Park, Keunhan; Lee, Jungchul; Zhang, Zhuomin M; King, William P

    2007-04-01

    This article describes tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a heated AFM cantilever. The electrical and thermal responses of the cantilever were investigated while the cantilever oscillated in free space or was in intermittent contact with a surface. The cantilever oscillates at its mechanical resonant frequency, 70.36 kHz, which is much faster than its thermal time constant of 300 micros, and so the cantilever operates in thermal steady state. The thermal impedance between the cantilever heater and the sample was measured through the cantilever temperature signal. Topographical imaging was performed on silicon calibration gratings of height 20 and 100 nm. The obtained topography sensitivity is as high as 200 microVnm and the resolution is as good as 0.5 nmHz(1/2), depending on the cantilever power. The cantilever heating power ranges 0-7 mW, which corresponds to a temperature range of 25-700 degrees C. The imaging was performed entirely using the cantilever thermal signal and no laser or other optics was required. As in conventional AFM, the tapping mode operation demonstrated here can suppress imaging artifacts and enable imaging of soft samples.

  10. The multi-position calibration of the stiffness for atomic-force microscope cantilevers based on vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yelong; Song, Le; Hu, Gang; Cai, Xue; Liu, Hongguang; Ma, Jinyu; Zhao, Meirong; Fang, Fengzhou

    2015-05-01

    Calibration of the stiffness of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is critical for industry and academic research. The multi-position calibration method for AFM cantilevers based on vibration is investigated. The position providing minimum uncertainty is deduced. The validity of the multi-position approach is shown via theoretical and experimental means. We applied it to the recently developed vibration method using an AFM cantilever with a normal stiffness of 0.1 N m-1. The standard deviation of the measured stiffness is 0.002 N m-1 with a mean value of 0.189 N m-1 and the relative combined uncertainty is approximately 7%, which is better than the approach using the single position at the tip of the cantilever.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers immersed in liquids based on the modified couple stress theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chang, Win-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The modified couple stress theory is adopted to study the sensitivity of a rectangular atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever immersed in acetone, water, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and 1-butanol. The theory contains a material length scale parameter and considers the size effect in the analysis. However, this parameter is difficult to obtain via experimental measurements. In this study, a conjugate gradient method for the parameter estimation of the frequency equation is presented. The optimal method provides a quantitative approach for estimating the material length scale parameter based on the modified couple stress theory. The results show that the material length scale parameter of the AFM cantilever immersed in acetone, CCl4, water, and 1-butanol is 0, 25, 116.3, and 471 nm, respectively. In addition, the vibration sensitivities of the AFM cantilever immersed in these liquids are investigated. The results are useful for the design of AFM cantilevers immersed in liquids.

  12. Atomic force microscope cantilever calibration device for quantified force metrology at micro- or nano-scale regime: the nano force calibrator (NFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Seok; Choi, Jae-Hyuk; Park, Yon-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2006-10-01

    Motivated by emerging needs for accurate force measurements in the nanotechnology and biophysics areas, we present an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever calibration system, the 'nano force calibrator' (NFC), consisting of a microbalance and a precision translation stage. Calibration using the NFC has proved to be a reliable and accurate method through a series of experiments with a commercial piezoresistive AFM cantilever. In these experiments, linearity, repeatability and reproducibility of measurements were investigated along with the effects of calibration conditions, such as orientation of the cantilever and temperature. Uncertainty analysis shows that the stiffness and force sensitivity are determined to be 3.385 N m-1 and 0.6490 µN Ω-1, which are traceable to the Système International d'Unités (SI units). The relative standard uncertainties of both the stiffness and sensitivity are approximately 0.4% or conservatively 0.5%.

  13. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  14. Study of thermal and acoustic noise interferences in low stiffness atomic force microscope cantilevers and characterization of their dynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Boudaoud, Mokrane; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2012-01-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for the measurement of forces at the micro/nano scale when calibrated cantilevers are used. Besides many existing calibration techniques, the thermal calibration is one of the simplest and fastest methods for the dynamic characterization of an AFM cantilever. This method is efficient provided that the Brownian motion (thermal noise) is the most important source of excitation during the calibration process. Otherwise, the value of spring constant is underestimated. This paper investigates noise interference ranges in low stiffness AFM cantilevers taking into account thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures as two main sources of noise. As a result, a preliminary knowledge about the conditions in which thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures have closely the same effect on the AFM cantilever (noise interference) is provided with both theoretical and experimental arguments. Consequently, beyond the noise interference range, commercial low stiffness AFM cantilevers are calibrated in two ways: using the thermal noise (in a wide temperature range) and acoustic pressures generated by a loudspeaker. We then demonstrate that acoustic noises can also be used for an efficient characterization and calibration of low stiffness AFM cantilevers. The accuracy of the acoustic characterization is evaluated by comparison with results from the thermal calibration.

  15. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  16. Micromechanical cantilevers and scanning probe microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Scott A.; Xu, Yang; MacDonald, Noel C.

    1995-09-01

    We have fabricated two microelectromechanical scanning tunneling microscopes (Micro- STMs) with 3D (xyz) actuators and integrated high aspects ratio tips. The reduction in the size of scanning probe microscopes allows for faster scanning speeds, array architectures, and massively parallel operation. The two Micro-STMs are fabricated from single crystal silicon using the high-aspect-ratio SCREAM process and are small enough to be used in array architectures. The torsional cantilever design used for out-of-plane (z) motion can be easily be adapted to scanning force microscopy. Typical atomic force microscope cantilevers have spring constants on the order of 0.01 - 10 N/m. To produce cantilevers with lower spring constants, ordinary thin film techniques would require longer (several mm) and thinner (sub- micrometers ) cantilevers. A mechanical analysis of torsional cantilevers reveals that high aspect ratio rectangular beams, such as the ones we fabricate, are easily twisted. By using the torsional design, we can achieve lower spring constants (10-1 - 10-7 N/m) without having to make a very thin film cantilever. We have demonstrated torsional cantilevers with spring constants on the order of 10-2 N/m. These cantilevers can be used as extremely sensitive force sensors for atomic force microscopy.

  17. A pressure gauge based on gas density measurement from analysis of the thermal noise of an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongjin; Paul, Mark R; Ducker, William A

    2012-05-01

    We describe a gas-density gauge based on the analysis of the thermally-driven fluctuations of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. The fluctuations are modeled as a ring-down of a simple harmonic oscillator, which allows fitting of the resonance frequency and damping of the cantilever, which in turn yields the gas density. The pressure is obtained from the density using the known equation of state. In the range 10-220 kPa, the pressure readings from the cantilever gauge deviate by an average of only about 5% from pressure readings on a commercial gauge. The theoretical description we use to determine the pressure from the cantilever motion is based upon the continuum hypothesis, which sets a minimum pressure for our analysis. It is anticipated that the cantilever gauge could be extended to measure lower pressures given a molecular theoretical description. Alternatively, the gauge could be calibrated for use in the non-continuum range. Our measurement technique is similar to previous AFM cantilever measurements, but the analysis produces improved accuracy.

  18. On eigenmodes, stiffness, and sensitivity of atomic force microscope cantilevers in air versus liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Raman, Arvind

    2010-02-15

    The effect of hydrodynamic loading on the eigenmode shapes, modal stiffnesses, and optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) microcantilevers is investigated by measuring the vibrations of such microcantilevers in air and water using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. It is found that for rectangular tipless microcantilevers, the measured fundamental and higher eigenmodes and their equivalent stiffnesses are nearly identical in air and in water. However, for microcantilevers with a tip mass or for picket shaped cantilevers, there is a marked difference in the second (and higher) eigenmode shapes between air and water that leads to a large decrease in their modal stiffness in water as compared to air as well as a decrease in their optical lever sensitivity. These results are explained in terms of hydrodynamic interactions of microcantilevers with nonuniform mass distribution. The results clearly demonstrate that tip mass and hydrodynamic loading must be taken into account in stiffness calibration and optical lever sensitivity calibration while using higher-order eigenmodes in dynamic AFM.

  19. SI-traceable determination of spring constants of various atomic force microscope cantilevers with a small uncertainty of 1%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Seok; Choi, Jae-Hyuk; Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, Yon-Kyu

    2007-11-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of using the nano force calibrator (NFC), consisting of a microbalance and a nano-stage, as a calibration device, which can accurately determine normal spring constants (k) of various atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers with traceability to the Système International d'Unités (SI units). From very compliant (k < 0.1 N m-1) to stiff (k > 10 N m-1) cantilevers, three types of commercial levers with different shapes (beam and V) and operating modes (contact and tapping) were chosen to test NFC calibration performances. We have found that all types of levers could be well characterized by the NFC even when a small force (approximately 500 nN) was used to calibrate a soft cantilever (k < 0.1 N m-1). We declared the relative standard uncertainty of the spring constant calibration of our method to be better than 1%, based on calibration results and uncertainty analysis. Because of its small calibration uncertainty, the NFC is recommendable for accurate calibration of AFM cantilevers and as a reference method for assessing other popularly used calibration methods.

  20. Digital control of force microscope cantilevers using a field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Jacky, Jonathan P; Garbini, Joseph L; Ettus, Matthew; Sidles, John A

    2008-12-01

    This report describes a cantilever controller for magnetic resonance force microscopy based on a field programmable gate array, along with the hardware and software used to integrate the controller into an experiment. The controller is assembled from a low-cost commercially available software defined radio device and libraries of open-source software. The controller includes a digital filter comprising two cascaded second-order sections ("biquads"), which together can implement transfer functions for optimal cantilever controllers. An appendix in this report shows how to calculate filter coefficients for an optimal controller from measured cantilever characteristics. The controller also includes an input multiplexer and adder used in calibration protocols. Filter coefficients and multiplexer settings can be set and adjusted by control software while an experiment is running. The input is sampled at 64 MHz; the sampling frequency in the filters can be divided down under software control to achieve a good match with filter characteristics. Data reported here were sampled at 500 kHz, chosen for acoustic cantilevers with resonant frequencies near 8 kHz. Inputs are digitized with 12 bit resolution, and outputs are digitized with 14 bits. The experiment software is organized as a client and server to make it easy to adapt the controller to different experiments. The server encapsulates the details of controller hardware organization, connection technology, filter architecture, and number representation. The same server could be used in any experiment, while a different client encodes the particulars of each experiment.

  1. Digital control of force microscope cantilevers using a field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacky, Jonathan P.; Garbini, Joseph L.; Ettus, Matthew; Sidles, John A.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes a cantilever controller for magnetic resonance force microscopy based on a field programmable gate array, along with the hardware and software used to integrate the controller into an experiment. The controller is assembled from a low-cost commercially available software defined radio device and libraries of open-source software. The controller includes a digital filter comprising two cascaded second-order sections ("biquads"), which together can implement transfer functions for optimal cantilever controllers. An appendix in this report shows how to calculate filter coefficients for an optimal controller from measured cantilever characteristics. The controller also includes an input multiplexer and adder used in calibration protocols. Filter coefficients and multiplexer settings can be set and adjusted by control software while an experiment is running. The input is sampled at 64 MHz; the sampling frequency in the filters can be divided down under software control to achieve a good match with filter characteristics. Data reported here were sampled at 500 kHz, chosen for acoustic cantilevers with resonant frequencies near 8 kHz. Inputs are digitized with 12 bit resolution, and outputs are digitized with 14 bits. The experiment software is organized as a client and server to make it easy to adapt the controller to different experiments. The server encapsulates the details of controller hardware organization, connection technology, filter architecture, and number representation. The same server could be used in any experiment, while a different client encodes the particulars of each experiment.

  2. Temperature and non-linear response of cantilever-type mechanical oscillators used in atomic force microscopes with interferometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Fläschner, G.; Ruschmeier, K.; Schwarz, A. Wiesendanger, R.; Bakhtiari, M. R.; Thorwart, M.

    2015-03-23

    The sensitivity of atomic force microscopes is fundamentally limited by the cantilever temperature, which can be, in principle, determined by measuring its thermal spectrum and applying the equipartition theorem. However, the mechanical response can be affected by the light field inside the cavity of a Fabry-Perot interferometer due to light absorption, radiation pressure, photothermal forces, and laser noise. By evaluating the optomechanical Hamiltonian, we are able to explain the peculiar distance dependence of the mechanical quality factor as well as the appearance of thermal spectra with symmetrical Lorentzian as well as asymmetrical Fano line shapes. Our results can be applied to any type of mechanical oscillator in an interferometer-based detection system.

  3. Temperature dependence of viscosity and density of viscous liquids determined from thermal noise spectra of uncalibrated atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Neal; Lee, Stephen L; Hähner, Georg

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate that the thermal response of uncalibrated atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to extract the density and the viscosity of viscous liquids with good accuracy. Temperature dependent thermal noise spectra were measured in water/poly(ethylene glycol) mixtures. Empirical parameters characteristic of the resonance behavior of the system were extracted from data recorded for one of the solutions at room temperature. These parameters were then employed to determine both viscosity and density values of the solutions simultaneously at different temperatures. In addition, activation energies for viscous flow were determined from the viscosity values obtained. The method presented is both fast and reliable and has the potential to be applied in connection with microfluidic systems, making macroscopic amounts of liquid and separate measurements with a viscometer and a densimeter redundant.

  4. Analyzing the Effect of Capillary Force on Vibrational Performance of the Cantilever of an Atomic Force Microscope in Tapping Mode with Double Piezoelectric Layers in an Air Environment.

    PubMed

    Nahavandi, Amir; Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the effects of forces exerted on the cantilever probe tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). These forces vary according to the separation distance between the probe tip and the surface of the sample being examined. Hence, at a distance away from the surface (farther than d(on)), these forces have an attractive nature and are of Van der Waals type, and when the probe tip is situated in the range of a₀≤ d(ts) ≤ d(on), the capillary force is added to the Van der Waals force. At a distance of d(ts) ≤ a₀, the Van der Waals and capillary forces remain constant at intermolecular distances, and the contact repulsive force repels the probe tip from the surface of sample. The capillary force emerges due to the contact of thin water films with a thickness of h(c) which have accumulated on the sample and probe. Under environmental conditions a layer of water or hydrocarbon often forms between the probe tip and sample. The capillary meniscus can grow until the rate of evaporation equals the rate of condensation. For each of the above forces, different models are presented. The smoothness or roughness of the surfaces and the geometry of the cantilever tip have a significant effect on the modeling of forces applied on the probe tip. Van der Waals and the repulsive forces are considered to be the same in all the simulations, and only the capillary force is altered in order to evaluate the role of this force in the AFM-based modeling. Therefore, in view of the remarkable advantages of the piezoelectric microcantilever and also the extensive applications of the tapping mode, we investigate vibrational motion of the piezoelectric microcantilever in the tapping mode. The cantilever mentioned is entirely covered by two piezoelectric layers that carry out both the actuation of the probe tip and the measuringof its position.

  5. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio

    2015-06-15

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner’s fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α{sub 3}β{sub 3} subcomplex of F{sub 1}-ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s.

  6. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio

    2015-06-01

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner's fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α3β3 subcomplex of F1-ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s.

  7. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio

    2015-06-01

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner's fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α3β3 subcomplex of F1-ATPase in dynamic action at ˜7 frames/s.

  8. Note: Guaranteed collocated multimode control of an atomic force microscope cantilever using on-chip piezoelectric actuation and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, Michael G.; Yong, Yuen K.

    2017-08-01

    The quality (Q) factor is an important parameter of the resonance of the microcantilever as it determines both imaging bandwidth and force sensitivity. The ability to control the Q factor of multiple modes is believed to be of great benefit for atomic force microscopy techniques involving multiple eigenmodes. In this paper, we propose a novel cantilever design employing multiple piezoelectric transducers which are used for separated actuation and sensing, leading to guaranteed collocation of the first eight eigenmodes up to 3 MHz. The design minimizes the feedthrough usually observed with these systems by incorporating a guard trace on the cantilever chip. As a result, a multimode Q controller is demonstrated to be able to modify the quality factor of the first two eigenmodes over up to four orders of magnitude without sacrificing robust stability.

  9. Analyzing the effect of the forces exerted on cantilever probe tip of atomic force microscope with tapering-shaped geometry and double piezoelectric extended layers in the air and liquid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Nahavandi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the force vibrational performance of tapering-shaped cantilevers, using Euler-Bernoulli theory. Tapering-shaped cantilevers have plan-view geometry consisting of a rectangular section at the clamped end and a triangular section at the tip. Hamilton's principle is utilized to obtain the partial differential equations governing the nonlinear vibration of the system as well as the corresponding boundary conditions. In this model, a micro cantilever, which is covered by two piezoelectric layers at the top and the bottom, is modeled at angle α. Both of these layers are subjected to similar AC and DC voltages. This paper attempts to determine the effect of the capillary force exerted on the cantilever probe tip of an atomic force microscope. The capillary force emerges due to the contact between thin water films with a thickness of hc which have accumulated on the sample and the probe. In addition, an attempt is made to develop the capillary force between the tip and the sample surface with respect to the geometry obtained. The smoothness or the roughness of the surfaces as well as the geometry of the cantilever tip have significant effects on the modeling of forces applied to the probe tip. In this article, the Van der Waals and the repulsive forces are considered to be the same in all of the simulations, and only is the capillary force altered in order to evaluate the role of this force in the atomic force microscope based modeling. We also indicate that the tip shape and the radial distance of the meniscus greatly influence the capillary force. The other objective of our study is to draw a comparison between tapering-and rectangular-shaped cantilevers. Furthermore, the equation for converting the tip of a tapering-shaped cantilever into a rectangular cantilever is provided. Moreover, the modal analysis method is employed to solve the motion equation. The mode shape function for the two tapering-shaped sections of the first

  10. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Katan, Allard J; Rankl, Christian; Stahl, Stefan W; van Buul, Arend M; Phang, In Yee; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Schön, Peter; Gerritsen, Jan W; Cambi, Alessandra; Rowan, Alan E; Vancso, G Julius; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Gaub, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Figdor, Carl G; Speller, Sylvia

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are frequently used for cantilever calibration, there is no consensus on the optimal calibration of soft and V-shaped cantilevers, especially those used in force spectroscopy. Therefore, in this study we aimed at establishing a commonly accepted approach to accurately calibrate compliant and V-shaped cantilevers. In a round robin experiment involving eight different laboratories we compared the thermal noise and the Sader method on ten commercial and custom-built AFMs. We found that spring constants of both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers can accurately be determined with both methods, although the Sader method proved to be superior. Furthermore, we observed that simultaneous application of both methods on an AFM proved an accurate consistency check of the instrument and thus provides optimal and highly reproducible calibration. To illustrate the importance of optimal calibration, we show that for biological force spectroscopy studies, an erroneously calibrated cantilever can significantly affect the derived (bio)physical parameters. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that with the pre-established protocol described reliable spring constants can be obtained for different types of cantilevers. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  12. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  13. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  14. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  15. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-21

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  16. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-01

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  17. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: Amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørrelykke, Simon F.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-07-01

    Optical tweezers and atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often calibrated by fitting their experimental power spectra of Brownian motion. We demonstrate here that if this is done with typical weighted least-squares methods, the result is a bias of relative size between -2/n and +1/n on the value of the fitted diffusion coefficient. Here, n is the number of power spectra averaged over, so typical calibrations contain 10%-20% bias. Both the sign and the size of the bias depend on the weighting scheme applied. Hence, so do length-scale calibrations based on the diffusion coefficient. The fitted value for the characteristic frequency is not affected by this bias. For the AFM then, force measurements are not affected provided an independent length-scale calibration is available. For optical tweezers there is no such luck, since the spring constant is found as the ratio of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self-interaction and aliasing, calibration of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models in finance, models for cell migration in biology, etc. Because the bias takes the form of a simple multiplicative factor on the fitted amplitude (e.g. the diffusion coefficient), it is straightforward to remove and the user will need minimal modifications to his or her favorite least-squares fitting programs. Results are demonstrated and illustrated using synthetic data, so we can compare fits with known true values. We also fit some commonly occurring power spectra once-and-for-all in the sense that we give their parameter values and associated error bars as explicit functions of experimental power-spectral values.

  18. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Nørrelykke, Simon F; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-07-01

    Optical tweezers and atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often calibrated by fitting their experimental power spectra of Brownian motion. We demonstrate here that if this is done with typical weighted least-squares methods, the result is a bias of relative size between -2/n and +1/n on the value of the fitted diffusion coefficient. Here, n is the number of power spectra averaged over, so typical calibrations contain 10%-20% bias. Both the sign and the size of the bias depend on the weighting scheme applied. Hence, so do length-scale calibrations based on the diffusion coefficient. The fitted value for the characteristic frequency is not affected by this bias. For the AFM then, force measurements are not affected provided an independent length-scale calibration is available. For optical tweezers there is no such luck, since the spring constant is found as the ratio of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self-interaction and aliasing, calibration of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models in finance, models for cell migration in biology, etc. Because the bias takes the form of a simple multiplicative factor on the fitted amplitude (e.g. the diffusion coefficient), it is straightforward to remove and the user will need minimal modifications to his or her favorite least-squares fitting programs. Results are demonstrated and illustrated using synthetic data, so we can compare fits with known true values. We also fit some commonly occurring power spectra once-and-for-all in the sense that we give their parameter values and associated error bars as explicit functions of experimental power-spectral values.

  19. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  20. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  1. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  2. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  4. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  5. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds.

  6. Finite element modeling of atomic force microscopy cantilever dynamics during video rate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Howard-Knight, J. P.; Hobbs, J. K.

    2011-04-01

    A dynamic finite element model has been constructed to simulate the behavior of low spring constant atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers used for imaging at high speed without active feedback as in VideoAFM. The model is tested against experimental data collected at 20 frame/s and good agreement is found. The complex dynamics of the cantilever, consisting of traveling waves coming from the tip sample interaction, reflecting off the cantilever-substrate junction, and interfering with new waves created at the tip, are revealed. The construction of the image from this resulting nonequilibrium cantilever deflection is also examined. Transient tip-sample forces are found to reach values up to 260 nN on a calibration grid sample, and the maximum forces do not always correspond to the position of steepest features as a result of energy stored in the cantilever.

  7. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  8. Improved Force Spectroscopy Using Focused-Ion-Beam-Modified Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Faulk, J K; Edwards, D T; Bull, M S; Perkins, T T

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in biophysics, including force-spectroscopy studies of protein folding and protein-ligand interactions. The precision of such studies increases with improvements in the underlying quality of the data. Currently, data quality is limited by the mechanical properties of the cantilever when using a modern commercial AFM. The key tradeoff is force stability vs short-term force precision and temporal resolution. Here, we present a method that avoids this compromise: efficient focused-ion-beam (FIB) modification of commercially available cantilevers. Force precision is improved by reducing the cantilever's hydrodynamic drag, and force stability is improved by reducing the cantilever stiffness and by retaining a cantilever's gold coating only at its free end. When applied to a commonly used short cantilever (L=40μm), we achieved sub-pN force precision over 5 decades of bandwidth (0.01-1000Hz) without significantly sacrificing temporal resolution (~75μs). Extending FIB modification to an ultrashort cantilever (L=9μm) also improved force precision and stability, while maintaining 1-μs-scale temporal resolution. Moreover, modifying ultrashort cantilevers also eliminated their inherent underdamped high-frequency motion and thereby avoided applying a rapidly oscillating force across the stretched molecule. Importantly, fabrication of FIB-modified cantilevers is accessible after an initial investment in training. Indeed, undergraduate researchers routinely modify 2-4 cantilevers per hour with the protocol detailed here. Furthermore, this protocol offers the individual user the ability to optimize a cantilever for a particular application. Hence, we expect FIB-modified cantilevers to improve AFM-based studies over broad areas of biophysical research. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel Method of Measuring Cantilever Deflection during an AFM Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hlady, V.; Pierce, M.; Pungor, A.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of a reflection interference contrast microscope (RICM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to monitor the cantilever–surface separation distance during force measurements using the streptavidin–biotin recognition pairs. The RICM showed that the cantilever loses contact with the surface before the final rupture of the adhesive bonds is measured by the AFM detection system. This finding suggests that the immobilization of biotin by physisorbed albumin and subsequent binding of streptavidin might have created a cross-linked protein network whose cohesion is tested by the AFM cantilever with the immobilized biotin ligands. PMID:25132721

  10. Macroscopic model of scanning force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-10-05

    A macroscopic version of the Scanning Force Microscope is described. It consists of a cantilever under the influence of external forces, which mimic the tip-sample interactions. The use of this piece of equipment is threefold. First, it serves as direct way to understand the parts and functions of the Scanning Force Microscope, and thus it is effectively used as an instructional tool. Second, due to its large size, it allows for simple measurements of applied forces and parameters that define the state of motion of the system. This information, in turn, serves to compare the interaction forces with the reconstructed ones, which cannot be done directly with the standard microscopic set up. Third, it provides a kinematics method to non-destructively measure elastic constants of materials, such as Young's and shear modules, with special application for brittle materials.

  11. Global consequences of a local Casimir force: Adhered cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetovoy, V. B.; Melenev, A. E.; Lokhanin, M. V.; Palasantzas, G.

    2017-07-01

    Although stiction is a cumbersome problem for microsystems, it stimulates investigations of surface adhesion. In fact, the shape of an adhered cantilever carries information of the adhesion energy that locks one end to the substrate. We demonstrate here that the system is also sensitive to the dispersion forces that are operative very close to the point of contact, but their contribution to the shape is maximum at about one third of the unadhered length. When the force exceeds a critical value, the cantilever does not lose stability but settles at a smaller unadhered length, whose relation to adhesion energy is only slightly affected by the force. Our calculations suggest the use of adhered cantilevers to measure the dispersion forces at short separations, where other methods suffer from jump-to-contact instability. Simultaneous measurement of the force and adhesion energy allows the separation of the dispersion contribution to the surface adhesion.

  12. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  13. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  14. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  15. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  16. Analytical model of the nonlinear dynamics of cantilever tip-sample surface interactions for various acoustic atomic force microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-04-01

    An analytical model is developed of the interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope with the sample surface that treats the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. To maintain equilibrium, the volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any). The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and amplitude modulation-atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) (intermittent contact mode). The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of A-AFM image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample. Applications of the model to measurements of LaRC™-CP2 polyimide film using RDF-AFUM and AM-AFM images predict maximum variations in the Young modulus of 24% and 18%, respectively, over a common scan area. Both predictions are in good agreement with the value of 21% obtained from independent mechanical stretching measurements of the polyimide sheet material.

  17. Direct Measurement of Lateral Force Using Dual Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Ichikawa, Masaya; Miura, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed an experimental system to measure a piconewton lateral force using dual cantilevers which cross with each other. The resolution of the lateral force is estimated to be 3.3 p ± 0.2 pN, which is comparable to forces due to thermal fluctuation. This experimental apparatus works so easily that it will enable us to determine forces during nano-manipulation and nano-tribological measurements. PMID:22737001

  18. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Forced vibrations of a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is ‘downwards’, i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping resonance response are compared for the case of an elastic beam made from PVC plastic excited over a frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz. The current analysis predicts the presence of ‘pseudo-nodes’ in the normal modes of oscillation. It is important to note that our results were obtained using very simple equipment, present in the teaching laboratory.

  20. Magnetostriction-driven cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penedo, M.; Fernández-Martínez, I.; Costa-Krämer, J. L.; Luna, M.; Briones, F.

    2009-10-01

    An actuation mode is presented to drive the mechanical oscillation of cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy. The method is based on direct mechanical excitation of the cantilevers coated with amorphous Fe-B-N thin films, by means of the film magnetostriction, i.e., the dimensional change in the film when magnetized. These amorphous magnetostrictive Fe-B-N thin films exhibit soft magnetic properties, excellent corrosion resistance in liquid environments, nearly zero accumulated stress when properly deposited, and good chemical stability. We present low noise and high resolution topographic images acquired in liquid environment to demonstrate the method capability.

  1. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  2. Method for lateral force calibration in atomic force microscope using MEMS microforce sensor.

    PubMed

    Dziekoński, Cezary; Dera, Wojciech; Jarząbek, Dariusz M

    2017-06-14

    In this paper we present a simple and direct method for the lateral force calibration constant determination. Our procedure does not require any knowledge about material or geometrical parameters of an investigated cantilever. We apply a commercially available microforce sensor with advanced electronics for direct measurement of the friction force applied by the cantilever's tip to a flat surface of the microforce sensor measuring beam. Due to the third law of dynamics, the friction force of the equal value tilts the AFM cantilever. Therefore, torsional (lateral force) signal is compared with the signal from the microforce sensor and the lateral force calibration constant is determined. The method is easy to perform and could be widely used for the lateral force calibration constant determination in many types of atomic force microscopes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Contractile cell forces deform macroscopic cantilevers and quantify biomaterial performance.

    PubMed

    Allenstein, U; Mayr, S G; Zink, M

    2015-07-07

    Cells require adhesion to survive, proliferate and migrate, as well as for wound healing and many other functions. The strength of contractile cell forces on an underlying surface is a highly relevant quantity to measure the affinity of cells to a rigid surface with and without coating. Here we show with experimental and theoretical studies that these forces create surface stresses that are sufficient to induce measurable bending of macroscopic cantilevers. Since contractile forces are linked to the formation of focal contacts, results give information on adhesion promoting qualities and allow a comparison of very diverse materials. In exemplary studies, in vitro fibroblast adhesion on the magnetic shape memory alloy Fe-Pd and on the l-lysine derived plasma-functionalized polymer PPLL was determined. We show that cells on Fe-Pd are able to induce surface stresses three times as high as on pure titanium cantilevers. A further increase was observed for PPLL, where the contractile forces are four times higher than on the titanium reference. In addition, we performed finite element simulations on the beam bending to back up the calculation of contractile forces from cantilever bending under non-homogenous surface stress. Our findings consolidate the role of contractile forces as a meaningful measure of biomaterial performance.

  4. Precise and direct method for the measurement of the torsion spring constant of the atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarząbek, D. M.

    2015-01-15

    A direct method for the evaluation of the torsional spring constants of the atomic force microscope cantilevers is presented in this paper. The method uses a nanoindenter to apply forces at the long axis of the cantilever and in the certain distance from it. The torque vs torsion relation is then evaluated by the comparison of the results of the indentations experiments at different positions on the cantilever. Next, this relation is used for the precise determination of the torsional spring constant of the cantilever. The statistical analysis shows that the standard deviation of the calibration measurements is equal to approximately 1%. Furthermore, a simple method for calibration of the photodetector’s lateral response is proposed. The overall procedure of the lateral calibration constant determination has the accuracy approximately equal to 10%.

  5. Precise and direct method for the measurement of the torsion spring constant of the atomic force microscopy cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Jarząbek, D M

    2015-01-01

    A direct method for the evaluation of the torsional spring constants of the atomic force microscope cantilevers is presented in this paper. The method uses a nanoindenter to apply forces at the long axis of the cantilever and in the certain distance from it. The torque vs torsion relation is then evaluated by the comparison of the results of the indentations experiments at different positions on the cantilever. Next, this relation is used for the precise determination of the torsional spring constant of the cantilever. The statistical analysis shows that the standard deviation of the calibration measurements is equal to approximately 1%. Furthermore, a simple method for calibration of the photodetector's lateral response is proposed. The overall procedure of the lateral calibration constant determination has the accuracy approximately equal to 10%.

  6. Precise and direct method for the measurement of the torsion spring constant of the atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarząbek, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    A direct method for the evaluation of the torsional spring constants of the atomic force microscope cantilevers is presented in this paper. The method uses a nanoindenter to apply forces at the long axis of the cantilever and in the certain distance from it. The torque vs torsion relation is then evaluated by the comparison of the results of the indentations experiments at different positions on the cantilever. Next, this relation is used for the precise determination of the torsional spring constant of the cantilever. The statistical analysis shows that the standard deviation of the calibration measurements is equal to approximately 1%. Furthermore, a simple method for calibration of the photodetector's lateral response is proposed. The overall procedure of the lateral calibration constant determination has the accuracy approximately equal to 10%.

  7. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-11-15

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  8. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    2013-11-01

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  9. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Grutzik, Scott J; Gates, Richard S; Gerbig, Yvonne B; Smith, Douglas T; Cook, Robert F; Zehnder, Alan T

    2013-11-01

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  10. Measuring and Understanding Forces on Atomic Length Scales with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Jason Paul

    Most microscopes can be used with little understanding of how they work--much can be learned looking through a light microscope without ever knowing what a photon is or who Maxwell was--and the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is no exception. Many AFM images don't look much different from a mountainous landscape, and much is learned interpreting them as such; however, to really push a microscope to its limits means understanding the interactions creating the contrast in the picture. For a Scanning Electron Microscope, this means understanding how electrons interact with matter, for an AFM it means understanding forces. The focus of this thesis is understanding the forces acting (especially in liquids) between tip and sample in AFM and a better understanding the instrument itself. Chapters I, II and VI involve better characterizing and improving the most important part of the AFM, the tiny cantilever used to measure forces. Chapter I describes a solution to one of the most basic problems that must be solved before forces can be accurately measured--measuring the stiffness of these cantilevers. Many limitations in AFM are set by physical characteristics of the cantilever itself, such as resonance frequency, spring constant, and quality factor. If an external force can be applied to the cantilever, feedback can be used to improve these characteristics. Chapter II shows how to do this using a magnetically applied external force, which has the advantage of working in liquids. These physical characteristics also change drastically when the cantilever is immersed in fluid. The resonance frequency of common cantilevers drops by as much as a factor of six in going from air to water. Chapter VI studies these changes and shows how further miniaturization of cantilevers can improve imaging speeds and signal-to-noise ratio. Early in its career, the AFM was heralded as having atomic resolution, but as the field matured researchers realized that the contact area between tip and

  11. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Tobias; Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm(3) is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm(3). In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers.

  12. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    PubMed Central

    Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers. PMID:25821686

  13. Differential magnetic force microscope imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zuobin; Liu, Jinyun; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging based on a two-pass scanning procedure to extract differential magnetic forces and eliminate or significantly reduce background forces with reversed tip magnetization. In the work, the difference of two scanned images with reversed tip magnetization was used to express the local magnetic forces. The magnetic sample was first scanned with a low lift distance between the MFM tip and the sample surface, and the magnetization direction of the probe was then changed after the first scan to perform the second scan. The differential magnetic force image was obtained through the subtraction of the two images from the two scans. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging is able to reduce the effect of background or environment interference forces, and offers an improved image contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Laser Actuation of Cantilevers for Picometre Amplitude Dynamic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Drew R.; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S. J.; Senden, Tim J.

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  15. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  16. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17fm/√Hz by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  17. Minimizing tip-sample forces and enhancing sensitivity in atomic force microscopy with dynamically compliant cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Sadeghian, Hamed; Tamer, Mehmet Selman; Goosen, Johannes Frans Loodewijk; van Keulen, Fred

    2017-06-01

    Due to the harmonic motion of the cantilever in Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy, it is seemingly impossible to estimate the tip-sample interactions from the motion of the cantilever. Not directly observing the interaction force, it is possible to damage the surface or the tip by applying an excessive mechanical load. The tip-sample interactions scale with the effective stiffness of the probe. Thus, the reduction of the mechanical load is usually limited by the manufacturability of low stiffness probes. However, the one-to-one relationship between spring constant and applied force only holds when higher modes of the cantilever are not excited. In this paper, it is shown that, by passively tuning higher modes of the cantilever, it is possible to reduce the peak repulsive force. These tuned probes can be dynamically more compliant than conventional probes with the same static spring constant. Both theoretical and experimental results show that a proper tuning of dynamic modes of cantilevers reduces the contact load and increases the sensitivity considerably. Moreover, due to the contribution of higher modes, the tuned cantilevers provide more information on the tip-sample interaction. This extra information from the higher harmonics can be used for mapping and possibly identification of material properties of samples.

  18. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction.

    PubMed

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A; Loring, Roger F

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  19. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    SciTech Connect

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  20. Measurement of Cantilever's Spring Constant with Cms Electrostatic Force Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Jui; Pan, Sheau-Shi; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Lin, Yi-Ching

    The mechanical property is one of the important parameters for evaluating micro/nano-scale materials. The measurement of micro/nano-mechanical property usually involves measurements of small displacement and force. To provide a traceable force standard in micro/nano-newton level, we have developed a force measurement system based on electrostatic sensing and actuation techniques. The system mainly consists of a monolithic flexure stage, a three-electrode capacitor and a digital controller. The three-electrode capacitor is utilized as a position sensor, and at the same time an electrostatic force actuator. The force under measurement is balanced by a compensation electrostatic force which is traceable to electrical and length standards. A commercial cantilever-type micro-force probe was used in this calibration experiment. The force probe was brought to contact with and press into the load button (a ruby sphere) of the force measurement system by a closed-loop controlled z-scanner. The spring constant was obtained from the average slope determined from measured force-displacement curves and was found to be (2.26 ± 0.01) N/m where the given uncertainty is one standard deviation. We have successfully demonstrated the calibration of the microforce probe using our self-developed electrostatic sensing and actuating force measurement system. The measured spring constant is consistent with the manufacturer's specification, and the relative standard deviation is less than 0.5%. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  1. Relaxation of a simulated lipid bilayer vesicle compressed by an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Ben M.; Bertrand, Martine; Joós, Béla

    2016-11-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we study the relaxation of bilayer vesicles, uniaxially compressed by an atomic force microscope cantilever. The relaxation time exhibits a strong force dependence. Force-compression curves are very similar to recent experiments wherein giant unilamellar vesicles were compressed in a nearly identical manner.

  2. Implementation of Akiyama probe in low temperature magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, Paul; Wu, Weida

    Exotic phenomena often call for high sensitivity scanning probe microscopic techniques working at extremely low temperatures. Specifically, it is of great fundamental interest to detect the weak magnetic signals in a range of interesting systems such as, quantum anomalous Hall, skyrmion, heavy-fermion, and multiferroic systems. To this end, we are developing low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) using a self-sensing cantilever called Akiyama-probe (A-probe). The main advantage of this specific probe is its extremely low power-dissipation compared to other self-sensing (e.g. piezoresistive) cantilevers for low temperature application. We will present progress of the implementation of A-probe and preliminary results under various conditions. This work is supported by DOE BES under Award DE-SC0008147.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  4. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  5. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  6. A Compact Vertical Scanner for Atomic Force Microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Shim, Jaesool; Lee, Dong-Yeon

    2010-01-01

    A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM) is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner’s performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, and feedback noise level. In addition, an AFM image using the proposed vertical scanner is generated. PMID:22163492

  7. A compact vertical scanner for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hong; Shim, Jaesool; Lee, Dong-Yeon

    2010-01-01

    A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM) is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner's performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, and feedback noise level. In addition, an AFM image using the proposed vertical scanner is generated.

  8. Analyzing the vibrational response of an AFM cantilever in liquid with the consideration of tip mass by comparing the hydrodynamic and contact repulsive force models in higher modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Nahavandi, Amir

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the vibration of a tapping-mode Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever covered with two whole piezoelectric layers in a liquid medium. The authors of this article have already modeled the vibration of a cantilever immersed in liquid over rough surfaces. Five new ideas have been considered for improving the results of the previous work. Mass and damping of a cantilever probe tip have been considered. Since the probe tip of an AFM cantilever has a mass, which can itself affect the natural frequency of vibration, the significance of this mass has been explored. Also, two hydrodynamic force models for analyzing the mass and damping added to a cantilever in liquid medium have been evaluated. In modeling the vibration of a cantilever in liquid, simplifications are made to the theoretical equations used in the modeling, which may make the obtained results different from those in the real case. So, two hydrodynamic force models are introduced and compared with each other. In addition to the already introduced DMT model, the JKR model has been proposed. The forces acting on a probe tip have attractive and repulsive effects. The attractive Van der Waals force can vary depending on the surface smoothness or roughness, and the repulsive contact force, which is independent of the type of surface roughness and usually varies with the hardness or softness of a surface. When the first mode is used in the vibration of an AFM cantilever, the changes of the existing physical parameters in the simulation do not usually produce a significant difference in the response. Thus, three cantilever vibration modes have been investigated. Finally, an analytical approach for obtaining the response of equations is presented which solves the resulting motion equation by the Laplace method and, thus, a time function is obtained for cantilever deflection is determined. Also, using the COMSOL software to model a cantilever in a liquid medium, the computed natural

  9. High-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy using a Q-controlled regular cantilever acting as the actuator: Proof-of-principle experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, M.; Satır, S.; Torello, D.; Değertekin, F. L.

    2014-12-15

    We present the proof-of-principle experiments of a high-speed actuation method to be used in tapping-mode atomic force microscopes (AFM). In this method, we do not employ a piezotube actuator to move the tip or the sample as in conventional AFM systems, but, we utilize a Q-controlled eigenmode of a cantilever to perform the fast actuation. We show that the actuation speed can be increased even with a regular cantilever.

  10. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir; Oral, Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ˜12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  11. Design of a self-aligned, wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with 10 nm magnetic force microscope resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Karcı, Özgür; Dede, Münir

    2014-10-01

    We describe the design of a wide temperature range (300 mK-300 K) atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope with a self-aligned fibre-cantilever mechanism. An alignment chip with alignment groves and a special mechanical design are used to eliminate tedious and time consuming fibre-cantilever alignment procedure for the entire temperature range. A low noise, Michelson fibre interferometer was integrated into the system for measuring deflection of the cantilever. The spectral noise density of the system was measured to be ~12 fm/√Hz at 4.2 K at 3 mW incident optical power. Abrikosov vortices in BSCCO(2212) single crystal sample and a high density hard disk sample were imaged at 10 nm resolution to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  12. High-speed atomic force microscope based on an astigmatic detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, H.-S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Hwu, E.-T.; Chang, C.-S.; Hwang, I.-S.; Ding, R.-F.; Huang, H.-F.; Wang, W.-M.; Huang, K.-Y.

    2014-10-15

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) enables visualizing dynamic behaviors of biological molecules under physiological conditions at a temporal resolution of 1s or shorter. A small cantilever with a high resonance frequency is crucial in increasing the scan speed. However, detecting mechanical resonances of small cantilevers is technically challenging. In this study, we constructed an atomic force microscope using a digital versatile disc (DVD) pickup head to detect cantilever deflections. In addition, a flexure-guided scanner and a sinusoidal scan method were implemented. In this work, we imaged a grating sample in air by using a regular cantilever and a small cantilever with a resonance frequency of 5.5 MHz. Poor tracking was seen at the scan rate of 50 line/s when a cantilever for regular AFM imaging was used. Using a small cantilever at the scan rate of 100 line/s revealed no significant degradation in the topographic images. The results indicate that a smaller cantilever can achieve a higher scan rate and superior force sensitivity. This work shows the potential for using a DVD pickup head in future HS-AFM technology.

  13. High-speed atomic force microscope based on an astigmatic detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, H.-S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Ding, R.-F.; Huang, H.-F.; Wang, W.-M.; Hwu, E.-T.; Huang, K.-Y.; Chang, C.-S.; Hwang, I.-S.

    2014-10-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) enables visualizing dynamic behaviors of biological molecules under physiological conditions at a temporal resolution of 1s or shorter. A small cantilever with a high resonance frequency is crucial in increasing the scan speed. However, detecting mechanical resonances of small cantilevers is technically challenging. In this study, we constructed an atomic force microscope using a digital versatile disc (DVD) pickup head to detect cantilever deflections. In addition, a flexure-guided scanner and a sinusoidal scan method were implemented. In this work, we imaged a grating sample in air by using a regular cantilever and a small cantilever with a resonance frequency of 5.5 MHz. Poor tracking was seen at the scan rate of 50 line/s when a cantilever for regular AFM imaging was used. Using a small cantilever at the scan rate of 100 line/s revealed no significant degradation in the topographic images. The results indicate that a smaller cantilever can achieve a higher scan rate and superior force sensitivity. This work shows the potential for using a DVD pickup head in future HS-AFM technology.

  14. Silicon cantilever functionalization for cellulose-specific chemical force imaging of switchgrass

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Ida; Evans, Barbara R.; Foston, Marcus B.; ...

    2015-05-08

    A method for direct functionalization of silicon and silicon nitride cantilevers with bifunctional silanes was tested with model surfaces to determine adhesive forces for different hydrogen-bonding chemistries. Application for biomass surface characterization was tested by mapping switchgrass and isolated switchgrass cellulose in topographic and force-volume mode using a cellulose-specific cantilever.

  15. A calibration method for lateral forces for use with colloidal probe force microscopy cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Goddard, D. T.

    2008-02-01

    A calibration method is described for colloidal probe cantilevers that enables friction force measurements obtained using lateral force microscopy (LFM) to be quantified. The method is an adaptation of the lever method of Feiler et al. [A. Feiler, P. Attard, and I. Larson, Rev. Sci. Instum. 71, 2746 (2000)] and uses the advantageous positioning of probe particles that are usually offset from the central axis of the cantilever. The main sources of error in the calibration method are assessed, in particular, the potential misalignment of the long axis of the cantilever that ideally should be perpendicular to the photodiode detector. When this is not taken into account, the misalignment is shown to have a significant effect on the cantilever torsional stiffness but not on the lateral photodiode sensitivity. Also, because the friction signal is affected by the topography of the substrate, the method presented is valid only against flat substrates. Two types of particles, 20μm glass beads and UO3 agglomerates attached to silicon tapping mode cantilevers were used to test the method against substrates including glass, cleaved mica, and UO2 single crystals. Comparisons with the lateral compliance method of Cain et al. [R. G. Cain, S. Biggs, and N. W. Page, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 227, 55 (2000)] are also made.

  16. A calibration method for lateral forces for use with colloidal probe force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Goddard, D. T.

    2008-02-15

    A calibration method is described for colloidal probe cantilevers that enables friction force measurements obtained using lateral force microscopy (LFM) to be quantified. The method is an adaptation of the lever method of Feiler et al. [A. Feiler, P. Attard, and I. Larson, Rev. Sci. Instum. 71, 2746 (2000)] and uses the advantageous positioning of probe particles that are usually offset from the central axis of the cantilever. The main sources of error in the calibration method are assessed, in particular, the potential misalignment of the long axis of the cantilever that ideally should be perpendicular to the photodiode detector. When this is not taken into account, the misalignment is shown to have a significant effect on the cantilever torsional stiffness but not on the lateral photodiode sensitivity. Also, because the friction signal is affected by the topography of the substrate, the method presented is valid only against flat substrates. Two types of particles, 20 {mu}m glass beads and UO{sub 3} agglomerates attached to silicon tapping mode cantilevers were used to test the method against substrates including glass, cleaved mica, and UO{sub 2} single crystals. Comparisons with the lateral compliance method of Cain et al. [R. G. Cain, S. Biggs, and N. W. Page, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 227, 55 (2000)] are also made.

  17. Analysis the effect of different geometries of AFM's cantilever on the dynamic behavior and the critical forces of three-dimensional manipulation.

    PubMed

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Saraie, Maniya B; Saraee, Mahdieh B

    2017-01-13

    An important challenge when using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is to be able to control the force exerted by the AFM for performing various tasks. Nevertheless, the exerted force is proportional to the deflection of the AFM cantilever, which itself is affected by a cantilever's stiffness coefficient. Many papers have been published so far on the methods of obtaining the stiffness coefficients of AFM cantilevers in 2D; however, a comprehensive model is yet to be presented on 3D cantilever motion. The discrepancies between the equations of the 2D and 3D analysis are due to the number and direction of forces and moments that are applied to a cantilever. Moreover, in the 3D analysis, contrary to the 2D analysis, due to the interaction between the forces and moments applied on a cantilever, its stiffness values cannot be separately expressed for each direction; and instead, a stiffness matrix should be used to correctly derive the relevant equations. In this paper, 3D stiffness coefficient matrices have been obtained for three common cantilever geometries including the rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The obtained equations are validated by two methods. In the first approach, the Finite Element Method is combined with the cantilever deflection values computed by using the obtained stiffness matrices. In the second approach, by reducing the problem's parameters, the forces applied on a cantilever along different directions are compared with each other in 2D and 3D cases. Then the 3D manipulation of a stiff nanoparticle is modeled and simulated by using the stiffness matrices obtained for the three cantilever geometries. The obtained results indicate that during the manipulation process, the dagger-shaped and rectangular cantilevers exert the maximum and minimum amounts of forces on the stiff nanoparticle, respectively. Also, by examining the effects of different probe tip geometries, it is realized that a probe tip of cylindrical geometry exerts the

  18. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  19. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  20. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  1. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  2. High bandwidth deflection readout for atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Juergen; Bibl, Matthias; Yoo, Han Woong; Schitter, Georg

    2015-10-01

    This contribution presents the systematic design of a high bandwidth deflection readout mechanism for atomic force microscopes. The widely used optical beam deflection method is revised by adding a focusing lens between the cantilever and the quadrant photodetector (QPD). This allows the utilization of QPDs with a small active area resulting in an increased detection bandwidth due to the reduced junction capacitance. Furthermore the additional lens can compensate a cross talk between a compensating z-movement of the cantilever and the deflection readout. Scaling effects are analyzed to get the optimal spot size for the given geometry of the QPD. The laser power is tuned to maximize the signal to noise ratio without limiting the bandwidth by local saturation effects. The systematic approach results in a measured -3 dB detection bandwidth of 64.5 MHz at a deflection noise density of 62fm/√Hz.

  3. Manipulation of cadmium selenide nanorods with an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Tranvouez, E; Orieux, A; Boer-Duchemin, E; Devillers, C H; Huc, V; Comtet, G; Dujardin, G

    2009-04-22

    We have used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to manipulate and study ligand-capped cadmium selenide nanorods deposited on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). The AFM tip was used to manipulate (i.e., translate and rotate) the nanorods by applying a force perpendicular to the nanorod axis. The manipulation result was shown to depend on the point of impact of the AFM tip with the nanorod and whether the nanorod had been manipulated previously. Forces applied parallel to the nanorod axis, however, did not give rise to manipulation. These results are interpreted by considering the atomic-scale interactions of the HOPG substrate with the organic ligands surrounding the nanorods. The vertical deflection of the cantilever was recorded during manipulation and was combined with a model in order to estimate the value of the horizontal force between the tip and nanorod during manipulation. This horizontal force is estimated to be on the order of a few tens of nN.

  4. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  5. Low temperature ultrahigh vacuum noncontact atomic force microscope in the pendulum geometry.

    PubMed

    Gysin, U; Rast, S; Kisiel, M; Werle, C; Meyer, E

    2011-02-01

    A noncontact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM) operating in magnetic fields up to ±7 T and liquid helium temperatures is presented in this article. In many common AFM experiments the cantilever is mounted parallel to the sample surface, while in our system the cantilever is assembled perpendicular to it; the so called pendulum mode of AFM operation. In this mode measurements employing very soft and, therefore, ultrasensitive cantilevers can be performed. The ultrahigh vacuum conditions allow to prepare and transfer cantilevers and samples in a requested manner avoiding surface contamination. We demonstrate the possibility of nc-AFM and Kelvin force probe microscopy imaging in the pendulum mode. Ultrasensitive experiments on small spin ensembles are presented as well.

  6. Extending the lower limits of force detection using micromachined silicon cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Timothy David

    2000-09-01

    The force resolution of a micromachined cantilever is ultimately limited by thermal contact with the surrounding environment and the intrinsic energy dissipation within the cantilever. By optimizing the cantilever geometry to reduce energy dissipation, this thesis demonstrates that a force resolution of 1.7 × 10-18N/ Hz can be achieved in a low temperature vacuum environment. This force resolution represents a world record for microcantilever-based force detection. In order to optimize the cantilever design, a custom micromachining process was developed for fabricating free-standing single-crystal-silicon cantilevers as thin as 400 angstroms. For such thin cantilevers, surface- related energy dissipation was shown to limit the low temperature mechanical Q. Methods for reducing the surface disorder by removing the native surface oxide typically resulted in a four-fold increase in Q and therefore improved force resolution. The fabricated cantilevers typically had spring constants less than 10 -4 N/m, or a hundred times lower than the spring constants of cantilevers commonly used in scanning probe microscopy. When used in scanning probe microscopy experiments, the cantilevers were aligned perpendicular to the sample surface in order to eliminate the problem of tip-to-sample snap-in. This novel geometry allowed the study of lateral forces between the cantilever tip and the sample. Changes in the cantilever resonant frequency were shown to predominately reflect the electrostatic nature of the surface being investigated. One surface interaction that was investigated in detail was the reduction of cantilever Q near various surfaces in vacuum. This non-contact dissipative phenomenon was related to electrical losses caused by induced charge motion in the sample and/or in the cantilever tip. In silicon samples, a quantitative theory relating the additional surface-induced cantilever damping to the electrical power dissipated was developed. Furthermore

  7. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  8. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Woehl, T J; Keller, R R; Killgore, J P

    2016-07-25

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  9. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  10. The importance of cantilever dynamics in the interpretation of Kelvin probe force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Satzinger, Kevin J.; Brown, Keith A.; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    A realistic interpretation of the measured contact potential difference (CPD) in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is crucial in order to extract meaningful information about the sample. Central to this interpretation is a method to include contributions from the macroscopic cantilever arm, as well as the cone and sharp tip of a KPFM probe. Here, three models of the electrostatic interaction between a KPFM probe and a sample are tested through an electrostatic simulation and compared with experiment. In contrast with previous studies that treat the KPFM cantilever as a rigid object, we allow the cantilever to bend and rotate; accounting for cantilever bending provides the closest agreement between theory and experiment. We demonstrate that cantilever dynamics play a major role in CPD measurements and provide a simulation technique to explore this phenomenon. PMID:23093809

  11. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-25

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  12. Optical lever calibration in atomic force microscope with a mechanical lever.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Vitard, Julien; Haliyo, Sinan; Régnier, Stéphane

    2008-09-01

    A novel method that uses a small mechanical lever has been developed to directly calibrate the lateral sensitivity of the optical lever in the atomic force microscope (AFM). The mechanical lever can convert the translation into a nanoscale rotation angle with a flexible hinge that provides an accurate conversion between the photodiode voltage output and torsional angle of a cantilever. During the calibration, the cantilever is mounted on a holder attached on the lever, which brings the torsional axis of the cantilever and rotation axis of the lever into line. By making use of its nanomotion on the Z-axis and using an external motion on the barrier, this device can complete the local and full-range lateral sensitivity calibrations of the optical lever without modifying the actual AFM or the cantilevers.

  13. Atomic force microscopy: Loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Edwards, Scott A.; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85μm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  14. Atomic force microscopy: loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Edwards, Scott A; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85 microm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  15. Selective nano-patterning of graphene using a heated atomic force microscope tip

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young-Soo; Wu, Xuan; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we introduce a selective thermochemical nano-patterning method of graphene on insulating substrates. A tiny heater formed at the end of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is optimized by a finite element method. The cantilever device is fabricated using conventional micromachining processes. After preliminary tests of the cantilever device, nano-patterning experiments are conducted with various conducting and insulating samples. The results indicate that faster scanning speed and higher contact force are desirable to reduce the sizes of nano-patterns. With the experimental condition of 1 μm/s and 24 mW, the heated AFM tip generates a graphene oxide layer of 3.6 nm height and 363 nm width, on a 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} layer, with a tip contact force of 100 nN.

  16. Quantitative measurement of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyunwoo; Hong, Seungbum; No, Kwangsoo

    2011-11-01

    A simple quantitative measurement procedure of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy is presented. This technique enables one to determine the corresponding lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity (LIOLS) of the cantilever on the given sample. Piezoelectric coefficient, d31 of BaTiO3 single crystal (-81.62 ± 40.22 pm/V) which was calculated using the estimated LIOLS was in good agreement with the reported value in literature.

  17. Quantitative measurement of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.; Hong, S.; No, K.

    2011-01-01

    A simple quantitative measurement procedure of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy is presented. This technique enables one to determine the corresponding lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity (LIOLS) of the cantilever on the given sample. Piezoelectric coefficient, d{sub 31} of BaTiO{sub 3} single crystal (-81.62 {+-} 40.22 pm/V) which was calculated using the estimated LIOLS was in good agreement with the reported value in literature.

  18. Silicon cantilever sensor for micro-/nanoscale dimension and force metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiner, Erwin; Doering, Lutz; Balke, Michael; Christ, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    A piezoresistive silicon cantilever-type tactile sensor was described as well as its application for dimensional metrology with micro components and as a transferable force standard in the micro-to-nano Newton range. As an example for tactile probing metrology the novel cantilever sensor was used for surface scanning with calibrated groove and roughness artifacts. Force metrology was addressed based on calibration procedures which were developed for commercial stylus instruments as well as for glass pipettes designed for the characterization of the vital forces of isolated cells.

  19. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  20. A method for atomic force microscopy cantilever stiffness calibration under heavy fluid loading.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott J; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2009-12-01

    This work presents a method for force calibration of rectangular atomic force microscopy (AFM) microcantilevers under heavy fluid loading. Theoretical modeling of the thermal response of microcantilevers is discussed including a fluid-structure interaction model of the cantilever-fluid system that incorporates the results of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. This model is curve fit to the measured thermal response of a cantilever in de-ionized water and a cost function is used to quantify the difference between the theoretical model and measured data. The curve fit is performed in a way that restricts the search space to parameters that reflect heavy fluid loading conditions. The resulting fitting parameters are used to calibrate the cantilever. For comparison, cantilevers are calibrated using Sader's method in air and the thermal noise method in both air and water. For a set of eight cantilevers ranging in stiffness from 0.050 to 5.8 N/m, the maximum difference between Sader's calibration performed in air and the new method performed in water was 9.4%. A set of three cantilevers that violate the aspect ratio assumption associated with the fluid loading model (length-to-width ratios less than 3.5) ranged in stiffness from 0.85 to 4.7 N/m and yielded differences as high as 17.8%.

  1. Development of Atomic Force Microscope for Arthroscopic Knee Cartilage Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imer, Raphaël; Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.; Stolz, Martin; Aebi, Ueli; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Koenig, Uwe; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A. U.; Staufer, Urs

    2006-03-01

    A recent study, based on ex vivo unconfined compression testing of normal, diseased, and enzymatically altered cartilage, revealed that a scanning force microscope (SFM), used as a nano-intender, is sensitive enough to enable measurement of alterations in the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Based on these ex vivo measurements, we have designed a quantitative diagnosis tool, the scanning force arthroscope (SFA), able to perform in vivo measurements during a standard arthroscopic procedure. For stabilizing and positioning the instrument relative to the surface under investigation, a pneumatic system has been developed. A segmented piezoelectric tube was used to perform the indentation displacement, and a pyramidal nanometer-scale silicon tip mounted on a cantilever with an integrated deflection sensor measured the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Mechanical means were designed to protect the fragile cantilever during the insertion of the instrument into the knee joint. The stability of the pneumatic stage was checked with a prototype SFA. In a series of tests, load-displacement curves were recorded in a knee phantom and, more recently, in a pig’s leg.

  2. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  3. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  4. Hydrogen-enhanced cracking revealed by in situ micro-cantilever bending test inside environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Hajilou, Tarlan; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2017-07-28

    To evaluate the hydrogen (H)-induced embrittlement in iron aluminium intermetallics, especially the one with stoichiometric composition of 50 at.% Al, a novel in situ micro-cantilever bending test was applied within an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), which provides both a full process monitoring and a clean, in situ H-charging condition. Two sets of cantilevers were analysed in this work: one set of un-notched cantilevers, and the other set with focused ion beam-milled notch laying on two crystallographic planes: (010) and (110). The cantilevers were tested under two environmental conditions: vacuum (approximately 5 × 10(-4) Pa) and ESEM (450 Pa water vapour). Crack initiation at stress-concentrated locations and propagation to cause catastrophic failure were observed when cantilevers were tested in the presence of H; while no cracking occurred when tested in vacuum. Both the bending strength for un-notched beams and the fracture toughness for notched beams were reduced under H exposure. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility was found to be orientation dependent: the (010) crystallographic plane was more fragile to HE than the (110) plane.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Hydrogen-enhanced cracking revealed by in situ micro-cantilever bending test inside environmental scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yun; Hajilou, Tarlan; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the hydrogen (H)-induced embrittlement in iron aluminium intermetallics, especially the one with stoichiometric composition of 50 at.% Al, a novel in situ micro-cantilever bending test was applied within an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), which provides both a full process monitoring and a clean, in situ H-charging condition. Two sets of cantilevers were analysed in this work: one set of un-notched cantilevers, and the other set with focused ion beam-milled notch laying on two crystallographic planes: (010) and (110). The cantilevers were tested under two environmental conditions: vacuum (approximately 5 × 10-4 Pa) and ESEM (450 Pa water vapour). Crack initiation at stress-concentrated locations and propagation to cause catastrophic failure were observed when cantilevers were tested in the presence of H; while no cracking occurred when tested in vacuum. Both the bending strength for un-notched beams and the fracture toughness for notched beams were reduced under H exposure. The hydrogen embrittlement (HE) susceptibility was found to be orientation dependent: the (010) crystallographic plane was more fragile to HE than the (110) plane. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  6. Investigation of polymer derived ceramics cantilevers for application of high speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Yun

    High speed Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a wide variety of applications ranging from nanomanufacturing to biophysics. In order to have higher scanning speed of certain AFM modes, high resonant frequency cantilevers are needed; therefore, the goal of this research is to investigate using polymer derived ceramics for possible applications in making high resonant frequency AFM cantilevers using complex cross sections. The polymer derived ceramic that will be studied, is silicon carbide. Polymer derived ceramics offer a potentially more economic fabrication approach for MEMS due to their relatively low processing temperatures and ease of complex shape design. Photolithography was used to make the desired cantilever shapes with micron scale size followed by a wet etching process to release the cantilevers from the substrates. The whole manufacturing process we use borrow well-developed techniques from the semiconducting industry, and as such this project also could offer the opportunity to reduce the fabrication cost of AFM cantilevers and MEMS in general. The characteristics of silicon carbide made from the precursor polymer, SMP-10 (Starfire Systems), were studied. In order to produce high qualities of silicon carbide cantilevers, where the major concern is defects, proper process parameters needed to be determined. Films of polymer derived ceramics often have defects due to shrinkage during the conversion process. Thus control of defects was a central issue in this study. A second, related concern was preventing oxidation; the polymer derived ceramics we chose is easily oxidized during processing. Establishing an environment without oxygen in the whole process was a significant challenge in the project. The optimization of the parameters for using photolithography and wet etching process was the final and central goal of the project; well established techniques used in microfabrication were modified for use in making the cantilever in the project. The techniques

  7. MIDAS: Lessons learned from the first spaceborne atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mark Stephen; Arends, Herman; Butler, Bart; Gavira, Jose; Jeszenszky, Harald; Mannel, Thurid; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS) atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta orbiter was the first such instrument launched into space in 2004. Designed only a few years after the technique was invented, MIDAS is currently orbiting comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko and producing the highest resolution 3D images of cometary dust ever made in situ. After more than a year of continuous operation much experience has been gained with this novel instrument. Coupled with operations of the Flight Spare and advances in terrestrial AFM a set of "lessons learned" has been produced, cumulating in recommendations for future spaceborne atomic force microscopes. The majority of the design could be reused as-is, or with incremental upgrades to include more modern components (e.g. the processor). Key additional recommendations are to incorporate an optical microscope to aid the search for particles and image registration, to include a variety of cantilevers (with different spring constants) and a variety of tip geometries.

  8. Harmonic force microscope: A new tool for biomolecular identification and material characterization based on nanomechanical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ozgur

    At the molecular level, physical and chemical properties of materials are tightly coupled to the mechanical properties. The potential of mechanics for interacting with matter at the nanoscale has been largely unexplored due to lack of instruments capable of performing mechanical measurements at nanometer length scales. This thesis describes nanomechanical sensing techniques and applications based on time-resolved tip-sample force measurements in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy. Tapping mode is the most successful operation mode of atomic force microscopes. Theoretical calculations presented in the first part of this thesis show that time variations of the tip-sample forces in the tapping-mode depend on the physical and chemical properties of the sample and therefore, have the potential to be used for nanomechanical measurements. Unfortunately, the force-sensing probe of the tapping-mode atomic force microscope, the vibrating cantilever, is limited in its response to the variations of forces in time within a period of oscillations. We are describing two types of special micromachined cantilevers that enable measurements of time variations of tip-sample forces: the harmonic cantilever and the coupled torsional cantilever. These special cantilevers allow sensitive mechanical measurements at the nanoscale and single molecular level. The operation of these cantilevers does not require any modifications to the existing atomic force microscopy systems. With the nanomechanical sensing techniques we have developed, we investigated phase transformations of sub-micron domains of composite polymers and observed their glass transitions for the first time. Conventional measurements on bulk properties of these samples do not provide information on the physical changes at the nanoscale. Studies on nucleic acids attached to a surface, a configuration commonly used in DNA microarray technology, showed that the hybridized DNA molecules can be detected at the single molecule

  9. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Verbiest, G J; van der Zalm, D J; Oosterkamp, T H; Rost, M J

    2015-03-01

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  10. Gating mechanosensitive channels in bacteria with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, Renata; Miller, Samantha; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Third Institute of Physics Team; School of Medical Sciences Collaboration

    The regulation of growth and integrity of bacteria is critically linked to mechanical stress. Bacteria typically maintain a high difference of osmotic pressure (turgor pressure) with respect to the environment. This pressure difference (on the order of 1 atm) is supported by the cell envelope, a composite of lipid membranes and a rigid cell wall. Turgor pressure is controlled by the ratio of osmolytes inside and outside bacteria and thus, can abruptly increase upon osmotic downshock. For structural integrity bacteria rely on the mechanical stability of the cell wall and on the action of mechanosensitive (MS) channels: membrane proteins that release solutes in response to stress in the cell envelope. We here present experimental data on MS channels gating. We activate channels by indenting living bacteria with the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). We compare responses of wild-type and mutant bacteria in which some or all MS channels have been eliminated.

  11. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, G. J.; Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J.

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  12. Design and calibration of a scanning force microscope for friction, adhesion, and contact potential studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleske, D. D.; Lee, G. U.; Gans, B. I.; Lee, K. P.; DiLella, D. P.; Wahl, K. J.; Barger, W. R.; Whitman, L. J.; Colton, R. J.

    1995-09-01

    We present the design and calibration of a scanning force microscope which can be used to study friction, adhesion, and contact potential differences between the cantilever tip and surface. The microscope uses a modular design where the laser, cantilever/sample holder, reflecting mirror, and detector are mounted directly on an optical table. The laser, reflecting mirror, and detector are mounted on translation and rotation stages. With this design the components can be rearranged to calibrate the Z piezo motion as a function of applied voltage. Using the detector micrometers, the detector response (voltage-to-distance relationship) can be determined after each series of measurements. The cantilever/sample holder is constructed such that the components are material matched and thermally compensated from a common reference point. This design feature minimizes thermal drift of the instrument. The instrument can be used in a contact scanning mode where both normal and lateral deflections of the cantilever are measured. In addition, the instrument can be used in frictional force studies, force curve mapping of the surface, and contact potential measurements. We present examples of each, including a detailed account of the instrument design and calibration.

  13. High-speed atomic force microscope combined with single-molecule fluorescence microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Iino, Ryota; Okazaki, Yasutaka; Yoshida, Masato; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Ando, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) have mutually complementary capabilities. Here, we report techniques to combine these microscopy systems so that both microscopy capabilities can be simultaneously used in the full extent. To combine the two systems, we have developed a tip-scan type HS-AFM instrument equipped with a device by which the laser beam from the optical lever detector can track the cantilever motion in the X- and Y-directions. This stand-alone HS-AFM system is mounted on an inverted optical microscope stage with a wide-area scanner. The capability of this combined system is demonstrated by simultaneous HS-AFM/TIRFM imaging of chitinase A moving on a chitin crystalline fiber and myosin V walking on an actin filament.

  14. High-speed atomic force microscope combined with single-molecule fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Iino, Ryota; Okazaki, Yasutaka; Yoshida, Masato; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Ando, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) have mutually complementary capabilities. Here, we report techniques to combine these microscopy systems so that both microscopy capabilities can be simultaneously used in the full extent. To combine the two systems, we have developed a tip-scan type HS-AFM instrument equipped with a device by which the laser beam from the optical lever detector can track the cantilever motion in the X- and Y-directions. This stand-alone HS-AFM system is mounted on an inverted optical microscope stage with a wide-area scanner. The capability of this combined system is demonstrated by simultaneous HS-AFM∕TIRFM imaging of chitinase A moving on a chitin crystalline fiber and myosin V walking on an actin filament.

  15. Design optimization of piezoresistive cantilevers for force sensing in air and water

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Park, Sung-Jin; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    Piezoresistive cantilevers fabricated from doped silicon or metal films are commonly used for force, topography, and chemical sensing at the micro- and macroscales. Proper design is required to optimize the achievable resolution by maximizing sensitivity while simultaneously minimizing the integrated noise over the bandwidth of interest. Existing analytical design methods are insufficient for modeling complex dopant profiles, design constraints, and nonlinear phenomena such as damping in fluid. Here we present an optimization method based on an analytical piezoresistive cantilever model. We use an existing iterative optimizer to minimimize a performance goal, such as minimum detectable force. The design tool is available as open source software. Optimal cantilever design and performance are found to strongly depend on the measurement bandwidth and the constraints applied. We discuss results for silicon piezoresistors fabricated by epitaxy and diffusion, but the method can be applied to any dopant profile or material which can be modeled in a similar fashion or extended to other microelectromechanical systems. PMID:19865512

  16. Radiation pressure excitation of a low temperature atomic force/magnetic force microscope for imaging in 4-300 K temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćelik, Ümit; Karcı, Özgür; Uysallı, Yiǧit; Özer, H. Özgür; Oral, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel radiation pressure based cantilever excitation method for imaging in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. Piezo-excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, however it may cause spurious resonance peaks. Therefore, the direct excitation of the cantilever plays a crucial role in AFM imaging. A fiber optic interferometer with a 1310 nm laser was used both for the excitation of the cantilever at the resonance and the deflection measurement of the cantilever in a commercial low temperature atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope (AFM/MFM) from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever's resonance frequency by a digital Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The laser beam is typically modulated by ˜500 μW, and ˜141.8 nmpp oscillation amplitude is obtained in moderate vacuum levels between 4 and 300 K. We have demonstrated the performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging atomic steps in graphite, magnetic domains in CoPt multilayers between 4 and 300 K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO(2212) single crystal at 4 K for the first time.

  17. Radiation pressure excitation of a low temperature atomic force/magnetic force microscope for imaging in 4-300 K temperature range.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ümit; Karcı, Özgür; Uysallı, Yiğit; Özer, H Özgür; Oral, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel radiation pressure based cantilever excitation method for imaging in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. Piezo-excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, however it may cause spurious resonance peaks. Therefore, the direct excitation of the cantilever plays a crucial role in AFM imaging. A fiber optic interferometer with a 1310 nm laser was used both for the excitation of the cantilever at the resonance and the deflection measurement of the cantilever in a commercial low temperature atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope (AFM/MFM) from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever's resonance frequency by a digital Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The laser beam is typically modulated by ∼500 μW, and ∼141.8 nmpp oscillation amplitude is obtained in moderate vacuum levels between 4 and 300 K. We have demonstrated the performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging atomic steps in graphite, magnetic domains in CoPt multilayers between 4 and 300 K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO(2212) single crystal at 4 K for the first time.

  18. High-speed atomic force microscopy for large scan sizes using small cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2010-06-01

    We present a high-speed atomic force microscope that exhibits a number of practical advantages over previous designs. Its central component is a high-speed scanner with a maximum scan size of 23 µm × 23 µm and a conveniently large sample stage area (6.5 mm × 6.5 mm). In combination with small cantilevers, image rates of up to 46 images s - 1 in air and 13 images s - 1 in liquid are reached under z-feedback control. By large scan size imaging of collagen fibrils in air, sample velocities of 8.8 mm s - 1 in the xy-direction and 11 mm s - 1 in the z-direction are reached. To provide optimized imaging conditions for both large and small scan sizes, a modular scanner design allows easily exchanging the x- and y-piezos. The scanner is therefore also suited for investigations on the molecular and atomic scale, which is demonstrated by imaging the step dynamics of a calcite surface during dissolution and the hexagonal lattice of a mica surface in liquid.

  19. Cantilevered bimorph-based scanner for high speed atomic force microscopy with large scanning range.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yusheng; Shang, Guangyi; Cai, Wei; Yao, Jun-en

    2010-05-01

    A cantilevered bimorph-based resonance-mode scanner for high speed atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging is presented. The free end of the bimorph is used for mounting a sample stage and the other one of that is fixed on the top of a conventional single tube scanner. High speed scanning is realized with the bimorph-based scanner vibrating at resonant frequency driven by a sine wave voltage applied to one piezolayer of the bimorph, while slow scanning is performed by the tube scanner. The other piezolayer provides information on vibration amplitude and phase of the bimorph itself simultaneously, which is used for real-time data processing and image calibration. By adjusting the free length of the bimorph, the line scan rate can be preset ranging from several hundred hertz to several kilohertz, which would be beneficial for the observation of samples with different properties. Combined with a home-made AFM system and a commercially available data acquisition card, AFM images of various samples have been obtained, and as an example, images of the silicon grating taken at a line rate of 1.5 kHz with the scan size of 20 microm are given. By manually moving the sample of polished Al foil surface while scanning, the capability of dynamic imaging is demonstrated.

  20. Midinfrared absorption measured at a lambda/400 resolution with an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Houel, Julien; Homeyer, Estelle; Sauvage, Sébastien; Boucaud, Philippe; Dazzi, Alexandre; Prazeres, Rui; Ortéga, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-22

    Midinfrared absorption can be locally measured using a detection combining an atomic force microscope and a pulsed excitation. This is illustrated for the midinfrared bulk GaAs phonon absorption and for the midinfrared absorption of thin SiO(2) microdisks. We show that the signal given by the cantilever oscillation amplitude of the atomic force microscope follows the spectral dependence of the bulk material absorption. The absorption spatial resolution achieved with microdisks is around 50 nanometer for an optical excitation around 22 micrometer wavelength.

  1. Lateral force calibration of an atomic force microscope with a diamagnetic levitation spring system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.; Kim, K.-S.; Rydberg, A.

    2006-06-15

    A novel diamagnetic lateral force calibrator (D-LFC) has been developed to directly calibrate atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever-tip or -bead assemblies. This enables an AFM to accurately measure the lateral forces encountered in friction or biomechanical-testing experiments at a small length scale. In the process of development, deformation characteristics of the AFM cantilever assemblies under frictional loading have been analyzed and four essential response variables, i.e., force constants, of the assembly have been identified. Calibration of the lateral force constant and the 'crosstalk' lateral force constant, among the four, provides the capability of measuring absolute AFM lateral forces. The D-LFC is composed of four NdFeB magnets and a diamagnetic pyrolytic graphite sheet, which can calibrate the two constants with an accuracy on the order of 0.1%. Preparation of the D-LFC and the data processing required to get the force constants is significantly simpler than any other calibration methods. The most up-to-date calibration technique, known as the 'wedge method', calibrates mainly one of the two constants and, if the crosstalk effect is properly analyzed, is primarily applicable to a sharp tip. In contrast, the D-LFC can calibrate both constants simultaneously for AFM tips or beads with any radius of curvature. These capabilities can extend the applicability of AFM lateral force measurement to studies of anisotropic multiscale friction processes and biomechanical behavior of cells and molecules under combined loading. Details of the D-LFC method as well as a comparison with the wedge method are provided in this article.

  2. An Atomic Force Microscope with Dual Actuation Capability for Biomolecular Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevim, Semih; Shamsudhin, Naveen; Ozer, Sevil; Feng, Luying; Fakhraee, Arielle; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.; Torun, Hamdi

    2016-06-01

    We report a modular atomic force microscope (AFM) design for biomolecular experiments. The AFM head uses readily available components and incorporates deflection-based optics and a piezotube-based cantilever actuator. Jetted-polymers have been used in the mechanical assembly, which allows rapid manufacturing. In addition, a FeCo-tipped electromagnet provides high-force cantilever actuation with vertical magnetic fields up to 0.55 T. Magnetic field calibration has been performed with a micro-hall sensor, which corresponds well with results from finite element magnetostatics simulations. An integrated force resolution of 1.82 and 2.98 pN, in air and in DI water, respectively was achieved in 1 kHz bandwidth with commercially available cantilevers made of Silicon Nitride. The controller and user interface are implemented on modular hardware to ensure scalability. The AFM can be operated in different modes, such as molecular pulling or force-clamp, by actuating the cantilever with the available actuators. The electromagnetic and piezoelectric actuation capabilities have been demonstrated in unbinding experiments of the biotin-streptavidin complex.

  3. An Atomic Force Microscope with Dual Actuation Capability for Biomolecular Experiments.

    PubMed

    Sevim, Semih; Shamsudhin, Naveen; Ozer, Sevil; Feng, Luying; Fakhraee, Arielle; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J; Torun, Hamdi

    2016-06-07

    We report a modular atomic force microscope (AFM) design for biomolecular experiments. The AFM head uses readily available components and incorporates deflection-based optics and a piezotube-based cantilever actuator. Jetted-polymers have been used in the mechanical assembly, which allows rapid manufacturing. In addition, a FeCo-tipped electromagnet provides high-force cantilever actuation with vertical magnetic fields up to 0.55 T. Magnetic field calibration has been performed with a micro-hall sensor, which corresponds well with results from finite element magnetostatics simulations. An integrated force resolution of 1.82 and 2.98 pN, in air and in DI water, respectively was achieved in 1 kHz bandwidth with commercially available cantilevers made of Silicon Nitride. The controller and user interface are implemented on modular hardware to ensure scalability. The AFM can be operated in different modes, such as molecular pulling or force-clamp, by actuating the cantilever with the available actuators. The electromagnetic and piezoelectric actuation capabilities have been demonstrated in unbinding experiments of the biotin-streptavidin complex.

  4. An Atomic Force Microscope with Dual Actuation Capability for Biomolecular Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sevim, Semih; Shamsudhin, Naveen; Ozer, Sevil; Feng, Luying; Fakhraee, Arielle; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.; Torun, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    We report a modular atomic force microscope (AFM) design for biomolecular experiments. The AFM head uses readily available components and incorporates deflection-based optics and a piezotube-based cantilever actuator. Jetted-polymers have been used in the mechanical assembly, which allows rapid manufacturing. In addition, a FeCo-tipped electromagnet provides high-force cantilever actuation with vertical magnetic fields up to 0.55 T. Magnetic field calibration has been performed with a micro-hall sensor, which corresponds well with results from finite element magnetostatics simulations. An integrated force resolution of 1.82 and 2.98 pN, in air and in DI water, respectively was achieved in 1 kHz bandwidth with commercially available cantilevers made of Silicon Nitride. The controller and user interface are implemented on modular hardware to ensure scalability. The AFM can be operated in different modes, such as molecular pulling or force-clamp, by actuating the cantilever with the available actuators. The electromagnetic and piezoelectric actuation capabilities have been demonstrated in unbinding experiments of the biotin-streptavidin complex. PMID:27273214

  5. Diamagnetic Levitation Cantilever System for the Calibration of Normal Force Atomic Force Microscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jahn; Yi, Jin-Woo; Murphy, Colin; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    In this presentation we report a novel technique for normal force calibration for Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) adhesion measurements known as the diamagnetic normal force calibration (D-NFC) system. The levitation produced by the repulsion between a diamagnetic graphite sheet and a set of rare-earth magnets is used in order to produce an oscillation due to an unstable mechanical moment produced by a silicon cantilever supported on the graphite. The measurement of the natural frequency of this oscillation allows for the calculation of the stiffness of the system to three-digit accuracy. The D-NFC response was proven to have a high sensitivity for the structure of water molecules collected on its surface. This in turns allows for the study of the effects of coatings on the structure of surface water. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  6. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  7. Numerical analysis of dynamic force spectroscopy using the torsional harmonic cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2010-02-01

    A spectral analysis method has been recently introduced by Stark et al (2002 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99 8473-8) and implemented by Sahin et al (2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 507-14) using a T-shaped cantilever design, the torsional harmonic cantilever (THC), which is capable of performing simultaneous tapping-mode atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy. Here we report on numerical simulations of the THC system using a simple dual-mass flexural-torsional model, which is applied in combination with Fourier data processing software to illustrate the spectroscopy process for quality factors corresponding to liquid, air and vacuum environments. We also illustrate the acquisition of enhanced topographical images and deformed surface contours under the application of uniform forces, and compare the results to those obtained with a previously reported linear dual-spring-mass model.

  8. V-shaped metallic-wire cantilevers for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Charles A.; Workman, Richard K.; Yao, Xiaowei; Hunt, Jeffery P.; Sarid, Dror

    1998-12-01

    A method for fabricating V-shaped cantilevers from a flattened Pt/Ir metal wire for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging is described. These novel cantilevers have been found to be more robust then conventional ones used for scanning capacitance and magnetic force microscopy as their conductivity is maintained even after a large number of surface scans. The use of a V-shaped geometry improves on earlier single-beam geometries by reducing rms imaging noise. Characterization of these cantilevers and combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim images are reported.

  9. MEMS piezoresistive cantilever for the direct measurement of cardiomyocyte contractile force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Kenei; Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Hirayama Shoji, Kayoko; Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Shimoyama, Isao

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports on a method to directly measure the contractile forces of cardiomyocytes using MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems)-based force sensors. The fabricated sensor chip consists of piezoresistive cantilevers that can measure contractile forces with high frequency (several tens of kHz) and high sensing resolution (less than 0.1 nN). Moreover, the proposed method does not require a complex observation system or image processing, which are necessary in conventional optical-based methods. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and evaluation of the proposed device and demonstrates the direct measurements of contractile forces of cardiomyocytes using the fabricated device.

  10. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles.

    The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep.

    This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing.

    Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  11. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles.

    The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep.

    This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing.

    Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-07

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  13. Note: curve fit models for atomic force microscopy cantilever calibration in water.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott J; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2011-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy stiffness calibrations performed on commercial instruments using the thermal noise method on the same cantilever in both air and water can vary by as much as 20% when a simple harmonic oscillator model and white noise are used in curve fitting. In this note, several fitting strategies are described that reduce this difference to about 11%. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  14. Optical and mechanical detection of near-field light by atomic force microscopy using a piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Watanabe, Shunji; Fujii, Toru; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) system with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) using a microfabricated force-sensing cantilever with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. Both optical and mechanical detection techniques were adopted in SNOM to detect scattered light induced by the interaction of the PZT cantilever tip apex and evanescent light, and SNOM images were obtained for each detection scheme. The mechanical detection technique did allow for a clear observation of the light scattered from the PZT cantilever without the interference observed by the optical detection technique, which used an objective lens, a pinhole, and a photomultiplier tube.

  15. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-11

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials.

  16. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  17. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  18. Detection of pulsed far-infrared and terahertz light with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J.-M.; Glotin, F.; Prazeres, R.; Berthet, J.-P.; Dazzi, A.

    2012-10-01

    We show that a commercial atomic force microscope can be used at room temperature as a detector throughout the infrared spectrum simply by recording the induced oscillation of its cantilever after irradiation by a pulsed laser. The oscillation amplitude can be made larger by spraying an absorbing graphite layer on the tip side. We demonstrate that its good sensitivity is due to a bilayer effect: their different thermal expansion coefficient forcing them to bend under irradiation. For the far-infrared spectral range, this device avoids the use of Helium cooled detectors and their numerous constraints.

  19. Simulating atomic force microscope images with density functional theory: The role of nonclassical contributions to the force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffhauser, Philipp; Kümmel, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We discuss a scheme for calculating atomic force microscope images within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). As in earlier works [T. L. Chan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 176101 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.176101; M. Kim and J. R. Chelikowsky, Appl. Surf. Sci. 303, 163 (2014), 10.1016/j.apsusc.2014.02.127] we do not simulate the cantilever explicitly, but consider it as a polarizable object. We go beyond previous studies by discussing the role of exchange and correlation effects; i.e., we approximately take into account the Pauli interaction between sample and cantilever. The good agreement that we find when comparing our calculated images to experimental images for the difficult case of the 8-hydroxyquinoline molecule demonstrates that exchange-correlation effects can play an important role in the DFT-based interpretation of AFM images.

  20. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  1. High speed tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid using an insulated piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, B.; Sulchek, T.; Murray, K.; York, D.; Jones, M.; Manning, L.; Malekos, S.; Beneschott, B.; Adams, J. D.; Cavazos, H.; Minne, S. C.

    2003-11-01

    Quicker imaging times for tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid could provide a real-time imaging tool for studying dynamic phenomena in physiological conditions. We demonstrate faster imaging speed using microcantilevers with integrated piezoelectric actuators. The exposed electric components of the cantilever necessitate an insulation scheme for use in liquid; three coating schemes have been tested. Preliminary tapping mode images have been taken using the insulated microactuator to simultaneously vibrate and actuate the cantilever over topographical features in liquid, including a high speed image of steps on a mica surface in water and an image of two e coli bacteria taken in saline solution at 75.5 μm/s, a threefold improvement in bandwidth versus conventional piezotube actuators.

  2. Mechanical properties of graphene cantilever from atomic force microscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Rasuli, R; Iraji Zad, A; Ahadian, M M

    2010-05-07

    We have studied the mechanical properties of a few-layer graphene cantilever (FLGC) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical properties of the suspended FLGC over an open hole have been derived from the AFM data. Force displacement curves using the Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov (DMT) and the massless cantilever beam models yield a Young modulus of E(c) approximately 37, E(a) approximately 0.7 TPa and a Hamakar constant of approximately 3 x 10( - 18) J. The threshold force to shear the FLGC was determined from a breaking force and modeling. In addition, we studied a graphene nanoribbon (GNR), which is a system similar to the FLGC; using density functional theory (DFT). The in-plane Young's modulus for the GNRs were calculated from the DFT outcomes approximately 0.82 TPa and the results were compared with the experiment. We found that the Young's modulus and the threshold shearing force are dependent on the direction of applied force and the values are different for zigzag edge and armchair edge GNRs.

  3. Capillary force on a tilted cylinder: Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sébastien; Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey

    2017-11-01

    The capillary force in situations where the liquid meniscus is asymmetric, such as the one around a tilted object, has been hitherto barely investigated even though these situations are very common in practice. In particular, the capillary force exerted on a tilted object may depend on the dipping angle i. We investigate experimentally the capillary force that applies on a tilted cylinder as a function of its dipping angle i, using a home-built tilting Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with custom made probes. A micrometric-size rod is glued at the end of an AFM cantilever of known stiffness, whose deflection is measured when the cylindrical probe is dipped in and retracted from reference liquids. We show that a torque correction is necessary to understand the measured deflection. We give the explicit expression of this correction as a function of the probes' geometrical parameters, so that its magnitude can be readily evaluated. The results are compatible with a vertical capillary force varying as 1/cosi, in agreement with a recent theoretical prediction. Finally, we discuss the accuracy of the method for measuring the surface tension times the cosine of the contact angle of the liquid on the probe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Applied voltage dependence of nano-oxidation of ferromagnetic thin films using atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Yasushi; Kidaka, Seiichi; Watanabe, Keizo; Nasu, Yasuaki; Yamada, Tsutomu; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2003-05-01

    Nanodots of Ni, CoFe, and Cr oxide were fabricated by the nano-oxidation technique using atomic force microscope. The dot size was controlled from 40 to 200 nm by changing the pulse voltage applied to the cantilever from 2 to 10 V. In order to evaluate the size of the nanostructures quantitatively, the electric field emitted from the cantilever was calculated. The threshold electric field strength was defined as the minimum strength to promote the oxidation. The threshold field strength of the order of 107 V/m was derived by fitting the experimental results. The voltage dependence of the size of fabricated Cr-oxide dots was fitted well by the calculation. The dot size of the ferromagnet-based oxide was fluctuating and did not agree with the calculation. From the theoretical analysis, it was suggested that the size of the nanostructures did not depend on the distance between the cantilever and film surface, but significantly depended on the curvature radius of the cantilever.

  5. Enhanced Raman scattering for temperature measurement of a laser-heated atomic force microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Brendan; Zhao, Yanming; Grover, Ranjan; Sarid, Dror

    2005-03-01

    Illuminating a silicon cantilever of an atomic force microscope with a focused laser beam creates heat that can be funneled into a nanoscale area at the apex of its tip. To characterize the heating dynamics and measure the temperature of the tip, a Raman scattering pump-and-probe method is used. It is found that at the apex of the tip the intensity of the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes components are significantly enhanced relative to those obtained on a bulk silicon sample. Modeling the temperature rise at the tip of the cantilever by a closed-form analytical expression gives good agreement with the Raman measurements. This model can be used to design the structure of the cantilever so that the heat delivery to its tip is optimized. Such an optimized cantilever can potentially be used in high-density, heat-assisted magnetic recording, optical data storage using phase-change media and thermomechanical recording systems, for example, where nanoscale heated regions are of importance.

  6. Cantilever-based chemical sensors for detecting catalytically produced reactions and motility forces generated via electrokinetic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Shyamala; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2007-11-01

    This paper reports the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a chemical sensor constructed from a microfabricated silicon cantilever, coated with gold, which is modified using photolithography techniques to contain a silver feature on the free-standing edge. When immersed in a fuel solution such as hydrogen peroxide, catalytic reactions occurring at the bimetallic silver-gold junction cause a catalytic force to act on the cantilever. The catalytic reaction is detected by measuring change in resonance frequency of the cantilever using a position-sensitive split photodiode and atomic force microscopy instrument. A model based on the Cleveland method is developed to quantify the forces produced and to study the effect of change of hydrogen peroxide concentration on the magnitude of the force. The force is observed to increase linearly for lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and level off at higher concentrations. The chemical sensor offers a possible method for using catalytically produced forces in microelectromechanical systems and microfluidic devices.

  7. Fast on-wafer electrical, mechanical, and electromechanical characterization of piezoresistive cantilever force sensors.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, G; Villanueva, L G; Perez-Murano, F; Bausells, J

    2012-01-01

    Validation of a technological process requires an intensive characterization of the performance of the resulting devices, circuits, or systems. The technology for the fabrication of micro and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) is evolving rapidly, with new kind of device concepts for applications like sensing or harvesting are being proposed and demonstrated. However, the characterization tools and methods for these new devices are still not fully developed. Here, we present an on-wafer, highly precise, and rapid characterization method to measure the mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical properties of piezoresistive cantilevers. The setup is based on a combination of probe-card and atomic force microscopy technology, it allows accessing many devices across a wafer and it can be applied to a broad range of MEMS and NEMS. Using this setup we have characterized the performance of multiple submicron thick piezoresistive cantilever force sensors. For the best design we have obtained a force sensitivity Re(F) = 158μV/nN, a noise of 5.8 μV (1 Hz-1 kHz) and a minimum detectable force of 37 pN with a relative standard deviation of σ(r) ≈ 8%. This small value of σ(r), together with a high fabrication yield >95%, validates our fabrication technology. These devices are intended to be used as bio-molecular detectors for the measurement of intermolecular forces between ligand and receptor molecule pairs.

  8. Fast on-wafer electrical, mechanical, and electromechanical characterization of piezoresistive cantilever force sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosolini, G.; Villanueva, L. G.; Perez-Murano, F.; Bausells, J.

    2012-01-01

    Validation of a technological process requires an intensive characterization of the performance of the resulting devices, circuits, or systems. The technology for the fabrication of micro and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) is evolving rapidly, with new kind of device concepts for applications like sensing or harvesting are being proposed and demonstrated. However, the characterization tools and methods for these new devices are still not fully developed. Here, we present an on-wafer, highly precise, and rapid characterization method to measure the mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical properties of piezoresistive cantilevers. The setup is based on a combination of probe-card and atomic force microscopy technology, it allows accessing many devices across a wafer and it can be applied to a broad range of MEMS and NEMS. Using this setup we have characterized the performance of multiple submicron thick piezoresistive cantilever force sensors. For the best design we have obtained a force sensitivity ℜF = 158μV/nN, a noise of 5.8 μV (1 Hz-1 kHz) and a minimum detectable force of 37 pN with a relative standard deviation of σr ≈ 8%. This small value of σr, together with a high fabrication yield >95%, validates our fabrication technology. These devices are intended to be used as bio-molecular detectors for the measurement of intermolecular forces between ligand and receptor molecule pairs.

  9. Atomic force microscopy of Precambrian microscopic fossils

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, André; Schopf, J. William; Altermann, Wladyslaw; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B.; Heckl, Wolfgang M.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique used routinely in material science to image substances at a submicron (including nm) scale. We apply this technique to analysis of the fine structure of organic-walled Precambrian fossils, microscopic sphaeromorph acritarchs (cysts of planktonic unicellular protists) permineralized in ≈650-million-year-old cherts of the Chichkan Formation of southern Kazakhstan. AFM images, backed by laser-Raman spectroscopic analysis of individual specimens, demonstrate that the walls of these petrified fossils are composed of stacked arrays of ≈200-nm-sized angular platelets of polycyclic aromatic kerogen. Together, AFM and laser-Raman spectroscopy provide means by which to elucidate the submicron-scale structure of individual microscopic fossils, investigate the geochemical maturation of ancient organic matter, and, potentially, distinguish true fossils from pseudofossils and probe the mechanisms of fossil preservation by silica permineralization. PMID:12089337

  10. Atomic force microscopy of Precambrian microscopic fossils.

    PubMed

    Kempe, André; Schopf, J William; Altermann, Wladyslaw; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Heckl, Wolfgang M

    2002-07-09

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique used routinely in material science to image substances at a submicron (including nm) scale. We apply this technique to analysis of the fine structure of organic-walled Precambrian fossils, microscopic sphaeromorph acritarchs (cysts of planktonic unicellular protists) permineralized in approximately 650-million-year-old cherts of the Chichkan Formation of southern Kazakhstan. AFM images, backed by laser-Raman spectroscopic analysis of individual specimens, demonstrate that the walls of these petrified fossils are composed of stacked arrays of approximately 200-nm-sized angular platelets of polycyclic aromatic kerogen. Together, AFM and laser-Raman spectroscopy provide means by which to elucidate the submicron-scale structure of individual microscopic fossils, investigate the geochemical maturation of ancient organic matter, and, potentially, distinguish true fossils from pseudofossils and probe the mechanisms of fossil preservation by silica permineralization.

  11. Direct calibration of colloidal probe cantilevers via Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek surface forces in electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaoting; Willing, Gerold A

    2008-12-01

    The development of colloidal probe microscopy has made it possible to directly measure the interaction forces between two different surfaces in solution. Cantilever calibration is presently a subject of intense experimental and theoretical interest due to the need for accurate force measurement. We developed a novel and direct calibration method for colloidal probe cantilevers to which a silica microsphere has been previously attached based on fitting experimental force curves for the interaction between the silica sphere and a silica flat in dilute KBr solutions to the theoretical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek force curves using the measured zeta potential of the silica surfaces.

  12. Dynamically forced cantilever system: A piezo-polymer characterization tool with possible application for micromechanical HF resonator devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schwoediauer, Reinhard

    2005-04-01

    A cantilever system, driven to a dynamically forced oscillation by a small piezoelectric specimen is presented as a simple and accurate tool to determine the converse dynamic piezocoefficient up to several kHz. The piezoelectric sample is mounted on top of a reflective cantilever where it is free to oscillate without any mechanical constraint. A Nomarsky-interferometer detects the induced cantilever displacement. The presented technique is especially suited for a precise characterization of small and soft piezoelectric polymer-samples with rough surfaces. The capability of the dynamically forced cantilever principle is demonstrated with a LiNbO{sub 3} crystal and with a porous ferroelectretic polypropylene foam. Results from measurements between 400 Hz and 5 kHz were found to be in excellent agreement with published values. Additionally, the dynamically forced cantilever principle may possibly improve the sensitivity of some micromechanical cantilever-sensors and it could also be interesting for the design of enhanced micromechanical high frequency mixer filters. Some ideas about are briefly presented.

  13. Sharp Tips on the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the eight sharp tips of the NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The microscope maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with one of the tips at the end of a beam. For the AFM image taken, the tip at the end of the upper right beam was used. The tip pointing up in the enlarged image is the size of a smoke particle at its base, or 2 microns. This image was taken with a scanning electron microscope before Phoenix launched on August 4, 2007.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium in collaboration with Imperial College London.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Sharp Tips on the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the eight sharp tips of the NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The microscope maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with one of the tips at the end of a beam. For the AFM image taken, the tip at the end of the upper right beam was used. The tip pointing up in the enlarged image is the size of a smoke particle at its base, or 2 microns. This image was taken with a scanning electron microscope before Phoenix launched on August 4, 2007.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium in collaboration with Imperial College London.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  16. Nanostethoscopy: A new mode of operation of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, A.; Holzrichter, J.F.; Balhorn, R.; Siekaus, W.J.

    1994-02-01

    The authors introduce a new mode of operation of the atomic force microscope (AFM). This detection scheme, a {open_quotes}Nano-Stethoscope{close_quotes}. Involves using the atomic force microscope in a novel acoustic mode not generally recognized. The Nano-Stethoscope uses the conventional scanning feature to locate a desired site, positions the AFM microscope tip over the site, holds the cantilever stationary (in x and v) and records the tip`s z-motion as a function of time. The tip/cantilever system thus functions as a micro-motion detector to respond to characteristic {open_quotes}pulsations{close_quotes}, nano-configurational chances, or any other event that influences the position of the tip as a function of time. The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of using the tip of an AFM in this manner in a biological system with a measurement of the vibrations of an emerging shrimp egg nauplius ({approximately}3 {mu}m. -10 Hz) and on the Angstrom scale in a non-biological system i.e.. the thermal expansion of metal interconnect lines on a microelectronic circuit.

  17. Endonuclease-based logic gates and sensors using magnetic force-amplified readout of DNA scission on cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Weizmann, Yossi; Elnathan, Roey; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Willner, Itamar

    2005-09-14

    The endonuclease scission of magnetic particles functionalized with sequence-specific DNAs, which are associated on cantilevers, is followed by the magnetic force-amplified readout of the reactions by the nano-mechanical deflection/retraction of the cantilevers. The systems are employed to develop AND or OR logic gates and to detect single base mismatch specificity of the endonucleases. The two endonucleases EcoRI (E(A)) and AscI (E(B)) are used as inputs. The removal of magnetic particles linked to the cantilever by the duplexes 1/1a and 2/2a via the simultaneous cleavage of the DNAs by E(A) and E(B) leads to the retraction of the magnetically deflected cantilever and to the establishment of the "AND" gate. The removal of the magnetic particles linked to the cantilevers by the duplex 3/3a by either E(A) or E(B) leads to the retraction of the magnetically deflected cantilever and to the establishment of the "OR" gate. The magnetic force-amplified readout of endonuclease activities is also employed to reveal single base mismatch specificity of the biocatalysts.

  18. Current integration force and displacement self-sensing method for cantilevered piezoelectric actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan, Ioan Alexandru; Rakotondrabe, Micky; Lutz, Philippe; Chaillet, Nicolas

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents a new method of self-sensing both of the displacement and the external applied force at the tip of piezoelectric cantilevers. Integrated electric current across piezoelectric actuators is compensated against material nonlinearities (creep, hysteresis) to provide reliable information. We propose to compensate the hysteresis by using the Prandtl-Ishlinskii static approach while an auto regressive and moving average exogenous (ARMAX) model is used to minimize the creep influence. The quasistatic estimation, electronic circuit, and aspects related to long-term charge preservations are described or referenced. As an experiment, we tested the actuator entering in contact with a fixed force sensor. An input signal of 20 V peak-to-peak (10% of maximum range) led to force self-sensing errors inferior to {+-}8%. A final discussion about method accuracy and its limitations is made.

  19. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials. This work is a partial contribution of the USDA Forest Service and NIST, agencies of the US government, and is not subject to copyright.

  20. Measurement of interaction force between nanoarrayed integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} and immobilized vitronectin on the cantilever tip

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minsu; Yang, Hyun-Kyu; Park, Keun-Hyung; Kang, Dong-Ku; Chang, Soo-Ik Kang, In-Cheol

    2007-11-03

    Protein nanoarrays containing integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} or BSA were fabricated on ProLinker{sup TM}-coated Au surface by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). An atomic force microscope (AFM) tip coated with ProLinker{sup TM} was modified by vitronectin. We measured the interaction force between nanoarrayed integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} or BSA and immobilized vitronectin on the cantilever tip by employing tethering-unbinding method. The unbinding force between integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} and vitronectin (1087 {+-} 62 pN) was much higher than that of between BSA and vitronectin (643 {+-} 74 pN). These results demonstrate that one can distinguish a specific protein interaction from non-specific interactions by means of force measurement on the molecular interactions between the nanoarrayed protein and its interacting protein on the AFM tip.

  1. Increased imaging speed and force sensitivity for bio-applications with small cantilevers using a conventional AFM setup

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.; Fantner, Ernest J.; Ivanova, Katerina; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Rangelow, Ivo; Ebner, Andreas; Rangl, Martina; Tang, Jilin; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the increased performance in speed and sensitivity achieved by the use of small AFM cantilevers on a standard AFM system. For this, small rectangular silicon oxynitride cantilevers were utilized to arrive at faster atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging times and more sensitive molecular recognition force spectroscopy (MRFS) experiments. The cantilevers we used had lengths between 13 and 46 μm, a width of about 11 μm, and a thickness between 150 and 600 nm. They were coated with chromium and gold on the backside for a better laser reflection. We characterized these small cantilevers through their frequency spectrum and with electron microscopy. Due to their small size and high resonance frequency we were able to increase the imaging speed by a factor of 10 without any loss in resolution for images from several μm scansize down to the nanometer scale. This was shown on bacterial surface layers (s-layer) with tapping mode under aqueous, near physiological conditions and on nuclear membranes in contact mode in ambient environment. In addition, we showed that single molecular forces can be measured with an up to 5 times higher force sensitivity in comparison to conventional cantilevers with similar spring constants. PMID:22721963

  2. Lewy bodies under atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Tercjak, Agnieszka; Bergareche, Alberto; Caballero, Cristina; Tuñon, Teresa; Linazasoro, Gurutz

    2014-02-01

    Lewy bodies are the hallmark of Parkinson disease and their sophisticated analysis will undoubtedly elucidate the pathogenic process. They have been studied by using different microscopic tools. The authors have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the ultramicrotom cut postmortem brain tissue of Parkinson disease patients. Under the same preparation conditions, they have found aggregated fibrillary nanostructures in Lewy bodies, as well as a loss of connections between neurons located in other parts of the substantia nigra. Although these results are preliminary and descriptive in nature, this paper reports the application of a novel and intriguing technique. Further studies including the study of cortical LB and Lewy neurites will be needed to determine the full potential of AFM in the study of the pathogenesis of cell death in Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies.

  3. Nanomechanical assessment of human and murine collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy cantilever-based nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, Orestis G; Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Zekonyte, Jurgita; Katsamenis, Orestis L; Fabri, Sebastien; Howarth, Peter H; Davies, Donna E; Thurner, Philipp J

    2014-11-01

    The nanomechanical assessment of collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy (AFM) is of increasing interest within the biomedical research community. In contrast to conventional nanoindentation there exists no common standard for conducting experiments and analysis of data. Currently used analysis approaches vary between studies and validation of quantitative results is usually not performed, which makes comparison of data from different studies difficult. Also there are no recommendations with regards to the maximum indentation depth that should not be exceeded to avoid substrate effects. Here we present a methodology and analysis approach for AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation experiments that allows efficient use of captured data and relying on a reference sample for determination of tip shape. Further we show experimental evidence that maximum indentation depth on collagen fibrils should be lower than 10-15% of the height of the fibril to avoid substrate effects and we show comparisons between our and other approaches used in previous works. While our analysis approach yields similar values for indentation modulus compared to the Oliver-Pharr method we found that Hertzian analysis yielded significantly lower values. Applying our approach we successfully and efficiently indented collagen fibrils from human bronchi, which were about 30 nm in size, considerably smaller compared to collagen fibrils obtained from murine tail-tendon. In addition, derived mechanical parameters of collagen fibrils are in agreement with data previously published. To establish a quantitative validation we compared indentation results from conventional and AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation on polymeric samples with known mechanical properties. Importantly we can show that our approach yields similar results when compared to conventional nanoindentation on polymer samples. Introducing an approach that is reliable, efficient and taking into account the AFM tip shape, we anticipate

  4. Optimum Design of Cantilevered Microprobes for Inspecting Lcd Panels and Measurement of Contacting Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol; Kim, Kwang-Joong

    Fine pitch microprobe arrays are microneedle-like probes for inspecting the pixels of LCD panels or IC. They are usually made of multi-layers of metallic, nonmetallic, or combination of the two. The design requirement for a contacting force is less than 2 gf and a deflection should be less than 100 µm. Many microprobe shapes satisfying the design requirements are possible. A cantilever-type microprobe having many needles was chosen and optimized in this study. Several candidate shapes were chosen using topology and shape optimization technique subjected to design requirements. Then, the microprobe arrays were fabricated using the process applied for MEMS fabrication and they were made of BeNi, BeCu, or Si. The contact probing forces and deflections were measured for checking the results from optimum design by newly developed measuring equipment in our laboratory. Numerical and experimental results were compared and both showed a good correlation.

  5. Cantilever tilt causing amplitude related convolution in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Sun, Jielin; Itoh, Hiroshi; Shen, Dianhong; Hu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the topography in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a convolution of the tip's shape and the sample's geometry. The classical convolution model was established in contact mode assuming a static probe, but it is no longer valid in dynamic mode AFM. It is still not well understood whether or how the vibration of the probe in dynamic mode affects the convolution. Such ignorance complicates the interpretation of the topography. Here we propose a convolution model for dynamic mode by taking into account the typical design of the cantilever tilt in AFMs, which leads to a different convolution from that in contact mode. Our model indicates that the cantilever tilt results in a dynamic convolution affected by the absolute value of the amplitude, especially in the case that corresponding contact convolution has sharp edges beyond certain angle. The effect was experimentally demonstrated by a perpendicular SiO(2)/Si super-lattice structure. Our model is useful for quantitative characterizations in dynamic mode, especially in probe characterization and critical dimension measurements.

  6. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  7. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H∞ control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  8. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  9. Minimizing Pulling Geometry Errors in Atomic Force Microscope Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Monica; Lee, Whasil; Ke, Changhong; Marszalek, Piotr E.; Cole, Daniel G.; Clark, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), it is assumed that the pulling angle is negligible and that the force applied to the molecule is equivalent to the force measured by the instrument. Recent studies, however, have indicated that the pulling geometry errors can drastically alter the measured force-extension relationship of molecules. Here we describe a software-based alignment method that repositions the cantilever such that it is located directly above the molecule's substrate attachment site. By aligning the applied force with the measurement axis, the molecule is no longer undergoing combined loading, and the full force can be measured by the cantilever. Simulations and experimental results verify the ability of the alignment program to minimize pulling geometry errors in AFM-SMFS studies. PMID:18641069

  10. Minimizing pulling geometry errors in atomic force microscope single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Monica; Lee, Whasil; Ke, Changhong; Marszalek, Piotr E; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2008-10-01

    In atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS), it is assumed that the pulling angle is negligible and that the force applied to the molecule is equivalent to the force measured by the instrument. Recent studies, however, have indicated that the pulling geometry errors can drastically alter the measured force-extension relationship of molecules. Here we describe a software-based alignment method that repositions the cantilever such that it is located directly above the molecule's substrate attachment site. By aligning the applied force with the measurement axis, the molecule is no longer undergoing combined loading, and the full force can be measured by the cantilever. Simulations and experimental results verify the ability of the alignment program to minimize pulling geometry errors in AFM-SMFS studies.

  11. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection.

    PubMed

    von Schmidsfeld, Alexander; Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry-Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber-cantilever configurations. In the Fabry-Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz(0.5) under optimum conditions.

  12. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry–Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber–cantilever configurations. In the Fabry–Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz0.5 under optimum conditions. PMID:27547601

  13. Mechanical property investigation of soft materials by cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Boehm, Ryan D

    2013-01-01

    Cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscopy (COIFM) was applied to the investigation of the mechanical properties of soft materials to avoid the double-spring effect and snap-to-contact problem associated with atomic force microscopy (AFM). When a force was measured as a function of distance between an oxidized silicon probe and the surface of a soft hydrocarbon film, it increases nonlinearly in the lower force region below ∼10 nN, following the Herzian model with the elastic modulus of ∼50 MPa. Above ∼10 nN, it increases linearly with a small oscillatory sawtooth pattern with amplitude 1-2 nN. The pattern suggests the possible existence of the layered structure within the film. When its internal part of the film was exposed to the probe, the force depends on the distance linearly with an adhesive force of -20 nN. This linear dependence suggests that the adhesive internal material behaved like a linear spring with a spring constant of ∼1 N/m. Constant-force images taken in the repulsive and attractive contact regimes revealed additional features that were not observed in the images taken in the noncontact regime. At some locations, however, contrast inversions were observed between the two contact regimes while the average roughness remained constant. The result suggests that some embedded materials had spring constants different from those of the surrounding material. This study demonstrated that the COIFM is capable of imaging mechanical properties of local structures such as small impurities and domains at the nanometer scale, which is a formidable challenge with conventional AFM methods.

  14. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  15. Fiber-top and ferrule-top cantilevers for atomic force microscopy and scanning near field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Dhwajal; Gruca, Grzegorz; van de Watering, Tomek; Heeck, Kier; Rector, Jan; Slaman, Martin; Andres, Dieter; Tiribilli, Bruno; Margheri, Giancarlo; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2012-04-01

    Fiber-top and ferrule-top cantilevers (FTC) are a new generation of all optical, monolithic, self-aligned microdevices. They are obtained by carving a cantilever on the cleaved end of an optical fiber (fiber-top) or on a ferrule terminated fiber (ferrule-top). FTCs rely on Fabry-Perot interferometry to measure the deflection of the cantilever with subnanometer deflection sensitivity. FTCs specially developed for scanning probe microscopy are equipped with a sharp tip that has the dual function of probing the topography and collecting/emitting light. We perform the scanning probe microscopy using these probes in air, liquid and at low temperature (12°K). The light emission/collection functionality of FTC probes also allows one to combine scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) and optical transmission microscopy with contact and non-contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). This makes FTCs ideal for AFM+SNOM on soft samples, polymers and biological specimen, where bent fiber probes and tuning fork based systems would not be recommended because of the high stiffness of those probes. We demonstrate here the capability of fiber-top cantilevers to measure deflection and collect near field optical signal, and also the capability of ferrule-top cantilevers for simultaneous optical transmission microscopy and topography of SNOM gratings. Thanks to their unique features, FTCs also open up possibilities for UV nanolithography and on-demand optical excitation at nanoscale.

  16. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  17. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies.

  18. 3D simulation of AFM non-uniform piezoelectric micro-cantilever with various geometries subjected to the tip-sample forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, Alireza Habibnejad; Abdi, Moein

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful instrument for investigation of surface topography at different workspaces. It is important to understand the dynamic behavior of AFM to improve its performance. 3D numerical method is suitable in order to simulate experimental conditions. This paper has investigated modeling and dynamic simulation of rectangular, Dagger and V-shaped geometries of AFM piezoelectric micro-cantilever (MC) with two electrode layers in the air environment. For a better understanding of the system dynamic, multi-layer MC dynamic equation has been derived. Euler-Bernoulli beam theory has been used for modeling the AFM cantilever. Hamilton's principle has been used for the MC modeling and the finite element method (FEM) has been applied for its discretization. In 3D, with respect to the tip-sample forces piezoelectric MC has been simulated via the COMSOL software. The frequency and time responses have been also investigated. The topographies have been performed on different surfaces with various roughness's types in the tapping and non-contact mode. The results of these two methods have been compared with experimental results. Moreover, the effects of MC geometrical parameters on surfaces topography and frequency responses have been studied and optimal dimensions of topographies have been obtained for each of the beam geometries. Simulations of various tip geometries have been performed in order to examine the effects of tip dimensions on the frequency and time responses. Furthermore, the effect of tip displacement on the frequency response has been investigated for different MC lengths.

  19. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study. PMID:26225979

  20. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-07-28

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study.

  1. 3D finite element analysis of electrostatic deflection of commercial and FIB-modified cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy: I. Triangular shaped cantilevers with symmetric pyramidal tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdrè, Giovanni; Moro, Daniele

    2008-10-01

    The investigation of the nanoscale distribution of electrostatic forces on material surfaces is of paramount importance for the development of nanotechnology, since these confined forces govern many physical processes on which a large number of technological applications are based. For instance, electric force microscopy (EFM) and micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) are technologies based on an electrostatic interaction between a cantilever and a specimen. In the present work we report on a 3D finite element analysis of the electrostatic deflection of cantilevers for electric and Kelvin force microscopy. A commercial triangular shaped cantilever with a symmetric pyramidal tip was modelled. In addition, the cantilever was modified by a focused ion beam (FIB) in order to reduce its parasitic electrostatic force, and its behaviour was studied by computation analysis. 3D modelling of the electrostatic deflection was realized by using a multiphysics finite element analysis software and it was applied to the real geometry of the cantilevers and probes obtained by using basic CAD tools. The results of the modelling are in good agreement with experimental data.

  2. Stabilized atomic force microscopy imaging in liquids using second harmonic of cantilever motion for setpoint control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiener, Jens; Witt, Susanne; Stark, Martin; Guckenberger, Reinhard

    2004-08-01

    We present an automated stabilization of the imaging process in tapping mode atomic force microscopy. For biological applications, the requirement of stable imaging conditions to achieve reliable high resolution is contradicted by the necessity to work in solution to ensure biological functionality: thermal and saline variations of the viscosity, in particular when exchanging the solution the sample is surrounded with, strongly affect the cantilever motion rendering the imaging process instable. Using anharmonic contributions in the deflection signal, the amplitude setpoint is controlled to compensate for unavoidable drift in the free oscillation. By this additional feedback, the tip-sample interaction is maintained stable at a low value, making the instrument robust against drift and tolerant to environmental changes. As a delicate test sample, the "single ring"-mutant of the bacterial chaperonin GroEL from E. coli was imaged. To prove the efficiency of our setup, we show highly stabilized, continuous imaging with minimized user interaction while strong perturbations by exchange of the buffer solution were imposed during the scanning.

  3. Accurate analytical measurements in the atomic force microscope: a microfabricated spring constant standard potentially traceable to the SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Hedley, John

    2003-12-01

    Calibration of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nanonewton and piconewton forces, which are critical to analytical applications of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules at nanoscale lateral resolution. We have developed a compact and easy-to-use reference artefact for this calibration, using a method that allows traceability to the SI (Système International). Traceability is crucial to ensure that force measurements by AFM are comparable to those made by optical tweezers and other methods. The new non-contact calibration method measures the spring constant of these artefacts, by a combination of electrical measurements and Doppler velocimetry. The device was fabricated by silicon surface micromachining. The device allows AFM cantilevers to be calibrated quite easily by the 'cantilever-on-reference' method, with our reference device having a spring constant uncertainty of around ± 5% at one standard deviation. A simple substitution of the analogue velocimeter used in this work with a digital model should reduce this uncertainty to around ± 2%. Both are significant improvements on current practice, and allow traceability to the SI for the first time at these nanonewton levels.

  4. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Van Der Hofstadt, M; Hüttener, M; Juárez, A; Gomila, G

    2015-07-01

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates.

  5. The electrically detected magnetic resonance microscope: Combining conductive atomic force microscopy with electrically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Konrad; Hauer, Benedikt; Stoib, Benedikt; Trautwein, Markus; Matich, Sonja; Huebl, Hans; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Finger, Friedhelm; Bittl, Robert; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2013-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a scanning probe microscope, which combines electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and (photo-)conductive atomic force microscopy ((p)cAFM). The integration of a 3-loop 2-gap X-band microwave resonator into an AFM allows the use of conductive AFM tips as a movable contact for EDMR experiments. The optical readout of the AFM cantilever is based on an infrared laser to avoid disturbances of current measurements by absorption of straylight of the detection laser. Using amorphous silicon thin film samples with varying defect densities, the capability to detect a spatial EDMR contrast is demonstrated. Resonant current changes as low as 20 fA can be detected, allowing the method to realize a spin sensitivity of 8 × 10^6spins/sqrtHz at room temperature.

  6. The electrically detected magnetic resonance microscope: combining conductive atomic force microscopy with electrically detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Klein, Konrad; Hauer, Benedikt; Stoib, Benedikt; Trautwein, Markus; Matich, Sonja; Huebl, Hans; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Finger, Friedhelm; Bittl, Robert; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S

    2013-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a scanning probe microscope, which combines electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and (photo-)conductive atomic force microscopy ((p)cAFM). The integration of a 3-loop 2-gap X-band microwave resonator into an AFM allows the use of conductive AFM tips as a movable contact for EDMR experiments. The optical readout of the AFM cantilever is based on an infrared laser to avoid disturbances of current measurements by absorption of straylight of the detection laser. Using amorphous silicon thin film samples with varying defect densities, the capability to detect a spatial EDMR contrast is demonstrated. Resonant current changes as low as 20 fA can be detected, allowing the method to realize a spin sensitivity of 8×10(6)spins/√Hz at room temperature.

  7. Construction of a ³He magnetic force microscope with a vector magnet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinho; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Yun Won; Shin, Dongwoo; Jeong, Juyoung; Wulferding, Dirk; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2016-02-01

    We constructed a (3)He magnetic force microscope operating at the base temperature of 300 mK under a vector magnetic field of 2-2-9 T in the x-y-z direction. Fiber optic interferometry as a detection scheme is employed in which two home-built fiber walkers are used for the alignment between the cantilever and the optical fiber. The noise level of the laser interferometer is close to its thermodynamic limit. The capabilities of the sub-Kelvin and vector field are demonstrated by imaging the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a ferromagnetic superconductor (ErNi2B2C) at T = 500 mK and by probing a dipole shape of a single Abrikosov vortex with an in-plane tip magnetization.

  8. Construction of a 3He magnetic force microscope with a vector magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinho; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Yun Won; Shin, Dongwoo; Jeong, Juyoung; Wulferding, Dirk; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2016-02-01

    We constructed a 3He magnetic force microscope operating at the base temperature of 300 mK under a vector magnetic field of 2-2-9 T in the x-y-z direction. Fiber optic interferometry as a detection scheme is employed in which two home-built fiber walkers are used for the alignment between the cantilever and the optical fiber. The noise level of the laser interferometer is close to its thermodynamic limit. The capabilities of the sub-Kelvin and vector field are demonstrated by imaging the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a ferromagnetic superconductor (ErNi2B2C) at T = 500 mK and by probing a dipole shape of a single Abrikosov vortex with an in-plane tip magnetization.

  9. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuliang Bi, Shusheng; Wang, Huimin

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  10. The Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM) Characterization of Nanomaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    the first intramolecular field effect transistors (FETs). Additionally, the first intramolecular logic gate utilizing SWNT FETs has recently become...magnetic force microscope (MFM)), Casimir forces, solvation forces, etc. In addition to these forces, other quantities could also be simultaneously...crystals may be employed, with each responsible for scanning in the x, y and z directions. This eliminates some of the distortion effects seen with a

  11. Atomic force microscope based near-field imaging for probing cell surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Sina

    Near-membrane and trans-membrane proteins and their interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can yield valuable information about cell dynamics. However, advances in the field of nanoscale cellular processes have been hindered, in part, due to limits imposed by current technology. In this work, a novel evanescent field (EF) imaging technique is designed, modeled, created and tested for near-field imaging in the apical surface of cells. This technique and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) were used to investigate interactions between integrins on the cell surface and the ECM protein, fibronectin. The goal was to monitor changes in the integrin density at the cell surface as a function of clustering after binding to fibronectin on the microsphere surface. For the EF technique, quantum dot (QD)-embedded polystyrene microspheres were used to couple light into whispering gallery modes (WGMs) inside the microspheres; the resulting EF at the surface of the microsphere was used as a near-field excitation source with ~50 nm axial resolution for exciting fluorescently-labeled integrins. For FRET measurements (~10 nm axial resolution), QDs (donors) were coated on the surface of microspheres and energy transfer to red fluorescent protein (RFP)-integrin constructs (acceptors) studied. In both techniques, the QD-modified microspheres were mounted on atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, functionalized with fibronectin, and brought into contact with fluorescently-labeled HeLa or vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. The results obtained from both methods show the clustering and activity of the integrins and are in good agreement with each other. Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA) was used to study the effects of inhomogeneous surrounding refractive index on the quality factor and position of the WGMs due to the attachment of a microsphere to an AFM cantilever. WGMs of various QD-embedded microspheres mounted on AFM cantilevers were experimentally

  12. The influence of a Si cantilever tip with/without tungsten coating on noncontact atomic force microscopy imaging of a Ge(001) surface.

    PubMed

    Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Kinoshita, Yukinori; Jun Li, Yan; Kageshima, Masami; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2009-07-01

    A sharp probe tip with atomic scale stability is essential and desirable for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) studies at the atomic scale. We observed a Ge(001) surface using both a Si cantilever and a tungsten coated Si cantilever at room temperature in order to investigate the influence of the tip apex structure on the NC-AFM images. By using the Si cantilever, we first obtained four types of image at the atomic scale which can be explained assuming a dimer structure on the tip apex. On the other hand, the home-made tungsten coated tip, which has atomic scale stability and high electric conductivity, imaged the so-called ordered c(4 x 2) structure without any artifacts. The tungsten coated cantilever was found to have significantly higher performance for NC-AFM studies at the atomic scale than the Si cantilever.

  13. Multimodal cantilevers with novel piezoelectric layer topology for sensitivity enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Michael G; Yong, Yuen Kuan

    2017-01-01

    Self-sensing techniques for atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers have several advantageous characteristics compared to the optical beam deflection method. The possibility of down scaling, parallelization of cantilever arrays and the absence of optical interference associated imaging artifacts have led to an increased research interest in these methods. However, for multifrequency AFM, the optimization of the transducer layout on the cantilever for higher order modes has not been addressed. To fully utilize an integrated piezoelectric transducer, this work alters the layout of the piezoelectric layer to maximize both the deflection of the cantilever and measured piezoelectric charge response for a given mode with respect to the spatial distribution of the strain. On a prototype cantilever design, significant increases in actuator and sensor sensitivities were achieved for the first four modes without any substantial increase in sensor noise. The transduction mechanism is specifically targeted at multifrequency AFM and has the potential to provide higher resolution imaging on higher order modes. PMID:28326225

  14. Measurement of deep groove structures using a self-fabricated long tip in a large range metrological atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. H.; Tan, S. L.; Xu, G.; Koyama, K.

    2011-09-01

    Metrological atomic force microscopes are widely used in national metrology institutes for measuring step height, lateral pitch and surface roughness. However, the maximum measurable depth or height variation is limited by both the vertical scanning range of the AFM and the tip height and sharpness of the tip at the end of the cantilever. A normal commercial AFM typically has a vertical scanning range less than 10 µm and a tip height of the cantilever only up to 15 µm so that it can be used to detect only relatively smooth surfaces or shallow structures up to several micrometres. To overcome these limitations, we have successfully integrated a long diamond tip of up to 120 µm developed at Namiki Precision Jewel Co., Ltd of Japan onto our large range metrological atomic force microprobe (LRM-AFM) for deep groove structure measurement. The LRM-AFM is based on a nano-measuring machine with a large scanning range of 25 mm in the X and Y axes and 5 mm in the Z axis. This paper describes the long diamond tip fabrication process and especially its application in the LRM-AFM for measuring deep groove structures of a step height of up to 100 µm. In addition, the mechanical quality factor (Q) of the diamond tip micro-cantilever was detected in the system. The results demonstrate that the system is capable of calibrating and measuring the surface structure with deep groove in tens of micrometres.

  15. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Borysov, Stanislav S; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip-surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip-surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  16. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B

    2014-01-01

    Summary We present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode. PMID:25383301

  17. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  18. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  19. Photothermal excitation setup for a modified commercial atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Holger; Rode, Sebastian; Schreiber, Martin; Kühnle, Angelika; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-02-15

    High-resolution imaging in liquids using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy is known to suffer from additional peaks in the resonance spectrum that are unrelated to the cantilever resonance. These unwanted peaks are caused by acoustic modes of the liquid and the setup arising from the indirect oscillation excitation by a piezoelectric transducer. Photothermal excitation has been identified as a suitable method for exciting the cantilever in a direct manner. Here, we present a simple design for implementing photothermal excitation in a modified Multimode scan head from Bruker. Our approach is based on adding a few components only to keep the modifications as simple as possible and to maintain the low noise level of the original setup with a typical deflection noise density of about 15 fm/√(Hz) measured in aqueous solution. The success of the modification is illustrated by a comparison of the resonance spectra obtained with piezoelectric and photothermal excitation. The performance of the systems is demonstrated by presenting high-resolution images on bare calcite in liquid as well as organic adsorbates (Alizarin Red S) on calcite with simultaneous atomic resolution of the underlying calcite substrate.

  20. Development of the magnetic force-induced dual vibration energy harvester using a unimorph cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umaba, M.; Nakamachi, E.; Morita, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a high frequency piezoelectric energy harvester converted from the human low vibrated motion energy was newly developed. This hybrid energy harvester consists of the unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, the pendulum and a pair of permanent magnets. One magnet was attached at the edge of cantilever, and the counterpart magnet at the edge of pendulum. The mechanical energy provided through the human walking motion, which is a typical ubiquitous existence of vibration, is converted to the electric energy via the piezoelectric unimorph cantilever vibration. At first, we studied the energy convert mechanism and analyze the performance of novel energy harvester, where the resonance free vibration of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever generated a high electric power. Next, we equipped the counterpart permanent magnet at the edge of pendulum, which vibrates with a very low frequency caused by the human walking. Then the counterpart magnet was set at the edge of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, which vibrated with a high frequency. This low-to-high frequency convert "dual vibration system" can be characterized as an enhanced energy harvester. We examined and obtained average values of voltage and power in this system, as 8.31 mV and 0.33 μW. Those results show the possibility to apply for the energy harvester in the portable and implantable Bio-MEMS devices.

  1. Improved atomic force microscope using a laser diode interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Pax, Paul; Yi, Leon; Howells, Sam; Gallagher, Mark; Chen, Ting; Elings, Virgil; Bocek, Dan

    1992-08-01

    The performance of an atomic force microscope using a laser diode interferometer has been improved to the point where its resolution is comparable to that of laser beam deflection systems. We describe the structure of this microscope, present a model that takes into account the main parameters associated with its operation, and demonstrate its sensitivity by showing images of a small area scan with atomic resolution as well as a large area scan in a stand-alone configuration.

  2. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a permanent magnet on the cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P.C.

    1997-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) is a microscopic 3-D imaging instrument based on a recent proposal to detect magnetic resonance signals mechanically using a micro-mechanical resonator. MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in various magnetic resonance experiments including electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonances and nuclear magnetic resonance. In order to apply this ultra-high, 3-D spatial resolution technique to samples of arbitrary size and shape, the magnetic particle which generates the field gradient {del}{bold B}, (and, therefore, the force {bold F = (m {center_dot} {del}B)} between itself and the spin magnetization {bold m} of the sample) will need to be mounted on the mechanical resonator. Up to the present, all experiments have been performed with the sample mounted on the resonator. This is done, in part, to avoid the spurious response of the mechanical resonator which is generated by the variation of the magnetization of the magnetic particle as the external field is varied.

  3. Tip localization of an atomic force microscope in transmission microscopy with nanoscale precision

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Fabian; Pippig, Diana A. Gaub, Hermann E.; Heucke, Stephan F.

    2015-03-15

    Since the atomic force microscope (AFM) has evolved into a general purpose platform for mechanical experiments at the nanoscale, the need for a simple and generally applicable localization of the AFM cantilever in the reference frame of an optical microscope has grown. Molecular manipulations like in single molecule cut and paste or force spectroscopy as well as tip mediated nanolithography are prominent examples for the broad variety of applications implemented to date. In contrast to the different kinds of superresolution microscopy where fluorescence is used to localize the emitter, we, here, employ the absorbance of the tip to localize its position in transmission microscopy. We show that in a low aperture illumination, the tip causes a significant reduction of the intensity in the image plane of the microscope objective when it is closer than a few hundred nm. By independently varying the z-position of the sample slide, we could verify that this diffraction limited image of the tip is not caused by a near field effect but is rather caused by the absorbance of the transmitted light in the low apex needle-like tip. We localized the centroid position of this tip image with a precision of better than 6 nm and used it in a feedback loop to position the tip into nano-apertures of 110 nm radius. Single-molecule force spectroscopy traces on the unfolding of individual green fluorescent proteins within the nano-apertures showed that their center positions were repeatedly approached with very high fidelity leaving the specific handle chemistry on the tip’s surface unimpaired.

  4. Tip localization of an atomic force microscope in transmission microscopy with nanoscale precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Fabian; Heucke, Stephan F.; Pippig, Diana A.; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2015-03-01

    Since the atomic force microscope (AFM) has evolved into a general purpose platform for mechanical experiments at the nanoscale, the need for a simple and generally applicable localization of the AFM cantilever in the reference frame of an optical microscope has grown. Molecular manipulations like in single molecule cut and paste or force spectroscopy as well as tip mediated nanolithography are prominent examples for the broad variety of applications implemented to date. In contrast to the different kinds of superresolution microscopy where fluorescence is used to localize the emitter, we, here, employ the absorbance of the tip to localize its position in transmission microscopy. We show that in a low aperture illumination, the tip causes a significant reduction of the intensity in the image plane of the microscope objective when it is closer than a few hundred nm. By independently varying the z-position of the sample slide, we could verify that this diffraction limited image of the tip is not caused by a near field effect but is rather caused by the absorbance of the transmitted light in the low apex needle-like tip. We localized the centroid position of this tip image with a precision of better than 6 nm and used it in a feedback loop to position the tip into nano-apertures of 110 nm radius. Single-molecule force spectroscopy traces on the unfolding of individual green fluorescent proteins within the nano-apertures showed that their center positions were repeatedly approached with very high fidelity leaving the specific handle chemistry on the tip's surface unimpaired.

  5. Nonlocal and surface effects on the flutter instability of cantilevered nanotubes conveying fluid subjected to follower forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahaadini, Reza; Hosseini, Mohammad; Jamalpoor, Ali

    2017-03-01

    On the basis of nonlocal elasticity theory, this paper studies the dynamic structural instability behavior of cantilever nanotubes conveying fluid incorporating end concentrated follower force and distributed tangential load, resting on the visco-Pasternak substrate. In order to improve the accuracy of the results, surface effects, i.e. surface elasticity and residual stresses are considered. Extended Hamilton's principle is implemented to obtain the nonlocal governing partial differential equation and related boundary conditions. Then, the extended Galerkin technique is used to convert partial differential equations into a general set of ordinary differential equations. Numerical results are expressed to reveal the variations of the critical flow velocity for flutter phenomenon of cantilever nanotubes with the various values of nonlocal parameter, mass ratios, nanotubes thickness, surface effects, various parameters of the visco-Pasternak medium, constant follower force and distributed compressive tangential load. Some numerical results of this research illustrated that the values of critical flutter flow velocity and stable region increase by considering surface effects. Also, critical flutter flow velocity decreases towards zero by increasing the value of the distributed compressive tangential load and constant follower force.

  6. Compact scanning-force microscope using a laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Iams, Doug; Weissenberger, Volker; Bell, L. Stephen

    1988-12-01

    The paper describes the operation of a compact scanning-force microscope in which the gradient of force acting on a vibrating tip is monitored by a diode laser and its integrated photodiode. The system does not require reflecting or focusing elements or complicated electronics. Experimental results using this system with magnetic domains on a magnetooptic storage medium attest to the feasibility of this concept.

  7. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J. Chapman, S.

    2014-08-14

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided.

  8. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    Treesearch

    Ryan Wagner; Robert Moon; Jon Pratt; Gordon Shaw; Arvind Raman

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale...

  9. Contact-free experimental determination of the static flexural spring constant of cantilever sensors using a microfluidic force tool

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, John D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Micro- and nanocantilevers are employed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) as sensing elements. They enable nanomechanical measurements, are essential for the characterization of nanomaterials, and form an integral part of many nanoscale devices. Despite the fact that numerous methods described in the literature can be applied to determine the static flexural spring constant of micro- and nanocantilever sensors, experimental techniques that do not require contact between the sensor and a surface at some point during the calibration process are still the exception rather than the rule. We describe a noncontact method using a microfluidic force tool that produces accurate forces and demonstrate that this, in combination with a thermal noise spectrum, can provide the static flexural spring constant for cantilever sensors of different geometric shapes over a wide range of spring constant values (≈0.8–160 N/m). PMID:27335740

  10. Lubrication forces in air and accommodation coefficient measured by a thermal damping method using an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honig, Christopher D. F.; Sader, John E.; Mulvaney, Paul; Ducker, William A.

    2010-05-01

    By analysis of the thermally driven oscillation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, we have measured both the damping and static forces acting on a sphere near a flat plate immersed in gas. By varying the proximity of the sphere to the plate, we can continuously vary the Knudsen number (Kn) at constant pressure, thereby accessing the slip flow, transition, and molecular regimes at a single pressure. We use measurements in the slip-flow regime to determine the combined slip length (on both sphere and plate) and the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient, σ . For ambient air at 1 atm between two methylated glass solids, the inverse damping is linear with separation and the combined slip length on both surfaces is 250nm±100nm , which corresponds to σ=0.77±0.24 . At small separations (Kn>0.4) the measured inverse damping is no longer linear with separation, and is observed to exhibit reasonable agreement with the Vinogradova formula.

  11. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  12. Radiation force of ultrasound as shear wave source in microscopic magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Shadi F.; Ozer, M. Bulent; Xu, Huihui; Royston, Thomas J.; Magin, Richard L.

    2005-09-01

    Microscopic magnetic resonance elastography (micro-MRE) is a high-resolution imaging technique for measuring the viscoelastic properties of small synthetic and biological samples. Taking MRE to the microscopic scale requires stronger static fields, stronger magnetic field gradients, higher performance RF coils, and more compact, higher frequency shear wave actuators. Prior work by our group has been conducted at 11.74 T. A needle attached to a vibrating cantilever beam was placed in contact with the surface of the sample to generate shear waves up to 800 Hz. At higher frequencies, the excited shear waves attenuate within an extremely short distance such that only a very small region in the vicinity of the actuator can be studied due to inherent dynamic range limitations. In principle, modulated focused radiation force of US should be able to create a localized shear wave source within the test sample at a distance from the US transducer, thereby enabling micro-MRE probing of the sample at very high frequencies (up to 5 kHz). A confocal US transducer was fabricated to create such a source within the working constraints of the micro-MRE system. Initial feasibility studies are reviewed in this presentation. [Research supported by NIH Grant No. EB004885-01.

  13. Bifurcation, chaos, and scan instability in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2016-03-28

    The dynamical motion at any point on the cantilever of an atomic force microscope can be expressed quite generally as a superposition of simple harmonic oscillators corresponding to the vibrational modes allowed by the cantilever shape. Central to the dynamical equations is the representation of the cantilever-sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients that account for the interaction force “stiffness,” the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Renormalization of the cantilever beam model shows that for a given cantilever drive frequency cantilever dynamics can be accurately represented by a single nonlinear mass-spring model with frequency-dependent stiffness and damping coefficients [S. A. Cantrell and J. H. Cantrell, J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094314 (2011)]. Application of the Melnikov method to the renormalized dynamical equation is shown to predict a cascade of period doubling bifurcations with increasing cantilever drive force that terminates in chaos. The threshold value of the drive force necessary to initiate bifurcation is shown to depend strongly on the cantilever setpoint and drive frequency, effective damping coefficient, nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. The model predicts the experimentally observed interruptions of the bifurcation cascade for cantilevers of sufficiently large stiffness. Operational factors leading to the loss of image quality in dynamic atomic force microscopy are addressed, and guidelines for optimizing scan stability are proposed using a quantitative analysis based on system dynamical parameters and choice of feedback loop parameter.

  14. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Michael; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively.

  15. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klocke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  16. Cantilever's behavior in the AC mode of an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, V.B.; Zanette, S.I.; Caride, A.O.; Prioli, R.; Rivas, A.M.F

    2003-03-15

    In this paper, a model with a small number of parameters is used to simulate the motion of a cantilever in the AC mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The results elucidate the transition dependence-from noncontact to tapping operating mode-on the height of the contamination layer and on the stiffness of the sample.

  17. Ultrahigh vacuum scanning force/scanning tunneling microscope: Application to high-resolution imaging of Si(111)7 × 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, L.; Wigren, R.; Erlandsson, R.

    1996-06-01

    We present a combined scanning force/scanning tunneling microscope (SFM/STM) operating in ultrahigh vacuum using a fiber-optic laser interferometer to detect the lever deflection. As force microscope it operates in ac and dc mode with commercial (Si, Si3N4) or individually made (W) cantilevers. Samples and cantilevers can be inserted without breaking the vacuum using a load-lock system. The force sensor includes a novel three-dimensional micropositioner based on the piezoelectric slider principle. The system includes standard surface analytical techniques (low-energy electron diffraction/Auger, prepared for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and is equipped for mass spectroscopic detection of reaction products from catalytic surfaces at elevated temperature. Tips are cleaned in situ using electron bombardment. By using tungsten cantilevers with a high spring constant (k=100-200 N/m), it is possible to switch directly between STM and SFM operation. As reference surface we have used the Si(111)7×7 reconstruction, prepared by in situ flashing to 1150 °C, which is imaged at atomic resolution using STM as well as ac-mode SFM.

  18. A quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope for electrical property measurements of microscopic materials.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Seiji; Kubo, Osamu; Kuramochi, Hiromi; Aono, Masakazu; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2011-07-15

    Four-terminal electrical measurement is realized on a microscopic structure in air, without a lithographic process, using a home-built quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope (QSPFM). The QSPFM has four probes whose positions are individually controlled by obtaining images of a sample in the manner of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and uses the probes as contacting electrodes for electrical measurements. A specially arranged tuning fork probe (TFP) is used as a self-detection force sensor to operate each probe in a frequency modulation AFM mode, resulting in simultaneous imaging of the same microscopic feature on an insulator using the four TFPs. Four-terminal electrical measurement is then demonstrated in air by placing each probe electrode in contact with a graphene flake exfoliated on a silicon dioxide film, and the sheet resistance of the flake is measured by the van der Pauw method. The present work shows that the QSPFM has the potential to measure the intrinsic electrical properties of a wide range of microscopic materials in situ without electrode fabrication.

  19. A quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope for electrical property measurements of microscopic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Seiji; Kubo, Osamu; Kuramochi, Hiromi; Aono, Masakazu; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2011-07-01

    Four-terminal electrical measurement is realized on a microscopic structure in air, without a lithographic process, using a home-built quadruple-scanning-probe force microscope (QSPFM). The QSPFM has four probes whose positions are individually controlled by obtaining images of a sample in the manner of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and uses the probes as contacting electrodes for electrical measurements. A specially arranged tuning fork probe (TFP) is used as a self-detection force sensor to operate each probe in a frequency modulation AFM mode, resulting in simultaneous imaging of the same microscopic feature on an insulator using the four TFPs. Four-terminal electrical measurement is then demonstrated in air by placing each probe electrode in contact with a graphene flake exfoliated on a silicon dioxide film, and the sheet resistance of the flake is measured by the van der Pauw method. The present work shows that the QSPFM has the potential to measure the intrinsic electrical properties of a wide range of microscopic materials in situ without electrode fabrication.

  20. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Reischl, Bernhard; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L.; Nordlund, Kai; Lassila, Antti

    2017-03-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20–60 %rh. Force–distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation.

  1. Spanning the scales of granular materials through microscopic force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Brodu, Nicolas; Dijksman, Joshua A.; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    If you walk on sand, it supports your weight. How do the disordered forces between particles in sand organize, to keep you from sinking? This simple question is surprisingly difficult to answer experimentally: measuring forces in three dimensions, between deeply buried grains, is challenging. Here we describe experiments in which we have succeeded in measuring forces inside a granular packing subject to controlled deformations. We connect the measured micro-scale forces to the macro-scale packing force response with an averaging, mean field calculation. This calculation explains how the combination of packing structure and contact deformations produce the observed nontrivial mechanical response of the packing, revealing a surprising microscopic particle deformation enhancement mechanism. PMID:25739968

  2. Nanopipette combined with quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope for force spectroscopy/microscopy and liquid delivery-based nanofabrication

    SciTech Connect

    An, Sangmin; Lee, Kunyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Noh, Haneol; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Lee, Manhee; Hong, Mun-Heon; Jhe, Wonho

    2014-03-15

    This paper introduces a nanopipette combined with a quartz tuning fork-atomic force microscope system (nanopipette/QTF-AFM), and describes experimental and theoretical investigations of the nanoscale materials used. The system offers several advantages over conventional cantilever-based AFM and QTF-AFM systems, including simple control of the quality factor based on the contact position of the QTF, easy variation of the effective tip diameter, electrical detection, on-demand delivery and patterning of various solutions, and in situ surface characterization after patterning. This tool enables nanoscale liquid delivery and nanofabrication processes without damaging the apex of the tip in various environments, and also offers force spectroscopy and microscopy capabilities.

  3. Atomic force microscope observations of otoconia in the newt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallworth, R.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Campbell, J. B.; Steyger, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    Calcitic and aragonitic otoconia from the Japanese red-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, were examined using an atomic force microscope. The surface structure of both otoconial polymorphs consisted of arrays of elements approximately 50 nm in diameter. Elements were generally round and were separated by shallow depressions of no more than 20 nm. The elements are suggested to be single crystals of calcium carbonate. The relationship of these observations to theories of otoconial genesis is discussed.

  4. Atomic force microscope observations of otoconia in the newt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallworth, R.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Campbell, J. B.; Steyger, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    Calcitic and aragonitic otoconia from the Japanese red-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, were examined using an atomic force microscope. The surface structure of both otoconial polymorphs consisted of arrays of elements approximately 50 nm in diameter. Elements were generally round and were separated by shallow depressions of no more than 20 nm. The elements are suggested to be single crystals of calcium carbonate. The relationship of these observations to theories of otoconial genesis is discussed.

  5. Nanoscale Subsurface Imaging via Resonant Difference-Frequency Atomic Force Ultrasonic Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, Sean A.; Cantrell, John H.; Lilehei, Peter T.

    2007-01-01

    A novel scanning probe microscope methodology has been developed that employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever fundamental resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of embedded nanoscale features.

  6. A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lea, A S; Higgins, S R; Knauss, K G; Rosso, K M

    2011-04-01

    A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ∼350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO(2), precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO(3)) mineral surface in scCO(2); both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (1014) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid-fluid interfaces under pressure. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, A. S.; Higgins, S. R.; Knauss, K. G.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    A high-pressure atomic force microscope(AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluidrefractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (101¯4) surface are presented. Finally, this new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

  8. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C; Lanza, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  9. Characterization of the photocurrents generated by the laser of atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yanfeng; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario; Iglesias, Vanessa; Lewis, David; Niu, Jiebin; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming; Hofer, Alexander; Frammelsberger, Werner; Benstetter, Guenther; Scheuermann, Andrew; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2016-08-15

    The conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) has become an essential tool for the nanoscale electronic characterization of many materials and devices. When studying photoactive samples, the laser used by the CAFM to detect the deflection of the cantilever can generate photocurrents that perturb the current signals collected, leading to unreliable characterization. In metal-coated semiconductor samples, this problem is further aggravated, and large currents above the nanometer range can be observed even without the application of any bias. Here we present the first characterization of the photocurrents introduced by the laser of the CAFM, and we quantify the amount of light arriving to the surface of the sample. The mechanisms for current collection when placing the CAFM tip on metal-coated photoactive samples are also analyzed in-depth. Finally, we successfully avoided the laser-induced perturbations using a two pass technique: the first scan collects the topography (laser ON) and the second collects the current (laser OFF). We also demonstrate that CAFMs without a laser (using a tuning fork for detecting the deflection of the tip) do not have this problem.

  10. A versatile atomic force microscope integrated with a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, J.; Strunz, T.; Fantner, E. J.; Fantner, G. E.; Cordill, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    A versatile atomic force microscope (AFM), which can be installed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), is introduced. The flexible design of the instrument enables correlated analysis for different experimental configurations, such as AFM imaging directly after nanoindentation in vacuum. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the specially designed AFM installed inside a SEM, slip steps emanating around nanoindents in single crystalline brass were examined. This example showcases how the combination of AFM and SEM imaging can be utilized for quantitative dislocation analysis through the measurement of the slip step heights without the hindrance of oxide formation. Finally, an in situ nanoindentation technique is introduced, illustrating the use of AFM imaging during indentation experiments to examine plastic deformation occurring under the indenter tip. The mechanical indentation data are correlated to the SEM and AFM images to estimate the number of dislocations emitted to the surface.

  11. A versatile atomic force microscope integrated with a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kreith, J; Strunz, T; Fantner, E J; Fantner, G E; Cordill, M J

    2017-05-01

    A versatile atomic force microscope (AFM), which can be installed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), is introduced. The flexible design of the instrument enables correlated analysis for different experimental configurations, such as AFM imaging directly after nanoindentation in vacuum. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the specially designed AFM installed inside a SEM, slip steps emanating around nanoindents in single crystalline brass were examined. This example showcases how the combination of AFM and SEM imaging can be utilized for quantitative dislocation analysis through the measurement of the slip step heights without the hindrance of oxide formation. Finally, an in situ nanoindentation technique is introduced, illustrating the use of AFM imaging during indentation experiments to examine plastic deformation occurring under the indenter tip. The mechanical indentation data are correlated to the SEM and AFM images to estimate the number of dislocations emitted to the surface.

  12. Adhesion Force Measurements Using an Atomic Force Microscope Upgraded with a Linear Position Sensitive Detector

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M.; Stuart, J.; Pungor, A.; Dryden, P.

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), in addition to providing images on an atomic scale, can be used to measure the forces between surfaces and the AFM probe. The potential uses of mapping the adhesive forces on the surface include a spatial determination of surface energy and a direct identification of surface proteins through specific protein–ligand binding interactions. The capabilities of the AFM to measure adhesive forces can be extended by replacing the four-quadrant photodiode detection sensor with an external linear position sensitive detector and by utilizing a dedicated user-programmable signal generator and acquisiton system. Such an upgrade enables the microscope to measure in the larger dynamic range of adhesion forces, improves the sensitivity and linearity of the measurement, and eliminates the problems inherent to the multiple repetitious contacts between the AFM probe and the specimen surface. PMID:25125792

  13. Digital atomic force microscope moiré method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Lien-Wen

    2004-11-01

    In this study, a novel digital atomic force microscope (AFM) moiré method is established to measure the displacement and strain fields. The moiré pattern is generated by the interference between the specimen grating and the virtual reference grating formed by digital image processes. The overlapped image is filtered by the 2-D wavelet transformation to obtain clear interference moiré patterns. From moiré patterns, the displacement and strain fields can be analyzed. The experimental results show that the digital AFM moiré method is very sensitive and easy to realize in nanoscale measurements.

  14. Integrated cantilever fabrication and system development for ultrasonic and acoustic scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Stephen; Sankaran, Balasubramanian; Altemus, Bruce; Xu, Bai; Geer, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Although the conventional optical lever technology typically used for scanning probe microscope applications has proven highly sensitive, accurate, and cost effective for most applications involving micromachined cantilever deflection measurements, frequency limitations and space needs limit its applicability to emerging ultrasonic-based SPM applications. Recently, the fabrication of cantilevers integrated with actuation and sensing components has opened avenues for feedback-based driving of micromachined cantilevers at higher-order resonance frequencies while sensing average deflection without the need for an optical deflection pathway for average deflection sensing. The work presented here will review recent efforts by our group in fabricating micromachined cantilevers with integrated piezoresistive deflection-sensing components combined with integrated ZnO actuation layers to induce cantilever deflection. These cantilevers are being fabricated for use in a heterodyne force microscopy system (HFM) to enable SPM imaging contrast based on viscoelastic response of a surface in contact with a micromachined tip wherein active-feedback technology is being applied to maintain ultrasonic tip excitation at higher order cantilever resonances. The first and second-pass fabrication results will be presented and reviewed regarding cantilever release and ZnO actuator (and electrode) fabrication. Dynamic response data from these structures, measured via laser Doppler vibrometery reveal the expected resonance structure for a cantilever of these dimensions.

  15. Sampling Protein Form and Function with the Atomic Force Microscope*

    PubMed Central

    Baclayon, Marian; Roos, Wouter H.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2010-01-01

    To study the structure, function, and interactions of proteins, a plethora of techniques is available. Many techniques sample such parameters in non-physiological environments (e.g. in air, ice, or vacuum). Atomic force microscopy (AFM), however, is a powerful biophysical technique that can probe these parameters under physiological buffer conditions. With the atomic force microscope operating under such conditions, it is possible to obtain images of biological structures without requiring labeling and to follow dynamic processes in real time. Furthermore, by operating in force spectroscopy mode, it can probe intramolecular interactions and binding strengths. In structural biology, it has proven its ability to image proteins and protein conformational changes at submolecular resolution, and in proteomics, it is developing as a tool to map surface proteomes and to study protein function by force spectroscopy methods. The power of AFM to combine studies of protein form and protein function enables bridging various research fields to come to a comprehensive, molecular level picture of biological processes. We review the use of AFM imaging and force spectroscopy techniques and discuss the major advances of these experiments in further understanding form and function of proteins at the nanoscale in physiologically relevant environments. PMID:20562411

  16. Cantilever bending based on humidity-actuated mesoporous silica/silicon bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Christian; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Morak, Roland; Sharifi, Parvin; Marmiroli, Benedetta; Sartori, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Griesser, Thomas; Teichert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary We use a soft templating approach in combination with evaporation induced self-assembly to prepare mesoporous films containing cylindrical pores with elliptical cross-section on an ordered pore lattice. The film is deposited on silicon-based commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using dip coating. This bilayer cantilever is mounted in a humidity controlled AFM, and its deflection is measured as a function of relative humidity. We also investigate a similar film on bulk silicon substrate using grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), in order to determine nanostructural parameters of the film as well as the water-sorption-induced deformation of the ordered mesopore lattice. The strain of the mesoporous layer is related to the cantilever deflection using simple bilayer bending theory. We also develop a simple quantitative model for cantilever deflection which only requires cantilever geometry and nanostructural parameters of the porous layer as input parameters. PMID:27335753

  17. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidsfeld, A. von Reichling, M.

    2015-09-21

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  18. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schmidsfeld, A.; Reichling, M.

    2015-09-01

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  19. Nanoindentation of gold nanorods with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischl, B.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.

    2014-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to measure mechanical properties of nanoscale objects, which are too small to be studied using a conventional nanoindenter. The contact mechanics at such small scales, in proximity of free surfaces, deviate substantially from simple continuum models. We present results from atomistic computer simulations of the indentation of gold nanorods using a diamond AFM tip and give insight in the atomic scale processes, involving creation and migration of dislocations, leading to the plastic deformation of the sample under load, and explain the force-distance curves observed for different tip apex radii of curvature, as well as different crystallographic structure and orientation of the gold nanorod samples.

  20. Athermalization in atomic force microscope based force spectroscopy using matched microstructure coupling.

    PubMed

    Torun, H; Finkler, O; Degertekin, F L

    2009-07-01

    The authors describe a method for athermalization in atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy applications using microstructures that thermomechanically match the AFM probes. The method uses a setup where the AFM probe is coupled with the matched structure and the displacements of both structures are read out simultaneously. The matched structure displaces with the AFM probe as temperature changes, thus the force applied to the sample can be kept constant without the need for a separate feedback loop for thermal drift compensation, and the differential signal can be used to cancel the shift in zero-force level of the AFM.

  1. Scanning thermal-conductivity microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Grover, Ranjan

    2006-02-01

    This article describes a novel implementation of an atomic force microscope that can map thermal-conductivity features across a sample with a high spatial resolution. The microscope employs a single-sided, metal-coated cantilever, which acts as a bimetallic strip together with a heating laser whose beam is focused on the cantilever's free end, on the opposite side of its tip. Subtracting the topography obtained by the unheated and heated cantilevers yields a map of thermal conductivity across the surface of a sample. The article presents (a) the theory of operation of the microscope and (b) the experimental results obtained on a silicon sample with oxide features, showing good agreement between the two.

  2. Stretching of Single Polymer Chains Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C.; van der Vegte, E. W.; van Swieten, E.; Robillard, G. T.; Hadziioannou, G.

    1998-03-01

    A variety of macroscopic phenomenon involve "nanoscale" polymer deformation including rubber elasticity, shear yielding, strain hardening, stress relaxation, fracture, and flow. With the advent of new and improved experimental techniques, such as the atomic force microscope (AFM), the probing of physical properties of polymers has reached finer and finer scales. The development of mixed self-assembling monolayer techniques and the chemical functionalization of AFM probe tips has allowed for mechanical experiments on single polymer chains of molecular dimensions. In our experiments, mixed monolayers are prepared in which end-functionalized, flexible polymer chains of thiol-terminated poly(methacrylic acid) are covalently bonded, isolated, and randomly distributed on gold substrates. The coils are then imaged, tethered to a gold-coated AFM tip, and stretched between the tip and the substrate in a conventional force / distance experiment. An increase in the attractive force due to entropic, elastic resistance to stretching, as well as fracture of the polymer chain is observed. The effect of chain stiffness, topological constraints, strain rate, mechanical hysteresis, and stress relaxation were investigated. Force modulation techniques were also employed in order to image the viscoelastic character of the polymer chains. Parallel work includes similar studies of biological systems such as wheat gluten proteins and polypeptides.

  3. Cantilever biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    This review will provide a general introduction to the field of cantilever biosensors by discussing the basic principles and the basic technical background necessary to understand and evaluate this class of sensors. Microfabricated cantilever sensors respond to changes in their environment or changes on their surface with a mechanical bending in the order of nanometers which can easily be detected. They are able to detect pH and temperature changes, the formation of self-assembled monolayers, DNA hybridization, antibody-antigen interactions, or the adsorption of bacteria. The review will focus on the surface stress mode of microfabricated cantilever arrays and their application as biosensors in molecular life science. A general background on biosensors, an overview of the different modes of operation of cantilever sensors and some details on sensor functionalization will be given. Finally, key experiments and current theoretical efforts to describe the surface stress mode of cantilever sensors will be discussed.

  4. Accurate Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation of the Normal Spring Constant of Various AFM Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke’s law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%. PMID:25763650

  5. Accurate calibration and uncertainty estimation of the normal spring constant of various AFM cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-03-10

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke's law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  6. Quantitative Membrane Electrostatics with the Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Mayer, Kathryn M.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is sensitive to electric double layer interactions in electrolyte solutions, but provides only a qualitative view of interfacial electrostatics. We have fully characterized silicon nitride probe tips and other experimental parameters to allow a quantitative electrostatic analysis by AFM, and we have tested the validity of a simple analytical force expression through numerical simulations. As a test sample, we have measured the effective surface charge density of supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine membranes with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine. The resulting surface charge density and surface potential values are in quantitative agreement with those predicted by the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation, but only when the numerical analysis is employed. In addition, we demonstrate that the AFM can detect double layer forces at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by <2%. Finally, we demonstrate 50-nm resolution electrostatic mapping on heterogeneous model membranes with the AFM. This novel combination of capabilities demonstrates that the AFM is a unique and powerful probe of membrane electrostatics. PMID:17158563

  7. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves.

  8. A new detection system for extremely small vertically mounted cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Antognozzi, M; Ulcinas, A; Picco, L; Simpson, S H; Heard, P J; Szczelkun, M D; Brenner, B; Miles, M J

    2008-09-24

    Detection techniques currently used in scanning force microscopy impose limitations on the geometrical dimensions of the probes and, as a consequence, on their force sensitivity and temporal response. A new technique, based on scattered evanescent electromagnetic waves (SEW), is presented here that can detect the displacement of the extreme end of a vertically mounted cantilever. The resolution of this method is tested using different cantilever sizes and a theoretical model is developed to maximize the detection sensitivity. The applications presented here clearly show that the SEW detection system enables the use of force sensors with sub-micron size, opening new possibilities in the investigation of biomolecular systems and high speed imaging. Two types of cantilevers were successfully tested: a high force sensitivity lever with a spring constant of 0.17 pN nm(-1) and a resonant frequency of 32 kHz; and a high speed lever with a spring constant of 50 pN nm(-1) and a resonant frequency of 1.8 MHz. Both these force sensors were fabricated by modifying commercial microcantilevers in a focused ion beam system. It is important to emphasize that these modified cantilevers could not be detected by the conventional optical detection system used in commercial atomic force microscopes.

  9. Research on three dimensional machining effects using atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yao-Ting; Kuo, Kai-Chen; Tseng, Ching-En; Huang, Jian-Yin; Lai, Yi-Chih; Yen, Jia-Yush; Lee, Chih-Kung; Chuang, Wei-Li

    2009-06-01

    This research studies the use of scanning probe microscope as the tool to manufacture three dimensional nanoscale objects. We modified a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) and replaced the original probe control system with a personal computer (PC) based controller. The modified system used the scanning probe in the AFM for the cutting tool and used the PC controller to control work piece. With the new controller, one could implement multiaxes motion control to perform trajectory planning and to test various cutting strategies. The experiments discovered that the debris can coalesce with the sample material and cause tremendous problem in the nanomachining process. This research thus proposed to make use of this material and developed a piling algorithm to not only cut but also pile up the debris in a favorable way for steric shaping. The experimental results showed that the proposed cutting and shaping algorithm can produce nano-objects as high as a few hundred nanometers. The probe tip typically wears down to around 500 μm diameter after the machining process, putting a limit on the machining resolution. The vertical resolution can achieve less than 10 nm without controlled environment.

  10. The long range voice coil atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, H.; Randall, C.; Bridges, D.; Hansma, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    Most current atomic force microscopes (AFMs) use piezoelectric ceramics for scan actuation. Piezoelectric ceramics provide precision motion with fast response to applied voltage potential. A drawback to piezoelectric ceramics is their inherently limited ranges. For many samples this is a nonissue, as imaging the nanoscale details is the goal. However, a key advantage of AFM over other microscopy techniques is its ability to image biological samples in aqueous buffer. Many biological specimens have topography for which the range of piezoactuated stages is limiting, a notable example of which is bone. In this article, we present the use of voice coils in scan actuation for an actuation range in the Z-axis an order of magnitude larger than any AFM commercially available today. The increased scan size will allow for imaging an important new variety of samples, including bone fractures. PMID:22380097

  11. The long range voice coil atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Randall, C.; Bridges, D.; Hansma, P. K.

    2012-02-15

    Most current atomic force microscopes (AFMs) use piezoelectric ceramics for scan actuation. Piezoelectric ceramics provide precision motion with fast response to applied voltage potential. A drawback to piezoelectric ceramics is their inherently limited ranges. For many samples this is a nonissue, as imaging the nanoscale details is the goal. However, a key advantage of AFM over other microscopy techniques is its ability to image biological samples in aqueous buffer. Many biological specimens have topography for which the range of piezoactuated stages is limiting, a notable example of which is bone. In this article, we present the use of voice coils in scan actuation for an actuation range in the Z-axis an order of magnitude larger than any AFM commercially available today. The increased scan size will allow for imaging an important new variety of samples, including bone fractures.

  12. Imaging the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin with the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, H.J.; Downing, K.H.; Hansma, P.K. )

    1990-12-01

    The membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin was imaged in buffer solution at room temperature with the atomic force microscope. Three different substrates were used: mica, silanized glass and lipid bilayers. Single bacteriorhodopsin molecules could be imaged in purple membranes adsorbed to mica. A depression was observed between the bacteriorhodopsin molecules. The two dimensional Fourier transform showed the hexagonal lattice with a lattice constant of 6.21 +/- 0.20 nm which is in agreement with results of electron diffraction experiments. Spots at a resolution of approximately 1.1 nm could be resolved. A protein, cationic ferritin, could be imaged bound to the purple membranes on glass which was silanized with aminopropyltriethoxysilane. This opens the possibility of studying receptor/ligand binding under native conditions. In addition, purple membranes bound to a lipid bilayer were imaged. These images may help in interpreting results of functional studies done with purple membranes adsorbed to black lipid membranes.

  13. Atomic force microscope based on vertical silicon probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Benjamin; Mairiaux, Estelle; Faucher, Marc

    2017-06-01

    A family of silicon micro-sensors for Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is presented that allows to operate with integrated transducers from medium to high frequencies together with moderate stiffness constants. The sensors are based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems technology. The vertical design specifically enables a long tip to oscillate perpendicularly to the surface to be imaged. The tip is part of a resonator including quasi-flexural composite beams, and symmetrical transducers that can be used as piezoresistive detector and/or electro-thermal actuator. Two vertical probes (Vprobes) were operated up to 4.3 MHz with stiffness constants 150 N/m to 500 N/m and the capability to oscillate from 10 pm to 90 nm. AFM images of several samples both in amplitude modulation (tapping-mode) and in frequency modulation were obtained.

  14. Investigation on flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer induced by forced vibration of cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Tan, Jianguo; Lv, Liang

    2015-12-01

    The mixing process has been an important issue for the design of supersonic combustion ramjet engine, and the mixing efficiency plays a crucial role in the improvement of the combustion efficiency. In the present study, nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering (NPLS), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and large eddy simulation (LES) are employed to investigate the flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer under different forced vibration conditions. The indexes of fractal dimension, mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are applied to describe the mixing process. Results show that different from the development and evolution of supersonic mixing layer without vibration, the flow under forced vibration is more likely to present the characteristics of three-dimensionality. The laminar flow region of mixing layer under forced vibration is greatly shortened and the scales of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices become larger, which promote the mixing process remarkably. The fractal dimension distribution reveals that comparing with the flow without vibration, the turbulent fluctuation of supersonic mixing layer under forced vibration is more intense. Besides, the distribution of mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are strongly influenced by forced vibration. Especially, when the forcing frequency is 4000 Hz, the mixing layer thickness and momentum thickness are 0.0391 m and 0.0222 m at the far field of 0.16 m, 83% and 131% higher than that without vibration at the same position, respectively.

  15. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  16. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Asencio, R; Thormann, E; Rutland, M W

    2013-09-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power spectrum is difficult to obtain due to the high resonance frequency and low signal/noise ratio. The applicability is shown to be general and this simple approach can thus be used to obtain torsional constants for any beam shaped cantilever.

  17. Investigation of static and dynamic behavior of functionally graded piezoelectric actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Vibhuti Bhushan; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-04-13

    In the present paper a novel functionally graded piezoelectric (FGP) actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe is proposed for atomic force microscope. The shear piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 15} has much higher value than coupling coefficients d{sub 31} and d{sub 33}, hence in the present work the micro cantilever beam actuated by d{sub 15} effect is utilized. The material properties are graded in the thickness direction of actuator by a simple power law. A three dimensional finite element analysis has been performed using COMSOL Multiphysics® (version 4.2) software. Tip deflection and free vibration analysis for the micro cantilever probe has been done. The results presented in the paper shall be useful in the design of micro cantilever probe and their subsequent utilization in atomic force microscopes.

  18. Triaxial Atomic Force Microscope Contact-Free Tweezers for Nanoassembly

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    We propose a Traixial Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) Contact-free Tweezer (TACT) for the controlled assembly of nanoparticles suspended in a liquid. The TACT overcomes four major challenges faced in nanoassembly: (1) The TACT can hold and position a single nanoparticle with spatial accuracy smaller than the nanoparticle size (~ 5 nm). (2) The nanoparticle is held away from the surface of the TACT by negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) to prevent van der Waals forces from sticking it to the TACT. (3) The TACT holds nanoparticles in a trap that is size-matched to the particle and surrounded by a repulsive region so that it will only trap a single particle at a time. (4) The trap can hold a semiconductor nanoparticle in water with a trapping energy greater than thermal energy. For example, a 5 nm radius silicon nanoparticle is held with 10 kBT at room temperature. We propose methods for using the TACT as a nanoscale pick-and-place tool to assemble semiconductor quantum dots, biological molecules, semiconductor nanowires, and carbon nanotubes. PMID:19713582

  19. The magnetic resonance force microscope: A new microscopic probe of magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Midzor, M.; Roukes, M.L.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1997-08-06

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) marries the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), to produce a three-dimensional imaging instrument with high, potentially atomic-scale, resolution. The principle of the MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in numerous experiments. By virtue of its unique capabilities the MRFM shows promise to make important contributions in fields ranging from three-dimensional materials characterization to bio-molecular structure determination. Here the authors focus on its application to the characterization and study of layered magnetic materials; the ability to illuminate the properties of buried interfaces in such materials is a particularly important goal. While sensitivity and spatial resolution are currently still far from their theoretical limits, they are nonetheless comparable to or superior to that achievable in conventional MRI. Further improvement of the MRFM will involve operation at lower temperature, application of larger field gradients, introduction of advanced mechanical resonators and improved reduction of the spurious coupling when the magnet is on the resonator.

  20. SI-traceable determination of the spring constant of a soft cantilever using the nanonewton force facility based on electrostatic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, V.; Belai, O.; Nies, D.; Buetefisch, S.; Mueller, M.; Ahbe, T.; Naparty, D.; Popadic, R.; Wolff, H.

    2016-08-01

    The PTB’s (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany) nanonewton force facility, first presented in work by Nesterov (2007 Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 360-6), Nesterov (2009 Meas. Sci. Technol. 20 084012) and Nesterov et al (2009 Metrologia 46 277-82), has been significantly improved and used to measure the stiffness of a cantilever. The facility is based on a disc pendulum with electrostatic reduction of its deflection and stiffness. In this paper, we will demonstrate that the facility is able to measure horizontal forces in the range below 1 μN with a resolution below 5 pN and an uncertainty below 2.7% for a measured force of 1 nN at a measurement duration of about 20 s. We will demonstrate the possibility of using this facility as a calibration device that can accurately determine spring constants of soft cantilevers (K ≲ 0.1 N m-1) with traceability to the SI units. The method and the results of measuring the spring constant of a soft cantilever (K  =  0.125 N m-1) in air, in a medium vacuum, in a high vacuum and in nitrogen are presented. We will show that a relative standard uncertainty of the spring constant calibration of better than 0.3% (measurement in a medium vacuum) and a repeatability of better than 0.04% are achieved.

  1. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-01-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips. PMID:27840664

  2. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  3. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  4. Force measurements with the atomic force microscope: Technique, interpretation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Cappella, Brunero; Kappl, Michael

    2005-10-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is not only a tool to image the topography of solid surfaces at high resolution. It can also be used to measure force-versus-distance curves. Such curves, briefly called force curves, provide valuable information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness, Hamaker constant, adhesion and surface charge densities. For this reason the measurement of force curves has become essential in different fields of research such as surface science, materials engineering, and biology. Another application is the analysis of surface forces per se. Some of the most fundamental questions in colloid and surface science can be addressed directly with the AFM: What are the interactions between particles in a liquid? How can a dispersion be stabilized? How do surfaces in general and particles in particular adhere to each other? Particles and surfaces interactions have major implications for friction and lubrication. Force measurements on single molecules involving the rupture of single chemical bonds and the stretching of polymer chains have almost become routine. The structure and properties of confined liquids can be addressed since force measurements provide information on the energy of a confined liquid film. After the review of Cappella [B. Cappella, G. Dietler, Surf. Sci. Rep. 34 (1999) 1-104] 6 years of intense development have occurred. In 1999, the AFM was used only by experts to do force measurements. Now, force curves are used by many AFM researchers to characterize materials and single molecules. The technique and our understanding of surface forces has reached a new level of maturity. In this review we describe the technique of AFM force measurements. Important experimental issues such as the determination of the spring constant and of the tip radius are discussed. Current state of the art in analyzing force curves obtained under different conditions is presented. Possibilities, perspectives but also open questions and

  5. Characterization of a two-dimensional cantilever array with through-wafer electrical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Eugene M.; Yaralioglu, Goksen G.; Quate, Calvin F.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    The characterization of two-dimensional micromachined silicon cantilever arrays with integrated through-wafer electrical interconnects is presented. The approach addresses alignment and density issues associated with operating two-dimensional scanning probe arrays. The tungsten based interconnect (30 μm diameter, 1 Ω resistance) is shown not to degrade the sensitivity of the piezoresistive deflection sensor embedded on each cantilever. Operation of the array (up to 2×7) as a microscope for imaging large areas (3.8×0.45 mm2) and with vertical row stitching is demonstrated with images of samples orders of magnitude larger than images possible with standard atomic force microscope techniques.

  6. Fast nanotopography imaging using a high speed cantilever with integrated heater-thermometer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghee; Somnath, Suhas; King, William P

    2013-04-05

    This paper presents a high speed tapping cantilever with an integrated heater-thermometer for fast nanotopography imaging. The cantilever is much smaller and faster than previous heated cantilevers, with a length of 35 μm and a resonant frequency of 1.4 MHz. The mechanical response time is characterized by scanning over a backward-facing step of height 20 nm. The mechanical response time is 77 μs in air and 448 μs in water, which compares favorably to the fastest commercial cantilevers that do not have integrated heaters. The doped silicon cantilever is designed with an integrated heater that can heat and cool in about 10 μs and can operate in both air and water. We demonstrate standard laser-based topography imaging along with thermal topography imaging, when the cantilever is actuated via the piezoelectric shaker in an atomic force microscope system and when it is actuated by Lorentz forces. The cantilever can perform thermal topography imaging in tapping mode with an imaging resolution of 7 nm at a scan speed of 1.46 mm s(-1).

  7. Fast nanotopography imaging using a high speed cantilever with integrated heater-thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Somnath, Suhas; King, William P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a high speed tapping cantilever with an integrated heater-thermometer for fast nanotopography imaging. The cantilever is much smaller and faster than previous heated cantilevers, with a length of 35 μm and a resonant frequency of 1.4 MHz. The mechanical response time is characterized by scanning over a backward-facing step of height 20 nm. The mechanical response time is 77 μs in air and 448 μs in water, which compares favorably to the fastest commercial cantilevers that do not have integrated heaters. The doped silicon cantilever is designed with an integrated heater that can heat and cool in about 10 μs and can operate in both air and water. We demonstrate standard laser-based topography imaging along with thermal topography imaging, when the cantilever is actuated via the piezoelectric shaker in an atomic force microscope system and when it is actuated by Lorentz forces. The cantilever can perform thermal topography imaging in tapping mode with an imaging resolution of 7 nm at a scan speed of 1.46 mm s-1.

  8. Development of a nano manipulator based on an atomic force microscope coupled with a haptic device: a novel manipulation tool for scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Futoshi; Kawanishi, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Hisayuki; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    We developed a novel nano manipulator based on an atomic force microscope (AFM) that can be operated inside the sample chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). This AFM manipulator is also coupled with a haptic device, and the nanometer-scale movement of the AFM cantilever can be scaled up to the millimeter-scale movement of the pen handle of the haptic device. Using this AFM manipulation system, we were able to observe the AFM cantilever and samples under the SEM and obtain topographical images of the AFM under the SEM. These AFM images contained quantitative height information of the sample that is difficult to obtain from SEM images. Our system was also useful for positioning the cantilever for accurate AFM manipulation because the manipulation scene could be directly observed in real time by SEM. Coupling of the AFM manipulator with the haptic device was also useful for manipulation in the SEM since the operator can move the AFM probe freely at any position on the sample surface while feeling the interaction force between the probe and the sample surface. We tested two types of cutting methods: simple cutting and vibration cutting. Our results showed that vibration cutting with probe oscillation is very useful for the dissection of biological samples which were dried for SEM observation. Thus, cultivated HeLa cells were successfully micro-dissected by vibration cutting, and the dissection process could be observed in real time in the SEM. This AFM manipulation system is expected to serve as a powerful tool for dissecting various biological samples at the micro and nanometer-scale under SEM observation.

  9. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-15

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  10. Tooth structure studied using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasas, Sandor; Berdal, Ariane; Celio, Marco R.

    1993-06-01

    We used the atomic force microscope (AFM) to observe structure of the tooth, both rat and human. The rigidity and the surface flatness of thin sections of this mineralized tissue, allow us to attain good resolution with the AFM. As enamel contains uniquely large crystals of hydroxyapatite it can be investigated at high resolution. Tooth enamel and thin slices of undecalcified developing tooth germs from 2 - 12 day old rats were observed, embedded in acrylic resin (Lowicryl K4M). In addition, as orthophosphoric acid is widely used clinically to etch tooth enamel before restoring with composites, we studied its action at pH2 on the tooth surface during 1 hour of exposition. Hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen fibers were seen in the tooth slices observed in air, and the classical structure of the enamel was visible. The etched enamel surface under liquid, showed dramatic differences to that imaged in air. Modifications to the surface were also seen during exposure to the acid.

  11. High-speed force load in force measurement in liquid using scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zou, Qingze

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an inversion-based iterative feedforward-feedback (II-FF/FB) approach to achieve high-speed force load in force measurement of soft materials in liquid using scanning probe microscope (SPM). SPM force measurement under liquid environment is needed to interrogate a wide range of soft materials, particularly live biological samples. Moreover, when dynamic evolution of the sample occurs during the measurement, and/or measuring the rate-dependent viscoelasticity of the sample, the force measurement also needs to be acquired at high-speed. Precision force load in liquid, however, is challenged by adverse effects including the thermal drift effect, the reduction of the signal to noise ratio, the distributive hydrodynamic force effect, and the hysteresis and vibrational dynamics effects of the piezoelectric actuators (for positioning the probe relative to the sample), particularly during high-speed measurement. Thus, the main contribution of the article is the development of the II-FF/FB approach to tackle these challenges. The proposed method is illustrated through an experimental implementation to the force-curve measurement of a poly (dimethylsiloxane) sample in liquid at high-speed.

  12. A single-cell scraper based on an atomic force microscope for detaching a living cell from a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Futoshi; Adachi, Makoto; Hashimoto, Shigetaka

    2015-10-07

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulator that can detach a single, living adhesion cell from its substrate without compromising the cell's viability. The micrometer-scale cell scraper designed for this purpose was fabricated from an AFM micro cantilever using focused ion beam milling. The homemade AFM equipped with the scraper was compact and standalone and could be mounted on a sample stage of an inverted optical microscope. It was possible to move the scraper using selectable modes of operation, either a manual mode with a haptic device or a computer-controlled mode. The viability of the scraped single cells was evaluated using a fluorescence dye of calcein-acetoxymethl ester. Single cells detached from the substrate were collected by aspiration into a micropipette capillary glass using an electro-osmotic pump. As a demonstration, single HeLa cells were selectively detached from the substrate and collected by the micropipette. It was possible to recultivate HeLa cells from the single cells collected using the system.

  13. A single-cell scraper based on an atomic force microscope for detaching a living cell from a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Futoshi; Adachi, Makoto; Hashimoto, Shigetaka

    2015-10-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulator that can detach a single, living adhesion cell from its substrate without compromising the cell's viability. The micrometer-scale cell scraper designed for this purpose was fabricated from an AFM micro cantilever using focused ion beam milling. The homemade AFM equipped with the scraper was compact and standalone and could be mounted on a sample stage of an inverted optical microscope. It was possible to move the scraper using selectable modes of operation, either a manual mode with a haptic device or a computer-controlled mode. The viability of the scraped single cells was evaluated using a fluorescence dye of calcein-acetoxymethl ester. Single cells detached from the substrate were collected by aspiration into a micropipette capillary glass using an electro-osmotic pump. As a demonstration, single HeLa cells were selectively detached from the substrate and collected by the micropipette. It was possible to recultivate HeLa cells from the single cells collected using the system.

  14. Laser interferometry force-feedback sensor for an interfacial force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Houston, Jack E.; Smith, William L.

    2004-04-13

    A scanning force microscope is provided with a force-feedback sensor to increase sensitivity and stability in determining interfacial forces between a probe and a sample. The sensor utilizes an interferometry technique that uses a collimated light beam directed onto a deflecting member, comprising a common plate suspended above capacitor electrodes situated on a substrate forming an interference cavity with a probe on the side of the common plate opposite the side suspended above capacitor electrodes. The probe interacts with the surface of the sample and the intensity of the reflected beam is measured and used to determine the change in displacement of the probe to the sample and to control the probe distance relative to the surface of the sample.

  15. Forces measured with micro-fabricated cantilevers during actomyosin interactions produced by filaments containing different myosin isoforms and loop 1 structures.

    PubMed

    Kalganov, Albert; Shalabi, Nabil; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kachmar, Linda Hussein; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Rassier, Dilson E

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that the actin-activated ATP kinetics and the mechanical work produced by muscle myosin molecules are regulated by two surface loops, located near the ATP binding pocket (loop 1), and in a region that interfaces with actin (loop 2). These loops regulate force and velocity of contraction, and have been investigated mostly in single molecules. There is a lack of information of the work produced by myosin molecules ordered in filaments and working cooperatively, which is the actual muscle environment. We use micro-fabricated cantilevers to measure forces produced by myosin filaments isolated from mollusk muscles, skeletal muscles, and smooth muscles containing variations in the structure of loop 1 (tonic and phasic myosins). We complemented the experiments with in-vitro assays to measure the velocity of actin motility. Smooth muscle myosin filaments produced more force than skeletal and mollusk myosin filaments when normalized per filament overlap. Skeletal muscle myosin propelled actin filaments in a higher sliding velocity than smooth muscle myosin. The values for force and velocity were consistent with previous studies using myosin molecules, and suggest a close correlation with the myosin isoform and structure of surface loop 1. The technique using micro-fabricated cantilevers to measure force of filaments allows for the investigation of the relation between myosin structure and contractility, allowing experiments to be conducted with an array of different myosin isoforms. Using the technique we observed that the work produced by myosin molecules is regulated by amino-acid sequences aligned in specific loops.

  16. An Analytical Model of Nanometer Scale Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Surfaces Measured Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    19 DMT Derjaguin, Muller, and Toporov... DMT ) [18] also solved the problem of the adhesive forces between two elastic spheres. The force of adhesion for DMT can be written as Fadh = κc3a R... DMT model applies to tips with small radius of curvature and cantilevers of high stiffness. The model works well for low adhesion systems [34]. The

  17. Tuning the Spring Constant of Cantilever-free Probe Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Brown, Keith A.; Boya, Radha; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    The versatility of atomic force microscope (AFM) based techniques such as scanning probe lithography is due in part to the utilization of a cantilever that can be fabricated to match a desired application. In contrast, cantilever-free scanning probe lithography utilizes a low cost array of probes on a compliant backing layer that allows for high throughput nanofabrication but lacks the tailorability afforded by the cantilever in traditional AFM. Here, we present a method to measure and tune the spring constant of probes in a cantilever-free array by adjusting the mechanical properties of the underlying elastomeric layer. Using this technique, we are able to fabricate large-area silicon probe arrays with spring constants that can be tuned in the range from 7 to 150 N/m. This technique offers an advantage in that the spring constant depends linearly on the geometry of the probe, which is in contrast to traditional cantilever-based lithography where the spring constant varies as the cube of the beam width and thickness. To illustrate the benefit of utilizing a probe array with a lower spring constant, we pattern a block copolymer on a delicate 50 nm thick silicon nitride window.

  18. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-01-21

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  19. Compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo Martin; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry Joseph

    2006-08-15

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  20. An open source/real-time atomic force microscope architecture to perform customizable force spectroscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Materassi, Donatello; Baschieri, Paolo; Tiribilli, Bruno; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Samorì, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    We describe the realization of an atomic force microscope architecture designed to perform customizable experiments in a flexible and automatic way. Novel technological contributions are given by the software implementation platform (RTAI-LINUX), which is free and open source, and from a functional point of view, by the implementation of hard real-time control algorithms. Some other technical solutions such as a new way to estimate the optical lever constant are described as well. The adoption of this architecture provides many degrees of freedom in the device behavior and, furthermore, allows one to obtain a flexible experimental instrument at a relatively low cost. In particular, we show how such a system has been employed to obtain measures in sophisticated single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments [Fernandez and Li, Science 303, 1674 (2004)]. Experimental results on proteins already studied using the same methodologies are provided in order to show the reliability of the measure system.

  1. Nondestructive and noncontact method for determining the spring constant of rectangular cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Golovko, Dmytro S.; Haschke, Thomas; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-04-15

    We present here an experimental setup and suggest an extension to the long existing added-mass method for the calibration of the spring constant of atomic force microscope cantilevers. Instead of measuring the resonance frequency shift that results from attaching particles of known masses to the end of cantilevers, we load them with water microdrops generated by a commercial inkjet dispenser. Such a device is capable of generating drops, and thus masses, of extremely reproducible size. This makes it an ideal tool for calibration tasks. Moreover, the major advantage of water microdrops is that they allow for a nearly contactless calibration: no mechanical micromanipulation of particles on cantilevers is required, neither for their deposition nor for removal. After some seconds the water drop is completely evaporated, and no residues are left on the cantilever surface or tip. We present two variants: we vary the size of the drops and deposit them at the free end of the cantilever, or we keep the size of the drops constant and vary their position along the cantilever. For the second variant, we implemented also numerical simulations. Spring constants measured by this method are comparable to results obtained by the thermal noise method, as we demonstrate for six different cantilevers.

  2. Cancelation of thermally induced frequency shifts in bimaterial cantilevers by nonlinear optomechanical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vy, Nguyen Duy; Tri Dat, Le; Iida, Takuya

    2016-08-01

    Bimaterial cantilevers have recently been used in, for example, the calorimetric analysis with picowatt resolution in microscopic space based on state-of-the-art atomic force microscopes. However, thermally induced effects usually change physical properties of the cantilevers, such as the resonance frequency, which reduce the accuracy of the measurements. Here, we propose an approach to circumvent this problem that uses an optical microcavity formed between a metallic layer coated on the back of the cantilever and one coated at the end of an optical fiber irradiating the cantilever. In addition to increasing the sensitivity, the optical rigidity of this system diminishes the thermally induced frequency shift. For a coating thickness of several tens of nanometers, the input power is 5-10 μW. These values can be evaluated from parameters derived by directly irradiating the cantilever in the absence of the microcavity. The system has the potential of using the cantilever both as a thermometer without frequency shifting and as a sensor with nanometer-controlled accuracy.

  3. Cancelation of thermally induced frequency shifts in bimaterial cantilevers by nonlinear optomechanical interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vy, Nguyen Duy; Tri Dat, Le; Iida, Takuya

    2016-08-01

    Bimaterial cantilevers have recently been used in, for example, the calorimetric analysis with picowatt resolution in microscopic space based on state-of-the-art atomic force microscopes. However, thermally induced effects usually change physical properties of the cantilevers, such as the resonance frequency, which reduce the accuracy of the measurements. Here, we propose an approach to circumvent this problem that uses an optical microcavity formed between a metallic layer coated on the back of the cantilever and one coated at the end of an optical fiber irradiating the cantilever. In addition to increasing the sensitivity, the optical rigidity of this system diminishes the thermally induced frequency shift. For a coating thickness of several tens of nanometers, the input power is 5–10 μW. These values can be evaluated from parameters derived by directly irradiating the cantilever in the absence of the microcavity. The system has the potential of using the cantilever both as a thermometer without frequency shifting and as a sensor with nanometer-controlled accuracy.

  4. Development of atomic force microscope with wide-band magnetic excitation for study of soft matter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageshima, Masami; Chikamoto, Takuma; Ogawa, Tatsuya; Hirata, Yoshiki; Inoue, Takahito; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2009-02-01

    In order to probe dynamical properties of mesoscopic soft matter systems such as polymers, structured liquid, etc., a new atomic force microscopy apparatus with a wide-band magnetic cantilever excitation system was developed. Constant-current driving of an electromagnet up to 1 MHz was implemented with a closed-loop driver circuit. Transfer function of a commercial cantilever attached with a magnetic particle was measured in a frequency range of 1-1000 kHz in distilled water. Effects of the laser spot position, distribution of the force exerted on the cantilever, and difference in the detection scheme on the obtained transfer function are discussed in comparison with theoretical predictions by other research groups. A preliminary result of viscoelasticity spectrum measurement of a single dextran chain is shown and is compared with a recent theoretical calculation.

  5. Development of atomic force microscope with wide-band magnetic excitation for study of soft matter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kageshima, Masami; Chikamoto, Takuma; Ogawa, Tatsuya; Hirata, Yoshiki; Inoue, Takahito; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2009-02-01

    In order to probe dynamical properties of mesoscopic soft matter systems such as polymers, structured liquid, etc., a new atomic force microscopy apparatus with a wide-band magnetic cantilever excitation system was developed. Constant-current driving of an electromagnet up to 1 MHz was implemented with a closed-loop driver circuit. Transfer function of a commercial cantilever attached with a magnetic particle was measured in a frequency range of 1-1000 kHz in distilled water. Effects of the laser spot position, distribution of the force exerted on the cantilever, and difference in the detection scheme on the obtained transfer function are discussed in comparison with theoretical predictions by other research groups. A preliminary result of viscoelasticity spectrum measurement of a single dextran chain is shown and is compared with a recent theoretical calculation.

  6. Investigation of Acoustic Fields Generated by Eddy Currents Using an Atomic Force Microscope (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0230 INVESTIGATION OF ACOUSTIC FIELDS GENERATED BY EDDY CURRENTS USING AN ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPE (POSTPRINT) V...Institute of Physics AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-7750 AIR... FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND UNITED STATES AIR FORCE NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in

  7. A variable-temperature nanostencil compatible with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Steurer, Wolfram Gross, Leo; Schlittler, Reto R.; Meyer, Gerhard

    2014-02-15

    We describe a nanostencil lithography tool capable of operating at variable temperatures down to 30 K. The setup is compatible with a combined low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope/atomic force microscope located within the same ultra-high-vacuum apparatus. The lateral movement capability of the mask allows the patterning of complex structures. To demonstrate operational functionality of the tool and estimate temperature drift and blurring, we fabricated LiF and NaCl nanostructures on Cu(111) at 77 K.

  8. Piezoelectric bimorph-based scanner in the tip-scan mode for high speed atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianyong; Gong, Weitao; Cai, Wei; Shang, Guangyi

    2013-08-01

    A piezoelectric bimorph-based scanner operating in tip-scan mode for high speed atomic force microscope (AFM) is first presented. The free end of the bimorph is used for fixing an AFM cantilever probe and the other one is mounted on the AFM head. The sample is placed on the top of a piezoelectric tube scanner. High speed scan is performed with the bimorph that vibrates at the resonant frequency, while slow scanning is carried out by the tube scanner. The design and performance of the scanner is discussed and given in detailed. Combined with a commercially available data acquisition system, a high speed AFM has been built successfully. By real-time observing the deformation of the pores on the surface of a commercial piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT-5) ceramics under electric field, the dynamic imaging capability of the AFM is demonstrated. The results show that the notable advantage of the AFM is that dynamic process of the sample with large dimensions can be easily investigated. In addition, this design could provide a way to study a sample in real time under the given experimental condition, such as under an external electric field, on a heating stage, or in a liquid cell.

  9. A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

  10. A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

  11. Interaction of the Hydrophobic Tip of an Atomic Force Microscope with Oligopeptides Immobilized Using Short and Long Tethers.

    PubMed

    Ma, C Derek; Acevedo-Vélez, Claribel; Wang, Chenxuan; Gellman, Samuel H; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-03-29

    We report an investigation of the adhesive force generated between the hydrophobic tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and surfaces presenting oligopeptides immobilized using either short (∼1 nm) or long (∼60 nm) tethers. Specifically, we used either sulfosuccinimidyl-4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SSMCC) or 10 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) end-functionalized with maleimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide groups to immobilize helical oligomers of β-amino acids (β-peptides) to mixed monolayers presenting tetraethylene glycol (EG4) and amine-terminated EG4 (EG4N) groups. When SSMCC was used to immobilize the β-peptides, we measured the adhesive interaction between the AFM tip and surface to rupture through a single event with magnitude consistent with the interaction of a single β-peptide with the AFM tip. Surprisingly, this occurred even when, on average, multiple β-peptides were located within the interaction area between the AFM tip and surface. In contrast, when using the long 10 kDa PEG tether, we observed the magnitude of the adhesive interaction as well as the dynamics of the rupture events to unmask the presence of the multiple β-peptides within the interaction area. To provide insight into these observations, we formulated a simple mechanical model of the interaction of the AFM tip with the immobilized β-peptides and used the model to demonstrate that adhesion measurements performed using short tethers (but not long tethers) are dominated by the interaction of single β-peptides because (i) the mechanical properties of the short tether are highly nonlinear, thus causing one β-peptide to dominate the adhesion force at the point of rupture, and (ii) the AFM cantilever is mechanically unstable following the rupture of the adhesive interaction with a single β-peptide. Overall, our study reveals that short tethers offer the basis of an approach that facilitates measurement of adhesive interactions with single molecules presented at

  12. A study of cantilever-free instrumentation for nanoscale magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, Bruce Adair

    The evolution of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) into the Magnetic Force Microscope (MFM) and Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) has had a substantial impact on the characterization of nanoscale phenomena. Detection of 10-17 Newtons per root Hertz has occurred with use of an ultra-sensitive cantilever along with optical interferometry methods within these geometries. The sensitivity of these platforms is dependent on the characteristics of the cantilever, where increased length and a low Young's modulus increase the force sensitivity (meters/newtons). Using IC fabrication techniques, the realization of generating cantilevers with this sensitivity is feasible, but stress compensation layers are required to prevent the free end from curling. Aside from the difficultly in fabrication, the cantilever based approach has one fixed spring constant yielding a finite detectable magnetic force range. An alternative approach incorporating the magnetic levitation of a magnet with an integrated reflector, known as the birdie, has been investigated. The goals of the cantilever-free instrumentation are two fold: (1) To replace the traditional cantilever with a magnetically levitated birdie (which will be scaled down to investigate nanoscale phenomena) through the creation of a virtual cantilever; (2) Investigate the detectable magnetic force range (tunability) of the virtual cantilever. The first 1-D milli-levitation platform has been fabricated and its preliminary characterization has been performed, showing a minimum detectable force in the nano-Newton range with a 10X tunability in spring constant. This high degree of force sensitivity and tunability confirms the design and enables the use for magnetic sample investigation. To further increase the utility of the cantilever-free approach, the birdie has been magnetically levitated in 3D by control circuitry that has been developed and characterized. The magnetic behavior of the custom designed X, Y and Z coil sets

  13. Atomic force microscope measurements of long-range forces near lipid-coated surfaces in electrolytes.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W; Blackford, B L; Cordes, J G; Jericho, M H; Pink, D A; Levadny, V G; Beveridge, T

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of DMPC (L-alpha-dimyristoyl-1,2-diterradecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoch oli ne, C36H72NO8P) lipid-coated Si3N4 surfaces immersed in an electrolyte was investigated with an atomic force microscope. A long-range interaction was observed, even when the Si3N4 surfaces were covered with nominally neutral lipid layers. The interaction was attributed to Coulomb interactions of charges located at the lipid surface. The experimental force curves were compared with solutions for the linearized as well as with exact solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The comparison suggested that in 0.5 mM KCl electrolyte the DMPC lipids carried about one unit of charge per 100 lipid molecules. The presence of this surface charge made it impossible to observe an effective charge density recently predicted for dipole layers near a dielectric when immersed in an electrolyte. A discrepancy between the theoretical results and the data at short separations was interpreted in terms of a decrease in the surface charge with separation distance. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9138586

  14. Uncertainty in least-squares fits to the thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators with applications to the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Yousefi, Morteza; Friend, James R.

    2014-02-15

    Thermal noise spectra of nanomechanical resonators are used widely to characterize their physical properties. These spectra typically exhibit a Lorentzian response, with additional white noise due to extraneous processes. Least-squares fits of these measurements enable extraction of key parameters of the resonator, including its resonant frequency, quality factor, and stiffness. Here, we present general formulas for the uncertainties in these fit parameters due to sampling noise inherent in all thermal noise spectra. Good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation of synthetic data and measurements of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever is demonstrated. These formulas enable robust interpretation of thermal noise spectra measurements commonly performed in the AFM and adaptive control of fitting procedures with specified tolerances.

  15. Note: Aligned deposition and modal characterization of micron and submicron poly(methyl methacyrlate) fiber cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Nain, Amrinder S; Filiz, Sinan; Ozdoganlar, O Burak; Sitti, Metin; Amon, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric micro-/nanofibers are finding increasing use as sensors for novel applications. Here, we demonstrate the ability to deposit an array of poly(methyl methacyrlate) fibers with micron and submicron diameters in aligned configurations on customized piezoelectric shakers. Using lateral motion of an atomic force microscope tip, fibers are broken to obtain fiber cantilevers of high aspect ratio (length/diameter > 20). The resonant frequencies of fabricated microfiber cantilevers are experimentally measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer. An average Young's modulus of 3.5 GPa and quality factor of 20 were estimated from the experimentally obtained frequency responses.

  16. Structural activity of a cloned potassium channel (ROMK1) monitored with the atomic force microscope: The “molecular-sandwich” technique

    PubMed Central

    Oberleithner, H.; Schneider, S. W.; Henderson, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to continuously follow height changes of individual protein molecules exposed to physiological stimuli. A AFM tip was coated with ROMK1 (a cloned renal epithelial potassium channel known to be highly pH sensitive) and lowered onto atomically flat mica surface until the protein was sandwiched between AFM tip and mica. Because the AFM tip was an integral part of a highly flexible cantilever, any structural alterations of the sandwiched molecule were transmitted to the cantilever. This resulted in a distortion of the cantilever that was monitored by means of a laser beam. With this system it was possible to resolve vertical height changes in the ROMK1 protein of ≥0.2 nm (approximately 5% of the molecule’s height) with a time resolution of ≥1 msec. When bathed in electrolyte solution that contained the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and 0.1 mM ATP (conditions that activate the native ion channel), we found stochastically occurring height fluctuations in the ROMK1 molecule. These changes in height were pH-dependent, being greatest at pH 7.6, and lowering the pH (either by titration or by the application of CO2) reduced their magnitude. The data show that overall changes in shape of proteins occur stochastically and increase in size and frequency when the proteins are active. This AFM “molecular-sandwich” technique, called MOST, measures structural activity of proteins in real time and could prove useful for studies on the relationship between structure and function of proteins at the molecular level. PMID:9391167

  17. Application of evanescent wave optics to the determination of absolute distance in surface force measurements using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Huntington, S T; Hartley, P G; Katsifolis, J

    2003-04-01

    A combined scanning near field optical/atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to obtain surface force measurements between a near field sensing tip and a tapered optical fibre surface, whilst simultaneously detecting the intensity of the evanescent field emanating from the fibre. The tapered optical fibre acts as a compliant sample to demonstrate the possible use of the near field intensity measurement system in determining 'real' surface separations from normal AFM surface force measurements at sub-nanometer resolution between deformable surfaces.

  18. Two-probe atomic-force microscope manipulator and its applications.

    PubMed

    Zhukov, A A; Stolyarov, V S; Kononenko, O V

    2017-06-01

    We report on a manipulator based on a two-probe atomic force microscope (AFM) with an individual feedback system for each probe. This manipulator works under an upright optical microscope with 3 mm focal distance. The design of the microscope helps us tomanipulate nanowires using the microscope probes as a two-prong fork. The AFM feedback is realized based on the dynamic full-time contact mode. The applications of the manipulator and advantages of its two-probe design are presented.

  19. The effects of two-dimensional bifurcations and quantum beats in a system of combined atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopes with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, V. Ch.; Krevchik, V. D.; Semenov, M. B.; Krevchik, P. V.; Zaytsev, R. V.; Egorov, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    The field and temperature dependence of the probability of two-dimensional dissipative tunneling is studied in the framework of one-instanton approximation for a model double-well oscillator potential in an external electric field at finite temperature with account for the influence of two local phonon modes for quantum dots in a system of a combined atomic force and a scanning tunneling microscope. It is demonstrated that in the mode of synchronous parallel transfer of tunneling particles from the cantilever tip to the quantum dot the two local phonon modes result in the occurrence of two stable peaks in the curve of the 2D dissipative tunneling probability as a function of the field. Qualitative comparison of the theoretical curve in the limit of weak dissociation and the experimental current-voltage characteristic for quantum dots that grow from colloidal gold under a cantilever tip at the initial stage of quantum-dot formation when the quantum dot size does not exceed 10 nm is performed. It is established that one of the two stable peaks that correspond to interaction of tunneling particles with two local phonon modes in the temperature dependence of the 2D dissipative tunneling probability can be split in two, which corresponds to the tunneling channel interference mechanism. It is found that the theoretically predicted and experimentally observed mode of quantum beats occurs near the bifurcation point.

  20. Anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism for an astigmatic atomic force microscope system based on a digital versatile disk optical head.

    PubMed

    Hwu, E-T; Illers, H; Wang, W-M; Hwang, I-S; Jusko, L; Danzebrink, H-U

    2012-01-01

    In this work, an anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism is applied to an astigmatic detection system (ADS)-based atomic force microscope (AFM) for drift compensation and cantilever alignment. The optical path of the ADS adopts a commercial digital versatile disc (DVD) optical head using the astigmatic focus error signal. The ADS-based astigmatic AFM is lightweight, compact size, low priced, and easy to use. Furthermore, the optical head is capable of measuring sub-atomic displacements of high-frequency AFM probes with a sub-micron laser spot (~570 nm, FWHM) and a high-working bandwidth (80 MHz). Nevertheless, conventional DVD optical heads suffer from signal drift problems. In a previous setup, signal drifts of even thousands of nanometers had been measured. With the anti-drift and auto-alignment mechanism, the signal drift is compensated by actuating a voice coil motor of the DVD optical head. A nearly zero signal drift was achieved. Additional benefits of this mechanism are automatic cantilever alignment and simplified design.

  1. Electron beam detection of a Nanotube Scanning Force Microscope.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Niguès, Antoine

    2017-09-14

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to probe matter at atomic scale by measuring the perturbation of a nanomechanical oscillator induced by near-field interaction forces. The quest to improve sensitivity and resolution of AFM forced the introduction of a new class of resonators with dimensions at the nanometer scale. In this context, nanotubes are the ultimate mechanical oscillators because of their one dimensional nature, small mass and almost perfect crystallinity. Coupled to the possibility of functionalisation, these properties make them the perfect candidates as ultra sensitive, on-demand force sensors. However their dimensions make the measurement of the mechanical properties a challenging task in particular when working in cavity free geometry at ambient temperature. By using a focused electron beam, we show that the mechanical response of nanotubes can be quantitatively measured while approaching to a surface sample. By coupling electron beam detection of individual nanotubes with a custom AFM we image the surface topography of a sample by continuously measuring the mechanical properties of the nanoresonators. The combination of very small size and mass together with the high resolution of the electron beam detection method offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of a new class of nanotube-based scanning force microscopy.

  2. Shear force control for a terahertz near field microscope.

    PubMed

    Buersgens, F; Acuna, G; Lang, C H; Potrebic, S I; Manus, S; Kersting, R

    2007-11-01

    We report on the advancement of apertureless terahertz microscopy by active shear force control of the scanning probe. Extreme subwavelength spatial resolution and a maximized image contrast are achieved by maintaining a tip-surface distance of about 20 nm. The constant distance between scanning tip and surface results in terahertz images that mirror the dielectric permittivity of the surface.

  3. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOEpatents

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  4. Atomic force microscopic observation of surface-supported human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Mon-Shu; Kuo, Feng-Jia; Lee, Yu-Siang; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2007-07-01

    The nanomechanical characteristics of the membrane cytoskeleton of human erythrocytes were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The self-assembly, fine structure, cell diameter, thickness, and reticulate cytoskeleton of erythrocytes on the mica surface were investigated. The adhesive forces that correspond to the membrane elasticity of various parts of the erythrocyte membrane surface were measured directly by AFM to be 0.64±0.14nN for cell indentation, 4.2±0.7nN for cell hump, and 11.5nN for side waist, respectively. The deformation of erythrocytes was discussed. Standing waves on the membrane that were set up by increased AFM amplitude were observed. The propagating velocity on the erythrocyte membrane was estimated to be ˜2.02×10-2m/s. Liquid physiological conditions were considered throughout.

  5. High-speed broadband nanomechanical property quantification and imaging of life science materials using atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Juan

    Nanoscale morphological characterization and mechanical properties quantification of soft and biological materials play an important role in areas ranging from nano-composite material synthesis and characterization, cellular mechanics to drug design. Frontier studies in these areas demand the coordination between nanoscale morphological evolution and mechanical behavior variations through simultaneous measurement of these two aspects of properties. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is very promising in achieving such simultaneous measurements at high-speed and broadband owing to its unique capability in applying force stimuli and then, measuring the response at specific locations in a physiologically friendly environment with pico-newton force and nanometer spatial resolution. Challenges, however, arise as current AFM systems are unable to account for the complex and coupled dynamics of the measurement system and probe-sample interaction during high-speed imaging and broadband measurements. In this dissertation, the creation of a set of dynamics and control tools to probe-based high-speed imaging and rapid broadband nanomechanical spectroscopy of soft and biological materials are presented. Firstly, advanced control-based approaches are presented to improve the imaging performance of AFM imaging both in air and in liquid. An adaptive contact mode (ACM) imaging scheme is proposed to replace the traditional contact mode (CM) imaging by addressing the major concerns in both the speed and the force exerted to the sample. In this work, the image distortion caused by the topography tracking error is accounted for in the topography quantification and the quantified sample topography is utilized in a gradient-based optimization method to adjust the cantilever deflection set-point for each scanline closely around the minimal level needed for maintaining a stable probe-sample contact, and a data-driven iterative feedforward control that utilizes a prediction of the next

  6. LDRD Final Report 01-ERI-001 Probing the Properties of Cells and Cell Surfaces with the Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    McElfresh, M; Belak, J; Rudd, R; Balhorn, R

    2004-02-17

    We have developed new techniques based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image, and to quantify the strength of, specific receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell. AFM has developed rapidly during the past decade, providing nanometer scale resolution in the imaging of biological materials ranging in size from single molecules to intact cells. By monitoring the cantilever deflection during approach-retraction cycles (i.e. force-volume curves), the unbinding forces have been determined for various ligand-receptor pairs. It is now possible to use a single receptor molecule bound to the tip of an AFM cantilever to map the locations of ligands bound on solid surfaces, opening the door for new ''recognition mapping'' methods. The goal of our project was to develop recognition mapping for living cells and cell membranes, a major step forward.

  7. Massively Parallel Atomic Force Microscope with Digital Holographic Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sache, L.; Kawakatsu, H.; Emery, Y.; Bleuler, H.

    2007-03-01

    Massively Parallel Scanning Probe Microscopy is an obvious path for data storage (E Grochowski, R F Hoyt, Future Trends in Hard disc Drives, IEEE Trans. Magn. 1996, 32, 1850- 1854; J L Griffin, S W Schlosser, G R Ganger and D F Nagle, Modeling and Performance of MEMS-Based Storage Devices, Proc. ACM SIGMETRICS, 2000). Current experimental systems still lay far behind Hard Disc Drive (HDD) or Digital Video Disk (DVD), be it in access speed, data throughput, storage density or cost per bit. This paper presents an entirely new approach with the promise to break several of these barriers. The key idea is readout of a Scanning Probes Microscope (SPM) array by Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM). This technology directly gives phase information at each pixel of a CCD array. This means that no contact line to each individual SPM probes is needed. The data is directly available in parallel form. Moreover, the optical setup needs in principle no expensive components, optical (or, to a large extent, mechanical) imperfections being compensated in the signal processing, i.e. in electronics. This gives the system the potential for a low cost device with fast Terabit readout capability.

  8. Method for characterizing nanoscale wear of atomic force microscope tips.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Notbohm, Jacob K; Carpick, Robert W; Turner, Kevin T

    2010-07-27

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful tool for studying tribology (adhesion, friction, and lubrication) at the nanoscale and is emerging as a critical tool for nanomanufacturing. However, nanoscale wear is a key limitation of conventional AFM probes that are made of silicon and silicon nitride (SiNx). Here we present a method for systematically quantifying tip wear, which consists of sequential contact-mode AFM scans on ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces with intermittent measurements of the tip properties using blind reconstruction, adhesion force measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We demonstrate direct measurement of volume loss over the wear test and agreement between blind reconstruction and TEM imaging. The geometries of various types of tips were monitored over a scanning distance of approximately 100 mm. The results show multiple failure mechanisms for different materials, including nanoscale fracture of a monolithic Si tip upon initial engagement with the surface, film failure of a SiNx-coated Si tip, and gradual, progressive wear of monolithic SiNx tips consistent with atom-by-atom attrition. Overall, the method provides a quantitative and systematic process for examining tip degradation and nanoscale wear, and the experimental results illustrate the multiple mechanisms that may lead to tip failure.

  9. Characterization of Akiyama probe applied to dual-probes atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hequn; Gao, Sitian; Li, Wei; Shi, Yushu; Li, Qi; Li, Shi; Zhu, Zhendong

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of nano-scale line-width has always been important and difficult in the field of nanometer measurements, while the rapid development of integrated circuit greatly raises the demand again. As one kind of scanning probe microscope (SPM), atomic force microscope (AFM) can realize quasi three-dimensional measurement, which is widely used in nanometer scale line-width measurement. Our team researched a dual-probes atomic force microscope, which can eliminate the prevalent effect of probe width on measurement results. In dual-probes AFM system, a novel head are newly designed. A kind of self-sensing and self-exciting probes which is Nanosensors cooperation's patented probe—Akiyama probe, is used in this novel head. The Akiyama probe applied to dual-probe atomic force microscope is one of the most important issues. The characterization of Akiyama probe would affect performance and accuracy of the whole system. The fundamental features of the Akiyama probe are electrically and optically characterized in "approach-withdraw" experiments. Further investigations include the frequency response of an Akiyama probe to small mechanical vibrations externally applied to the tip and the effective loading force yielding between the tip and the sample during the periodic contact. We hope that the characterization of the Akiyama probe described in this paper will guide application for dual-probe atomic force microscope.

  10. Elastic modulus and fracture strength evaluation on the nanoscale by scanning force microscope experiments.

    PubMed

    Jarzabek, D M; Kaufmann, A N; Schift, H; Rymuza, Z; Jung, T A

    2014-05-30

    This work first reviews the capability of scanning force microscopy (SFM) to perform experiments with forces in a wide range, from low non-contact forces to high contact forces which induce mechanical deformations in the substrate. In analogy to fracture strength evaluation, as established in materials science, SFM is used to exert forces on pillars with nanometer dimensions while the cantilever deformations are monitored quantitatively. Hence, it is possible to bend the pillars until the threshold for triggering fracture is reached, and to determine the mechanical properties at the different stages of this process. Using this novel approach, in combination with 'state of the art' nanofabrication to produce nanopillar arrays on silicon and silicon dioxide substrates, a number of experiments are performed. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of the fracture strength of Si and of the SiO2/Si interface and E-modulus are presented. To analyze the experimental data obtained in the different experimental procedures and modes, finite element method calculations were used. The methods introduced herein provide a versatile toolbox for addressing a wide range of scientific problems and for applications in materials science and technology.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of liquid bridge for fixed volume in atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; He, MengFu; Zhao, WenBin; Li, Yang

    2013-10-01

    In ambient condition, capillary forces are the major contributors to the adhesive forces between the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the sample. In general, capillary forces are thought to be related to water film thickness, contact time and relative humidity and so on. In this paper, an original analysis regarding the liquid bridge, based on the surface and interface thermodynamic theory, is proposed. The cases covered in the study include the capillary forces and temperature of liquid bridge for quickly drawn liquid bridge, and for nonvolatile liquid bridge. The study results show that variation in temperature may occur in the liquid bridge when it is stretched.

  12. Theoretical Study of the Effect of Probe Shape on Adhesion Force Between Probe and Substrate in Atomic Force Microscope Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Hu, Junhui; Kong, Lingjiang

    2013-12-01

    The quantitative description of adhesion force dependence on the probe shape is of importance in many scientific and industrial fields. We performed a theoretical study on the influences of the probe shape (the sphere and parabolic probe) on the adhesion force at different humidity in order to elucidate how the adhesion force varied with the probe shape in atomic force microscope manipulation experiment. We found that the combined action of the triple point and the Kelvin radius is the guiding trend of the adhesion force, and these two fundamental parameters are closely related to the probe shape. Meanwhile, the theoretical results demonstrated that the adhesion force are in a good agreement with the experiment data if the van der Waals force is take into account.

  13. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-15

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  14. Reduced Humidity Effects on Probe Nano-Oxidation Investigated Using Dynamic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramochi, Hiromi; Ando, Kazunori; Tokizaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2006-03-01

    Humidity effects on nano-oxidation are investigated using a dynamic force microscope in the humidity range of 30-60%. Oxide size and detected faradaic current increased with relative humidity and applied voltage. The aspect ratios of fabricated oxides at various humidities are approximately of the same magnitude. Scanning probe microscope nano-oxidation in the dynamic mode is less subject to the relative humidity than that in the contact mode.

  15. High-throughput atomic force microscopes operating in parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghian, Hamed; Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Winters, Jasper; Bijnagte, Tom; Rijnbeek, Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an essential nanoinstrument technique for several applications such as cell biology and nanoelectronics metrology and inspection. The need for statistically significant sample sizes means that data collection can be an extremely lengthy process in AFM. The use of a single AFM instrument is known for its very low speed and not being suitable for scanning large areas, resulting in a very-low-throughput measurement. We address this challenge by parallelizing AFM instruments. The parallelization is achieved by miniaturizing the AFM instrument and operating many of them simultaneously. This instrument has the advantages that each miniaturized AFM can be operated independently and that the advances in the field of AFM, both in terms of speed and imaging modalities, can be implemented more easily. Moreover, a parallel AFM instrument also allows one to measure several physical parameters simultaneously; while one instrument measures nano-scale topography, another instrument can measure mechanical, electrical, or thermal properties, making it a lab-on-an-instrument. In this paper, a proof of principle of such a parallel AFM instrument has been demonstrated by analyzing the topography of large samples such as semiconductor wafers. This nanoinstrument provides new research opportunities in the nanometrology of wafers and nanolithography masks by enabling real die-to-die and wafer-level measurements and in cell biology by measuring the nano-scale properties of a large number of cells.

  16. Visualization of Cytoskeletal Elements by the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Woodworth, Craig; Sokolov, Igor

    2004-03-01

    We describe a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to directly visualize cytoskeletal fibers in human foreskin epithelial cells. The nonionic detergent Triton X-100 in a low concentration was used to remove the membrane, soluble proteins, and organelles from the cell. The remaining cytoskeleton can then be directly visualized in either liquid or air-dried ambient conditions. These two types of scanning provide complimentary information. Scanning in liquids visualizes the surface filaments of the cytoskeleton, whereas scanning in air shows both the surface filaments and the total volume of the cytoskeletal fibers. The smallest fibers observed were ca. 50 nm in diameter. The lateral resolution of this technique was ca.20 nm, which can be increased to a single nanometer level by choosing sharper AFM tips. Because the AFM is a true 3 dimensional technique, we are able to quantify the observed cytoskeleton by its density and volume. The types of fibers can be identified by their size, similar to electron microscopy.

  17. Controlled manipulation of atoms in insulating surfaces with the virtual atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Trevethan, T; Watkins, M; Kantorovich, L N; Shluger, A L

    2007-01-12

    We predict how single oxygen ions can be manipulated on the MgO (100) surface and demonstrate the possibility of detecting a single-atom event using a noncontact atomic force microscope. The manipulation process is simulated explicitly in real time with a virtual dynamic atomic force microscope including the full response of the instrumentation and demonstrates a strong dependence on temperature. The proposed new atomistic mechanism and protocols for the controlled manipulation of single atoms and vacancies on insulating surfaces may be relevant for anchoring molecules and metal clusters at these surfaces and controlling their electronic properties.

  18. Energy dissipation mechanisms in microcantilever oscillators with applications to the detection of small forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumura, Kevin Youl

    In 1986 the atomic force microscope (AFM) was invented by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber. Cantilever based force microscopy has been used in a wide range of fields including the study of biological samples, data storage media, and microelectronics. These AFM-based imaging techniques typically measure forces in the piconewton (10-12 N) range. Recent developments in microcantilever fabrication and optical fiber displacement sensors have allowed for the construction of force microscope systems that are capable of measuring forces in the attonewton (10-18 N) range. Applications such as magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) require the cantilevers used to have subattonewton force resolution in order to eventually detect single nuclear spins. It is believed that improvements in cantilever and experimental design will allow for improved force resolution. A fundamental limit to the detection of small forces is thermomechanical noise. The thermal noise force limit, via the fluctuation dissipation theorem, is directly related to the amount of mechanical energy dissipation in the cantilever-based force sensor. Work has therefore been focused on developing an understanding of which mechanisms are limiting the force resolution of these microcantilever oscillators. Arrays of silicon nitride, single-crystal silicon, and polysilicon cantilevers have been fabricated and studied. By measuring the dependence of Q on cantilever material, geometry, and surface treatments, significant insight into the dissipation mechanisms has been obtained. For submicron thick cantilevers, Q is found to decrease with decreasing cantilever thickness, indicative of surface loss mechanisms. For single-crystal silicon cantilevers, significant increase in room temperature Q is obtained after 700 C heat treatment in either N 2 or forming gas. Thermoelastic dissipation is not a factor for submicron thick cantilevers, but is shown to be significant for silicon nitride cantilevers as thin as 2.3 um. At low

  19. Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device

    PubMed Central

    Pirozzi, K. L.; Long, C. J.; McAleer, C. W.; Smith, A. S. T.; Hickman, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney's thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney's equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases. PMID:24046483

  20. Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozzi, K. L.; Long, C. J.; McAleer, C. W.; Smith, A. S. T.; Hickman, J. J.

    2013-08-01

    Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney's thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney's equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases.

  1. Kinesin force generation measured using a centrifuge microscope sperm-gliding motility assay.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, K; Cole, D; Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1996-01-01

    To measure force generation and characterize the relationship between force and velocity in kinesin-driven motility we have developed a centrifuge microscope sperm-gliding motility assay. The average (extrapolated) value of maximum isometric force at low kinesin density was 0.90 +/- 0.14 pN. Furthermore, in the experiments at low kinesin density, sperm pulled off before stall at forces between 0.40 and 0.75 pN. To further characterize our kinesin-demembranated sperm assay we estimated maximum isometric force using a laser trap-based assay. At low kinesin density, 4.34 +/- 1.5 pN was the maximum force. Using values of axoneme stiffness available from other studies, we concluded that, in our centrifuge microscope-based assay, a sperm axoneme functions as a lever arm, magnifying the centrifugal force and leading to pull-off before stall. In addition, drag of the distal portion of the axoneme is increased by the centrifugal force (because the axoneme is rotated into closer proximity to the glass surface) and represents an additional force that the kinesin motor must overcome. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:8968616

  2. Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Till; El Ouali, Mehdi; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter

    2011-11-01

    A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p ≤10(-10) mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission.

  3. Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hagedorn, Till; Ouali, Mehdi El; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Gruetter, Peter

    2011-11-15

    A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p {<=}10{sup -10} mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission.

  4. Micro-wilhelmy and related liquid property measurements using constant-diameter nanoneedle-tipped atomic force microscope probes.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M; Hosseini, Mahdi; Pabba, Santosh; Berry, Scott M; Dobrokhotov, Vladimir V; Safir, Abdelilah; Keynton, Robert S; Cohn, Robert W

    2008-12-02

    The micro-Wilhelmy method is a well-established method of determining surface tension by measuring the force of withdrawing a tens of microns to millimeters in diameter cylindrical wire or fiber from a liquid. A comparison of insertion force to retraction force can also be used to determine the contact angle with the fiber. Given the limited availability of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes that have long constant diameter tips, force-distance (F-D) curves using probes with standard tapered tips have been difficult to relate to surface tension. In this report, constant diameter metal alloy nanowires (referred to as "nanoneedles") between 7.2 and 67 microm in length and 108 and 1006 nm in diameter were grown on AFM probes. F-D and Q damping AFM measurements of wetting and drag forces made with the probes were compared against standard macroscopic models of these forces on slender cylinders to estimate surface tension, contact angle, meniscus height, evaporation rate, and viscosity. The surface tensions for several low molecular weight liquids that were measured with these probes were between -4.2% and +8.3% of standard reported values. Also, the F-D curves show well-defined stair-step events on insertion and retraction from partial wetting liquids, compared to the continuously growing attractive force of standard tapered AFM probe tips. In the AFM used, the stair-step feature in F-D curves was repeatably monitored for at least 0.5 h (depending on the volatility of the liquid), and this feature was then used to evaluate evaporation rates (as low as 0.30 nm/s) through changes in the surface height of the liquid. A nanoneedle with a step change in diameter at a known distance from its end produced two steps in the F-D curve from which the meniscus height was determined. The step features enable meniscus height to be determined from distance between the steps, as an alternative to calculating the height corresponding to the AFM measured values of surface tension and

  5. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Samuel D [Aiken, SC; Fondeur, Fernando F [North Augusta, SC

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  6. The Analog Atomic Force Microscope: Measuring, Modeling, and Graphing for Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Valerie; Brandt, Sharon; Lieberman, Marya

    2013-01-01

    using an analog atomic force microscope (A-AFM) made from a cardboard box and mailing tubes. Varying numbers of ping pong balls inside the tubes mimic atoms on a surface. Students use a dowel to make macroscale measurements similar to those of a nanoscale AFM tip as it…

  7. A large range metrological atomic force microscope and its uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Lu, M.; Shi, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFMs) is widely used in nanotechnology research and industry. To ensure the quantity consistency, the measurement precision of these machines must be calibrated and trace back to SI international unit. In the calibration process, first the standard grating pitch artifact is calibrated by metrological atomic force microscope which has the direct tracing capability; then the grating pitch artifact is transferred to calibrate the common AFMs. Because the importance of metrological atomic force microscope in nanometer tracing, the NIM of China has developed a large range metrological atomic force microscope with 50mm×50mm×2mm scan area. In this paper, the structure and performance of this instrument will be introduced briefly. The instrument utilizes a series of novel designs like hybrid air bearing and sliding guide platform, three dimensional orthogonal piezo scanner head, multi-pass interferometer and Fourier harmonic components separation method to achieve both high precision measurement in small area and fast measurement in large area. As a metrological instrument, the error sources and uncertainties of mAFM are also analyzed, theoretical analysis and experiments show the standard uncertainty of the mAFM is less than 2nm in small range and 20nm in large range

  8. Nano Goes to School: A Teaching Model of the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Kovac, Janez

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a teaching model of the atomic force microscope (AFM), which proved to be successful in the role of an introduction to nanoscience in high school. The model can demonstrate the two modes of operation of the AFM (contact mode and oscillating mode) as well as some basic principles that limit the resolution of the method. It can…

  9. A Computer-Controlled Classroom Model of an Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Tyler A.; Johnson, Matthew M.; Eklund, Peter C.; Russin, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "seeing by feeling" as a way to circumvent limitations on sight is universal on the macroscopic scale--reading Braille, feeling one's way around a dark room, etc. The development of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 extended this concept to imaging in the nanoscale. While there are classroom demonstrations that use…

  10. A Computer-Controlled Classroom Model of an Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Tyler A.; Johnson, Matthew M.; Eklund, Peter C.; Russin, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "seeing by feeling" as a way to circumvent limitations on sight is universal on the macroscopic scale--reading Braille, feeling one's way around a dark room, etc. The development of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 extended this concept to imaging in the nanoscale. While there are classroom demonstrations that use…

  11. The Analog Atomic Force Microscope: Measuring, Modeling, and Graphing for Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Valerie; Brandt, Sharon; Lieberman, Marya

    2013-01-01

    using an analog atomic force microscope (A-AFM) made from a cardboard box and mailing tubes. Varying numbers of ping pong balls inside the tubes mimic atoms on a surface. Students use a dowel to make macroscale measurements similar to those of a nanoscale AFM tip as it…

  12. Nano Goes to School: A Teaching Model of the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Kovac, Janez

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a teaching model of the atomic force microscope (AFM), which proved to be successful in the role of an introduction to nanoscience in high school. The model can demonstrate the two modes of operation of the AFM (contact mode and oscillating mode) as well as some basic principles that limit the resolution of the method. It can…

  13. Intercomparison of lateral scales of scanning electron microscopes and atomic force microscopes in research institutes in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Korpelainen, Virpi; Bergstrand, Sten; Karlsson, Helge; Lillepea, Lauri; Lassila, Antti

    2014-04-01

    An intercomparison of lateral scales of scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and atomic force microscopes (AFM) in various research laboratories in Northern Europe was organized by the local national metrology institutes. In this paper are presented the results of the comparison, with also an example uncertainty budget for AFM grating pitch measurement. Grating samples (1D) were circulated among the participating laboratories. The participating laboratories were also asked about the calibration of their instruments. The accuracy of the uncertainty estimates seemed to vary largely between the laboratories, and for some laboratories the appropriateness of the calibration procedures could be considered. Several institutes (60% of all results in terms of En value) also had good comprehension of their measurement capability. The average difference from reference value was 6.7 and 10.0 nm for calibrated instruments and 20.6 and 39.9 nm for uncalibrated instruments for 300 nm and 700 nm gratings, respectively. The correlation of the results for both nominally 300 and 700 nm gratings shows that a simple scale factor calibration would have corrected a large part of the deviations from the reference values.

  14. Computer Simulation of the Forces Acting on the Polystyrene Probe Submerged into the Succinonitrile Near Phase Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Kaukler, William F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modeling approach to simulate both mesoscale and microscopic forces acting in a typical AFM experiment is presented. At mesoscale level interaction between the cantilever tip and the sample surface is primarily described by the balance of attractive Van der Waals and repulsive forces. The model of cantilever oscillations is applicable to both non-contact and "tapping" AFM. This model can be farther enhanced to describe nanoparticle manipulation by cantilever. At microscopic level tip contamination and details of tip-surface interaction can be simulated using molecular dynamics approach. Integration of mesoscale model with molecular dynamic model is discussed.

  15. Computer Simulation of the Forces Acting on the Polystyrene Probe Submerged into the Succinonitrile Near Phase Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Kaukler, William F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modeling approach to simulate both mesoscale and microscopic forces acting in a typical AFM experiment is presented. At mesoscale level interaction between the cantilever tip and the sample surface is primarily described by the balance of attractive Van der Waals and repulsive forces. The model of cantilever oscillations is applicable to both non-contact and "tapping" AFM. This model can be farther enhanced to describe nanoparticle manipulation by cantilever. At microscopic level tip contamination and details of tip-surface interaction can be simulated using molecular dynamics approach. Integration of mesoscale model with molecular dynamic model is discussed.

  16. The role of nonlinear dynamics in quantitative atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Forchheimer, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Haviland, David B

    2012-07-05

    Various methods of force measurement with the atomic force microscope are compared for their ability to accurately determine the tip-surface force from analysis of the nonlinear cantilever motion. It is explained how intermodulation, or the frequency mixing of multiple drive tones by the nonlinear tip-surface force, can be used to concentrate the nonlinear motion in a narrow band of frequency near the cantilever's fundamental resonance, where accuracy and sensitivity of force measurement are greatest. Two different methods for reconstructing tip-surface forces from intermodulation spectra are explained. The reconstruction of both conservative and dissipative tip-surface interactions from intermodulation spectra are demonstrated on simulated data.

  17. Microscopic Theory for the Role of Attractive Forces in the Dynamics of Supercooled Liquids.

    PubMed

    Dell, Zachary E; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2015-11-13

    We formulate a microscopic, no adjustable parameter, theory of activated relaxation in supercooled liquids directly in terms of the repulsive and attractive forces within the framework of pair correlations. Under isochoric conditions, attractive forces can nonperturbatively modify slow dynamics, but at high enough density their influence vanishes. Under isobaric conditions, attractive forces play a minor role. High temperature apparent Arrhenius behavior and density-temperature scaling are predicted. Our results are consistent with recent isochoric simulations and isobaric experiments on a deeply supercooled molecular liquid. The approach can be generalized to treat colloidal gelation and glass melting, and other soft matter slow dynamics problems.

  18. The NanoBeamBalance: A passive, tensile-test device for the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Mesquida, P.

    2011-05-01

    An add-on device is presented, which significantly expands the force measurement capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM). The device consists of a completely passive mechanism, which translates the vertical motion of the AFM tip in force measurements into a horizontal motion of two sample support pads. The advantage is that it is much easier to deposit microscopic samples from suspension onto flat surfaces than to attach them reliably between tip and a surface. The working-principle and the design of the device is comprehensively described and demonstrated on the example of collagen fibres with a diameter of a few μm. Well-defined tensile measurements in longitudinal direction were performed, showing that the tensile stiffness of collagen fibres from rat tail tendon decreases by a factor of 5 when rehydrated from a dried sample and slowly increases upon cross-linking with glutaraldehyde.

  19. The NanoBeamBalance: a passive, tensile-test device for the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Wenger, M P E; Mesquida, P

    2011-05-01

    An add-on device is presented, which significantly expands the force measurement capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM). The device consists of a completely passive mechanism, which translates the vertical motion of the AFM tip in force measurements into a horizontal motion of two sample support pads. The advantage is that it is much easier to deposit microscopic samples from suspension onto flat surfaces than to attach them reliably between tip and a surface. The working-principle and the design of the device is comprehensively described and demonstrated on the example of collagen fibres with a diameter of a few μm. Well-defined tensile measurements in longitudinal direction were performed, showing that the tensile stiffness of collagen fibres from rat tail tendon decreases by a factor of 5 when rehydrated from a dried sample and slowly increases upon cross-linking with glutaraldehyde.

  20. Cantilever clamp fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A device is disclosed for sealing and clamping a cylindrical element which is to be attached to an object such as a wall, a pressurized vessel or another cylindrical element. The device includes a gland having an inner cylindrical wall, which is threaded at one end and is attached at a bendable end to a deformable portion, which in turn is attached to one end of a conical cantilever structure. The other end of the cantilever structure connects at a bendable area to one end of an outer cylindrical wall. The opposite end of cylindrical wall terminates in a thickened portion, the radially outer surface of which is adapted to accommodate a tool for rotating the gland. The terminal end of cylindrical wall also includes an abutment surface, which is adapted to engage a seal, which in turn engages a surface of a receiver. The receiver further includes a threaded portion for engagement with the threaded portion of gland whereby a tightening rotation of gland relative to receiver will cause relative movement between cylindrical walls and of gland. This movement causes a rotation of the conical structure and thus a bending action at bending area and at the bending end of the upper end of inner cylindrical wall. These rotational and bending actions result in a forcing of the deformable portion radially inwardly so as to contact and deform a pipe. This forcible contact creates a seal between gland and pipe, and simultaneously clamps the pipe in position.

  1. Geometric derivation of the microscopic stress: A covariant central force decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M.; Arroyo, Marino

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the derivation of the microscopic stress, linking the statistical mechanics of particle systems and continuum mechanics. The starting point in our geometric derivation is the Doyle-Ericksen formula, which states that the Cauchy stress tensor is the derivative of the free-energy with respect to the ambient metric tensor and which follows from a covariance argument. Thus, our approach to define the microscopic stress tensor does not rely on the statement of balance of linear momentum as in the classical Irving-Kirkwood-Noll approach. Nevertheless, the resulting stress tensor satisfies balance of linear and angular momentum. Furthermore, our approach removes the ambiguity in the definition of the microscopic stress in the presence of multibody interactions by naturally suggesting a canonical and physically motivated force decomposition into pairwise terms, a key ingredient in this theory. As a result, our approach provides objective expressions to compute a microscopic stress for a system in equilibrium and for force-fields expanded into multibody interactions of arbitrarily high order. We illustrate the proposed methodology with molecular dynamics simulations of a fibrous protein using a force-field involving up to 5-body interactions.

  2. Measuring the viscoelastic properties of human platelets with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Radmacher, M; Fritz, M; Kacher, C M; Cleveland, J P; Hansma, P K

    1996-01-01

    We have measured force curves as a function of the lateral position on top of human platelets with the atomic force microscope. These force curves show the indentation of the cell as the tip loads the sample. By analyzing these force curves we were able to determine the elastic modulus of the platelet with a lateral resolution of approximately 100 nm. The elastic moduli were in a range of 1-50 kPa measured in the frequency range of 1-50 Hz. Loading forces could be controlled with a resolution of 80 pN and indentations of the platelet could be determined with a resolution of 20 nm. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 PMID:8770233

  3. Piezoelectric cantilever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Wan Y. (Inventor); Shih, Wei-Heng (Inventor); Shen, Zuyan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A piezoelectric cantilever with a non-piezoelectric, or piezoelectric tip useful as mass and viscosity sensors. The change in the cantilever mass can be accurately quantified by monitoring a resonance frequency shift of the cantilever. For bio-detection, antibodies or other specific receptors of target antigens may be immobilized on the cantilever surface, preferably on the non-piezoelectric tip. For chemical detection, high surface-area selective absorbent materials are coated on the cantilever tip. Binding of the target antigens or analytes to the cantilever surface increases the cantilever mass. Detection of target antigens or analytes is achieved by monitoring the cantilever's resonance frequency and determining the resonance frequency shift that is due to the mass of the adsorbed target antigens on the cantilever surface. The use of a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever allows both electrical actuation and electrical sensing. Incorporating a non-piezoelectric tip (14) enhances the sensitivity of the sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric cantilever can withstand damping in highly viscous liquids and can be used as a viscosity sensor in wide viscosity range.

  4. Contractility of myofibrils from the heart and diaphragm muscles measured with atomic force cantilevers: effects of heart-specific deletion of arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Paula A B; Ribeiro, Jorge P; Minozzo, Fábio C; Pavlov, Ivan; Leu, Nicolae A; Kurosaka, Satoshi; Kashina, Anna; Rassier, Dilson E

    2013-10-09

    Contractile properties of myofibrils from the myocardium and diaphragm in chronic heart failure are not well understood. We investigated myofibrils in a knockout (KO) mouse model with cardiac-specific deletion of arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase (α-MHCAte1), which presents dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that chronic heart failure in α-MHCAte1 mice is associated with abnormal contractile properties of the heart and diaphragm. We used a newly developed system of atomic force cantilevers (AFC) to compare myofibrils from α-MHCAte1 and age-matched wild type mice (WT). Myofibrils from the myocardium and the diaphragm were attached to the AFC used for force measurements during activation/deactivation cycles at different sarcomere lengths. In the heart, α-MHCAte1 myofibrils presented a reduced force during full activation (89±9 nN/μm(2)) when compared to WT (132±11 nN/μm(2)), and the decrease was not influenced by sarcomere length. These myofibrils presented similar kinetics of force development (K(act)), redevelopment (K(tr)), and relaxation (K(rel)). In the diaphragm, α-MHCAte1 myofibrils presented an increased force during full activation (209±31 nN/μm(2)) when compared to WT (123±20 nN/μm(2)). Diaphragm myofibrils of α-MHCAte1 and WT presented similar K(act), but α-MHCAte1 myofibrils presented a faster K(rel) (6.11±0.41s(-1) vs 4.63±0.41 s(-1)). Contrary to our working hypothesis, diaphragm myofibrils from α-MHCAte1 mice produced an increased force compared to myofibrils from WT. These results suggest a potential compensatory mechanism by which the diaphragm works under loading conditions in the α-MHCAte1 chronic heart failure model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips.

  6. A low temperature scanning tunneling microscope for electronic and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smit, R H M; Grande, R; Lasanta, B; Riquelme, J J; Rubio-Bollinger, G; Agraït, N

    2007-11-01

    In this article, we describe and test a novel way to extend a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with the capability to measure forces. The tuning fork that we use for this is optimized to have a high quality factor and frequency resolution. Moreover, as this technique is fully compatible with the use of bulk tips, it is possible to combine the force measurements with the use of superconductive or magnetic tips, advantageous for electronic spectroscopy. It also allows us to calibrate both the amplitude and the spring constant of the tuning fork easily, in situ and with high precision.

  7. Direct alignment of nematic liquid crystal molecule using atomic force microscope nano-rubbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Itaru; Yoshida, Norio; Ebisawa, Mizue; Takayanagi, Atsuo; Otani, Yukitoshi; Umeda, Norihiro

    2005-12-01

    The orientation control of liquid crystal (LC) molecular on the polyimide film has been necessary to fabricate LC devices. Nano-rubbing by atomic force microscope (AFM) has been proposed as the one of methods to control it precisely. In the method, a thin polyimide film was rubbed by a sharpened AFM probe-tip with relatively strong load force. However, the method has some drawbacks; the frictional wear of AFM probe-tip and the difficulty of reorientation after rubbing. In this paper, we have proposed the orientation control of LC on the polyimide film and using direct AFM nano-rubbing method with weak load forces. The change of LC alignment was quantitatively observed by a polarization microscope and birefringence-contrast scanning near-field optical microscope. The effect of scanning density was strong for azimuth angle but the effect of the scanning velocity was weak for both retardation and azimuth angle. An optical switching device was developed utilized isotropic-nematic phase change of liquid crystal which was rubbed in the grating pattern with methyl red dying, and the optical device was operated at the frequency of 0.5Hz. As a result, The proposed method had an effective method to fabricate novel liquid crystal optical devices.

  8. Atomic force microscope imaging and force measurements at electrified and actively corroding interfaces: Challenges and novel cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtiner, Markus; Ankah, Genesis Ngwa; Bashir, Asif; Renner, Frank Uwe

    2011-02-01

    We report the design of an improved electrochemical cell for atomic force microscope measurements in corrosive electrochemical environments. Our design improvements are guided by experimental requirements for studying corrosive reactions such as selective dissolution, dealloying, pitting corrosion, and/or surface and interface forces at electrified interfaces. Our aim is to examine some of the limitations of typical electrochemical scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiments and in particular to outline precautions and cell-design elements, which must necessarily be taken into account in order to obtain reliable experimental results. In particular, we discuss electrochemical requirements for typical electrochemical SPM experiments and introduce novel design features to avoid common issues such as crevice formations; we discuss the choice of electrodes and contaminations from ions of reference electrodes. We optimize the cell geometry and introduce standard samples for electrochemical AFM experiments. We have tested the novel design by performing force-distance spectroscopy as a function of the applied electrochemical potential between a bare gold electrode surface and a SAM-coated AFM tip. Topography imaging was tested by studying the well-known dealloying process of a Cu3Au(111) surface up to the critical potential. Our design improvements should be equally applicable to in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope cells.

  9. Conductive transparent fiber probes for shear-force atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Tooru

    2006-01-01

    New conductive transparent (CT) probes that can inject currents into nanometer-sized regions and collect light from them have been developed for shear-force atomic force microscopy (SF-AFM) of partially isolative regions. The CT probe consists of a straight elastic silica fiber with one end tapered to a point. The taper is coated with an indium-tin-oxide film as a transparent electrode, and the probe apex has a nanometer-scale radius. The essential feature of the CT probes is coaxial nickel plating on the shaft of the isolative silica fiber, which is adjusted to obtain suitable elasticity for smooth shear-force feedback as well as for supplying currents to the transparent electrode. Experimental results clarified that nickel thickness between 0.5 and 15 microm on 20 mm-long fibers makes resistance low enough for supplying current to the probe apex and also makes the Q curves smooth enough for shear-force feedback. Clear SF-AFM and current images were successfully obtained for a sample containing both conductive and isolative regions. The CT probes for SF-AFM can expand applications of probe-current-induced luminescence measurements to samples that contain highly resistive and isolative regions, for which scanning tunneling microscopy cannot be applied.

  10. Determination of Base Binding Strength and Base Stacking Interaction of DNA Duplex Using Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  11. Determination of base binding strength and base stacking interaction of DNA duplex using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-03-16

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes.

  12. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-03

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  13. Thermal calibration of photodiode sensitivity for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Attard, Phil; Pettersson, Torbjoern; Rutland, Mark W.

    2006-11-15

    The photodiode sensitivity in the atomic force microscope is calibrated by relating the voltage noise to the thermal fluctuations of the cantilever angle. The method accounts for the ratio of the thermal fluctuations measured in the fundamental vibration mode to the total, and also for the tilt and extended tip of the cantilever. The method is noncontact and is suitable for soft or deformable surfaces where the constant compliance method cannot be used. For hard surfaces, the method can also be used to calibrate the cantilever spring constant.

  14. Integrated micro-scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; MacDonald, N. C.; Miller, S. A.

    1995-10-01

    Two versions of micro-scanning tunneling microscopes (micro-STMs) have been fabricated. The integrated micro-STMs are fabricated from single crystal silicon using the high-aspect-ratio SCREAM process. Each micro-STM includes integrated xy comb drive actuators and a torsional z actuator with integrated cantilever and tip. One micro-STM measures approximately 200 μm on-a-side and is an example of a STM element for a STM array architecture. Another, larger micro-STM/atomic force microscope measures 2 mm on-a-side including a 1 mm long cantilever with a 20 nm diam tip. We demonstrate the operation of this larger STM by obtaining a STM image of a 200 nm metal conductor on a silicon chip.

  15. The growth cones of living neurons probed by the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Davide; Grattarola, Massimo; Tedesco, Mariateresa

    2011-01-01

    A detailed report of experimental findings concerning the use of atomic force microscopy to probe growth cones of chick embryo spinal cord neurons under vital conditions is given.The role played by indentation in the making of images and force-versus-distance curves is critically discussed. As a result, the thickness of growth cone regions is quantitatively estimated. By comparing the obtained images with descriptions given in the literature on the basis of other microscopy techniques, a central (C) region and a peripheral (P) region are identified, characterized by a different thickness and a different structural organization. Moreover, clusters of adhesion molecules are tentatively identified in regions where neuron arborizations were challenged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip.

  16. Under pressure: predicting pressurized metered dose inhaler interactions using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Young, Paul M; Price, Robert; Lewis, David; Edge, Stephen; Traini, Daniela

    2003-06-01

    Drug particulate interactions in pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI) may lead to a decrease in aerosolization efficiency and subsequent efficacy in patient treatment. The interactions between salbutamol sulfate (commonly used in Ventolin pMDIs) and a series of pMDI canister materials were investigated using the atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe technique. Approximately 4000 individual force-distance curves were determined for a drug probe and three surfaces (10 x 10 mum areas) in situ, in a model propellant. The area under each force-distance curve was integrated to obtain separation energy values. Median separation energy values followed the rank order borosilicate glass > aluminum > PTFE, suggesting PTFE to be the most suitable canister coating.

  17. The role of adhesion in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, D.; Hunt, J. P.; Workman, R. K.; Yao, X.; Peterson, C. A.

    The equation of motion of the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in the tapping mode in the presence of tip-sample adhesion modeled by the JKR theory is solved self-consistently. The vibration of the cantilever is discussed in terms of the parameters characterizing the properties of the cantilever, tip, and sample. A comparison with the experimental phase-shifts as a function of the setpoint reported by Magonov et al. is presented and sample indentation and tip-sample force and pressure are analyzed.

  18. Photothermally excited force modulation microscopy for broadband nanomechanical property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan Killgore, Jason P.

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate photothermally excited force modulation microscopy (PTE FMM) for mechanical property characterization across a broad frequency range with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Photothermal excitation allows for an AFM cantilever driving force that varies smoothly as a function of drive frequency, thus avoiding the problem of spurious resonant vibrations that hinder piezoelectric excitation schemes. A complication of PTE FMM is that the sub-resonance cantilever vibration shape is fundamentally different compared to piezoelectric excitation. By directly measuring the vibrational shape of the cantilever, we show that PTE FMM is an accurate nanomechanical characterization method. PTE FMM is a pathway towards the characterization of frequency sensitive specimens such as polymers and biomaterials with frequency range limited only by the resonance frequency of the cantilever and the low frequency limit of the AFM.

  19. The relation between a microscopic threshold-force model and macroscopic models of adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulikal, Srivatsan; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lapusta, Nadia

    2017-06-01

    This paper continues our recent work on the relationship between discrete contact interactions at the microscopic scale and continuum contact interactions at the macroscopic scale (Hulikal et al., J. Mech. Phys. Solids 76, 144-161, 2015). The focus of this work is on adhesion. We show that a collection of a large number of discrete elements governed by a threshold-force based model at the microscopic scale collectively gives rise to continuum fracture mechanics at the macroscopic scale. A key step is the introduction of an efficient numerical method that enables the computation of a large number of discrete contacts. Finally, while this work focuses on scaling laws, the methodology introduced in this paper can also be used to study rough-surface adhesion.

  20. Microscopic analysis of sharp force trauma in bone and cartilage: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Christian; Rainwater, Christopher W; Fridie, Jeannette S

    2013-09-01

    Sharp force trauma research lacks agreement on reported error rates for correctly identifying toolmark characteristics on bone and cartilage. This study provides error rates for determining blade class (serrated, partially serrated, nonserrated) and type of edge bevel (left, right, even). Three analysts examined cuts to a wax medium, cartilage, and bone using two types of microscopes. Additionally, the observers examined impressions taken from the wax medium and the cartilage. Overall, a total of 504 observations were performed. Serrated blades were distinguishable from nonserrated blades due to their patterned striations. Some difficulties were encountered in distinguishing serrated and partially serrated blades; however, when these groups were considered together as one classification type (serrated), classification accuracy improved from 79% to 96%. Classification accuracy for edge bevel was 65%. Error rates were similar when comparing direct observation of the cut marks versus indirect observation (impressions). Additionally, the type of microscope used did not affect error rates.

  1. The relation between a microscopic threshold-force model and macroscopic models of adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulikal, Srivatsan; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lapusta, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    This paper continues our recent work on the relationship between discrete contact interactions at the microscopic scale and continuum contact interactions at the macroscopic scale (Hulikal et al., J. Mech. Phys. Solids 76, 144-161, 2015). The focus of this work is on adhesion. We show that a collection of a large number of discrete elements governed by a threshold-force based model at the microscopic scale collectively gives rise to continuum fracture mechanics at the macroscopic scale. A key step is the introduction of an efficient numerical method that enables the computation of a large number of discrete contacts. Finally, while this work focuses on scaling laws, the methodology introduced in this paper can also be used to study rough-surface adhesion.

  2. Non-contact quantification of laser micro-impulse in water by atomic force microscopy and its application for biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2011-12-01

    We developed a local force measurement system of a femtosecond laser-induced impulsive force, which is due to shock and stress waves generated by focusing an intense femtosecond laser into water with a highly numerical aperture objective lens. In this system, the force localized in micron-sized region was detected by bending movement of a cantilever of atomic force microscope (AFM). Here we calculated the bending movement of the AFM cantilever when the femtosecond laser is focused in water at the vicinity of the cantilever and the impulsive force is loaded on the cantilever. From the result, a method to estimate the total of the impulsive force at the laser focal point was suggested and applied to estimate intercellular adhesion strength.

  3. Molecular Mechanics of Single Protein Molecules Measured with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Paul K.

    2000-03-01

    After a short history of AFM development in our lab, including recent developments with small cantilevers, this talk will focus on 1) pulling single protein molecules to explore the forces involved in unfolding and 2) watching single protein molecules in action to learn how they function mechanically. 1) Pulling experiments on proteins used as marine adhesives in abalone shells and other biological composite materials reveal modules bound together by sacrificial bonds that are weaker than the backbone bonds in the polypeptide chain.1 These self-healing modules provide effective energy absorption and appear to be a real key to understanding the impressive fracture resistance of biological composite materials. For example, the abalone shell is 3000 times more fracture resistant than a single crystal of calcium carbonate, despite the fact that 97% of the mass of the shell is crystalline calcium carbonate. 2) It is becoming possible, again with AFMs, to learn how some enzymes, nature's nanomachines, do their exquisite materials synthesis and processing. The talk will focus on the chaperonin system of GroEL and GroES that processes incorrectly folded proteins and assists them in refolding correctly. It is becoming possible not only to see single molecule events such as the association and disassociation of the GroEL-Gro-ES complex, but also to measure potential energy functions for the molecules in various conformational states. These new measurements, together with detailed structural measurements from other techniques, give new clues about how these proteins use the energy of ATP to do their work. Since the AFMs of today are very far from fundamental limits, this is only the beginning. 1. B. L. Smith, T. E. Schaffer, M. Viani, J. B. Thompson, N. A. Frederick, J. Kindt, A. Belcher, G. D. Stucky, D. E. Morse and P. K. Hansma, Nature 399, 761 (1999)

  4. A Weed Cantilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Elhannan L.; Padalino, John

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Environmental Action Task activity, which may be used as a recreational game or an environmental perception experience, may be conducted indoors or out-of-doors, using weed stems (or spaghetti) and masking tape to construct a cantilever. Small groups of children work together to make the cantilever with the longest arm. Further…

  5. Atomic Force Microscope Investigations of Bacterial Biofilms Treated with Gas Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervoort, Kurt; Zelaya, Anna; Brelles-Marino, Graciela

    2012-02-01

    We present investigations of bacterial biofilms before and after treatment with gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve biofilm communities, where bacteria grow embedded in an exopolysaccharide matrix, and cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard inactivation methods. In this study, biofilms formed by the opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Through AFM images and micromechanical measurements we observed bacterial morphological damage and reduced AFM tip-sample surface adhesion following plasma treatment.

  6. Manipulation, dissection, and lithography using modified tapping mode atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Li, Zhuang; Wei, Gang; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li; Sun, Lanlan

    2006-12-01

    A modified tapping mode of the atomic force microscope (AFM) was introduced for manipulation, dissection, and lithography. By sufficiently decreasing the amplitude of AFM tip in the normal tapping mode and adjusting the setpoint, the tip-sample interaction can be efficiently controlled. This modified tapping mode has some characteristics of the AFM contact mode and can be used to manipulate nanoparticles, dissect biomolecules, and make lithographs on various surfaces. This method did not need any additional equipment and it can be applied to any AFM system. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Atomic force microscopic study of the effects of ethanol on yeast cell surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K; Walker, Graeme M

    2006-02-01

    The detrimental effects of ethanol toxicity on the cell surface morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354) were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In combination with culture viability and mean cell volume measurements AFM studies allowed us to relate the cell surface morphological changes, observed on nanometer lateral resolution, with the cellular stress physiology. Exposing yeasts to increasing stressful concentrations of ethanol led to decreased cell viabilities and mean cell volumes. Together with the roughness and bearing volume analyses of the AFM images, the results provided novel insight into the relative ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Sc. pombe.

  8. Note: A novel atomic force microscope fast imaging approach: Variable-speed scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yudong; Fang, Yongchun; Yu, Jie; Dong, Xiaokun

    2011-05-01

    Imaging speed is one of the key factors limiting atomic force microscope's (AFM) wide applications. To improve its performance, a variable-speed scanning (VSS) method is designed in this note for an AFM. Specifically, in the VSS mode, the scanning speed is tuned online according to the feedback information to properly distribute imaging time along sample surface. Furthermore, some practical mechanism is proposed to determine the best time of moving the AFM tip to the next scanned point. The contrast experiment results show that the VSS method speeds up the imaging rate while ensuring image quality.

  9. Note: A novel atomic force microscope fast imaging approach: variable-speed scanning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yudong; Fang, Yongchun; Yu, Jie; Dong, Xiaokun

    2011-05-01

    Imaging speed is one of the key factors limiting atomic force microscope's (AFM) wide applications. To improve its performance, a variable-speed scanning (VSS) method is designed in this note for an AFM. Specifically, in the VSS mode, the scanning speed is tuned online according to the feedback information to properly distribute imaging time along sample surface. Furthermore, some practical mechanism is proposed to determine the best time of moving the AFM tip to the next scanned point. The contrast experiment results show that the VSS method speeds up the imaging rate while ensuring image quality.

  10. Minute Current Detection during Anodic Oxidation by Atomic Force Microscope At High Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramochi, Hiromi; Ando, Kazunori; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2003-09-01

    The faradaic current during anodic oxidation has been detected using an atomic force microscope with intent to study the meniscus formation process and the oxidation mechanism. The faradaic current is of the order of pA for a Si sample, which is at the same level as the leakage current noise; there are problems in detecting, such as sensitivity limits and poor reproducibility. These problems occurred due to high humidity. We could overcome these problems by hermetically sealing the entire electronic parts in the unit to avoid the humidity effects and achieved the detection of a minute current of the sub-pA order even at high humidity.

  11. Velocity controlled anodization nanolithography with an atomic force microscope using Faradaic current feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Matthew S.; Cole, Daniel G.; Clark, Robert L.

    2007-03-01

    A technique, called velocity controlled anodization nanolithography, is presented that ensures line continuity during atomic force microscope based local anodic oxidation on silicon. Spontaneous current spikes disrupt the generation of uniform silicon oxide patterns during lithography at low humidity. Varying the translational speed during lithography in response to the current fluctuations enables the formation of a more complete and continuous oxide layer. The velocity corrections as a result of control are able to maintain constant current flow through the tip-sample interface. The authors demonstrate that this method is effective for in situ quality control.

  12. Atomic Force Microscope Investigations of Biofilm-Forming Bacterial Cells Treated with Gas Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervoort, Kurt; Renshaw, Andrew; Abramzon, Nina; Brelles-Marino, Graciela

    2009-03-01

    We present investigations of biofilm-forming bacteria before and after treatment from gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve bacteria in biofilm communities, where cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard killing methods. Chromobacterium violaceum were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). After 5 min. plasma treatment, 90% of cells were inactivated, that is, transformed to non-culturable cells. Results for cell surface morphology and micromechanical properties for plasma treatments lasting from 5 to 60 minutes were obtained and will be presented.

  13. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of fibrin 'A-a' polymerization interactions via the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averett, Laurel E.

    Fibrin, the polymerized form of the soluble plasma protein fibrinogen, plays a critical role in hemostasis as the structural scaffold of blood clots. The primary functions of fibrin are to withstand the shear forces of blood flow and provide mechanical stability to the clot, protecting the wound. While studies have investigated the mechanical properties of fibrin constructs, the response to force of critical polymerization interactions such as the 'A--a' knob--hole interaction remains unclear. Herein, the response of the 'A--a' bond to force was examined at the single-molecule level using the atomic force microscope. Force spectroscopy methodology was developed to examine the 'A--a' interaction while reducing the incidence of both nonspecific and multiple molecule interactions. The rupture of this interaction resulted in a previously unreported characteristic force profile comprised of up to four events. We hypothesized that the first event represented reorientation of the fibrinogen molecule, the second and third represented unfolding of structures in the D region of fibrinogen, and the last event was the rupture of the 'A--a' bond weakened by prior structural unfolding. The configuration, molecular extension, and kinetic parameters of each event in the characteristic pattern were examined to compare the unfolding of fibrin to other proteins unfolded by force. Fitting the pattern with polymer models showed that the D region of fibrinogen could lengthen by ˜50% of the length of a fibrin monomer before rupture of the 'A--a' bond. Analysis showed that the second and third events had kinetic parameters similar to other protein structures unfolded by force. Studies of the dependence of the characteristic pattern on calcium, concentration of sodium chloride, pH, and temperature demonstrated that the incidence of the last event was affected by solution conditions. However, only low pH and high temperatures reduced the probability that an interaction was characteristic

  14. Nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy and imaging of structural lipids in human stratum corneum using an atomic force microscope to directly detect absorbed light from a tunable IR laser source.

    PubMed

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Domanov, Yegor; Balooch, Guive; Luengo, Gustavo S

    2013-06-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) and a tunable infrared (IR) laser source have been combined in a single instrument (AFM-IR) capable of producing ~200-nm spatial resolution IR spectra and absorption images. This new capability enables IR spectroscopic characterization of human stratum corneum at unprecendented levels. Samples of normal and delipidized stratum corneum were embedded, cross-sectioned and mounted on ZnSe prisms. A pulsed tunable IR laser source produces thermomechanical expansion upon absorption, which is detected through excitation of contact resonance modes in the AFM cantilever. In addition to reducing the total lipid content, the delipidization process damages the stratum corneum morphological structure. The delipidized stratum corneum shows substantially less long-chain CH2 -stretching IR absorption band intensity than normal skin. AFM-IR images that compare absorbances at 2930/cm (lipid) and 3290/cm (keratin) suggest that regions of higher lipid concentration are located at the perimeter of corneocytes in the normal stratum corneum.

  15. Imaging and Manipulating Molecules on a Zeolite Surface with an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenhorn, A. L.; Mac Dougall, J. E.; Gould, S. A. C.; Cox, S. D.; Wise, W. S.; Massie, J.; Maivald, P.; Elings, V. B.; Stucky, G. D.; Hansma, P. K.

    1990-03-01

    The adsorption of neutral molecules and ions on the surfaces of zeolites was observed in real time with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Direct imaging of the surface of the zeolite clinoptilolite was possible by using a diluted tert-butyl ammonium chloride solution as a medium. Images of the crystal in different liquids revealed that molecules could be bound to the surface in different ways; neutral molecules of tert-butanol formed an ordered array, whereas tert-butyl ammonium ions formed clusters. These absorbed molecules were not rearranged by the AFM tip when used in an imaging mode. However, when a sufficiently large force was applied, the tip of the AFM could rearrange the tert-butyl ammonium ions on the zeolite surface. This demonstration of molecular manipulation suggests new applications, including biosensors and lithography.

  16. Silicon nanowire transistors with a channel width of 4 nm fabricated by atomic force microscope nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Martinez, J; Martínez, R V; Garcia, R

    2008-11-01

    The emergence of an ultrasensitive sensor technology based on silicon nanowires requires both the fabrication of nanoscale diameter wires and the integration with microelectronic processes. Here we demonstrate an atomic force microscopy lithography that enables the reproducible fabrication of complex single-crystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistors with a high electrical performance. The nanowires have been carved from a silicon-on-insulator wafer by a combination of local oxidation processes with a force microscope and etching steps. We have fabricated and measured the electrical properties of a silicon nanowire transistor with a channel width of 4 nm. The flexibility of the nanofabrication process is illustrated by showing the electrical performance of two nanowire circuits with different geometries. The fabrication method is compatible with standard Si CMOS processing technologies and, therefore, can be used to develop a wide range of architectures and new microelectronic devices.

  17. Biochemical and atomic force microscopic characterization of salmon nasal cartilage proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Ikuko; Mineta, Takashi; Sasaki, Mana; Tatara, Yota; Makino, Eiji; Kato, Yoji

    2014-03-15

    Biological activities of salmon nasal cartilage proteoglycan fractions are known, however, structural information is lacking. Recently, the major proteoglycan of this cartilage was identified as aggrecan. In this study, global molecular images and glycosaminoglycan structure of salmon nasal cartilage aggrecan purified from 4M guanidine hydrochloride extract were analyzed using HPLCs and atomic force microscopy with bovine tracheal cartilage aggrecan as a control. The estimated numbers of sulfates per disaccharide unit of chondroitin sulfate chains of salmon and bovine aggrecans were similar (approximately 0.85). However, the disaccharide composition showed a higher proportion of chondroitin 6-sulfate units in salmon aggrecan, 60%, compared to 40% in bovine. Gel filtration HPLC and monosaccharide analysis showed the salmon aggrecan had a lower number (approximately one-third), but 1.5-3.3 times longer chondroitin sulfate chains than the bovine aggrecan. Atomic force microscopic molecular images of aggrecan supported the images predicted by biochemical analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  19. Self-heating in piezoresistive cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Corbin, Elise A.; King, William P.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-01-01

    We report experiments and models of self-heating in piezoresistive microcantilevers that show how cantilever measurement resolution depends on the thermal properties of the surrounding fluid. The predicted cantilever temperature rise from a finite difference model is compared with detailed temperature measurements on fabricated devices. Increasing the fluid thermal conductivity allows for lower temperature operation for a given power dissipation, leading to lower force and displacement noise. The force noise in air is 76% greater than in water for the same increase in piezoresistor temperature. PMID:21731884

  20. Measurements of dispersion forces between colloidal latex particles with the atomic force microscope and comparison with Lifshitz theory

    SciTech Connect

    Elzbieciak-Wodka, Magdalena; Ruiz-Cabello, F. Javier Montes; Trefalt, Gregor; Maroni, Plinio; Borkovec, Michal; Popescu, Mihail N.

    2014-03-14

    Interaction forces between carboxylate colloidal latex particles of about 2 μm in diameter immersed in aqueous solutions of monovalent salts were measured with the colloidal probe technique, which is based on the atomic force microscope. We have systematically varied the ionic strength, the type of salt, and also the surface charge densities of the particles through changes in the solution pH. Based on these measurements, we have accurately measured the dispersion forces acting between the particles and estimated the apparent Hamaker constant to be (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup −21} J at a separation distance of about 10 nm. This value is basically independent of the salt concentration and the type of salt. Good agreement with Lifshitz theory is found when roughness effects are taken into account. The combination of retardation and roughness effects reduces the value of the apparent Hamaker constant and its ionic strength dependence with respect to the case of ideally smooth surfaces.

  1. Computational simulations of solvation force and squeezing out of dodecane chain molecules in an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong-Guang; Xiang, Yuan; Leng, Yongsheng

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the squeeze out behaviors of liquid films at nanometer scale in an atomic force microscope (AFM) has been a significant interest since the 1990s. We carry out all-atom static-mode AFM simulations in a liquid-vapor molecular dynamics ensemble to investigate the solvation force oscillation and squeeze out mechanisms of a confined linear dodecane fluid between a gold AFM tip and a mica substrate. Solvation force oscillations are found to be associated with the layering transition of the liquid film and unstable jumps of the AFM tip. Detailed structural analyses and molecular animations show that the local permeation of chain molecules and the squeeze out of molecules near the edge of contact promote the layering transition under compression. The confinement-induced slow down dynamics is manifested by the decrease in diffusivity and increase in rotational relaxation times. However, the persistent diffusive behavior of dodecane chain molecules even in the single-monolayer film is attributed to the chain sliding motions in the film due to the substantial vacancy space and thermal fluctuations.

  2. Measurements of dispersion forces between colloidal latex particles with the atomic force microscope and comparison with Lifshitz theory.

    PubMed

    Elzbieciak-Wodka, Magdalena; Popescu, Mihail N; Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F Javier; Trefalt, Gregor; Maroni, Plinio; Borkovec, Michal

    2014-03-14

    Interaction forces between carboxylate colloidal latex particles of about 2 μm in diameter immersed in aqueous solutions of monovalent salts were measured with the colloidal probe technique, which is based on the atomic force microscope. We have systematically varied the ionic strength, the type of salt, and also the surface charge densities of the particles through changes in the solution pH. Based on these measurements, we have accurately measured the dispersion forces acting between the particles and estimated the apparent Hamaker constant to be (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10(-21) J at a separation distance of about 10 nm. This value is basically independent of the salt concentration and the type of salt. Good agreement with Lifshitz theory is found when roughness effects are taken into account. The combination of retardation and roughness effects reduces the value of the apparent Hamaker constant and its ionic strength dependence with respect to the case of ideally smooth surfaces.

  3. Indentation quantification for in-liquid nanomechanical measurement of soft material using an atomic force microscope: Rate-dependent elastic modulus of live cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Juan; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Zou, Qingze

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a control-based approach to replace the conventional method to achieve accurate indentation quantification is proposed for nanomechanical measurement of live cells using atomic force microscope. Accurate indentation quantification is central to probe-based nanomechanical property measurement. The conventional method for in-liquid nanomechanical measurement of live cells, however, fails to accurately quantify the indentation as effects of the relative probe acceleration and the hydrodynamic force are not addressed. As a result, significant errors and uncertainties are induced in the nanomechanical properties measured. In this paper, a control-based approach is proposed to account for these adverse effects by tracking the same excitation force profile on both a live cell and a hard reference sample through the use of an advanced control technique, and by quantifying the indentation from the difference of the cantilever base displacement in these two measurements. The proposed control-based approach not only eliminates the relative probe acceleration effect with no need to calibrate the parameters involved, but it also reduces the hydrodynamic force effect significantly when the force load rate becomes high. We further hypothesize that, by using the proposed control-based approach, the rate-dependent elastic modulus of live human epithelial cells under different stress conditions can be reliably quantified to predict the elasticity evolution of cell membranes, and hence can be used to predict cellular behaviors. By implementing the proposed approach, the elastic modulus of HeLa cells before and after the stress process were quantified as the force load rate was changed over three orders of magnitude from 0.1 to 100 Hz, where the amplitude of the applied force and the indentation were at 0.4–2 nN and 250–450 nm, respectively. The measured elastic modulus of HeLa cells showed a clear power-law dependence on the load rate, both before and after the

  4. Development of nanomanipulator using a high-speed atomic force microscope coupled with a haptic device.

    PubMed

    Iwata, F; Ohashi, Y; Ishisaki, I; Picco, L M; Ushiki, T

    2013-10-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been widely used for surface fabrication and manipulation. However, nanomanipulation using a conventional AFM is inefficient because of the sequential nature of the scan-manipulation scan cycle, which makes it difficult for the operator to observe the region of interest and perform the manipulation simultaneously. In this paper, a nanomanipulation technique using a high-speed atomic force microscope (HS-AFM) is described. During manipulation using the AFM probe, the operation is periodically interrupted for a fraction of a second for high-speed imaging that allows the topographical image of the manipulated surface to be periodically updated. With the use of high-speed imaging, the interrupting time for imaging can be greatly reduced, and as a result, the operator almost does not notice the blink time of the interruption for imaging during the manipulation. This creates a more intuitive interface with greater feedback and finesse to the operator. Nanofabrication under real-time monitoring was performed to demonstrate the utility of this arrangement for real-time nanomanipulation of sample surfaces under ambient conditions. Furthermore, the HS-AFM is coupled with a haptic device for the human interface, enabling the operator to move the HS-AFM probe to any position on the surface while feeling the response from the surface during the manipulation.

  5. A microscopic approach to Casimir and Casimir–Polder forces between metallic bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Barcellona, Pablo Passante, Roberto

    2015-04-15

    We consider the Casimir–Polder interaction energy between a metallic nanoparticle and a metallic plate, as well as the Casimir interaction energy between two macroscopic metal plates, in terms of the many-body dispersion interactions between their constituents. Expressions for two- and three-body dispersion interactions between the microscopic parts of a real metal are first obtained, both in the retarded and non-retarded limits. These expressions are then used to evaluate the overall two- and three-body contributions to the macroscopic Casimir–Polder and Casimir force, and to compare them with each other, for the two following geometries: metal nanoparticle/half-space and half-space/half-space, where all the materials are assumed perfect conductors. The above evaluation is obtained by summing up the contributions from the microscopic constituents of the bodies (metal nanoparticles). In the case of nanoparticle/half-space, our results fully agree with those that can be extracted from the corresponding macroscopic results, and explicitly show the non-applicability of the pairwise approximation for the geometry considered. In both cases, we find that, while the overall two-body contribution yields an attractive force, the overall three-body contribution is repulsive. Also, they turn out to be of the same order, consistently with the known non applicability of the pairwise approximation. The issue of the rapidity of convergence of the many-body expansion is also briefly discussed.

  6. Presynaptic structure of Aplysia single live neuron by atomic force and confocal laser scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Aee-Young; Chae, Yeon-Su; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Seonghoon

    2013-05-02

    The structural and functional plasticity of Aplysia mechanosensory presynaptic neurons has been studied in relation with the mechanism underlying learning and memory. Long-term facilitation (LTF), which is a well-known cellular model for long-term memory in Aplysia, is accompanied by new synaptic structural growth or change. We developed a combined atomic force microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope (AFM-CLSM) system integrated with a MATLAB routine for image processing to concurrently obtain high-resolution 3-dimensional (3D) outer-surface morphological images and 3D interior fluorescence images. With our combined AFM-CLSM system, volumetric changes in the presynaptic structures (varicosities) of Aplysia live sensory-motor neuron cocultures were observed. The spatial distribution of synaptic vesicle molecules in the preexisting varicosities was monitored together with a volumetric change in the varicosities. Our combined AFM-CLSM system is successfully adapted for measuring learning-related structural changes and the movement of synaptic molecules in the single live neuron through interaction force and fluorescence imaging.

  7. Re-calibration of the NIST SRM 2059 master standard using traceable atomic force microscope metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Potzick, James; Orji, Ndubuisi G.

    2008-10-01

    The current photomask linewidth Standard Reference Material (SRM) supplied by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), SRM 2059, is the fifth generation of such standards for mask metrology. An in house optical microscope tool developed at NIST, called the NIST ultra-violet (UV) microscope, was used in transmission mode to calibrate the SRM 2059 photomasks. Due to the limitations of available optical models for determining the edge response in the UV microscope, the tool was used in a comparator mode. One of the masks was selected as a master standard - and the features on this mask were calibrated using traceable critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) dimensional metrology. The optical measurements were then used to determine the relative offsets between the widths on the master standard and individual masks for sale to customers. At the time of these measurements, however, the uncertainties in the CD-AFM reference metrology on the master standard were larger than can now be achieved because the NIST single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) project had not been completed. Using our CD-AFM at NIST, we have performed new measurements on the SRM 2059 master standard. The new AFM results are in agreement with the prior measurements and have expanded uncertainties approximately one fourth of those of the earlier results for sub-micrometer features. When the optical comparator data for customers masks are reanalyzed using these new AFM results, we expect to reduce the combined reported uncertainties for the linewidths on the actual SRMs by at least 40 % for the nominal 0.25 μm features.

  8. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Udo; Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-02-27

    The authors present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1 pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15 pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  9. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Albers, Boris J; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C; Baykara, Mehmet Z; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2008-03-01

    We present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1 pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15 pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  10. Combination of Universal Mechanical Testing Machine with Atomic Force Microscope for Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian; He, Dannong

    2015-08-01

    Surface deformation and fracture processes of materials under external force are important for understanding and developing materials. Here, a combined horizontal universal mechanical testing machine (HUMTM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system is developed by modifying UMTM to combine with AFM and designing a height-adjustable stabilizing apparatus. Then the combined HUMTM-AFM system is evaluated. Finally, as initial demonstrations, it is applied to analyze the relationship among macroscopic mechanical properties, surface nanomorphological changes under external force, and fracture processes of two kinds of representative large scale thin film materials: polymer material with high strain rate (Parafilm) and metal material with low strain rate (aluminum foil). All the results demonstrate the combined HUMTM-AFM system overcomes several disadvantages of current AFM-combined tensile/compression devices including small load force, incapability for large scale specimens, disability for materials with high strain rate, and etc. Therefore, the combined HUMTM-AFM system is a promising tool for materials research in the future.

  11. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S.; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis.

  12. A wireless centrifuge force microscope (CFM) enables multiplexed single-molecule experiments in a commercial centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tony; Patel, Dhruv S; Halvorsen, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The centrifuge force microscope (CFM) was recently introduced as a platform for massively parallel single-molecule manipulation and analysis. Here we developed a low-cost and self-contained CFM module that works directly within a commercial centrifuge, greatly improving accessibility and ease of use. Our instrument incorporates research grade video microscopy, a power source, a computer, and wireless transmission capability to simultaneously monitor many individually tethered microspheres. We validated the instrument by performing single-molecule force shearing of short DNA duplexes. For a 7 bp duplex, we observed over 1000 dissociation events due to force dependent shearing from 2 pN to 12 pN with dissociation times in the range of 10-100 s. We extended the measurement to a 10 bp duplex, applying a 12 pN force clamp and directly observing single-molecule dissociation over an 85 min experiment. Our new CFM module facilitates simple and inexpensive experiments that dramatically improve access to single-molecule analysis.

  13. Combination of Universal Mechanical Testing Machine with Atomic Force Microscope for Materials Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jian; He, Dannong

    2015-01-01

    Surface deformation and fracture processes of materials under external force are important for understanding and developing materials. Here, a combined horizontal universal mechanical testing machine (HUMTM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system is developed by modifying UMTM to combine with AFM and designing a height-adjustable stabilizing apparatus. Then the combined HUMTM-AFM system is evaluated. Finally, as initial demonstrations, it is applied to analyze the relationship among macroscopic mechanical properties, surface nanomorphological changes under external force, and fracture processes of two kinds of representative large scale thin film materials: polymer material with high strain rate (Parafilm) and metal material with low strain rate (aluminum foil). All the results demonstrate the combined HUMTM-AFM system overcomes several disadvantages of current AFM-combined tensile/compression devices including small load force, incapability for large scale specimens, disability for materials with high strain rate, and etc. Therefore, the combined HUMTM-AFM system is a promising tool for materials research in the future. PMID:26265357

  14. An atomic force microscope operating at hypergravity for in situ measurement of cellular mechano-response.

    PubMed

    van Loon, J J W A; van Laar, M C; Korterik, J P; Segerink, F B; Wubbels, R J; de Jong, H A A; van Hulst, N F

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel atomic force microscope (AFM) system, operational in liquid at variable gravity, dedicated to image cell shape changes of cells in vitro under hypergravity conditions. The hypergravity AFM is realized by mounting a stand-alone AFM into a large-diameter centrifuge. The balance between mechanical forces, both intra- and extracellular, determines both cell shape and integrity. Gravity seems to be an insignificant force at the level of a single cell, in contrast to the effect of gravity on a complete (multicellular) organism, where for instance bones and muscles are highly unloaded under near weightless (microgravity) conditions. However, past space flights and ground based cell biological studies, under both hypogravity and hypergravity conditions have shown changes in cell behaviour (signal transduction), cell architecture (cytoskeleton) and proliferation. Thus the role of direct or indirect gravity effects at the level of cells has remained unclear. Here we aim to address the role of gravity on cell shape. We concentrate on the validation of the novel AFM for use under hypergravity conditions. We find indications that a single cell exposed to 2 to 3 x g reduces some 30-50% in average height, as monitored with AFM. Indeed, in situ measurements of the effects of changing gravitational load on cell shape are well feasible by means of AFM in liquid. The combination provides a promising technique to measure, online, the temporal characteristics of the cellular mechano-response during exposure to inertial forces.

  15. Nanomechanical Cantilever Array Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Hans; Hegner, Martin; Gerber, Christoph

    Microfabricated cantilever sensors have attracted much interest in recent years as devices for the fast and reliable detection of small concentrations of molecules in air and solution. In addition to application of such sensors for gas and chemical-vapor sensing, for example as an artificial nose, they have also been employed to measure physical properties of tiny amounts of materials in miniaturized versions of conventional standard techniques such as calorimetry, thermogravimetry, weighing, photothermal spectroscopy, as well as for monitoring chemical reactions such as catalysis on small surfaces. In the past few years, the cantilever-sensor concept has been extended to biochemical applications and as an analytical device for measurements of biomaterials. Because of the label-free detection principle of cantilever sensors, their small size and scalability, this kind of device is advantageous for diagnostic applications and disease monitoring, as well as for genomics or proteomics purposes. The use of microcantilever arrays enables detection of several analytes simultaneously and solves the inherent problem of thermal drift often present when using single microcantilever sensors, as some of the cantilevers can be used as sensor cantilevers for detection, and other cantilevers serve as passivated reference cantilevers that do not exhibit affinity to the molecules to be detected.

  16. Getting Physical with Your Chemistry: Mechanically Investigating Local Structure and Properties of Surfaces with the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, William F.; Hoh, Jan H.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) investigates mechanically the chemical properties of individual molecules, surfaces, and materials using suitably designed probes. The current state of the art of AFM in terms of imaging, force measurement, and sample manipulation and its application to physical chemistry is discussed.

  17. Getting Physical with Your Chemistry: Mechanically Investigating Local Structure and Properties of Surfaces with the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, William F.; Hoh, Jan H.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) investigates mechanically the chemical properties of individual molecules, surfaces, and materials using suitably designed probes. The current state of the art of AFM in terms of imaging, force measurement, and sample manipulation and its application to physical chemistry is discussed.

  18. Rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics using AFM cantilevers as nanomechanical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, G.; Alonso-Sarduy, L.; Rio, L. Marques; Bizzini, A.; Trampuz, A.; Notz, J.; Dietler, G.; Kasas, S.

    2013-07-01

    The widespread misuse of drugs has increased the number of multiresistant bacteria, and this means that tools that can rapidly detect and characterize bacterial response to antibiotics are much needed in the management of infections. Various techniques, such as the resazurin-reduction assays, the mycobacterial growth indicator tube or polymerase chain reaction-based methods, have been used to investigate bacterial metabolism and its response to drugs. However, many are relatively expensive or unable to distinguish between living and dead bacteria. Here we show that the fluctuations of highly sensitive atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to detect low concentrations of bacteria, characterize their metabolism and quantitatively screen (within minutes) their response to antibiotics. We applied this methodology to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing that live bacteria produced larger cantilever fluctuations than bacteria exposed to antibiotics. Our preliminary experiments suggest that the fluctuation is associated with bacterial metabolism.

  19. Calibration of frictional forces in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.; Carpick, R.W.; Salmeron, M.

    1996-09-01

    The atomic force microscope can provide information on the atomic-level frictional properties of surfaces, but reproducible quantitative measurements are difficult to obtain. Parameters that are either unknown or difficult to precisely measure include the normal and lateral cantilever force constants (particularly with microfabricated cantilevers), the tip height, the deflection sensor response, and the tip structure and composition at the tip-surface contact. We present an {ital in} {ital situ} experimental procedure to determine the response of a cantilever to lateral forces in terms of its normal force response. This procedure is quite general. It will work with any type of deflection sensor and does not require the knowledge or direct measurement of the lever dimensions or the tip height. In addition, the shape of the tip apex can be determined. We also discuss a number of specific issues related to force and friction measurements using optical lever deflection sensing. We present experimental results on the lateral force response of commercially available V-shaped cantilevers. Our results are consistent with estimates of lever mechanical properties using continuum elasticity theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Novel amplitude and frequency demodulation algorithm for a virtual dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Kokavecz, J; Tóth, Z; Horváth, Z L; Heszler, P; Mechler, A

    2006-04-14

    Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM; also called non-contact atomic force microscopy) is the prevailing operation mode in (sub-)atomic resolution vacuum applications. A major obstacle that prohibits a wider application range is the low frame capture rate. The speed of FM-AFM is limited by the low bandwidth of the automatic gain control (AGC) and frequency demodulation loops. In this work we describe a novel algorithm that can be used to overcome these weaknesses. We analysed the settling times of the proposed loops and that of the complete system, and we found that an approximately 70-fold improvement can be achieved over the existing real and virtual atomic force microscopes. We show that proportional-integral-differential controllers perform better in the frequency demodulation loop than conventional proportional-integral controllers. We demonstrate that the signal to noise ratio of the proposed system is 5.7 × 10(-5), which agrees with that of the conventional systems; thus, the new algorithm would improve the performance of FM-AFMs without compromising the resolution.

  1. Imaging and analyzing the elasticity of vascular smooth muscle cells by atomic force acoustic microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Qian; Chen, Ming; Yao, Wengang; Qian, Menglu; Hu, Bing

    2012-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play an important role in the good performance of the vasculature. To study the surface, intracellular structure and elasticity of VSMCs, atomic force acoustic microscope (AFAM) was used for imaging VSMCs from A7r5 rat aorta arteries. The topography images of VSMCs were obtained in contact mode and the acoustic images were obtained by AFAM in sample vibration mode. Then, the force curve measurement derived using Young's modulus of the interested areas was used for evaluating elasticity properties. The acoustic images were found in higher resolution with more information than the topography images. The force curves showed the difference in Young's modulus of the different parts of VSMC. These findings demonstrate that AFAM is useful for displaying the surface, structure and elasticity property of VSMCs clearly, with short scanning time, negligible harm or damage to cell and nanometer-level resolution. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of a scanning probe microscope with advanced sample treatment capabilities: An atomic force microscope combined with a miniaturized inductively coupled plasma source.

    PubMed

    Hund, Markus; Herold, Hans

    2007-06-01

    We describe the design and performance of an atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with a miniaturized inductively coupled plasma source working at a radio frequency of 27.12 MHz. State-of-the-art scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) have limited in situ sample treatment capabilities. Aggressive treatments such as plasma etching or harsh treatments such as etching in aggressive liquids typically require the removal of the sample from the microscope. Consequently, time consuming procedures are required if the same sample spot has to be imaged after successive processing steps. We have developed a first prototype of a SPM which features a quasi in situ sample treatment using a modified commercial atomic force microscope. A sample holder is positioned in a special reactor chamber; the AFM tip can be retracted by several millimeters so that the chamber can be closed for a treatment procedure. Most importantly, after the treatment, the tip is moved back to the sample with a lateral drift per process step in the 20 nm regime. The performance of the prototype is characterized by consecutive plasma etching of a nanostructured polymer film.

  3. Nano-imaging collagen by atomic force, near-field and nonlinear microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ken Choong; Tang, Jinkai; Li, Hao; Ng, Boon Ping; Kok, Shaw Wei; Wang, Qijie; Zhang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    As the most abundant protein in the human body, collagen has a very important role in vast numbers of bio-medical applications. The unique second order nonlinear properties of fibrillar collagen make it a very important index in nonlinear optical imaging based disease diagnosis of the brain, skin, liver, colon, kidney, bone, heart and other organs in the human body. The second-order nonlinear susceptibility of collagen has been explored at the macroscopic level and was explained as a volume-averaged molecular hyperpolarizability. However, details about the origin of optical second harmonic signals from collagen fibrils at the molecular level are still not clear. Such information is necessary for accurate interpolation of bio-information from nonlinear optical imaging techniques. The later has shown great potential in collagen based disease diagnosis methodologies. In this paper, we report our work using an atomic force microscope (AFM), near field (SNOM) and nonlinear laser scanning microscope (NLSM) to study the structure of collagen fibrils and other pro-collagen structures.

  4. X-ray holographic microscopy by means of photoresist recording and atomic-force microscope readout

    SciTech Connect

    Lindaas, S.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kalinovsky, A.

    1996-09-01

    We have reconstructed in-line (or Gabor) x-ray holograms at 40{endash}50-nm resolution from a complex biological specimen. The holograms were recorded as a relief pattern on photoresist with use of 1.89-nm, soft x rays from the X1A undulator beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We have improved the resolution and the fidelity and simplified the experiment compared with earlier work by employing a special atomic-force microscope to examine and digitize the holograms. Following digitization the holograms were reconstructed numerically, allowing both the absorptive and phase-shifting properties of the reconstructed object to be mapped. A comparison of the reconstructed images with images obtained from visible light and transmission electron microscopes has been made to confirm the validity of the x-ray holographic technique. The method offers promise as a technique for soft-x-ray microscopy and diffraction tomography of dry and frozen hydrated specimens and for microscopy with pulsed x-ray sources. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  5. Drift reduction in a scanning electrostatic force microscope for surface profile measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhigang; Ito, So; Goto, Shigeaki; Hosobuchi, Keiichiro; Shimizu, Yuki; Gao, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The influence of drifts on the measurement results of an electrostatic force microscope (EFM) based on a dual-height method for surface profile measurement is analyzed. Two types of drifts and their influence on the EFM measurement are discussed by computer simulation. It is figured out that the mechanical drift has a larger impact compared to the resonance frequency drift for the specific EFM with the conventional round-trip scan mode. It is also verified that the profile reconstruction algorithm of the dual-height method for separating the electric property distribution and the surface profile of the surface has an effect of magnifying the drift error in the result of surface profile measurement, which is a much more significant measurement of uncertainty sources for the developed EFM compared with an ordinary scanning probe microscope (SPM). A new vertical reciprocating scan (VRS) mode is then employed to reduce the influences of the drifts. The feasibility of the VRS mode is demonstrated by computer simulation and measurement experiments with a diffraction grating.

  6. In situ roughness measurements for the solar cell industry using an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    González-Jorge, Higinio; Alvarez-Valado, Victor; Valencia, Jose Luis; Torres, Soledad

    2010-01-01

    Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production.

  7. Imaging Bacterial Flagella and Inter-membrane Structures with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralich, R. M.; Chang, W. J.; Henriksen, P. N.

    1998-10-01

    Because of geometric factors, the atomic force microscope (AFM) only offers high resolution when the plane of interest is parallel to the scan-plane. Therefore, for three-dimensional objects such as bacteria, resolution can be very poor for the portion of the cell structure that is perpendicular to the scan-direction. To gain access to these structures, the rigid peptidoglycan cell wall of bacteria can be chemically dissolved, causing the soft liquid-like outer membrane to collapse onto the supporting substrate. In the collapsed state, the bacteria flagella and inter-membrane structure that anchor these flagella to the cell now lie flat on the substrate surface, rendering them accessible to imaging with the AFM. Through this process, the thickness of the outer membrane can be measured and the protein motors that propel and anchor the flagella can be imaged. Images and measurements obtained are presented along with data analysis and interpretation.

  8. Simulation of Tip-Sample Interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1994-01-01

    Recent simulations of the interaction between planar surfaces and model Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tips have suggested that there are conditions under which the tip may become unstable and 'avalanche' toward the sample surface. Here we investigate via computer simulation the stability of a variety of model AFM tip configurations with respect to the avalanche transition for a number of fcc metals. We perform Monte-Carlo simulations at room temperature using the Equivalent Crystal Theory (ECT) of Smith and Banerjea. Results are compared with recent experimental results as well as with our earlier work on the avalanche of parallel planar surfaces. Our results on a model single-atom tip are in excellent agreement with recent experiments on tunneling through mechanically-controlled break junctions.

  9. In situ measurements of human articular cartilage stiffness by means of a scanning force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imer, Raphaël; Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nico F.; Stolz, Martin; Aebi, Ueli; Kilger, Robert; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A. U.; Staufer, Urs

    2007-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a painful and disabling progressive joint disease, characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. In order to study this disease at early stages, we have miniaturized and integrated a complete scanning force microscope into a standard arthroscopic device fitting through a standard orthopedic canula. This instrument will allow orthopedic surgeons to measure the mechanical properties of articular cartilage at the nanometer and micrometer scale in-vivo during a standard arthroscopy. An orthopedic surgeon assessed the handling of the instrument. First measurements of the elasticity-modulus of human cartilage were recorded in a cadaver knee non minimal invasive. Second, minimally invasive experiments were performed using arthroscopic instruments. Load-displacement curves were successfully recorded.

  10. High-throughput automatic defect review for 300mm blank wafers with atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2015-03-01

    While feature size in lithography process continuously becomes smaller, defect sizes on blank wafers become more comparable to device sizes. Defects with nm-scale characteristic size could be misclassified by automated optical inspection (AOI) and require post-processing for proper classification. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is known to provide high lateral and the highest vertical resolution by mechanical probing among all techniques. However, its low throughput and tip life in addition to the laborious efforts for finding the defects have been the major limitations of this technique. In this paper we introduce automatic defect review (ADR) AFM as a post-inspection metrology tool for defect study and classification for 300 mm blank wafers and to overcome the limitations stated above. The ADR AFM provides high throughput, high resolution, and non-destructive means for obtaining 3D information for nm-scale defect review and classification.

  11. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Mishra, Bud; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  12. Lateral Manipulation of Single Defect on Insulating Surface Using Noncontact Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Insook; Nishi, Ryuji; Abe, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Morita, Seizo

    2011-01-01

    A single atomic defect on an ionic crystal surface was manipulated at the atomic level using an atomic force microscope. During raster scanning, the defect was manipulated at near the tip-sample distance and at room temperature. The defect, which is imaged as a sharp half-moon shape, moves continuously if the tip is close to the sample surface. The defect randomly moves along a zigzag or straight path or jumps long distances. The movement of the defect on an insulator is complex in contrast to that on semiconductors. The defect moves suddenly owing to the tip approaching the surface when the distance feedback is overshot under the condition of a large difference in frequency shift between the feedback set point and a weak interaction on the defect.

  13. Practical use of a carbon nanotube attached to a blunt apex in an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Masashi; Abe, Hidekazu; Tokumoto, Hiroshi; Shima, Takayuki; Tominaga, Junji; Fukuda, Hajime

    2004-03-15

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) was successfully attached to a base probe with a blunt apex and subsequently used as a probe for an atomic force microscope (AFM). This setup demonstrates high spatial resolution properties, plus an advantage: we were able to readily identify the loss of the CNT from the end of the probe by the resultant sudden drop in resolution. This design of probe is expected to feature yet another advantage: that of relative immunity to accidental collision compared to a CNT attached to a commercially available sharp tip. We also discuss the problems specific to CNT-attached probes, which are carbon contamination of the sample surface and artifact images formed at the edge of pit structures. We demonstrate that carbon contamination can be suppressed by a rubbing procedure before the scanning use, and that pit artifacts can be eliminated by optimizing the CNT length.

  14. Toolkit for the Automated Characterization of Optical Trapping Forces on Microscopic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Joseph; Hoeprich, David; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Optical traps have been in use in microbiological studies for the past 40 years to obtain noninvasive control of microscopic particles. However, the magnitude of the applied forces is often unknown. Therefore, we have developed an automated data acquisition and processing system which characterizes trap properties for known particle geometries. Extensive experiments and measurements utilizing well-characterized objects were performed and compared to literature to confirm the system's performance. This system will enable the future analysis of a trapped primary cilium, a slender rod-shaped organelle with aspect ratio L/R >30, where `L' is the cilium length and `R' the cilium diameter. The trapping of cilia is of primary importance, as it will lead to the precise measurements of mechanical properties of the organelle and its significance to the epithelial cell. Support from the National Institutes of Health, 1R15DK092716 is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Scanning thermal microscopy based on a modified atomic force microscope combined with pyroelectric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniow, J.-S.; Chirtoc, M.; Trannoy, N.; Raphael, O.; Pelzl, J.

    2005-06-01

    We propose a novel approach in scanning thermal microscopy of layered samples. The thermal probe (ThP) (Wollaston wire) acts as a local a.c. heat source at the front of a sample layer deposited on a pyroelectric (PE) sensor. The PE signal is proportional to the heat wave transmitted through the sample. The ThP and PE signals can be used to generate complementary thermal conductivity maps and with some restrictions, thermal diffusivity maps of the sample. Additionally, the topography map is obtained in the usual way from the atomic force microscope. We give the theoretical background for the interpretation of PE signal obtained at low and at high frequency, and we demonstrate that it carries information on the thermal diffusivity of a test sample (12 μm thick PET polymer sheet). Finally, we discuss the contributions of heat transfer channels between ThP and sample, and the role of contact thermal resistance.

  16. Local anodic oxidation of superconducting NbN thin films by an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Yang, X.; You, L. X.; Wang, X.; Zhang, L. B.; Kang, L.; Wu, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    A local anodic oxidation technique has been applied to create oxidized nanowires on superconducting NbN thin films using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a conductive probe. The AFM surface topography shows that both the width and height of the oxidized nanowires increase with increasing applied probe voltage under a certain relative humidity and a probe scan rate. The resistances of the NbN microbridges with and without an oxidized nanowire crossing were measured, and the results indicate that the oxidized nanowires with height of more than 8 nm are fully oxidized. The R-T and I-V characteristics of the NbN microbridges with the oxide wire of less than 8 nm were also obtained and analyzed. Methods for fabricating devices such as superconducting single photon detectors and superconducting hot electron bolometer mixers using this technology are discussed.

  17. Application of an atomic force microscope piezocantilever for dilatometry under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liran; Schmiedeshoff, George M.; E Graf, David; Park, Ju-Hyun; Murphy, Timothy P.; Tozer, Stanley W.; Palm, Eric; Sarrao, John L.; Cooley, Jason C.

    2017-06-01

    We report on the development of a sensitive dilatometer based upon an atomic force microscope piezocantilever. This dilatometer is designed to measure the elastic properties of bulk materials in extreme conditions, such as temperatures down to 25 mK and magnetic fields up to 16 T. The layered heavy fermion superconductor \\text{CeCoI}{{\\text{n}}5} and its non-magnetic analog \\text{LaRhI}{{\\text{n}}5} are measured to demonstrate their use in detecting phase transitions and quantum oscillations. In addition, using this dilatometer, a simultaneous multi-axis dilation measurement is performed. This compact dilatometer has many advantages, such as its ability to measure very small samples with sub-mm lengths at low temperature and small field dependence, and its ability to rotate, while it works well irrespective of whether it is in a changing liquid or gas environment (i.e. within a flow cryostat or mixing chamber).

  18. Digital phase-shifting atomic force microscope Moiré method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Lien-Wen

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the digital atomic force microscope (AFM) Moiré method with phase-shifting technology is established to measure the in-plane displacement and strain fields. The Moiré pattern is generated by the interference between the specimen grating and the virtual reference grating formed by digital image processes. The overlapped image is filtered by two-dimensional wavelet transformation to obtain the clear interference Moiré patterns. The four-step phase-shifting method is realized by translating the phase of the virtual reference grating from 0 to 2π. The principle of the digital AFM Moiré method and the phase-shifting technology are described in detail. Experimental results show that this method is convenient to use and efficient in realizing the microscale measurement.

  19. In Situ Roughness Measurements for the Solar Cell Industry Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    González-Jorge, Higinio; Alvarez-Valado, Victor; Valencia, Jose Luis; Torres, Soledad

    2010-01-01

    Areal roughness parameters always need to be under control in the thin film solar cell industry because of their close relationship with the electrical efficiency of the cells. In this work, these parameters are evaluated for measurements carried out in a typical fabrication area for this industry. Measurements are made using a portable atomic force microscope on the CNC diamond cutting machine where an initial sample of transparent conductive oxide is cut into four pieces. The method is validated by making a comparison between the parameters obtained in this process and in the laboratory under optimal conditions. Areal roughness parameters and Fourier Spectral Analysis of the data show good compatibility and open the possibility to use this type of measurement instrument to perform in situ quality control. This procedure gives a sample for evaluation without destroying any of the transparent conductive oxide; in this way 100% of the production can be tested, so improving the measurement time and rate of production. PMID:22319338

  20. Design of mechanical components for vibration reduction in an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulsoo; Jung, Jongkyu; Youm, Woosub; Park, Kyihwan

    2011-03-01

    Vibration is a key factor to be considered when designing the mechanical components of a high precision and high speed atomic force microscope (AFM). It is required to design the mechanical components so that they have resonant frequencies higher than the external and internal vibration frequencies. In this work, the mechanical vibration in a conventional AFM system is analyzed by considering its mechanical components, and a vibration reduction is then achieved by reconfiguring the mechanical components. To analyze the mechanical vibration, a schematic of the lumped model of the AFM system is derived and the vibrational influences of the AFM components are experimentally examined. Based on this vibration analysis, a reconfigured AFM system is proposed and its effects are compared to a conventional system through a series of simulations and experiments.

  1. Atomic force microscope characterization of self-assembly behaviors of cyclo[8] pyrrole on solid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hai; Zhao, Siqi; Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Jinzhi; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Daoben; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Wenjie; Cai, Jianfeng

    2017-04-01

    Cyclo [8] pyrrole (CP) is a porphyrin analogue containing eight α-conjugated pyrrole units which are arranged in a nearly coplanar conformation. The π-π interactions between CP molecules lead to regular aggregations through a solution casting process. Using tapping mode atomic force microscope (AFM), we investigated the morphology of self-assembled aggregates formed by deposition of different CP solutions on different substrates. We found that in the n-butanol solution, nanofibrous structures could be formed on the silicon or mica surface. Interestingly, on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, or silicon and mica surface with a toluene solution, only irregular spherical structures were identified. The difference in the nanomorphology may be attributed to distinct interactions between molecule-molecule, molecule-solvent and molecule-substrate.

  2. Nanotribological characterization of digital micromirror devices using an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiwen; Bhushan, Bharat

    2004-08-01

    Texas Instruments' digital micromirror device (DMD) comprises an array of fast digital micromirrors, monolithically integrated onto and controlled by an underlying silicon memory chip. The DMD is one of the few success stories in the emerging field of MEMS. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to characterize the nanotribological properties of the elements of the DMD. An AFM methodology was developed to identify and remove micromirrors of interest. The surface roughness, adhesion, friction, and stiffness properties of the DMD elements were studied. The influence of relative humidity and temperature on the behavior of the DMD element surfaces was also investigated. Potential mechanisms for wear and stiction are discussed in light of the findings.

  3. In-Situ atomic force microscopic observation of ion beam bombarded plant cell envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Brown, I. G.; Seprom, C.; Vilaithong, T.

    2007-04-01

    A program in ion beam bioengineering has been established at Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand, and ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) has been demonstrated. However, a good understanding of the fundamental physical processes involved is lacking. In parallel work, onion skin cells have been bombarded with Ar+ ions at energy 25 keV and fluence1-2 × 1015 ions/cm2, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures on the cell wall that could serve as channels for the transfer of large macromolecules into the cell interior. An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) system has been designed and installed in the CMU bio-implantation facility as a tool for the observation of these microcraters during ion beam bombardment. Here we describe some of the features of the in-situ AFM and outline some of the related work.

  4. Niobium and niobium nitride SQUIDs based on anodized nanobridges made with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, M.; Fournier, T.; Pannetier, B.; Thirion, C.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Villegier, J. C.; Bouchiat, V.

    2002-03-01

    We present a fabrication method of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) based on direct write lithography with an atomic force microscope (AFM). This technique involves maskless local anodization of Nb or NbN ultrathin films using the voltage biased tip of the AFM. The SQUIDs are of weak-link type, for which two geometries have been tested: Dayem and variable thickness nanobridges. The magnetic field dependence of the maximum supercurrent Ic( Φ) in resulting SQUIDs is thoroughly measured for different weak link geometries and for both tested materials. It is found that the modulation shape and depth of Ic( Φ) curves are greatly dependent on the weak link size. We analyze the results taking into account the kinetic inductance of nanobridges and using the Likharev-Yakobson model. Finally we show that the present resolution reached by this technique (20 nm) enables us to fabricate Nb weak-links which behavior approaches those of ideal Josephson junctions.

  5. The structure of cometary dust - first results from the MIDAS Atomic Force Microscope onboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Romstedt, J.

    2014-12-01

    A decade after launch the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft has finally arrived at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Unlike previous cometary missions, Rosetta is not a flyby, limited to taking a snapshot of the comet at a single heliocentric distance. Instead, Rosetta intercepted the comet prior to the onset of major activity and will chart its evolution during its perihelion passage and beyond. Such a unique mission requires a unique payload; as well as the more typical remote sensing instruments, Rosetta also carries sensors to sample in situ the gas and dust environment. One of these instruments is MIDAS, an atomic force microscope designed to collect dust and image it in three dimensions with nanometre resolution. Equipped with an array of sharp tips, four of which are magnetised to allow magnetic force microscopy, MIDAS exposes targets to the incident flux after which they are moved to the microscope for analysis. As well as extending coverage of the dust size distribution down to the finest particles, MIDAS has the unique capability to determine the shape of pristine particles - to determine, for example, if they are compact or fluffy, and to look for features which may be diagnostic of their formation environment or evolution. The magnetic mode lets MIDAS probe samples for magnetic material and to map its location if present. Having been operating almost continuously after hibernation imaging empty targets before exposure, the first exposures were performed when Rosetta entered 30 km bound orbits. The first MIDAS images and analyses of collected dust grains are presented here.

  6. Soft Body Impact of Cantilever Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    SOFT BODY IMPACT OF CANTILEVER BEAMS.(U) MAR S0 J D SHARP N CLASSIFIED AFML-TR-79169 NL mmh"hllhmlhlhlu BBBBhBBhmBhBBl EEEIIIIIIIIIIE IIIIIIIIIII- t...1 . 1111122 OO 136 IIIIIT 111111.25 11 1.4 111111.6 MfEROCOPY RESOLUTI(%, USI CIIARI NAINA I’ M \\I W I IA~NPAR\\I’l ’ AFML-TR-79-4169 SOFT BODY IMPACT ...document. AIR FORCE/56780/18 June 1980 -400 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS PAGE (Ma.n. Dat. Enterod), EDISRCIN jOFT BODY IMPACT OF CANTILEVER B EAI4’ Oct

  7. DURIP: Piezoresponse Force Microscope (PFM) with Controlled Environment for Characterization of Flexoelectric Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-21

    under this grant consists of the following units: a Brucker Nano AFM system [9], environment control unit (temperature, gas/liquid, vacuum, and vibration ...flexoelectric characterizations; chamber medium includes gas and liquid; cantilever vibration frequency Hz-MHz. With this PFM, the following new...Sound and Vibration 273, pp.713-740, 2004. [2] B. Kaushik, D. Nance, and K.K. Ahuja, “A Review of the Role of Acoustic Sensors in the Modern

  8. DETAIL OF CANTILEVERED MEZZANINE OBSERVATION ROOM ON SOUTH WEST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CANTILEVERED MEZZANINE OBSERVATION ROOM ON SOUTH- WEST CORNER OF BUILDING. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Base Engineer Pavement & Grounds Facility, Off Colorado Street, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  9. Assessment of insulated conductive cantilevers for biology and electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Gullo, Maurizio R.; Akiyama, Terunobu; Tonin, Andreas; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.; Staufer, Urs; Engel, Andreas

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the characterization and application of electrically insulated conductive tips mounted on a cantilever for use in an atomic force microscope and operated in liquid. These multifunctional probes were microfabricated and designed for measurements on biological samples in buffer solution, but they can also be employed for electrochemical applications, in particular scanning electrochemical microscopy. The silicon nitride based cantilevers had a spring constant <=0.1 N m-1 and a conductive tip, which was insulated except at the apex. The conductive core of the tip consisted of a metal, e.g. platinum silicide, and exhibited a typical radius of 15 nm. The mechanical and electrical characterization of the probe is presented and discussed. First measurements on the hexagonally packed intermediate layer of Deinococcus radiodurans demonstrated the possibility to adjust the image contrast by applying a voltage between a support and the conductive tip and to measure variations of less than 1 pA in faradaic current with a lateral resolution of 7.8 nm.

  10. Calibration of an interfacial force microscope for MEMS metrology : FY08-09 activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Baker, Michael Sean; Crowson, Douglas A.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Moore, Nathan W.

    2009-10-01

    Progress in MEMS fabrication has enabled a wide variety of force and displacement sensing devices to be constructed. One device under intense development at Sandia is a passive shock switch, described elsewhere (Mitchell 2008). A goal of all MEMS devices, including the shock switch, is to achieve a high degree of reliability. This, in turn, requires systematic methods for validating device performance during each iteration of design. Once a design is finalized, suitable tools are needed to provide quality assurance for manufactured devices. To ensure device performance, measurements on these devices must be traceable to NIST standards. In addition, accurate metrology of MEMS components is needed to validate mechanical models that are used to design devices to accelerate development and meet emerging needs. Progress towards a NIST-traceable calibration method is described for a next-generation, 2D Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM) for applications in MEMS metrology and qualification. Discussed are the results of screening several suitable calibration methods and the known sources of uncertainty in each method.

  11. Indentation with atomic force microscope, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell gains elasticity under ethanol stress.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuan-Pu; Lin, Xiang-Hua; Dong, Shi-Jun; Yuan, Qi-Peng; Li, Hao

    2016-10-01

    During bioethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane is the first target to be attacked by the accumulated ethanol. In such a prominent position, S. cerevisiae cell membrane could reversely provide protection through changing fluidity or elasticity secondary to remodeled membrane components or structure during the fermentation process. However, there is yet to be a direct observation of the real effect of the membrane compositional change. In this study, atomic force microscope-based strategy was performed to determine Young's modulus of S. cerevisiae to directly clarify ethanol stress-associated changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane fluidity and elasticity. Cell survival rate decreased while the cell swelling rate and membrane permeability increased as ethanol concentration increased from 0% to 20% v/v. Young's modulus decreased continuously from 3.76MPa to 1.53MPa while ethanol stress increased from 0% to 20% v/v, indicating that ethanol stress induced the S. cerevisiae membrane fluidity and elasticity changes. Combined with the fact that membrane composition varies under ethanol stress, to some extent, this could be considered as a forced defensive act to the ethanol stress by S. cerevisiae cells. On the other hand, the ethanol stress induced loosening of cell membrane also caused S. cerevisiae cell to proactively remodel membrane to make cell membrane more agreeable to the increase of environmental threat. Increased ethanol stress made S. cerevisiae cell membrane more fluidized and elastic, and eventually further facilitated yeast cell's survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Computer-Controlled Classroom Model of an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, Tyler A.; Johnson, Matthew M.; Eklund, Peter C.; Russin, Timothy J.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of "seeing by feeling" as a way to circumvent limitations on sight is universal on the macroscopic scale—reading Braille, feeling one's way around a dark room, etc. The development of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 extended this concept to imaging in the nanoscale. While there are classroom demonstrations that use a tactile probe to map the topography or some other property of a sample, the rastering of the probe over the sample is manually controlled, which is both tedious and potentially inaccurate. Other groups have used simulation or tele-operation of an AFM probe. In this paper we describe a teaching AFM with complete computer control to map out topographic and magnetic properties of a "crystal" consisting of two-dimensional arrays of spherical marble "atoms." Our AFM is well suited for lessons on the "Big Ideas of Nanoscale" such as tools and instrumentation, as well as a pre-teaching activity for groups with remote access AFM or mobile AFM. The principle of operation of our classroom AFM is the same as that of a real AFM, excepting the nature of the force between sample and probe.

  13. Premelting at ice-solid interfaces studied via velocity dependent indentation with force microscope tips.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, , Jr.; Pittenger, B.; Cochran, M. J.; Donev, J. M. K.; Robertson, B. E.; Szuchmacher, A. L.; Overney, R. M.

    2000-03-01

    We have indented the surface of ice at temperatures between -1 C and -17 C with sharp atomic force microscope tips. For a thick, viscous interfacial melt layer, a Newtonian treatment of the indentation process suggests that indents at different strain rates should have the same force/velocity ratio for a given pit depth. This is observed for silicon tips with and without a hydrophobic coating at temperatures between -1 C and -10 C implying the presence of a liquid-like layer at the interface between tip and ice. A simple model for viscous flow that incorporates the approximate shape of our tip is used to obtain an estimate of the layer thickness, assuming the layer has the viscosity of supercooled water. This estimate increases with increasing temperature as expected. The hydrophobically coated tip has a significantly thinner layer than the uncoated tip, but the dependence of thickness on temperature is similar. (Supported by NSF DMR 96-23590, U. Washington Nanotechnology Center, and Exxon Educational Foundation.)

  14. Determination of the elastic properties of tomato fruit cells with an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zdunek, Artur; Kurenda, Andrzej

    2013-09-11

    Since the mechanical properties of single cells together with the intercellular adhesive properties determine the macro-mechanical properties of plants, a method for evaluation of the cell elastic properties is needed to help explanation of the behavior of fruits and vegetables in handling and food processing. For this purpose, indentation of tomato mesocarp cells with an atomic force microscope was used. The Young's modulus of a cell using the Hertz and Sneddon models, and stiffness were calculated from force-indentation curves. Use of two probes of distinct radius of curvature (20 nm and 10,000 nm) showed that the measured elastic properties were significantly affected by tip geometry. The Young's modulus was about 100 kPa ± 35 kPa and 20 kPa ± 14 kPa for the sharper tip and a bead tip, respectively. Moreover, large variability regarding elastic properties (>100%) among cells sampled from the same region in the fruit was observed. We showed that AFM provides the possibility of combining nano-mechanical properties with topography imaging, which could be very useful for the study of structure-related properties of fruits and vegetables at the cellular and sub-cellular scale.

  15. Comparison of line width calibration using critical dimension atomic force microscopes between PTB and NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Hahm, Kai; Bosse, Harald; Dixson, Ronald G.

    2017-06-01

    International comparisons between National Metrology Institutes are important to verify measurement results and the associated uncertainties. In this paper, we report a comparison of the line width calibration of a crystalline silicon line width standard, referred to as IVPS100-PTB standard, between the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany and the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the United States. Critical dimension atomic force microscopy was the measurement method used for this comparison. Both institutes applied generally the same but independently developed traceability pathways: the scaling factor of the atomic force microscope (AFM) scanner was calibrated by a set of step height and lateral standards certified by metrological AFMs, while the effective tip width was ultimately traceable to the lattice parameter of silicon via high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Good agreement has been achieved in the comparison: For two groups of line features with nominal critical dimensions (CDs) of 50 nm, 70 nm, 90 nm, 110 nm and 130 nm that were compared, the observed deviations of CD results were between  -1.5 nm and 0.3 nm. The deviations are well within the associated measurement uncertainty.

  16. High-Resolution Magnetic Force Microscope Images of a Magnetic Particle Chain Extracted from Magnetic Bacteria AMB-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Tomohito; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Mashiko, Shinro

    1998-11-01

    Bacterial magnetic particles were observed by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a magnetic force microscope (MFM). The chain of magnetic particles was extracted from the bacteria with little disturbance to their alignment by a new preparation method.Magnetic bacteria cells were broken using an NaOH/ethanol solution. Cell debris was washed away in order to leave the magnetic particle chains, which were held on the glass surface by a magnet.In both AFM and MFM images, individual magnetic particles could be clearly observed.The MFM image showed that the particles aligned their magnetized axes along the chain.

  17. Attachment of micro- and nano-particles on tipless cantilevers for colloidal probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Dexter J; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2014-07-15

    Current colloidal probe preparation techniques face several challenges in the production of functional probes using particles ⩽5 μm. Challenges include: glue encapsulated particles, glue altered particle properties, improper particle or agglomerate attachment, and lengthy procedures. We present a method to rapidly and reproducibly produce functional micro and nano-colloidal probes. Using a six-step procedure, cantilevers mounted on a custom designed 45° holder were used to approach and obtain a minimal amount of epoxy resin (viscosity of ∼14,000 cP) followed by a single micron/nano particle on the apex of a tipless cantilever. The epoxy and particles were prepared on individual glass slides and subsequently affixed to a 10× or 40× optical microscope lens using another custom designed holder. Scanning electron microscopy and comparative glue-colloidal probe measurements were used to confirm colloidal probe functionality. The method presented allowed rapid and reproducible production of functional colloidal probes (80% success). Single nano-particles were prominently affixed to the apex of the cantilever, unaffected by the epoxy. Nano-colloidal probes were used to conduct topographical, instantaneous force, and adhesive force mapping measurements in dry and liquid media conveying their versatility and functionality in studying nano-colloidal systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Atomic force microscope manipulation of Ag atom on the Si(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkhtaivan, Batnyam; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    We present first-principles total-energy electronic-structure calculations that provide the microscopic mechanism of Ag atom diffusion between the half unit cells (HUCs) on the Si(111)-(7 ×7 ) surface with and without the tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM). We find that, without the presence of the AFM tip, there are three pathways of inter-HUC diffusion. The pathway, in which the diffusing atom passes over the nanohole of the surface, has the lowest energy barrier. The diffusion along this pathway between the two HUCs is almost symmetric with the energy barrier of about 0.8 eV in both directions. In the other two pathways, the adatom diffuses along the edge of the nanohole. The diffusion along these two pathways have an energy barrier of about 1 eV. With the presence of the tip, we find that the reaction pathways are essentially the same, but the diffusion along the edge of the nanohole has a lower energy barrier than the diffusion over the nanohole. Thus the diffusion channel is changed by the presence of the tip. In the diffusion along the edge of the nanohole, the energy barrier in one direction is substantially reduced to be 0.2-0.4 eV by the tip, while that of the diffusion in the reverse direction remains larger than 1 eV. The Si tip reduces the energy barrier more than the Pt tip due to the flexibility of the tip apex structure. In addition to the reduction of the barrier, the tip traps the diffusing adatom preventing diffusion in the reverse direction. Also we find that the shape of the tip apex structure is important for the adatom's trapping ability. The bond formation between the AFM tip atom and the surface adatom is essential for atom manipulation using the AFM tip. Our results show that atom manipulation is possible with both the metallic and semiconducting AFM tips.

  19. Automatic defect review for EUV photomask reticles by atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2015-10-01

    Defects on a reticle are inspected, reviewed, and repaired by different tools. They are located by automated optical inspection (AOI); however, if the characteristic size of defects is similar to that of light and electron beam wavelengths, they are often unclassified or misclassified by AOI. Atomic force microscopes (AFM) along with electron microscopes are used for investigating defects located by AOI to distinguish false defects from real defects and effectively classify them. Both AFM and electron microscopes provide high resolution images. However, electron microscopy is known to be destructive and have less accuracy in 3rd dimension measurement compared to AFM [1]. On the other hand, AFM is known to have low throughput and limited tip life in addition to requiring significant effort to finding the defects. These limitations emanate from having to perform multiple large scans to find the defect locations, to compensate for stage coordinate inaccuracies, and to correct the mismatch between the AFM and the AOI tools. In this work we introduce automatic defect review (ADR) AFM for defect study and classification of EUV mask reticles that overcomes the aforementioned limitations of traditional AFM. This metrology solution is based on an AFM configuration with decoupled Z and XY scanners that makes it possible to collect large survey images with minimum out of plane motion. To minimize the stage errors and mismatch between the AFM and the AOI coordinates, the coordinates of fiducial markers are used for coarse alignment. In addition, fine alignment of the coordinates is performed using enhanced optical vision on marks on the reticle. The ADR AFM is used to study a series of phase defects identified by an AOI tool on a reticle. Locating the defects, imaging, and defect classification are performed using the ADR automation software and with the throughput of several defects per hour. In order to preserve tip life and data consistency, AFM imaging is performed in non

  20. Serial weighting of micro-objects with resonant microchanneled cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dörig, Pablo; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vassalli, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers have proven to be very effective mass sensors. The attachment of a small mass to a vibrating cantilever produces a resonance frequency shift that can be monitored, providing the ability to measure mass changes down to a few molecules resolution. Nevertheless, the lack of a practical method to handle the catch and release process required for dynamic weighting of microobjects strongly hindered the application of the technology beyond proof of concept measurements. Here, a method is proposed in which FluidFM hollow cantilevers are exploited to overcome the standard limitations of AFM-based mass sensors, providing high throughput single object weighting with picogram accuracy. The extension of the dynamic models of AFM cantilevers to hollow cantilevers was discussed and the effectiveness of mass weighting in air was validated on test samples.

  1. Acquire an Bruker Dimension FastScanTM Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) for Materials, Physical and Biological Science Research and Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-14

    UU 14-04-2016 1-Jan-2015 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Acquire an Bruker Dimension FastScanTM Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) for Materials, Physical and...published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Acquire an Bruker Dimension FastScanTM Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) for Materials, Physical and...the DOD HBCU/MI Instrumentation Award Regarding “Acquire an Bruker Dimension FastScan TM Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) for Materials, Physical

  2. 3-D Raman Imagery and Atomic Force Microscopy of Ancient Microscopic Fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopf, J.

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of the Precambrian (~540- to ~3,500-Ma-old) fossil record depend critically on identification of authentic microbial fossils. Combined with standard paleontologic studies (e.g., of paleoecologic setting, population structure, cellular morphology, preservational variants), two techniques recently introduced to such studies -- Raman imagery and atomic force microscopy -- can help meet this need. Laser-Raman imagery is a non-intrusive, non-destructive technique that can be used to demonstrate a micron-scale one-to-one correlation between optically discernable morphology and the organic (kerogenous) composition of individual microbial fossils(1,2), a prime indicator of biogencity. Such analyses can be used to characterize the molecular-structural makeup of organic-walled microscopic fossils both in acid-resistant residues and in petrographic thin sections, and whether the fossils analyzed are exposed at the upper surface of, or are embedded within (to depths >65 microns), the section studied. By providing means to map chemically, in three dimensions, whole fossils or parts of such fossils(3), Raman imagery can also show the presence of cell lumina, interior cellular cavities, another prime indicator of biogenicity. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to visualize the nanometer-scale structure of the kerogenous components of single Precambrian microscopic fossils(4). Capable of analyzing minute fragments of ancient organic matter exposed at the upper surface of thin sections (or of kerogen particles deposited on flat surfaces), such analyses hold promise not only for discriminating between biotic and abiotic micro-objects but for elucidation of the domain size -- and, thus, the degree of graphitization -- of the graphene subunits of the carbonaceous matter analyzed. These techniques -- both new to paleobiology -- can provide useful insight into the biogenicity and geochemical maturity of ancient organic matter. References: (1) Kudryavtsev, A.B. et

  3. Mapping thermal conductivity using bimetallic atomic force microscopy probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ranjan; McCarthy, Brendan; Sarid, Dror; Guven, Ibrahim

    2006-06-01

    We demonstrate a technique to measure local thermal conductivity of materials using an atomic force microscope equipped with a commercial silicon cantilever coated by a thin metal film. This bimaterial cantilever acts as a bimetallic strip that bends when heated by a focused laser beam. The bending is apparent as a topographic distortion, which varies with the amount of heat flowing from the cantilever's tip into the sample. By comparing the surface topographies of the sample, as measured with heated and unheated cantilevers, the local thermal conductivity of the tip-sample contact area can be determined. Experimental results with this system are presented and found to be in good agreement with a finite element model.

  4. The asymmetrical structure of Golgi apparatus membranes revealed by in situ atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haijiao; Su, Weiheng; Cai, Mingjun; Jiang, Junguang; Zeng, Xianlu; Wang, Hongda

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus has attracted intense attentions due to its fascinating morphology and vital role as the pivot of cellular secretory pathway since its discovery. However, its complex structure at the molecular level remains elusive due to limited approaches. In this study, the structure of Golgi apparatus, including the Golgi stack, cisternal structure, relevant tubules and vesicles, were directly visualized by high-resolution atomic force microscope. We imaged both sides of Golgi apparatus membranes and revealed that the outer leaflet of Golgi membranes is relatively smooth while the inner membrane leaflet is rough and covered by dense proteins. With the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and Triton X-100, we confirmed the existence of lipid rafts in Golgi apparatus membrane, which are mostly in the size of 20 nm -200 nm and appear irregular in shape. Our results may be of significance to reveal the structure-function relationship of the Golgi complex and pave the way for visualizing the endomembrane system in mammalian cells at the molecular level.

  5. Atomic force microscope studies on the interactions of Candida rugosa lipase and supported lipidic bilayers.

    PubMed

    Prim, Nuria; Iversen, Lars; Diaz, Pilar; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    Using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique we prepared substrate supported well-defined lipid/phospholipid (1-mono-palmitoyl-rac-glycerol (MPG)/l,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC)) bilayers in which the MPG lipid leaflet was exposed to the aqueous phase. Hydrolysis of MPG performed by Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) on the upper MPG layer of these supported bilayers on mica was imaged by real time atomic force microscope (AFM) using a liquid cell, so that the area increase of the initial structural defects could be followed over time. Our data strongly suggest that the edges of the initial structural defects are the preferred activation sites for CRL once the enzyme is adsorbed onto these interfaces. When a 2.5nM bulk concentration of CRL was assayed on this planar lipid substrate, we found a long lag phase before a sharp increase of catalytic activity. The lag-burst kinetic behaviour was related to the interfacial activation phenomenon although we propose that it is also dependent on the gel-phase state of this interface.

  6. Fast, multi-frequency, and quantitative nanomechanical mapping of live cells using the atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Wang, Wen-Horng; Geahlen, Robert L.; Raman, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding goal in cellular mechanobiology has been to link dynamic biomolecular processes underpinning disease or morphogenesis to spatio-temporal changes in nanoscale mechanical properties such as viscoelasticity, surface tension, and adhesion. This requires the development of quantitative mechanical microscopy methods with high spatio-temporal resolution within a single cell. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can map the heterogeneous mechanical properties of cells with high spatial resolution, however, the image acquisition time is 1–2 orders of magnitude longer than that required to study dynamic cellular processes. We present a technique that allows commercial AFM systems to map quantitatively the dynamically changing viscoelastic properties of live eukaryotic cells at widely separated frequencies over large areas (several 10’s of microns) with spatial resolution equal to amplitude-modulation (AM-AFM) and with image acquisition times (tens of seconds) approaching those of speckle fluorescence methods. This represents a ~20 fold improvement in nanomechanical imaging throughput compared to AM-AFM and is fully compatible with emerging high speed AFM systems. This method is used to study the spatio-temporal mechanical response of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells to the inhibition of Syk protein tyrosine kinase giving insight into the signaling pathways by which Syk negatively regulates motility of highly invasive cancer cells. PMID:26118423

  7. Mechanically modulated dewetting by atomic force microscope for micro- and nano- droplet array fabrication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Li, Pan; Wang, Dong; Li, Longhai; Xie, Shuangxi; Liu, Lianqing; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2014-10-06

    Organizing a material into well-defined patterns during the dewetting process provides an attractive micro-/nano-fabrication method without using a conventional lithographic process, and hence, offers potential applications in organic electronics, optics systems, and memory devices. We report here how the mechanical modification of polymer surface by an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can be used to guide thin film dewetting evolution and break the intrinsic spatial correlation of spontaneous instability. An AFM is used to implement the mechanical modification of progressively narrow grids to investigate the influence of pattern size on the modulation of ultrathin polystyrene films dewetting evolution. For films with different initial thicknesses, when grid size is close to or below the characteristic wavelength of instability, the spinodal dewetting is suppressed, and film rupture is restricted to the cutting trench. We will show in this paper it is possible to generate only one droplet per gridded area on a thin film subsequent to nucleation dominated dewetting on a non-patterned substrate. Furthermore, when the grid periodicity exceeds the spinodal length, the number of droplets in predefined areas gradually approaches that associated with unconfined dewetting.

  8. Surface roughness in ceramics with different finishing techniques using atomic force microscope and profilometer.

    PubMed

    Tholt de Vasconcellos, Beatriz; Miranda-Júnior, Walter Gomes; Prioli, Rodrigo; Thompson, Jeffrey; Oda, Margareth

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the finishing and polishing of 3 ceramic materials: Vitadur Alpha, IPS Empress 2 and AllCeram. Surface modification techniques were selected to simulate dental practice. Forty-five specimens of each ceramic were divided into 5 groups of 9 specimens, which were finished using the following procedures: Group 1--glaze; Group 2--glaze, grinding and subsequent polishing with the Eve system; Group 3--glaze, grinding and subsequent polished with the Identoflex system; Group 4--glaze followed by polishing with Identoflex; Group 5--glaze, grinding and subsequent polishing with Shofu kit. Two roughness-measuring instruments were used: a stylus profilometer and an atomic force microscope (AFM). The 135 specimens were evaluated quantitatively with respect to Ra (average roughness) and Ry (maximum roughness height), and the results were examined statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test, with a significance level of 0.05. The roughness parameter (Ra), measured by the profilometer, and AFM showed that some of the commercial intraoral polishing kits tested achieved a finish equal in smoothness to the glazed surface. According to Pearson's test, no correlation was found between the parameter Ry, measured with the profilometer, and AFM. The profilometer results for Ry demonstrated no significant differences between the final polished surfaces and the initial glazed ones. On the other hand, the Ry values obtained by AFM indicated the tested polishing kits incapability of producing smoothness comparable to the glazed surfaces.

  9. Comparison of red blood cell membrane microstructure after different physicochemical influences: atomic force microscope research.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Victor V; Chernysh, Alexander M; Kozlova, Elena K; Borshegovskaya, Polina Yu; Bliznjuk, Ulyana A; Rysaeva, Regina M; Gudkova, Olga Ye

    2010-09-01

    After the influence of different actions on the blood, the erythrocytes may change their macrostructure. At the same time, the microstructure of cell membrane will be changed as well. This study provides the results of comparison of red blood cell membrane microstructure after they have been affected by different factors. Images and spatial profiles of the cell surface were obtained by atomic force microscope. It was proposed to use spatial Fourier transform to decompose the initial complex profile into series of simple ones. This made it possible to compare surface parameters after exposure of red blood cells to different external actions. Quantitative differences between membrane profile harmonic composition parameters (amplitude and spatial period) after physical impact (impulse electrical field, osmotic swelling) and after chemical impact (the fixing fluid glutaraldehyde and the drug Esmeron) were experimentally confirmed. Such experimental and theoretical approach may lay down the foundations of mechanisms of different factors' effect on red blood cells both in research and in clinics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanoimaging and ultra structure of Entamoeba histolytica and its pseudopods by using atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Medina, Honorio; Urdaneta, H.; Barboza, J.

    2000-04-01

    Nan-imaging of Entamoeba histolytica was carried out by using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The structure of the nucleus, endoplasm and ectoplasm were studied separately. The diameter of the nucleus in living E. histolytica was found to be of the order of 10 micrometers which is slightly higher than the earlier reported value. The presence of karysome was detected in the nucleus. Well-organized patterns of chromatoid bodies located within the endoplasm, were detected and their repetitive patterns were examined. The organized structure was also extended within the ectoplasm. The dimensions and form of the organization suggest that chromatic bodies are constituted with ribosomes ordered in the form of folded sheet. Such structures were found to be absent in non-living E. histolytica. AFM images were also captured just in the act when ameba was extending its pseudopods. Alteration in the ultrastructure caused during the process of extension was viewed. Well marked canals of width 694.05 nm. And height 211.05 nm are clearly perceptible towards the direction of the pseudopods. 3D images are presented to appreciate the height variation, which can not be achieved by conventional well-established techniques such as electron microscopy.

  11. A calibrated atomic force microscope using an orthogonal scanner and a calibrated laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Yeon; Kim, Dong-Min; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Park, Jinwon

    2007-02-01

    A compact and two-dimensional atomic force microscope (AFM) using an orthogonal sample scanner, a calibrated homodyne laser interferometer and a commercial AFM head was developed for use in the nano-metrology field. The x and y position of the sample with respect to the tip are acquired by using the laser interferometer in the open-loop state, when each z data point of the AFM head is taken. The sample scanner, which has a motion amplifying mechanism was designed to move a sample up to 100 μm × 100 μm in orthogonal way, which means less crosstalk between axes. Moreover, the rotational errors between axes are measured to ensure the accuracy of the calibrated AFM within the full scanning range. The conventional homodyne laser interferometer was used to measure the x and y displacements of the sample and compensated via an X-ray interferometer to reduce the nonlinearity of the optical interferometer. The repeatability of the calibrated AFM was measured to sub-nanometers within a few hundred nanometers scanning range.

  12. Reversible mechano-electrochemical writing of metallic nanostructures with the tip of an atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Marina; Wagner, Andreas; Schimmel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary We recently introduced a method that allows the controlled deposition of nanoscale metallic patterns at defined locations using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a “mechano-electrochemical pen”, locally activating a passivated substrate surface for site-selective electrochemical deposition. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility of this process and study the long-term stability of the resulting metallic structures. The remarkable stability for more than 1.5 years under ambient air without any observable changes can be attributed to self-passivation. After AFM-activated electrochemical deposition of copper nanostructures on a polycrystalline gold film and subsequent AFM imaging, the copper nanostructures could be dissolved by reversing the electrochemical potential. Subsequent AFM-tip-activated deposition of different copper nanostructures at the same location where the previous structures were deleted, shows that there is no observable memory effect, i.e., no effect of the previous writing process on the subsequent writing process. Thus, the four processes required for reversible information storage, “write”, “read”, “delete” and “re-write”, were successfully demonstrated on the nanometer scale. PMID:23365795

  13. Fabrication and measurement of nanostructures on the micro ball surface using a modified atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. S.; Geng, Y. Q.; Li, W. B.; Yan, Y. D.; Hu, Z. J.; Sun, T.; Liang, Y. C.; Dong, S.

    2012-11-01

    In order to machine and measure nanostructures on the micro ball surface, a modified atomic force microscope (AFM) combining a commercial AFM system with a home built precision air bearing spindle is established. Based on this system, motions of both the AFM scanner and the air bearing spindle are controlled to machine nanostructures on the micro ball based on the AFM tip-based nano mechanical machining approach. The eccentric error between the axis of the micro ball and the axis of the spindle is reduced to 3-4 μm by the provided fine adjusting method. A 1000 nano lines array, 36 square pits structure, 10 square pits structure, and a zig-zag structure on the circumference of the micro ball with the diameter of 1.5 mm are machined successfully. The measurement results achieved by the same system reveal that the profiles and mode-power spectra curves of the micro ball are influenced by the artificially machined nanostructures significantly according to their distributions. This work is an useful attempt for modifying the micro ball profile and manufacture of the spherical modulation targets to study the experimental performance of the micro ball in implosion.

  14. Detection of erythrocytes influenced by aging and type 2 diabetes using atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hua; Xing, Xiaobo; Zhao, Hongxia; Chen, Yong; Huang, Xun; Ma, Shuyuan; Ye, Hongyan; Cai, Jiye

    2010-01-22

    The pathophysiological changes of erythrocytes are detected at the molecular scale, which is important to reveal the onset of diseases. Type 2 diabetes is an age-related metabolic disorder with high prevalence in elderly (or old) people. Up to now, there are no treatments to cure diabetes. Therefore, early detection and the ability to monitor the progression of type 2 diabetes are very important for developing effective therapies. Type 2 diabetes is associated with high blood glucose in the context of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. These abnormalities may disturb the architecture and functions of erythrocytes at molecular scale. In this study, the aging- and diabetes-induced changes in morphological and biomechanical properties of erythrocytes are clearly characterized at nanometer scale using atomic force microscope (AFM). The structural information and mechanical properties of the cell surface membranes of erythrocytes are very important indicators for determining the healthy, diseased or aging status. So, AFM may potentially be developed into a powerful tool in diagnosing diseases.

  15. The Asymmetrical Structure of Golgi Apparatus Membranes Revealed by In situ Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haijiao; Su, Weiheng; Cai, Mingjun; Jiang, Junguang; Zeng, Xianlu; Wang, Hongda

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus has attracted intense attentions due to its fascinating morphology and vital role as the pivot of cellular secretory pathway since its discovery. However, its complex structure at the molecular level remains elusive due to limited approaches. In this study, the structure of Golgi apparatus, including the Golgi stack, cisternal structure, relevant tubules and vesicles, were directly visualized by high-resolution atomic force microscope. We imaged both sides of Golgi apparatus membranes and revealed that the outer leaflet of Golgi membranes is relatively smooth while the inner membrane leaflet is rough and covered by dense proteins. With the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and Triton X-100, we confirmed the existence of lipid rafts in Golgi apparatus membrane, which are mostly in the size of 20 nm –200 nm and appear irregular in shape. Our results may be of significance to reveal the structure-function relationship of the Golgi complex and pave the way for visualizing the endomembrane system in mammalian cells at the molecular level. PMID:23613878

  16. Fabrication and measurement of nanostructures on the micro ball surface using a modified atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X S; Geng, Y Q; Li, W B; Yan, Y D; Hu, Z J; Sun, T; Liang, Y C; Dong, S

    2012-11-01

    In order to machine and measure nanostructures on the micro ball surface, a modified atomic force microscope (AFM) combining a commercial AFM system with a home built precision air bearing spindle is established. Based on this system, motions of both the AFM scanner and the air bearing spindle are controlled to machine nanostructures on the micro ball based on the AFM tip-based nano mechanical machining approach. The eccentric error between the axis of the micro ball and the axis of the spindle is reduced to 3-4 μm by the provided fine adjusting method. A 1000 nano lines array, 36 square pits structure, 10 square pits structure, and a zig-zag structure on the circumference of the micro ball with the diameter of 1.5 mm are machined successfully. The measurement results achieved by the same system reveal that the profiles and mode-power spectra curves of the micro ball are influenced by the artificially machined nanostructures significantly according to their distributions. This work is an useful attempt for modifying the micro ball profile and manufacture of the spherical modulation targets to study the experimental performance of the micro ball in implosion.

  17. Mechanically Modulated Dewetting by Atomic Force Microscope for Micro- and Nano- Droplet Array Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feifei; Li, Pan; Wang, Dong; Li, Longhai; Xie, Shuangxi; Liu, Lianqing; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2014-10-01

    Organizing a material into well-defined patterns during the dewetting process provides an attractive micro-/nano-fabrication method without using a conventional lithographic process, and hence, offers potential applications in organic electronics, optics systems, and memory devices. We report here how the mechanical modification of polymer surface by an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can be used to guide thin film dewetting evolution and break the intrinsic spatial correlation of spontaneous instability. An AFM is used to implement the mechanical modification of progressively narrow grids to investigate the influence of pattern size on the modulation of ultrathin polystyrene films dewetting evolution. For films with different initial thicknesses, when grid size is close to or below the characteristic wavelength of instability, the spinodal dewetting is suppressed, and film rupture is restricted to the cutting trench. We will show in this paper it is possible to generate only one droplet per gridded area on a thin film subsequent to nucleation dominated dewetting on a non-patterned substrate. Furthermore, when the grid periodicity exceeds the spinodal length, the number of droplets in predefined areas gradually approaches that associated with unconfined dewetting.

  18. Atomic force microscope investigation of the boundary-lubricant layer in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, S M T; Neu, C P; Duraine, G; Komvopoulos, K; Reddi, A H

    2010-07-01

    To determine the roles of superficial zone protein (SZP), hyaluronan (HA), and surface-active phospholipids (SAPL) in boundary lubrication of articular cartilage through systematic enzyme digestion using trypsin, hyaluronidase, and phospolipase-C (PLC) surface treatments. The friction coefficient of articular cartilage surfaces was measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after enzyme digestion. Surface roughness, adhesion, and stiffness of the articular surface were also measured to determine the mechanism of friction in the boundary lubrication regime. Histology and transmission electron microscopy were used to visualize the surface changes of treatment groups that showed significant friction changes after enzyme digestion. A significant increase in the friction coefficient of both load-bearing and non load-bearing regions of the joint was observed after proteolysis by trypsin. Treatment with trypsin, hyaluronidase, or PLC did not affect the surface roughness. However, trypsin treatment decreased the adhesion significantly. Results indicate that the protein component at the articular cartilage surface is the main boundary lubricant, with SZP being a primary candidate. The prevailing nanoscale deformation processes are likely plastic and/or viscoelastic in nature, suggesting that plowing is the dominant friction mechanism. The findings of this study indicate that SZP plays an intrinsic and critical role in boundary lubrication at the articular surface of cartilage, whereas the effects of HA and SAPL on the tribological behavior are marginal. Copyright 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanically Modulated Dewetting by Atomic Force Microscope for Micro- and Nano- Droplet Array Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feifei; Li, Pan; Wang, Dong; Li, Longhai; Xie, Shuangxi; Liu, Lianqing; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2014-01-01

    Organizing a material into well-defined patterns during the dewetting process provides an attractive micro-/nano-fabrication method without using a conventional lithographic process, and hence, offers potential applications in organic electronics, optics systems, and memory devices. We report here how the mechanical modification of polymer surface by an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can be used to guide thin film dewetting evolution and break the intrinsic spatial correlation of spontaneous instability. An AFM is used to implement the mechanical modification of progressively narrow grids to investigate the influence of pattern size on the modulation of ultrathin polystyrene films dewetting evolution. For films with different initial thicknesses, when grid size is close to or below the characteristic wavelength of instability, the spinodal dewetting is suppressed, and film rupture is restricted to the cutting trench. We will show in this paper it is possible to generate only one droplet per gridded area on a thin film subsequent to nucleation dominated dewetting on a non-patterned substrate. Furthermore, when the grid periodicity exceeds the spinodal length, the number of droplets in predefined areas gradually approaches that associated with unconfined dewetting. PMID:25283744

  20. Method for providing a compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry J.

    2008-12-16

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.