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Sample records for force posture statement

  1. Air Force Posture Statement 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    missions and dropped over 800,000 gallons of fire suppressant on wildfires in Idaho and California. Additionally, they flew 45 support sorties lifting...represent buckets of capabilities the Air Force can draw upon to satisfy the requirements of theater commanders—flexible, responsive, adaptable. A nominal...Force childcare cost model . Tremendously important to child and family quality of life are the commissaries and exchanges. The Air Force continues to

  2. United States Air Force Posture Statement 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-24

    Mozanoique r v • South Africa •Japan Guam Tiailand J • Philippines Malaysia Singapore Australia • t^t USfll- Operstions Rcross the Spectrum of...valuable exercise. Air Force Test and Training Ranges "Vital National Assets"—An F-16 CJ pilot fires an AGM-65D Maverick missile at a target during an

  3. Air Force Posture Statement 2008: Department of Air Force Presentation to the House Armed Services Committee, U.S. House of Representatives, Fiscal Year 2009 Air Force Posture Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-27

    unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 1 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE PRESENTATION TO THE HOUSE ARMED SERVICES...COMMITTEE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FISCAL YEAR 2009 AIR FORCE POSTURE STATEMENT STATEMENT OF: THE HONORABLE MICHAEL W. WYNNE SECRETARY OF...Highest Quality of Life Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 4.2.1 Housing and Military Construction

  4. The U.S. Air Force Posture Statement 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Statement 2006 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...expensive aircraft and equipment, as well as accepting a manageable level of risk in order to selectively maintain some older systems until newer systems...rise, with projections for 2004-2007 ndcatng a twofold ncrease over the number of advanced SAM system exports during the md to late 1990s

  5. U.S. Air Force Posture Statement 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    buyouts (incentives) for force shaping. To sustain a civilian workforce, we need the right mix of new, mid-level, and se- nior employees. In the last...generation strike fighter aircraft for the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and our allies. Current program 62 emphasis is on facilitating the evolution ... price is one quarter of the cost, and its develop- ment schedule is half the time, of similar missile programs. JASSM is currently undergoing flight

  6. U.S. Air Force Posture Statement 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    command and control; electronic Warfare; network Warfare; and intelligence , surveillance and Reconnaissance ( isR ). Many air Force programs, while...persistent isR and—in the case of Predator—a lethal strike option. in addition to their global responsibilities, stateside airborne Warning and control...Joint sTaRs) is an airborne battle management, command and control, intelligence , surveillance, and reconnaissance platform. its primary mission

  7. Posture Statement 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    dispersed, comprising formal, informal, family, and cultural associations tied by varied and sometimes near- invisible links. Th ey ex- ploit the...coordination, and communication between all levels of government. USSOCOM’s leadership, vision, and initiative in prosecuting the GWOT was validated most...Rather, the new vision expresses a need for low density, high demand SOF assets to be postured with a “presence for purpose”, to be at the “right place

  8. Strategic Joint Staff Force Posture and Readiness Process Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-31

    STRATEGIC JOINT STAFF FORCE POSTURE AND READINESS PROCESS ANALYSIS 31 March 2014 Dan Kennedy, Consultant for Alcea Technologies Inc... Posture and Readiness Process Analysis 1 Executive Summary 1. The purpose of this report is to examine the process used by the Strategic Joint...Staff to determine the Force Posture and Readiness (FP&R) of the Canadian Armed Forces. The CDS Directive for CAF Force Posture and Readiness 2013

  9. The evolution of NATO's conventional force posture

    SciTech Connect

    Duffield, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation has three objectives. The first is to describe the evolution of NATO's conventional force posture in greater detail than has previously been possible by drawing upon recently declassified government documents. The author's focus is on changes that have occurred in the role of conventional forces in NATO strategy as well as in the structure and actual capabilities of NATO's conventional forces. He examines five episodes in NATO history during which significant change in the alliance's conventional forces was seriously contemplated, attempted, or actually took place. The second objective is to explain this history. To this end, he examines several leading theories of international relations: balance of power and balance of threat, public goods, and regimes. By comparing the predictions of these theories with the historical record, he was able to identify the factors most important in shaping NATO's conventional force posture over the years. Since these factors are likely to continue to be important, this analysis allows assessing prospects for future change, the third objective. This study suggests that NATO's conventional force posture has become increasingly static over the years.

  10. Posture Statement of General Douglas M. Fraser, United States Air Force Commander, United States Southern Command, Before the 112th Congress House Armed Services Committee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-06

    Latinoamericano de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO). 3 Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF South), our key component in detection and monitoring of illicit...food prices, and energy shortages are likely to continue until the government addresses the underlying causes of social turmoil. In Venezuela, 12... social interaction and overall well- being. Outdoor recreation areas have been expanded, and library holdings increased to 25,000 items. Educational

  11. United States Air Force Posture Statement 2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    United States Wildfire Relief Our people played a pivotal role fighting the worst wildfires to ravage the western United States in 50 years. In 48...munitions, and training valued at over $103 billion. These contracts included sales of over 13 240 F–16s to the United Arab Emirates, Greece , Israel...f ly in g h o u rs FY El Salvador Canada Bahamas Jamaica Chile Haiti France Italy United Kingdom Denmark Germany Greece Norway Slovokia Egypt Turkey

  12. Postural steadiness and ankle force variability in peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, Roger J.; Feldman-Kothe, Caitlin; Trabert, Megan K.; Hitchcock, Leah N.; Reiser, Raoul F.; Tracy, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose was to determine the effect of peripheral neuropathy (PN) on motor output variability for ankle muscles of older adults, and the relation between ankle motor variability and postural stability in PN patients. Methods Older adults with (O-PN) and without PN (O), and young adults (Y) underwent assessment of standing postural stability and ankle muscle force steadiness. Results O-PN displayed impaired ankle muscle force control and postural stability compared with O and Y groups. For O-PN, the amplitude of plantarflexor force fluctuations was moderately correlated with postural stability under no-vision conditions (r = 0.54, P = 0.01). Discussion The correlation of variations in ankle force with postural stability in PN suggests a contribution of ankle muscle dyscontrol to the postural instability that impacts physical function for older adults with PN. PMID:26284897

  13. 1998 Department of the Navy Posture Statement. Forward From the Sea: Anytime, Anywhere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Technology SVII. Efficiency #VIII. Programs # IX. Conclusion I flack 1 IÜ Each page in the online version of the Posture Statement has these three...and Commitment. This posture statement illustrates the framework adopted by the Department of the Navy to achieve our vision of 21st century...weapons combine to convince any adversary that seeking a nuclear advantage — or even nuclear parity — I would be futile. Stealth and mobility make this

  14. Functional muscle synergies constrain force production during postural tasks.

    PubMed

    McKay, J Lucas; Ting, Lena H

    2008-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a set of five functional muscle synergies were sufficient to characterize both hindlimb muscle activity and active forces during automatic postural responses in cats standing at multiple postural configurations. This characterization depended critically upon the assumption that the endpoint force vector (synergy force vector) produced by the activation of each muscle synergy rotated with the limb axis as the hindlimb posture varied in the sagittal plane. Here, we used a detailed, 3D static model of the hindlimb to confirm that this assumption is biomechanically plausible: as we varied the model posture, simulated synergy force vectors rotated monotonically with the limb axis in the parasagittal plane (r2=0.94+/-0.08). We then tested whether a neural strategy of using these five functional muscle synergies provides the same force-generating capability as controlling each of the 31 muscles individually. We compared feasible force sets (FFSs) from the model with and without a muscle synergy organization. FFS volumes were significantly reduced with the muscle synergy organization (F=1556.01, p<0.01), and as posture varied, the synergy-limited FFSs changed in shape, consistent with changes in experimentally measured active forces. In contrast, nominal FFS shapes were invariant with posture, reinforcing prior findings that postural forces cannot be predicted by hindlimb biomechanics alone. We propose that an internal model for postural force generation may coordinate functional muscle synergies that are invariant in intrinsic limb coordinates, and this reduced-dimension control scheme reduces the set of forces available for postural control.

  15. Effects of handle orientation, gloves, handle friction and elbow posture on maximum horizontal pull and push forces.

    PubMed

    Seo, Na Jin; Armstrong, Thomas J; Young, Justin G

    2010-01-01

    Biomechanical models were evaluated for effects of handle orientation, handle material, gloves and arm posture on maximal pull/push force. Eight healthy subjects performed maximum pull/push exertions on handles with two different orientations and two different surface materials, using bare hand and two types of glove as well as two arm postures. The empirical data supported the proposed biomechanical models: Pull/push forces for the bare hand on a rubber handle decreased 10% when the handle was parallel to the pull/push direction, compared with when perpendicular to it. For parallel handles, pull/push forces further decreased with decreasing hand-handle friction coefficient (simulated by different handle materials and gloves). Pull force exerted by the bare hand was 29% greater when the elbow was extended than when flexed. Pull force was greater than push force (with bare hand and flexed elbow). The biomechanical models suggest that friction between the hand and handle limits pull/push forces for parallel handles. Elbow strength may be responsible for decreased pull force for the flexed elbow posture and decreased force for pull compared with push in the postures examined. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Biomechanical models presented in this paper provide insights for causes of upper extremity strength limitations during pull/push tasks. Findings in this paper can be used directly in the design of workstation and objects to reduce fatigue and risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. Gnatho-postural treatment in an air force pilot.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Alberto; Tecco, Simona; Cioffi, Domenico; Rinaldi, Antonio; Longoni, Salvatore

    2012-05-01

    Due to the stresses of flight, air force pilots are more likely to experience oral parafunctions such as bruxism when compared to the general population. Further, their craniocervical mandibular system is subjected to particular stresses in the course of their duties. The aim of this study was to analyze an air force pilot who was undergoing gnatho-postural treatment in order to protect the masticatory system and achieve better occlusal balance. A 32-yr-old pilot from the Italian Air Force national aerobatic team P.A.N. Frecce Tricolori was chosen from the pilots analyzed and treated at the Istituto Medico Legale A. Mosso. A resin stabilization splint was designed for the pilot's lower arch, allowing for the unobstructed excursive glides of the mandible in the protrusive position, and laterality and occlusal balance in the centric position. The clinical gnatho-postural treatment involving a functional diagnostic instrument used on Italian Air Force pilots protects the masticatory system from dental abrasion and, in this particular case, seemed to improve the pilot's posture control system as analyzed by the stabilometric platform.

  17. Human arm posture prediction in response to isometric endpoint forces.

    PubMed

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2015-11-26

    The ability to predict the musculoskeletal response to external loads has multiple applications for the design of machines with a human interface and for the prediction of outcomes of musculoskeletal interventions. In this study, we applied an inverse-inverse dynamics technique to investigate its ability to predict arm posture in response to isometric hand forces. For each subject, we made a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model using the AnyBody Modelling System (AMS). Then, we had each subject-specific model hold a weight anteriorly to the right shoulder joint at a distance of half of the arm length. We selected the glenohumeral abduction angle (GHAA) as the only free parameter. Subsequently, we used inverse-inverse dynamics to find the optimal GHAA that minimised a performance criterion with physiological constraints. In this study, we investigated the performance of two different objective functions: summation of squared muscle activity (SSMA) and summation of squared normalised joint torques (SSNJT). To validate the simulation results, arm posture responses to different isometric downward hand forces were measured for six healthy male subjects. Five trials were performed for each loading condition. The results showed that, with an increase in hand load, there was a reduced GHAA in all subjects. Another interesting finding was that self-selected postures for lighter tasks varied more than postures for heavier tasks for all subjects. To understand this, we investigated the curvature of the objective function as a function of the load and observed an increased curvature with increased load. This may explain the reduced intra-subject variations observed for increasing loads. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid acceleration in dogs: ground forces and body posture dynamics.

    PubMed

    Walter, Rebecca M; Carrier, David R

    2009-06-01

    Because the ability to accelerate rapidly is crucial to the survival and reproductive fitness of most terrestrial animals, it is important to understand how the biomechanics of rapid acceleration differs from that of steady-state locomotion. Here we compare rapid acceleration with high-speed galloping in dogs to investigate the ways in which body and limb posture and ground forces are altered to produce effective acceleration. Seven dogs were videotaped at 250 Hz as they performed ;maximum effort' accelerations, starting in a standing position on a force plate and one and two strides before it. These dogs began accelerations by rapidly flexing their ankles and knees as they dropped into a crouch. The crouched posture was maintained in the first accelerating stride such that the ankle and knee were significantly more flexed than during steady high-speed galloping. The hindlimb was also significantly more retracted over the first stance period than during high-speed galloping. Ground forces differed from steady-state locomotion in that rapidly accelerating dogs supported only 43% of their body weight with the forelimbs, compared with 56-64% in steady-state locomotion. The hindlimbs applied greater peak accelerating forces than the forelimbs, but the forelimbs contributed significantly to the dogs' acceleration by producing 43% of the total propulsive impulse. Kinematically, rapid acceleration differs from steady-state galloping in that the limbs are more flexed and more retracted, while the back undergoes greater pitching movement. Ground reaction forces also differ significantly from steady-state galloping in that almost no decelerating forces are applied while propulsive force impulses are three to six times greater.

  19. National Guard Posture Statement 2010. America’s Indispensable Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    First Class Tom Steber Technical Sergeant Michelle Burroughs Technical Sergeant Brian E. Christiansen Technical Sergeant D. Clare Technical Sergeant... Barron , MS SGT Michael Barry, KS SSG Robert J. Basham, WI SPC Todd M. Bates, OH SSG Tane T. Baum, OR SPC Alan Bean Jr., VT SGT Bobby E. Beasley, WV SSgt...Christopher R. Willoughby, AL SSG Clinton L. Wisdom, KS SPC Robert A. Wise, FL SPC Michelle M. Witmer, WI SSG Delmar White, KY SGT Elijah Tai Wah Wong, AZ

  20. 2007 Posture Statement, Army Reserve: An Operational Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Officer Bob Louck is a Warrior Citizen who retired from the military in 1985. After September 11th, the former instructor pilot turned pastry truck...environments are nothing new to Bob. Whether the enemy is the Taliban or the Viet Cong, Chief Warrant Officer Louck , who last flew a Chinook in 1970...especially the young people who are recruited by the Taliban.” (Chief Warrant Officer Louck on a humanitarian mission in Pakistan

  1. Effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and respiratory muscles activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jintae; Park, Soojin; Kim, Youngju; Choi, Yeonsung; Lyu, Hyeonnam

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and deep breathing. [Subjects] Twenty-six subjects, divided into the two groups (normal and forward head posture groups), participated in this study. [Methods] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were measured using respiratory function instrumentation that met the American Thoracic Society's recommendation for diagnostic spirometry. Accessory respiratory muscle activity during deep breathing was measured by electromyography. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the measure variables between the normal and forward head posture group. [Results] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. Accessory respiratory muscle activity was also lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. In particular, the sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis major activity of the forward head posture group was significantly lower than that of normal group. Activities of the other muscles were generally decreased with forward head posture, but were not significantly different between the two groups. [Conclusion] These results indicate that forward head posture could reduce vital capacity, possibly because of weakness or disharmony of the accessory respiratory muscles.

  2. Pre-impact lower extremity posture and brake pedal force predict foot and ankle forces during an automobile collision.

    PubMed

    Hardin, E C; Su, A; van den Bogert, A J

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how a driver's foot and ankle forces during a frontal vehicle collision depend on initial lower extremity posture and brake pedal force. A 2D musculoskeletal model with seven segments and six right-side muscle groups was used. A simulation of a three-second braking task found 3647 sets of muscle activation levels that resulted in stable braking postures with realistic pedal force. These activation patterns were then used in impact simulations where vehicle deceleration was applied and driver movements and foot and ankle forces were simulated. Peak rearfoot ground reaction force (F(RF)), peak Achilles tendon force (FAT), peak calcaneal force (F(CF)) and peak ankle joint force (F(AJ)) were calculated. Peak forces during the impact simulation were 476 +/- 687 N (F(RF)), 2934 +/- 944 N (F(CF)) and 2449 +/- 918 N (F(AJ)). Many simulations resulted in force levels that could cause fractures. Multivariate quadratic regression determined that the pre-impact brake pedal force (PF), knee angle (KA) and heel distance (HD) explained 72% of the variance in peak FRF, 62% in peak F(CF) and 73% in peak F(AJ). Foot and ankle forces during a collision depend on initial posture and pedal force. Braking postures with increased knee flexion, while keeping the seat position fixed, are associated with higher foot and ankle forces during a collision.

  3. Correlates Between Force and Postural Tremor in Older Individuals with Essential Tremor.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Justin J; Keogh, Justin W L

    2016-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is commonly associated with kinetic tremor. However, other forms of tremor, such as force and postural tremor, may occur in ET with less severity. This study objectively assessed force and postural tremor characteristics in ET with the purpose of identifying the relationships between these tremors. Ten individuals with ET (age 71 ± 5 years) and ten healthy controls (age 70 ± 5 years) participated in the study. Force tremor was quantified as fluctuations in index finger abduction force during isometric contractions at 10 % maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and 60 % MVC. Postural tremor was quantified as index finger acceleration when the subjects held their entire arm unsupported, and when their arm was supported so that only the index finger could move. Time- and frequency-domain parameters were extracted from tremor data, and then correlations within, and between, tremor subtypes were examined. ET force tremor was dependent on contraction intensity whereas postural tremor was unaffected by the level of limb support. Significant correlations existed between frequency components of postural tremor and force tremor amplitude. Force tremor amplitude normalised to the level of contraction intensity correlated to the proportion of power for postural tremor. These correlations were observed for both contraction intensities and both levels of postural support. The proportion of power represents the output of central oscillators in ET patients and therefore correlated well to force tremor. Given that significant relationships existed between spectral features of postural tremor and the overall force tremor amplitude, it is clear that these tremor modalities are not completely independent in older adults with ET.

  4. An investigation of rugby scrimmaging posture and individual maximum pushing force.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Lan; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Wu, Jia-Hroung; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2007-02-01

    Although rugby is a popular contact sport and the isokinetic muscle torque assessment has recently found widespread application in the field of sports medicine, little research has examined the factors associated with the performance of game-specific skills directly by using the isokinetic-type rugby scrimmaging machine. This study is designed to (a) measure and observe the differences in the maximum individual pushing forward force produced by scrimmaging in different body postures (3 body heights x 2 foot positions) with a self-developed rugby scrimmaging machine and (b) observe the variations in hip, knee, and ankle angles at different body postures and explore the relationship between these angle values and the individual maximum pushing force. Ten national rugby players were invited to participate in the examination. The experimental equipment included a self-developed rugby scrimmaging machine and a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Our results showed that the foot positions (parallel and nonparallel foot positions) do not affect the maximum pushing force; however, the maximum pushing force was significantly lower in posture I (36% body height) than in posture II (38%) and posture III (40%). The maximum forward force in posture III (40% body height) was also slightly greater than for the scrum in posture II (38% body height). In addition, it was determined that hip, knee, and ankle angles under parallel feet positioning are factors that are closely negatively related in terms of affecting maximum pushing force in scrimmaging. In cross-feet postures, there was a positive correlation between individual forward force and hip angle of the rear leg. From our results, we can conclude that if the player stands in an appropriate starting position at the early stage of scrimmaging, it will benefit the forward force production.

  5. United States Air Force Annual Financial Statements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    u m b e rs in Th o u sa n d s America’s Air Force is built on the solid foundation of our intelligent, professional, and...People Active Civilian 249 166 161 162 160 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 FY 1990 FY 1999 FY 2000 FY 2001 FY 2002 N u m b e rs in Th o u sa n d s improve...September 30, 2002 Service Acquisition Life Value N/A N/A $ 364,091 N/A $ $ 346,220 S /L 20 Or 40 38,697,669 $ -22,423,315 15,577,312 S /L

  6. Normative values for a video-force plate assessment of postural control in athletic children.

    PubMed

    Howell, David R; Meehan, William P

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to provide normative data for young athletes during the three stances of the modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS) using an objective video-force plate system. Postural control was measured in 398 athletes between 8 and 18 years of age during the three stances of the mBESS using a video-force plate rating system. Girls exhibited better postural control than boys during each stance of the mBESS. Age was not significantly associated with postural control. We provide normative data for a video-force plate assessment of postural stability in pediatric athletes during the three stances of the mBESS.

  7. Maximum handgrip force in relation to upper limb posture--a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Roman-Liu, Danuta

    2003-01-01

    It is essential to establish normative values of handgrip force in relation to factors influencing the force. This study developed a predictive equation that expresses the maximum force of the handgrip in relation to upper limb posture and gender. To create the equation, data from published studies on experimental results of maximum handgrip force in different upper limb postures were used. Selected were only those studies that describe upper limb posture during experiments clearly enough so that it could be transferred according to the Seven Degrees of Freedom Model, which unambiguously defines upper limb posture with values of seven angles. A predictive equation for male maximum handgrip force in relation to angles of wrist flexion/extension, wrist adduction/abduction, forearm pronation/supination, elbow flexion, shoulder flexion/extension, shoulder horizontal adduction/abduction, and arm medial/lateral rotation along the long axis was developed. Also developed was a mathematical formula that expresses maximum handgrip force for men in relation to maximum handgrip force for women. The equation is general and can be used for calculating norm values. It can also be applied to a specific population by performing an experimental study for one upper limb posture and assessing maximum force on the basis of the predictive equation for others.

  8. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume I. Posture statement, outlook and program review

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    Activities of all elements of the Department of Energy (DOE) except those of FERC are reported. Chapter I, the Posture Statement, gives an overview of the policies, programs, and strategies of DOE. It describes the national energy policy and its effects, sets out the current state of energy supply and demand in the US and around the world, describes the present assessment of future energy availability, and outlines the strategy for 1982. Additional chapters detail the major programs in the following Offices or Assistant Secretaryships: Conservation, Fossil Fuel, Nuclear Energy, Renewable Energy Resources, Electric Energy Systems and Energy Storage, Environment, Energy Supporting Research, Energy Production and Power Marketing, Energy Information, Economic Regulation, General Science, Defense, International Programs, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, Energy Contingency Planning, and Administration. Information is included in appendices on foreign direct investment in US energy sources and supplies for 1979, exports of energy resources by foreign companies, major recipients of DOE funding, DOE actions taken regarding disclosure of energy assets by DOE employees, and financial assistance programs. (MCW)

  9. U.S. Air Force Annual Financial Statement 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    the donor, trust agreement , or statute. Special fund accounts are used to record government receipts reserved for a specific purpose. Certain trust...OMB. Based on an agreement with OMB, funds for Security Assistance programs are reported separately from Air Force financial statements and notes...Reconciliation of Net Cost of Operations to Budget. The U.S. has cost sharing agreements with countries having a mutual or reciprocal defense agreement

  10. Imperceptible electrical noise attenuates isometric plantar flexion force fluctuations with correlated reductions in postural sway.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Kohn, André Fabio

    2012-03-01

    Optimal levels of noise stimulation have been shown to enhance the detection and transmission of neural signals thereby improving the performance of sensory and motor systems. The first series of experiments in the present study aimed to investigate whether subsensory electrical noise stimulation applied over the triceps surae (TS) in seated subjects decreases torque variability during a force-matching task of isometric plantar flexion and whether the same electrical noise stimulation decreases postural sway during quiet stance. Correlation tests were applied to investigate whether the noise-induced postural sway decrease is linearly predicted by the noise-induced torque variability decrease. A second series of experiments was conducted to investigate whether there are differences in torque variability between conditions in which the subsensory electrical noise is applied only to the TS, only to the tibialis anterior (TA) and to both TS and TA, during the force-matching task with seated subjects. Noise stimulation applied over the TS muscles caused a significant reduction in force variability during the maintained isometric force paradigm and also decreased postural oscillations during quiet stance. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the reduction in force fluctuation and the decrease in postural sway with the electrical noise stimulation. This last result indicates that changes in plantar flexion force variability in response to a given subsensory random stimulation of the TS may provide an estimate of the variations in postural sway caused by the same subsensory stimulation of the TS. We suggest that the decreases in force variability and postural sway found here are due to stochastic resonance that causes an improved transmission of proprioceptive information. In the second series of experiments, the reduction in force variability found when noise was applied to the TA muscle alone did not reach statistical significance, suggesting that TS

  11. Effect of posture on forces and moments measured in a Hybrid III ATD lower leg.

    PubMed

    Van Tuyl, John; Burkhart, Timothy A; Quenneville, Cheryl E

    2016-05-18

    Anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) are used to assess real injury risk to occupants of vehicles during injurious events. In the lower leg, values from load cells are compared to injury criteria developed in cadaveric studies. These criteria are typically developed with the leg in a neutral posture, whereas the ATD may assume a wide range of postures during safety evaluation tests. The degree to which the initial posture of an ATD has an effect on the measured forces and moments in the lower leg is unknown. A Hybrid III ATD lower leg was impacted in a range of postures under conditions representing a crash test, and peak axial force and adjusted tibia index injury measures were evaluated. Ankle posture was varied in 5° increments using a custom-made footplate, and dorsi/plantarflexion (20° DF to 20° PF) and in/eversion (20° IV to 5° EV) were evaluated. Tibia angle was also varied (representing knee flexion/extension) by ±10° from neutral. Peak axial force was not affected by ankle flexion or tibia angulation. Adjusted tibia index was lowest for plantarflexion, as well as for tibia angles representative of knee extension. Both peak axial force and adjusted tibia index were lowest for postures of great inversion and were highest in neutral or near-neutral postures. The range of postures tested herein spanned published injury criteria and thus would have made the difference between pass and fail in a safety evaluation. In/eversion had the largest influence on injury metrics, likely due to the change in axial stiffness and altered impact durations in these postures. Results suggest increased injury risk at neutral or near-neutral postures, whereas previous cadaveric studies have suggested that in/eversion does not influence injury risk. It is unclear whether the ATD appropriately represents the natural lower leg for impacts in out-of-position testing. Great care must be taken when initially positioning ATDs for safety evaluations, because small perturbations in

  12. Control of grip force and vertical posture while holding an object and being perturbed.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Lee, Yun-Ju; Aruin, Alexander S

    2016-11-01

    We investigated motor control perspectives of coordinating maintenance of posture and application of grip force when holding an object and being perturbed. Ten subjects stood on the force platform holding an instrumented object in their dominant hand and were exposed to an external perturbation applied to their shoulders. Task demands were manipulated by positioning a slippery cap on top of the instrumented object. Grip force applied to the object, the object acceleration and the center of pressure (COP) were recorded and analyzed during the time intervals typical for the anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) components of postural control. Onsets of grip force were seen before the onsets of the COP displacement and initiation of movements of the handheld object during the APA phase of postural control, while the onsets of maximum grip force preceded the maximum COP displacement during the CPA phase. When the task demands increased by holding a handheld object with the slippery cap, subjects tended to generate grip force earlier and of a smaller magnitude; also, the COP displacement in the APA phase was smaller as compared to holding a handheld object only. The outcome provides a foundation for future studies of maintenance of vertical posture in people with impairments of balance and grip force control when holding an object and being perturbed.

  13. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Tat, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s), and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression. PMID:28286771

  14. Selective Linear-Regression Model for hand posture discrimination and grip force estimation using surface electromyogram signals.

    PubMed

    Yamanoi, Yusuke; Morishita, Soichiro; Kato, Ryu; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the method of hand posture discrimination and grip force estimation by means of Selective Linear-Regression Model. Generally, myoelectric hands which discriminate hand posture and estimate grip force at the same time result in unsatisfying results because of complication of EMG signals. Therefore, most of myoelectric hands can control either the force or the posture. However, the proposed method is able to discriminate hand posture and to estimate grip force simultaneously while the accuracy results are achieved. In experiments, EMG signals were measured while hand posture and grip force were changing. As a result, it appears that EMG features increase monotonically with grip force. In addition, increasing forms of EMG features are different on each posture. Based on these experimental results, the authors propose the method for both discriminating hand posture and estimating grip force by means of several linear-regression models which utilize the relationship between the grip force and EMG features on each posture. To evaluate the effectiveness of this method, the failure rates of discrimination and the estimation errors of the proposed method were employed. The results indicate that failure rates and estimation errors are improved significantly.

  15. Low-frequency force steadiness practice in plantar flexor muscle reduces postural sway during quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Oshita, Kazushige; Yano, Sumio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of low-frequency force steadiness practice in the plantar flexor muscles on postural sway during quiet standing. Healthy young 21 men (21±1 yrs) were randomly assigned to a practice group (n=14) and a nonexercising control group (n=7). Practice groups were divided by frequency of practice: 7 participants practiced once a week, and the other 7 twice a week, for 4 weeks. Steadiness practice required practice group to 5 sets of 60-s contraction at levels corresponding to 10% and 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) in the plantar flexor muscles. The 4-week-long practice period reduced the force fluctuations (assessed as the standard deviation (SD) of the outputted force during steady isometric plantar flexion) and postural sway (assessed as SD of the center of mass velocity during quiet standing). However, these practice effects were not significantly affected by the practice frequencies (1 vs. 2 sessions per week) examined in this study. Further, a linear regression analysis revealed the association between prepractice postural sway and the relative change in postural sway by the practice (r=-0.904) in the practice group. These results suggest that the steadiness practice in plantar flexor muscles improves postural stability during quiet standing, even though the practice is low-frequency (once a week) and low-intensity (within 20% MVC). These practice effects are dependent on prepractice postural stability. Further, the present results have provided the functional significance of force fluctuation in lower limb muscles.

  16. Correlation between clinical assessment and force plate measurement of postural control after stroke.

    PubMed

    Frykberg, Gunilla Elmgren; Lindmark, Birgitta; Lanshammar, Håkan; Borg, Jörgen

    2007-07-01

    To explore the correlation between clinical assessment and force plate measurement of postural control after stroke when selected balance tasks are performed under similar spatial and temporal conditions, and to examine the inter-rater agreement of assessment of weight distribution during quiet stance in subjects with stroke. A descriptive and correlational study. Clinical assessment of postural control using Berg Balance Scale, video recording for rating of weight distribution, and force plate measurement with the Vifor-system, were performed in 20 subjects with stroke. Mean velocity of displacement of the centre of pressure in the anterior-posterior direction correlated moderately with scores from the Berg Balance Scale items "maintaining a position" in the whole sample (rs = -0.50, p < 0.05). Moderate correlation was found between ratings of each of 3 physiotherapists and centre of pressure's mean position in the frontal plane on the force plate, while the inter-rater agreement was poor. Clinical assessment of postural control and weight distribution showed moderate correlation with force plate measurement when the assessments were performed under similar conditions. The data suggest that the reliability of observational postural analysis needs to be improved.

  17. Ground Reaction Forces Generated by Twenty-eight Hatha Yoga Postures.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sylvia J; Hager, Ron; Lockhart, Barbara; Seeley, Matthew K

    Adherents claim many benefits from the practice of yoga, including promotion of bone health and prevention of osteoporosis. However, no known studies have investigated whether yoga enhances bone mineral density. Furthermore, none have estimated reaction forces applied by yoga practitioners. The purpose of this study was to collect ground reaction force (GRF) data on a variety of hatha yoga postures that would commonly be practiced in fitness centers or private studios. Twelve female and eight male volunteers performed a sequence of 28 hatha yoga postures while GRF data were collected with an AMTI strain-gauge force platform. The sequence was repeated six times by each study subject. Four dependent variables were studied: peak vertical GRF, mean vertical GRF, peak resultant GRF, and mean resultant GRF. Univariate analysis was used to identify mean values and standard deviations for the dependent variables. Peak vertical and resultant values of each posture were similar for all subjects, and standard deviations were small. Similarly, mean vertical and resultant values were similar for all subjects. This 28 posture yoga sequence produced low impact GRF applied to upper and lower extremities. Further research is warranted to determine whether these forces are sufficient to promote osteogenesis or maintain current bone health in yoga practitioners.

  18. Ground Reaction Forces Generated by Twenty-eight Hatha Yoga Postures

    PubMed Central

    WILCOX, SYLVIA J.; HAGER, RON; LOCKHART, BARBARA; SEELEY, MATTHEW K.

    2012-01-01

    Adherents claim many benefits from the practice of yoga, including promotion of bone health and prevention of osteoporosis. However, no known studies have investigated whether yoga enhances bone mineral density. Furthermore, none have estimated reaction forces applied by yoga practitioners. The purpose of this study was to collect ground reaction force (GRF) data on a variety of hatha yoga postures that would commonly be practiced in fitness centers or private studios. Twelve female and eight male volunteers performed a sequence of 28 hatha yoga postures while GRF data were collected with an AMTI strain-gauge force platform. The sequence was repeated six times by each study subject. Four dependent variables were studied: peak vertical GRF, mean vertical GRF, peak resultant GRF, and mean resultant GRF. Univariate analysis was used to identify mean values and standard deviations for the dependent variables. Peak vertical and resultant values of each posture were similar for all subjects, and standard deviations were small. Similarly, mean vertical and resultant values were similar for all subjects. This 28 posture yoga sequence produced low impact GRF applied to upper and lower extremities. Further research is warranted to determine whether these forces are sufficient to promote osteogenesis or maintain current bone health in yoga practitioners. PMID:27182380

  19. AFCYBER: Postured to Support Air Force and USCYBERCOM Cyber Needs?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Garamone, “ Alexander Details U.S. Cyber Command Gains,” September 24, 2010, from American Forces Press Service. 41 Brigadier General Franz , U.S. Cyber...missions. General Alexander , Commander USCYBERCOM, first envisions a cyber profession where communications, signals intelligence, cryptography...to support both USCYBERCOM and Air Force requirements. General Alexander considers having trained and ready forces as the single most important

  20. The development and validation of equations to predict grip force in the workplace: contributions of muscle activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Keir, Peter J; Mogk, Jeremy P M

    2005-08-15

    The inherent difficulty of measuring forces on the hand in ergonomic workplace assessments has led to the need for equations to predict grip force. A family of equations was developed, and validated, for the prediction of grip force using forearm electromyography (six finger and wrist muscles) as well as posture of the wrist (flexed, neutral and extended) and forearm (pronated, neutral, supinated). Inclusion of muscle activity was necessary to explain over 85% of the grip force variance and was further improved with wrist posture but not forearm posture. Posture itself had little predictive power without muscle activity (<1%). Nominal wrist posture improved predictive power more than the measured wrist angle. Inclusion of baseline muscle activity, the activity required to simply hold the grip dynamometer, greatly improved grip force predictions, especially at low force levels. While the complete model using six muscles and posture was the most accurate, the detailed validation and error analysis revealed that equations based on fewer components often resulted in a negligible reduction in predictive strength. Error was typically less than 10% under 50% of maximal grip force and around 15% over 50% of maximal grip force. This study presents detailed error analyses to both improve upon previous studies and to allow an educated decision to be made on which muscles to monitor depending on expected force levels, costs and error deemed acceptable by the potential user.

  1. Investigation of spinal posture signatures and ground reaction forces during landing in elite female gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Wade, Melanie; Campbell, Amity; Smith, Anne; Norcott, Joanne; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The link between static and dynamic landing lumbar postures, when gymnasts are exposed to large ground reaction forces, has not been established. This investigation aimed to (a) determine if a relationship exists between sagittal static and dynamic landing lumbar spine angles at peak ground reaction force (GRF) and (b) quantify how close to end-range postures the gymnasts were at landing peak GRF. Twenty-one female gymnasts' upper and lower lumbar spine angles were recorded: statically in sitting and standing, during landing of three gymnastic skills, and during active end-range lumbar flexion. Pearson's correlations were used to investigate relationships between the angles in different postures. Significant correlations (r = .77-.89, p <.01) were found between all the static/dynamic postures in the lower lumbar spine angle, while fewer and less significant upper lumbar spine correlations were reported. Thirty percent of gymnasts landed a backsault with their lower lumbar spine flexed beyond their active end-range while experiencing GRF 6.8-13.3 times their body weight. These results inform low back pain prevention and management strategies in this population and highlight areas for future research.

  2. Self-selected duty cycle times for grip force, wrist flexion postures and three grip types.

    PubMed

    Finneran, Aoife; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Performance and health issues are common in industry. On-the-job productivity gains related to good design, which could help justify ergonomics intervention, are often not considered. More quantitative data are needed to model the discomfort/productivity relationship for upper limb activity in simulated repetitive assembly type work. Eighteen participants completed an experiment, simulating a repetitive upper limb task with force, posture and grip type recorded as independent variables. Duty cycle time and discomfort were recorded as dependent variables. Participants performed 18 experiment combinations (block designed around force); each treatment lasted 35 min, including breaks. Analysis indicated a significant two-way interaction between posture and grip type. Results from this experiment were used to model the effect of these variables on operator discomfort and performance.

  3. Force measurements of postural sway and rapid arm lift in seated children with and without MMC.

    PubMed

    Norrlin, Simone; Karlsson, Annica; Ahlsten, Gunnar; Lanshammar, Håkan; Silander, Hans C; Dahl, Margareta

    2002-03-01

    The aim was to investigate the horizontal ground reaction forces of seated postural sway and rapid arm lift in children with and without myelomeningocele. BACKGROUND; It is unclear whether children with myelomeningocele have limited control of body posture entirely caused by the impairment in the legs or also by other dysfunction. 11 children with myelomeningocele, 10-13 years, and 20 children without physical impairment were investigated. Data were collected by force plate measurements during quiet sitting and during rapid arm lift. The forces were expressed as the corresponding acceleration of the centre of mass. The amplitude and the frequency of the centre of mass acceleration quantified the sway. Movement time, onset and anteroposterior peak acceleration were analysed during arm lift. The children with myelomeningocele had a low sway frequency under both conditions: eyes open and eyes closed. The movement time was longer for these children compared to the controls. The onset of initial anteroposterior centre of mass acceleration preceded the arm lift and was directed forward in both groups. The peak centre of mass acceleration was usually directed backward. The control of postural sway was different in children with myelomeningocele compared to children without disabilities and this could not be explained by the cele level. The children with myelomeningocele had a slow motor performance of the seated sway and during arm lift. Slow motor performance involves functional limitations in the individual child and is important for the therapy program.

  4. Ability of Low-Cost Force-Feedback Device to Influence Postural Stability.

    PubMed

    Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Tatti, Fabio; Borghese, Nunzio A

    2015-01-01

    Low-cost gaming technology offers promising devices for the rehabilitation of stroke patients at home. While several attempts have been made to use low-cost motion tracking devices (Kinect) or balance boards (Wii Board), the potential of low-cost haptic devices has yet to be explored in this context. The objective of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to influence postural stability with a low-cost device despite its technical limitations, and to explore the most promising modes of haptic interaction to increase and decrease postural stability. Two groups of younger subjects used a high-end (Omega.3) and a low-cost (Falcon) device respectively. A third group of older subjects used the Falcon. We show that light touch contact with the device improves stability, whereas the force tasks decrease it. The effects of the different tasks are consistent in the two age groups. Although there are differences in the participants' interaction with the two devices, the effect of the devices on postural stability is comparable. We conclude that a low-cost haptic device can be used to increase or decrease postural stability of healthy subjects with an age similar to that of typical stroke patients, in a safe and controllable way.

  5. The effect of force-controlled biting on human posture control.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, D; Stein, T; Potthast, W; Rammelsberg, P; Schindler, H J; Ringhof, S

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have confirmed the neuromuscular effects of jaw motor activity on the postural stability of humans, but the mechanisms of functional coupling of the craniomandibular system (CMS) with human posture are not yet fully understood. The purpose of our study was, therefore, to investigate whether submaximum biting affects the kinematics of the ankle, knee, and hip joints and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the leg muscles during bipedal narrow stance and single-leg stance. Twelve healthy young subjects performed force-controlled biting (FB) and non-biting (NB) during bipedal narrow stance and single-leg stance. To investigate the effects of FB on the angles of the hip, knee, and ankle joints, a 3D motion-capture system (Vicon MX) was used. EMG activity was recorded to enable analysis of the coefficient of variation of the muscle co-contraction ratios (CVR) of six pairs of postural muscles. Between FB and NB, no significant differences were found for the mean values of the angles of the ankle, knee, and hip joints, but the standard deviations were significantly reduced during FB. The values of the ranges of motion and the mean angular velocities for the three joints studied revealed significant reduction during FB also. CVR was also significantly reduced during FB for five of the six muscle pairs studied. Although submaximum biting does not change the basic strategy of posture control, it affects neuromuscular co-contraction patterns, resulting in increased kinematic precision.

  6. Evaluation of postural sway and impact forces during ingress and egress of scissor lifts at elevations.

    PubMed

    Pan, Christopher S; Chiou, Sharon S; Kau, Tsui-Ying; Wimer, Bryan M; Ning, Xiaopeng; Keane, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Workers are at risk when entering (ingress) or exiting (egress) elevated scissor lifts. In this study, we recorded ground impact forces and postural sway from 22 construction workers while they performed ingress and egress between a scissor lift and an adjacent work surface with varying conditions: lift opening designs, horizontal and vertical gaps, and sloped work surfaces. We observed higher peak ground shear forces when using a bar-and-chain opening, with larger horizontal gap, with the lift surface more than 0.2 m below the work surface, and presence of a sloped (26°) work surface. Similar trends were observed for postural sway, except that the influence of vertical distance was not significant. To reduce slip/trip/fall risk and postural sway of workers while ingress or egress of an elevated scissor lift, we suggest scissor lifts be equipped with a gate-type opening instead of a bar-and-chain design. We also suggest the lift surface be placed no more than 0.2 m lower than the work surface and the horizontal gap between lift and work surfaces be as small as possible. Selecting a non-sloped surface to ingress or egress a scissor lift is also preferred to reduce risk. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. United States Air Force Annual Financial Statement 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    screen interfaces, adjustable rudder pedals, ergonomic seat , improved High Annual Financial Statement 2011 General Fund Required Supplementary...over the Budget Authority – Appropriation line of the Statement of Budgetary Resources are designed to operate effectively to prevent, detect, and...Commands are designed and operating effectively to prevent or detect and correct material misstatements. The assertion has been audited by an

  8. Postural stability, clicker reaction time and bow draw force predict performance in elite recurve archery.

    PubMed

    Spratford, Wayne; Campbell, Rhiannon

    2017-06-01

    Recurve archery is an Olympic sport that requires extreme precision, upper body strength and endurance. The purpose of this research was to quantify how postural stability variables both pre- and post-arrow release, draw force, flight time, arrow length and clicker reaction time, collectively, impacted on the performance or scoring outcomes in elite recurve archery athletes. Thirty-nine elite-level recurve archers (23 male and 16 female; mean age = 24.7 ± 7.3 years) from four different countries volunteered to participate in this study prior to competing at a World Cup event. An AMTI force platform (1000Hz) was used to obtain centre of pressure (COP) measurements 1s prior to arrow release and 0.5s post-arrow release. High-speed footage (200Hz) allowed for calculation of arrow flight time and score. Results identified clicker reaction time, draw force and maximum sway speed as the variables that best predicted shot performance. Specifically, reduced clicker reaction time, greater bow draw force and reduced postural sway speed post-arrow release were predictors of higher scoring shots. It is suggested that future research should focus on investigating shoulder muscle tremors at full draw in relation to clicker reaction time, and the effect of upper body strength interventions (specifically targeting the musculature around the shoulder girdle) on performance in recurve archers.

  9. Haptic perception of force magnitude and its relation to postural arm dynamics in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Femke E; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Mugge, Winfred; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2015-12-08

    In a previous study, we found the perception of force magnitude to be anisotropic in the horizontal plane. In the current study, we investigated this anisotropy in three dimensional space. In addition, we tested our previous hypothesis that the perceptual anisotropy was directly related to anisotropies in arm dynamics. In experiment 1, static force magnitude perception was studied using a free magnitude estimation paradigm. This experiment revealed a significant and consistent anisotropy in force magnitude perception, with forces exerted perpendicular to the line between hand and shoulder being perceived as 50% larger than forces exerted along this line. In experiment 2, postural arm dynamics were measured using stochastic position perturbations exerted by a haptic device and quantified through system identification. By fitting a mass-damper-spring model to the data, the stiffness, damping and inertia parameters could be characterized in all the directions in which perception was also measured. These results show that none of the arm dynamics parameters were oriented either exactly perpendicular or parallel to the perceptual anisotropy. This means that endpoint stiffness, damping or inertia alone cannot explain the consistent anisotropy in force magnitude perception.

  10. Haptic perception of force magnitude and its relation to postural arm dynamics in 3D

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Femke E.; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M.; Mugge, Winfred; Kappers, Astrid M. L.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we found the perception of force magnitude to be anisotropic in the horizontal plane. In the current study, we investigated this anisotropy in three dimensional space. In addition, we tested our previous hypothesis that the perceptual anisotropy was directly related to anisotropies in arm dynamics. In experiment 1, static force magnitude perception was studied using a free magnitude estimation paradigm. This experiment revealed a significant and consistent anisotropy in force magnitude perception, with forces exerted perpendicular to the line between hand and shoulder being perceived as 50% larger than forces exerted along this line. In experiment 2, postural arm dynamics were measured using stochastic position perturbations exerted by a haptic device and quantified through system identification. By fitting a mass-damper-spring model to the data, the stiffness, damping and inertia parameters could be characterized in all the directions in which perception was also measured. These results show that none of the arm dynamics parameters were oriented either exactly perpendicular or parallel to the perceptual anisotropy. This means that endpoint stiffness, damping or inertia alone cannot explain the consistent anisotropy in force magnitude perception. PMID:26643041

  11. Canadian Athletic Therapists' Association Education Task Force Consensus Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafave, Mark R.; Bergeron, Glen; Klassen, Connie; Parr, Kelly; Valdez, Dennis; Elliott, Jacqueline; Peeler, Jason; Orecchio, Elsa; McKenzie, Kirsty; Streed, Kristin; DeMont, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Context: A published commentary from 2 of the current authors acted as a catalyst for raising some key issues that have arisen in athletic therapy education in Canada over the years. Objective: The purpose of this article is to report on the process followed to establish a number of consensus statements related to postsecondary athletic therapy…

  12. Canadian Athletic Therapists' Association Education Task Force Consensus Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafave, Mark R.; Bergeron, Glen; Klassen, Connie; Parr, Kelly; Valdez, Dennis; Elliott, Jacqueline; Peeler, Jason; Orecchio, Elsa; McKenzie, Kirsty; Streed, Kristin; DeMont, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Context: A published commentary from 2 of the current authors acted as a catalyst for raising some key issues that have arisen in athletic therapy education in Canada over the years. Objective: The purpose of this article is to report on the process followed to establish a number of consensus statements related to postsecondary athletic therapy…

  13. Multi-muscle synergies in an unusual postural task: quick shear force production.

    PubMed

    Robert, Thomas; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2008-05-01

    We considered a hypothetical two-level hierarchy participating in the control of vertical posture. The framework of the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis was used to explore the muscle groupings (M-modes) and multi-M-mode synergies involved in the stabilization of a time profile of the shear force in the anterior-posterior direction. Standing subjects were asked to produce pulses of shear force into a target using visual feedback while trying to minimize the shift of the center of pressure (COP). Principal component analysis applied to integrated muscle activation indices identified three M-modes. The composition of the M-modes was similar across subjects and the two directions of the shear force pulse. It differed from the composition of M-modes described in earlier studies of more natural actions associated with large COP shifts. Further, the trial-to-trial M-mode variance was partitioned into two components: one component that does not affect a particular performance variable (V(UCM)), and its orthogonal component (V(ORT)). We argued that there is a multi-M-mode synergy stabilizing this particular performance variable if V(UCM) is higher than V(ORT). Overall, we found a multi-M-mode synergy stabilizing both shear force and COP coordinate. For the shear force, this synergy was strong for the backward force pulses and nonsignificant for the forward pulses. An opposite result was found for the COP coordinate: the synergy was stronger for the forward force pulses. The study shows that M-mode composition can change in a task-specific way and that two different performance variables can be stabilized using the same set of elemental variables (M-modes). The different dependences of the ΔV indices for the shear force and COP coordinate on the force pulse direction supports applicability of the principle of superposition (separate controllers for different performance variables) to the control of different mechanical variables in postural tasks. The M

  14. United States Coast Guard 2010 Posture Statement: With 2011 Budget in Brief

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Patrol Forces South West Asia) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in FY 2009. Additionally, MK1 Roberts has been a Boarding Team Member for ten ...recently selected as the Coast Guard recipient for the United Service Organizations ( USO ) Military Leadership Award, which was given to one female

  15. Screening for bladder cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2011-08-16

    Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for bladder cancer. The USPSTF performed a targeted literature search for new evidence on the benefits and harms of screening, the accuracy of primary care-feasible screening tests, and the benefits and harms of treatment. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for bladder cancer in asymptomatic adults (I statement).

  16. Association of force steadiness of plantar flexor muscles and postural sway during quiet standing by young adults.

    PubMed

    Oshita, Kazushige; Yano, Sumio

    2012-08-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relations of force fluctuations during isometric plantar-flexion and postural sway during quiet standing. Twelve healthy men (M age = 21 yr., SD = 1) performed unilateral plantar flexion measured by a strain gauge force transducer. Participants performed force-matching tasks; sustained plantar flexion for 20 sec. at levels corresponding to 10% and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction with the visual feedback. Also, participants were asked to stand quietly with their eyes open, and then the center of mass displacement and velocity in the anteroposterior were measured. In analysis, postural sway was associated with force fluctuation at only 10% of maximum voluntary contraction. The statistically significant correlation between variables was found only at corresponding contraction intensities for plantar-flexor muscles. From this one may infer neural strategies in plantar-flexor muscles during quiet standing may be characteristics similar to those controlling the plantar-flexion force in young adults.

  17. Mitigating Insider Sabotage and Espionage: A Review of the United States Air Force’s Current Posture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE’S CURRENT POSTURE THESIS Erika C. Leach, Captain, USAF AFIT/ GIR /ENG/09-05 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR...the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT/ GIR /ENG/09-05 MITIGATING INSIDER SABOTAGE AND...Leach, BA Captain, USAF March 2009 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT/ GIR /ENG/09-05 MITIGATING INSIDER

  18. Common muscle synergies for control of center of mass and force in nonstepping and stepping postural behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chvatal, Stacie A; Torres-Oviedo, Gelsy; Safavynia, Seyed A; Ting, Lena H

    2011-08-01

    We investigated muscle activity, ground reaction forces, and center of mass (CoM) acceleration in two different postural behaviors for standing balance control in humans to determine whether common neural mechanisms are used in different postural tasks. We compared nonstepping responses, where the base of support is stationary and balance is recovered by returning CoM back to its initial position, with stepping responses, where the base of support is enlarged and balance is recovered by pushing the CoM away from the initial position. In response to perturbations of the same direction, these two postural behaviors resulted in different muscle activity and ground reaction forces. We hypothesized that a common pool of muscle synergies producing consistent task-level biomechanical functions is used to generate different postural behaviors. Two sets of support-surface translations in 12 horizontal-plane directions were presented, first to evoke stepping responses and then to evoke nonstepping responses. Electromyographs in 16 lower back and leg muscles of the stance leg were measured. Initially (∼100-ms latency), electromyographs, CoM acceleration, and forces were similar in nonstepping and stepping responses, but these diverged in later time periods (∼200 ms), when stepping occurred. We identified muscle synergies using non-negative matrix factorization and functional muscle synergies that quantified correlations between muscle synergy recruitment levels and biomechanical outputs. Functional muscle synergies that produce forces to restore CoM position in nonstepping responses were also used to displace the CoM during stepping responses. These results suggest that muscle synergies represent common neural mechanisms for CoM movement control under different dynamic conditions: stepping and nonstepping postural responses.

  19. Common muscle synergies for control of center of mass and force in nonstepping and stepping postural behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Chvatal, Stacie A.; Torres-Oviedo, Gelsy; Safavynia, Seyed A.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated muscle activity, ground reaction forces, and center of mass (CoM) acceleration in two different postural behaviors for standing balance control in humans to determine whether common neural mechanisms are used in different postural tasks. We compared nonstepping responses, where the base of support is stationary and balance is recovered by returning CoM back to its initial position, with stepping responses, where the base of support is enlarged and balance is recovered by pushing the CoM away from the initial position. In response to perturbations of the same direction, these two postural behaviors resulted in different muscle activity and ground reaction forces. We hypothesized that a common pool of muscle synergies producing consistent task-level biomechanical functions is used to generate different postural behaviors. Two sets of support-surface translations in 12 horizontal-plane directions were presented, first to evoke stepping responses and then to evoke nonstepping responses. Electromyographs in 16 lower back and leg muscles of the stance leg were measured. Initially (∼100-ms latency), electromyographs, CoM acceleration, and forces were similar in nonstepping and stepping responses, but these diverged in later time periods (∼200 ms), when stepping occurred. We identified muscle synergies using non-negative matrix factorization and functional muscle synergies that quantified correlations between muscle synergy recruitment levels and biomechanical outputs. Functional muscle synergies that produce forces to restore CoM position in nonstepping responses were also used to displace the CoM during stepping responses. These results suggest that muscle synergies represent common neural mechanisms for CoM movement control under different dynamic conditions: stepping and nonstepping postural responses. PMID:21653725

  20. Postural Responses to a Suddenly Released Pulling Force in Older Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Yun; Lin, Sang-I; Liao, Yu-Ting; Lin, Ruey-Mo; Hsu, Che-Chia; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP), one of the most common musculoskeletal conditions in older adults, might affect balance and functional independence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the postural responses to a suddenly released pulling force in older adults with and without CLBP. Thirty community-dwelling older adults with CLBP and 26 voluntary controls without CLBP were enrolled. Participants were required to stand on a force platform while, with one hand, they pulled a string that was fastened at the other end to a 2-kg or to a 4-kg force in the opposite direction at a random order. The number of times the participants lost their balance and motions of center of pressure (COP) when the string was suddenly released were recorded. The results demonstrated that although the loss of balance rates for each pulling force condition did not differ between groups, older adults with CLBP had poorer postural responses: delayed reaction, larger displacement, higher velocity, longer path length, and greater COP sway area compared to the older controls. Furthermore, both groups showed larger postural responses in the 4-kg pulling force condition. Although aging is generally believed to be associated with declining balance and postural control, these findings highlight the effect of CLBP on reactive balance when responding to an externally generated force in an older population. This study also suggests that, for older adults with CLBP, in addition to treating them for pain and disability, reactive balance evaluation and training, such as reaction and movement strategy training should be included in their interventions. Clinicians and older patients with CLBP need to be made aware of the significance of impaired reactive balance and the increased risk of falls when encountering unexpected perturbations. PMID:27622646

  1. USAF Posture Statement 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-12

    set of options to deter war, deliver rapid, life-saving responses to threatened areas anywhere on the planet , and strike hard and precisely wherever...expansion of the WGS program to a ninth satellite, thus increasing interoperability and partner access to the system. We are also acquiring and...adversary objectives or impose unacceptable costs by effectively holding any target on the planet at risk and, if necessary, disabling or destroying

  2. Army Posture Statement 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-14

    and overhead. We are now well underway in deploying the Lean Six Sigma methodology as a vehicle to seek continuous process improvement, eliminate...and morale. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint Commands...between 2007 and 2013. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint

  3. Effects of vibration in forced posture on biochemical bone metabolism indices, and morphometric and mechanical properties of the lumbar vertebra.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qi; Wei, Fuling; Zhang, Li; Ju, Xiaowei; Zhu, Lvgang; Huang, Changlin; Huang, Tao; Zuo, Xincheng; Gao, Chunfang

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a relatively strong association between occupational lower back pain (LBP) and long-term exposure to vibration. However, there is limited knowledge of the impact of vibration and sedentariness on bone metabolism of the lumbar vertebra and the mechanism of bone-derived LBP. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vibration in forced posture (a seated posture) on biochemical bone metabolism indices, and morphometric and mechanical properties of the lumbar vertebra, and provide a scientific theoretical basis for the mechanism of bone-derived LBP, serum levels of Ca(2+), (HPO4)(2-), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), and bone gla protein (BGP),the pathological changes and biomechanics of lumbar vertebra of New Zealand white rabbits were studied. The results demonstrate that both forced posture and vibration can cause pathological changes to the lumbar vertebra, which can result in bone-derived LBP, and vibration combined with a seated posture could cause further damage to bone metabolism. Serological changes can be used as early markers for clinical diagnosis of bone-derived LBP.

  4. Effects of Vibration in Forced Posture on Biochemical Bone Metabolism Indices, and Morphometric and Mechanical Properties of the Lumbar Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Ju, Xiaowei; Zhu, Lvgang; Huang, Changlin; Huang, Tao; Zuo, Xincheng; Gao, Chunfang

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a relatively strong association between occupational lower back pain (LBP) and long-term exposure to vibration. However, there is limited knowledge of the impact of vibration and sedentariness on bone metabolism of the lumbar vertebra and the mechanism of bone-derived LBP. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vibration in forced posture (a seated posture) on biochemical bone metabolism indices, and morphometric and mechanical properties of the lumbar vertebra, and provide a scientific theoretical basis for the mechanism of bone-derived LBP, serum levels of Ca2+, (HPO4)2−, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), and bone gla protein (BGP),the pathological changes and biomechanics of lumbar vertebra of New Zealand white rabbits were studied. The results demonstrate that both forced posture and vibration can cause pathological changes to the lumbar vertebra, which can result in bone-derived LBP, and vibration combined with a seated posture could cause further damage to bone metabolism. Serological changes can be used as early markers for clinical diagnosis of bone-derived LBP. PMID:24265702

  5. Screening for chronic kidney disease: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-10-16

    New U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The USPSTF reviewed evidence on screening for CKD, including evidence on screening, accuracy of screening, early treatment, and harms of screening and early treatment. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic adults without diagnosed CKD. Testing for and monitoring CKD for the purpose of chronic disease management (including testing and monitoring patients with diabetes or hypertension) are not covered by this recommendation. The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of routine screening for CKD in asymptomatic adults (I statement).

  6. Comparative Effects of Different Balance-Training-Progression Styles on Postural Control and Ankle Force Production: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Cuğ, Mutlu; Duncan, Ashley; Wikstrom, Erik

    2016-02-01

    Despite the effectiveness of balance training, the exact parameters needed to maximize the benefits of such programs remain unknown. One such factor is how individuals should progress to higher levels of task difficulty within a balance-training program. Yet no investigators have directly compared different balance-training-progression styles. To compare an error-based progression (ie, advance when proficient at a task) with a repetition-based progression (ie, advance after a set amount of repetitions) style during a balance-training program in healthy individuals. Randomized controlled trial. Research laboratory. A total of 28 (16 women, 12 men) physically healthy young adults (age = 21.57 ± 3.95 years, height = 171.60 ± 11.03 cm, weight = 72.96 ± 16.18 kg, body mass index = 24.53 ± 3.7). All participants completed 12 supervised balance-training sessions over 4 weeks. Each session consisted of a combination of dynamic unstable-surface tasks that incorporated a BOSU ball and lasted about 30 minutes. Static balance from an instrumented force plate, dynamic balance as measured via the Star Excursion Balance Test, and ankle force production in all 4 cardinal planes of motion as measured with a handheld dynamometer before and after the intervention. Selected static postural-control outcomes, dynamic postural control, and ankle force production in all planes of motion improved (P < .05). However, no differences between the progression styles were observed (P > .05) for any of the outcome measures. A 4-week balance-training program consisting of dynamic unstable-surface exercises on a BOSU ball improved dynamic postural control and ankle force production in healthy young adults. These results suggest that an error-based balance-training program is comparable with but not superior to a repetition-based balance-training program in improving postural control and ankle force production in healthy young adults.

  7. The influence of wrist posture, grip type, and grip force on median nerve shape and cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Jeffrey C; Leonardis, Joshua; Lipps, David B; Gates, Deanna H

    2017-05-01

    During grasping, the median nerve undergoes mechanical stress in the carpal tunnel which may contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome. This study investigated the effects of wrist posture, grip type, and grip force on the shape and cross-sectional area of the median nerve. Ultrasound examination was used to obtain cross-sectional images of the dominant wrist of 16 healthy subjects (8 male) at the proximal carpal tunnel during grasping. The cross-sectional area, circularity, and axis lengths of the median nerve were assessed in 27 different conditions (3 postures × 3 grip types × 3 force levels). There were no significant changes in median nerve cross-sectional area (P > 0.05). There were significant interactions across posture, grip type, and grip force affecting nerve circularity and axis lengths. When the wrist was flexed, increasing grip force caused the median nerve to shorten in the mediolateral direction and lengthen in the anteroposterior direction (P < 0.04), becoming more circular. These effects were significant during four finger pinch grip and chuck grip (P < 0.05) but not key grip (P > 0.07). With the wrist extended, the nerve became more flattened (less circular) as grip force increased during four finger pinch grip and chuck grip (P < 0.04) but not key grip (P > 0.3). Circularity was lower during the four finger pinch compared to chuck or key grip (P < 0.03). The findings suggest that grip type and wrist posture significantly alter the shape of the median nerve. Clin. Anat. 30:470-478, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Slowed muscle force production and sensory organization deficits contribute to altered postural control strategies in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Yiu, Beverley P H L

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to (1) compare the postural control strategies, sensory organization of balance control, and lower limb muscle performance of children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and (2) determine the association between postural control strategies, sensory organization parameters and knee muscle performance indices among children with DCD. Fifty-eight DCD-affected children and 46 typically developing children participated in the study. Postural control strategies and sensory organization were evaluated with the sensory organization test (SOT). Knee muscle strength and time to produce maximum muscle torque (at 180°/s) were assessed using an isokinetic machine. Analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between groups, and multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between postural control strategies, sensory organization parameters, and isokinetic indices in children with DCD. The DCD group had significantly lower strategy scores (SOT conditions 5 and 6), lower visual and vestibular ratios, and took a longer time to reach peak torque in the knee flexor muscles than the control group (p>0.05). After accounting for age, sex, and body mass index, the vestibular ratio explained 35.8% of the variance in the strategy score of SOT condition 5 (p<0.05). Moreover, the visual ratio, vestibular ratio, and time to peak torque of the knee flexors were all significant predictors (p<0.05) of the strategy score during SOT condition 6, accounting for 14, 19.7, and 19.8% of its variance, respectively. The children with DCD demonstrated deficits in postural control strategy, sensory organization and prolonged duration of muscle force development. Slowed knee muscle force production combined with poor visual and vestibular functioning may result in greater use of hip strategy by children with DCD in sensory challenging environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Screening for Preeclampsia: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-04-25

    Preeclampsia affects approximately 4% of pregnancies in the United States. It is the second leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide and may lead to serious maternal complications, including stroke, eclampsia, and organ failure. Adverse perinatal outcomes for the fetus and newborn include intrauterine growth restriction, low birth weight, and stillbirth. Many of the complications associated with preeclampsia lead to early induction of labor or cesarean delivery and subsequent preterm birth. Preeclampsia is more prevalent among African American women than among white women. Differences in prevalence may be, in part, due to African American women being disproportionally affected by risk factors for preeclampsia. African American women also have case fatality rates related to preeclampsia 3 times higher than rates among white women. Inequalities in access to adequate prenatal care may contribute to poor outcomes associated with preeclampsia in African American women. To update the 1996 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for preeclampsia. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening and diagnostic tests for preeclampsia, the potential benefits and harms of screening for preeclampsia, the effectiveness of risk prediction tools, and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected preeclampsia. Given the evidence that treatment can reduce maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, and the well-established accuracy of blood pressure measurements, the USPSTF found adequate evidence that screening for preeclampsia results in a substantial benefit for the mother and infant. In addition, there is adequate evidence to bound the harms of screening for and treatment of preeclampsia as no greater than small. Therefore, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that there is a substantial net benefit of screening for preeclampsia in pregnant women. The USPSTF recommends screening for preeclampsia in pregnant

  10. Department of the Navy 1994 Posture Statement. ’Revolutionizing Our Naval Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    approved separation incentives such as separation payments to eligible employees who elect to resign or retire, and outplacement subsidy payments to...Priority Placement Program and the Defense Outplacement Referral System. ETHICS, CHARACTER, AND LEADERSHIP Ethics, character, and leadership have always been

  11. Contribution of seat and foot reaction forces to anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) in sitting isometric ramp pushes.

    PubMed

    Le Bozec, Serge; Bouisset, Simon

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the role of the upper and lower body on the dynamic phenomena, which precede the voluntary movement (anticipatory postural adjustments: APAs), and the way in which they contribute to postural control. In this view, sitting subjects were asked to perform horizontal two-handed ramp pushes as quickly as possible. A dynamometric bar was used to provide the push force (F(x)). Local reaction forces along the antero-posterior and vertical axes, at the seat and foot-rests (R(Sx), R(Sz), and R(fx), R(fz), respectively), as well as global ones (R(x) and R(z)), were measured. Two postural conditions were considered: full (100 BP) and one-third ischio-femoral contact (30 BP). Anticipatory postural adjustments durations (dAPAs) were measured between the onset of global or local (that is, at the seat and foot level) reaction forces, and the onset of push force increase. Firstly, the dAPAs were longer at the foot than at the seat level, that is, the APA sequence starts at the foot level: it is suggested that a "posturo-focal" sequence is followed, whose progression order is precisely dependent on the postural conditions. Moreover, the APA peak amplitudes (pAPA), measured at the seat contact were significantly greater than the corresponding ones measured at the foot contact: the upper body dynamics are larger than the lower body dynamics. Secondly, a greater peak push force (pF(x)) entailed significant dAPA increases, in preference to pAPA increases. As APAs are dynamic phenomena, they can perturb balance, suggesting that, in order to avoid unnecessary perturbation, APAs are increased in terms of duration rather than amplitude. Lastly, the impulses corresponding to the push force increase ("BPI(x)") and to the APA periods ("ACPI(x)") were calculated. As ACPI(x) was very low as compared to BPI(x), it was suggested that the APA action was limited to the period of the voluntary movement onset.

  12. Comparison of isometric force of the craniocervical flexor and extensor muscles between women with and without forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Bokaee, Fateme; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Manshadi, Farideh Dehghan; Naimi, Sedigheh Sadat; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Azimi, Hadi

    2016-09-01

    The stability of the craniocervical (CC) area is provided by CC muscles. Muscle imbalance between forces of these muscles may lead to forward head posture (FHP). FHP is one of the most prevalent abnormal postures in patients with neck pain. The aim of the present study was to compare isometric force of the CC flexor and extensor muscles between women with and without FHP. Isometric force of the CC flexor and extensor muscles was measured by a custom-made device and compared between 70 women with and without FHP (35 in each group). No significant difference was observed between the two groups regarding isometric force of the CC flexor and extensor muscles, but the ratio of the isometric force of the CC muscles (flexor to extensor) revealed significant difference between the two groups, and it was greater in the control group compared with that in the FHP group. The ratio of isometric force of the CC muscles (flexor to extensor) may be a good indicator for assessment of patients with FHP. This ratio may also be valuable to follow the results of therapeutic intervention for these patients.

  13. Proof of Concept of an Online EMG-Based Decoding of Hand Postures and Individual Digit Forces for Prosthetic Hand Control.

    PubMed

    Gailey, Alycia; Artemiadis, Panagiotis; Santello, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Options currently available to individuals with upper limb loss range from prosthetic hands that can perform many movements, but require more cognitive effort to control, to simpler terminal devices with limited functional abilities. We attempted to address this issue by designing a myoelectric control system to modulate prosthetic hand posture and digit force distribution. We recorded surface electromyographic (EMG) signals from five forearm muscles in eight able-bodied subjects while they modulated hand posture and the flexion force distribution of individual fingers. We used a support vector machine (SVM) and a random forest regression (RFR) to map EMG signal features to hand posture and individual digit forces, respectively. After training, subjects performed grasping tasks and hand gestures while a computer program computed and displayed online feedback of all digit forces, in which digits were flexed, and the magnitude of contact forces. We also used a commercially available prosthetic hand, the i-Limb (Touch Bionics), to provide a practical demonstration of the proposed approach's ability to control hand posture and finger forces. Subjects could control hand pose and force distribution across the fingers during online testing. Decoding success rates ranged from 60% (index finger pointing) to 83-99% for 2-digit grasp and resting state, respectively. Subjects could also modulate finger force distribution. This work provides a proof of concept for the application of SVM and RFR for online control of hand posture and finger force distribution, respectively. Our approach has potential applications for enabling in-hand manipulation with a prosthetic hand.

  14. Primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-08-20

    Chinese translation Update of the child abuse and neglect portion of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for family and intimate partner violence. The USPSTF commissioned a systematic review on interventions to prevent child maltreatment for children at risk, focusing on new studies and evidence gaps that were unresolved at the time of the 2004 recommendation. Beneficial outcomes considered include reduced exposure to maltreatment and reduced harms to physical or mental health or mortality. This recommendation applies to children in the general U.S. population from newborn to age 18 years who do not have signs or symptoms of maltreatment. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment. (I statement).

  15. Screening for hearing loss in older adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-11-06

    Update of the 1996 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for hearing impairment in older adults. The USPSTF reviewed evidence published between 1950 and January 2010 on screening for age-related sensorineural hearing impairment in adults aged 50 years or older without diagnosed hearing loss in the primary care setting. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic adults aged 50 years or older. It does not apply to persons seeking evaluation for perceived hearing problems or for cognitive or affective symptoms that may be related to hearing loss. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for hearing loss in asymptomatic adults aged 50 years or older (I statement).

  16. Behavioral counseling to prevent skin cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-07-03

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on counseling to prevent skin cancer. The USPSTF performed a targeted literature search for new evidence that counseling patients about sun protection reduces intermediate outcomes (such as sunburn) or skin cancer. Other key questions addressed the link between counseling and behavior change, the link between behavior change and incidence of skin cancer, and the adverse effects of counseling or sun-protective behavior changes. The USPSTF recommends counseling children, adolescents, and young adults aged 10 to 24 years who have fair skin about minimizing their exposure to ultraviolet radiation to reduce risk for skin cancer (B recommendation).The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of counseling adults older than 24 years about minimizing risks to prevent skin cancer (I statement).

  17. Screening for coronary heart disease with electrocardiography: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-10-02

    Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for coronary heart disease (CHD). The USPSTF reviewed new evidence on the benefits of screening with electrocardiography (ECG) in asymptomatic adults to reduce the risk for CHD events versus not screening, the effect of identifying high-risk persons on treatment to reduce risk, the accuracy of stratifying individuals into risk categories, and the harms of screening. The USPSTF recommends against screening with resting or exercise ECG for the prediction of CHD events in asymptomatic adults at low risk for CHD events (D recommendation). The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening with resting or exercise ECG for the prediction of CHD events in asymptomatic adults at intermediate or high risk for CHD events (I statement).

  18. Comparative Effects of Different Balance-Training–Progression Styles on Postural Control and Ankle Force Production: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cuğ, Mutlu; Duncan, Ashley; Wikstrom, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Despite the effectiveness of balance training, the exact parameters needed to maximize the benefits of such programs remain unknown. One such factor is how individuals should progress to higher levels of task difficulty within a balance-training program. Yet no investigators have directly compared different balance-training–progression styles. Objective:  To compare an error-based progression (ie, advance when proficient at a task) with a repetition-based progression (ie, advance after a set amount of repetitions) style during a balance-training program in healthy individuals. Design:  Randomized controlled trial. Setting:  Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants:  A total of 28 (16 women, 12 men) physically healthy young adults (age = 21.57 ± 3.95 years, height = 171.60 ± 11.03 cm, weight = 72.96 ± 16.18 kg, body mass index = 24.53 ± 3.7). Intervention(s):  All participants completed 12 supervised balance-training sessions over 4 weeks. Each session consisted of a combination of dynamic unstable-surface tasks that incorporated a BOSU ball and lasted about 30 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Static balance from an instrumented force plate, dynamic balance as measured via the Star Excursion Balance Test, and ankle force production in all 4 cardinal planes of motion as measured with a handheld dynamometer before and after the intervention. Results:  Selected static postural-control outcomes, dynamic postural control, and ankle force production in all planes of motion improved (P < .05). However, no differences between the progression styles were observed (P > .05) for any of the outcome measures. Conclusions:  A 4-week balance-training program consisting of dynamic unstable-surface exercises on a BOSU ball improved dynamic postural control and ankle force production in healthy young adults. These results suggest that an error-based balance-training program is comparable with but not superior to a repetition

  19. Screening for ovarian cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force reaffirmation recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-12-18

    Reaffirmation of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for ovarian cancer. A 2008 review of the literature commissioned by the USPSTF revealed no new evidence about the benefits of screening for ovarian cancer but provided some new data about observed harms of screening. A bridge search to 2011 focused on evidence from randomized, controlled trials. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic women. It does not apply to women with known genetic mutations that increase their risk for ovarian cancer (for example, BRCA mutations). The USPSTF recommends against screening for ovarian cancer in women (D recommendation).

  20. Screening for breast cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    2009-11-17

    Update of the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for breast cancer in the general population. The USPSTF examined the evidence on the efficacy of 5 screening modalities in reducing mortality from breast cancer: film mammography, clinical breast examination, breast self-examination, digital mammography, and magnetic resonance imaging in order to update the 2002 recommendation. To accomplish this update, the USPSTF commissioned 2 studies: 1) a targeted systematic evidence review of 6 selected questions relating to benefits and harms of screening, and 2) a decision analysis that used population modeling techniques to compare the expected health outcomes and resource requirements of starting and ending mammography screening at different ages and using annual versus biennial screening intervals. The USPSTF recommends against routine screening mammography in women aged 40 to 49 years. The decision to start regular, biennial screening mammography before the age of 50 years should be an individual one and take into account patient context, including the patient's values regarding specific benefits and harms. (Grade C recommendation) The USPSTF recommends biennial screening mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74 years. (Grade B recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of screening mammography in women 75 years or older. (I statement) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of clinical breast examination beyond screening mammography in women 40 years or older. (I statement) The USPSTF recommends against clinicians teaching women how to perform breast self-examination. (Grade D recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess additional benefits and harms of either digital mammography or magnetic resonance imaging instead of

  1. Variability of motoneuron activation and the modulation of force production in a postural reflex of the hermit crab abdomen.

    PubMed

    Krans, Jacob L; Chapple, William D

    2005-08-01

    The tri-phasic reflex in hermit crab (Pagurus pollicarus) abdomen is triggered by local mechanoreceptors and is essential for postural control. The reflex consists of three stereotypical phases: a brief, high-frequency burst, a transient cessation of firing, and a late-discharge that is much lower in frequency than the initial burst. To better understand the reflex generation of force, variability of motoneuron discharge in each of five parameters of reflex activation was assessed. An intracellular current injection routine was used to correlate each of these parameters with force production. Phase 3 motoneuron firing frequency showed the greatest correlation with force production. Phase 3 spike rate increased as a function of phase 2 duration, but the relationship between phase 2 duration and force produced by the reflex was weak. Junction potential amplitude decreased as phase 2 duration increased, and we hypothesize that this trend counteracts the increased phase 3 frequency, explaining the weak relationship of phase 2 duration and force production. Surprisingly, when phase 3 frequency was held constant and phase 2 was increased in duration, the concurrent decrease in junction potential amplitude did not reduce force production.

  2. Screening for prostate cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-07-17

    Update of the 2008 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for prostate cancer. The USPSTF reviewed new evidence on the benefits and harms of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening for prostate cancer, as well as the benefits and harms of treatment of localized prostate cancer. The USPSTF recommends against PSA-based screening for prostate cancer (grade D recommendation).This recommendation applies to men in the general U.S. population, regardless of age. This recommendation does not include the use of the PSA test for surveillance after diagnosis or treatment of prostate cancer; the use of the PSA test for this indication is outside the scope of the USPSTF.

  3. Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-03-18

    Update of the 2008 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening tests for GDM, the benefits and harms of screening before and after 24 weeks of gestation, and the benefits and harms of treatment in the mother and infant. This recommendation applies to pregnant women who have not been previously diagnosed with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus. The USPSTF recommends screening for GDM in asymptomatic pregnant women after 24 weeks of gestation. (B recommendation)The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for GDM in asymptomatic pregnant women before 24 weeks of gestation. (I statement).

  4. Screening for glaucoma: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-10-01

    Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for glaucoma. The USPSTF reviewed evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for glaucoma and of medical and surgical treatment of early glaucoma. Beneficial outcomes of interest included improved vision-related quality of life and reduced progression of early asymptomatic glaucoma to vision-related impairment. The USPSTF also considered evidence on the accuracy of glaucoma screening tests. This recommendation applies to adults who do not have vision symptoms and are seen in a primary care setting. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for primary open-angle glaucoma in adults. (I statement)

  5. Screening for HIV: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-07-02

    Update of the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for HIV. The USPSTF reviewed new evidence on the effectiveness of treatments in HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts greater than 0.200 × 109 cells/L; effects of screening, counseling, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use on risky behaviors and HIV transmission risk; and long-term cardiovascular harms of ART. These recommendations apply to adolescents, adults, and pregnant women. The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen adolescents and adults aged 15 to 65 years for HIV infection. Younger adolescents and older adults who are at increased risk should also be screened. (Grade A recommendation)The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen all pregnant women for HIV, including those who present in labor who are untested and whose HIV status is unknown. (Grade A recommendation).

  6. Screening for cognitive impairment in older adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-06-03

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for dementia. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits, harms, and sensitivity and specificity of screening instruments for cognitive impairment in older adults and the benefits and harms of commonly used treatment and management options for older adults with mild cognitive impairment or early dementia and their caregivers. This recommendation applies to universal screening with formal screening instruments in community-dwelling adults in the general primary care population who are older than 65 years and have no signs or symptoms of cognitive impairment. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for cognitive impairment. (I statement).

  7. A short essay on posture and movement.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J P

    1977-01-01

    Certain statements concerning the relation of posture and movement which have become traditional are re-examined--in particular, the statement 'Movement (that is, pysiological movement) consists of a series of postures. The theme of the essay is the posture--that is, postural activity--should be regarded as a function in its own right and not merely as a component of movement and, secondly, that expressions such as a' series of postures' or 'a change of posture' are not valid as definitions of physiological movement is general, but describe only movement which is part of the postural function. Voluntary movement consists of much more than a series of postures and its significance, ordinarily, is not postural. PMID:845603

  8. Observed differences in upper extremity forces, muscle efforts, postures, velocities and accelerations across computer activities in a field study of office workers.

    PubMed

    Bruno Garza, J L; Eijckelhof, B H W; Johnson, P W; Raina, S M; Rynell, P W; Huysmans, M A; van Dieën, J H; van der Beek, A J; Blatter, B M; Dennerlein, J T

    2012-01-01

    This study, a part of the PRedicting Occupational biomechanics in OFfice workers (PROOF) study, investigated whether there are differences in field-measured forces, muscle efforts, postures, velocities and accelerations across computer activities. These parameters were measured continuously for 120 office workers performing their own work for two hours each. There were differences in nearly all forces, muscle efforts, postures, velocities and accelerations across keyboard, mouse and idle activities. Keyboard activities showed a 50% increase in the median right trapezius muscle effort when compared to mouse activities. Median shoulder rotation changed from 25 degrees internal rotation during keyboard use to 15 degrees external rotation during mouse use. Only keyboard use was associated with median ulnar deviations greater than 5 degrees. Idle activities led to the greatest variability observed in all muscle efforts and postures measured. In future studies, measurements of computer activities could be used to provide information on the physical exposures experienced during computer use. Practitioner Summary: Computer users may develop musculoskeletal disorders due to their force, muscle effort, posture and wrist velocity and acceleration exposures during computer use. We report that many physical exposures are different across computer activities. This information may be used to estimate physical exposures based on patterns of computer activities over time.

  9. Screening for cervical cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-06-19

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for cervical cancer. The USPSTF reviewed new evidence on the comparative test performance of liquid-based cytology and the benefits and harms of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing as a stand-alone test or in combination with cytology. In addition to the systematic evidence review, the USPSTF commissioned a decision analysis to help clarify the age at which to begin and end screening, the optimal interval for screening, and the relative benefits and harms of different strategies for screening (such as cytology and co-testing). This recommendation statement applies to women who have a cervix, regardless of sexual history. This recommendation statement does not apply to women who have received a diagnosis of a high-grade precancerous cervical lesion or cervical cancer, women with in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol, or women who are immunocompromised (such as those who are HIV positive).The USPSTF recommends screening for cervical cancer in women aged 21 to 65 years with cytology (Papanicolaou smear) every 3 years or, for women aged 30 to 65 years who want to lengthen the screening interval, screening with a combination of cytology and HPV testing every 5 years. See the Clinical Considerations for discussion of cytology method, HPV testing, and screening interval (A recommendation).The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women younger than age 21 years (D recommendation).The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women older than age 65 years who have had adequate prior screening and are not otherwise at high risk for cervical cancer. See the Clinical Considerations for discussion of adequacy of prior screening and risk factors (D recommendation).The USPSTF recommends against screening for cervical cancer in women who have had a hysterectomy with removal of the cervix and who do not have a history of a high

  10. Self-Described Differences Between Legs in Ballet Dancers: Do They Relate to Postural Stability and Ground Reaction Force Measures?

    PubMed

    Mertz, Laura; Docherty, Carrie

    2012-12-01

    Ballet technique classes are designed to train dancers symmetrically, but they may actually create a lateral bias. It is unknown whether dancers in general are functionally asymmetrical, or how an individual dancer's perceived imbalance between legs might manifest itself. The purpose of this study was to examine ballet dancers' lateral preference by analyzing their postural stability and ground reaction forces in fifth position when landing from dance-specific jumps. Thirty university ballet majors volunteered to participate in this study. The subjects wore their own ballet technique shoes and performed fundamental ballet jumps out of fifth position on a force plate. The force plate recorded center of pressure (COP) and ground reaction force (GRF) data. Each subject completed a laterality questionnaire that determined his or her preferred landing leg for ballet jumps, self-identified stronger leg, and self-identified leg with better balance. All statistical comparisons were made between the leg indicated on the laterality questionnaire and the other leg (i.e., if the dancer's response to a question was "left," the comparison was made with the left leg as the "preferred" leg and the right leg as the "non-preferred leg"). No significant differences were identified between the limbs in any of the analyses conducted (all statistical comparisons produced p values > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that a dancer's preferential use of one limb over the other has no bearing on GRFs or balance ability after landing jumps in ballet. Similarly, dancers' opinions of their leg characteristics (such as one leg being stronger than the other) seem not to correlate with the dancers' actual ability to absorb GRFs or to balance when landing from ballet jumps.

  11. Screening for chlamydial infection: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    2007-07-17

    Update of 2001 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations about screening sexually active adolescents and adults for chlamydial infection. The USPSTF weighed the benefits (improved fertility, pregnancy outcomes, and infection transmission) and harms (anxiety, relationship problems, and unnecessary treatment of false-positive results) of chlamydial screening identified in their 2001 recommendations and the accompanying systematic review of English-language articles published between July 2000 and July 2005. Screen for chlamydial infection in all sexually active nonpregnant young women age 24 years or younger and for older nonpregnant women who are at increased risk. (A recommendation) Screen for chlamydial infection in all pregnant women age 24 years or younger and in older pregnant women who are at increased risk. (B recommendation) Do not routinely screen for chlamydial infection in women age 25 years or older, regardless of whether they are pregnant, if they are not at increased risk. (C recommendation) Current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for chlamydial infection for men. (I statement).

  12. Screening for Celiac Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Ebell, Mark; Epling, John W; Herzstein, Jessica; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-03-28

    Celiac disease is caused by an immune response in persons who are genetically susceptible to dietary gluten, a protein complex found in wheat, rye, and barley. Ingestion of gluten by persons with celiac disease causes immune-mediated inflammatory damage to the small intestine. To issue a new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for celiac disease. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of screening in asymptomatic adults, adolescents, and children; the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening and targeted vs universal screening; and the benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF also reviewed contextual information on the prevalence of celiac disease among patients without obvious symptoms and the natural history of subclinical celiac disease. The USPSTF found inadequate evidence on the accuracy of screening for celiac disease, the potential benefits and harms of screening vs not screening or targeted vs universal screening, and the potential benefits and harms of treatment of screen-detected celiac disease. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for celiac disease in asymptomatic persons. (I statement).

  13. U.S. Force Posture Strategy in the Asia Pacific Region: An Independent Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-27

    As a claimant to the South China Sea and an oil -rich but potentially vulnerable state, Brunei‘s leadership has taken note of China‘s stance...Expeditionary Force MILCON—Military Construction MOU—Memorandum of Understanding NAFTA —North American Free Trade Agreement NDAA—National Defense

  14. Effect of sampling rates on the quantification of forces, durations, and rates of loading of simulated side posture high-velocity, low-amplitude lumbar spine manipulation.

    PubMed

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; DeVocht, James; Tayh, Ali; Xia, Ting

    2013-06-01

    Quantification of chiropractic high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) may require biomechanical equipment capable of sampling data at high rates. However, there are few studies reported in the literature regarding the minimal sampling rate required to record the HVLA-SM force-time profile data accurately and precisely. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different sampling rates on the quantification of forces, durations, and rates of loading of simulated side posture lumbar spine HVLA-SM delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Five doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and 5 asymptomatic participants were recruited for this study. Force-time profiles were recorded during (i) 52 simulated HVLA-SM thrusts to a force transducer placed on a force plate by 2 DCs and (ii) 12 lumbar side posture HVLA-SM on 5 participants by 3 DCs. Data sampling rate of the force plate remained the same at 1000 Hz, whereas the sampling rate of the force transducer varied at 50, 100, 200, and 500 Hz. The data were reduced using custom-written MATLAB (Mathworks, Inc, Natick, MA) and MathCad (version 15; Parametric Technologies, Natick, MA) programs and analyzed descriptively. The average differences in the computed durations and rates of loading are smaller than 5% between 50 and 1000 Hz sampling rates. The differences in the computed preloads and peak loads are smaller than 3%. The small differences observed in the characteristics of force-time profiles of simulated manual HVLA-SM thrusts measured using various sampling rates suggest that a sampling rate as low as 50 to 100 Hz may be sufficient. The results are applicable to the manipulation performed in this study: manual side posture lumbar spine HVLA-SM. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Cost Analysis of the U.S. Air Force Overseas Posture: Informing Strategic Choices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    included end strength reductions of 50,000 personnel (Sustainable Defense Task Force, Debt , Deficits, and Defense: A Way Forward, Washington, D.C...estimate support costs, it is necessary to use a method that will capture the variable- versus fixed-costs dynamic effectively. The nature of these...of forward presence will have swamped the relative costs. Cost estimates for the Operation Iraqi Freedom range from about $800 billion68 to several

  16. Use of induced acceleration to quantify the (de)stabilization effect of external and internal forces on postural responses.

    PubMed

    van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; Carpenter, Mark G; van der Helm, Frans C T; van der Kooij, Herman

    2007-12-01

    Due to the mechanical coupling between the body segments, it is impossible to see with the naked eye the causes of body movements and understand the interaction between movements of different body parts. The goal of this paper is to investigate the use of induced acceleration analysis to reveal the causes of body movements. We derive the analytical equations to calculate induced accelerations and evaluate its potential to study human postural responses to support-surface translations. We measured the kinematic and kinetic responses of a subject to sudden forward and backward translations of a moving platform. The kinematic and kinetics served as input to the induced acceleration analyses. The induced accelerations showed explicitly that the platform acceleration and deceleration contributed to the destabilization and restabilization of standing balance, respectively. Furthermore, the joint torques, coriolis and centrifugal forces caused by swinging of the arms, contributed positively to stabilization of the Center of Mass. It is concluded that induced acceleration analyses is a valuable tool in understanding balance responses to different kinds of perturbations and may help to identify the causes of movement in different pathologies.

  17. Screening for and management of obesity in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-09-04

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for obesity and overweight in adults. The USPSTF reviewed new evidence on the benefits and harms of screening and primary care–feasible or referable nonsurgical weight-loss interventions. The USPSTF recommends screening all adults for obesity. Clinicians should offer or refer patients with a body mass index of 30 kg/m(2) or higher to intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions (B recommendation).

  18. U.S. Nuclear Policy, Strategy, and Force Structure: Insights and Issues from the 1994, 2001, and 2010 Nuclear Posture Reviews

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Unclassified 19. SECURITY...on Armed Services, House of Representatives, 110th Cong., 1st sess., 2008, 1. 45 Keith B. Payne, “The Nuclear Posture Review: Setting the Record... House , 1991), 26. 64 Cheney, 1993 Annual Report, 4. 65 Buchan et al., Future Roles of U.S. Nuclear Forces, 47. 21

  19. Postural balance in low back pain patients: Intra-session reliability of center of pressure on a portable force platform and of the one leg stand test.

    PubMed

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2011-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (CoP) on a force platform. Portable force platforms might be of clinical relevance, but their reliability for LBP patients in a clinical setting has not been demonstrated. As LBP patients are more dependent on vision compared to healthy controls, the ratio of tests performed with eyes open and eyes closed (Romberg Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure identical aspects of postural stability. We examined 49 LBP patients and found acceptable reliability of the CoP parameters' trace length and velocity, whereas reliability regarding C90 area, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST was poor. Correlations between the CoP parameters and OLST were insignificant. Reliability of trace length and velocity is acceptable and can be used as parameters when assessing CoP in LBP patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of Machine Learning Approaches for Classifying Sitting Posture Based on Force and Acceleration Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tanadini, Matteo; Plüss, Stefan; Schnüriger, Karin; Singh, Navrag B.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational musculoskeletal disorders, particularly chronic low back pain (LBP), are ubiquitous due to prolonged static sitting or nonergonomic sitting positions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an instrumented chair with force and acceleration sensors to determine the accuracy of automatically identifying the user's sitting position by applying five different machine learning methods (Support Vector Machines, Multinomial Regression, Boosting, Neural Networks, and Random Forest). Forty-one subjects were requested to sit four times in seven different prescribed sitting positions (total 1148 samples). Sixteen force sensor values and the backrest angle were used as the explanatory variables (features) for the classification. The different classification methods were compared by means of a Leave-One-Out cross-validation approach. The best performance was achieved using the Random Forest classification algorithm, producing a mean classification accuracy of 90.9% for subjects with which the algorithm was not familiar. The classification accuracy varied between 81% and 98% for the seven different sitting positions. The present study showed the possibility of accurately classifying different sitting positions by means of the introduced instrumented office chair combined with machine learning analyses. The use of such novel approaches for the accurate assessment of chair usage could offer insights into the relationships between sitting position, sitting behaviour, and the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:27868066

  1. Application of Machine Learning Approaches for Classifying Sitting Posture Based on Force and Acceleration Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Roland; Tanadini, Matteo; Plüss, Stefan; Schnüriger, Karin; Singh, Navrag B; Taylor, William R; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Occupational musculoskeletal disorders, particularly chronic low back pain (LBP), are ubiquitous due to prolonged static sitting or nonergonomic sitting positions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an instrumented chair with force and acceleration sensors to determine the accuracy of automatically identifying the user's sitting position by applying five different machine learning methods (Support Vector Machines, Multinomial Regression, Boosting, Neural Networks, and Random Forest). Forty-one subjects were requested to sit four times in seven different prescribed sitting positions (total 1148 samples). Sixteen force sensor values and the backrest angle were used as the explanatory variables (features) for the classification. The different classification methods were compared by means of a Leave-One-Out cross-validation approach. The best performance was achieved using the Random Forest classification algorithm, producing a mean classification accuracy of 90.9% for subjects with which the algorithm was not familiar. The classification accuracy varied between 81% and 98% for the seven different sitting positions. The present study showed the possibility of accurately classifying different sitting positions by means of the introduced instrumented office chair combined with machine learning analyses. The use of such novel approaches for the accurate assessment of chair usage could offer insights into the relationships between sitting position, sitting behaviour, and the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders.

  2. Efficacy and safety of protein supplements for U.S. Armed Forces personnel: consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Austin, Krista G; Lieberman, Harris R; Askew, E Wayne

    2013-11-01

    To provide evidence-based guidance regarding the efficacy and safety of dietary protein supplement (PS) use by members of the U.S. Armed Forces, a panel of internationally recognized experts in the fields of protein metabolism and dietary supplement research was convened by the Department of Defense Center Alliance for Dietary Supplement Research and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command. To develop a consensus statement, potential benefits, risks, and strategies to optimize military performance through PS use were considered in the context of specific warfighter populations and occupational demands. To maintain muscle mass, strength, and performance during periods of substantial metabolic demand and concomitant negative energy balance the panel recommended that warfighters consume 1.5-2.0 g · kg(-1) · d(-1) of protein. However, if metabolic demand is low, such as in garrison, protein intake should equal the current Military Dietary Reference Intake (0.8-1.5 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)). Although PS use generally appears to be safe for healthy adults, warfighters should be educated on PS quality, given quality-control and contamination concerns with commercial dietary supplements. To achieve recommended protein intakes, the panel strongly urges consumption of high-quality protein-containing whole foods. However, when impractical, the use of PSs (20-25 g per serving or 0.25-0.3 g · kg(-1) per meal), particularly after periods of strenuous physical activity (e.g., military training, combat patrols, and exercise), is acceptable. The committee acknowledges the need for further study of protein requirements for extreme, military-specific environmental conditions and whether unique metabolic stressors associated with military service alter protein requirements for aging warfighters.

  3. Screening for Skin Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Davidson, Karina W; Ebell, Mark; Epling, John W; García, Francisco A R; Gillman, Matthew W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Pignone, Michael P; Siu, Albert L

    2016-07-26

    Basal and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common types of cancer in the United States and represent the vast majority of all cases of skin cancer; however, they rarely result in death or substantial morbidity, whereas melanoma skin cancer has notably higher mortality rates. In 2016, an estimated 76,400 US men and women will develop melanoma and 10,100 will die from the disease. To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for skin cancer. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of screening for skin cancer with a clinical visual skin examination in reducing skin cancer morbidity and mortality and death from any cause; its potential harms, including any harms resulting from associated diagnostic follow-up; its test characteristics when performed by a primary care clinician vs a dermatologist; and whether its use leads to earlier detection of skin cancer compared with usual care. Evidence to assess the net benefit of screening for skin cancer with a clinical visual skin examination is limited. Direct evidence on the effectiveness of screening in reducing melanoma morbidity and mortality is limited to a single fair-quality ecologic study with important methodological limitations. Information on harms is similarly sparse. The potential for harm clearly exists, including a high rate of unnecessary biopsies, possibly resulting in cosmetic or, more rarely, functional adverse effects, and the risk of overdiagnosis and overtreatment. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of visual skin examination by a clinician to screen for skin cancer in adults (I statement).

  4. Time evolution of the organization of multi-muscle postural responses to sudden changes in the external force applied at the trunk level.

    PubMed

    Robert, Thomas; Latash, Mark L

    2008-06-20

    We studied muscle activation patterns in response to perturbations of posture (sudden changes in the external force applied to the thorax) during two time intervals corresponding to pre-programmed postural reactions and voluntary corrections of posture. A hypothesis was tested that a set of postural muscles could be used to form stable groups (M-modes) whose composition changes in different time intervals after a perturbation. Perturbations were applied at the sternum level to standing subjects at an unexpected time. Principal component analysis with factor extraction allowed to identify sets of three factors (M-modes) during the two time intervals, 80-180 ms (T(1)) and 250-450 ms (T(2)) after the perturbation. The composition of M-modes was similar within each time interval across subjects and perturbations but differed significantly between T(1) and T(2). In particular, M-modes during T(1) were characterized by more co-contraction patterns. The results suggest that the neural controller is able to rearrange M-mode composition in real time based on a safety-efficacy trade-off. The results also support the idea that M-modes represent synergies in the muscle space, while they may be used as elemental variables to form synergies at a higher hierarchical level to produce desired mechanical effects.

  5. Changes in the Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon Geometry in the Carpal Tunnel Due to Force Production and Posture of Metacarpophalangeal Joint of the Index Finger: an MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark. L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is a disorder caused by increased pressure in the carpal tunnel associated with repetitive, stereotypical finger actions. Little is known about in vivo geometrical changes in the carpal tunnel caused by motion at the finger joints and exerting a fingertip force. Methods The hands and forearms of five subjects were scanned using a 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. The metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger was placed in: flexion, neutral and extension. For each joint posture subjects either produced no active force (passive condition) or exerted a flexion force to resist a load (~4.0 N) at the fingertip (active condition). Changes in the radii of curvature, position and transverse plane area of the flexor digitorum profundus tendons at the carpal tunnel level were measured. Results The radius of curvature of the flexor digitorum profundus tendons, at the carpal tunnel level, was significantly affected by posture of the index finger metacarpophalangeal joint (p<0.05) and the radii was significantly different between fingers (p<0.05). Actively producing force caused a significant shift (p<0.05) in the flexor digitorum profundus tendons in the ventral (palmar) direction. No significant change in the area of an ellipse containing the flexor digitorum profundus tendons was observed between conditions. Interpretation The results show that relatively small changes in the posture and force production of a single finger can lead to significant changes in the geometry of all the flexor digitorum profundus tendons in the carpal tunnel. Additionally, voluntary force production at the fingertip increases the moment arm of the FDP tendons about the wrist joint. PMID:23219762

  6. Postural health in women: the role of physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Britnell, S J; Cole, J V; Isherwood, L; Sran, M M; Britnell, N; Burgi, S; Candido, G; Watson, L

    2005-05-01

    To advise obstetric and gynaecology care providers of the physical, psychological, and environmental factors that affect women's posture throughout their lifespan, from adolescence to menopause. To outline the physiotherapy management of obstetrics, osteoporosis, and urinary incontinence in women and to identify recommendations for referral to a physiotherapist. Knowledge of abnormal postures, contributing factors and recommendations for physiotherapy management. MEDLINE, PEDro, and Cochrane Library Search from 1992 to 2003 for English-language articles and references from current textbooks related to posture and women's health conditions that are managed by physiotherapists. The evidence collected was reviewed by the authors and quantified using the evaluation of evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam. 1. Pelvic floor muscle training with a physiotherapist is recommended to prevent urinary incontinence during pregnancy and after delivery (I-A). 2. Core stability training with a physiotherapist is recommended to prevent and treat back and pelvic pain during and following pregnancy (I-B). 3. Physiotherapist-prescribed exercises are recommended for women to elicit positive changes in bone mass and to reduce fall and fracture risk (I-A). 4. Pelvic floor muscle training with a physiotherapist is recommended for women with stress urinary incontinence (I-A). The Canadian Physiotherapy Association and Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada have developed this joint policy statement regarding posture in women's health that highlights the physical, psychological, and environmental factors that affect women's posture throughout their lifespan, from adolescence to menopause. This statement outlines the role of physiotherapy in the assessment and treatment of women's posture; outlines the physiotherapy management of obstetrics, osteoporosis, and urinary incontinence; and identifies recommendations for referral to a

  7. Potential force dynamics of heart rate variability reflect cardiac autonomic modulation with respect to posture, age, and breathing pattern.

    PubMed

    Mahananto, Faizal; Igasaki, Tomohiko; Murayama, Nobuki

    2015-09-01

    Various physiological and pathological conditions are correlated with cardiac autonomic function. Heart rate variability is a marker of cardiac autonomic modulation and can be measured by several methods. However, the available methods are sensitive to breathing patterns. To quantify cardiac autonomic modulation by observing the potential force dynamics of the R-R interval time series in healthy individuals. We propose two "potentials of unbalanced complex kinetic" (PUCK) parameters to quantify the characteristics of the potential force dynamics of R-R interval time series: potential strength (slope) and fluctuation size (slope standard deviations [SSD1, SSD2]). We applied this method to the series of R-R intervals obtained from 30 healthy subjects in an experimental condition that elicited cardiac autonomic (i.e., sympathetic and vagal) activation (in supine, sitting, and standing positions). Subjects were categorized into three groups by decade (i.e., 20 s, 30 s, and 40 s) to verify the cardiac autonomic differences by age. Two respiration patterns were introduced to check the influence of the pattern into the analytical results. Sympathetic modulation activation significantly increased the slope and reduced SSD1 and SSD2; these trends were confirmed in all groups. The slope is concordant with the result of the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio in frequency components as an indicator of sympathetic modulation. No trend was observed in slope among age groups. However, SSD1 and SSD2 in the 40 s group were significantly decreased in the supine and sitting positions. The results with respect to respiration frequency showed lower sympathetic modulation as shown in the LF/HF ratio and slope, whereas higher vagal modulation as shown in the HF appeared with a longer breathing rate. PUCK can quantify the cardiac autonomic modulation in the experimental conditions of different postures. SSD1 and SSD2 are more sensitive to age than frequency components and are

  8. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation to prevent fractures in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-05-07

    New U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on vitamin D and calcium supplementation to prevent fractures in adults. The USPSTF commissioned 2 systematic evidence reviews and a meta-analysis on vitamin D supplementation with or without calcium to assess the effects of supplementation on bone health outcomes in community-dwelling adults, the association of vitamin D and calcium levels with bone health outcomes, and the adverse effects of supplementation. These recommendations apply to noninstitutionalized or community-dwelling asymptomatic adults without a history of fractures. This recommendation does not apply to the treatment of persons with osteoporosis or vitamin D deficiency. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of the benefits and harms of combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation for the primary prevention of fractures in premenopausal women or in men. (I statement)The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of the benefits and harms of daily supplementation with greater than 400 IU of vitamin D3 and greater than 1000 mg of calcium for the primary prevention of fractures in noninstitutionalized postmenopausal women. (I statement)The USPSTF recommends against daily supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D3 and 1000 mg or less of calcium for the primary prevention of fractures in noninstitutionalized postmenopausal women. (D recommendation).

  9. Sequencing sit-to-stand and upright posture for mobility limitation assessment: determination of the timing of the task phases from force platform data.

    PubMed

    Mazzà, Claudia; Zok, Mounir; Della Croce, Ugo

    2005-06-01

    The identification of quantitative tools to assess an individual's mobility limitation is a complex and challenging task. Several motor tasks have been designated as potential indicators of mobility limitation. In this study, a multiple motor task obtained by sequencing sit-to-stand and upright posture was used. Algorithms based on data obtained exclusively from a single force platform were developed to detect the timing of the motor task phases (sit-to-stand, preparation to the upright posture and upright posture). To test these algorithms, an experimental protocol inducing predictable changes in the acquired signals was designed. Twenty-two young, able-bodied subjects performed the task in four different conditions: self-selected natural and high speed with feet kept together, and self-selected natural and high speed with feet pelvis-width apart. The proposed algorithms effectively detected the timing of the task phases, the duration of which was sensitive to the four different experimental conditions. As expected, the duration of the sit-to-stand was sensitive to the speed of the task and not to the foot position, while the duration of the preparation to the upright posture was sensitive to foot position but not to speed. In addition to providing a simple and effective description of the execution of the motor task, the correct timing of the studied multiple task could facilitate the accurate determination of variables descriptive of the single isolated phases, allowing for a more thorough description of the motor task and therefore could contribute to the development of effective quantitative functional evaluation tests.

  10. A Review of the Purpose and Scope Statements of the Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness of the Arizona Board of Regents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coopers & Lybrand, New York, NY.

    One of the working papers in the final report of the Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness, this document presents a review, designed to raise questions, of the Task Force's purpose and scope statements. The primary portion of the study was a series of interviews with 105 Arizonans (holding key…

  11. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of Norton Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    would be terminated. The base would be preserved in a condition intended to minimize deterioration, ensure base security, and maintain the grounds and...closure activities, establishing a caretaker force to maintain Air Force properties after closure, and serving as the Air Force liaison supporting...Alternative, the U.S Government would retain ownership of the Norton AFB property . A DMT (with a crew of approximately 50 personnel) would maintain the

  12. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    04/10/2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final Environmental Impact Statement 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30/12/2009-2/12/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE F-35A...available. Must cite at least the year and be Year 2000 compliant, e.g. 30-06-1998; xx-06-1998; xx-xx-1998. 2. REPORT TYPE . State the type of report...the alternatives and associated scenarios. Beddown of the F-35A would change noise conditions and the type of land uses affected by aircraft noise at

  13. Screening for vitamin D deficiency in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    LeFevre, Michael L

    2015-01-20

    New USPSTF recommendation on screening for vitamin D deficiency in adults. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on screening for and treatment of vitamin D deficiency, including the benefits and harms of screening and early treatment. This recommendation applies to community-dwelling, nonpregnant adults aged 18 years or older who are seen in primary care settings and are not known to have signs or symptoms of vitamin D deficiency or conditions for which vitamin D treatment is recommended. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for vitamin D deficiency in asymptomatic adults. (I statement).

  14. Electrical potentials measured on the surface of the knee reflect the changes of the contact force in the knee joint produced by postural sway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Garon, Martin; Quenneville, Éric; Buschmann, Michael D; Savard, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Electroarthrography (EAG) is a novel technique for recording potentials on the knee surface that are generated by the compression of articular cartilage and that reflect both compression force and cartilage quality. The mechanical loading of the knee is achieved by transferring the subject's body weight from a bipedal stance to a unipedal stance. We hypothesized that EAG potentials change with postural sway. The study was performed on 20 normal subjects (10 male, 10 female; age 29±10.5 yrs.; mass 68.8±14.2kg; height 172.6±11.4cm). Data was recorded during 10 successive loading cycles repeated on two different days. During loading, EAG potentials were recorded with 4 electrodes placed on both sides of the knee and the ground reaction force (GRF) and the antero-posterior and medial-lateral displacements of the center of pressure (COP) were measured with a force plate. Two electromechanical models predicting the EAG signal from the GRF alone or from the GRF plus the COP displacements were computed by linear regression. The mean relative error between the four EAG signals and the predicted signals ranged from 24% to 49% for the GRF model, and from 15% to 35% for the GRF+COP model, this reduction was statistically significant at 3 electrode sites (p<0.05). The GRF+COP model also improved the repeatability of the parameters estimated on the first and second days when compared to the GRF model. In conclusion, EAG signals can be predicted by GRF and COP displacements and may reflect changes in the knee contact force due to postural sway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    life for close to 8,000 people * It disproport ionately affects low-income and immigrant communities, environmental injustice * It will harm 1,500...They will also pol lute our environment . The Air Force said t hat Burlington is NOT the environmentally preferred base. Please reject Vermont as the...bear the cost in every way. This represents the worst of social and environmental injustice . The Air Force is better than that. Individuals in this

  16. Primary care interventions to prevent tobacco use in children and adolescents: U.S. preventive services task force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-09-01

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on primary care interventions to prevent tobacco use in children and adolescents. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of primary care interventions on the rates of initiation or cessation of tobacco use in children and adolescents and on health outcomes, such as respiratory health, dental and oral health, and adult smoking. The USPSTF also reviewed the evidence on the potential harms of these interventions. This recommendation applies to school-aged children and adolescents. The USPSTF has issued a separate recommendation statement on tobacco use counseling in adults and pregnant women. The USPSTF recommends that primary care clinicians provide interventions, including education or brief counseling, to prevent initiation of tobacco use in school-aged children and adolescents.

  17. Primary care interventions to prevent tobacco use in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-10-15

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on primary care interventions to prevent tobacco use in children and adolescents. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of primary care interventions on the rates of initiation or cessation of tobacco use in children and adolescents and on health outcomes, such as respiratory health, dental and oral health, and adult smoking. The USPSTF also reviewed the evidence on the potential harms of these interventions. This recommendation applies to school-aged children and adolescents. The USPSTF has issued a separate recommendation statement on tobacco use counseling in adults and pregnant women. The USPSTF recommends that primary care clinicians provide interventions, including education or brief counseling, to prevent initiation of tobacco use in school-aged children and adolescents.

  18. Postural discomfort and perceived exertion in standardized box-holding postures.

    PubMed

    Olendorf, M R; Drury, C G

    2001-12-15

    To help in the design or redesign of workplaces it would be helpful to know in advance the postural stress consequences of a wide range of body postures. This experiment evaluated 168 postures chosen to represent those in the Ovako Working-posture Analysing System (OWAS) using Rated Perceived Exertion (RPE) and Body Part Discomfort (BPD) measures. The postures comprised all combinations of three arm postures, four back postures, seven leg postures and two forces (weights of held boxes). Twelve male subjects held each posture for a fixed duration (20 s) before providing RPE and BPD ratings. Analysis of the ratings gave highly significant main effects, with the major driver being the object weight. As each factor was varied, the largest effect was on the body region corresponding to that factor. A simple main-effects-only additive model explained 91% of the variance of RPE means for the postures.

  19. F-22 Aircraft Force Development Evaluation and Weapons School Beddown, Final Environmental Impact Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    environmental justice guidelines since the proportion of minority and low-income people within the affected area are higher than the proportion in the county. The Air Force will continue to employ noise abatement procedures to reduce noise effects in the surrounding communities and assist local officials who seek to establish or modify noise attenuation measures for residences. For Nellis Air Force Range and the encompassing NRC, flight and ordnance delivery activities proposed for the F-22s would have negligible changes to current conditions.

  20. Dynamic fe Model of Sitting Man Adjustable to Body Height, Body Mass and Posture Used for Calculating Internal Forces in the Lumbar Vertebral Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankoke, S.; Buck, B.; Woelfel, H. P.

    1998-08-01

    Long-term whole-body vibrations can cause degeneration of the lumbar spine. Therefore existing degeneration has to be assessed as well as industrial working places to prevent further damage. Hence, the mechanical stress in the lumbar spine—especially in the three lower vertebrae—has to be known. This stress can be expressed as internal forces. These internal forces cannot be evaluated experimentally, because force transducers cannot be implementated in the force lines because of ethical reasons. Thus it is necessary to calculate the internal forces with a dynamic mathematical model of sitting man.A two dimensional dynamic Finite Element model of sitting man is presented which allows calculation of these unknown internal forces. The model is based on an anatomic representation of the lower lumbar spine (L3-L5). This lumber spine model is incorporated into a dynamic model of the upper torso with neck, head and arms as well as a model of the body caudal to the lumbar spine with pelvis and legs. Additionally a simple dynamic representation of the viscera is used. All these parts are modelled as rigid bodies connected by linear stiffnesses. Energy dissipation is modelled by assigning modal damping ratio to the calculated undamped eigenvalues. Geometry and inertial properties of the model are determined according to human anatomy. Stiffnesses of the spine model are derived from static in-vitro experiments in references [1] and [2]. Remaining stiffness parameters and parameters for energy dissipation are determined by using parameter identification to fit measurements in reference [3]. The model, which is available in 3 different postures, allows one to adjust its parameters for body height and body mass to the values of the person for which internal forces have to be calculated.

  1. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Environmental Impact Statement for the Closure of Mather Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    the California Health and Safety Code). The Department would like to be informed of future activities and use plans associated with the Muther AFB...Page 2 cc: Lt. Col Richard Blank Chief, Environmental Management 323rd Flying Training Wing Mather Air Force Base, CA 95655-5000 Lt. Col. Jose Saenz

  2. Draft environmental impact statement for the disposal of K. I. Sawyer Air Force Base, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Pursuant to the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act, K. I. Sawyer AFB was closed in September 1995. This Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act to analyze the potential environmental consequences of the disposal and reasonable alternatives for reuse of the base. The document includes analyses of community setting, land use and aesthetics, transportation, utilities, hazardous materials and hazardous waste management, geology and soils, water resources, air quality, noise, biological resources, and cultural resources. Four reuse alternatives were examined: a Proposed Action that features air cargo, regional aircraft maintenance, regional passenger, and general aviation uses of the runway with an industrial component being developed in the military family housing area; an International Wayport Alternative that consists of international passenger, air cargo, and aircraft maintenance uses, as well as regional passenger and general aviation uses, and a large residential area; a Commercial Aviation Alternative that proposes a regional commercial airport with an Upper Peninsula vocational/educational training facility; and a Recreation Alternative that would retain more than 80 percent of the base for public facilities recreation land uses. All alternatives include industrial, institutional, commercial, and residential uses. A No-Action Alternative, which would entail no reuse of the base property, was also evaluated.

  3. ERS task force statement: diagnosis and treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Tschopp, Jean-Marie; Bintcliffe, Oliver; Astoul, Philippe; Canalis, Emilio; Driesen, Peter; Janssen, Julius; Krasnik, Marc; Maskell, Nicholas; Van Schil, Paul; Tonia, Thomy; Waller, David A; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Cardillo, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) affects young healthy people with a significant recurrence rate. Recent advances in treatment have been variably implemented in clinical practice. This statement reviews the latest developments and concepts to improve clinical management and stimulate further research.The European Respiratory Society's Scientific Committee established a multidisciplinary team of pulmonologists and surgeons to produce a comprehensive review of available scientific evidence.Smoking remains the main risk factor of PSP. Routine smoking cessation is advised. More prospective data are required to better define the PSP population and incidence of recurrence. In first episodes of PSP, treatment approach is driven by symptoms rather than PSP size. The role of bullae rupture as the cause of air leakage remains unclear, implying that any treatment of PSP recurrence includes pleurodesis. Talc poudrage pleurodesis by thoracoscopy is safe, provided calibrated talc is available. Video-assisted thoracic surgery is preferred to thoracotomy as a surgical approach.In first episodes of PSP, aspiration is required only in symptomatic patients. After a persistent or recurrent PSP, definitive treatment including pleurodesis is undertaken. Future randomised controlled trials comparing different strategies are required.

  4. Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Second KC-135R Air Refueling Squadron, Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Labor and Industry , Research and Analysis Bureau, Helena. 1988b Montana Air Quality Data and Information Summary for 1987. Department of Health and...employment and earnings by major industrial sectors and on personal i and on personal income published by the US Bureau of Economic Analysis were obtained...force and unemployment was provided by the Montana Department of Labor and Industry , Research and Analysis Bureau (1986). Information on key industries

  5. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    the new planes is GO for it. I call the " noise " THE SOUND OF FREEDOM" So anyone opposing them here in the greater Burlington Vermont , should think...that we cannot afford to di srupt. I have noise and safety concerns and believe there are more negatives than positives. The Air Force’s own report...here in Vermont to the noise from this plane. Loretta Marriott 13 Mills Ave South Burlington, VT 05403 1 E-288 Mr. Nicholas Genn anos HQACC/A7PS

  6. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of Portions of Grissom Air Force Base, Indiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    Mus musculus Long-tailed weasel Mustela frenata White-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus Muskrat Ondatra zibethica White-footed mouse Peromyscus... phase ) 36 208 366 64 34 68 Direct Employment 633 3,098 6,991 454 1,622 3,709 Secondary Employment 300 2,244 5,541 234 622 1,397 Population Increase 908...uses. In February 1993, the GRA submitted to the Air Force a Concept Development Draft Phase Il-B Report (RKG Associates, Inc., 1993). This plan

  7. Environmental Impact Statement, Auxiliary Airfield for Williams Air Force Base, Arizona

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    business services I I 30 25 C Public and quasi-public services I I 1 30 25 Outdoor recreation I I I Cc C Resources production, open space C Cd Cd C C...at the Site Boundary of an Auxiliary Airfield from T-37 Training Flightsa Concen- Federal/State Averaging trati nb Standasdc Pollutant Period (Gg/m...80-1, prepared by San Diego State University and Hubbs Marine Research Center for the U.S. Air Force, Space Division. Spiller, S.F., 1988, field

  8. [The Polish Task Force position statement on safety of biologic treatment with monoclonal antibodies and soluble receptors].

    PubMed

    Jahnz-Rozyk, Karina; Wiesik-Szewczyk, Ewa

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of biologic therapies for treatment in many fields of medicine such as rheumatology oncology, dermatology, hematology and allergology, became one of the most important achievements of the modem medicine. The first biological therapeutics have already reached patent expiration date and corresponding biosimilars were approved by EMA (European Medicine Agency) and FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Many more biosimilar products are currently under review for marketing authorization around the world. The approval of products similar, but not identical to already known innovative biologics, due to complexity of structure and manufacturing technology, stirs a lot of discussions regarding safety concerns related to differences in posttranslational processing and in immunogenicity between reference and biosimilar products, and relevance of these differences to the clinical practice. Critical issues involve extrapolation to different clinical indication, automatic substitution and switching. Despite EMA recommendation and advocacy for biosimilars, it is beyond this regulatory authority to establish definitive regulation for each EU member, which it is expected to be country related. The aim of the study was an attempt to define the stance regarding particular aspects of biological treatment conducted in Poland is undertaken. The Task Force of 13 experts involved in various aspects of biologic therapies in Poland was established. A modified Delphi voting was performed to achieve consensus regarding the most important aspects of biologic treatment in Poland, with particular concern of biosimilars. Ten final statements were discussed and voted upon. The statements cover general aspects of biosimilars including expected cost-benefit ratios, extrapolation of clinical indications, interchange switching, patient information and requirement of patient consent. The state of post marketing pharmacovigilance of biologics (innovative ones as well as biosimilars) was

  9. Screening for oral cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-01-07

    Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for oral cancer. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on whether screening for oral cancer reduces morbidity or mortality and on the accuracy of the oral screening examination for identifying oral cancer or potentially malignant disorders that have a high likelihood of progression to oral cancer. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic adults aged 18 years or older who are seen by primary care providers. This recommendation focuses on screening of the oral cavity performed by primary care providers and not dental providers or otolaryngologists. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for oral cancer in asymptomatic adults.

  10. Screening for lung cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-03-04

    Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for lung cancer. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the efficacy of low-dose computed tomography, chest radiography, and sputum cytologic evaluation for lung cancer screening in asymptomatic persons who are at average or high risk for lung cancer (current or former smokers) and the benefits and harms of these screening tests and of surgical resection of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. The USPSTF also commissioned modeling studies to provide information about the optimum age at which to begin and end screening, the optimum screening interval, and the relative benefits and harms of different screening strategies. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic adults aged 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. The USPSTF recommends annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography in adults aged 55 to 80 years who have a 30 pack-year smoking history and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. Screening should be discontinued once a person has not smoked for 15 years or develops a health problem that substantially limits life expectancy or the ability or willingness to have curative lung surgery. (B recommendation).

  11. Consensus statement of the ESICM task force on colloid volume therapy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Konrad; Perner, Anders; Sprung, Charles L; Jaeschke, Roman; Schortgen, Frederique; Johan Groeneveld, A B; Beale, Richard; Hartog, Christiane S

    2012-03-01

    Colloids are administered to more patients than crystalloids, although recent evidence suggests that colloids may possibly be harmful in some patients. The European Society of Intensive Care Medicine therefore assembled a task force to compile consensus recommendations based on the current best evidence for the safety and efficacy of the currently most frequently used colloids--hydroxyethyl starches (HES), gelatins and human albumin. Meta-analyses, systematic reviews and clinical studies of colloid use were evaluated for the treatment of volume depletion in mixed intensive care unit (ICU), cardiac surgery, head injury, sepsis and organ donor patients. Clinical endpoints included mortality, kidney function and bleeding. The relevance of concentration and dosage was also assessed. Publications from 1960 until May 2011 were included. The quality of available evidence and strength of recommendations were based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. We recommend not to use HES with molecular weight ≥ 200 kDa and/or degree of substitution >0.4 in patients with severe sepsis or risk of acute kidney injury and suggest not to use 6% HES 130/0.4 or gelatin in these populations. We recommend not to use colloids in patients with head injury and not to administer gelatins and HES in organ donors. We suggest not to use hyperoncotic solutions for fluid resuscitation. We conclude and recommend that any new colloid should be introduced into clinical practice only after its patient-important safety parameters are established.

  12. Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Siu, Albert L; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Epling, John W; García, Francisco A R; Gillman, Matthew; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Harper, Diane M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Pignone, Michael P

    2016-04-05

    About 14% of US adults aged 40 to 79 years have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and it is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Persons with severe COPD are often unable to participate in normal physical activity due to deterioration of lung function. To update the 2008 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for COPD in asymptomatic adults. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on whether screening for COPD in asymptomatic adults (those who do not recognize or report respiratory symptoms) improves health outcomes. The USPSTF reviewed the diagnostic accuracy of screening tools (including prescreening questionnaires and spirometry); whether screening for COPD improves the delivery and uptake of targeted preventive services, such as smoking cessation or relevant immunizations; and the possible harms of screening for and treatment of mild to moderate COPD. Similar to 2008, the USPSTF did not find evidence that screening for COPD in asymptomatic persons improves health-related quality of life, morbidity, or mortality. The USPSTF determined that early detection of COPD, before the development of symptoms, does not alter the course of the disease or improve patient outcomes. The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for COPD in asymptomatic persons has no net benefit. The USPSTF recommends against screening for COPD in asymptomatic adults. (D recommendation).

  13. Menopausal hormone therapy for the primary prevention of chronic conditions: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-01-01

    Update of the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on hormone therapy for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women. The USPSTF commissioned a review of the literature to update evidence about the benefits and harms of using menopausal hormone therapy to prevent chronic conditions, as well as whether the benefits and harms of hormone therapy differ by population subgroups defined by age; the presence of comorbid medical conditions; and the type, dose, and method of hormonal delivery. This recommendation applies to postmenopausal women who are considering hormone therapy for the primary prevention of chronic medical conditions. It does not apply to women who are considering hormone therapy for the management of menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes or vaginal dryness. It also does not apply to women younger than 50 years who have had surgical menopause. The USPSTF recommends against the use of combined estrogen and progestin for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women. (Grade D recommendation).The USPSTF recommends against the use of estrogen for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women who have had a hysterectomy. (Grade D recommendation).

  14. Prevention of falls in community-dwelling older adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-08-07

    Update of the 1996 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on counseling to prevent household and recreational injuries, including falls. The USPSTF reviewed new evidence on the effectiveness and harms of primary care-relevant interventions to prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults. The interventions were grouped into 5 main categories: multifactorial clinical assessment (with or without direct intervention), clinical management (with or without screening), clinical education or behavioral counseling, home hazard modification, and exercise or physical therapy. The USPSTF recommends exercise or physical therapy and vitamin D supplementation to prevent falls in community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older who are at increased risk for falls. (Grade B recommendation)The USPSTF does not recommend automatically performing an in-depth multifactorial risk assessment in conjunction with comprehensive management of identified risks to prevent falls in community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older because the likelihood of benefit is small. In determining whether this service is appropriate in individual cases, patients and clinicians should consider the balance of benefits and harms on the basis of the circumstances of prior falls, comorbid medical conditions, and patient values. (Grade C recommendation).

  15. Prevention of dental caries in children from birth through age 5 years: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-06-01

    Update of the 2004 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on prevention of dental caries in preschool-aged children. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on prevention of dental caries by primary care clinicians in children 5 years and younger, focusing on screening for caries, assessment of risk for future caries, and the effectiveness of various interventions that have possible benefits in preventing caries. This recommendation applies to children age 5 years and younger. The USPSTF recommends that primary care clinicians prescribe oral fluoride supplementation starting at age 6 months for children whose water supply is deficient in fluoride. (B recommendation) The USPSTF recommends that primary care clinicians apply fluoride varnish to the primary teeth of all infants and children starting at the age of primary tooth eruption. (B recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of routine screening examinations for dental caries performed by primary care clinicians in children from birth to age 5 years. (I Statement). Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy to prevent preterm delivery: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    2008-02-05

    Update of the 2001 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy. The USPSTF weighed the benefits and harms of screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy by identifying new evidence addressing previously identified gaps from the 2001 USPSTF recommendation. Published literature on this topic was identified by using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library databases, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, reference lists, and consultation with experts and was systematically reviewed. When data allowed, a series of meta-analyses (using new and 2001 report data) was done to estimate the pooled effect of treatment on preterm delivery (<37 weeks, <34 weeks, or <32 weeks) and on low birthweight and preterm, premature rupture of membranes. Do not screen for bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women at low risk for preterm delivery. (D recommendation) Current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women at high risk for preterm delivery. (I statement).

  17. Time to Redefine PD? Introductory Statement of the MDS Task Force on the Definition of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Daniela; Postuma, Ronald B; Bloem, Bastiaan; Chan, Piu; Dubois, Bruno; Gasser, Thomas; Goetz, Christopher G; Halliday, Glenda M; Hardy, John; Lang, Anthony E; Litvan, Irene; Marek, Kenneth; Obeso, José; Oertel, Wolfgang; Olanow, C Warren; Poewe, Werner; Stern, Matthew; Deuschl, Günther

    2014-01-01

    With advances in knowledge disease, boundaries may change. Occasionally, these changes are of such a magnitude that they require redefinition of the disease. In recognition of the profound changes in our understanding of Parkinson's disease (PD), the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society (MDS) commissioned a task force to consider a redefinition of PD. This review is a discussion article, intended as the introductory statement of the task force. Several critical issues were identified that challenge current PD definitions. First, new findings challenge the central role of the classical pathologic criteria as the arbiter of diagnosis, notably genetic cases without synuclein deposition, the high prevalence of incidental Lewy body (LB) deposition, and the nonmotor prodrome of PD. It remains unclear, however, whether these challenges merit a change in the pathologic gold standard, especially considering the limitations of alternate gold standards. Second, the increasing recognition of dementia in PD challenges the distinction between diffuse LB disease and PD. Consideration might be given to removing dementia as an exclusion criterion for PD diagnosis. Third, there is increasing recognition of disease heterogeneity, suggesting that PD subtypes should be formally identified; however, current subtype classifications may not be sufficiently robust to warrant formal delineation. Fourth, the recognition of a nonmotor prodrome of PD requires that new diagnostic criteria for early-stage and prodromal PD should be created; here, essential features of these criteria are proposed. Finally, there is a need to create new MDS diagnostic criteria that take these changes in disease definition into consideration. © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:24619848

  18. Time to redefine PD? Introductory statement of the MDS Task Force on the definition of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Berg, Daniela; Postuma, Ronald B; Bloem, Bastiaan; Chan, Piu; Dubois, Bruno; Gasser, Thomas; Goetz, Christopher G; Halliday, Glenda M; Hardy, John; Lang, Anthony E; Litvan, Irene; Marek, Kenneth; Obeso, José; Oertel, Wolfgang; Olanow, C Warren; Poewe, Werner; Stern, Matthew; Deuschl, Günther

    2014-04-01

    With advances in knowledge disease, boundaries may change. Occasionally, these changes are of such a magnitude that they require redefinition of the disease. In recognition of the profound changes in our understanding of Parkinson's disease (PD), the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society (MDS) commissioned a task force to consider a redefinition of PD. This review is a discussion article, intended as the introductory statement of the task force. Several critical issues were identified that challenge current PD definitions. First, new findings challenge the central role of the classical pathologic criteria as the arbiter of diagnosis, notably genetic cases without synuclein deposition, the high prevalence of incidental Lewy body (LB) deposition, and the nonmotor prodrome of PD. It remains unclear, however, whether these challenges merit a change in the pathologic gold standard, especially considering the limitations of alternate gold standards. Second, the increasing recognition of dementia in PD challenges the distinction between diffuse LB disease and PD. Consideration might be given to removing dementia as an exclusion criterion for PD diagnosis. Third, there is increasing recognition of disease heterogeneity, suggesting that PD subtypes should be formally identified; however, current subtype classifications may not be sufficiently robust to warrant formal delineation. Fourth, the recognition of a nonmotor prodrome of PD requires that new diagnostic criteria for early-stage and prodromal PD should be created; here, essential features of these criteria are proposed. Finally, there is a need to create new MDS diagnostic criteria that take these changes in disease definition into consideration. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Screening for Obesity in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Grossman, David C; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-06-20

    Based on year 2000 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts, approximately 17% of children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 years in the United States have obesity, and almost 32% of children and adolescents are overweight or have obesity. Obesity in children and adolescents is associated with morbidity such as mental health and psychological issues, asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, orthopedic problems, and adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes (eg, high blood pressure, abnormal lipid levels, and insulin resistance). Children and adolescents may also experience teasing and bullying behaviors based on their weight. Obesity in childhood and adolescence may continue into adulthood and lead to adverse cardiovascular outcomes or other obesity-related morbidity, such as type 2 diabetes. Although the overall rate of child and adolescent obesity has stabilized over the last decade after increasing steadily for 3 decades, obesity rates continue to increase in certain populations, such as African American girls and Hispanic boys. These racial/ethnic differences in obesity prevalence are likely a result of both genetic and nongenetic factors (eg, socioeconomic status, intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and fast food, and having a television in the bedroom). To update the 2010 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for obesity in children 6 years and older. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on screening for obesity in children and adolescents and the benefits and harms of weight management interventions. Comprehensive, intensive behavioral interventions (≥26 contact hours) in children and adolescents 6 years and older who have obesity can result in improvements in weight status for up to 12 months; there is inadequate evidence regarding the effectiveness of less intensive interventions. The harms of behavioral interventions can be bounded as small to none, and the harms of screening are minimal. Therefore, the USPSTF

  20. [Faulty posture and selected respiratory indicators].

    PubMed

    Pawlicka-Lisowska, Agnieszka; Motylewski, Sławomir; Lisowski, Jacek; Michalak, Katarzyna; Poziomska-Piatkowska, Elzbieta

    2013-08-01

    Was to diagnose the body posture of physiotherapy students of the Medical University of Lodz and to determine the relationship between selected respiratory indicator and the incidence of faulty posture in the studied group. 196 students of Medical University of Lodz were included in the study. Posture assessment was conducted using Kasperczyk's points method. In the study authors indicated selected respiratory parameters, incuding: forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure measured in the mouth (MIP, MEP). The results of the study showed a reduction of the respiratory parameters rates (FVC, FEV1) and respiratory muscle strength (MIP, MEP) in the group of students with a poor posture compared to students with a good posture. Although the statistical analysis showed no significant correlation between the presence of the faulty posture and respiratory parameters, there was a clear tendency for those parameters to decrease in the group of students with a poor posture. The results of the examined indicators showed a reduction of the respiratory parameters rates (FVC, FEV1) and respiratory muscle strength (MIP, MEP) in the group of students with a poor posture compared to students with a good posture. The posture classified by Kasperczyk as good is prevailing in the studied. The results obtained in this study suggest the need to take action on the prevention and correction of faulty posture.

  1. The association between whole body vibration exposure and musculoskeletal disorders in the Swedish work force is confounded by lifting and posture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagberg, Mats; Burström, Lage; Ekman, Anna; Vilhelmsson, Rebecka

    2006-12-01

    This was a cross-sectional study based on material representing the Swedish work-force from a survey conducted in 1999, 2001 and 2003 by Statistics Sweden. Exposure to whole body vibration (WBV) was prevalent among agricultural, forestry, fishery workers and among plant and machinery operators based on a sample of 40,000 employed persons. Approximately 70% responders, that are 9798 persons answered both the interview and the questionnaire for the analysis of exposure-response. Exposure to WBV at least half the working time was associated with prevalence ratios above two for musculoskeletal symptoms in the low back, neck, shoulder/arm and hand among workers. When the exposure factors lifting and frequent bending were added to a multivariate analysis, surprisingly the magnitude of association was low between low back symptoms and WBV exposure. Interestingly, the relation between WBV exposure and symptoms in the neck, shoulder/arm and hand had the same or higher magnitude of association even when the possible confounders were in the model. For the neck, low back and shoulder/arm there was a visible increase in prevalence ratio (as high as 5 times) when combined exposures of WBV, lifting, frequent bending, twisted posture and noise were included in the analysis.

  2. Exploring interactions between force, repetition and posture on intervertebral disc height loss and bulging in isolated porcine cervical functional spinal units from sub-acute-failure magnitudes of cyclic compressive loading.

    PubMed

    Gooyers, Chad E; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-10-15

    Most in vitro studies are limited in the ability to partition intervertebral disc (IVD) height loss from total specimen height loss since the net changes in the actuator position of the materials testing system simply reflect net changes to functional spinal units (FSUs) used for testing. Three levels of peak compressive force, three cycle rates and two dynamic postural conditions were examined using a full-factorial design. Cyclic compressive force was applied using a time-varying waveform with synchronous flexion/extension for 5000 cycles. Surface scans from the anterior aspect of the IVD were recorded in a neutral and flexed posture before and after the cyclic loading protocol using a 3D laser scanner to characterise changes in IVD height loss and bulging. A significant three-way interaction (p=0.0092) between the magnitude of peak compressive force, cycle rate and degree of postural deviation was observed in cycle-varying specimen height loss data. A significant main effect of peak compressive force (p=0.0003) was also observed in IVD height loss calculated from the surface profiles of the IVD. The relative contribution of IVD height loss (measured on the anterior surface) to total specimen height loss across experimental conditions varied considerably, ranging from 19% to 58%. Postural deviation was the only factor that significantly affected the magnitude of peak AF bulge (p=0.0016). This investigation provides evidence that total specimen height loss is not an accurate depiction of cycle-varying changes in the IVD across a range of in vivo scenarios that were replicated with in vitro testing.

  3. Screening for intimate partner violence and abuse of elderly and vulnerable adults: U.S. preventive services task force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-03-19

    Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for family and intimate partner violence (IPV). The USPSTF commissioned a systematic evidence review on screening women for IPV and elderly and vulnerable adults for abuse and neglect. This review examined the accuracy of screening tools for identifying IPV and the benefits and harms of screening women of childbearing age and elderly and vulnerable adults. These recommendations apply to asymptomatic women (women who do not have signs or symptoms of abuse) of reproductive age and elderly and vulnerable adults. The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen women of childbearing age for IPV, such as domestic violence, and provide or refer women who screen positive to intervention services (B recommendation).The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening all elderly or vulnerable adults (physically or mentally dysfunctional) for abuse and neglect (I statement).

  4. Vision Screening in Children Aged 6 Months to 5 Years: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Owens, Douglas K; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-09-05

    One of the most important causes of vision abnormalities in children is amblyopia (also known as "lazy eye"). Amblyopia is an alteration in the visual neural pathway in a child's developing brain that can lead to permanent vision loss in the affected eye. Among children younger than 6 years, 1% to 6% have amblyopia or its risk factors (strabismus, anisometropia, or both). Early identification of vision abnormalities could prevent the development of amblyopia. Studies show that screening rates among children vary by race/ethnicity and family income. Data based on parent reports from 2009-2010 indicated identical screening rates among black non-Hispanic children and white non-Hispanic children (80.7%); however, Hispanic children were less likely than non-Hispanic children to report vision screening (69.8%). Children whose families earned 200% or more above the federal poverty level were more likely to report vision screening than families with lower incomes. To update the 2011 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for amblyopia and its risk factors in children. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the accuracy of vision screening tests and the benefits and harms of vision screening and treatment. Surgical interventions were considered to be out of scope for this review. Treatment of amblyopia is associated with moderate improvements in visual acuity in children aged 3 to 5 years, which are likely to result in permanent improvements in vision throughout life. The USPSTF concluded that the benefits are moderate because untreated amblyopia results in permanent, uncorrectable vision loss, and the benefits of screening and treatment potentially can be experienced over a child's lifetime. The USPSTF found adequate evidence to bound the potential harms of treatment (ie, higher false-positive rates in low-prevalence populations) as small. Therefore, the USPSTF concluded with moderate certainty that the overall net benefit is moderate for

  5. Does forward head posture affect postural control in human healthy volunteers?

    PubMed

    Silva, Anabela G; Johnson, Mark I

    2013-06-01

    Proprioceptive afferent input from neck muscles plays an important role in postural control. Forward head posture has the potential to impair proprioceptive information from neck muscles and contribute to postural control deficits in patients with neck pain. This study investigated whether induced forward head posture affects postural control in healthy participants when compared to natural head posture. Centre of pressure sway area, distance covered and mean velocity were measured during 30s of static standing using a force platform with 25 healthy individuals (mean age ± SD = 20.76 ± 2.19 years) in 8 different conditions. Base of support, eyes open or closed and natural or forward head posture varied within these testing conditions. The majority of comparisons between natural and forward head posture were not statistically significant (p>0.05). This suggests that induced forward head posture in young healthy adults does not challenge them enough to impair postural control. Future studies should evaluate whether forward head posture affects postural control of individuals with chronic neck pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 2012 National Guard Bureau Posture Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Citizen-Soldiers, who in their civilian lives are in positions of influence across the spectrum of business, education , and government, make up the...Connection Education Program is an employment initiative designed to help improve quality of life for unemployed or underemployed Soldiers. This...Dominican Rep. South Dakota/Suriname Texas/ Chile West Virginia / Peru Wisconsin / Nicaragua USNORTHCOM - 1 Rhode Island / Bahamas 18 National Guard Bureau

  7. Forced Changes of Combat Posture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-30

    true of the majority of studies based A bon historical data, since these numbers are the most readily available. Other quantitative data such as...one regiment) was continuing an offensive that had just broken through the German Gustav Line. Although the attacker’sSF numerical superiority was...attack, which resulted in the capture of the fortified mountain village of Castellonorato, breached the Gustav Line and -- in combination with

  8. The reliability and validity of the Saliba Postural Classification System.

    PubMed

    Collins, Cristiana Kahl; Johnson, Vicky Saliba; Godwin, Ellen M; Pappas, Evangelos

    2016-07-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of the Saliba Postural Classification System (SPCS). Two physical therapists classified pictures of 100 volunteer participants standing in their habitual posture for inter and intra-tester reliability. For validity, 54 participants stood on a force plate in a habitual and a corrected posture, while a vertical force was applied through the shoulders until the clinician felt a postural give. Data were extracted at the time the give was felt and at a time in the corrected posture that matched the peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) in the habitual posture. Inter-tester reliability demonstrated 75% agreement with a Kappa = 0.64 (95% CI = 0.524-0.756, SE = 0.059). Intra-tester reliability demonstrated 87% agreement with a Kappa = 0.8, (95% CI = 0.702-0.898, SE = 0.05) and 80% agreement with a Kappa = 0.706, (95% CI = 0.594-0818, SE = 0.057). The examiner applied a significantly higher (p < 0.001) peak vertical force in the corrected posture prior to a postural give when compared to the habitual posture. Within the corrected posture, the %VGRF was higher when the test was ongoing vs. when a postural give was felt (p < 0.001). The %VGRF was not different between the two postures when comparing the peaks (p = 0.214). The SPCS has substantial agreement for inter- and intra-tester reliability and is largely a valid postural classification system as determined by the larger vertical forces in the corrected postures. Further studies on the correlation between the SPCS and diagnostic classifications are indicated.

  9. Determining postural stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, Erez (Inventor); Forth, Katharine E. (Inventor); Paloski, William H. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for determining postural stability of a person can include acquiring a plurality of pressure data points over a period of time from at least one pressure sensor. The method can also include the step of identifying a postural state for each pressure data point to generate a plurality of postural states. The method can include the step of determining a postural state of the person at a point in time based on at least the plurality of postural states.

  10. Screening and behavioral counseling interventions in primary care to reduce alcohol misuse: U.S. preventive services task force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-08-06

    Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening and behavioral counseling interventions in primary care to reduce alcohol misuse. The USPSTF reviewed new evidence on the effectiveness of screening for alcohol misuse for improving health outcomes, the accuracy of various screening approaches, the effectiveness of various behavioral counseling interventions for improving intermediate or long-term health outcomes, the harms of screening and behavioral counseling interventions, and influences from the health care system that promote or detract from effective screening and counseling interventions for alcohol misuse. These recommendations apply to adolescents aged 12 to 17 years and adults aged 18 years or older. These recommendations do not apply to persons who are actively seeking evaluation or treatment of alcohol misuse. The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen adults aged 18 years or older for alcohol misuse and provide persons engaged in risky or hazardous drinking with brief behavioral counseling interventions to reduce alcohol misuse. (Grade B recommendation)The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening and behavioral counseling interventions in primary care settings to reduce alcohol misuse in adolescents. (I statement)

  11. Vitamin, mineral, and multivitamin supplements for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: U.S. Preventive services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-04-15

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on vitamin supplementation to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the efficacy of multivitamin or mineral supplements in the general adult population for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. This recommendation applies to healthy adults without special nutritional needs (typically aged 50 years or older). It does not apply to children, women who are pregnant or may become pregnant, or persons who are chronically ill or hospitalized or have a known nutritional deficiency. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of multivitamins for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or cancer. (I statement). The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of single- or paired-nutrient supplements (except β-carotene and vitamin E) for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or cancer. (I statement). The USPSTF recommends against β-carotene or vitamin E supplements for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or cancer. (D recommendation).

  12. Screening for Iron Deficiency Anemia and Iron Supplementation in Pregnant Women to Improve Maternal Health and Birth Outcomes: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Siu, Albert L

    2015-10-06

    Update of the 2006 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for iron deficiency anemia. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the association between change in iron status as a result of intervention (oral supplementation or treatment) in pregnant women and adolescents and improvement in maternal and infant health outcomes. This recommendation applies to pregnant women and adolescents living in the United States who do not have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. It does not address pregnant women who are malnourished, have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia, or have special hematologic conditions or nutritional needs that may increase their need for iron. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women to prevent adverse maternal health and birth outcomes. (I statement). The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of routine iron supplementation for pregnant women to prevent adverse maternal health and birth outcomes. (I statement).

  13. Behavioral and Pharmacotherapy Interventions for Tobacco Smoking Cessation in Adults, Including Pregnant Women: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Siu, Albert L

    2015-10-20

    Update of the 2009 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on counseling and interventions to prevent tobacco use and tobacco-related disease in adults, including pregnant women. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on interventions for tobacco smoking cessation that are relevant to primary care (behavioral interventions, pharmacotherapy, and complementary or alternative therapy) in adults, including pregnant women. This recommendation applies to adults aged 18 years or older, including pregnant women. The USPSTF recommends that clinicians ask all adults about tobacco use, advise them to stop using tobacco, and provide behavioral interventions and U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy for cessation to adults who use tobacco. (A recommendation). The USPSTF recommends that clinicians ask all pregnant women about tobacco use, advise them to stop using tobacco, and provide behavioral interventions for cessation to pregnant women who use tobacco. (A recommendation). The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of pharmacotherapy interventions for tobacco cessation in pregnant women. (I statement). The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to recommend electronic nicotine delivery systems for tobacco cessation in adults, including pregnant women. The USPSTF recommends that clinicians direct patients who smoke tobacco to other cessation interventions with established effectiveness and safety (previously stated). (I statement).

  14. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Air Force, Space Division Housing Project, San Pedro, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-24

    Occupational Health Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force (Installations, Environment and Safety) 1 Atch Final EIS, Vol. 2 COVER SHEET (a...Force is respornible for the health and welfare of its military personnel and their dependents, including provisions for adequate housing through either...narrowly focused in at least eight areas: 1. The final EIS should incorporate a more detailed assessment of the possible presence and health and safety

  15. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G D; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar; Adatia, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD.

  16. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G.; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G. D.; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S.; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  17. Primary care behavioral interventions to reduce illicit drug and nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-05-06

    Update of the 2008 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for illicit drug use. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on interventions to help adolescents who have never used drugs to remain abstinent and interventions to help adolescents who are using drugs but do not meet criteria for a substance use disorder to reduce or stop their use. This recommendation applies to children and adolescents younger than age 18 years who have not been diagnosed with a substance use disorder. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care-based behavioral interventions to prevent or reduce illicit drug or nonmedical pharmaceutical use in children and adolescents. (I statement).

  18. Screening for Speech and Language Delay and Disorders in Children Aged 5 Years or Younger: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Siu, Albert L

    2015-08-01

    This report is an update of the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2006 recommendation on screening for speech and language delay in preschool-aged children. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on screening for speech and language delay and disorders in children aged 5 years or younger, including the accuracy of screening in primary care settings, the role of surveillance by primary care clinicians, whether screening and interventions lead to improved outcomes, and the potential harms associated with screening and interventions. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic children aged 5 years or younger whose parents or clinicians do not have specific concerns about their speech, language, hearing, or development. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for speech and language delay and disorders in children aged 5 years or younger (I statement). Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Strategic Mobility, The Force Proejction Army, and the Ottawa Landmine Treaty: Can the Army Get There?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Accessed 27 October 2000. This theme was reiterated in the fiscal year 2001 Army Posture Statement. 70 Louis Caldera and Eric K. Shinseki, A Statement on the...Operations, III-21. 87 Ibid., III-4. 88 Louis Caldera and Eric K. Shinseki, A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army Fiscal Year 2001...October 2000. 50 Caldera , Louis and Eric K. Shinseki. A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army Fiscal Year 2001, (http://www.army.mil/aps

  20. Mobility as the Purpose of Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Le Mouel, Charlotte; Brette, Romain

    2017-01-01

    Counteracting the destabilizing force of gravity is usually considered to be the main purpose of postural control. However, from the consideration of the mechanical requirements for movement, we argue that posture is adjusted in view of providing impetus for movement. Thus, we show that the posture that is usually adopted in quiet standing in fact allows torque for potential movement. Moreover, when performing a movement—either voluntarily or in response to an external perturbation—we show that the postural adjustments are organized both spatially and temporally so as to provide the required torque for the movement. Thus, when movement is performed skillfully, the force of gravity is not counteracted but actually used to provide impetus to movement. This ability to move one's weight so as to exploit the torque of gravity seems to be dependent on development and skill learning, and is impaired in aging. PMID:28798679

  1. Combined Diet and Physical Activity Promotion Programs for Prevention of Diabetes: Community Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Nicolaas P; Remington, Patrick L

    2015-09-15

    Community Preventive Services Task Force recommendation on the use of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes in persons at increased risk. The Task Force commissioned an evidence review that assessed the benefits and harms of programs to promote and support individual improvements in diet, exercise, and weight and supervised a review on the economic efficiency of these programs in clinical trial, primary care, and primary care-referable settings. Adolescents and adults at increased risk for progression to type 2 diabetes. The Task Force recommends the use of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs by health care systems, communities, and other implementers to provide counseling and support to clients identified as being at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Economic evidence indicates that these programs are cost-effective.

  2. Disposal and reuse of Myrtle Beach Air Force Base, South Carolina final environmental impact statement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    Pursuant to the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 1990, Myrtle Beach AFB closed in March 1993. This EIS was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act to analyze the potential environmental consequences of the disposal of the base. Although disposal will create few direct impacts, reuse by others will create indirect impacts. The EIS analyzes the effects a range of reasonable foreseeable alternative reuses may have on the local community; including land use and aesthetics, transportation, utilities, hazardous materials/wastes, geology and soils, water resources, air quality, noise, biological resources, and cultural resources. Preservation covenants within the disposal document could eliminate or reduce any negative environmental effects to a non-adverse level. Because the Air Force is disposing of the property, some of the mitigation measures are beyond Air Force control. Remediation of Installation Restoration Program sites will continue to be the responsibility of the Air Force.

  3. Environmental Impact Statement Supersonic Flight Operations in the Valentine Military Operations Area, Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    AM COMMAND 7’A .- 1 9-19’ 3: -42 FPr- H0 iF rEH TO ;777’-, P. OF ~ Air Forc~e Environmental Planning Division (HQ USAF/CEVP) lXoma S’B69 1260 Air...the width reduces to about three feet. Applying this data to Valentine would show the probability of a focus boom impacting any one spot where the...future research may provide a better understanding I of the relationship between noise and non-auditory ill-health; however, in the interim decisions

  4. Influence of postural threat on postural responses to aversive visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Lelard, Thierry; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Montalan, Benoît; Longin, Estelle; Bucchioni, Giulia; Ahmaidi, Said; Godefroy, Olivier; Mouras, Harold

    2014-06-01

    Recent research has shown that emotion influences postural control. The objective of the present study was to establish whether or not postural threat influences postural and physiological responses to aversive visual stimuli. In order to investigate the coupling between emotional reactions, motivated behavior and postural responses, we studied the displacement of the subject's center of pressure (COP) and the changes in electrodermal activity (EDA), heart rate (HR) and postural muscle activation. Thirty-two participants (15 males, 17 females; mean ± SD age: 21.4 ± 2.3) viewed affective and neutral pictures while standing still on a force platform in the presence or absence of postural threat. The HR and EDA data revealed that the emotional state varied as a function of the postural condition. The mean displacement in the anteroposterior (AP) axis was more rearwards in response to aversive stimuli that in response to neutral stimuli, in both the absence of postural threat (-0.65 mm and +0.90 mm for aversive and neutral stimuli, respectively) and the presence of postural threat (-0.00 mm vs. +0.89 mm, respectively). An aversive stimulus was associated with a shorter AP COP sway path than a neutral stimulus in the presence of a postural threat (167.26 mm vs. 174.66 mm for aversive and neutral stimuli, respectively) but not in the latter's absence (155.85 mm vs. 154.48 mm, respectively). Our results evidenced withdrawal behavior in response to an aversive stimulus (relative to a neutral stimulus) in the absence of postural threat. Withdrawal behavior was attenuated (but nevertheless active) in the presence of a postural threat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Does increased postural threat lead to more conscious control of posture?

    PubMed

    Huffman, J L; Horslen, B C; Carpenter, M G; Adkin, A L

    2009-11-01

    Although it is well established that postural threat modifies postural control, little is known regarding the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for these changes. It is possible that changes in postural control under conditions of elevated postural threat result from a shift to a more conscious control of posture. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of elevated postural threat on conscious control of posture and to determine the relationship between conscious control and postural control measures. Forty-eight healthy young adults stood on a force plate at two different surface heights: ground level (LOW) and 3.2-m above ground level (HIGH). Centre of pressure measures calculated in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction were mean position (AP-MP), root mean square (AP-RMS) and mean power frequency (AP-MPF). A modified state-specific version of the Movement Specific Reinvestment Scale was used to measure conscious motor processing (CMP) and movement self-consciousness (MSC). Balance confidence, fear of falling, perceived stability, and perceived and actual anxiety indicators were also collected. A significant effect of postural threat was found for movement reinvestment as participants reported more conscious control and a greater concern about their posture at the HIGH height. Significant correlations between CMP and MSC with AP-MP were observed as participants who consciously controlled and were more concerned for their posture leaned further away from the platform edge. It is possible that changes in movement reinvestment can influence specific aspects of posture (leaning) but other aspects may be immune to these changes (amplitude and frequency).

  6. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  7. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  8. [Risks of awkward posture].

    PubMed

    Bazzini, G; Capodaglio, E; Panigazzi, M; Prestifilippo, E; Vercesi, C

    2010-01-01

    For posture we mean the position of the body in the space and the relationship with its segments. The correct posture is determined by neurophysiological, biomechanical, emotional, psychological and relation factors, enabling us to perform daily and working activities with the lowest energy expenditure. When possible we suggest during posture variation, a preventive measure where there are prolonged fixed activities.

  9. Changes in mechanical load and extensor muscle activity in the cervico-thoracic spine induced by sitting posture modification.

    PubMed

    Edmondston, Stephen J; Sharp, Michael; Symes, Andew; Alhabib, Nawaf; Allison, Garry T

    2011-02-01

    The influence of whole body sitting posture on cervico-thoracic posture, mechanical load and extensor muscle activity was examined in 23 asymptomatic adults. Cervical and upper thoracic extensor muscle activity measured in guided slouched and lumbo-pelvic neutral postures was normalised to that measured in a self-selected habitual posture. Head and neck posture and gravitational load moment measurements were obtained in each posture. Sagittal head translation, upper cervical extension and load moment were significantly greater in the slouched posture (p < 0.001). Contrasting patterns of cervical and thoracic extensor activity were observed in the slouched and neutral postures, with cervical extensor activity 40% higher in the slouched posture (p < 0.0001). Thoracic extensor activity was significantly higher in the lumbo-pelvic neutral posture than the habitual posture (p = 0.002). The significant changes in extensor muscle activity with postural modification appear to be induced by the associated change in mechanical load moment of the head. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: More neutral sitting postures reduce the demand on the cervical extensor muscles and modify the relative contribution of cervical and thoracic extensors to the control of head and neck posture. Postures that promote these patterns of muscular activity may reduce cervical spine loading and the development of posture-related neck pain.

  10. Screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using spirometry: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    2008-04-01

    New U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation about screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using spirometry. The USPSTF weighed the benefits (prevention of > or =1 exacerbation and improvement in respiratory-related health status measures) and harms (time and effort required by both patients and the health care system, false-positive screening tests, and adverse effects of subsequent unnecessary therapy) of COPD screening identified in the accompanying review of the evidence. The USPSTF did not consider the financial costs of spirometry testing or COPD therapies. Do not screen adults for COPD using spirometry. (Grade D recommendation).

  11. Army Posture Statement: A Statement on the Posture of the United States Army 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-02

    16 Fiscal Stewardship Energy Security and Sustainability The Profession of...28 D. Fiscal Year 2012 President’s Budget* E. Reserve...seLfLess seRvice | HonoR | integRity | peRsonaL couRage 16www.army.mil/aps/11 Stewardship, Innovation and Accomplishments Fiscal Stewardship We take our

  12. Transfer of dynamic learning across postures.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Alaa A; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2009-11-01

    When learning a difficult motor task, we often decompose the task so that the control of individual body segments is practiced in isolation. But on re-composition, the combined movements can result in novel and possibly complex internal forces between the body segments that were not experienced (or did not need to be compensated for) during isolated practice. Here we investigate whether dynamics learned in isolation by one part of the body can be used by other parts of the body to immediately predict and compensate for novel forces between body segments. Subjects reached to targets while holding the handle of a robotic, force-generating manipulandum. One group of subjects was initially exposed to the novel robot dynamics while seated and was then tested in a standing position. A second group was tested in the reverse order: standing then sitting. Both groups adapted their arm dynamics to the novel environment, and this movement learning transferred between seated and standing postures and vice versa. Both groups also generated anticipatory postural adjustments when standing and exposed to the force field for several trials. In the group that had learned the dynamics while seated, the appropriate postural adjustments were observed on the very first reach on standing. These results suggest that the CNS can immediately anticipate the effect of learned movement dynamics on a novel whole-body posture. The results support the existence of separate mappings for posture and movement, which encode similar dynamics but can be adapted independently.

  13. Transfer of Dynamic Learning Across Postures

    PubMed Central

    Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    When learning a difficult motor task, we often decompose the task so that the control of individual body segments is practiced in isolation. But on re-composition, the combined movements can result in novel and possibly complex internal forces between the body segments that were not experienced (or did not need to be compensated for) during isolated practice. Here we investigate whether dynamics learned in isolation by one part of the body can be used by other parts of the body to immediately predict and compensate for novel forces between body segments. Subjects reached to targets while holding the handle of a robotic, force-generating manipulandum. One group of subjects was initially exposed to the novel robot dynamics while seated and was then tested in a standing position. A second group was tested in the reverse order: standing then sitting. Both groups adapted their arm dynamics to the novel environment, and this movement learning transferred between seated and standing postures and vice versa. Both groups also generated anticipatory postural adjustments when standing and exposed to the force field for several trials. In the group that had learned the dynamics while seated, the appropriate postural adjustments were observed on the very first reach on standing. These results suggest that the CNS can immediately anticipate the effect of learned movement dynamics on a novel whole-body posture. The results support the existence of separate mappings for posture and movement, which encode similar dynamics but can be adapted independently. PMID:19710374

  14. Effect of Posture on Hip Angles and Moments during Gait

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.

    2014-01-01

    Anterior hip pain is common in young, active adults. Clinically, we have noted that patients with anterior hip pain often walk in a swayback posture, and that their pain is reduced when the posture is corrected. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential mechanism for the reduction in pain by testing the effect of posture on movement patterns and internal moments during gait in healthy subjects. Fifteen subjects were instructed to walk while maintaining three postures: 1) natural, 2) swayback, and 3) forward flexed. Kinematic and force data were collected using a motion capture system and a force plate. Walking in the swayback posture resulted in a higher peak hip extension angle, hip flexor moment and hip flexion angular impulse compared to natural posture. In contrast, walking in a forward flexed posture resulted in a decreased hip extension angle and decreased hip flexion angular impulse. Based on these results, walking in a swayback posture may result in increased forces required of the anterior hip structures, potentially contributing to anterior hip pain. This study provides a potential biomechanical mechanism for clinical observations that posture correction in patients with hip pain is beneficial. PMID:25262565

  15. Effect of posture on hip angles and moments during gait.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Sahrmann, Shirley A

    2015-02-01

    Anterior hip pain is common in young, active adults. Clinically, we have noted that patients with anterior hip pain often walk in a swayback posture, and that their pain is reduced when the posture is corrected. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential mechanism for the reduction in pain by testing the effect of posture on movement patterns and internal moments during gait in healthy subjects. Fifteen subjects were instructed to walk while maintaining three postures: 1) natural, 2) swayback, and 3) forward flexed. Kinematic and force data were collected using a motion capture system and a force plate. Walking in the swayback posture resulted in a higher peak hip extension angle, hip flexor moment and hip flexion angular impulse compared to natural posture. In contrast, walking in a forward flexed posture resulted in a decreased hip extension angle and decreased hip flexion angular impulse. Based on these results, walking in a swayback posture may result in increased forces required of the anterior hip structures, potentially contributing to anterior hip pain. This study provides a potential biomechanical mechanism for clinical observations that posture correction in patients with hip pain is beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Screening for primary hypertension in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-11-05

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for high blood pressure in children and adolescents. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on screening and diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for blood pressure in children and adolescents, the effectiveness and harms of treatment of screen-detected primary childhood hypertension, and the association of hypertension with markers of cardiovascular disease in childhood and adulthood. This recommendation applies to children and adolescents who do not have symptoms of hypertension. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for primary hypertension in asymptomatic children and adolescents to prevent subsequent cardiovascular disease in childhood or adulthood.

  17. Screening for primary hypertension in children and adolescents: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-11-01

    Update of the 2003 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for high blood pressure in children and adolescents. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on screening and diagnostic accuracy of screening tests for blood pressure in children and adolescents, the effectiveness and harms of treatment of screen-detected primary childhood hypertension, and the association of hypertension with markers of cardiovascular disease in childhood and adulthood. This recommendation applies to children and adolescents who do not have symptoms of hypertension. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for primary hypertension in asymptomatic children and adolescents to prevent subsequent cardiovascular disease in childhood or adulthood.

  18. Screening for hepatitis C virus infection in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-09-03

    Update of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for and treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in asymptomatic adults. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality commissioned 2 systematic reviews on screening for and treatment of HCV infection in asymptomatic adults, focusing on evidence gaps identified in the previous USPSTF recommendation and new studies published since 2004. The evidence on screening for HCV in pregnant women was also considered. This recommendation applies to all asymptomatic adults without known liver disease or functional abnormalities. The USPSTF recommends screening for HCV infection in persons at high risk for infection. The USPSTF also recommends offering 1-time screening for HCV infection to adults born between 1945 and 1965. (B recommendation).

  19. Folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    2009-05-05

    In 1996, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that all women planning or capable of pregnancy take a multivitamin supplement containing folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects. This recommendation is an update of the 1996 USPSTF recommendation. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on folic acid supplementation in women of childbearing age published since the 1996 USPSTF recommendation. The USPSTF did not review the evidence on folic acid food fortification, counseling to increase dietary intake, or screening for neural tube defects. The USPSTF recommends that all women planning or capable of pregnancy take a daily supplement containing 0.4 to 0.8 mg (400 to 800 microg) of folic acid. (Grade A recommendation).

  20. Development of Human Posture Simulation Method for Assessing Posture Angles and Spinal Loads

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Lun; Waters, Thomas; Werren, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Video-based posture analysis employing a biomechanical model is gaining a growing popularity for ergonomic assessments. A human posture simulation method of estimating multiple body postural angles and spinal loads from a video record was developed to expedite ergonomic assessments. The method was evaluated by a repeated measures study design with three trunk flexion levels, two lift asymmetry levels, three viewing angles and three trial repetitions as experimental factors. The study comprised two phases evaluating the accuracy of simulating self and other people’s lifting posture via a proxy of a computer-generated humanoid. The mean values of the accuracy of simulating self and humanoid postures were 12° and 15°, respectively. The repeatability of the method for the same lifting condition was excellent (~2°). The least simulation error was associated with side viewing angle. The estimated back compressive force and moment, calculated by a three dimensional biomechanical model, exhibited a range of 5% underestimation. The posture simulation method enables researchers to simultaneously quantify body posture angles and spinal loading variables with accuracy and precision comparable to on-screen posture matching methods. PMID:26361435

  1. Folic Acid Supplementation for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Davidson, Karina W; Epling, John W; García, Francisco A R; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phillips, William R; Phipps, Maureen G; Pignone, Michael P; Silverstein, Michael; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-01-10

    Neural tube defects are among the most common major congenital anomalies in the United States and may lead to a range of disabilities or death. Daily folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period can prevent neural tube defects. However, most women do not receive the recommended daily intake of folate from diet alone. To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on folic acid supplementation in women of childbearing age. In 2009, the USPSTF reviewed the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation in women of childbearing age for the prevention of neural tube defects in infants. The current review assessed new evidence on the benefits and harms of folic acid supplementation. The USPSTF assessed the balance of the benefits and harms of folic acid supplementation in women of childbearing age and determined that the net benefit is substantial. Evidence is adequate that the harms to the mother or infant from folic acid supplementation taken at the usual doses are no greater than small. Therefore, the USPSTF reaffirms its 2009 recommendation. The USPSTF recommends that all women who are planning or capable of pregnancy take a daily supplement containing 0.4 to 0.8 mg (400-800 µg) of folic acid. (A recommendation).

  2. Screening for peripheral artery disease and cardiovascular disease risk assessment with the ankle-brachial index in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-09-03

    Update of the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for peripheral artery disease (PAD). The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the use of resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) as a screening test for PAD or as a risk predictor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The review focused on resting ABI as the sole screening method; the diagnostic performance of ABI testing in primary care populations, unselected populations, and asymptomatic populations; the predictive value of ABI testing for major CVD outcomes in primary care or unselected populations; and the effect of treatment on general CVD and PAD-specific morbidity in patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic PAD. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic adults who do not have a known diagnosis of PAD, CVD, severe chronic kidney disease, or diabetes. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for PAD and CVD risk assessment with the ABI in adults. (I statement).

  3. Behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for cardiovascular disease prevention in adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2012-09-04

    Update of the 2003 and 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statements on behavioral counseling to promote a healthful diet and physical activity in adults without preexisting cardiovascular disease (CVD) or its risk factors. The USPSTF reviewed new evidence on whether counseling interventions relevant to primary care for physical activity or a healthful diet modify self-reported behaviors; intermediate physiologic outcomes (for example, reduced lipid levels, blood pressure, weight, and body mass index and increased glucose tolerance); and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adults without known CVD, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or diabetes. General adult population without a known diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, or CVD. Although the correlation among healthful diet, physical activity, and the incidence of CVD is strong, existing evidence indicates that the health benefit of initiating behavioral counseling in the primary care setting to promote a healthful diet and physical activity is small. Clinicians may choose to selectively counsel patients rather than incorporate counseling into the care of all adults in the general population. Issues to consider include other risk factors for CVD, a patient's readiness for change, social support and community resources that support behavioral change, and other health care and preventive service priorities. Harms may include the lost opportunity to provide other services that have a greater health effect. This is a grade C recommendation.

  4. Fingertip contact influences human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface can strongly influence apparent body orientation, as well as the maintenance of upright posture during quiet stance. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postural sway and contact forces at the fingertip while subjects touched a rigid metal bar. Subjects were tested in the tandem Romberg stance with eyes open or closed under three conditions of fingertip contact: no contact, touch contact (< 0.98 N of force), and force contact (as much force as desired). Touch contact was as effective as force contact or sight of the surroundings in reducing postural sway when compared to the no contact, eyes closed condition. Body sway and fingertip forces were essentially in phase with force contact, suggesting that fingertip contact forces are physically counteracting body sway. Time delays between body sway and fingertip forces were much larger with light touch contact, suggesting that the fingertip is providing information that allows anticipatory innervation of musculature to reduce body sway. The results are related to observations on precision grip as well as the somatosensory, proprioceptive, and motor mechanisms involved in the reduction of body sway.

  5. Fingertip contact influences human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface can strongly influence apparent body orientation, as well as the maintenance of upright posture during quiet stance. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postural sway and contact forces at the fingertip while subjects touched a rigid metal bar. Subjects were tested in the tandem Romberg stance with eyes open or closed under three conditions of fingertip contact: no contact, touch contact (< 0.98 N of force), and force contact (as much force as desired). Touch contact was as effective as force contact or sight of the surroundings in reducing postural sway when compared to the no contact, eyes closed condition. Body sway and fingertip forces were essentially in phase with force contact, suggesting that fingertip contact forces are physically counteracting body sway. Time delays between body sway and fingertip forces were much larger with light touch contact, suggesting that the fingertip is providing information that allows anticipatory innervation of musculature to reduce body sway. The results are related to observations on precision grip as well as the somatosensory, proprioceptive, and motor mechanisms involved in the reduction of body sway.

  6. Supporting the Well-Being of the Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Fiscal Year 1998 , Posture Statement presented to the 105th Cong., 1st sess. (Washington, D. C.: U.S. Department of the Army, 1997). 15Louis Caldera ...www.army.mil/aps/04/index.html>; Internet. Accessed 16 October 2004. Caldera , Louis and Dennis J Reimer, GEN. A Statement on the Posture of the United

  7. Modifications of anticipatory postural adjustments in a rock climbing task: the effect of supporting wall inclination.

    PubMed

    Noé, F

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of initial postural constraint on the realisation of a leg release in a rock climbing task. Two conditions were tested: a vertical posture and an overhanging posture. The overhanging posture was characterised by a large sustentation base, which enhanced the mechanical possibilities of the system. Subjects had to release their right foot in both postural conditions. In the vertical posture, movement's effectuation was associated with anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). In the overhanging posture, the movement was performed without APAs. The results indicated that APAs were modulated according to the possibilities of force creation of the system. Hence, the disappearance of APAs in the overhanging posture was explained by the efficiency of the system to create the impulse necessary to perform the task.

  8. Fear of falling and postural control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Jog, Mandar S

    2003-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between fear of falling (FOF) and qualitative and quantitative postural control in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifty-eight nondemented PD patients were studied along with age-matched healthy controls. The degree of FOF was estimated using the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Qualitative postural control was evaluated using a component of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale. Postural control was quantified, using centre of pressure measures obtained from a force plate, for eight standing balance tests of different challenges. The results showed that FOF was more evident for PD patients when compared with healthy individuals of similar age. Furthermore, FOF was significantly associated with a qualitative estimate of postural control in PD; individuals with PD who had a greater degree of posture impairment reported greater FOF. The results also showed that an estimate of FOF may help to explain quantitative postural instability in PD. FOF, when coupled with a qualitative estimate of postural control, was able to explain a greater amount of variation in quantitative balance performance for five of the eight balance tests. When considered independently, the qualitative measure of postural control, in general, could not well predict quantitative balance performance. The greater degree of FOF and its possible association with altered postural control suggests that FOF should be considered as an important, independent risk factor in the assessment and treatment of postural instability in patients with PD. Copyright 2003 Movement Disorder Society

  9. [Menisci and posture].

    PubMed

    Sérgio, J S

    2000-01-01

    The first aim of this work is not only to review the localised perspective of meniscopathy, concerned with the consequences of meniscectomy, but to also view it in a broader dimension, in the behavioural aspect--related to postural activity. The second aim is to establish the relationship between these two dimensions. Meniscopathies invariably lead to degenerative alterations of the knee joint--not sufficiently explained by the local factors--that result in a situation of osteoarthritis. Some investigators established that the osteoarthritis process should not be confined only to the mechanical responsibility, due to some studies that also confirm the existence of biochemical alterations. However, others have also shown that the nervous system (NS) is likely to influence the inflammatory manifestations through the unmyelinated afferent fibers and sympathetic efferent fibers of the joints. These fibers can interact with non-neural elements, releasing some mediators, such as P substance (PS) and norepinephrine (NE), which, by themselves, or through other substances, contribute to the exacerbation of the inflammatory process. In order to relate the facts above, this longitudinal study comprised the following approaches clinical: anthropometric; biotechnical; and posturographic. It was characterised by five moments of data collection, the periodicity of which is related to the time of the surgery: the first moment is before surgery, followed by the remaining four, at six-week intervals, the sample being composed of--15 male caucasians, aged between 20 and 30 years, working for the Air Force. These Subjects were divided into two groups, according to the amount of meniscus removed in the longitudinal direction. Group A--meniscectomy < 1/2 the longitudinal body, composed of 7 subjects, with an average age of 21.4 years; and Group B, meniscectomy > 1/2 the longitudinal body, composed of: 8 subjects, with an average age of 24.1 years. The statistical analysis contained a

  10. Obesity Impact on the Attentional Cost for Controlling Posture

    PubMed Central

    Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste; Olivier, Isabelle; Promayon, Emmanuel; Nougier, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects of obesity on attentional resources allocated to postural control in seating and unipedal standing. Methods Ten non obese adults (BMI = 22.4±1.3, age = 42.4±15.1) and 10 obese adult patients (BMI = 35.2±2.8, age = 46.2±19.6) maintained postural stability on a force platform in two postural tasks (seated and unipedal). The two postural tasks were performed (1) alone and (2) in a dual-task paradigm in combination with an auditory reaction time task (RT). Performing the RT task together with the postural one was supposed to require some attentional resources that allowed estimating the attentional cost of postural control. 4 trials were performed in each condition for a total of 16 trials. Findings (1) Whereas seated non obese and obese patients exhibited similar centre of foot pressure oscillations (CoP), in the unipedal stance only obese patients strongly increased their CoP sway in comparison to controls. (2) Whatever the postural task, the additional RT task did not affect postural stability. (3) Seated, RT did not differ between the two groups. (4) RT strongly increased between the two postural conditions in the obese patients only, suggesting that body schema and the use of internal models was altered with obesity. Interpretation Obese patients needed more attentional resources to control postural stability during unipedal stance than non obese participants. This was not the case in a more simple posture such as seating. To reduce the risk of fall as indicated by the critical values of CoP displacement, obese patients must dedicate a strong large part of their attentional resources to postural control, to the detriment of non-postural events. Obese patients were not able to easily perform multitasking as healthy adults do, reflecting weakened psycho-motor abilities. PMID:21187914

  11. Deficits in Lower Limb Muscle Reflex Contraction Latency and Peak Force Are Associated With Impairments in Postural Control and Gross Motor Skills of Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S.M.; Ng, Shamay S.M.; Guo, X.; Wang, Yuling; Chung, Raymond C.K.; Stat, Grad; Ki, W.Y.; Macfarlane, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional, exploratory study aimed to compare neuromuscular performance, balance and motor skills proficiencies of typically developing children and those with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and to determine associations of these neuromuscular factors with balance and motor skills performances in children with DCD. One hundred thirty children with DCD and 117 typically developing children participated in the study. Medial hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies in response to an unexpected posterior-to-anterior trunk perturbation were assessed by electromyography and accelerometer. Hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle peak force and time to peak force were quantified by dynamometer, and balance and motor skills performances were evaluated with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC). Independent t tests revealed that children with DCD had longer hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies (P < 0.001) and lower isometric peak forces (P < 0.001), but not times to peak forces (P > 0.025), than the controls. Multiple regression analysis accounting for basic demographics showed that gastrocnemius peak force was independently associated with the MABC balance subscore and ball skills subscore, accounting for 5.7% (P = 0.003) and 8.5% (P = 0.001) of the variance, respectively. Gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latency also explained 11.4% (P < 0.001) of the variance in the MABC ball skills subscore. Children with DCD had delayed leg muscle activation onset times and lower isometric peak forces. Gastrocnemius peak force was associated with balance and ball skills performances, whereas timing of gastrocnemius muscle activation was a determinant of ball skill performance in the DCD population. PMID:26469921

  12. Inter-Association Task Force Recommendations on Emergency Preparedness and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in High School and College Athletic Programs: A Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    Drezner, Jonathan A; Courson, Ron W; Roberts, William O; Mosesso, Vincent N; Link, Mark S; Maron, Barry J

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assist high school and college athletic programs prepare for and respond to a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This consensus statement summarizes our current understanding of SCA in young athletes, defines the necessary elements for emergency preparedness, and establishes uniform treatment protocols for the management of SCA. Background: Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes. The increasing presence of and timely access to automated external defibrillators (AEDs) at sporting events provides a means of early defibrillation and the potential for effective secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. An Inter-Association Task Force was sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers' Association to develop consensus recommendations on emergency preparedness and management of SCA in athletes. Recommendations: Comprehensive emergency planning is needed for high school and college athletic programs to ensure an efficient and structured response to SCA. Essential elements of an emergency action plan include establishment of an effective communication system, training of anticipated responders in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and AED use, access to an AED for early defibrillation, acquisition of necessary emergency equipment, coordination and integration of on-site responder and AED programs with the local emergency medical services system, and practice and review of the response plan. Prompt recognition of SCA, early activation of the emergency medical services system, the presence of a trained rescuer to initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and access to early defibrillation are critical in the management of SCA. In any collapsed and unresponsive athlete, SCA should be suspected and an AED applied as soon as possible for rhythm analysis and defibrillation if indicated. PMID:17597956

  13. Postural dynamics in maximal isometric ramp efforts.

    PubMed

    Bouisset, Simon; Le Bozec, Serge; Ribreau, Christian

    2002-09-01

    Aglobal biomechanical model of transient push efforts is proposed where transient efforts are taken into consideration, with the aim to examine in greater depth the postural adjustments associated with voluntary efforts. In this context, the push effort is considered as a perturbation of balance, and the other reaction forces as a counter-perturbation which is necessary for the task to be performed efficiently. The subjects were asked to exert maximal horizontal two-handed isometric pushes on a dynamometric bar, as rapidly as possible. They were seated on a custom-designed device which measured global and partitive dynamic quantities. The results showed that the horizontal reaction forces and the horizontal displacement of the centre of pressure increased quasi-proportionally with the perturbation. In addition, it was established that vertical reaction forces increased at seat level whereas they decreased at foot level, resulting in minor vertical acceleration and displacement of the centre of gravity. On the contrary, the anteroposterior reaction forces increased both at foot and at seat levels. Based on a detailed examination of the various terms of the model, it is concluded that transient muscular effort induces dynamics of the postural chain. These observations support the view that there is a postural counter-perturbation which is associated with motor activity. More generally, the model helped to specify the effect of postural dynamic phenomena. It makes it possible to stress the importance of adherence at the contact level between the subject and the seat in the course of transient efforts.

  14. Efficiency of physical therapy on postural imbalance after stroke: study protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hugues, A; Di Marco, J; Janiaud, P; Xue, Y; Pires, J; Khademi, H; Cucherat, M; Bonan, I; Gueyffier, F; Rode, G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Stroke frequently results in balance disorders, leading to lower levels of activity and a diminution in autonomy. Current physical therapies (PT) aiming to reduce postural imbalance have shown a large variety of effects with low levels of evidence. The objectives are to determine the efficiency of PT in recovering from postural imbalance in patients after a stroke and to assess which PT is more effective. Methods and analysis We will search several databases from inception to October 2015. Only randomised controlled trials assessing PT to recover from poststroke postural imbalance in adults will be considered. Outcome measures will be the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke (PASS), the ‘weight-bearing asymmetry’ (WBA), the ‘centre of pressure’ (COP) and the ‘limit of stability’ (LOS). WBA, COP and LOS are measured by a (sitting or standing) static evaluation on force plate or another device. Two independent reviewers will screen titles, abstracts and full-text articles, evaluate the risk of bias and will perform data extraction. In addition to the outcomes, measures of independence will be analysed. This study will aim at determining the effects of PT on the function (WBA, COP, LOS), the activity (BBS, PASS) and the independence of patients. Subgroup analyses will be planned according to the location of brain lesion (hemispheric, brainstem or cerebellum), the time since stroke (early, late, chronic), the PT (type, main aim (direct effect or generalisation), overall duration), the type of approaches (top-down or bottom-up) and the methodological quality of studies. Ethics and dissemination No ethical statement will be required. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. This meta-analysis aims at managing the rehabilitation after postural imbalance by PT after a stroke. Trial registration number Prospero CRD42016037966;Pre-results. PMID:28137928

  15. Social Postural Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  16. Social Postural Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  17. Reduced postural differences between phobic postural vertigo patients and healthy subjects during a postural threat.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Johan; Tjernström, Fredrik; Karlberg, Mikael; Fransson, Per Anders; Magnusson, Måns

    2009-08-01

    Phobic postural vertigo is characterized by subjective imbalance and dizziness while standing or walking, despite normal values for clinical balance tests. Patients with phobic postural vertigo exhibit an increased high-frequency sway in posturographic tests. Their postural sway, however, becomes similar to the sway of healthy subjects during difficult balance tasks. Posturographic recordings of 30 s of quiet stance was compared to recordings of 30 s of quiet stance during a postural threat, which consisted of the knowledge of forthcoming vibratory calf muscle stimulation, in 37 consecutive patients with phobic postural vertigo and 24 healthy subjects. During quiet stance without the threat of forthcoming vibratory stimulation, patients with phobic postural vertigo exhibited a postural sway containing significantly more high-frequency sway than the healthy subjects. During the quiet stance with forthcoming vibratory stimulation, i.e., anticipation of a postural threat, the significant differences between groups disappeared for all variables except sagittal high-frequency sway. During postural threat, healthy subjects seemed to adopt a postural strategy that was similar to that exhibited by phobic postural vertigo patients. The lack of additional effects facing a postural threat among phobic postural vertigo patients may be due to an already maximized postural adaptation. Deviant postural reactions among patients with phobic postural vertigo may be considered as an avoidant postural response due to a constant fear of losing postural control.

  18. Eye Movements Affect Postural Control in Young and Older Females.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Neil M; Bampouras, Theodoros M; Donovan, Tim; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is used for postural stabilization in humans. However, little is known about how eye movements prevalent in everyday life interact with the postural control system in older individuals. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of stationary gaze fixations, smooth pursuits, and saccadic eye movements, with combinations of absent, fixed and oscillating large-field visual backgrounds to generate different forms of retinal flow, on postural control in healthy young and older females. Participants were presented with computer generated visual stimuli, whilst postural sway and gaze fixations were simultaneously assessed with a force platform and eye tracking equipment, respectively. The results showed that fixed backgrounds and stationary gaze fixations attenuated postural sway. In contrast, oscillating backgrounds and smooth pursuits increased postural sway. There were no differences regarding saccades. There were also no differences in postural sway or gaze errors between age groups in any visual condition. The stabilizing effect of the fixed visual stimuli show how retinal flow and extraocular factors guide postural adjustments. The destabilizing effect of oscillating visual backgrounds and smooth pursuits may be related to more challenging conditions for determining body shifts from retinal flow, and more complex extraocular signals, respectively. Because the older participants matched the young group's performance in all conditions, decreases of posture and gaze control during stance may not be a direct consequence of healthy aging. Further research examining extraocular and retinal mechanisms of balance control and the effects of eye movements, during locomotion, is needed to better inform fall prevention interventions.

  19. Postural control during visual and kinesthetic motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, M; Guillot, A; Collet, C

    2011-03-01

    Despite the accumulating evidence supporting an interaction between cognitive functions and postural control, little is known about the selective impact of the mental representation of an action, i.e., motor imagery (MI) on postural control. As postural oscillations are reduced during a cognitive task of backward silent counting, a greater stability is also expected during MI compared to a no-task condition (standing). Twenty participants took part in this experiment, which aimed at providing evidence that MI may improve postural stability. They were requested to mentally imagine a movement while standing on a force-plate. Results showed a decrease in both path length and postural sway variability on the anterior-posterior and lateral axes during all dual-task sessions, as compared to the motionless condition. These postural adjustments might result from both central and peripheral processes, and/or increased muscle stiffness. Conversely, postural oscillation amplitude increased on the vertical axis during MI of three vertical jumps, hence suggesting that postural regulations remain task-related during MI. Finally, our data showed that kinesthetic and visual imagery differentially impacted the postural regulation.

  20. Transfer of postural adaptation depends on context of prior exposure.

    PubMed

    Pienciak-Siewert, Alison; Barletta, Anthony J; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2014-04-01

    Postural control is significantly affected by the postural base of support; however, the effects on postural adaptation are not well understood. Here we investigated how adaptation and transfer of anticipatory postural control are affected by stance width. Subjects made reaching movements in a novel dynamic environment while holding the handle of a force-generating robotic arm. Each subject initially adapted to the dynamics while standing in a wide stance and then switched to a narrow stance, or vice versa. Our hypothesis is that anticipatory postural control, reflected in center of pressure (COP) movement, is not affected by stance width, as long as the control remains within functional limits; therefore we predicted that subjects in either stance would show similar COP movement by the end of adaptation and immediately upon transfer to the other stance. We found that both groups showed similar adaptation of postural control, by using different muscle activation strategies to account for the differing stance widths. One group, after adapting in wide stance, transferred similar postural control to narrow stance, by modifying their muscle activity to account for the new stance. Interestingly, the other group showed an increase in postural control when transferring from narrow to wide stance, associated with no change in muscle activity. These results confirm that adaptation of anticipatory postural control is not affected by stance width, as long as the control remains within biomechanical limits. However, transfer of control between stance widths is affected by the initial context in which the task is learned.

  1. Eye Movements Affect Postural Control in Young and Older Females

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Neil M.; Bampouras, Theodoros M.; Donovan, Tim; Dewhurst, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Visual information is used for postural stabilization in humans. However, little is known about how eye movements prevalent in everyday life interact with the postural control system in older individuals. Therefore, the present study assessed the effects of stationary gaze fixations, smooth pursuits, and saccadic eye movements, with combinations of absent, fixed and oscillating large-field visual backgrounds to generate different forms of retinal flow, on postural control in healthy young and older females. Participants were presented with computer generated visual stimuli, whilst postural sway and gaze fixations were simultaneously assessed with a force platform and eye tracking equipment, respectively. The results showed that fixed backgrounds and stationary gaze fixations attenuated postural sway. In contrast, oscillating backgrounds and smooth pursuits increased postural sway. There were no differences regarding saccades. There were also no differences in postural sway or gaze errors between age groups in any visual condition. The stabilizing effect of the fixed visual stimuli show how retinal flow and extraocular factors guide postural adjustments. The destabilizing effect of oscillating visual backgrounds and smooth pursuits may be related to more challenging conditions for determining body shifts from retinal flow, and more complex extraocular signals, respectively. Because the older participants matched the young group's performance in all conditions, decreases of posture and gaze control during stance may not be a direct consequence of healthy aging. Further research examining extraocular and retinal mechanisms of balance control and the effects of eye movements, during locomotion, is needed to better inform fall prevention interventions. PMID:27695412

  2. Saccades Improve Postural Control: A Developmental Study in Normal Children

    PubMed Central

    Ajrezo, Layla; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Bucci, Maria Pia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dual-task performance is known to affect postural stability in children. This study focused on the effect of oculomotor tasks like saccadic eye movements on postural stability, studied in a large population of children by recording simultaneously their eye movements and posture. Materials and Methods Ninety-five healthy children from 5.8 to 17.6 years old were examined. All children were free of any vestibular, neurological, ophtalmologic and orthoptic abnormalities. Postural control was measured with a force platform TechnoConcept®, and eye movements with video oculography (MobilEBT®). Children performed two oculomotor tasks: fixation of a stable central target and horizontal saccades. We measured the saccade latency and the number of saccades during fixation as well as the surface, length and mean velocity of the center of pressure. Results During postural measurement, we observed a correlation between the age on the one hand and a decrease in saccade latency as well as an improvement in the quality of fixation on the other. Postural sway decreases with age and is reduced in the dual task (saccades) in comparison with a simple task of fixation. Discussion - Conclusion These results suggest a maturation of neural circuits controlling posture and eye movements during childhood. This study also shows the presence of an interaction between the oculomotor system and the postural system. Engaging in oculomotor tasks results in a reduction of postural sway. PMID:24278379

  3. A Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondale, Walter F.

    1973-01-01

    Article is a statement by Senator Walter F. Mondale, a Democrat from Minnesota, on the evaluation of social programs and a serious appraisal of social policy for the nation's children and their families. (Author/RK)

  4. UNITED STATES SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES IN AFRICA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    recommendations for future engagements. These recommendations include employing SOF using a persistent engagement posture , focusing on advanced...commitments.2 The U.S. shifted from what some called a history of “benign neglect” to a posture of “strategic engagement.”3 At the time of AFRICOM’s...reserves.6, 7 How do these interests translate into priorities for AFRICOM? General David Rodriguez, Commander AFRICOM, in his 2015 posture statement

  5. Integrated postural analysis in children with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Boccalandro, E; Pasta, G; Mannucci, P M; Santagostino, E; Peyvandi, F; Seuser, A; Mancuso, M E; Solimeno, L P

    2014-03-01

    The maintenance of a correct posture in haemophilic boys might contribute to prevent joint bleeds, chronic pain and dysfunction. This single-centre study was aimed at evaluating whether or not postural alterations are more common in haemophilic than in non-haemophilic boys and whether they are related to the orthopaedic status. Posture and balance were investigated in boys with severe/moderate haemophilia (cases) and in age-matched non-haemophilic peers (controls). Thirty-five cases (89% with haemophilia A: 74% with severe disease) were included in the study and compared with 57 controls. Posture was evaluated on digital pictures of anterior, lateral and posterior views of the habitual standing position. Balance was examined with a portable force platform with eyes open and closed. The trajectory of the total body centre of force (CoF) displacement over the platform was computed by multiple planes obtaining different measures: sway area, velocity, acceleration and body loads. The joint status of cases was assessed with the Haemophilia Joint Health Score. Cases were more disharmonic than controls (52% vs. 26% in controls; P = 0.04), swayed significantly less and more slowly than controls (P < 0.05 for several parameters of CoF displacement) revealing stiffness of the musculoskeletal system. However, they were able to maintain their stance within a similar sway area. Haemophilic boys have more postural disharmonies than non-haemophilic peers, hence a global evaluation of the orthopaedic status should include also balance and posture examination to identify early dysfunction and establish a tailored physical or rehabilitation programme.

  6. The influence of sounds on posture control.

    PubMed

    Siedlecka, Bożena; Sobera, Małgorzata; Sikora, Aleksandra; Drzewowska, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    It is still not clear which parameters of sound are the most significant for body reactions and whether the way of sound reception plays a role in body control. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of frequency, spectrum and loudness of sounds on posture control in healthy women and men. The study subjects were 29 young adults who were submitted to a 60-second standing test in the bipedal stance on the force platform (AMTI). During the tests, 3 sinusoidal sounds with various timing and 2 musical sounds (guitar and piano) of the frequency 225 Hz, 1000 Hz and 4000 Hz were applied through headphones. The centre of pressure (COP) amplitude was registered. The sway area and COP mean velocity were computed. It was found that high frequency sounds contributed to a significant decrease of sway area values. No significant influence of low frequency sounds on posture control was observed. The influence of the sound spectrum (timbre) on posture control is limited; only the crescendo spectrum improves the body stability in the bipedal stance and not the music spectrum as guitar and piano. The loudness of sound, although extremely high, is not the cause of postural control changing in relation to lower loudness. No effect of gender was found in terms of body stability under different sound conditions. Based on the results, it can be argued that, in general, in a bipedal stance in terms of stability high sound frequency improves posture control, whereas sound spectrum and intensity show a limited impact.

  7. Postural sway following cryotherapy in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Claudiane A; Duarte, Marcos; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    In light of the wide use of cryotherapy and its potential negative effects on postural stability, little is known about how postural sway is affected, particularly when the whole lower limb is immersed. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of cryotherapy on postural sway in healthy males. Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned into two intervention groups: control (tepid water at ∼26°C) or ice (cold water at ∼11°C). Postural sway was measured through the center of pressure (COP) position while they stood on a force plate during bipedal (70 s) and unipedal (40 s) conditions before and after the subjects were immersed in a water tub up to the umbilical level for 20 min. COP standard deviation (SD) and COP velocity were analyzed in the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions. Statistical analysis showed that in the bipedal condition cryotherapy increased the COP SD and COP velocity in the ML direction. During the unipedal condition, a higher COP velocity in the AP and ML directions was also reported. Our findings indicate that cryotherapy by immersing the whole lower limb should be used with caution before engaging in challenging postural control activities.

  8. Adaptation to transient postural perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Robert O.

    1992-01-01

    This research was first proposed in May, 1986, to focus on some of the problems encountered in the analysis of postural responses gathered from crewmembers. The ultimate driving force behind this line of research was the desire to treat, predict, or explain 'Space Adaptation Syndrome' (SAS) and hence circumvent any adverse effects of space motion sickness on crewmember performance. The aim of this project was to develop an easily implemented analysis of the transient responses to platform translation that can be elicited with a protocol designed to force sensorimotor reorganization, utilizing statistically reliable criterion measures. This report will present: (1) a summary of the activity that took place in each of the three funded years of the project; (2) discussion of experimental results and their implications for future research; and (3) a list of presentations and publications resulting from this project.

  9. Postural neck pain: an investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Edmondston, Stephen J; Chan, Hon Yan; Ngai, Gorman Chi Wing; Warren, M Linda R; Williams, Jonathan M; Glennon, Susan; Netto, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    Impairments of cervico-cephalic kinaesthesia and habitual forward head posture have been considered important in the aetiology of postural neck pain, yet these factors have not been specifically examined in a homogeneous clinical population. The objective of this study was to compare the habitual sitting posture (HSP), perception of good posture and postural repositioning error (PRE) of the cervico-thoracic (CT) spine in individuals with postural neck pain, with a matched group of asymptomatic subjects. Twenty-one subjects with postural neck pain and 22 asymptomatic control subjects were recruited into the study. An optical motion analysis system was used to measure the HSP and perceived 'good' sitting posture. PRE was measured over six trials where the subject attempted to replicate their self-selected 'good' posture. There was no difference between the groups in the HSP but significant differences were identified in the perception of 'good' posture. Posture repositioning error was higher for the head posture variables than for CT and shoulder girdle variables in both groups. However, there was no significant difference in posture repositioning error between groups for any of the posture measures. The findings suggest that individuals with postural neck pain may have a different perception of 'good' posture, but no significant difference in HSP or kinaesthetic sensibility compared with matched asymptomatic subjects.

  10. Selection and control of limb posture for stability.

    PubMed

    Franklin, David W; Selen, Luc P J; Franklin, Sae; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Impedance control can be used to stabilize the limb against both instability and unpredictable perturbations. Limb posture influences motor noise, energy usage and limb impedance as well as their interaction. Here we examine whether subjects use limb posture as part of a mechanism to regulate limb stability. Subjects performed stabilization tasks while attached to a two dimensional robotic manipulandum which generated a virtual environment. Subjects were instructed that they could perform the stabilization task anywhere in the workspace, while the chosen postures were tracked as subjects repeated the task. In order to investigate the mechanisms behind the chosen limb postures, simulations of the neuro-mechanical system were performed. The results indicate that posture selection is performed to provide energy efficiency in the presence of force variability.

  11. Grasp posture alters visual processing biases near the hands

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Observers experience biases in visual processing for objects within easy reach of their hands that may assist them in evaluating items that are candidates for action. I investigated the hypothesis that hand postures affording different types of actions differentially bias vision. Across three experiments, participants performed global motion detection and global form perception tasks while their hands were positioned a) near the display in a posture affording a power grasp, b) near the display in a posture affording a precision grasp, or c) in their laps. Although the power grasp posture facilitated performance on the motion task, the precision grasp posture instead facilitated performance on the form task. These results suggest that the visual system weights processing based on an observer’s current affordances for specific actions: fast and forceful power grasps enhance temporal sensitivity, while detail-oriented precision grasps enhance spatial sensitivity. PMID:25862545

  12. Control of posture during tasks representing common work-related postures - a reliability study.

    PubMed

    Mani, Ramakrishnan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Sullivan, S John

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of control of posture using a task battery that represents work-related postural conditions is highly recommended for providing a comprehensive understanding of collective postural demands. However, dearth of evidence exists on the reliability of a task battery, thus precluding its use as an outcome measure in field research. This study investigated the intrasession reliability and systematic variation of force plate derived centre of pressure (COP) measures obtained during repeated performance of a task battery (lifting task, limits of stability and bipedal and unipedal stance). COP signals obtained during each task performance were processed to derive various time-domain COP measures. Statistical analyses revealed that 13 of the 19 COP measures displayed excellent relative (ICC(2,3) ≥ 0.75) and acceptable absolute reliability (SEM%: ≤ 10). Although COP measures displayed systematic variation, the differences were less or equal to the measurement error, except COP measures of unipedal stance and limits of stability. The chosen task battery is reliable and can be used for comprehensive evaluation of control of posture, in both field and laboratory research. Practitioner Summary: Repeated evaluation of multiple tasks together sequentially could introduce measurement variability. This study investigated intrasession reliability of a task battery representing common work-related postures. The chosen task battery was found to be reliable with acceptable measurement error and can be used in field research settings for evaluation of control of posture.

  13. Postural stability and occlusal status among Japanese elderly.

    PubMed

    Song-Yu, Xuan; Rodis, Omar M M; Ogata, Sagiri; Can-Hu, Jin; Nishimura, Michiko; Matsumura, Seishi

    2012-06-01

    There are still no data available on the relationship between postural stability and occlusal status among the elderly. To examine relationships between postural stability and occlusal status through a cohort study among elderly Japanese. Oral examination, occlusal status, postural stability and a questionnaire were conducted and given to 87 community-dwelling Japanese at enrolment. The average occlusal pressure of the female group was statistically higher than the male group while average occlusal pressure and postural stability length were lesser in the group with more remaining teeth. Postural stability area and number of remaining teeth showed statistically significant correlations. Postural stability length was lesser in the group with strong occlusal force. Furthermore, the number of decayed teeth was fewer in the good hygiene group. This study identified a close relationship between occlusal status and postural stability of Japanese older individuals. Occlusal hypofunction was observed more in those with occlusal problems, and a decrease in their occlusal functions resulted in postural instability. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Oculomotor tasks affect differently postural control in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Ajrezo, Layla; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette

    2015-11-01

    Eye movements affect postural stability in children. The present study focuses on the effect of different types of eye movements on postural stability in healthy children. Both eye movements and postural stability have been recorded in 51 healthy children from 6.3 to 15.5 years old. Eye movements were recorded binocularly with a video oculography (MobilEBT(®)), and postural stability was measured while child was standing on a force platform (TechnoConcept(®)). Children performed three oculomotor tasks: saccades, pursuits and reading a text silently. We measured the number of saccades made in the three oculomotor tasks, the number of words read, and the surface area, the length and mean velocity of the center of pressure (CoP). According to previous studies, postural control improves with age until 10-12 years. Saccades toward a target as well as during a reading task reduce significantly the CoP displacement and its velocity, while during pursuit eye movements all children increase postural parameters (i.e., the surface area, the length and mean velocity of the CoP). These results suggest the presence of an interaction between the oculomotor control and the postural system. Visual attention to perform saccades (to stationary targets or to words) influences postural stability more than the frequency of saccade triggering does.

  15. Biomechanical assessment of human posture: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Rosário, José Luís Pimentel do

    2014-07-01

    Postural deviations have been linked to a series of different kinds of pain and dysfunction. However, posture is not an easy subject to study, mainly because postural assessments are still scientifically inaccurate, such as photography, or expensive, such as MRI, whereas others, such as X-ray, involve radiation problems. The aim of this literature review was to search for new scientific methods for assessing posture and to discuss which among both new and old methods are best for scientific and clinical objectives. The Medline and Lilacs databases were searched for the period 2003 to 2013 with the use of the following keywords: "posture" and "postural." A total of 452 articles that assessed posture in some way were found. Twenty-two articles were selected, and 11 relevant types of technologies were described. The relevant technologies discussed were force plate; pictures; goniometers, inclinometers, tape, and other devices; 3D analysis; 3D X-ray; sensors; electromyography; Kinect; magnetic resonance imaging; 4D computed tomography; and infrared. There is enough technology to make a very good quantitative evaluation possible. For example, the 3D MRI or the 4D CT can register static and dynamic posture. Other cheaper solutions may use combined and synchronized equipments. However, these synchronizations still require validation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Joint Force Cyberspace Component Command: Establishing Cyberspace Operations Unity of Effort for the Joint Force Commander

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    to protect DoD networks and systems. Recognizing the user as the first line of defense, the DoD plans to improve internal “cyber hygiene ” practices...sequels requires a full understanding of an adversary’s cyberspace posture and capabilities. This includes not only the network infrastructure, but...2012.235 In his 2014 Posture Statement to the House Armed Services Committee Statement, Commander, United States Pacific Command, Admiral Samuel J

  17. Multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Turcot, Katia; Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Suvà, Domizio; Armand, Stéphane

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated balance impairment in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Although it is currently accepted that postural control depends on multi-joint coordination, no study has previously considered this postural strategy in patients suffering from knee OA. The objectives of this study were to investigate the multi-joint postural behavior in patients with knee OA and to evaluate the association with clinical outcomes. Eighty-seven patients with knee OA and twenty-five healthy elderly were recruited to the study. A motion analysis system and two force plates were used to investigate the joint kinematics (trunk and lower body segments), the lower body joint moments, the vertical ground reaction force ratio and the center of pressure (COP) during a quiet standing task. Pain, functional capacity and quality of life status were also recorded. Patients with symptomatic and severe knee OA adopt a more flexed posture at all joint levels in comparison with the control group. A significant difference in the mean ratio was found between groups, showing an asymmetric weight distribution in patients with knee OA. A significant decrease in the COP range in the anterior-posterior direction was also observed in the group of patients. Only small associations were observed between postural impairments and clinical outcomes. This study brings new insights regarding the postural behavior of patients with severe knee OA during a quiet standing task. The results confirm the multi-joint asymmetric posture adopted by this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Postural alterations and pulmonary function of mouth-breathing children.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Waleska da; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Guimarães, Fernando Silva; Menezes, Sara Lucia Siveira de

    2010-01-01

    Mouth-breathing children have changes in their stomatognathic system, which result in head projection, stress increase in the scapular belt muscles and postural adaptations. Although thoracic shape and posture can influence ventilatory dynamics, we didn't find studies addressing pulmonary function of mouth-breathing children. this study aimed at analyzing the posture of mouth-breathing children, and studying the existence of correlations between posture and pulmonary volumes. prospective, observational and cross-sectional study, where the posture and pulmonary function of 17 mouth-breathing children and of 17 nasal-breathing children were evaluated by means of photogrammetry and forced spirometry. when compared to nasal-breathing, mouth-breathing subjects presented an increment in head projection and cervical lordosis, forwarded gravity center and reduced pulmonary volumes. There was an association between head projection and forced vital capacity, and between postural alterations and age. mouth-breathing children have postural alterations which increases with age and also reduced spirometry values. The vital capacity reduction correlates negatively with head projection.

  19. Body posture recognition and turning recording system for the care of bed bound patients.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Rong-Shue; Mi, Zhenqiang; Yang, Bo-Ru; Kau, Lih-Jen; Bitew, Mekuanint Agegnehu; Li, Tzu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes body posture recognition and turning recording system for assisting the care of bed bound patients in nursing homes. The system continuously detects the patient's body posture and records the length of time for each body posture. If the patient remains in the same body posture long enough to develop pressure ulcers, the system notifies caregivers to change the patient's body posture. The objective of recording is to provide the log of body turning for querying of patients' family members. In order to accurately detect patient's body posture, we developed a novel pressure sensing pad which contains force sensing resistor sensors. Based on the proposed pressure sensing pad, we developed a bed posture recognition module which includes a bed posture recognition algorithm. The algorithm is based on fuzzy theory. The body posture recognition algorithm can detect the patient's bed posture whether it is right lateral decubitus, left lateral decubitus, or supine. The detected information of patient's body posture can be then transmitted to the server of healthcare center by the communication module to perform the functions of recording and notification. Experimental results showed that the average posture recognition accuracy for our proposed module is 92%.

  20. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  1. Ergonomic analysis of working posture in nursing personnel: example of modified Ovako Working Analysis System application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Chiou, W K

    1995-02-01

    A postural analysis system was developed using a biomechanical approach to identify low back pain related working postures of nursing personnel. The Ovako Working Analysis System (OWAS) was modified for doing postural recording. Chaffin's biomechanical model was used to calculate the associated work stress on the L5/S1. The system was applied to examine the working postures of 64 nurses of 16 departments. The frequency distribution of the trunk showed 15.9% of the 8,629 observed postures were bending more than 15 degrees. Based on the calculated stress, 17.0% of the observed postures generated forces higher than the recommended action limit of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition to patient transfers, potentially health hazardous postures were identified in nursing tasks of inspection, nursing techniques, instrumentation, physical examination, taking inventory, and documentation.

  2. Physics-based seated posture prediction for pregnant women and validation considering ground and seat pan contacts.

    PubMed

    Howard, Bradley; Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, Jingzhou James

    2012-07-01

    An understanding of human seated posture is important across many fields of scientific research. Certain demographics, such as pregnant women, have special postural limitations that need to be considered. Physics-based posture prediction is a tool in which seated postures can be quickly and thoroughly analyzed, as long the predicted postures are realistic. This paper proposes and validates an optimization formulation to predict seated posture for pregnant women considering ground and seat pan contacts. For the optimization formulation, the design variables are joint angles (posture); the cost function is dependent on joint torques. Constraints include joint limits, joint torque limits, the distances from the end-effectors to target points, and self-collision avoidance constraints. Three different joint torque cost functions have been investigated to account for the special postural characteristics of pregnant women and consider the support reaction forces (SRFs) associated with seated posture. Postures are predicted for three different reaching tasks in common reaching directions using each of the objective function formulations. The predicted postures are validated against experimental postures obtained using motion capture. A linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the validity of the predicted postures and was the criteria for comparison between the different objective functions. A 56 degree of freedom model was used for the posture prediction. Use of the objective function minimizing the maximum normalized joint torque provided an R² value of 0.828, proving superior to either of two alternative functions.

  3. Body posture and syndromes of back pain.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Nowotny-Czupryna, Olga; Brzęk, Anna; Kowalczyk, Anna; Czupryna, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The effects of faulty postures include disturbances of the symmetric distribution of compressive and tensile forces acting on both sides of the body axis and the emergence of harmful shear forces. The torques of antigravity muscles also change unfavourably. This may lead to the development of a repetitive strain syndrome, stenosis of intervertebral foramina, compression of nerve roots and back pain. The development of back pain syndromes is significantly affected by the performance of various work-related tasks in non-ergonomic positions. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between back pain syndromes and the quality of body posture, especially in the context of work ergonomics. The study enrolled 125 persons: 39 adults with a childhood history of scoliosis, 39 midwives, and 47 physiotherapists. Body posture was assessed in all participants. In midwives and physiotherapists, body position during the performance of work-related tasks was also evaluated. The frequency and severity of pain was assessed with the Jackson-Moskowitz measure. The study revealed that over 80% of the participants suffered from spinal pain. In most cases, the pain was intermittent and was felt in the lumbar spine. The occurrence of pain among midwives and physiotherapists was not directly dependent on the predominant type of abnormal spinal position assumed during the performance of occupational tasks or the quality of body posture. The complaint was also reported by ca. 85% of persons with a history of scoliosis. An incorrect body posture (especially scoliosis) and performance of work-related tasks in non-ergonomic positions increase the probability of back pain.

  4. The effect of Parkinson's disease and levodopa on adaptation of anticipatory postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Hall, L M; Brauer, S G; Horak, F; Hodges, P W

    2013-10-10

    Postural support alters anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Efficient adaptation to changes in postural support in reactive and centrally initiated postural synergies is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examined whether APAs are affected differently by familiar and novel supports in people with PD, ON and OFF levodopa. The effect of PD and levodopa on the ability to immediately adapt APAs to changes in support and refine with practice was also investigated. Fourteen people with PD and 14 healthy control participants performed 20 single rapid leg lift tasks in four support conditions: unsupported, bilateral handgrip (familiar), bite plate (novel) and a combined handgrip+bite plate condition. APAs, identified from force plate data, were characterized by an increase in the vertical ground reaction force under the lifted leg as a result of a shift of weight toward the stance limb. Results showed the ability to incorporate familiar and novel external supports into the postural strategy was preserved in PD. Controls and PD patients in the OFF state further refined the postural strategy with practice as evidenced by changes in amplitude of vertical ground reaction forces and forces applied to support apparatus within conditions between the initial and final trials. In the ON state, people with PD failed to refine the use of postural supports in any condition. The results suggest that immediate postural adaptation is intact in people with PD and unaffected by levodopa administration but the ability to refine postural adaptations with task experience is compromised by dopamine therapy.

  5. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is a disease characterized by excessively increased heart rate during orthostatic challenge associated with symptoms of orthostatic intolerance including dizziness, exercise intolerance, headache, fatigue, memory problems, nausea, blurred vision, pallor, and sweating, which improve with recumbence. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome patients may present with a multitude of additional symptoms that are attributable to vascular vasoconstriction. Observed signs and symptoms in a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome include tachycardia at rest, exaggerated heart rate increase with upright position and exercise, crushing chest pain, tremor, syncope, loss of vision, confusion, migraines, fatigue, heat intolerance, parasthesia, dysesthesia, allodynia, altered traditional senses, and thermoregulatory abnormalities. There are a number of possible dermatological manifestations of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome easily explained by its recently discovered pathophysiology. The author reports the case of a 22-year-old woman with moderate-to-severe postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with numerous dermatological manifestations attributable to the disease process. The cutaneous manifestations observed in this patient are diverse and most noticeable during postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome flares. The most distinct are evanescent, hyperemic, sharply demarcated, irregular patches on the chest and neck area that resolve upon diascopy. This distinct “evanescent hyperemia” disappears spontaneously after seconds to minutes and reappears unexpectedly. Other observed dermatological manifestations of this systemic disease include Raynaud’s phenomenon, koilonychia, onychodystrophy, madarosis, dysesthesia, allodynia, telogen effluvium, increased capillary refill time, and livedo reticularis. The treatment of this disease poses a great challenge. The author reports the unprecedented use of an

  6. Enhancing digital driver models: identification of distinct postural strategies used by drivers.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Gyouhyung; Nussbaum, Maury A; Babski-Reeves, Kari L

    2010-03-01

    Driver workspace design and evaluation is, in part, based on assumed driving postures of users and determines several ergonomic aspects of a vehicle, such as reach, visibility and postural comfort. Accurately predicting and specifying standard driving postures, hence, are necessary to improve the ergonomic quality of the driver workspace. In this study, a statistical clustering approach was employed to reduce driving posture simulation/prediction errors, assuming that drivers use several distinct postural strategies when interacting with automobiles. 2-D driving postures, described by 16 joint angles, were obtained from 38 participants with diverse demographics (age, gender) and anthropometrics (stature, body mass) and in two vehicle classes (sedans and SUVs). Based on the proximity of joint angle sets, cluster analysis yielded three predominant postural strategies in each vehicle class (i.e. 'lower limb flexed', 'upper limb flexed' and 'extended'). Mean angular differences between clusters ranged from 3.8 to 52.4 degrees for the majority of joints, supporting the practical relevance of the distinct clusters. The existence of such postural strategies should be considered when utilising digital human models (DHMs) to enhance and evaluate driver workspace design ergonomically and proactively. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study identified drivers' distinct postural strategies, based on actual drivers' behaviours. Such strategies can facilitate accurate positioning of DHMs and hence help design ergonomic driver workspaces.

  7. The influence of training on decision times and errors associated with classifying trunk postures using video-based posture assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Weir, Patricia L; Andrews, David M; van Wyk, Paula M; Callaghan, Jack P

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of training on the decision times and errors associated with video-based trunk posture classifications. Altogether, 30 amateur and 30 knowledge-based participants completed a three-phase study (pre-training, training, post-training) that required them to classify static trunk postures in images on a computer screen into a posture category that represented the angle of the trunk depicted. Trunk postures were presented in both flexion/extension and lateral bend views and at several distances from the boundaries of the posture categories. Both decision time and errors decreased as distance from the boundaries increased. On average, amateur analysts experienced a larger decrease in decision time per posture classification than knowledge-based analysts (amateur: 0.79 s, knowledge-based: 0.60 s; p <0.05) suggesting that training can have beneficial effects on classification performance. The implications are that the analysis time associated with video-based posture assessment methods can be reduced with appropriate training, making this type of approach feasible for larger-scale field studies. Statement of Relevance:Understanding the role that training can play in reducing errors associated with the use of video-based posture assessment methods may result in more efficient use of these tools by ergonomic practitioners. Reducing decision time and misclassification errors will provide a more efficient, accurate and representative assessment of injury risk.

  8. Management of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) and vasovagal syncope (VVS) are relatively common clinical syndromes that are seen by physicians in several disciplines. They are often not well recognised and are poorly understood by physicians, are associated with significant morbidity and cause significant frustration for both patients and their physicians. The 2015 Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia and Vasovagal Syncope provides physicians with an introduction to these disorders and initial recommendations on their investigation and treatment. Here we summarise the consensus statement to help physicians in the management of patients with these frequently distressing problems. PMID:27617091

  9. Optimal Alignment of Search and Rescue Response Posture with Historical Incident Occurrence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Optimal alignment of search and rescue response posture with historical incident occurrence Bohdan L. Kaluzny CJOC OR&A DRDC – Centre for Operational...response posture with historical incident occurrence Bohdan L. Kaluzny CJOC OR&A DRDC – Centre for Operational Research and Analysis Defence Research...posture of the responding SAR unit. The study was part of a Director Air Force Readiness initiative to determine the cost -benefit of increasing the RP30

  10. Postural perturbations: new insights for treatment of balance disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horak, F. B.; Henry, S. M.; Shumway-Cook, A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews the neural control of posture as understood through studies of automatic responses to mechanical perturbations. Recent studies of responses to postural perturbations have provided a new view of how postural stability is controlled, and this view has profound implications for physical therapy practice. We discuss the implications for rehabilitation of balance disorders and demonstrate how an understanding of the specific systems underlying postural control can help to focus and enrich our therapeutic approaches. By understanding the basic systems underlying control of balance, such as strategy selection, rapid latencies, coordinated temporal spatial patterns, force control, and context-specific adaptations, therapists can focus their treatment on each patient's specific impairments. Research on postural responses to surface translations has shown that balance is not based on a fixed set of equilibrium reflexes but on a flexible, functional motor skill that can adapt with training and experience. More research is needed to determine the extent to which quantification of automatic postural responses has practical implications for predicting falls in patients with constraints in their postural control system.

  11. Postural perturbations: new insights for treatment of balance disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horak, F. B.; Henry, S. M.; Shumway-Cook, A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews the neural control of posture as understood through studies of automatic responses to mechanical perturbations. Recent studies of responses to postural perturbations have provided a new view of how postural stability is controlled, and this view has profound implications for physical therapy practice. We discuss the implications for rehabilitation of balance disorders and demonstrate how an understanding of the specific systems underlying postural control can help to focus and enrich our therapeutic approaches. By understanding the basic systems underlying control of balance, such as strategy selection, rapid latencies, coordinated temporal spatial patterns, force control, and context-specific adaptations, therapists can focus their treatment on each patient's specific impairments. Research on postural responses to surface translations has shown that balance is not based on a fixed set of equilibrium reflexes but on a flexible, functional motor skill that can adapt with training and experience. More research is needed to determine the extent to which quantification of automatic postural responses has practical implications for predicting falls in patients with constraints in their postural control system.

  12. Postural ability reflects the athletic skill level of surfers.

    PubMed

    Paillard, Thierry; Margnes, Eric; Portet, Mathieu; Breucq, Arnaud

    2011-08-01

    This work analyses surfers' postural control and their use of visual information in static (stable) and dynamic (unstable) postures according to their level of competition. Two groups of healthy surfers were investigated: a group of local level surfers (LOC) (n = 8) and a group of national/international level surfers (NIN) (n = 9). Posture was assessed by measuring the centre of foot pressure with a force platform for 50 s with stable support and for 25 s with unstable support (sagittal or frontal plane). The tests were completed with the eyes open (the subjects looked at a fixed level target at a distance of 2 m) and closed (they kept their gaze in a straight-ahead direction). Results showed that the contribution of vision in postural maintenance, with unstable support was less important in the NIN surfers than in the LOC surfers and that the NIN surfers had better postural control than the LOC surfers. Firstly, the results suggest that expert surfers could shift the sensorimotor dominance from vision to proprioception for postural maintenance. Secondly, there is a relationship between the postural ability and the competition level of surfers. These observations are likely to induce new prospects of training for surfers.

  13. Gravitational Effects upon Locomotion Posture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John K.; Bentley, Jason R.; Edwards, W. Brent; Perusek, Gail P.; Samorezov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Researchers use actual microgravity (AM) during parabolic flight and simulated microgravity (SM) obtained with horizontal suspension analogs to better understand the effect of gravity upon gait. In both environments, the gravitational force is replaced by an external load (EL) that returns the subject to the treadmill. However, when compared to normal gravity (N), researchers consistently find reduced ground reaction forces (GRF) and subtle kinematic differences (Schaffner et al., 2005). On the International Space Station, the EL is applied by elastic bungees attached to a waist and shoulder harness. While bungees can provide EL approaching body weight (BW), their force-length characteristics coupled with vertical oscillations of the body during gait result in a variable load. However, during locomotion in N, the EL is consistently equal to 100% body weight. Comparisons between AM and N have shown that during running, GRF are decreased in AM (Schaffner et al, 2005). Kinematic evaluations in the past have focussed on joint range of motion rather than joint posture at specific instances of the gait cycle. The reduced GRF in microgravity may be a result of differing hip, knee, and ankle positions during contact. The purpose of this investigation was to compare joint angles of the lower extremities during walking and running in AM, SM, and N. We hypothesized that in AM and SM, joints would be more flexed at heel strike (HS), mid-stance (MS) and toe-off (TO) than in N.

  14. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Garg, R; Ritch, A; Sarkar, P

    2007-07-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is an autonomic disturbance which has become better understood in recent years. It is now thought to encompass a group of disorders that have similar clinical features, such as orthostatic intolerance, but individual distinguishing parameters--for example, blood pressure and pulse rate. The clinical picture, diagnosis, and management of POTS are discussed.

  15. Posture and Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TP3 includes short reports on: (1) Modification of Goal-Directed Arm Movements During Inflight Adaptation to Microgravity; (2) Quantitative Analysis of Motion control in Long Term Microgravity; (3) Does the Centre of Gravity Remain the Stabilised Reference during Complex Human Postural Equilibrium Tasks in Weightlessness?; and (4) Arm End-Point Trajectories Under Normal and Microgravity Environments.

  16. Measuring postural control during mini-squat posture in men with early knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Petrella, M; Gramani-Say, K; Serrão, P R M S; Lessi, G C; Barela, J A; Carvalho, R P; Mattiello, S M

    2017-02-06

    Studies have suggested a compromised postural control in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) evidenced by larger and faster displacement of center of pressure (COP). However, quantification of postural control in the mini-squat posture performed by patients with early knee OA and its relation to muscle strength and self-reported symptoms have not been investigated. The main aim of this cross-sectional, observational, controlled study was to determine whether postural control in the mini-squat posture differs between individuals with early knee OA and a control group (CG) and verify the relation among knee extensor torque (KET) and self-reported physical function, stiffness and pain. Twenty four individuals with knee OA grades I and II (OAG) (mean age: 52.35±5.00) and twenty subjects without knee injuries (CG) (mean age: 51.40±8.07) participated in this study. Participants were assessed in postural control through a force plate (Bertec Mod. USA), which provided information about the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) COP displacement during the mini-squat, in isometric, concentric and eccentric knee extensor torque (KET) (90°/s) through an isokinetic dynamometer (BiodexMulti-Joint System3, Biodex Medical Incorporation, New York, NY, USA), and in self-reported symptoms through the WOMAC questionnaire. The main outcomes measured were the AP and ML COP amplitude and velocity of displacement; isometric, concentric, and eccentric KET and self-reported physical function, stiffness and pain. No significant differences were found between groups for postural control (p>0.05). Significant lower eccentric KET (p=0.01) and higher scores for the WOMAC subscales of pain (p=<0.001), stiffness (p=0.001) and physical function (p<0.001) were found for the OAG. Moderate and negative correlations were found between the AP COP amplitude of displacement and physical function (ρ=-0.40, p=0.02). Moderate and negative correlations were observed between the AP COP

  17. 48 CFR 552.270-24 - Statement of Lease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statement of Lease. 552... Statement of Lease. As prescribed in 570.603, insert the following clause: Statement of Lease (SEP 1999) (a... this clause and, if such is the case, that (1) the lease is in full force and effect; and (2) the...

  18. Postural control in women with breast hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Alessandra Ferreira; Raggi, Gabriela Cristina; dos Santos Cardoso Sá, Cristina; Costa, Márcio Paulino; de Lima, Jonas Eraldo; Tanaka, Clarice

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The consequences of breast hypertrophy have been described based on the alteration of body mass distribution, leading to an impact on psychological and physical aspects. The principles of motor control suggest that breast hypertrophy can lead to sensorimotor alterations and the impairment of body balance due to postural misalignment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the postural control of women with breast hypertrophy under different sensory information conditions. METHOD: This cross-sectional study included 14 women with breast hypertrophy and 14 without breast hypertrophy, and the mean ages of the groups were 39±15 years and 39±16 years, respectively. A force platform was used to assess the sensory systems that contribute to postural control: somatosensory, visual and vestibular. Four postural conditions were sequentially tested: eyes open and fixed platform, eyes closed and fixed platform, eyes open and mobile platform, and eyes closed and mobile platform. The data were processed, and variables related to the center of pressure were analyzed for each condition. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the conditions between the groups for the area of center of pressure displacement and the velocity of center of pressure displacement in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. The alpha level error was set at 0.05. RESULTS: Women with breast hypertrophy presented an area that was significantly higher for three out of four conditions and a higher velocity of center of pressure displacement in the anterior-posterior direction under two conditions: eyes open and mobile platform and eyes closed and mobile platform. CONCLUSIONS: Women with breast hypertrophy have altered postural control, which was demonstrated by the higher area and velocity of center of pressure displacement. PMID:22892919

  19. Postural dependence of human locomotion during gait initiation

    PubMed Central

    Mille, Marie-Laure; Simoneau, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The initiation of human walking involves postural motor actions for body orientation and balance stabilization that must be effectively integrated with locomotion to allow safe and efficient transport. Our ability to coordinately adapt these functions to environmental or bodily changes through error-based motor learning is essential to effective performance. Predictive compensations for postural perturbations through anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) that stabilize mediolateral (ML) standing balance normally precede and accompany stepping. The temporal sequencing between these events may involve neural processes that suppress stepping until the expected stability conditions are achieved. If so, then an unexpected perturbation that disrupts the ML APAs should delay locomotion. This study investigated how the central nervous system (CNS) adapts posture and locomotion to perturbations of ML standing balance. Healthy human adults initiated locomotion while a resistance force was applied at the pelvis to perturb posture. In experiment 1, using random perturbations, step onset timing was delayed relative to the APA onset indicating that locomotion was withheld until expected stability conditions occurred. Furthermore, stepping parameters were adapted with the APAs indicating that motor prediction of the consequences of the postural changes likely modified the step motor command. In experiment 2, repetitive postural perturbations induced sustained locomotor aftereffects in some parameters (i.e., step height), immediate but rapidly readapted aftereffects in others, or had no aftereffects. These results indicated both rapid but transient reactive adaptations in the posture and gait assembly and more durable practice-dependent changes suggesting feedforward adaptation of locomotion in response to the prevailing postural conditions. PMID:25231611

  20. Postural adjustment after an unexpected perturbation in children with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    De Souza, F M B; Pereira, R P; Minuque, N P; Do Carmo, C M; De Mello, M H M; Villaça, P; Tanaka, C

    2012-05-01

    Children with haemophilia often bleed inside joints and muscles, which may impair postural adjustments. These postural adjustments are necessary to control postural balance during daily activities. The inability to quickly recover postural balance could elevate the risk of bleeding. To determine whether children with haemophilia have impaired postural adjustment after an unexpected perturbation compared with healthy children. Twenty children with haemophilia comprised the haemophilic group (HG), and 20 healthy, age-paired children comprised the control group (CG). Subjects stood on a force plate, and 4% of the subjects' body weight was applied via a pulley system to a belt around the subjects' trunks. The centre of pressure (COP) displacement was measured after the weight was unexpectedly released to produce a controlled postural perturbation followed by postural adjustment to recover balance. The subjects' postural adjustments in eight subsequent intervals of 1 s (t1-t8), beginning with the moment of weight removal, were compared among intervals and between groups. The applied perturbation magnitudes were the same for both groups, and no difference was observed between the groups in t1. However, the COP displacement in t2 in the HG was significantly higher than in the CG. No differences were observed between the groups in the other intervals. Within-group analysis showed that the COP was higher in t2 than in t4 (P = 0.016), t5 (P = 0.001) and t8 (P = 0.050) in the HG. No differences were observed among intervals in the CG. Children with haemophilia demonstrated differences in postural adjustment while undergoing unexpected balance perturbations when compared with healthily children.

  1. Static Postural Control in Youth With Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type I.

    PubMed

    Pouliot-Laforte, Annie; Lemay, Martin; Rauch, Frank; Veilleux, Louis-Nicolas

    2017-04-19

    To assess static postural control in eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions in individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I as compared with typically developing (TD) individuals and to explore the relation between postural control and lower limb muscle function. Cross-sectional study. Outpatient department of a pediatric orthopedic hospital. A convenience sample (N=38) of individuals with OI type I (n=22; mean age, 13.1y; range, 6-21y) and TD individuals (n=16; mean age, 13.1y; range, 6-20y) was selected. Participants were eligible if they were between 6 and 21 years and if they did not have any fracture or surgery in the lower limb in the 12 months before testing. Not applicable. Postural control was assessed through static balance tests and muscle function through mechanographic tests on a force platform. Selected postural parameters were path length, velocity, 90% confidence ellipse area, and the ellipse's length of the mediolateral and anteroposterior axes. Mechanographic parameters were peak force and peak power as measured using the multiple two-legged hopping and the single two-legged jump test, respectively. Individuals with OI type I had poorer postural control than did TD individuals as indicated by longer and faster displacements and a larger ellipse area. Muscle function was unrelated to postural control in the OI group. Removing visual information resulted in a larger increase in postural control parameters in the OI group than in the TD group. A proprioceptive deficit could explain poorer postural control in individuals with OI type I. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Mineral Resource Management Plan. Potential Exploration, Development, and Production of Oil and Gas Resources; Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    the best combination of chemical and physical characteristics for producing food, feed, forage, fiber, and oil - seed crops, and is also available or...OF THE AIR FORCE BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND POTENTIAL EXPLORATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND PRODUCTION OF OIL AND GAS RESOURCES...and national defense activities. Because the development of oil and gas on Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) could adversely affect the base’s missions

  3. Postural Analysis in Time and Frequency Domains in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Rigoldi, Chiara; Celletti, Claudia; Mainardi, Luca; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to analyze postural control in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) participants in time and frequency domain. This study considered a pathological group composed by 22 EDS participants performing a postural test consisting in maintaining standing position over a force platform for 30 s in two conditions: open eyes (OE) and closed…

  4. Postural Analysis in Time and Frequency Domains in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Rigoldi, Chiara; Celletti, Claudia; Mainardi, Luca; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to analyze postural control in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) participants in time and frequency domain. This study considered a pathological group composed by 22 EDS participants performing a postural test consisting in maintaining standing position over a force platform for 30 s in two conditions: open eyes (OE) and closed…

  5. Decreasing Internal Focus of Attention Improves Postural Control during Quiet Standing in Young Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nafati, Gilel; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate whether and how decreasing the amount of attentional focus invested in postural control could affect bipedal postural control. Twelve participants were asked to stand upright as immobile as possible on a force platform in one control condition and one cognitive condition. In the latter condition, they…

  6. Decreasing Internal Focus of Attention Improves Postural Control during Quiet Standing in Young Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nafati, Gilel; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate whether and how decreasing the amount of attentional focus invested in postural control could affect bipedal postural control. Twelve participants were asked to stand upright as immobile as possible on a force platform in one control condition and one cognitive condition. In the latter condition, they…

  7. Cortico-muscular coupling in a patient with postural myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Kristeva, Rumyana; Popa, Traian; Chakarov, Vihren; Hummel, Sibylla

    2004-08-19

    We investigated the cortico-muscular coherence in a patient with posturally induced cortically originating negative myoclonus. We recorded simultaneously 50 channels EEG and EMG from quadriceps and biceps femoris muscles of the left upper leg. Three experimental conditions were investigated with the patient in a seated position: (i) recording during rest (Rest), (ii) recording while the patient had to hold his left leg horizontally stretched out (Postural), and (iii) recording while the patient had to hold his left leg horizontally stretched out against a vertical force (Postural against force). Coherence, phase difference and cumulant density were computed as indicators for cortico-muscular coupling. The cortical component preceding the silent period was shown by averaging and was reconstructed. During postural and postural against force conditions, the EEG over the vertex was significantly coherent with EMG, in alpha (7-15 Hz) and beta range (15-30 Hz). The strongest coherence peak was at 21 Hz. No high-frequency coherence was observed. The phase difference and the cumulant density estimate corresponded to a 32 ms time lag between motor cortex and muscles, with EEG leading. The broadening of the coherence spectrum at which the motor cortex drives the muscles together with the excessive coherence levels and the giant SEP could reflect the hyperexcitability of the sensorimotor cortex. The frequency content of the coherence may be characteristic for this type of myoclonus. The results lend support to the view that the frequency analysis may have some diagnostic potential in cortical myoclonus.

  8. Stand Up Straight: Posture for Singers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, Delores R.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the importance of posture in music-making. Provides information on the importance of posture and the different types of posture stances to help students work toward better posture. Includes information on using kinesthetic experiences to help students improve their posture. (CMK)

  9. Posture Statement of the United States Army 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-10

    achieve cost reductions.) To do so, we are applying the Lean Six Sigma methodology . Just as we are leveraging the lessons of war to improve fighting...wide Business Transformation initiative based on the Lean Six Sigma methodology to reduce the cost of the business side of the Army. • Identified

  10. Posture Statement of the United States Army 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-06

    other unit specifi c TADSS. Most importantly in FY04, the ARNG led the way in the development of a Virtual Combat Convoy Trainer ( VCCT ) system...Army Reserve also uses simulation devices like the EST 2000 and the VCCT systems at consolidated training sites, to include mobilization stations. The...United States Army Reserve USARC United States Army Reserve Command USARPAC U.S. Army Pacifi c Command VCCT Virtual Combat Convoy Trainer WMD

  11. Postural development in rats.

    PubMed

    Lelard, T; Jamon, M; Gasc, J-P; Vidal, P-P

    2006-11-01

    Mammals adopt a limited number of postures during their day-to-day activities. These stereotyped skeletal configurations are functionally adequate and limit the number of degrees of freedom to be controlled by the central nervous system. The temporal pattern of emergence of these configurations in altricial mammals is unknown. We therefore carried out an X-ray study in unrestrained rats from birth (P0) until postnatal day 23 (P23). The X-rays showed that many of the skeletal configurations described in adult rodents were already present at birth. By contrast, limb placement changed abruptly at around P10. These skeletal configurations, observed in anesthetized pups, required the maintenance of precise motor control. On the other hand, motor control continued to mature, as shown by progressive changes in resting posture and head movements from P0 to P23. We suggest that a few innate skeletal configurations provide the necessary frames of reference for the gradual construction of an adult motor repertoire in altricial mammals, such as the rat. The apparent absence of a requirement for external sensorial cues in the maturation of this repertoire may account for the maturation of postural and motor control in utero in precocial mammals (Muir et al., 2000 for a review on the locomotor behavior of altricial and precocial animals).

  12. Vowel posture normalization.

    PubMed

    Hashi, M; Westbury, J R; Honda, K

    1998-10-01

    A simple normalization procedure was applied to point-parametrized articulatory data to yield quantitative speaker-general descriptions of "average" vowel postures. Articulatory data from 20 English and 8 Japanese speakers, drawn from existing x-ray microbeam database corpora, were included in the analysis. The purpose of the normalization procedure was to minimize the effects of differences in vocal tract size and shape on average postures derived from the raw data. The procedure resulted in a general reduction of cross-speaker variance in the y dimension of the normalized space, within both language groups. This result can be traced to a systematic source of variance in the y dimension of the raw data (i.e., palatal height) "successfully removed" from the normalized data. The procedure did not result in a comparable, general reduction in cross-speaker variance in the x dimension. This negative result can be traced partly to the new observation that some speakers within the English sample habitually placed their tongues in a fronted position for all vowels, whereas other speakers habitually placed their tongues in a rearward position. Methods for evaluating articulatory normalization schemes, and possible sources of interspeaker variability in vowel postures, are discussed.

  13. Holding a Handle for Balance during Continuous Postural Perturbations—Immediate and Transitionary Effects on Whole Body Posture

    PubMed Central

    Čamernik, Jernej; Potocanac, Zrinka; Peternel, Luka; Babič, Jan

    2016-01-01

    When balance is exposed to perturbations, hand contacts are often used to assist postural control. We investigated the immediate and the transitionary effects of supportive hand contacts during continuous anteroposterior perturbations of stance by automated waist-pulls. Ten young adults were perturbed for 5 min and required to maintain balance by holding to a stationary, shoulder-high handle and following its removal. Center of pressure (COP) displacement, hip, knee and ankle angles, leg and trunk muscle activity and handle contact forces were acquired. The analysis of results show that COP excursions are significantly smaller when the subjects utilize supportive hand contact and that the displacement of COP is strongly correlated to the perturbation force and significantly larger in the anterior than posterior direction. Regression analysis of hand forces revealed that subjects utilized the hand support significantly more during the posterior than anterior perturbations. Moreover, kinematical analysis showed that utilization of supportive hand contacts alter posture of the whole body and that postural readjustments after the release of the handle, occur at different time scales in the hip, knee and ankle joints. Overall, our findings show that supportive hand contacts are efficiently used for balance control during continuous postural perturbations and that utilization of a handle has significant immediate and transitionary effects on whole body posture. PMID:27725798

  14. Holding a Handle for Balance during Continuous Postural Perturbations-Immediate and Transitionary Effects on Whole Body Posture.

    PubMed

    Čamernik, Jernej; Potocanac, Zrinka; Peternel, Luka; Babič, Jan

    2016-01-01

    When balance is exposed to perturbations, hand contacts are often used to assist postural control. We investigated the immediate and the transitionary effects of supportive hand contacts during continuous anteroposterior perturbations of stance by automated waist-pulls. Ten young adults were perturbed for 5 min and required to maintain balance by holding to a stationary, shoulder-high handle and following its removal. Center of pressure (COP) displacement, hip, knee and ankle angles, leg and trunk muscle activity and handle contact forces were acquired. The analysis of results show that COP excursions are significantly smaller when the subjects utilize supportive hand contact and that the displacement of COP is strongly correlated to the perturbation force and significantly larger in the anterior than posterior direction. Regression analysis of hand forces revealed that subjects utilized the hand support significantly more during the posterior than anterior perturbations. Moreover, kinematical analysis showed that utilization of supportive hand contacts alter posture of the whole body and that postural readjustments after the release of the handle, occur at different time scales in the hip, knee and ankle joints. Overall, our findings show that supportive hand contacts are efficiently used for balance control during continuous postural perturbations and that utilization of a handle has significant immediate and transitionary effects on whole body posture.

  15. Onset of dyskinesia and changes in postural task performance during the course of neuroleptic withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Newell, Karl M; Ko, Young G; Sprague, Robert L; Mahorney, Steven L; Bodfish, James W

    2002-07-01

    The effect of neuroleptic withdrawal on postural task performance of 20 adults with mental retardation was examined. Dyskinesia was measured using the DISCUS rating scale and postural stability using a force platform during a prospective longitudinal neuroleptic medication withdrawal protocol. Assessments were conducted at baseline and monthly intervals, extending to approximately one year following complete medication withdrawal, when significant changes in amount of postural motion and sequential pattern of postural movement complexity were observed. Postural task performance tended to return to near baseline levels at periods of up to 1 year following medication withdrawal, although one third of the subjects continued to display atypical postural motion profiles at follow-up. Results provide within-subject evidence that tardive dyskinesia is associated with generalized changes in motor control and not simply peripheral disturbances of movement.

  16. Posture modulates implicit hand maps.

    PubMed

    Longo, Matthew R

    2015-11-01

    Several forms of somatosensation require that afferent signals be informed by stored representations of body size and shape. Recent results have revealed that position sense relies on a highly distorted body representation. Changes of internal hand posture produce plastic alterations of processing in somatosensory cortex. This study therefore investigated how such postural changes affect implicit body representations underlying position sense. Participants localised the knuckles and tips of each finger in external space in two postures: the fingers splayed (Apart posture) or pressed together (Together posture). Comparison of the relative locations of the judgments of each landmark were used to construct implicit maps of represented hand structure. Spreading the fingers apart produced increases in the implicit representation of hand size, with no apparent effect on hand shape. Thus, changes of internal hand posture produce rapid modulation of how the hand itself is represented, paralleling the known effects on somatosensory cortical processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aspirin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2016-06-21

    Update of the 2009 USPSTF recommendation on aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and the 2007 recommendation on aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use to prevent colorectal cancer (CRC). The USPSTF reviewed 5 additional studies of aspirin for the primary prevention of CVD and several additional analyses of CRC follow-up data. The USPSTF also relied on commissioned systematic reviews of all-cause mortality and total cancer incidence and mortality and a comprehensive review of harms. The USPSTF then used a microsimulation model to systematically estimate the balance of benefits and harms. This recommendation applies to adults aged 40 years or older without known CVD and without increased bleeding risk. The USPSTF recommends initiating low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD and CRC in adults aged 50 to 59 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk, are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years. (B recommendation) The decision to initiate low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD and CRC in adults aged 60 to 69 years who have a 10% or greater 10-year CVD risk should be an individual one. Persons who are not at increased risk for bleeding, have a life expectancy of at least 10 years, and are willing to take low-dose aspirin daily for at least 10 years are more likely to benefit. Persons who place a higher value on the potential benefits than the potential harms may choose to initiate low-dose aspirin. (C recommendation) The current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of initiating aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD and CRC in adults younger than 50 years. (I statement) The current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of initiating aspirin use for the primary prevention of CVD and CRC in adults aged 70 years or older. (I

  18. Postural stabilization on a moving platform oscillating at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, I; Aalto, H; Starck, J; Ishizaki, H

    1993-04-01

    The effect of a fore-aft oscillating platform on postural stability was studied in nine healthy volunteers. The force platform technique was used with automatic analysis that evaluated the position of the center point of force as a function of time. The duration of stimulation lasted 90 s and the perturbation frequencies ranged from 8 to 24 Hz, and were given at constant rms acceleration of 4 m/s2. When compared with a vibration-free baseline stance, horizontal vibration of the platform caused significantly worse postural stability in all subjects. Test frequencies of 8 and 10 Hz produced greater sway velocities than perturbation at frequencies of 14 and 16 Hz. The results indicate that horizontal perturbation of the support surface leads to postural instability that is frequency-dependent.

  19. Lighten up: Specific postural instructions affect axial rigidity and step initiation in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rajal G.; Gurfinkel, Victor S.; Kwak, Elizabeth; Warden, Amelia C.; Horak, Fay B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with stooped postural alignment, increased postural sway, and reduced mobility. The Alexander Technique (AT) is a mindfulness-based approach to improving posture and mobility by reducing muscular interference while maintaining upward intentions. Evidence suggests that AT can reduce disability associated with PD, but a mechanism for this effect has not yet been established. Objective We investigated whether AT-based instructions reduce axial rigidity and increase upright postural alignment, and whether these instructions have different effects on postural alignment, axial rigidity, postural sway, and mobility than effort-based instructions regarding posture. Method Twenty subjects with PD practiced two sets of instructions and then attempted to implement both approaches (as well as a relaxed control condition) during quiet standing and step initiation. The ‘Lighten Up’ instructions relied on AT principles of reducing excess tension while encouraging length. The ‘Pull Up’ instructions relied on popular concepts of effortful posture correction. We measured kinematics, resistance to axial rotation, and ground reaction forces. Results Both sets of experimental instructions led to increases in upright postural alignment relative to the control condition. Only the Lighten Up instructions led to reduced postural sway, reduced axial postural tone, greater modifiability of tone, and a smoother center of pressure trajectory during step initiation, possibly indicating greater movement efficiency. Conclusion Mindful movement approaches such as AT may benefit balance and mobility in subjects with PD by acutely facilitating increased upright postural alignment while decreasing rigidity. PMID:25665828

  20. Otolith and Vertical Canal Contributions to Dynamic Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. Owen

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine: 1) how do normal subjects adjust postural movements in response to changing or altered otolith input, for example, due to aging? and 2) how do patients adapt postural control after altered unilateral or bilateral vestibular sensory inputs such as ablative inner ear surgery or ototoxicity, respectively? The following hypotheses are under investigation: 1) selective alteration of otolith input or abnormalities of otolith receptor function will result in distinctive spatial, frequency, and temporal patterns of head movements and body postural sway dynamics. 2) subjects with reduced, altered, or absent vertical semicircular canal receptor sensitivity but normal otolith receptor function or vice versa, should show predictable alterations of body and head movement strategies essential for the control of postural sway and movement. The effect of altered postural movement control upon compensation and/or adaptation will be determined. These experiments provide data for the development of computational models of postural control in normals, vestibular deficient subjects and normal humans exposed to unusual force environments, including orbital space flight.

  1. "Postural first" principle when balance is challenged in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Lion, Alexis; Spada, Rosario S; Bosser, Gilles; Gauchard, Gérome C; Anello, Guido; Bosco, Paolo; Calabrese, Santa; Iero, Antonella; Stella, Giuseppe; Elia, Maurizio; Perrin, Philippe P

    2014-08-01

    Human cognitive processing limits can lead to difficulties in performing two tasks simultaneously. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cognitive load on both simple and complex postural tasks. Postural control was evaluated in 128 noninstitutionalized elderly people (mean age = 73.6 ± 5.6 years) using a force platform on a firm support in control condition (CC) and mental counting condition (MCC) with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC). Then, the same tests were performed on a foam support. Sway path traveled and area covered by the center of foot pressure were recorded, low values indicating efficient balance. On firm support, sway path was higher in MCC than in CC both in EO and EC conditions (p < 0.001). On foam support, sway path was higher in CC than in MCC in EC condition (p < 0.001), area being higher in CC than in MCC both in EO (p < 0.05) and EC (p < 0.001) conditions. The results indicate that cognitive load alters balance control in a simple postural task (i.e. on firm support), which is highlighted by an increase of energetic expenditure (i.e. increase of the sway path covered) to balance. Awareness may not be increased and the attentional demand may be shared between balance and mental task. Conversely, cognitive load does not perturb the realization of a new complex postural task. This result showed that postural control is prioritized ("postural first" principle) when seriously challenged.

  2. Postural strategy changes with fatigue of the lumbar extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin L; Madigan, Michael L; Davidson, Bradley S; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of lumbar extensor fatigue on postural strategy in response to a balance perturbation. Anteriorly-directed force perturbations were applied to the upper back with a padded pendulum and attempted to challenge the postural control system without eliciting a stepping response. In three separate sessions, subjects were perturbed both before and after a fatiguing protocol that induced lumbar extensor fatigue to one of three different fatigue levels. Postural strategy was quantified using center of pressure position along with joint angles and joint torques for the ankle, knee, hip, and "low back" joints. Results showed both proactive and reactive changes in postural strategy. Proactive changes involved a slight anterior lean prior to the perturbation, and reactive changes were consistent with a shift toward more of a hip strategy with fatigue. In addition, results suggested that subjects classified as moving mostly at the hip prior to fatigue were more affected by fatigue compared to subjects classified as moving roughly equal amounts at the ankle and hip prior to fatigue. Increasing fatigue level exaggerated some, but not all, of the changes in postural strategy with fatigue. These findings illustrate that neuromuscular fatigue can influence postural strategy in response to a balance perturbation.

  3. Tai Chi training reduced coupling between respiration and postural control

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Matthew L; Manor, Brad; Hsieh, Wan-hsin; Hu, Kun; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    In order to maintain stable upright stance, the postural control system must account for the continuous perturbations to the body’s center-of-mass including those caused by spontaneous respiration. Both aging and disease increase “posturo-respiratory synchronization;” which reflects the degree to which respiration affects postural sway fluctuations over time. Tai Chi training emphasizes the coordination of respiration and bodily movements and may therefore optimize the functional interaction between these two systems. The purpose of the project was to examine the effect of Tai Chi training on the interaction between respiration and postural control in older adults. We hypothesized that Tai Chi training would improve the ability of the postural control system to compensate for respiratory perturbations and thus, reduce posturo-respiratory synchronization. Participants were recruited from supportive housing facilities and randomized to a 12-week Tai Chi intervention (n=28; 86±5yrs) or educational-control program (n=34, 85±6yrs). Standing postural sway and respiration were simultaneously recorded with a force plate and respiratory belt under eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Posturo-respiratory synchronization was determined by quantifying the variation of the phase relationship between the dominant oscillatory mode of respiration and corresponding oscillations within postural sway. Groups were similar in age, gender distribution, height, body mass, and intervention compliance. Neither intervention altered average sway speed, sway magnitude or respiratory rate. As compared to the education-control group, however, Tai Chi training reduced posturo-respiratory synchronization when standing with eyes open or closed (p<0.001). Tai Chi training did not affect traditional parameters of standing postural control or respiration, yet reduced the coupling between respiration and postural control. The beneficial effects of Tai Chi training may therefore stem in part

  4. Guidelines for wrist posture based on carpal tunnel pressure thresholds.

    PubMed

    Keir, Peter J; Bach, Joel M; Hudes, Mark; Rempel, David M

    2007-02-01

    To develop work guidelines for wrist posture based on carpal tunnel pressure. Wrist posture is considered a risk factor for distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders, and sustained wrist deviation from neutral at work may be associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, the physiologic basis for wrist posture guidelines at work is limited. The relationship of wrist posture to carpal tunnel pressure was examined in 37 healthy participants. The participants slowly moved their wrists in extension-flexion and radioulnar deviation while wrist posture and carpal tunnel pressure were recorded. The wrist postures associated with pressures of 25 and 30 mmHg were identified for each motion and used to determine the 25th percentile wrist angles (the angles that protect 75% of the study population from reaching a pressure of 25 or 30 mmHg). Using 30 mmHg, the 25th percentile angles were 32.7 degrees (95% confidence interval [CI] = 27.2-38.1 degrees) for wrist extension, 48.6 degrees (37.7 -59.4 degrees) for flexion, 21.8 degrees (14.7-29.0 degrees) for radial deviation, and 14.5 degrees (9.6-19.4 degrees) for ulnar deviation. For 25 mmHg, the 25th percentile angles were 26.6 degrees and 37.7 degrees for extension and flexion, with radial and ulnar deviation being 17.8 degrees and 12.1 degrees, respectively. Further research can incorporate the independent contributions of pinch force and finger posture into this model. The method presented can provide wrist posture guidelines for the design of tools and hand-intensive tasks.

  5. Tai Chi training reduced coupling between respiration and postural control.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Matthew L; Manor, Brad; Hsieh, Wan-hsin; Hu, Kun; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    In order to maintain stable upright stance, the postural control system must account for the continuous perturbations to the body's center-of-mass including those caused by spontaneous respiration. Both aging and disease increase "posturo-respiratory synchronization;" which reflects the degree to which respiration affects postural sway fluctuations over time. Tai Chi training emphasizes the coordination of respiration and bodily movements and may therefore optimize the functional interaction between these two systems. The purpose of the project was to examine the effect of Tai Chi training on the interaction between respiration and postural control in older adults. We hypothesized that Tai Chi training would improve the ability of the postural control system to compensate for respiratory perturbations and thus, reduce posturo-respiratory synchronization. Participants were recruited from supportive housing facilities and randomized to a 12-week Tai Chi intervention (n=28; 86 ± 5 yrs) or educational-control program (n=34, 85 ± 6 yrs). Standing postural sway and respiration were simultaneously recorded with a force plate and respiratory belt under eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Posturo-respiratory synchronization was determined by quantifying the variation of the phase relationship between the dominant oscillatory mode of respiration and corresponding oscillations within postural sway. Groups were similar in age, gender distribution, height, body mass, and intervention compliance. Neither intervention altered average sway speed, sway magnitude or respiratory rate. As compared to the education-control group, however, Tai Chi training reduced posturo-respiratory synchronization when standing with eyes open or closed (p<0.001). Tai Chi training did not affect traditional parameters of standing postural control or respiration, yet reduced the coupling between respiration and postural control. The beneficial effects of Tai Chi training may therefore stem in part

  6. Recommendations for the diagnosis and management of corticosteroid insufficiency in critically ill adult patients: consensus statements from an international task force by the American College of Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E; Pastores, Stephen M; Annane, Djillali; Meduri, G Umberto; Sprung, Charles L; Arlt, Wiebke; Keh, Didier; Briegel, Josef; Beishuizen, Albertus; Dimopoulou, Ioanna; Tsagarakis, Stylianos; Singer, Mervyn; Chrousos, George P; Zaloga, Gary; Bokhari, Faran; Vogeser, Michael

    2008-06-01

    To develop consensus statements for the diagnosis and management of corticosteroid insufficiency in critically ill adult patients. A multidisciplinary, multispecialty task force of experts in critical care medicine was convened from the membership of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. In addition, international experts in endocrinology were invited to participate. The task force members reviewed published literature and provided expert opinion from which the consensus was derived. The consensus statements were developed using a modified Delphi methodology. The strength of each recommendation was quantified using the Modified GRADE system, which classifies recommendations as strong (grade 1) or weak (grade 2) and the quality of evidence as high (grade A), moderate (grade B), or low (grade C) based on factors that include the study design, the consistency of the results, and the directness of the evidence. The task force coined the term critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency to describe the dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that occurs during critical illness. Critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency is caused by adrenal insufficiency together with tissue corticosteroid resistance and is characterized by an exaggerated and protracted proinflammatory response. Critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency should be suspected in hypotensive patients who have responded poorly to fluids and vasopressor agents, particularly in the setting of sepsis. At this time, the diagnosis of tissue corticosteroid resistance remains problematic. Adrenal insufficiency in critically ill patients is best made by a delta total serum cortisol of < 9 microg/dL after adrenocorticotrophic hormone (250 microg) administration or a random total cortisol of < 10 microg/dL. The benefit of treatment with glucocorticoids at this time seems to be limited to patients with vasopressor

  7. Environmental Impact Statement, Establishment of the Gandy Range Extension and Adjacent Restricted Airspace as an Area for Supersonic Flight Training, Hill Air Force Base, Utah

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-20

    1979, the Air Force Systems Command (AFSC) became the single range manager and the range is now operated as a major training and test facility base...supersonic flight airspace managed by other unii~s is limited by the transit distance required to obtain this training. Excluding the UTTR, the...I 1.1.1 Range Managers ........... ........... . . . . . 1 1.1.2 Utah Test and Training Range ..... .......... . . . . 1

  8. Lead effects on postural balance of children

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, A.; Shukla, R.; Bornschein, R.L.; Dietrich, K.N. ); Keith, R. )

    1990-11-01

    The postural sway responses of 63 children with a mean age of 5.74 years were quantified with a Force Platform technique. The average maximum (max) blood lead (PbB) of these children during the first 5 years of life was 20.7 {mu}g/dL (range 9.2 to 32.5). The backward stepwise regression analysis for sway area response during the eyes-closed, no-foam test with all the covariates and confounders and the PbB parameters showed a significant relationship with peak or max PbB during the second year of life. These results are consistent with their previous study with a smaller group of children. The data have been analyzed to provide some insight into the role of various afferents for the maintenance of postural balance. The results suggests a hypothesis that if the max PbB had caused some level of impairment in the functional capacities or interconnectivity of the vestibular and/or proprioception systems at 2 years of age, then it is reasonable to assume that the redundancy in the postural afferent systems would naturally adapt to rely more on the remaining intact afferent system (in this case, vision).

  9. Effects of disease severity and medication state on postural control asymmetry during challenging postural tasks in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Polastri, Paula F; Baptista, André M; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Beretta, Victor S; Gobbi, Lilian T B

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of disease severity and medication state on postural control asymmetry during challenging tasks in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nineteen people with PD and 11 neurologically healthy individuals performed three standing task conditions: bipedal standing, tandem and unipedal adapted standing; the individuals with PD performed the tasks in ON and OFF medication state. The participants with PD were distributed into 2 groups according to disease severity: unilateral group (n=8) and bilateral group (n=11). The two PD groups performed the evaluations both under and without the medication. Two force plates were used to analyze the posture. The symmetric index was calculated for various of center of pressure. ANOVA one-way (groups) and two-way (PD groups×medication), with repeated measures for medication, were calculated. For main effects of group, the bilateral group was more asymmetric than CG. For main effects of medication, only unipedal adapted standing presented effects of PD medication. There was PD groups×medication interaction. Under the effects of medication, the unilateral group presented lower asymmetry of RMS in anterior-posterior direction and area than the bilateral group in unipedal adapted standing. In addition, the unilateral group presented lower asymmetry of mean velocity, RMS in anterior-posterior direction and area in unipedal standing and area in tandem adapted standing after a medication dose. Postural control asymmetry during challenging postural tasks was dependent on disease severity and medication state in people with PD. The bilateral group presented higher postural control asymmetry than the control and unilateral groups in challenging postural tasks. Finally, the medication dose was able to reduce postural control asymmetry in the unilateral group during challenging postural tasks.

  10. Determining posture from physiological tremor.

    PubMed

    Albert, Mark V; Kording, Konrad P

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of body and limb posture is important to many clinical and research studies. Current approaches either directly measure posture (e.g., using optical or magnetic methods) or more indirectly measure it by integrating changes over time (e.g., using gyroscopes and/or accelerometers). Here, we introduce a way of estimating posture from movements without requiring integration over time and the resulting complications. We show how the almost imperceptible tremor of the hand is affected by posture in an intuitive way and therefore can be used to estimate the posture of the arm. We recorded postures and tremor of the arms of volunteers. By using only the minor axis in the covariance of hand tremor, we could estimate the angle of the forearm with a standard deviation of about 4° when the subject's elbow is resting on a table and about 10° when it is off the table. This technique can also be applied as a post hoc analysis on other hand-position data sets to extract posture. This new method allows the estimation of body posture from tremor, is complementary to other techniques, and so can become a useful tool for future research and clinical applications.

  11. Determining posture from physiological tremor

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Mark V.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of body and limb posture is important to many clinical and research studies. Current approaches either directly measure posture (e.g., using optical or magnetic methods) or more indirectly measure it by integrating changes over time (e.g., using gyroscopes and/or accelerometers). Here, we introduce a way of estimating posture from movements without requiring integration over time and the resultingcomplications. Weshow how the almost imperceptible tremor of the hand is affected by posture in an intuitive way and therefore can be used to estimate the posture of the arm. We recorded postures and tremor of the arms of volunteers. By using only the minor axis in the covariance of hand tremor, we could estimate the angle of the forearm with a standard deviation of about 4° when the subject's elbow is resting on a table and about 10° when it is off the table. This technique can also be applied as a post hoc analysis on other hand-position data sets to extract posture. This new method allows the estimation of body posture from tremor, is complementary to other techniques, and so can become a useful tool for future research and clinical applications. PMID:21997329

  12. Differences in lumbar spine load due to posture and upper limb external load.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Joanna; Roman-Liu, Danuta; Zagrajek, Tomasz; Borkowski, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    As the lumbar region of the spine is particularly predisposed to musculoskeletal disorders, the aim of this article was to assess lumbar spine load on the basis of an accurate model of this part of the body. The model was developed with the finite element method and the energy criterion for optimising muscle work. Computer calculations confirmed that stresses and compression forces in intervertebral discs increased with an increase in the load force and that they were significantly larger in the bent forwards posture than in the erect posture. This result clearly shows that lifting light objects and the erect posture are important elements in minimising spine load.

  13. Proposed Expansion of German Air Force Operations at Holloman AFB, New Mexico, Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Hearing Transcripts and Responses to Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    1998 InMMCD 4 ’ U I TABLE OF CONTENTS I 3 * PREFACE 1.0 ALPINE, TEXAS PUBLIC HEARING 1 2.0 DELL CITY, TEXAS PUBLIC HEARING 3.0 TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, NEW ...located in southern New Mexico, for air-to-ground training. The target complex would be comprised of a 2-by- 4 -square-mile impact area within a 12-by-15...August 4 . The document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of establishing a German Air Force Replacement Training Unit (RTU) at Holloman AFB, New

  14. The Relationship Among Foot Posture, Core and Lower Extremity Muscle Function, and Postural Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Stephen C.; Bazett-Jones, David M.; Joshi, Mukta N.; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E.; James, C. Roger

    2014-01-01

    Context: Identification of impaired balance as a risk factor for lower extremity injury regardless of injury history has led to subsequent investigation of variables that may adversely affect balance in healthy individuals. Objectives: To investigate the relationship among core and lower extremity muscle function, foot posture, and balance. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Musculoskeletal injury biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 108 individuals (40 men, 68 women; age = 22.8 ± 4.7 years, height = 168.5 ± 10.4 cm, mass = 69.9 ± 13.3 kg) participated in the study. Main Outcome Measure(s): Core endurance was assessed during 1 time-to-failure trial, and isometric hip and ankle strength were assessed using a handheld dynamometer and isokinetic dynamometer, respectively. Foot structure was quantified using the digital photographic measurement method. Single-limb–stance time to boundary was assessed using a force plate during an eyes-closed condition. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed to predict balance using lower extremity strength, foot posture, and core endurance. Results: Foot posture (β = −0.22, P = .03) and ankle-inversion strength (β = −0.29, P = .006) predicted mediolateral balance. Increasing arch posture and ankle-inversion strength were associated with decreased mediolateral single-limb–stance balance. Conclusions: Increasing arch height was associated with decreased mediolateral control of single-limb stance. The relationship between time to boundary and injury risk, however, has not been explored. Therefore, the relationship between increasing arch height and injury due to postural instability cannot be determined from this study. If authors of future prospective studies identify a relationship between decreased time to boundary and increased injury risk, foot structure may be an important variable to assess during preparticipation physical examinations. The relationship

  15. Increased alertness, better than posture prioritization, explains dual-task performance in prosthesis users and controls under increasing postural and cognitive challenge.

    PubMed

    Howard, Charla L; Perry, Bonnie; Chow, John W; Wallace, Chris; Stokic, Dobrivoje S

    2017-08-31

    Sensorimotor impairments after limb amputation impose a threat to stability. Commonly described strategies for maintaining stability are the posture first strategy (prioritization of balance) and posture second strategy (prioritization of concurrent tasks). The existence of these strategies was examined in 13 below-knee prosthesis users and 15 controls during dual-task standing under increasing postural and cognitive challenge by evaluating path length, 95% sway area, and anterior-posterior and medial-lateral amplitudes of the center of pressure. The subjects stood on two force platforms under usual (hard surface/eyes open) and difficult (soft surface/eyes closed) conditions, first alone and while performing a cognitive task without and then with instruction on cognitive prioritization. During standing alone, sway was not significantly different between groups. After adding the cognitive task without prioritization instruction, prosthesis users increased sway more under the dual-task than single-task standing (p ≤ 0.028) during both usual and difficult conditions, favoring the posture second strategy. Controls, however, reduced dual-task sway under a greater postural challenge (p ≤ 0.017), suggesting the posture first strategy. With prioritization of the cognitive task, sway was unchanged or reduced in prosthesis users, suggesting departure from the posture second strategy, whereas controls maintained the posture first strategy. Individual analysis of dual tasking revealed that greater postural demand in controls and greater cognitive challenge in prosthesis users led to both reduced sway and improved cognitive performance, suggesting cognitive-motor facilitation. Thus, activation of additional resources through increased alertness, rather than posture prioritization, may explain dual-task performance in both prosthesis users and controls under increasing postural and cognitive challenge.

  16. Postural performance of vestibular loss patients under increased postural threat.

    PubMed

    Young, Laurence R; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Dumitrescu, Michel; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane; Lacour, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The effects of increasing postural task difficulty on balance control was investigated in 9 compensated vestibular loss patients whose results were compared to 11 healthy adults. Subjects were tested in static (stable support) and dynamic (sinusoidal translation of the support) conditions, both at floor level and at height (62 cm above the floor), and with and without vision, to create an additional postural threat. Wavelet analysis of the center of foot pressure displacement and motion analysis of the body segments were used to evaluate the postural performance. Evaluation questionnaires were used to examine the compensation level of the patients (DHI test), their general anxiety level (SAST), fear of height (subjective scale), and workload (NASA TLX test). (Vestibular loss patients rely more on vision and spend more energy maintaining balance than controls, but they use the same postural strategy as normals in both static and dynamic conditions.) Questionnaire data all showed differences in behavior and perceptions between the controls and the patients. However, at height and without vision, a whole body strategy leading to rigid posture replaces the head stabilization strategy found for standing at floor level. The effects of height on postural control can be attributable to an increase in postural threat and attention changes resulting from modifications in perception.

  17. A new posture measurement method for measuring intrinsic standing posture.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shigehisa; Kodama, Naoki; Maeda, Naoto; Sakamoto, Shunichi; Minagi, Shogo

    2014-04-01

    Although body posture in relation to the dental condition has been of great interest in the dental profession, rumination bias has been a substantial obstacle to achieving a reliable objective evaluation of the intrinsic body posture. The aim of this study was to establish a posture control protocol that would minimize the effect of bias. Fifteen healthy male volunteers (23-33 years of age) participated in this study. The posture movement was recorded for 10 seconds by a three-dimensional motion capture system. The experiment was performed on four different days. The posture was most stable at 4-5 seconds after the start of the front bulb gaze (the mean coefficient of variation ranged from 0.1 to 44.1). The intraclass correlation coefficients for four days were 0.871-0.975 (P < or = 0.001). It was concluded that the use of this measurement method helped in producing a reliable intrinsic standing posture where unbiased evaluation of the effect of any intervention on the body posture is researched.

  18. Improvement in Automatic Postural Coordination Following Alexander Technique Lessons in a Person With Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Horak, Fay B; Henry, Sharon M

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose The relationship between abnormal postural coordination and back pain is unclear. The Alexander Technique (AT) aims to improve postural coordination by using conscious processes to alter automatic postural coordination and ongoing muscular activity, and it has been reported to reduce low back pain. This case report describes the use of the AT with a client with low back pain and the observed changes in automatic postural responses and back pain. Case Description The client was a 49-year-old woman with a 25-year history of left-sided, idiopathic, lumbrosacral back pain. Automatic postural coordination was measured using a force plate during horizontal platform translations and one-legged standing. Outcomes The client was tested monthly for 4 months before AT lessons and for 3 months after lessons. Before lessons, she consistently had laterally asymmetric automatic postural responses to translations. After AT lessons, the magnitude and asymmetry of her responses and balance improved and her low back pain decreased. Discussion Further research is warranted to study whether AT lessons improve low back pain–associated abnormalities in automatic postural coordination and whether improving automatic postural coordination helps to reduce low back pain. [Cacciatore TW, Horak FB, Henry SM. Improvement in automatic postural coordination following Alexander Technique lessons in a person with low back pain. PMID:15921477

  19. Why quality of life measurement is important in dermatology clinical practice: An expert-based opinion statement by the EADV Task Force on Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Finlay, A Y; Salek, M S; Abeni, D; Tomás-Aragonés, L; van Cranenburgh, O D; Evers, A W M; Jemec, G B E; Linder, D; Manolache, L; Marrón, S E; Prinsen, C A C; Susitaival, P; Chernyshov, P V

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the many ways in which quality of life (QoL) measurement may potentially be advantageous in routine clinical dermatology practice. Thirteen members of the EADV Task Force on Quality of Life, eight dermatologists, three health psychologists, one epidemiologist and one pharmacoepidemiologist, independently listed all of the ways they thought this may be advantageous. A total of 108 different ways of using QoL information in clinical practice were suggested (median per participant = 8, range = 4-15), and were classified into 20 descriptive groups. These were sorted into the following five categories: inform clinical decisions, clinician-patient communication, awareness of skin disease burden, informing the consultation and clinical service administration. The wide range of potential benefits identified may not only encourage clinicians to use these measures but also highlights many areas requiring evidence to establish the true value of routine use of QoL measures.

  20. Guidelines on genetic evaluation and management of Lynch syndrome: a consensus statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giardiello, Francis M; Allen, John I; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Boland, C Richard; Burke, Carol A; Burt, Randall W; Church, James M; Dominitz, Jason A; Johnson, David A; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Levin, Theodore R; Lieberman, David A; Robertson, Douglas J; Syngal, Sapna; Rex, Douglas K

    2014-08-01

    The Multi-Society Task Force, in collaboration with invited experts, developed guidelines to assist health care providers with the appropriate provision of genetic testing and management of patients at risk for and affected with Lynch syndrome as follows: Figure 1 provides a colorectal cancer risk assessment tool to screen individuals in the office or endoscopy setting; Figure 2 illustrates a strategy for universal screening for Lynch syndrome by tumor testing of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer; Figures 3-6 provide algorithms for genetic evaluation of affected and at-risk family members of pedigrees with Lynch syndrome; Table 10 provides guidelines for screening at-risk and affected persons with Lynch syndrome; and Table 12 lists the guidelines for the management of patients with Lynch syndrome. A detailed explanation of Lynch syndrome and the methodology utilized to derive these guidelines, as well as an explanation of, and supporting literature for, these guidelines are provided.

  1. Guidelines on genetic evaluation and management of Lynch syndrome: a consensus statement by the US Multi-society Task Force on colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giardiello, Francis M; Allen, John I; Axilbund, Jennifer E; Boland, C Richard; Burke, Carol A; Burt, Randall W; Church, James M; Dominitz, Jason A; Johnson, David A; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Levin, Theodore R; Lieberman, David A; Robertson, Douglas J; Syngal, Sapna; Rex, Douglas K

    2014-08-01

    The Multi-Society Task Force, in collaboration with invited experts, developed guidelines to assist health care providers with the appropriate provision of genetic testing and management of patients at risk for and affected with Lynch syndrome as follows: Figure 1 provides a colorectal cancer risk assessment tool to screen individuals in the office or endoscopy setting; Figure 2 illustrates a strategy for universal screening for Lynch syndrome by tumor testing of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer; Figures 3,4,5,6 provide algorithms for genetic evaluation of affected and at-risk family members of pedigrees with Lynch syndrome; Table 10 provides guidelines for screening at-risk and affected persons with Lynch syndrome; and Table 12 lists the guidelines for the management of patients with Lynch syndrome. A detailed explanation of Lynch syndrome and the methodology utilized to derive these guidelines, as well as an explanation of, and supporting literature for, these guidelines are provided.

  2. Atypical anticipatory postural adjustments during gait initiation among individuals with sub-acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Rajachandrakumar, Roshanth; Fraser, Julia E; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Inness, Elizabeth L; Biasin, Lou; Brunton, Karen; McIlroy, William E; Mansfield, Avril

    2017-02-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments, executed prior to gait initiation, help preserve lateral stability when stepping. Atypical patterns of anticipatory activity prior to gait initiation may occur in individuals with unilateral impairment (e.g., stroke). This study aimed to determine the prevalence, correlates, and consequences of atypical anticipatory postural adjustment patterns prior to gait initiation in a sub-acute stroke population. Forty independently-ambulatory individuals with sub-acute stroke stood on two force plates and initiated gait at a self-selected speed. Medio-lateral centre of pressure displacement was calculated and used to define anticipatory postural adjustments (shift in medio-lateral centre of pressure >10mm from baseline). Stroke severity, motor recovery, and functional balance and mobility status were also obtained. Three patterns were identified: single (typical), absent (atypical), and multiple (atypical) anticipatory postural adjustments. Thirty-five percent of trials had atypical anticipatory postural adjustments (absent and multiple). Frequency of absent anticipatory postural adjustments was negatively correlated with walking speed. Multiple anticipatory postural adjustments were more prevalent when leading with the non-paretic than the paretic limb. Trials with multiple anticipatory postural adjustments had longer duration of anticipatory postural adjustment and time to foot-off, and shorter unloading time than trials with single anticipatory postural adjustments. A high prevalence of atypical anticipatory control prior to gait initiation was found in individuals with stroke. Temporal differences were identified with multiple anticipatory postural adjustments, indicating altered gait initiation. These findings provide insight into postural control during gait initiation in individuals with sub-acute stroke, and may inform interventions to improve ambulation in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Meta-analysis: association between wrist posture and carpal tunnel syndrome among workers.

    PubMed

    You, Doohee; Smith, Allan H; Rempel, David

    2014-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common work-related peripheral neuropathy. In addition to grip force and repetitive hand exertions, wrist posture (hyperextension and hyperflexion) may be a risk factor for CTS among workers. However, findings of studies evaluating the relationship between wrist posture and CTS are inconsistent. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies to evaluate the evidence of the relationship between wrist posture at work and risk of CTS. PubMed and Google Scholar were searched to identify relevant studies published between 1980 and 2012. The following search terms were used: "work related", "carpal tunnel syndrome", "wrist posture", and "epidemiology". The studies defined wrist posture as the deviation of the wrist in extension or flexion from a neutral wrist posture. Relative risk (RR) of individual studies for postural risk was pooled to evaluate the overall risk of wrist posture on CTS. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All were cross-sectional or case-control designs and relied on self-report or observer's estimates for wrist posture assessment. The pooled RR of work-related CTS increased with increasing hours of exposure to wrist deviation or extension/flexion [RR = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.646-2.43; p < 0.01: Shore-adjusted 95% CI: 1.32-2.97]. We found evidence that prolonged exposure to non-neutral wrist postures is associated with a twofold increased risk for CTS compared with low hours of exposure to non-neutral wrist postures. Workplace interventions to prevent CTS should incorporate training and engineering interventions that reduce sustained non-neutral wrist postures.

  4. The Effect of Body Posture on Brain Glymphatic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hedok; Xie, Lulu; Yu, Mei; Kang, Hongyi; Feng, Tian; Deane, Rashid; Logan, Jean; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    The glymphatic pathway expedites clearance of waste, including soluble amyloid β (Aβ) from the brain. Transport through this pathway is controlled by the brain's arousal level because, during sleep or anesthesia, the brain's interstitial space volume expands (compared with wakefulness), resulting in faster waste removal. Humans, as well as animals, exhibit different body postures during sleep, which may also affect waste removal. Therefore, not only the level of consciousness, but also body posture, might affect CSF–interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange efficiency. We used dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI and kinetic modeling to quantify CSF-ISF exchange rates in anesthetized rodents' brains in supine, prone, or lateral positions. To validate the MRI data and to assess specifically the influence of body posture on clearance of Aβ, we used fluorescence microscopy and radioactive tracers, respectively. The analysis showed that glymphatic transport was most efficient in the lateral position compared with the supine or prone positions. In the prone position, in which the rat's head was in the most upright position (mimicking posture during the awake state), transport was characterized by “retention” of the tracer, slower clearance, and more CSF efflux along larger caliber cervical vessels. The optical imaging and radiotracer studies confirmed that glymphatic transport and Aβ clearance were superior in the lateral and supine positions. We propose that the most popular sleep posture (lateral) has evolved to optimize waste removal during sleep and that posture must be considered in diagnostic imaging procedures developed in the future to assess CSF-ISF transport in humans. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The rodent brain removes waste better during sleep or anesthesia compared with the awake state. Animals exhibit different body posture during the awake and sleep states, which might affect the brain's waste removal efficiency. We investigated the influence of body posture on

  5. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and genetic testing for BRCA-related cancer in women: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2014-02-18

    Update of the 2005 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on genetic risk assessment and BRCA mutation testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on risk assessment,genetic counseling, and genetic testing for potentially harmful BRCA mutations in asymptomatic women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer but no personal history of cancer or known potentially harmful BRCA mutations in the family. The USPSTF also reviewed interventions aimed at reducing the risk for BRCA-related cancer in women with potentially harmful BRCA mutations, including intensive cancer screening, medications, and risk-reducing surgery. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic women who have not been diagnosed with BRCA-related cancer. The USPSTF recommends that primary care providers screen women who have family members with breast, ovarian, tubal, or peritoneal cancer with 1 of several screening tools designed to identify a family history that may be associated with an increased risk for potentially harmful mutations in breast cancer susceptibility genes (BRCA1 or BRCA2). Women with positive screening results should receive genetic counseling and, if indicated after counseling, BRCA testing. (B recommendation)The USPSTF recommends against routine genetic counseling or BRCA testing for women whose family history is not associated with an increased risk for potentially harmful mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. (D recommendation).

  6. Medications to decrease the risk for breast cancer in women: recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Virginia A

    2013-11-19

    Update of the 2002 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on the use of medications for breast cancer risk reduction. The USPSTF reviewed evidence on the effectiveness,adverse effects, and subgroup variations of medications to reduce the risk for breast cancer—specifically, the selective estrogen receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene. The USPSTF also reviewed a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials to understand the relative benefits and harms of tamoxifen and raloxifene. This recommendation applies to asymptomatic women aged 35 years or older without a prior diagnosis of breast cancer,ductal carcinoma in situ, or lobular carcinoma in situ. The USPSTF recommends that clinicians engage in shared, informed decision making with women who are at increased risk for breast cancer about medications to reduce their risk.For women who are at increased risk for breast cancer and at low risk for adverse medication effects, clinicians should offer to prescribe risk-reducing medications, such as tamoxifen or raloxifene. (B recommendation)The USPSTF recommends against the routine use of medications,such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, for risk reduction of primary breast cancer in women who are not at increased risk for breast cancer. (D recommendation).

  7. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  8. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  9. Postural control during pushing movement with risk of forward perturbation.

    PubMed

    Okai, Rika; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a forward bilateral pushing movement on postural control in a situation where known, unknown, and unpredictable perturbations may be induced. Participants stood upright and voluntarily pushed a handle with both hands. In the first task, the handle was free to be moved by the participant (perturbation; movable task) and in the second task, the handle was locked (stationary task). For each task, body displacement and observed applied force were recorded. Anticipatory postural control adjustment plays a vital role in body stability; however, in contrast to its role in maintaining stability, adjustment can generate a restricted voluntary movement because motor programming selects a postural control that gives priority to body stability over the target movement.

  10. The influence of initial posture on the sit-to-stand movement.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C; Bojsen-Møller, F; Soames, R W

    1989-01-01

    Head movements, ground reaction forces and electromyographic activity of selected muscles were recorded simultaneously from two subjects as they performed the sit-to-stand manouevre under a variety of conditions. The influence of initial leg posture on the magnitude of the various parameters under investigation was examined first. A preferred initial leg posture resulted in smaller magnitudes of head movement and ground reaction forces. EMG activity in some muscles, trapezius and erector spinae, decreased, while in others, quadriceps and hamstrings, it increased in the preferred leg posture. The decreases seen correlate with reductions in head movement observed. The effect of inhibiting habitual postural adjustments of the head and neck, by comparing "free" and "guided" movements was also examined. In guided movements there are significant reductions in head movement, ground reaction forces and EMG activity in trapezius, sternomastoid and erector spinae. It would appear that both initial leg posture and the abolition of habitual postural adjustment have a profound influence on the efficiency of the sit-to-stand manouevre. This preliminary study high-lights the practical importance of head posture in the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders, as well as in movement education.

  11. Diabetes mellitus in older people: position statement on behalf of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG), the European Diabetes Working Party for Older People (EDWPOP), and the International Task Force of Experts in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Alan; Morley, John E; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leo; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Bayer, Tony; Zeyfang, Andrej; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Vischer, Ulrich; Woo, Jean; Chapman, Ian; Dunning, Trisha; Meneilly, Graydon; Rodriguez-Saldana, Joel; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis Miguel; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Gadsby, Roger; Schernthaner, Guntram; Lorig, Kate

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent metabolic condition in ageing societies associated with high levels of morbidity, multiple therapies, and functional deterioration that challenges even the best of health care systems to deliver high-quality, individualized care. Most international clinical guidelines have ignored the often-unique issues of frailty, functional limitation, changes in mental health, and increasing dependency that characterize many aged patients with diabetes. A collaborative Expert Group of the IAGG and EDWPOP and an International Task Force have explored the key issues that affect diabetes in older people using a robust method comprising a Delphi process and an evidence-based review of the literature. Eight domains of interest were initially agreed and discussed: hypoglycemia, therapy, care home diabetes, influence of comorbidities, glucose targets, family/carer perspectives, diabetes education, and patient safety. A set of "consensus" statements was produced in each domain of interest. These form a foundation for future policy development in this area and should influence the clinical behavior and approach of all health professionals engaged in delivering diabetes care to older people.

  12. Stabilizing posture through imagery.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Eleonora; Manzoni, Diego; Santarcangelo, Enrica L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the general population, suppression of vision modulates body sway by increasing the center of pressure (CoP) velocity, while a light fingertip touch reduces the area of the CoP displacement in blindfolded subjects. This study assessed whether imagined fixation and fingertip touch differentially stabilize posture in subjects with high (highs) and low (lows) hypnotizability. Visual and tactile imageries were ineffective in lows. In highs, the effects of visual imagery could not be evaluated because the real information was ineffective; real tactile stimulation was effective only on velocity, but the imagery effects could not be definitely assessed owing to low effect size. The highs' larger variability could account for this and represents the most important finding.

  13. The effect of asymmetry of posture on anticipatory postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Aruin, Alexander S

    2006-06-19

    The study investigates the effect of body asymmetry on anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Subjects performed a task involving a standard load release induced by a shoulder abduction movement while standing symmetrically or in an asymmetrical stance with either their right or left leg in 45 degrees of external rotation. EMG activities of trunk and leg muscles were recorded during the postural perturbation and were quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Anticipatory postural adjustments were observed in all experimental conditions. It was found that asymmetrical body positioning was associated with significant asymmetrical patterns of APAs seen in the right and left distal muscles. These APA asymmetries were dependant upon the side in which the body asymmetry was induced: reduced APAs were observed in the leg muscles on the side of leg rotation, while increased APAs were seen in the muscles on the contralateral side. These findings stress the important role that body asymmetries play in the control of upright posture.

  14. Behavioral Counseling to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Adults Without Cardiovascular Risk Factors: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Grossman, David C; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Curry, Susan J; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2017-07-11

    Adults who adhere to national guidelines for a healthful diet and physical activity have lower rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than those who do not. All persons, regardless of their risk status for cardiovascular disease (CVD), can gain health benefits from healthy eating behaviors and appropriate physical activity. To update the 2012 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on behavioral counseling to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for cardiovascular disease prevention among adults without obesity who do not have cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, abnormal blood glucose levels, or diabetes). The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on whether primary care-relevant counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet, physical activity, or both improve health outcomes, intermediate outcomes associated with CVD, or dietary or physical activity behaviors in adults; interventions to reduce sedentary behaviors; and the harms of behavioral counseling interventions. Counseling interventions result in improvements in healthful behaviors and small but potentially important improvements in intermediate outcomes, including reductions in blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and improvements in measures of adiposity. The overall magnitude of benefit related to these interventions is positive but small. The potential harms are at most small, leading the USPSTF to conclude that these interventions have a small net benefit for adults without obesity who do not have CVD risk factors. The USPSTF recommends that primary care professionals individualize the decision to offer or refer adults without obesity who do not have hypertension, dyslipidemia, abnormal blood glucose levels, or diabetes to behavioral counseling to promote a healthful diet and physical activity. Existing evidence indicates a positive but small benefit of behavioral counseling for the prevention of CVD in this population

  15. Examination of the relationship between mandibular position and body posture.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Kiwamu; Mehta, Noshir R; Abdallah, Emad F; Forgione, Albert G; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Takao; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of changing mandibular position on body posture and reciprocally, body posture on mandibular position. Forty-five (45) asymptomatic subjects (24 males and 21 females, ages 21-53 years, mean age 30.7 years) were included in this study and randomly assigned to one of two groups, based on the table of random numbers. The only difference between group I and group II was the sequence of the testing. The MatScan (Tekscan, Inc., South Boston, MA) system was used to measure the result of changes in body posture (center of foot pressure: COP) while subjects maintained the following 5 mandibular positions: (1) rest position, (2) centric occlusion, (3) clinically midlined jaw position with the labial frena aligned, (4) a placebo wax appliance, worn around the labial surfaces of the teeth and (5) right eccentric mandibular position. The T-Scan II (Tekscan, Inc., South Boston, MA) system was used to analyze occlusal force distribution in two postural positions, with and without a heel lift under the right foot. Total trajectory length of COP in centric occlusion was shorter than in the rest position (p < 0.05). COP area in right eccentric mandibular position was larger than in centric occlusion (p < 0.05). When subjects used a heel lift under the right foot, occlusal forces shifted to the right side compared to no heel lift (p < 0.01). Based on these findings, it was concluded that changing mandibular position affected body posture. Conversely, changing body posture affected mandibular position.

  16. A Simple Postflight Measure of Postural Atania in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Harm, D. I.; Kofman, I. S.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight universally present with postural ataxia. Throughout the Space Shuttle Program, measurement of ataxia has concentrated on sway in the anterior-posterior (AP) plane. The current investigation, as a part of a larger functional study, concentrated on characterizing postural instability using dynamic stabilographic sway patterns in both the AP and medial-lateral (ML) planes. To accomplish this goal, six astronauts from short-duration (Shuttle) and three from long-duration (ISS) flights were required to recover from a simulated fall. Subjects with eyes open, wearing running shoes lay prone on the floor for 2 minutes and then quickly stood up, maintained a quiet stance for 3 minutes, arms relaxed along the side of the body, and feet comfortably placed on the force plate. Crewmembers were tested twice before flight, on landing day (Shuttle only), and 1, 6, and 30 days after flight. Anterior-posterior and ML center-of-pressure (COP) coordinates were calculated from the ground reaction forces collected at 500 Hz. The 3-minute quiet stance trial was broken into three 1-minute segments for stabilogram diffusion analysis. A mean sway speed (rate of change of COP displacement) was also calculated as an additional postural stability parameter. While there was considerable variation, most of crewmembers tested exhibited increased stochastic activity evidenced by larger short-term COP diffusion coefficients postflight in both the AP and ML planes, suggesting significant changes in postural control mechanisms, particularly control of lower limb muscle function. As expected, postural instability of ISS astronauts on the first day postflight was similar to that of Shuttle crewmembers on landing day. Recoveries of stochastic activity and mean sway speed to baseline levels were typically observed by the 30th day postflight for both long-duration and short-duration crewmembers. Dynamic postural stability characteristics obtained in this low

  17. Influence of gymnastics training on the development of postural control.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Claudia; Barela, José Angelo; Viana, André Rocha; Barela, Ana Maria Forti

    2011-03-29

    This study investigated the influence of gymnastics training on the postural control of children with and without the use of visual information. Two age groups, aged 5-7 and 9-11 years old, of gymnasts and nongymnasts were asked to maintain an upright and quiet stance on a force platform with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) for 30s. Area of the stabilogram (AOS) and mean velocity of the center of pressure (COP) in anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions were calculated and used to investigate the effects of gymnastics training, age, and visual information. Younger gymnasts presented greater postural control compared to younger nongymnasts while visual information did not improve postural control in younger nongymnasts. Younger gymnasts displayed improved postural control with EO compared to EC. The mean velocity of the COP in the ML direction was: less for younger gymnasts than younger nongymnasts with EO. These results suggest that gymnastics training promotes improvements in postural control of younger children only, which results from their use of visual information when available.

  18. Postural stability assessment following concussion: one piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Guskiewicz, K M

    2001-07-01

    Clinicians regularly assess concussion according to the symptoms that an athlete manifests at the time of injury, as well as during subsequent evaluations. The subjectivity involved with symptom assessment, however, often leaves the clinician without a clear picture of the athlete's true mental status. Neuropsychologic testing has become very popular in the sports medicine community for assessing the cognitive domain of neurologic functioning, and postural stability testing is gaining credence for assessing the motor domain. The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of postural stability testing as an adjunct to concussion assessment of athletes. Multiple studies, using both sophisticated force plate technology, as well as those using less sophisticated clinical balance tests, have identified postural stability deficits lasting several days following sport-related concussion. It appears that postural stability testing provides a useful tool for objectively assessing the motor domain of neurologic functioning, and should be considered a reliable and valid adjunct to the assessment of athletes suffering from concussion. Although symptom severity, neurocognitive function, and postural stability are often affected initially following concussion, they are not necessarily related or even affected to the same degree.

  19. Postural control during standing reach in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao-Ling; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Howe, Tsu-Hsin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the dynamic postural control of children with Down syndrome (DS). Specifically, we compared postural control and goal-directed reaching performance between children with DS and typically developing children during standing reach. Standing reach performance was analyzed in three main phases using the kinematic and kinetic data collected from a force plate and a motion capture system. Fourteen children with DS, age and gender matched with fourteen typically developing children, were recruited for this study. The results showed that the demand of the standing reach task affected both dynamic postural control and reaching performance in children with DS, especially in the condition of beyond arm's length reaching. More postural adjustment strategies were recruited when reaching distance was beyond arm's length. Children with DS tended to use inefficient and conservative strategies for postural stability and reaching. That is, children with DS perform standing reach with increased reaction and execution time and decreased amplitudes of center of pressure displacements. Standing reach resembled functional balance that is required in daily activities. It is suggested to be considered as a part of strength and balance training program with graded task difficulty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of emotional videos on postural control in children.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Arthur de Freitas; Palluel, Estelle; Olivier, Isabelle; Nougier, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    The link between emotions and postural control has been rather unexplored in children. The objective of the present study was to establish whether the projection of pleasant and unpleasant videos with similar arousal would lead to specific postural responses such as postural freezing, aversive or appetitive behaviours as a function of age. We hypothesized that postural sway would similarly increase with the viewing of high arousal videos in children and adults, whatever the emotional context. 40 children participated in the study and were divided into two groups of age: group 7-9 years (n=23; mean age=8 years ± 0.7) and group 10-12 years (n=17; mean age=11 years ± 0.7). 19 adults (mean age=25.8 years ± 4.4) also took part in the experiment. They viewed emotional videos while standing still on a force platform. Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were analysed. Antero-posterior, medio-lateral mean speed and sway path length increased similarly with the viewing of high arousal movies in the younger, older children, and adults. Our findings suggest that the development of postural control is not influenced by the maturation of the emotional processing.

  1. Anticipatory postural adjustments in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vennila; Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2012-01-11

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently exhibit difficulties in balance maintenance. It is known that anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) play an important role in postural control. However, no information exists on how people living with MS utilize APAs for control of posture. A group of individuals with MS and a group of healthy control subjects performed rapid arm flexion and extension movements while standing on a force platform. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of six trunk and leg muscles and displacement of center of pressure (COP) were recorded and quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Individuals with MS demonstrated diminished ability to produce directional specific patterns of anticipatory EMGs as compared to control subjects. In addition, individuals with MS demonstrated smaller magnitudes of anticipatory muscle activation. This was associated with larger displacements of the COP during the balance restoration phase. These results suggest the importance of anticipatory postural control in maintenance of vertical posture in individuals with MS. The outcome of the study could be used while developing rehabilitation strategies focused on balance restoration in individuals with MS.

  2. Effect of posture positions on the evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y S; Fan, J T; Yu, W

    2011-03-01

    Evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing are important parameters in the design and engineering of thermal environments and functional clothing. Past work on the measurement of evaporative resistance of clothing was, however, limited to the standing posture with or without body motion. Information on the evaporative resistance of clothing when the wearer is in a sedentary or supine posture and how it is related to that when the wearer is in a standing posture is lacking. This paper presents original data on the effect of postures on the evaporative resistance of clothing, thermal insulation and permeability index, based on the measurements under three postures, viz. standing, sedentary and supine, using the sweating fabric manikin-Walter. Regression models are also established to relate the evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing under sedentary and supine postures to those under the standing posture. The study further shows that the apparent evaporated resistances of standing and sedentary postures measured in the non-isothermal condition are much lower than those in the isothermal condition. The apparent evaporative resistances measured using the mass loss method are generally lower than those measured using the heat loss method due to moisture absorption or condensation within clothing. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The thermal insulation and evaporative resistance values of clothing ensembles under different postures are essential data for the ergonomics design of thermal environments (e.g. indoors or a vehicle's interior environment) and functional clothing. They are also necessary for the prediction of thermal comfort or duration of exposure in different environmental conditions.

  3. [What are the effects of the aging of the neuromuscular system on postural stability?].

    PubMed

    Cattagni, Thomas; Scaglioni, Gil; Cornu, Christophe; Berrut, Gilles; Martin, Alain

    2015-12-01

    Aging is frequently associated with a decreased postural stability, essentially after 60 years, leading to an increased risk of falling. In this article we propose to highlight the influence of the aging of the neuromuscular system on postural stability when standing upright. To maintain balance while standing upright, human needs to control the activity of ankle muscles and particularly the plantar flexors. During the aging process, the performance of these muscles are strongly altered. It is commonly observed large deficits in elderly people with history of falls. Some authors reported an inverse correlation between the amplitude of postural sway and the capacity of force production of ankle muscles suggesting that the assessment of neuromuscular function could be an index of postural stability or even of the falling risk. Finally, enhance the strength of ankle muscles in elderly through physical exercise could be an adequate intervention to improve postural stability and reduce the incidence of falls.

  4. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  5. School Library Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Instructional Resources Branch.

    The School Library Policy Statement for Manitoba schools begins with the mission statement of Manitoba Education and Training and the Goals of Learning for Manitoba. Statements of Manitoba's School Library Policy and the Philosophy of the School Library Program are also provided, together with an outline of the responsibilities of both Manitoba's…

  6. An Increase in Postural Load Facilitates an Anterior Shift of Processing Resources to Frontal Executive Function in a Postural-Suprapostural Task

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Ya; Chang, Gwo-Ching; Tsai, Yi-Ying; Hwang, Ing-Shiou

    2016-01-01

    Increase in postural-demand resources does not necessarily degrade a concurrent motor task, according to the adaptive resource-sharing hypothesis of postural-suprapostural dual-tasking. This study investigated how brain networks are organized to optimize a suprapostural motor task when the postural load increases and shifts postural control into a less automatic process. Fourteen volunteers executed a designated force-matching task from a level surface (a relative automatic process in posture) and from a stabilometer board while maintaining balance at a target angle (a relatively controlled process in posture). Task performance of the postural and suprapostural tasks, synchronization likelihood (SL) of scalp EEG, and graph-theoretical metrics were assessed. Behavioral results showed that the accuracy and reaction time of force-matching from a stabilometer board were not affected, despite a significant increase in postural sway. However, force-matching in the stabilometer condition showed greater local and global efficiencies of the brain networks than force-matching in the level-surface condition. Force-matching from a stabilometer board was also associated with greater frontal cluster coefficients, greater mean SL of the frontal and sensorimotor areas, and smaller mean SL of the parietal-occipital cortex than force-matching from a level surface. The contrast of supra-threshold links in the upper alpha and beta bands between the two stance conditions validated load-induced facilitation of inter-regional connections between the frontal and sensorimotor areas, but that contrast also indicated connection suppression between the right frontal-temporal and the parietal-occipital areas for the stabilometer stance condition. In conclusion, an increase in stance difficulty alters the neurocognitive processes in executing a postural-suprapostural task. Suprapostural performance is not degraded by increase in postural load, due to (1) increased effectiveness of information

  7. Imaging Posture Veils Neural Signals

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Robert T.; Raz, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Whereas modern brain imaging often demands holding body positions incongruent with everyday life, posture governs both neural activity and cognitive performance. Humans commonly perform while upright; yet, many neuroimaging methodologies require participants to remain motionless and adhere to non-ecological comportments within a confined space. This inconsistency between ecological postures and imaging constraints undermines the transferability and generalizability of many a neuroimaging assay. Here we highlight the influence of posture on brain function and behavior. Specifically, we challenge the tacit assumption that brain processes and cognitive performance are comparable across a spectrum of positions. We provide an integrative synthesis regarding the increasingly prominent influence of imaging postures on autonomic function, mental capacity, sensory thresholds, and neural activity. Arguing that neuroimagers and cognitive scientists could benefit from considering the influence posture wields on both general functioning and brain activity, we examine existing imaging technologies and the potential of portable and versatile imaging devices (e.g., functional near infrared spectroscopy). Finally, we discuss ways that accounting for posture may help unveil the complex brain processes of everyday cognition. PMID:27818629

  8. The effects of wind and posture on the aerodynamic performance during the flight stage of skiing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifeng; Fang, Haisheng

    2011-09-01

    Numerical simulation is conducted to evaluate the wind and posture effects on the aerodynamic performance of a skier during the flight stage. Both steady and unsteady models are applied on a 2D geometry. Using the Fluent code, the fundamental equations of fluid flow are solved simultaneously. In particular we focus on the influence of wind speed and direction on aerodynamic forces with several different postures of the skier in steady modeling. For a chosen case, the unsteady models are used to predict the transient characteristics of streamline distributions and aerodynamic forces. It is found that the skier's postures, wind speed, and direction play a significant role. The wind condition affects the pressure force (the form drag) on the skier and makes it a resistance or thrust regarding wind directions. The optimized posture with a minimization of resistance under a facing wind is determined as a moving-forward body of the skier. The unsteady modeling reveals that the wake around the skier and aerodynamic forces are strongly dependent on time. This initial study not only provides a qualitative and theoretical basis for the athletes to understand the effects of wind and postures, and then to optimize their postures according to the wind condition during the flight stage of skiing, but also builds the foundation for the systematic study of skiing process with more advanced CFD models in the future.

  9. Vertical heterophoria and postural control in nonspecific chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Matheron, Eric; Kapoula, Zoï

    2011-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to test postural control during quiet standing in nonspecific chronic low back pain (LBP) subjects with vertical heterophoria (VH) before and after cancellation of VH; also to compare with healthy subjects with, and without VH. Fourteen subjects with LBP took part in this study. The postural performance was measured through the center of pressure displacements with a force platform while the subjects fixated on a target placed at either 40 or 200 cm, before and after VH cancellation with an appropriate prism. Their postural performance was compared to that of 14 healthy subjects with VH and 12 without VH (i.e. vertical orthophoria) studied previously in similar conditions. For LBP subjects, cancellation of VH with a prism improved postural performance. With respect to control subjects (with or without VH), the variance of speed of the center of pressure was higher, suggesting more energy was needed to stabilize their posture in quiet upright stance. Similarly to controls, LBP subjects showed higher postural sway when they were looking at a target at a far distance than at a close distance. The most important finding is that LBP subjects with VH can improve their performance after prism-cancellation of their VH. We suggest that VH reflects mild conflict between sensory and motor inputs involved in postural control i.e. a non optimal integration of the various signals. This could affect the performance of postural control and perhaps lead to pain. Nonspecific chronic back pain may results from such prolonged conflict.

  10. Paw preference is not affected by postural demand in a nonprimate mammal (Felis silvestris catus).

    PubMed

    Konerding, Wiebke S; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Bleich, Eva; Zimmermann, Elke

    2012-02-01

    Previously, it has been thought that handedness is unique to humans. Recently, it has been found that hand or paw preferences are common among a variety of vertebrate species. Different models have been put forth to describe the evolution of primate handedness. In this study we aimed to explore whether these models can also be used to predict manual laterality in nonprimate mammalian groups. The cat (Felis silvestris catus) is a good nonprimate model for manual laterality, as cats frequently use paws to catch and hold prey. Cats were exposed to two standardized manual laterality tasks, differing in postural demand. Subjects (N = 28) were forced to use either a stable or unstable body posture (i.e., sitting or standing vs. vertical clinging) to extract food items from a plastic box attached at two different heights. We revealed that cats exhibited paw preferences at an individual level with about 40% left, 30% right, 30% nonlateralized subjects. Postural demand was linked to task difficulty: the unstable body posture was found to be significantly more difficult than the stable body posture. However, these differences in postural demand and task difficulty did not lead to differences in direction or strength of paw preference. Findings suggested that nonprimate mammals differ from primates in their sensitivity to task related factors, such as postural demand. Results coincide with those of some prosimians, providing support for the hypothesis that postural demand and the associated task complexity became influencing factors on manual laterality in the course of primate evolution.

  11. Physical Demand Profiles of Hatha Yoga Postures Performed by Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Salem, George J.; Yu, Sean S.-Y.; Samarawickrame, Sachithra; Azen, Stanley P.; Greendale, Gail A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the physical demands placed upon the musculoskeletal system by individual postures may allow experienced instructors and therapists to develop safe and effective yoga programs which reduce undesirable side effects. Thus, we used biomechanical methods to quantify the lower extremity joint angles, joint moments of force, and muscle activities of 21 Hatha yoga postures, commonly used in senior yoga programs. Twenty older adults, 70.7 years ± 3.8 years, participated in a 32-wk yoga class (2 d/wk) where they learned introductory and intermediate postures (asanas). They then performed the asanas in a motion analysis laboratory. Kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic data was collected over three seconds while the participants held the poses statically. Profiles illustrating the postures and including the biomechanical data were then generated for each asana. Our findings demonstrated that Hatha yoga postures engendered a range of appreciable joint angles, JMOFs, and muscle activities about the ankle, knee, and hip, and that demands associated with some postures and posture modifications were not always intuitive. They also demonstrated that all of the postures elicited appreciable rectus abdominis activity, which was up to 70% of that induced during walking. PMID:24282431

  12. Postural control and fear of falling in persons with low-level paraplegia.

    PubMed

    John, Ligie T; Cherian, Binu; Babu, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Falls are prevalent reasons for spinal cord injury (SCI). Postinjury fear of falling (FOF) can affect rehabilitation potential. We quantified FOF in 15 men with paraplegia (ambulatory with bilateral knee-ankle-foot orthoses [KAFOs] and elbow crutches) in correlation with their postural control at the center for long-term SCI rehabilitation of a tertiary-care teaching hospital. Our outcome measures comprised the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale, the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES), postural sway measurements in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions; and walking speed, cadence, and endurance. We assessed FOF with the MFES followed by measuring postural sway with a force platform. We measured gait parameters by asking the participant to ambulate on an indoor pathway. The mean postural sway was 314.13 +/- 184.05 mm (mean +/- standard deviation) in the anteroposterior direction and 222.16 +/- 112.34 mm in the mediolateral direction. The MFES score was 41.29 +/- 12.77, which showed a statistically significant negative correlation with postural control. The self-perception of confidence as measured by MFES might not really represent the actual postural stability in individuals with low-level paraplegia. FOF can adversely affect the postural control of individuals with low-level paraplegia. Clinicians should consider FOF as an influential factor in postural control during rehabilitation.

  13. The Contribution of Pre-impact Spine Posture on Human Body Model Response in Whole-body Side Impact.

    PubMed

    Poulard, David; Subit, Damien; Donlon, John-Paul; Lessley, David J; Kim, Taewung; Park, Gwansik; Kent, Richard W

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze independently the contribution of pre-impact spine posture on impact response by subjecting a finite element human body model (HBM) to whole-body, lateral impacts. Seven postured models were created from the original HBM: one matching the standard driving posture and six matching pre-impact posture measured for each of six subjects tested in previously published experiments. The same measurements as those obtained during the experiments were calculated from the simulations, and biofidelity metrics based on signals correlation were established to compare the response of HBM to that of the cadavers. HBM responses showed good correlation with the subject response for the reaction forces, the rib strain (correlation score=0.8) and the overall kinematics. The pre-impact posture was found to greatly alter the reaction forces, deflections and the strain time histories mainly in terms of time delay. By modifying only the posture of HBM, the variability in the impact response was found to be equivalent to that observed in the experiments performed with cadavers with different anthropometries. The patterns observed in the responses of the postured HBM indicate that the inclination of the spine in the frontal plane plays a major role. The postured HBM sustained from 2 to 5 bone fractures, including the scapula in some cases, confirming that the pre-impact posture influences the injury outcome predicted by the simulation.

  14. Comparative effects of posture on pressure and shear at the body-seat interface.

    PubMed

    Hobson, D A

    1992-01-01

    This study considers the effects of seated posture and body orientation on the pressure-distribution and surface shear (tangential) forces acting at the body-seat interface. Nine postures typically assumed by wheel-chair users were studied. Comparisons were made within and between two study groups, made up of 12 subjects with spinal cord injuries (SCI) and 10 nondisabled subjects. Both interface pressure and the surface shear were measured simultaneously in each of nine reproducible, seated postures. The same seat cushion was used for all trials. The Oxford Pressure Monitor, a pneumatic cell device, was used to measure and record the interface pressures. Instrumentation for measuring and recording the surface shear force was constructed specifically for the study. Analysis consisted of statistically comparing changes in pressure values and shear forces derived from eight sitting postures with reference to values recorded in a defined neutral sitting posture. The pressure-distribution findings suggest that in the postures studied SCI subjects have maximum pressures that are higher than nondisabled subjects in all postures, ranging from 6% to 46% depending on the posture. Maximum pressures can be reduced by postural changes: forward flexion to 50 degrees, -9%; backrest recline to 120 degrees, -12%; and, full body tilt, -11%. On average, the SCI group members have peak pressure gradients (PPG) that are 1.5 to 2.5 greater than the nondisabled group. The maximum reduction in PPG occurred at backrest recline of 120 degrees, -18%. Tangential shear force acts at the body-seat interface in all nine postures studied. Extrapolation of results suggests that full-body tilt to approximately 25 degrees reduces the surface shear force to near zero. In contrast, a backrest-only recline of 20 degrees causes a 25% increase in the surface shear force. These results suggest that caution must be taken when using nondisabled subjects as surrogates for people with SCI because of the

  15. Postural reorganization induced by torso cutaneous covibration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom-Chan; Martin, Bernard J; Ho, Allison; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous information from joints has been attributed proprioceptive properties similar to those of muscle spindles. This study aimed to assess whether vibration-induced changes in torso cutaneous information contribute to whole-body postural reorganization in humans. Ten healthy young adults stood in normal and Romberg stances with six vibrating actuators positioned on the torso in contact with the skin over the left and right external oblique, internal oblique, and erector spinae muscle locations at the L4/L5 vertebrae level. Vibrations around the torso were randomly applied at two locations simultaneously (covibration) or at all locations simultaneously. Kinematic analysis of the body segments indicated that covibration applied to the skin over the internal oblique muscles induced shifts of both the head and torso in the anterior direction (torso flexion) while the hips shifted in the posterior direction (ankle plantar flexion). Conversely, covibration applied to the skin over the erector spinae muscle locations produced opposite effects. However, covibration applied to the skin over the left internal oblique and left erector spinae, the right internal oblique and right erector spinae, or at all locations simultaneously did not induce any significant postural changes. In addition, the center of pressure position as measured by the force plate was unaffected by all covibration conditions tested. These results were independent of stance and suggest an integrated and coordinated reorganization of posture in response to vibration-induced changes in cutaneous information. In addition, combinations of vibrotactile stimuli over multiple locations exhibit directional summation properties in contrast to the individual responses we observed in our previous work.

  16. Postural Stability When Leaning from Perceived Upright

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanya, Robert D.; Grounds, John F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    The transition between quiet stance and gait requires the volitional movement of one?s center of mass (COM) toward a limit of stability (LOS). The goal of this study was to measure the effect of leaning from perceived upright on postural stability when voluntarily maintaining fixed stance positions and during perturbations of the support surface. The COM was derived from force plate data in 12 healthy subjects while standing with feet positioned so that lateral base of support was equal to foot length. For all conditions, arms were folded and subjects were instructed to lean without bending at the hips or lifting their feet. The LOS was determined during maximal voluntary leans with eyes open and closed. The COM was then displayed on a monitor located in front of the subject. Subjects were visually guided to lean toward a target position, maintain this position for 10s, return to upright, and then repeat the same targeted lean maneuver with eyes closed. Targets were randomly presented at 2? in 8 directions and between 2-6? in these same directions according to the asymmetric LOS. Subjects were then verbally guided to lean between 2? back and 4? forward prior to a perturbation of the support surface in either a forward or backward direction. The average LOS was 5.8? forward, 2.9? back, and 4.8? in left/right directions, with no significant difference between eyes open and closed. Center of pressure (COP) velocity increased as subjects maintained fixed stance positions farther from upright, with increased variability during eyes closed conditions. The time to stability and COP path length increased as subjects leaned opposite to the direction of the support surface perturbations. We conclude that postural stability is compromised as subjects lean away from perceived upright, except for perturbations that induce sway in the direction opposite the lean. The asymmetric LOS relative to perceived upright favors postural stability for COM movements in the forward direction.

  17. Disparity of a seat cushion and its influence on postural control.

    PubMed

    Nag, Pranab K; Nag, Anjali; Vyas, Heer; Shah, Priyanka

    2013-01-01

    Properties of supporting surfaces of a seat have an influence on postural control. Centre of pressure (COP) displacement parameters reflect both the balance controlling process and movements of the centre of a mass of entire body. The subjects of the study were 9 healthy men. A seat cushion was examined with a 2-force platform setup. Force exertion at a seat pan and feet and COP displacement at a seat pan were measured to analyse postural control. Analysis of variance determined the differences in postural control depending on a cushion type among the subjects. Significant differences in COP displacement parameters were in COP trajectory length, medio-lateral COP displacement and COP velocity. The results of the study showed that foam cushion ensures better postural control.

  18. Postural threat influences conscious perception of postural sway.

    PubMed

    Cleworth, Taylor W; Carpenter, Mark G

    2016-05-04

    This study examined how changes in threat influenced conscious perceptions of postural sway. Young healthy adults stood on a forceplate mounted to a hydraulic lift placed at two heights (0.8m and 3.2m). At each height, subjects stood quietly with eyes open and eyes closed for 60s. Subjects were instructed to either stand normal, or stand normal and track their perceived sway in the antero-posterior plane by rotating a hand-held potentiometer. Participants reported an increased level of fear, anxiety, arousal and a decreased level of balance confidence when standing at height. In addition, postural sway amplitude decreased and frequency increased at height. However, there were no effects of height on perceived sway. When standing under conditions of increased postural threat, sway amplitude is reduced, while sway perception appears to remain unchanged. Therefore, when threat is increased, sensory gain may be increased to compensate for postural strategies that reduce sway (i.e. stiffening strategy), thereby ensuring sufficient afferent information is available to maintain, or even increase the conscious perception of postural sway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Does postural chain mobility influence muscular control in sitting ramp pushes?

    PubMed

    Le Bozec, Serge; Bouisset, Simon

    2004-10-01

    This study was conducted under the hypothesis that voluntary movement involves a perturbation of body balance and that a counter-perturbation has to be developed to limit the perturbation effects, which is a condition necessary to perform the movement efficiently. The stabilising action is produced in body segments that constitute the "postural" chain, and the voluntary movement by the segments said to constitute the "focal" chain. In order to deepen the understanding of how the postural chain contributes to the motor act, isometric transient efforts were considered. Seven adults in a sitting posture were instructed to exert bilateral horizontal pushes on a dynamometric bar, as rapidly as possible, up to their maximal force (Fx). Two sitting conditions were considered: full ischio-femoral contact (100 BP) and one-third ischio-femoral contact (30 BP), the latter being known to yield greater pelvis and spine mobility, that is greater postural mobility. Each session consisted of ten maximal pushes for each sitting condition. In order to explore the influence of postural mobility on muscular control and push force, surface EMGs of 14 postural and focal muscles were recorded. In addition, reaction forces (Rx) and displacement (Xp) of the centre of pressure (along the anteroposterior axis) were measured, as well as iliac crest acceleration (xh and zh, along the anteroposterior and vertical axes, respectively). The results showed that push force varied abruptly during the task ramp effort. When the ischio-femoral contact was limited, push force was enhanced, as well as the rate of push force rise (Fx/Deltat, Deltat being the force rise duration), suggesting a greater perturbation to balance. Also, there were significant increases in the Rx reaction forces, indicating body segment acceleration: "dynamic" phenomena occurred in the articulated body chain in response to increases in Fx. In addition, even though muscular contraction was isometric, postural EMGs, as well as

  20. 32 CFR 989.16 - Environmental impact statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Environmental impact statement. 989.16 Section 989.16 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.16 Environmental impact statement. (a) Certain...

  1. 32 CFR 989.16 - Environmental impact statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Environmental impact statement. 989.16 Section 989.16 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.16 Environmental impact statement. (a) Certain...

  2. 32 CFR 989.16 - Environmental impact statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Environmental impact statement. 989.16 Section 989.16 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.16 Environmental impact statement. (a) Certain...

  3. 32 CFR 989.16 - Environmental impact statement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Environmental impact statement. 989.16 Section 989.16 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.16 Environmental impact statement. (a) Certain...

  4. Effect of Social Stimuli on Postural Responses in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghanouni, Parisa; Memari, Amir-Hossein; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Eghlidi, Jandark; Moshayedi, Pouria

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of social versus non-social stimuli on postural responses in 21 boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (mean age of 11.6 ± 1.5) compared with 30 typically developing (TD) boys (mean age of 11.7 ± 1.8). Postural control of children was examined while they were standing on a force plate and viewing…

  5. The impact of posture and prolonged cyclic compressive loading on vertebral joint mechanics.

    PubMed

    Gooyers, Chad E; McMillan, Robert D; Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P

    2012-08-01

    An in vitro biomechanics investigation exposing porcine functional spinal units (FSUs) to submaximal cyclic or static compressive forces while in a flexed, neutral, or extended posture. To investigate the combined effect of cyclically applied compressive force (e.g., vibration) and postural deviation on intervertebral joint mechanics. Independently, prolonged vibration exposure and non-neutral postures are known risk factors for development of low back pain and injury. However, there is limited basic scientific evidence to explain how the risk of low back injury from vibration exposure is modified by other mechanical factors. This work examined the influence of static postural deviation on vertebral joint height loss and compressive stiffness under cyclically applied compressive force. Forty-eight FSUs, consisting of 2 adjacent vertebrae, ligaments, and the intervening intervertebral disc were included in the study. Each specimen was randomized to 1 of 3 experimental posture conditions (neutral, flexed, or extended) and assigned to 1 of 2 loading protocols, consisting of (1) cyclic (1500 ± 1200 N applied at 5 Hz using a sinusoidal waveform, resulting in 0.2 g rms acceleration) or (2) 1500 N of static compressive force. RESULTS.: As expected, FSU height loss followed a typical first-order response in both the static and cyclic loading protocols, with the majority (~50%) of the loss occurring in the first 20 minutes of testing. A significant interaction between posture and loading protocol (P < 0.001) was noted in the magnitude of FSU height loss. Subsequent analysis of simple effects revealed significant differences between cyclic and static loading protocols in both a neutral (P = 0.016) and a flexed posture (P < 0.0001). No significant differences (P = 0.320) were noted between pre/postmeasurements of FSU compressive stiffness. Posture is an important mechanical factor to consider when assessing the risk of injury from cyclic loading to the lumbar spine.

  6. Lumbar spine postures in marines during simulated operational positions.

    PubMed

    Berry, David B; Rodríguez-Soto, Ana E; Su, Jeannie; Gombatto, Sara P; Shahidi, Bahar; Palombo, Laura; Chung, Christine; Jensen, Andrew; Kelly, Karen R; Ward, Samuel R

    2017-01-04

    Low back pain has a 70% higher prevalence in members of the armed forces than in the general population, possibly due to the loads and positions soldiers experience during training and combat. Although the influence of heavy load carriage on standing lumbar spine posture in this population is known, postures in other operationally relevant positions are unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to characterize the effect of simulated military operational positions under relevant loading conditions on global and local lumbar spine postures in active duty male US Marines. Secondary objectives were to evaluate if intervertebral disc degeneration and low back pain affect lumbar spine postures. Magnetic resonance images were acquired on an upright scanner in the following operational positions: Natural standing with no external load, standing with body armor (11.3 kg), sitting with body armor, and prone on elbows with body armor. Custom software was used to measure global lumbar spine posture: Lumbosacral flexion, sacral slope, lordosis, local measures of intervertebral angles, and intervertebral distances. Sitting resulted in decreased lumbar lordosis at all levels of the spine except L1-L2. When subjects were prone on elbows, a significant increase in local lordosis was observed only at L5-S1 compared with all other positions. Marines with disc degeneration (77%) or history of low back pain (72%) had decreased lumbar range of motion and less lumbar extension than healthy Marines. These results indicate that a male Marine's pathology undergoes a stereotypic set of postural changes during functional tasks, which may impair performance. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 9999:XX-XX, 2017.

  7. Effects of Four Days Hiking on Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; de Avelar, Ivan Silveira; Silva, Maria Sebastiana; Soares, Viviane; Lobo da Costa, Paula Hentschel

    2015-01-01

    Hiking is a demanding form of exercise that may cause delayed responses of the postural muscles and a loss of somatosensory information, particularly when repeatedly performed for several days. These effects may negatively influence the postural control of hikers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a four-day hike on postural control. Twenty-six adults of both sexes travelled 262 kilometers, stopping for lunch and resting in the early evening each day. Force platforms were used to collect center of pressure (COP) data at 100 Hz for 70 seconds before hiking started and immediately after arriving at the rest station each day. The COP time course data were analyzed according to global stabilometric descriptors, spectral analysis and structural descriptors using sway density curve (SDC) and stabilometric diffusion analysis (SDA). Significant increases were found for global variables in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions (COP sway area, COP total sway path, COP mean velocity, COP root mean square value and COP range). In the spectral analysis, only the 80% power frequency (F80) in the anterior-posterior direction showed a significant increase, reflecting the increase of the sway frequencies. The SDC revealed a significant increase in the mean distance between peaks (MD) and a significant decrease in the mean peak amplitudes (MP), suggesting that a larger torque amplitude is required for stabilization and that the postural stability is reduced. The SDA revealed a decrease in the long-term slope (Hl) and increases in the short-term (Ks) and the long-term (Kl) intercepts. We considered the likelihood that the presence of local and general fatigue, pain and related neuromuscular adaptations and somatosensory deficits may have contributed to these postural responses. Together, these results demonstrated that four days of hiking increased sway frequencies and deteriorated postural control in the standing position. PMID

  8. Sagittal plane trunk posture influences patellofemoral joint stress during running.

    PubMed

    Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Powers, Christopher M

    2014-10-01

    Cross-sectional, repeated-measures. Objectives To examine the association between sagittal plane trunk posture and patellofemoral joint (PFJ) stress, and to determine whether modifying sagittal plane trunk posture influences PFJ stress during running. Patellofemoral pain is the most common injury among runners and is thought to be the result of elevated PFJ stress. While sagittal plane trunk posture has been shown to influence tibiofemoral joint mechanics, no study has examined the influence of trunk posture on PFJ kinetics. Twenty-four asymptomatic recreational runners (12 women, 12 men) ran overground at a speed of 3.4 m/s under 3 trunk-posture conditions: self-selected, flexed, and extended. Trunk and knee kinematics, ground reaction forces, and electromyographic signals from selected lower extremity muscles were obtained. A previously described PFJ biomechanical model was used to quantify PFJ stress. The mean ± SD trunk flexion angles under the self-selected, flexed, and extended running conditions were 7.3° ± 3.6°, 14.1° ± 4.8°, and 4.0° ± 3.9°, respectively. A significant inverse relationship was observed between mean trunk flexion angle and peak PFJ stress during the self-selected condition (r = -0.60, P = .002). Peak PFJ stress was significantly lower in the flexed condition (mean ± SD, 20.2 ± 3.4 MPa; P<.001) and significantly higher in the extended condition (23.1 ± 3.4 MPa; P<.001) compared to the self-selected condition (21.5 ± 3.2 MPa). Sagittal plane trunk posture has a significant influence on PFJ kinetics during running. Incorporation of a forward trunk lean may be an effective strategy to reduce PFJ stress during running.

  9. Effects of four days hiking on postural control.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; de Avelar, Ivan Silveira; Silva, Maria Sebastiana; Soares, Viviane; Lobo da Costa, Paula Hentschel

    2015-01-01

    Hiking is a demanding form of exercise that may cause delayed responses of the postural muscles and a loss of somatosensory information, particularly when repeatedly performed for several days. These effects may negatively influence the postural control of hikers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a four-day hike on postural control. Twenty-six adults of both sexes travelled 262 kilometers, stopping for lunch and resting in the early evening each day. Force platforms were used to collect center of pressure (COP) data at 100 Hz for 70 seconds before hiking started and immediately after arriving at the rest station each day. The COP time course data were analyzed according to global stabilometric descriptors, spectral analysis and structural descriptors using sway density curve (SDC) and stabilometric diffusion analysis (SDA). Significant increases were found for global variables in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions (COP sway area, COP total sway path, COP mean velocity, COP root mean square value and COP range). In the spectral analysis, only the 80% power frequency (F80) in the anterior-posterior direction showed a significant increase, reflecting the increase of the sway frequencies. The SDC revealed a significant increase in the mean distance between peaks (MD) and a significant decrease in the mean peak amplitudes (MP), suggesting that a larger torque amplitude is required for stabilization and that the postural stability is reduced. The SDA revealed a decrease in the long-term slope (Hl) and increases in the short-term (Ks) and the long-term (Kl) intercepts. We considered the likelihood that the presence of local and general fatigue, pain and related neuromuscular adaptations and somatosensory deficits may have contributed to these postural responses. Together, these results demonstrated that four days of hiking increased sway frequencies and deteriorated postural control in the standing position.

  10. The effect of smartphone usage time on posture and respiratory function

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang In; Lee, Na Kyung; Kang, Kyung Woo; Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Do Youn

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in posture and respiratory functions depending on the duration of smartphone usage. [Subjects and Methods] Participants were randomly allocated to 2 groups: group 1 (subjects who used smartphones for <4 hours/day, n=25) and group 2 (subjects who used smartphones for >4 hours/day, n=25). The craniovertebral angles of all participants were measured and scapular indices were calculated to assess the change in posture and forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow were measured to assess changes in respiratory function. [Results] There were significant differences in the craniovertebral angle, scapular index, and peak expiratory flow depending on the duration of smartphone usage. [Conclusion] The result of this study showed that prolonged use of smartphones could negatively affect both, posture and respiratory function. PMID:26957754

  11. Motor systems and postural instability.

    PubMed

    Vassar, Rachel L; Rose, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependence alter the neurologic control of posture and motor function. Ethanol delays the conduction of electric signals from the central nervous system to the muscles controlling posture and impairs the integration of sensory inputs required for maintaining vertical stance. Consequently, alcohol intoxication delays the ability to detect postural changes and enact the appropriate response. Common signs of acute alcohol intoxication include spinocerebellar and vestibulocerebellar ataxia, oculomotor changes, and increased reliance on visuospatial clues. Chronic alcoholism results in postural tremors and excessive sway during quiet stance that can persist even after sobriety is achieved. Underlying neurologic changes due to chronic alcoholism have been found to be associated with these characteristic postural changes and include decreased volume of the anterior superior vermis of the cerebellum, decreased connectivity within the corpus callosum, and overall cortical atrophy. Severity of motor impairments and other symptoms from alcoholism relate to a variety of factors, including duration of alcoholism, age, sex, and other health determinants and comorbidities. Imaging studies highlight the potential for partial recovery from neurologic and motor deficits caused by alcoholism. Emerging evidence on the motor and neurologic changes caused by alcohol dependence may allow for improved treatment and prevention of the morbidities associated with alcoholism.

  12. Improving posture-motor dual-task with a supraposture-focus strategy in young and elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shu-Han; Huang, Cheng-Ya

    2017-01-01

    In a postural-suprapostural task, appropriate prioritization is necessary to achieve task goals and maintain postural stability. A "posture-first" principle is typically favored by elderly people in order to secure stance stability, but this comes at the cost of reduced suprapostural performance. Using a postural-suprapostural task with a motor suprapostural goal, this study investigated differences between young and older adults in dual-task cost across varying task prioritization paradigms. Eighteen healthy young (mean age: 24.8 ± 5.2 years) and 18 older (mean age: 68.8 ± 3.7 years) adults executed a designated force-matching task from a stabilometer board using either a stabilometer stance (posture-focus strategy) or force-matching (supraposture-focus strategy) as the primary task. The dual-task effect (DTE: % change in dual-task condition; positive value: dual-task benefit, negative value: dual-task cost) of force-matching error and reaction time (RT), posture error, and approximate entropy (ApEn) of stabilometer movement were measured. When using the supraposture-focus strategy, young adults exhibited larger DTE values in each behavioral parameter than when using the posture-focus strategy. The older adults using the supraposture-focus strategy also attained larger DTE values for posture error, stabilometer movement ApEn, and force-matching error than when using the posture-focus strategy. These results suggest that the supraposture-focus strategy exerted an increased dual-task benefit for posture-motor dual-tasking in both healthy young and elderly adults. The present findings imply that the older adults should make use of the supraposture-focus strategy for fall prevention during dual-task execution.

  13. Improving posture-motor dual-task with a supraposture-focus strategy in young and elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shu-Han

    2017-01-01

    In a postural-suprapostural task, appropriate prioritization is necessary to achieve task goals and maintain postural stability. A “posture-first” principle is typically favored by elderly people in order to secure stance stability, but this comes at the cost of reduced suprapostural performance. Using a postural-suprapostural task with a motor suprapostural goal, this study investigated differences between young and older adults in dual-task cost across varying task prioritization paradigms. Eighteen healthy young (mean age: 24.8 ± 5.2 years) and 18 older (mean age: 68.8 ± 3.7 years) adults executed a designated force-matching task from a stabilometer board using either a stabilometer stance (posture-focus strategy) or force-matching (supraposture-focus strategy) as the primary task. The dual-task effect (DTE: % change in dual-task condition; positive value: dual-task benefit, negative value: dual-task cost) of force-matching error and reaction time (RT), posture error, and approximate entropy (ApEn) of stabilometer movement were measured. When using the supraposture-focus strategy, young adults exhibited larger DTE values in each behavioral parameter than when using the posture-focus strategy. The older adults using the supraposture-focus strategy also attained larger DTE values for posture error, stabilometer movement ApEn, and force-matching error than when using the posture-focus strategy. These results suggest that the supraposture-focus strategy exerted an increased dual-task benefit for posture-motor dual-tasking in both healthy young and elderly adults. The present findings imply that the older adults should make use of the supraposture-focus strategy for fall prevention during dual-task execution. PMID:28151943

  14. The role of haptic cues from rough and slippery surfaces in human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Haptic information is critically important in complex sensory-motor tasks such as manipulating objects. Its comparable importance in spatial orientation is only beginning to be recognized. We have shown that postural sway in humans is significantly reduced by lightly touching a stable surface with a fingertip at contact force levels far below those physically necessary to stabilize the body. To investigate further the functional relationship between contact forces at the hand and postural equilibrium, we had subjects stand in the tandem Romberg stance while being allowed physically supportive (force contact) and non-physically supportive (touch contact) amounts of index fingertip force on surfaces with different frictional characteristics. Mean sway amplitude (MSA) was reduced by over 50% with both touch and force contact of the fingertip, compared to standing without fingertip contact. No differences in MSA were observed when touching rough or slippery surfaces. The amplitude of EMG activity in the peroneal muscles and the timing relationships between fingertip forces, body sway and EMG activity suggested that with touch contact of the finger or with force contact on a slippery surface long-loop "reflexes" involving postural muscles were stabilizing sway. With force contact of the fingertip on a rough surface, MSA reduction was achieved primarily through physical support of the body. This pattern of results indicates that light touch contact cues from the fingertip in conjunction with proprioceptive signals about arm configuration are providing information about body sway that can be used to reduce MSA through postural muscle activation.

  15. The role of haptic cues from rough and slippery surfaces in human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Haptic information is critically important in complex sensory-motor tasks such as manipulating objects. Its comparable importance in spatial orientation is only beginning to be recognized. We have shown that postural sway in humans is significantly reduced by lightly touching a stable surface with a fingertip at contact force levels far below those physically necessary to stabilize the body. To investigate further the functional relationship between contact forces at the hand and postural equilibrium, we had subjects stand in the tandem Romberg stance while being allowed physically supportive (force contact) and non-physically supportive (touch contact) amounts of index fingertip force on surfaces with different frictional characteristics. Mean sway amplitude (MSA) was reduced by over 50% with both touch and force contact of the fingertip, compared to standing without fingertip contact. No differences in MSA were observed when touching rough or slippery surfaces. The amplitude of EMG activity in the peroneal muscles and the timing relationships between fingertip forces, body sway and EMG activity suggested that with touch contact of the finger or with force contact on a slippery surface long-loop "reflexes" involving postural muscles were stabilizing sway. With force contact of the fingertip on a rough surface, MSA reduction was achieved primarily through physical support of the body. This pattern of results indicates that light touch contact cues from the fingertip in conjunction with proprioceptive signals about arm configuration are providing information about body sway that can be used to reduce MSA through postural muscle activation.

  16. Automatic and Interactive Key Posture Design by Combing the PIK with Parametric Posture Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shilei; Wu, Bing; Liang, Jiahong; Su, Jiongming

    Key posture design is commonly needed in computer animation. This paper presents an automatic and interactive whole body posture designing technique by combining the PIK (prioritized inverse kinematics) with the proposed parametric human posture splicing technique. The key feature of PIK is that the user can design a posture by adding high level constraints with different priorities. However, the PIK is essentially a numerical IK algorithm which relies on the iterative optimization starting from a good enough initial posture to get the final result. To speed up the running efficiency and ensure the lifelikeness of the final posture, the parametric posture splicing technique is proposed to generate the initial guess of the PIK. According to the set of the high level constraints, the whole body is divided into some partial parts, whose postures are then generated by the parametric posture synthesis from a single posture database. Then an initial posture guess with some main characteristics of the finally acceptable posture can be generated approximately by splicing these partial body postures together. Starting from this initial guess and with all constraints considered at different priority levels, the PIK can be initialized with a bias defined by this particularly initial guess and iterated step by step to get a final posture. The total process of the whole body posture generation is automatic and interactive. The experimental results show that this combination method can not only improve the computation efficiency of the PIK but also can simultaneously ensure the naturalness of the final posture.

  17. Postural Performance and Strategy in the Unipedal Stance of Soccer Players at Different Levels of Competition

    PubMed Central

    Paillard, Thierry; Noé, Frédéric; Rivière, Terence; Marion, Vincent; Montoya, Richard; Dupui, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Context: Sport training enhances the ability to use somatosensory and otolithic information, which improves postural capabilities. Postural changes are different according to the sport practiced, but few authors have analyzed subjects' postural performances to discriminate the expertise level among highly skilled athletes within a specific discipline. Objective: To compare the postural performance and the postural strategy between soccer players at different levels of competition (national and regional). Design: Repeated measures with 1 between-groups factor (level of competition: national or regional) and 1 within-groups factor (vision: eyes open or eyes closed). Dependent variables were center-of-pressure surface area and velocity; total spectral energy; and percentage of low-, medium-, and high-frequency band. Setting: Sports performance laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Fifteen national male soccer players (age = 24 ± 3 years, height = 179 ± 5 cm, mass = 72 ± 3 kg) and 15 regional male soccer players (age = 23 ± 3 years, height = 174 ± 4 cm, mass = 68 ± 5 kg) participated in the study. Intervention(s): The subjects performed posturographic tests with eyes open and closed. Main Outcome Measure(s): While subjects performed static and dynamic posturographic tests, we measured the center of foot pressure on a force platform. Spatiotemporal center-of-pressure measurements were used to evaluate the postural performance, and a frequency analysis of the center-of-pressure excursions (fast Fourier transform) was conducted to estimate the postural strategy. Results: Within a laboratory task, national soccer players produced better postural performances than regional players and had a different postural strategy. The national players were more stable than the regional players and used proprioception and vision information differently. Conclusions: In the test conditions specific to playing soccer, level of playing experience influenced postural control

  18. Effects of hip posture on the frontal impact tolerance of the human hip joint.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Jonathan D; Reed, Matthew P; Jeffreys, Thomas A; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2003-10-01

    The pattern of left- and right-side hip injuries to front-seat occupants involved in offset and angled frontal crashes suggests that hip posture (i.e., the orientation of the femur relative to the pelvis) affects the fracture/dislocation tolerance of the hip joint to forces transmitted along the femur during knee-to-knee-bolster loading in frontal impacts. To investigate this hypothesis, dynamic hip tolerance tests were conducted on the left and right hips of 22 unembalmed cadavers. In these tests, the knee was dynamically loaded in the direction of the long axis of the femur and the pelvis was fixed to minimize inertial effects. Thirty-five successful hip tolerance tests were conducted. Twenty-five of these tests were performed with the hip oriented in a typical posture for a seated driver, or neutral posture, to provide a baseline measure of hip tolerance. The effects of hip posture on hip tolerance were quantified using a paired-comparison experimental design. In six pairs of tests, one side of each cadaver was tested with the hip joint oriented in the neutral posture and the contralateral hip from the same cadaver was tested with the hip joint adducted 10 degrees from the neutral posture. In four pairs of tests, the hip was tested in neutral and 30 degrees flexed postures. The average fracture tolerance of the hip in the neutral posture was 6.1-/+1.5 kN. Hip tolerance decreased by an average of 34-/+4% with 30 degrees of flexion from the neutral posture (p<0.0001) and by 18-/+8% with 10 degrees of adduction from the neutral posture (p=0.008).

  19. Postural control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Jackeline Yumi; Quitschal, Rafaela Maia; Doná, Flávia; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena

    2014-01-01

    Postural instability is one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease. To evaluate postural balance in Parkinson's disease. Thirty patients with Parkinson's disease were compared with controls using Tetrax™ interactive balance system posturography. For different positions, patients with Parkinson's disease showed a significantly higher weight distribution index, fall index, Fourier transformation at low-medium frequencies (F2-F4), and significantly lower right/left and toe/heel synchronization versus controls. Postural imbalance in Parkinson's disease patients is characterized by the abnormalities of weight distribution index, synchronization index, Fourier transformation index, and fall index as measured by Tetrax™ posturography. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Postural synergies and their development.

    PubMed

    Latash, Mark L; Krishnamoorthy, Vijaya; Scholz, John P; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2005-01-01

    The recent developments of a particular approach to analyzing motor synergies based on the principle of motor abundance has allowed a quantitative assessment of multi-effector coordination in motor tasks involving anticipatory adjustments to self-triggered postural perturbations and in voluntary postural sway. This approach, the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis, is based on an assumption that the central nervous system organizes covariation of elemental variables to stabilize important performance variables in a task-specific manner. In particular, this approach has been used to demonstrate and to assess the emergence of synergies and their modification with motor practice in typical persons and persons with Down syndrome. The framework of the UCM hypothesis allows the formulation of testable hypotheses with respect to developing postural synergies in typically and atypically developing persons.

  1. Is there an association between variables of postural control and strength in adolescents?

    PubMed

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert

    2011-06-01

    Is there an association between variables of postural control and strength in adolescents? The risk of sustaining sport injuries is particularly high in adolescents. Deficits in postural control and muscle strength represent 2 important intrinsic injury risk factors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between variables of static and dynamic postural control and isometric and dynamic muscle strength and to find out whether there is an association between measures of postural control and muscle strength. Twenty-eight adolescents participated in this study (age 16.8 ± 0.6 years; body mass index 20.5 ± 1.8 kg · m(-2)). Biomechanic tests included the measurements of maximal isometric leg extension force (MIF) and rate of force development (RFDmax) of the leg extensors on a leg press with the feet resting on a force platform, vertical jumping force, and height (countermovement jump [CMJ]) on a force plate and the assessment of static (1-legged stance on a balance platform) and dynamic (mediolateral perturbation impulse on a balance platform) postural control. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. No significant associations were observed between measures of static and dynamic postural control. Significant positive correlations were detected between variables of isometric and dynamic muscle strength with r-values ranging from 0.441 to 0.779 (p < 0.05). Based on these models, a 100-N increase in MIF of the leg extensors was associated with 3.9, 4.2, and 6.5% better maximal CMJ force, CMJ height, and RFDmax, respectively. No significant correlations were observed between variables of postural control and muscle strength. The nonsignificant correlation between static/dynamic postural control and muscle strength implies that primarily dynamic measures of postural control should be incorporated in injury risk assessment and that postural control and muscle strength are independent of each other and may have to be trained

  2. Deficits in Lower Limb Muscle Reflex Contraction Latency and Peak Force Are Associated With Impairments in Postural Control and Gross Motor Skills of Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Guo, X; Wang, Yuling; Chung, Raymond C K; Stat, Grad; Ki, W Y; Macfarlane, Duncan J

    2015-10-01

    This cross-sectional, exploratory study aimed to compare neuromuscular performance, balance and motor skills proficiencies of typically developing children and those with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and to determine associations of these neuromuscular factors with balance and motor skills performances in children with DCD.One hundred thirty children with DCD and 117 typically developing children participated in the study. Medial hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies in response to an unexpected posterior-to-anterior trunk perturbation were assessed by electromyography and accelerometer. Hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle peak force and time to peak force were quantified by dynamometer, and balance and motor skills performances were evaluated with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC).Independent t tests revealed that children with DCD had longer hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies (P < 0.001) and lower isometric peak forces (P < 0.001), but not times to peak forces (P > 0.025), than the controls. Multiple regression analysis accounting for basic demographics showed that gastrocnemius peak force was independently associated with the MABC balance subscore and ball skills subscore, accounting for 5.7% (P = 0.003) and 8.5% (P = 0.001) of the variance, respectively. Gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latency also explained 11.4% (P < 0.001) of the variance in the MABC ball skills subscore.Children with DCD had delayed leg muscle activation onset times and lower isometric peak forces. Gastrocnemius peak force was associated with balance and ball skills performances, whereas timing of gastrocnemius muscle activation was a determinant of ball skill performance in the DCD population.

  3. Posture kinematics reconstruction and body model creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffredo, M.; Schmid, M.; Conforto, S.; Carli, Marco; D'Alessio, Tommaso

    2004-05-01

    Postural ability can be evaluated through the analysis of body oscillations, by estimating the displacements of selected sets of body segments. The analysis of human movement is generally achieved through the exploitation of stereophotogrammetric systems that rely on the use of markers. Marker systems show a high cost and patient settings which can be uncomfortable. On the other hand, the use of force platform has some disadvantages: the acquisition of dynamics data permits to estimate only the body oscillations as a whole, without any information about individual body segment movements. Some of these drawbacks can be overcome by the use of video systems, applying a marker-free sub-pixel algorithm. In this paper, a novel method to evaluate balance strategies that utilises commercial available systems and applies methods for feature extraction and image processing algorithms is presented.

  4. Craniomandibular System and Postural Balance after 3-Day Dry Immersion

    PubMed Central

    Treffel, Loïc; Dmitrieva, Liubov; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Custaud, Marc-Antoine; Blanc, Stéphane; Gharib, Claude; Millet, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the influence of simulated microgravity by exposure to dry immersion on the craniomandibular system. Twelve healthy male volunteers participated in a 3-day dry immersion study. Before and immediately after exposure we measured maximal bite force using piezoresistive sensors. The mechanical properties of the jaw and cervical muscles were evaluated before, during, and after dry immersion using MyotonPRO. Because recent studies reported the effects of jaw motor activity on the postural stability of humans, stabilometric measurements of center of pressure were performed before and after dry immersion in two mandibular positions: rest position without jaw clenching, and intercuspidal position during voluntary teeth clenching. Results revealed no significant changes of maximal bite force after dry immersion. All postural parameters were significantly altered by dry immersion. There were however no significant differences in stabilometric data according to mandibular position. Moreover the masseter tonicity increased immediately after the end of dry immersion period. Dry immersion could be used as a valid model for studying the effects of microgravity on human subjects. However, 3 days appear insufficient in duration to evaluate the effects of weightlessness on maximal bite force. Our research suggests a link between postural disturbance after dry immersion and masseter tonicity. PMID:26913867

  5. Posture in otoneurology. Volume I.

    PubMed

    Norré, M E

    1990-01-01

    In this study, posture is studied in the context of neuro-otological problems. In the several chapters, postural elements, postural influence upon balance aspects as well as postural components of the balance function in normal and pathological conditions are emphasized. Two main applications are put forward: rehabilitation by postural treatment techniques (REHAB) and examination techniques for the vestibulospinal aspects (posturography--PG). I. Balance function Balance is provided by automatic reflexes for stabilization of the visual field (vestibulo-ocular reflex--VOR) and for a correct posture, erect standing (vestibulo-spinal reflex--VSR) and head position (vestibulo-collic reflex--VCR). The fundamental characteristics of these reflexes are described, especially of those related to posture. The reflexes are elaborated on the basis of sensory inputs that inform about changed relations to space and environment, provided by visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems. The sensory signals are further processed by the centers to adequate reflexes and to some extent to a conscious awareness. II. Dysfunction and adaptation Dysfunction in the balance mechanisms leads to erroneous reflexes, but most importantly to frightening sensations of vertigo. The peripheral disturbances produce a sensory mismatch which is the primum movens of vertigo. Built-in adaptive mechanisms cope with this disturbance and restore global balance function. The mechanisms involved have been studied as vestibular compensation and habituation, VOR-reflex plasticity and sensory "substitutive" compensation. The mechanisms are set into action by the dysfunctional situation and constitute an error-controlled process. Emphasis is laid upon the items related to rehabilitation treatment and posturography. A survey of clinical entities of vestibular peripheral dysfunction is included. III. Examination techniques The logical approach to the patient with vertigo consists in an analysis of the complaints

  6. Age Related Decline in Postural Control Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelmach, George E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied voluntary and reflexive mechanisms of postural control of young (N=8) and elderly (N=8) adults through measurement of reflexive reactions to large-fast and small-slow ankle rotation postural disturbances. Found reflexive mechanisms relatively intact for both groups although elderly appeared more disadvantaged when posture was under the…

  7. Postural Control in Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohen-Raz, Reuven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Postural control was evaluated in 91 autistic, 166 normal, and 18 mentally retarded children using a computerized posturographic procedure. In comparison to normal children, the autistic subjects were less likely to exhibit age-related changes in postural performance, and postures were more variable and less stable. (Author/JDD)

  8. Postural Control in Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohen-Raz, Reuven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Postural control was evaluated in 91 autistic, 166 normal, and 18 mentally retarded children using a computerized posturographic procedure. In comparison to normal children, the autistic subjects were less likely to exhibit age-related changes in postural performance, and postures were more variable and less stable. (Author/JDD)

  9. Age Related Decline in Postural Control Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelmach, George E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied voluntary and reflexive mechanisms of postural control of young (N=8) and elderly (N=8) adults through measurement of reflexive reactions to large-fast and small-slow ankle rotation postural disturbances. Found reflexive mechanisms relatively intact for both groups although elderly appeared more disadvantaged when posture was under the…

  10. INFLUENCE OF INJURY ON DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL IN RUNNERS

    PubMed Central

    Klusendorf, Anna; Kernozek, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Injury has been linked with altered postural control in active populations. The association between running injury and dynamic postural control has not been examined. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine dynamic postural control in injured and uninjured runners using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Time to Stabilization (TTS) of ground reaction forces following a single-leg landing, and postural stability indices reflecting the fluctuations in GRFs during single-leg landing and stabilization tasks (forward and lateral hop). It was hypothesized that dynamic postural control differences would exist between runners with a history of injury that interrupted training for ≥7 days (INJ) when compared to runners without injury (CON). Design Case-control study Methods Twenty-two INJ (14 F, 8 M; 23.7 ± 2.1 y; 22.3 ± 2.8 kg/m2; 29.5 ± 16.3 mi/wk) currently running > 50% pre-injury mileage without pain were compared with twenty-two matched CON (14F, 8M; 22.7 ± 1.2 y; 22.7 ± 2.7 kg/m2; 31.2 ± 19.6 mi/wk). INJ group was stratified by site of injury into two groups (Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower Leg/Ankle/Foot) for secondary analysis. Leg length-normalized anterior, posterolateral, and posteromedial reach distances on the SEBT, medial/lateral and anterior/posterior ground reaction force TTS, directional postural stability indices, and a composite dynamic postural stability index (DPSI), were assessed using mixed model ANOVA (α=0.05) and effect sizes (d). Results No group X direction interaction or group differences were observed for the SEBT (p=0.51, 0.71) or TTS (p=0.83, 0.72) measures. A group X direction interaction was found for postural stability indices during the forward landing task (p<0.01). Both Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower leg/Ankle/Foot INJ groups demonstrated a greater vertical postural stability index (VPSI) (p=0.01 for both, d=0.80, 0.95) and DPSI (p=0.01, 0.02, d=0.75, 0.93) when

  11. INFLUENCE OF INJURY ON DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL IN RUNNERS.

    PubMed

    Meardon, Stacey; Klusendorf, Anna; Kernozek, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Injury has been linked with altered postural control in active populations. The association between running injury and dynamic postural control has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to examine dynamic postural control in injured and uninjured runners using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Time to Stabilization (TTS) of ground reaction forces following a single-leg landing, and postural stability indices reflecting the fluctuations in GRFs during single-leg landing and stabilization tasks (forward and lateral hop). It was hypothesized that dynamic postural control differences would exist between runners with a history of injury that interrupted training for ≥7 days (INJ) when compared to runners without injury (CON). Case-control study. Twenty-two INJ (14 F, 8 M; 23.7 ± 2.1 y; 22.3 ± 2.8 kg/m2; 29.5 ± 16.3 mi/wk) currently running > 50% pre-injury mileage without pain were compared with twenty-two matched CON (14F, 8M; 22.7 ± 1.2 y; 22.7 ± 2.7 kg/m2; 31.2 ± 19.6 mi/wk). INJ group was stratified by site of injury into two groups (Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower Leg/Ankle/Foot) for secondary analysis. Leg length-normalized anterior, posterolateral, and posteromedial reach distances on the SEBT, medial/lateral and anterior/posterior ground reaction force TTS, directional postural stability indices, and a composite dynamic postural stability index (DPSI), were assessed using mixed model ANOVA (α=0.05) and effect sizes (d). No group X direction interaction or group differences were observed for the SEBT (p=0.51, 0.71) or TTS (p=0.83, 0.72) measures. A group X direction interaction was found for postural stability indices during the forward landing task (p<0.01). Both Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower leg/Ankle/Foot INJ groups demonstrated a greater vertical postural stability index (VPSI) (p=0.01 for both, d=0.80, 0.95) and DPSI (p=0.01, 0.02, d=0.75, 0.93) when compared to CON suggesting impaired balance control. A group

  12. Comparison of postural stability between injured and uninjured ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, I-Jung; Liao, Jung-Hsien; Wu, Hong-Wen; Su, Fong-Chin

    2011-06-01

    Ballet movements require a limited base of support; thus, ballet dancers require a high level of postural control. However, postural stability in ballet dancers is still unclear and needs to be understood. To evaluate ballet dancers' postural stability in performing single-leg standing, the en pointe task, and the first and fifth positions and to determine differences in task performance among healthy nondancers, healthy dancers, and dancers with ankle sprains. Controlled laboratory study. Injured dancers, uninjured dancers, and nondancers were recruited for this study (N = 33 age-matched participants; n= 11 per group). The tasks tested were single-leg standing with eyes open and closed, first position, fifth position, and en pointe. Center of pressure parameters were calculated from the ground-reaction force collected with 1 force plate. Analysis of variance was used to assess the differences of center of pressure parameters among 3 groups in single-leg standing; independent t test was used to examine the differences of center of pressure parameters between injured and uninjured dancers. During single-leg standing, injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and total trajectory of center of pressure, compared with the uninjured dancers and nondancers. During the first and fifth positions, the injured dancers demonstrated significantly greater standard deviation of center of pressure position in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, compared with the uninjured dancers. During en pointe, the injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and the anterior-posterior direction, compared with the uninjured dancers. The injured and uninjured dancers demonstrated differences in postural stability in the medial-lateral direction during single-leg standing and the ballet postures. Although the injured dancers received ballet training, their postural stability

  13. Evaluation of postural stability in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kenis-Coskun, Ozge; Giray, Esra; Eren, Beyhan; Ozkok, Ozlem; Karadag-Saygi, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Postural stability is the ability of to maintain the position of the body within the support area. This function is affected in cerebral palsy. The aim of the present study was to compare static and dynamic postural stability between children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and healthy controls. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven children between the ages of 5 and 14 diagnosed with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (19 right, 18 left) and 23 healthy gender- and age-matched controls were included in the study. Postural stability was evaluated in both of the groups using a Neurocom Balance. Sway velocity was measured both with the eyes open and closed. Sit to stand and turning abilities were also assessed. [Results] The sway velocities with the eyes open and closed were significantly different between the groups. The weight transfer time in the Sit to Stand test was also significantly slower in children with cerebral palsy. Children with cerebral palsy also showed slower turning times and greater sway velocities during the Step and Quick Turn test on a force plate compared with their healthy counterparts. [Conclusion] Both static and dynamic postural stability parameters are affected in hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Further research is needed to define rehabilitation interventions to improve these parameters in patients. PMID:27313338

  14. Anticipatory postural adjustments in children with hemiplegia and diplegia.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Gay L; Shiratori, Takako; Aruin, Alexander S

    2011-12-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) play an important role in the performance of many activities requiring the maintenance of standing posture. However, little is known about if and how children with cerebral palsy (CP) generate APAs. Two groups of children with CP (hemiplegia and diplegia) and a group of children with typical motor development performed arm flexion and extension movements while standing on a force platform. Electromyographic activity of six trunk and leg muscles and displacement of center of pressure (COP) were recorded. Children with CP were able to generate anticipatory postural adjustments and produce directionally specific APAs and COP displacements similar to those described in adults and typically developing children. However, children with diplegia were unable to generate APAs of the same magnitude as children with typical development and hemiplegia and had higher baseline muscle activity prior to movement. In children with diplegia, COP was posteriorly displaced and peak acceleration was smaller during bilateral extension compared to children with hemiplegia. The outcomes of the study highlight the role of APAs in the control of posture of children with CP and point out the similarities and differences in anticipatory control in children with diplegia and hemiplegia. These differences may foster ideas for treatment strategies to enhance APAs in children with CP.

  15. Anticipatory postural adjustments in conditions of simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Aruin, Alexander S

    2008-11-01

    The study investigates the role of decreased gravity on anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Subjects performed fast bilateral arm-raising movements and load releases while in conditions of normal and reduced gravity. Reduced gravity conditions were simulated by changing the ratio between the body weight and mass. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of dorsal and ventral trunk and leg muscles, as well as ground reaction forces, were recorded and quantified within the time intervals typical of APAs. Anticipatory postural adjustments were seen in normal gravity conditions as well as in simulated reduced gravity conditions. However, in decreased gravity conditions, the magnitudes of the anticipatory integrals of electromyography muscle activity (EMG) were smaller compared to normal gravity. Moreover, there was a linear relation between EMG and simulated decreased gravity and between the displacement of the center of pressure (COP) and simulated gravity. The study provides new data on the effect of gravity in feed-forward postural control and stresses the importance of taking into consideration its role in the control of upright posture.

  16. Haptic cues for orientation and postural control in sighted and blind individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Easton, R. D.; Bentzen, B. L.; Lackner, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Haptic cues from fingertip contact with a stable surface attenuate body sway in subjects even when the contact forces are too small to provide physical support of the body. We investigated how haptic cues derived from contact of a cane with a stationary surface at low force levels aids postural control in sighted and congenitally blind individuals. Five sighted (eyes closed) and five congenitally blind subjects maintained a tandem Romberg stance in five conditions: (1) no cane; (2,3) touch contact (< 2 N of applied force) while holding the cane in a vertical or slanted orientation; and (4,5) force contact (as much force as desired) in the vertical and slanted orientations. Touch contact of a cane at force levels below those necessary to provide significant physical stabilization was as effective as force contact in reducing postural sway in all subjects, compared to the no-cane condition. A slanted cane was far more effective in reducing postural sway than was a perpendicular cane. Cane use also decreased head displacement of sighted subjects far more than that of blind subjects. These results suggest that head movement control is linked to postural control through gaze stabilization reflexes in sighted subjects; such reflexes are absent in congenitally blind individuals and may account for their higher levels of head displacement.

  17. Haptic cues for orientation and postural control in sighted and blind individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Easton, R. D.; Bentzen, B. L.; Lackner, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Haptic cues from fingertip contact with a stable surface attenuate body sway in subjects even when the contact forces are too small to provide physical support of the body. We investigated how haptic cues derived from contact of a cane with a stationary surface at low force levels aids postural control in sighted and congenitally blind individuals. Five sighted (eyes closed) and five congenitally blind subjects maintained a tandem Romberg stance in five conditions: (1) no cane; (2,3) touch contact (< 2 N of applied force) while holding the cane in a vertical or slanted orientation; and (4,5) force contact (as much force as desired) in the vertical and slanted orientations. Touch contact of a cane at force levels below those necessary to provide significant physical stabilization was as effective as force contact in reducing postural sway in all subjects, compared to the no-cane condition. A slanted cane was far more effective in reducing postural sway than was a perpendicular cane. Cane use also decreased head displacement of sighted subjects far more than that of blind subjects. These results suggest that head movement control is linked to postural control through gaze stabilization reflexes in sighted subjects; such reflexes are absent in congenitally blind individuals and may account for their higher levels of head displacement.

  18. The Role of the US Army Reserve in Support of the US Army Force 2025 and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    41 The US Army Reserve 2015 Posture Statement ............................................................ 42 Rally ...to the communities where they live and work. ― Lieutenant General Jeffrey W. Talley, 32nd Chief of Army Reserve, Rally Point 32.1 The purpose...published in 2011, Rally Point 32.1 published in 2014, The US 18 Army Reserve 2015 Posture Statement, and US Army Reserve at a Glance, published in 2014

  19. Importance of Proprioceptive Information for Postural Control in Children with Strabismus before and after Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Maria P.; Soufi, Hayette; Villeneuve, Philippe; Colleville, Lucile; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Lions, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the role of proprioception in postural balance in children with strabismus before and after realignment of their visual axes by eye surgery. Postural recordings were made with the TechnoConcept® force platform in 23 children. Several conditions were studied, whether the subjects had both eyes open, or either the dominant or the non-dominant eye open, without and with foam pads of 4 mm underfoot. Recordings were performed before and after strabismus surgery. The surface area, the length and the mean speed of the center of pressure (CoP) were analyzed. Before strabismus surgery, all children showed better stability with both eyes open with respect to the condition with the non-dominant eye open; furthermore postural stability improved in the presence of foam pads. After surgery, the surface area of CoP decreased significantly, especially in the non-dominant eye viewing condition. We suggest that strabismic children use mainly proprioceptive information in order to control their posture, but also visual inputs, which are important for obtaining a good postural stability. The alignment of the visual axes after surgery provides enhanced postural stability, suggesting, again the major role of visual inputs in the control of posture. Proprioceptive plasticity after strabismus surgery may allow better visual rehabilitation. PMID:27656133

  20. Dynamic postural control and associated attentional demands in contemporary dancers versus non-dancers.

    PubMed

    Sirois-Leclerc, Geneviève; Remaud, Anthony; Bilodeau, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Postural control is not a fully automatic process, but requires a certain level of attention, particularly as the difficulty of the postural task increases. This study aimed at testing whether experienced contemporary dancers, because of their specialized training involving the control of posture/balance, would present with a dual-task performance suggesting lesser attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control compared with non-dancers. Twenty dancers and 16 non-dancers performed a dynamic postural tracking task in both antero-posterior and side-to-side directions, while standing on a force platform. The postural task was performed, in turn, 1) as a stand-alone task, and concurrently with both 2) a simple reaction time task and 3) a choice reaction time task. Postural control performance was estimated through variables calculated from centre of pressure movements. Although no overall group difference was found in reaction time values, we found a better ability to control the side to side movements of the centre of pressure during the tracking task in dancers compared with non-dancers, which was dependent on the secondary task. This suggests that such increased ability is influenced by available attentional resources.

  1. Bioceramic fabrics improve quiet standing posture and handstand stability in expert gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Cian, C; Gianocca, V; Barraud, P A; Guerraz, M; Bresciani, J P

    2015-10-01

    Bioceramic fabrics have been claimed to improve blood circulation, thermoregulation and muscle relaxation, thereby also improving muscular activity. Here we tested whether bioceramic fabrics have an effect on postural control and contribute to improve postural stability. In Experiment 1, we tested whether bioceramic fabrics contribute to reduce body-sway when maintaining standard standing posture. In Experiment 2, we measured the effect of bioceramic fabrics on body-sway when maintaining a more instable posture, namely a handstand hold. For both experiments, postural oscillations were measured using a force platform with four strain gauges that recorded the displacements of the center of pressure (CoP) in the horizontal plane. In half of the trials, the participants wore a full-body second skin suit containing a bioceramic layer. In the other half of the trials, they wore a 'placebo' second skin suit that had the same cut, appearance and elasticity as the bioceramic suit but did not contain the bioceramic layer. In both experiments, the surface of displacement of the CoP was significantly smaller when participants were wearing the bioceramic suit than when they were wearing the placebo suit. The results suggest that bioceramic fabrics do have an effect on postural control and improve postural stability.

  2. Dynamic postural control and associated attentional demands in contemporary dancers versus non-dancers

    PubMed Central

    Sirois-Leclerc, Geneviève; Remaud, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Postural control is not a fully automatic process, but requires a certain level of attention, particularly as the difficulty of the postural task increases. This study aimed at testing whether experienced contemporary dancers, because of their specialized training involving the control of posture/balance, would present with a dual-task performance suggesting lesser attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control compared with non-dancers. Twenty dancers and 16 non-dancers performed a dynamic postural tracking task in both antero-posterior and side-to-side directions, while standing on a force platform. The postural task was performed, in turn, 1) as a stand-alone task, and concurrently with both 2) a simple reaction time task and 3) a choice reaction time task. Postural control performance was estimated through variables calculated from centre of pressure movements. Although no overall group difference was found in reaction time values, we found a better ability to control the side to side movements of the centre of pressure during the tracking task in dancers compared with non-dancers, which was dependent on the secondary task. This suggests that such increased ability is influenced by available attentional resources. PMID:28323843

  3. Improvement of anticipatory postural adjustments for balance control: effect of a single training session.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2015-04-01

    Humans use anticipatory and compensatory postural strategies to maintain and restore balance when perturbed. Inefficient generation and utilization of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) is one of the reasons for postural instability. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on subsequent control of posture. Thirteen healthy young adults were exposed to predictable external perturbations before and after a single training session consisting of catches of a medicine ball thrown at the shoulder level. 3-D body kinematics, EMG activity of thirteen trunk and lower limb muscles, and ground reaction forces were recorded before and immediately after a single training session. Muscle onsets, EMG integrals, center of pressure (COP), and center of mass (COM) displacements were analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory phases of postural control. The effect of a single training session was seen as significantly early muscle onsets and larger anticipatory COP displacements. As a result, significantly smaller peak COM displacements were observed after the perturbation indicating greater postural stability. The outcome of this study provides a background for examining the role of training in improvement of APAs and its effect on postural stability in individuals in need.

  4. Postural disturbances resulting from unilateral and bilateral diaphragm contractions: a phrenic nerve stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Hamaoui, Alain; Hudson, Anna L; Laviolette, Louis; Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Do, Manh-Cuong; Similowski, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Thoracoabdominal breathing movements are a complex source of postural disturbance, but there are contradictory reports in the literature with inspiration described as having either a backward or a forward disturbing effect. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, the present study studied the postural disturbance caused by isolated contractions of the diaphragm. Eight male and four female healthy subjects followed an original paradigm of phrenic nerve stimulation (bilateral and unilateral) and "diaphragmatic" voluntary sniff maneuvers in the seated and standing postures. Center of gravity (CG) acceleration was calculated from force plate recordings, and respiratory kinematics were assessed with thoracic and abdominal sensor belts. CG and respiratory signals revealed that, while seated, bilateral phrenic stimulation and sniff maneuvers consistently produced expansion of the abdomen associated with a forward peak of CG acceleration. In the standing posture, the direction of the CG peak was reversed and always directed backward. Unilateral phrenic stimulation induced an additional medial-lateral acceleration of the CG, directed toward the nonactive side while seated, but in the opposite direction while standing. These results suggest that isolated diaphragmatic contractions produce a constant disturbing pattern for a given posture, but with opposite effects between standing and seated postures. This could be related to the different biomechanical configuration of the body in each posture, corresponding to distinct kinematic patterns of the osteoarticular chain. In addition, the lateral component of the CG acceleration induced by unilateral diaphragm contractions could be clinically relevant in patients with hemidiaphragm paralysis.

  5. Multijoint dynamics and postural stability of the human arm.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Eric J; Kirsch, Robert F; Crago, Patrick E

    2004-08-01

    The goal of this study was to examine how the mechanical properties of the human arm are modulated during isometric force regulation tasks. Specifically, we examined whether the dynamic stability of the limb remained nearly invariant across a range of voluntarily generated endpoint forces and limb postures. Previous single joint studies have demonstrated that dynamic joint stability, as quantified via estimates of the joint damping ratio, is nearly invariant during isometric torque regulation tasks. However, the relevance of these findings to the control of multijoint posture has not been investigated previously. A similar degree of invariance at the multijoint level could suggest a fundamental property of the motor system that could be incorporated into the planning and execution of multijoint tasks. In this work, limb mechanics were quantified using estimates of dynamic endpoint stiffness, which characterizes the relationship between imposed displacements of limb posture and the forces opposing those displacements. Endpoint stiffness was estimated using a two-link robot operating in the horizontal plane at the height of each subject's glenohumeral joint. The robot was used to apply stochastic position perturbations to the arm and to measure the resulting forces. Endpoint stiffness dynamics were estimated nonparametrically and subsequently summarized using inertial, viscous and elastic parameters. We found that in the tasks studied, there was a differential modulation of endpoint elasticity and endpoint viscosity. Elasticity increased nearly linearly with increases in voluntary force generation while viscosity increased nonlinearly. This differential regulation resulted in limb dynamics that had a remarkably consistent damping ratio across all subjects and all tested conditions. These results emphasize the importance of considering the full dynamic response of a limb when investigating multijoint stability, and suggest that a minimal degree of limb stability is

  6. Suboptimal Muscle Synergy Activation Patterns Generalize their Motor Function across Postures.

    PubMed

    Sohn, M Hongchul; Ting, Lena H

    2016-01-01

    We used a musculoskeletal model to investigate the possible biomechanical and neural bases of using consistent muscle synergy patterns to produce functional motor outputs across different biomechanical conditions, which we define as generalizability. Experimental studies in cats demonstrate that the same muscle synergies are used during reactive postural responses at widely varying configurations, producing similarly-oriented endpoint force vectors with respect to the limb axis. However, whether generalizability across postures arises due to similar biomechanical properties or to neural selection of a particular muscle activation pattern has not been explicitly tested. Here, we used a detailed cat hindlimb model to explore the set of feasible muscle activation patterns that produce experimental synergy force vectors at a target posture, and tested their generalizability by applying them to different test postures. We used three methods to select candidate muscle activation patterns: (1) randomly-selected feasible muscle activation patterns, (2) optimal muscle activation patterns minimizing muscle effort at a given posture, and (3) generalizable muscle activation patterns that explicitly minimized deviations from experimentally-identified synergy force vectors across all postures. Generalizability was measured by the deviation between the simulated force direction of the candidate muscle activation pattern and the experimental synergy force vectors at the test postures. Force angle deviations were the greatest for the randomly selected feasible muscle activation patterns (e.g., >100°), intermediate for effort-wise optimal muscle activation patterns (e.g., ~20°), and smallest for generalizable muscle activation patterns (e.g., <5°). Generalizable muscle activation patterns were suboptimal in terms of effort, often exceeding 50% of the maximum possible effort (cf. ~5% in minimum-effort muscle activation patterns). The feasible muscle activation ranges of individual

  7. Suboptimal Muscle Synergy Activation Patterns Generalize their Motor Function across Postures

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, M. Hongchul; Ting, Lena H.

    2016-01-01

    We used a musculoskeletal model to investigate the possible biomechanical and neural bases of using consistent muscle synergy patterns to produce functional motor outputs across different biomechanical conditions, which we define as generalizability. Experimental studies in cats demonstrate that the same muscle synergies are used during reactive postural responses at widely varying configurations, producing similarly-oriented endpoint force vectors with respect to the limb axis. However, whether generalizability across postures arises due to similar biomechanical properties or to neural selection of a particular muscle activation pattern has not been explicitly tested. Here, we used a detailed cat hindlimb model to explore the set of feasible muscle activation patterns that produce experimental synergy force vectors at a target posture, and tested their generalizability by applying them to different test postures. We used three methods to select candidate muscle activation patterns: (1) randomly-selected feasible muscle activation patterns, (2) optimal muscle activation patterns minimizing muscle effort at a given posture, and (3) generalizable muscle activation patterns that explicitly minimized deviations from experimentally-identified synergy force vectors across all postures. Generalizability was measured by the deviation between the simulated force direction of the candidate muscle activation pattern and the experimental synergy force vectors at the test postures. Force angle deviations were the greatest for the randomly selected feasible muscle activation patterns (e.g., >100°), intermediate for effort-wise optimal muscle activation patterns (e.g., ~20°), and smallest for generalizable muscle activation patterns (e.g., <5°). Generalizable muscle activation patterns were suboptimal in terms of effort, often exceeding 50% of the maximum possible effort (cf. ~5% in minimum-effort muscle activation patterns). The feasible muscle activation ranges of individual

  8. Teaching Philosophy Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faryadi, Qais

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the rationale for my teaching philosophy. Using a personal perspective, I explain my objectives, mission, and vision in writing my philosophy of teaching statements. This article also creates a road map and reference points for educators who want to write their own teaching philosophy statements to help them make informed…

  9. Drug Free Campus Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper Coll., WY.

    These three brief documents, a policy statement, a summary of pertinent laws on alcohol and illegal drugs, and a substance addiction specialist curriculum description, taken together describe the Casper College (Wyoming) drug and alcohol abuse prevention program. The policy statement briefly summarizes the health risks associated with drug and…

  10. Postural analysis of nursing work.

    PubMed

    Hignett, S

    1996-06-01

    Back pain in the nursing profession is an acknowledged wide spread occupational hazard. This study used OWAS (Ovako Working posture Analysis System) to measure the severity of the working postures adopted by nurses on Care of the Elderly wards when carrying out manual handling operations for animate and inanimate loads. Twenty-six nurses were observed on 31 occasions to obtain 4299 observations, these data were collected and processed using the OWASCO and OWASAN programs, and then analysed by grouping the results into defined patient (animate) handling and non-patient (inanimate) handling tasks. A statistical comparison was made between the two groups using the percentage of action categories two, three and four, to the total number of action categories. A significant difference (p < 0.05) was found, demonstrating that the percentage of harmful postures adopted during patient handling tasks was significantly higher than during non-patient handling tasks. This high level of postural stress and the poor track record of risk management within the Health Care Industry leads to the recommendation that an attitudinal change is needed to successfully address and reduce the manual handling burden which is currently being carried by the nursing staff.

  11. Recognizing postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, Daniel; Agnew, Donna; Stiles, Lauren; Ditoro, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, diagnosis, and management of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), a potentially debilitating autonomic disorder that can have many causes and presentations. POTS can be mistaken for panic disorder, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Clinician suspicion for the syndrome is key to prompt patient diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Wearable Devices for Classification of Inadequate Posture at Work Using Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Barkallah, Eya; Freulard, Johan; Otis, Martin J-D; Ngomo, Suzy; Ayena, Johannes C; Desrosiers, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Inadequate postures adopted by an operator at work are among the most important risk factors in Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (WMSDs). Although several studies have focused on inadequate posture, there is limited information on its identification in a work context. The aim of this study is to automatically differentiate between adequate and inadequate postures using two wearable devices (helmet and instrumented insole) with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and force sensors. From the force sensors located inside the insole, the center of pressure (COP) is computed since it is considered an important parameter in the analysis of posture. In a first step, a set of 60 features is computed with a direct approach, and later reduced to eight via a hybrid feature selection. A neural network is then employed to classify the current posture of a worker, yielding a recognition rate of 90%. In a second step, an innovative graphic approach is proposed to extract three additional features for the classification. This approach represents the main contribution of this study. Combining both approaches improves the recognition rate to 95%. Our results suggest that neural network could be applied successfully for the classification of adequate and inadequate posture.

  13. Effect of masticating chewing gum on postural stability during upright standing.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, Keisuke; Goto, Fumiyuki

    2011-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of masticating chewing gum on postural stability during upright standing. To address this issue, 12 healthy subjects performed quiet standing on a force platform for the posturography study. The subjects were instructed to stand as stable as possible on the force platform in order to record the trajectory of the center-of-pressure (COP). After measuring the postural sway in the initial condition (pre-condition), the subjects were asked to stand while masticating chewing gum (gum-condition). Following the gum-condition, quiet standing without mastication was evaluated (post-condition) to ensure the effect of masticating chewing gum on postural stability. The trajectory and velocity of the COP were analyzed for each condition. We found that the postural stability tended to enhance during mastication of chewing gum. The rectangle area of the COP trajectory significantly diminished in the gum-condition and significantly enlarged in the post-condition. A similar effect was observed in the maximum velocity and standard deviation (SD) of the fore-aft amplitude of the COP trajectory. The values were significantly smaller in the gum-condition compared to those in the post-condition. These findings suggest that mastication of chewing gum affects the postural control by enhancing the postural stability during upright standing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinesiology taping does not change fibularis longus latency time and postural sway.

    PubMed

    Correia, Christophe; Lopes, Susana; Gonçalves, Rafael; Torres, Rui; Pinho, Francisco; Gonçalves, Pedro; Rodrigues, Mário; Costa, Rui; Lopes, Mário; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Kinesiology tape seems to improve muscle force, although little is known regarding its effect on latency time and postural sway. To examine the effects of kinesiology taping on fibularis longus latency time and postural sway in healthy subjects. Thirty participants were equally randomized into three groups, two experimental groups receiving kinesiology tape (EG1, from origin to insertion; EG2, from insertion to origin) and a control group. Before and 20-min after the intervention, postural sway was assessed on a force platform and fibularis longus latency time was recorded with surface electromyography during a sudden inversion perturbation. At baseline, no differences were found between groups regarding age, anthropometrics variables, postural sway and fibularis longus latency time. In both experimental groups, the application of tape did not change postural sway and fibularis longus latency time (EG1: 93.7 ± 15.0 to 89.9 ± 15.6 ms; EG2, 81.24 ± 14.21 to 81.57 ± 16.64, p < 0.05). Also, no changes were observed in the control group. Kinesiology tape seems not to enhance fibularis longus reaction time and postural sway in young healthy subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Notebook computer use on a desk, lap and lap support: effects on posture, performance and comfort.

    PubMed

    Asundi, Krishna; Odell, Dan; Luce, Adam; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2010-01-01

    This study quantified postures of users working on a notebook computer situated in their lap and tested the effect of using a device designed to increase the height of the notebook when placed on the lap. A motion analysis system measured head, neck and upper extremity postures of 15 adults as they worked on a notebook computer placed on a desk (DESK), the lap (LAP) and a commercially available lapdesk (LAPDESK). Compared with the DESK, the LAP increased downwards head tilt 6 degrees and wrist extension 8 degrees . Shoulder flexion and ulnar deviation decreased 13 degrees and 9 degrees , respectively. Compared with the LAP, the LAPDESK decreased downwards head tilt 4 degrees , neck flexion 2 degrees , and wrist extension 9 degrees. Users reported less discomfort and difficulty in the DESK configuration. Use of the lapdesk improved postures compared with the lap; however, all configurations resulted in high values of wrist extension, wrist deviation and downwards head tilt. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study quantifies postures of users working with a notebook computer in typical portable configurations. A better understanding of the postures assumed during notebook computer use can improve usage guidelines to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries.

  16. Continuous assessment of work activities and posture in long-term care nurses.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Joanne N; Holmes, Michael W R; Keir, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    The high prevalence of low back injuries in nursing has prompted the use of mechanical lift assists while overall assessment of activities and postures remains limited. The purpose of this study was to chronicle trunk posture and work tasks of long-term healthcare professionals. An inclinometer monitored trunk posture for 27 workers, 20 of whom were also observed continuously throughout their shift. Patient lifts and transfers accounted for less than 4% of the shift while patient care, unloaded standing and walking and miscellaneous tasks accounted for 85%. Manual lifts and transfers occurred twice as often as mechanically assisted lifts but took only half the time. The workers had a median trunk flexion angle of 9.2 degrees , spent 25% of their time flexed beyond 30 degrees and had peak flexion angles greater than 75 degrees in many tasks. Analysis of posture throughout the entire working shift indicates that, in addition to lifts and transfers, emphasis needs to be placed on patient care and miscellaneous activities when assessing injury risk for nurses. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Patient handling has been the focus in the effort to reduce back pain and injury in nursing. In addition to the use of mechanical lifts, there is a need to examine other aspects of nursing, including patient care and other ancillary tasks, which comprise the majority of the work shift and, while often unloaded, exhibit extreme postures that may also lead to injury.

  17. Postural stability of older female Scottish country dancers in comparison with physically active controls.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Susan; Peacock, Leslie; Bampouras, Theodoros M

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity assists older individuals' functional ability and postural stability. Recently, Scottish country dance (SCD) was reported as being a beneficial form of physical activity for functional ability in older females. This study aims to examine the effect of SCD on postural stability. Scottish country dancers (n = 20) were compared with physically active controls (n = 33) for static postural sway measured on a force platform. The Romberg and Tandem stances were used under 'eyes open' and 'eyes closed' conditions. Ninety-five percent ellipse area and sway velocity were calculated from the center of pressure displacement. Ninety-five percent ellipse area was the same for both groups in all tests. The control group had greater sway velocity for all tests (P < .01) except Tandem eyes closed. SCD participation resulted in similar postural sway as participation in other physical activities, however nondancers may need a greater amount of regulatory activity to maintain balance.

  18. Effect of sitting posture on respiratory function while using a smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyung Woo; Jung, Sang In; Lee, Do Youn; Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Na Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate respiratory function in different sitting postures while using a smartphone. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty healthy volunteers were recruited. Participants were divided into 2 groups, a control group of participants who spent time as they liked for 1 hour, and a smartphone group of participants who spent time using a smartphone in a sitting position for 1 hour. To investigate changes in respiratory function, we measured forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow. [Results] There was a statistically significant difference in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second between the control group and smartphone group. [Conclusion] The clinical implication of our findings is that the posture assumed while using a smartphone leads to reduced respiratory function. PMID:27313358

  19. Influence of vision and dental occlusion on body posture in pilots.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Alberto; Nota, Alessandro; Cravino, Gaia; Cioffi, Clementina; Rinaldi, Antonio; Cozza, Paola

    2013-08-01

    Air force pilots have great postural control, movement coordination, motor learning, and motor transformation. They undergo abnormal stresses during flight that affect their organs and systems, with consequences such as barodontalgia, bruxism, TMJ dysfunctions, and cervical pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental occlusion and vision on their body posture. In collaboration with the "A. Mosso" Legal Medical Institute (Aeronautica Militare), two groups, consisting of 20 air force and 20 civilian pilots, were selected for the study using a protocol approved by the Italian Air Force. An oral examination and a force platform test were performed in order to evaluate the subjects' postural system efficiency. A MANOVA (Multivariate analysis of variance) analysis was performed by using the Wilkes' criterion, in order to statistically evaluate the influence of each factor. Both the sway area and velocity parameters are very strongly influenced by vision: the sway area increases by approximately 32% and the sway velocity increases by approximately 50% when the pilot closes his eyes. Only the sway area parameter was significantly influenced by the mandibular position: the mandibular position with eyes open changed the sway area by about 51% and with eyes closed by about 40%. No statistically significant differences were found between air force and civilian pilots. The results of this analysis show that occlusion and visual function could influence posture in air force and civilian pilots.

  20. Postural trials: expertise in rhythmic gymnastics increases control in lateral directions.

    PubMed

    Calavalle, A R; Sisti, D; Rocchi, M B L; Panebianco, R; Del Sal, M; Stocchi, V

    2008-11-01

    The first aim of this paper was to investigate if expertise in rhythmic gymnastics influences postural performance even in an easy non-specific task such as bipedal posture. Rhythmic gymnastics is a unique female sport which encompasses aspects of both artistic gymnastics and ballet and includes the use of a small apparatus (rope, hoop, ball, clubs and ribbon). Most previous studies have shown that expertise achieved by artistic gymnasts and dancers improves postural steadiness only in the situations for which those athletes are trained. Literature has not yet compared rhythmic gymnasts to other athletes in terms of their postural strategies. Hence, the study presented herein tested a group of high level rhythmic gymnasts and a group of female university students, trained in other sports, in the bipedal posture under eyes open and closed conditions. A force platform was used to record body sway. (1) Distance from the centre of sway, (2) lateral and (3) antero-posterior displacements were analyzed in time and frequency domains. Comparing the two groups, it was found that rhythmic gymnasts had better strategies than students in simple postural tasks, especially in lateral directions and in the period from 0.05 to 2 s. The most interesting finding in this study is that rhythmic gymnastics training seems to have a direct effect on the ability to maintain bipedal posture, which may confirm the "transfer" hypothesis of rhythmic gymnastics expertise to bipedal postural sway, especially in medio-lateral displacements. This finding has never been reported in previous studies on artistic gymnasts and ballet dancers. Furthermore, the present study confirmed the visual dependence of all the athletes, irrespective of their disciplines, in their postural trials.

  1. Trial-to-trial adaptation in control of arm reaching and standing posture.

    PubMed

    Pienciak-Siewert, Alison; Horan, Dylan P; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2016-12-01

    Classical theories of motor learning hypothesize that adaptation is driven by sensorimotor error; this is supported by studies of arm and eye movements that have shown that trial-to-trial adaptation increases with error. Studies of postural control have shown that anticipatory postural adjustments increase with the magnitude of a perturbation. However, differences in adaptation have been observed between the two modalities, possibly due to either the inherent instability or sensory uncertainty in standing posture. Therefore, we hypothesized that trial-to-trial adaptation in posture should be driven by error, similar to what is observed in arm reaching, but the nature of the relationship between error and adaptation may differ. Here we investigated trial-to-trial adaptation of arm reaching and postural control concurrently; subjects made reaching movements in a novel dynamic environment of varying strengths, while standing and holding the handle of a force-generating robotic arm. We found that error and adaptation increased with perturbation strength in both arm and posture. Furthermore, in both modalities, adaptation showed a significant correlation with error magnitude. Our results indicate that adaptation scales proportionally with error in the arm and near proportionally in posture. In posture only, adaptation was not sensitive to small error sizes, which were similar in size to errors experienced in unperturbed baseline movements due to inherent variability. This finding may be explained as an effect of uncertainty about the source of small errors. Our findings suggest that in rehabilitation, postural error size should be considered relative to the magnitude of inherent movement variability.

  2. Spinal lordosis optimizes the requirements for a stable erect posture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lordosis is the bending of the lumbar spine that gives the vertebral column of humans its characteristic ventrally convex curvature. Infants develop lordosis around the time when they acquire bipedal locomotion. Even macaques develop a lordosis when they are trained to walk bipedally. The aim of this study was to investigate why humans and some animals develop a lumbar lordosis while learning to walk bipedally. Results We developed a musculoskeletal model of the lumbar spine, that includes an asymmetric, dorsally shifted location of the spinal column in the body, realistic moment arms, and physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSA) of the muscles as well as realistic force-length and force-velocity relationships. The model was used to analyze the stability of an upright body posture. According to our results, lordosis reduces the local joint torques necessary for an equilibrium of the vertebral column during an erect posture. At the same time lordosis increases the demands on the global muscles to provide stability. Conclusions We conclude that the development of a spinal lordosis is a compromise between the stability requirements of an erect posture and the necessity of torque equilibria at each spinal segment. PMID:22507595

  3. Spinal lordosis optimizes the requirements for a stable erect posture.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Liebetrau, Anne; Schinowski, David; Wulf, Thomas; de Lussanet, Marc H E

    2012-04-16

    Lordosis is the bending of the lumbar spine that gives the vertebral column of humans its characteristic ventrally convex curvature. Infants develop lordosis around the time when they acquire bipedal locomotion. Even macaques develop a lordosis when they are trained to walk bipedally. The aim of this study was to investigate why humans and some animals develop a lumbar lordosis while learning to walk bipedally. We developed a musculoskeletal model of the lumbar spine, that includes an asymmetric, dorsally shifted location of the spinal column in the body, realistic moment arms, and physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSA) of the muscles as well as realistic force-length and force-velocity relationships. The model was used to analyze the stability of an upright body posture. According to our results, lordosis reduces the local joint torques necessary for an equilibrium of the vertebral column during an erect posture. At the same time lordosis increases the demands on the global muscles to provide stability. We conclude that the development of a spinal lordosis is a compromise between the stability requirements of an erect posture and the necessity of torque equilibria at each spinal segment.

  4. Does body posture influence hand preference in an ancestral primate model?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The origin of human handedness and its evolution in primates is presently under debate. Current hypotheses suggest that body posture (postural origin hypothesis and bipedalism hypothesis) have an important impact on the evolution of handedness in primates. To gain insight into the origin of manual lateralization in primates, we studied gray mouse lemurs, suggested to represent the most ancestral primate condition. First, we investigated hand preference in a simple food grasping task to explore the importance of hand usage in a natural foraging situation. Second, we explored the influence of body posture by applying a forced food grasping task with varying postural demands (sit, biped, cling, triped). Results The tested mouse lemur population did not prefer to use their hands alone to grasp for food items. Instead, they preferred to pick them up using a mouth-hand combination or the mouth alone. If mouth usage was inhibited, they showed an individual but no population level handedness for all four postural forced food grasping tasks. Additionally, we found no influence of body posture on hand preference in gray mouse lemurs. Conclusion Our results do not support the current theories of primate handedness. Rather, they propose that ecological adaptation indicated by postural habit and body size of a given species has an important impact on hand preference in primates. Our findings suggest that small-bodied, quadrupedal primates, adapted to the fine branch niche of dense forests, prefer mouth retrieval of food and are less manually lateralized than large-bodied species which consume food in a more upright, and less stable body posture. PMID:21356048

  5. Anticipatory postural adjustments and anticipatory synergy adjustments: preparing to a postural perturbation with predictable and unpredictable direction.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Daniele; Falaki, Ali; Solnik, Stanislaw; Latash, Mark L

    2017-03-01

    We explored two aspects of feed-forward postural control, anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and anticipatory synergy adjustments (ASAs) seen prior to self-triggered unloading with known and unknown direction of the perturbation. In particular, we tested two main hypotheses predicting contrasting changes in APAs and ASAs. The first hypothesis predicted no major changes in ASAs. The second hypothesis predicted delayed APAs with predominance of co-contraction patterns when perturbation direction was unknown. Healthy subjects stood on the force plate and held a bar with two loads acting in the forward and backward directions. They pressed a trigger that released one of the loads causing a postural perturbation. In different series, the direction of the perturbation was either known (the same load released in all trials) or unknown (the subjects did not know which of the two loads would be released). Surface electromyograms were recorded and used to quantify APAs, synergies stabilizing center of pressure coordinate (within the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis), and ASA. APAs and ASAs were seen in all conditions. APAs were delayed, and predominance of co-contraction patterns was seen under the conditions with unpredictable direction of perturbation. In contrast, no significant changes in synergies and ASAs were seen. Overall, these results show that feed-forward control of vertical posture has two distinct components, reflected in APAs and ASAs, which show qualitatively different adjustments with changes in predictability of the direction of perturbation. These results are interpreted within the recently proposed hierarchical scheme of the synergic control of motor tasks. The observations underscore the complexity of the feed-forward postural control, which involves separate changes in salient performance variables (such as coordinate of the center of pressure) and in their stability properties.

  6. Effects of aging and tactile stochastic resonance on postural performance and postural control in a sensory conflict task.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Postural control in certain situations depends on functioning of tactile or proprioceptive receptors and their respective dynamic integration. Loss of sensory functioning can lead to increased risk of falls in challenging postural tasks, especially in older adults. Stochastic resonance, a concept describing better function of systems with addition of optimal levels of noise, has shown to be beneficial for balance performance in certain populations and simple postural tasks. In this study, we tested the effects of aging and a tactile stochastic resonance stimulus (TSRS) on balance of adults in a sensory conflict task. Nineteen older (71-84 years of age) and younger participants (22-29 years of age) stood on a force plate for repeated trials of 20 s duration, while foot sole stimulation was either turned on or off, and the visual surrounding was sway-referenced. Balance performance was evaluated by computing an Equilibrium Score (ES) and anterior-posterior sway path length (APPlength). For postural control evaluation, strategy scores and approximate entropy (ApEn) were computed. Repeated-measures ANOVA, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were conducted for statistical analysis. Our results showed that balance performance differed between older and younger adults as indicated by ES (p = 0.01) and APPlength (0.01), and addition of vibration only improved performance in the older group significantly (p = 0.012). Strategy scores differed between both age groups, whereas vibration only affected the older group (p = 0.025). Our results indicate that aging affects specific postural outcomes and that TSRS is beneficial for older adults in a visual sensory conflict task, but more research is needed to investigate the effectiveness in individuals with more severe balance problems, for example, due to neuropathy.

  7. Does Observation of Postural Imbalance Induce a Postural Reaction?

    PubMed Central

    Tia, Banty; Saimpont, Arnaud; Paizis, Christos; Mourey, France; Fadiga, Luciano; Pozzo, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies bring evidence that action observation elicits contagious responses during social interactions. However automatic imitative tendencies are generally inhibited and it remains unclear in which conditions mere action observation triggers motor behaviours. In this study, we addressed the question of contagious postural responses when observing human imbalance. Methodology/Principal Findings We recorded participants' body sway while they observed a fixation cross (control condition), an upright point-light display of a gymnast balancing on a rope, and the same point-light display presented upside down. Our results showed that, when the upright stimulus was displayed prior to the inverted one, centre of pressure area and antero-posterior path length were significantly greater in the upright condition compared to the control and upside down conditions. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate a contagious postural reaction suggesting a partial inefficiency of inhibitory processes. Further, kinematic information was sufficient to trigger this reaction. The difference recorded between the upright and upside down conditions indicates that the contagion effect was dependent on the integration of gravity constraints by body kinematics. Interestingly, the postural response was sensitive to habituation, and seemed to disappear when the observer was previously shown an inverted display. The motor contagion recorded here is consistent with previous work showing vegetative output during observation of an effortful movement and could indicate that lower level control facilitates contagion effects. PMID:21423622

  8. Postural sway and brain potentials evoked by visual depth stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Takeo; Fujiwara, Katsuo

    2008-07-01

    This study measured the postural sway and brain potentials evoked by a visual depth stimulus. Thirteen subjects maintained standing posture on a force platform, and were administered two types of depth stimuli, strong and weak. The latency and amplitude of evoked potentials as well as changes in center of foot pressure (CFP) and the electromyogram (EMG) were examined. CFP displacement was found to change according to stimulus intensity. In the occipital lobe, evoked potentials exhibited a triphasic peak, with the first positive peak at approximately 120 ms (P120), the first negative peak at approximately 160 ms (N200), and the second positive peak at approximately 260 ms (P250). Brain evoked potentials correlated with CFP displacement as well as the latency of onset of EMG response. Onset of EMG response was probably related to the P120 component, whereas CFP displacement was related to the P250 component.

  9. Postanaesthetic postural stability following thiopental or propanidid anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, J; Jansen, E; Larsen, R E; Olesen, M B

    1978-01-01

    Using a quantitative Romberg-test performed on a computerized force-plate-system, postural stability was tested in 39 patients before and 3 hours after general anaesthesia with either thiopental (20 patients) or propanidid (19 patients). Sway-tendencies in the sagittal and the transversal direction were recorded. Comparing pre- and postoperative test results, patients anaesthetized with thiopental had a decreased postural stability 3 hours after anaesthesia, indicated by a significantly (P less than 0.05) increased sway-tendency of 22.6% in the sagittal direction. No change occurred in sway-tendency in the transversal direction in this group. In the propanidid group no significant differences were found between pre- and postoperative test results.

  10. The effects of deuterium on static posture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.

    1990-01-01

    A significant operational problem impacting upon the Space Shuttle program involves the astronaut's ability to safely egress from the Orbiter during an emergency situation. Following space flight, astronauts display significant movement problems. One variable which may contribute to increased movement ataxia is deuterium (D2O). Deuterium is present in low levels within the Orbiter's water supply but may accumulate to significant physiological levels during lengthy missions. Deuterium was linked to a number of negative physiological responses, including motion sickness, decreased metabolism, and slowing of neural conduction velocity. The effects of D2O on static postural control in response to a range of dosage levels were investigated. Nine sugjects were divided into three groups of three subjects each. The groups were divided into a low, medium, and a high D2O dosage group. The subjects static posture was assessed with the use of the EquiTest systems, a commercially available postural control evaluation system featuring movable force plates and a visual surround that can be servoed to the subject's sway. In addition to the force plate information, data about the degree of subject sway about the hips and shoulders was obtained. Additionally, surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the selected lower limb muscles were collected along with saliva samples used to determine the amount of deuterium enrichment following D2O ingestion. Two baseline testing sessions were performed using the EquiTest testing protocol prior to ingestion of the D2O. Thirty minutes after dosing, subjects again performed the tests. Two more post-dosing tests were run with an interest interval of one hour. Preliminary data anlaysis indicates that only subjects in the igh dose group displayed any significant static postural problems. Future analyses of the sway and EMG is expected to reveal significant variations in the subject's postural control strategy following D2O dosing. While

  11. Postural risk assessment of mechanised firewood processing.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Raffaele; Aminti, Giovanni; De Francesco, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    The study assessed the postural risk of mechanised firewood processing with eight machines, representing the main technology solutions available on the market. Assessment was conducted with the Ovako Working posture Analysis System (OWAS) on 1000 still frames randomly extracted from videotaped work samples. The postural risk associated with firewood processing was variable and associated with technology type. Simple, manually operated new machines incurred a higher postural risk compared with semi- or fully automatic machines. In contrast, new semi-automatic and automatic machines were generally free from postural risk. In all cases, attention should be paid to postural risk that may occur during blockage resolution. The study did not cover the postural risk of firewood processing sites as a whole. The study provided useful information for selecting firewood processing machinery and for improving firewood machinery design, as part of a more articulate strategy aimed at enhancing the safety of firewood processing work sites. Practitioner Summary: The postural risk associated with mechanised firewood processing (eg cutting and splitting) depends on the type of equipment. Postural risk is highest (OWAS Action Category 2) with new in-line machines, designed for operation by a single worker. Fully automatic machines present minimum postural risk, except during blockage resolution.

  12. Postural instability in Parkinson Disease: to step or not to step.

    PubMed

    Kimmell, Kristopher; Pulusu, Vinay K; Bharucha, Kersi J; Ross, Elliott D

    2015-10-15

    Postural instability is a key feature of Parkinson Disease that is associated with falls and morbidity. We designed a pull apparatus to quantitatively measure the force needed to pull subjects off-balance. Thirteen Controls and eight individuals with Parkinson Disease (PD) were evaluated. All individuals with PD reported subjective symptoms of postural instability and were symptomatic for approximately 9.4years when tested. No significant differences were found between Controls and PD subjects in the magnitude of force required to pull them off-balance. None of the Controls fell and all took a step into the direction of pull to maintain their balance. 59% of the time PD subjects fell because they did not take a step in the direction of pull to maintain their center of mass (COM) over their feet, thus indicating a deficiency in postural reflexes. If they fell on the first pull, PD subjects did not show a learning effect when pulled multiple times in the same direction. The utility of the Pull Test to detect postural instability is related to the subject's behavioral response, not the force needed to pull them off balance. Our findings may also help explain certain features of the PD gait as an attempt by subjects to avoid postural instability by not placing their COM in gravitationally unstable positions.

  13. Acquisition of co-ordination between posture and movement in a bimanual task.

    PubMed

    Paulignan, Y; Dufossé, M; Hugon, M; Massion, J

    1989-01-01

    The acquisition of co-ordination between posture and movement was investigated in human subjects performing a load lifting task. Sitting subjects held their left (postural) forearm in a horizontal position while supporting a 1 kg load via an electromagnet. Perturbation of the postural forearm position consisted of the load release triggered either by the experimenter (control) or by the subject voluntarily moving the other arm. In the latter case, the movement involved the elbow joint (load lifting (A), isometric force change at the wrist level (B), elbow rotation (C) and pressing a button with the wrist (D] or the fingers (grip isometric force change). We recorded the maximal amplitude and maximal velocity of the rotation of the postural forearm, the EMG of the forearm flexors on both sides and the force exerted either by the load on the postural arm or by the isometric contraction of the moving arm. The maximal forearm angular velocity after unloading was known to be related to the level of muscle contraction before unloading. 1. In the control situation, repetition of the imposed unloading test resulted in a progressive reduction in the maximal forearm rotation without any decrease in the maximal velocity. The amplitude and duration of the unloading reflex were found to increase in parallel. These results suggest that an adaptive mechanism took place which increased the gain of the unloading reflex loop and reduced the mechanical effect of the perturbation. This mechanism was found to come into play not only in the control situation but also in other paradigms where the perturbation was expected by the subjects. 2. A decrease in both maximal amplitude and velocity of forearm rotation together with a weak "anticipatory" deactivation of the forearm postural flexors was observed when the unloading was caused by an elbow movement (situations A, B, C) which indicates that a feedforward postural control took place. An interlimb coordination was built up and stabilized

  14. DSCOVR Public Release Statement

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-23

    ... DSCOVR Public Release Statement Wednesday, July 20, 2016 The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is a ... is limited to the near infrared solar reflected signal. The fourth detector is a high signal-to-noise photodiode spanning UV, Visible, and ...

  15. Aljoya Consensus Statement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A consensus statement of 100 experts meeting at the Aljoya Conference Center in Seattle, Washington in July 2000 for the First International Conference on Trans-Pacific Transport of Atmospheric Contaminants.

  16. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  17. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  18. Environmental Impact Statements Defended

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Discusses a government report that claims that government decision making has improved since federal agencies have been required to submit any proposed action in the form of an environmental impact statement for comments by the public and other agencies. (MLH)

  19. Direct Speaker Gaze Promotes Trust in Truth-Ambiguous Statements.

    PubMed

    Kreysa, Helene; Kessler, Luise; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2016-01-01

    A speaker's gaze behaviour can provide perceivers with a multitude of cues which are relevant for communication, thus constituting an important non-verbal interaction channel. The present study investigated whether direct eye gaze of a speaker affects the likelihood of listeners believing truth-ambiguous statements. Participants were presented with videos in which a speaker produced such statements with either direct or averted gaze. The statements were selected through a rating study to ensure that participants were unlikely to know a-priori whether they were true or not (e.g., "sniffer dogs cannot smell the difference between identical twins"). Participants indicated in a forced-choice task whether or not they believed each statement. We found that participants were more likely to believe statements by a speaker looking at them directly, compared to a speaker with averted gaze. Moreover, when participants disagreed with a statement, they were slower to do so when the statement was uttered with direct (compared to averted) gaze, suggesting that the process of rejecting a statement as untrue may be inhibited when that statement is accompanied by direct gaze.

  20. Direct Speaker Gaze Promotes Trust in Truth-Ambiguous Statements

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Luise; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2016-01-01

    A speaker’s gaze behaviour can provide perceivers with a multitude of cues which are relevant for communication, thus constituting an important non-verbal interaction channel. The present study investigated whether direct eye gaze of a speaker affects the likelihood of listeners believing truth-ambiguous statements. Participants were presented with videos in which a speaker produced such statements with either direct or averted gaze. The statements were selected through a rating study to ensure that participants were unlikely to know a-priori whether they were true or not (e.g., “sniffer dogs cannot smell the difference between identical twins”). Participants indicated in a forced-choice task whether or not they believed each statement. We found that participants were more likely to believe statements by a speaker looking at them directly, compared to a speaker with averted gaze. Moreover, when participants disagreed with a statement, they were slower to do so when the statement was uttered with direct (compared to averted) gaze, suggesting that the process of rejecting a statement as untrue may be inhibited when that statement is accompanied by direct gaze. PMID:27643789

  1. Effect of stance width on multidirectional postural responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, S. M.; Fung, J.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of stance width on postural responses to 12 different directions of surface translations was examined. Postural responses were characterized by recording 11 lower limb and trunk muscles, body kinematics, and forces exerted under each foot of 7 healthy subjects while they were subjected to horizontal surface translations in 12 different, randomly presented directions. A quasi-static approach of force analysis was done, examining force integrals in three different epochs (background, passive, and active periods). The latency and amplitude of muscle responses were quantified for each direction, and muscle tuning curves were used to determine the spatial activation patterns for each muscle. The results demonstrate that the horizontal force constraint exerted at the ground was lessened in the wide, compared with narrow, stance for humans, a similar finding to that reported by Macpherson for cats. Despite more trunk displacement in narrow stance, there were no significant changes in body center of mass (CoM) displacement due to large changes in center of pressure (CoP), especially in response to lateral translations. Electromyographic (EMG) magnitude decreased for all directions in wide stance, particularly for the more proximal muscles, whereas latencies remained the same from narrow to wide stance. Equilibrium control in narrow stance was more of an active postural strategy that included regulating the loading/unloading of the limbs and the direction of horizontal force vectors. In wide stance, equilibrium control relied more on an increase in passive stiffness resulting from changes in limb geometry. The selective latency modulation of the proximal muscles with translation direction suggests that the trunk was being actively controlled in all directions. The similar EMG latencies for both narrow and wide stance, with modulation of only the muscle activation magnitude as stance width changed, suggest that the same postural synergy was only slightly modified

  2. Effect of stance width on multidirectional postural responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, S. M.; Fung, J.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of stance width on postural responses to 12 different directions of surface translations was examined. Postural responses were characterized by recording 11 lower limb and trunk muscles, body kinematics, and forces exerted under each foot of 7 healthy subjects while they were subjected to horizontal surface translations in 12 different, randomly presented directions. A quasi-static approach of force analysis was done, examining force integrals in three different epochs (background, passive, and active periods). The latency and amplitude of muscle responses were quantified for each direction, and muscle tuning curves were used to determine the spatial activation patterns for each muscle. The results demonstrate that the horizontal force constraint exerted at the ground was lessened in the wide, compared with narrow, stance for humans, a similar finding to that reported by Macpherson for cats. Despite more trunk displacement in narrow stance, there were no significant changes in body center of mass (CoM) displacement due to large changes in center of pressure (CoP), especially in response to lateral translations. Electromyographic (EMG) magnitude decreased for all directions in wide stance, particularly for the more proximal muscles, whereas latencies remained the same from narrow to wide stance. Equilibrium control in narrow stance was more of an active postural strategy that included regulating the loading/unloading of the limbs and the direction of horizontal force vectors. In wide stance, equilibrium control relied more on an increase in passive stiffness resulting from changes in limb geometry. The selective latency modulation of the proximal muscles with translation direction suggests that the trunk was being actively controlled in all directions. The similar EMG latencies for both narrow and wide stance, with modulation of only the muscle activation magnitude as stance width changed, suggest that the same postural synergy was only slightly modified

  3. The Steps to Perfect Posture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Many people have memories of being told to "stop slouching" while seated at the piano bench. But the reality is that good piano posture is not as simple as bolting upright on the bench when the teacher barks. According to Eric Sutz, a Chicago-area piano teacher and performer, one should see a natural curve in his/her lower lumbar area and should…

  4. The Steps to Perfect Posture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Many people have memories of being told to "stop slouching" while seated at the piano bench. But the reality is that good piano posture is not as simple as bolting upright on the bench when the teacher barks. According to Eric Sutz, a Chicago-area piano teacher and performer, one should see a natural curve in his/her lower lumbar area and should…

  5. Postural consistency in skilled archers.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J; Atha, J

    1990-01-01

    The consistency of an archer's postural set at the moment of loose (arrow release) is commonly perceived to be an important determinant of success. The coach seeks, among other things, to provide the archer with information about postural consistency, details of which he acquires by eye or occasionally by video-recordings. The gains that might be achieved from more precise information are examined here. Nine skilled archers, classified into either skilled or elite groups according to their officially computed handicap, were continuously monitored and measured with a three-dimensional co-ordinate analyser (Charnwood Dynamics Coda-3 Scanner) while shooting two ends (series) of three arrows each. Considerable variability was observed in the precision with which the positions of head, elbow and bow at the moment of loose were replicated by archers of similar levels of skill. These results are interpreted to suggest that precise postural consistency may not be the primary feature distinguishing between the performance of archers at the higher skill levels.

  6. The Contribution of Pre-impact Posture on Restrained Occupant Finite Element Model Response in Frontal Impact.

    PubMed

    Poulard, David; Subit, Damien; Nie, Bingbing; Donlon, John-Paul; Kent, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to discuss the influence of the pre-impact posture to the response of a finite element human body model (HBM) in frontal impacts. This study uses previously published cadaveric tests (PMHS), which measured six realistic pre-impact postures. Seven postured models were created from the THUMS occupant model (v4.0): one matching the standard UMTRI driving posture as it was the target posture in the experiments, and six matching the measured pre-impact postures. The same measurements as those obtained during the cadaveric tests were calculated from the simulations, and biofidelity metrics based on signals correlation (CORA) were established to compare the response of the seven models to the experiments. The HBM responses showed good agreement with the PMHS responses for the reaction forces (CORA = 0.80 ± 0.05) and the kinematics of the lower part of the torso but only fair correlation was found with the head, the upper spine, rib strains (CORA= 0.50 ± 0.05) and chest deflections (CORA = 0.67 ± 0.08). All models sustained rib fractures, sternal fracture and clavicle fracture. The average number of rib fractures for all the models was 5.3 ± 1.0, lower than in the experiments (10.8 ± 9.0). Variation in pre-impact posture greatly altered the time histories of the reaction forces, deflections and the rib strains, mainly in terms of time delay, but no definite improvement in HBM response or injury prediction was observed. By modifying only the posture of the HBM, the variability in the impact response was found to be equivalent to that observed in the experiments. The postured HBM sustained from 4 to 8 rib fractures, confirming that the pre-impact posture influenced the injury outcome predicted by the simulation. This study tries to answer an important question: what is the effect of occupant posture on kinematics and kinetics. Significant differences in kinematics observed between HBM and PMHS suggesting more coupling between the pelvis

  7. Biomechanical approach to quantifying anticipatory postural adjustments in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Maki, B E

    1993-07-01

    The paper outlines a biomechanical approach to quantifying anticipatory postural adjustments in the elderly. The measurement problems that occur in applying the biomechanical approach to elderly subjects are described and the 'signal-to-noise' properties of three candidate measures are compared, using data from volitional unilateral arm-raise tests performed on 100 elderly subjects. The results suggest that changes in vertical ground reaction force provide the greatest potential for accurate measurement of anticipatory adjustments, in comparison with changes in horizontal force or centre-of-pressure displacement. By normalising the anticipatory change in vertical ground reaction force with respect to the vertical perturbation force induced by the arm motion, a measure of relative anticipatory response is derived. The use of this measure, as well as its limitations, are demonstrated by analysing its relationship to actual falling risk, monitored prospectively in the elderly subject population. The findings showed evidence of larger relative anticipatory adjustments in the subjects who experienced recurrent falls, and it is suggested that these responses may be indicative of disordered motor programming. However, to detect these differences, it was necessary to average responses over multiple trials and to exclude trials with very small arm acceleration or very large baseline 'noise' (associated with ongoing postural sway). The need to screen and exclude data would seem to limit the practical utility of this approach in testing elderly populations.

  8. Analysis of human postural responses to recoverable falls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortolami, S. B.; DiZio, P.; Rabin, E.; Lackner, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied the kinematics and kinetics of human postural responses to "recoverable falls." To induce brief falling we used a Hold and Release (H&R) paradigm. Standing subjects actively resisted a force applied to their sternum. When this force was quickly released they were suddenly off balance. For a brief period, approximately 125 ms, until restoring forces were generated to shift the center of foot pressure in front of the center of mass, the body was in a forward fall acted on by gravity and ground support forces. We were able to describe the whole-body postural behavior following release using a multilink inverted pendulum model in a regime of "small oscillations." A three-segment model incorporating upper body, upper leg, and lower leg, with active stiffness and damping at the joints was fully adequate to fit the kinematic data from all conditions. The significance of our findings is that in situations involving recoverable falls or loss of balance the earliest responses are likely dependent on actively-tuned, reflexive mechanisms yielding stiffness and damping modulation of the joints. We demonstrate that haptic cues from index fingertip contact with a stationary surface lead to a significantly smaller angular displacement of the torso and a more rapid recovery of balance. Our H&R paradigm and associated model provide a quantifiable approach to studying recovery from potential falling in normal and clinical subjects.

  9. Analysis of human postural responses to recoverable falls.

    PubMed

    Bortolami, S B; DiZio, P; Rabin, E; Lackner, J R

    2003-08-01

    We studied the kinematics and kinetics of human postural responses to "recoverable falls." To induce brief falling we used a Hold and Release (H&R) paradigm. Standing subjects actively resisted a force applied to their sternum. When this force was quickly released they were suddenly off balance. For a brief period, approximately 125 ms, until restoring forces were generated to shift the center of foot pressure in front of the center of mass, the body was in a forward fall acted on by gravity and ground support forces. We were able to describe the whole-body postural behavior following release using a multilink inverted pendulum model in a regime of "small oscillations." A three-segment model incorporating upper body, upper leg, and lower leg, with active stiffness and damping at the joints was fully adequate to fit the kinematic data from all conditions. The significance of our findings is that in situations involving recoverable falls or loss of balance the earliest responses are likely dependent on actively-tuned, reflexive mechanisms yielding stiffness and damping modulation of the joints. We demonstrate that haptic cues from index fingertip contact with a stationary surface lead to a significantly smaller angular displacement of the torso and a more rapid recovery of balance. Our H&R paradigm and associated model provide a quantifiable approach to studying recovery from potential falling in normal and clinical subjects.

  10. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  11. Common postural defects among music students.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Piñeiro, Patricia; Díaz-Pereira, M Pino; Martínez, Aurora

    2015-07-01

    Postural quality during musical performance affects both musculoskeletal health and the quality of the performance. In this study we examined the posture of 100 students at a Higher Conservatory of Music in Spain. By analysing video tapes and photographs of the students while performing, a panel of experts extracted values of 11 variables reflecting aspects of overall postural quality or the postural quality of various parts of the body. The most common postural defects were identified, together with the situations in which they occur. It is concluded that most students incur in unphysiological postures during performance. It is hoped that use of the results of this study will help correct these errors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Posture alters human resting-state.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Robert T; Lifshitz, Michael; Jones, Jennifer M; Raz, Amir

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging is ubiquitous; however, neuroimagers seldom investigate the putative impact of posture on brain activity. Whereas participants in most psychological experiments sit upright, many prominent neuroimaging techniques (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)) require participants to lie supine. Such postural discrepancies may hold important implications for brain function in general and for fMRI in particular. We directly investigated the effect of posture on spontaneous brain dynamics by recording scalp electrical activity in four orthostatic conditions (lying supine, inclined at 45°, sitting upright, and standing erect). Here we show that upright versus supine posture increases widespread high-frequency oscillatory activity. Our electroencephalographic findings highlight the importance of posture as a determinant in neuroimaging. When generalizing supine imaging results to ecological human cognition, therefore, cognitive neuroscientists would benefit from considering the influence of posture on brain dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of propranolol on postural stability.

    PubMed

    Lidegaard, O; Jansen, E C; Korsgaard Larsen, T

    1984-06-01

    In a double-blind cross-over study, the influence of propranolol on postural stability was investigated in 7 normals. The postural stability was measured by a computer-assisted quantitative Romberg test. A dose of 10 mg propranolol administered intravenously resulted in an impaired postural stability, with a delay of about half an hour. This delay could be responsible for the missing correlation between the sway and plasma-propranolol.

  14. The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Costa, F.; Shannon, J. R.; Robertson, R. M.; Wathen, M.; Stein, M.; Biaggioni, I.; Ertl, A.; Black, B.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The postural tachycardia syndrome is a common disorder that is characterized by chronic orthostatic symptoms and a dramatic increase in heart rate on standing, but that does not involve orthostatic hypotension. Several lines of evidence indicate that this disorder may result from sympathetic denervation of the legs. METHODS: We measured norepinephrine spillover (the rate of entry of norepinephrine into the venous circulation) in the arms and legs both before and in response to exposure to three stimuli (the cold pressor test, sodium nitroprusside infusion, and tyramine infusion) in 10 patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome and in 8 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. RESULTS: At base line, the mean (+/-SD) plasma norepinephrine concentration in the femoral vein was lower in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (135+/-30 vs. 215+/-55 pg per milliliter [0.80+/-0.18 vs. 1.27+/-0.32 nmol per liter], P=0.001). Norepinephrine spillover in the arms increased to a similar extent in the two groups in response to each of the three stimuli, but the increases in the legs were smaller in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (0.001+/-0.09 vs. 0.12+/-0.12 ng per minute per deciliter of tissue [0.006+/-0.53 vs. 0.71+/-0.71 nmol per minute per deciliter] with the cold pressor test, P=0.02; 0.02+/-0.07 vs. 0.23+/-0.17 ng per minute per deciliter [0.12+/-0.41 vs. 1.36+/-1.00 nmol per minute per deciliter] with nitroprusside infusion, P=0.01; and 0.008+/-0.09 vs. 0.19+/-0.25 ng per minute per deciliter [0.05+/-0.53 vs. 1.12+/-1.47 nmol per minute per deciliter] with tyramine infusion, P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome results from partial sympathetic denervation, especially in the legs.

  15. The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Costa, F.; Shannon, J. R.; Robertson, R. M.; Wathen, M.; Stein, M.; Biaggioni, I.; Ertl, A.; Black, B.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The postural tachycardia syndrome is a common disorder that is characterized by chronic orthostatic symptoms and a dramatic increase in heart rate on standing, but that does not involve orthostatic hypotension. Several lines of evidence indicate that this disorder may result from sympathetic denervation of the legs. METHODS: We measured norepinephrine spillover (the rate of entry of norepinephrine into the venous circulation) in the arms and legs both before and in response to exposure to three stimuli (the cold pressor test, sodium nitroprusside infusion, and tyramine infusion) in 10 patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome and in 8 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. RESULTS: At base line, the mean (+/-SD) plasma norepinephrine concentration in the femoral vein was lower in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (135+/-30 vs. 215+/-55 pg per milliliter [0.80+/-0.18 vs. 1.27+/-0.32 nmol per liter], P=0.001). Norepinephrine spillover in the arms increased to a similar extent in the two groups in response to each of the three stimuli, but the increases in the legs were smaller in the patients with the postural tachycardia syndrome than in the normal subjects (0.001+/-0.09 vs. 0.12+/-0.12 ng per minute per deciliter of tissue [0.006+/-0.53 vs. 0.71+/-0.71 nmol per minute per deciliter] with the cold pressor test, P=0.02; 0.02+/-0.07 vs. 0.23+/-0.17 ng per minute per deciliter [0.12+/-0.41 vs. 1.36+/-1.00 nmol per minute per deciliter] with nitroprusside infusion, P=0.01; and 0.008+/-0.09 vs. 0.19+/-0.25 ng per minute per deciliter [0.05+/-0.53 vs. 1.12+/-1.47 nmol per minute per deciliter] with tyramine infusion, P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome results from partial sympathetic denervation, especially in the legs.

  16. Correlation between rounded shoulder posture, neck disability indices, and degree of forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jin Seop

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to examine the correlation between rounded shoulder posture, neck disability indices and the degree of forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects aged 19-24 years were selected for this study, and the craniovertebral angle was used to measure the degree of forward head posture in the standing and seated positions. Vernier calipers were used to measure rounded shoulder posture in the supine position, and neck pain and functional disability were assessed using neck disability indices. [Results] Angle and neck disability indices in both standing and sitting posture positions exhibited a significant inverse relationship. However, no significant correlation was detected between the craniovertebral angle and rounded shoulder posture for the standing and sitting posture positions. [Conclusion] In conclusion, it was demonstrated in the present study that, depending on the degree of forward head posture, changes were detected in the neck disability indices. However, even an increase in the forward head tilt angle did not lead to rounded shoulder posture. Therefore, maintaining proper posture may prevent postural pain syndrome, functional disability, and postural deformity.

  17. Correlation between rounded shoulder posture, neck disability indices, and degree of forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jin Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to examine the correlation between rounded shoulder posture, neck disability indices and the degree of forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects aged 19–24 years were selected for this study, and the craniovertebral angle was used to measure the degree of forward head posture in the standing and seated positions. Vernier calipers were used to measure rounded shoulder posture in the supine position, and neck pain and functional disability were assessed using neck disability indices. [Results] Angle and neck disability indices in both standing and sitting posture positions exhibited a significant inverse relationship. However, no significant correlation was detected between the craniovertebral angle and rounded shoulder posture for the standing and sitting posture positions. [Conclusion] In conclusion, it was demonstrated in the present study that, depending on the degree of forward head posture, changes were detected in the neck disability indices. However, even an increase in the forward head tilt angle did not lead to rounded shoulder posture. Therefore, maintaining proper posture may prevent postural pain syndrome, functional disability, and postural deformity. PMID:27821964

  18. A reliable technique for the assessment of posture: assessment criteria for aspects of posture.

    PubMed

    Watson, A W; Mac Donncha, C

    2000-09-01

    The purposes of this study were: a) to describe assessment criteria for 10 separate aspects of posture; b) to describe the development and use of a qualitative posture rating scale based on the above; and c) to establish the reliability of the assessment technique. Experimental design. Observation and photographic record of the posture of a sample of adolescent males. Reliability determined using two observations separated by a period of seven days. 114 adolescent males (age, 15-17 yrs) randomly selected from two post-primary schools. Ten different aspects of posture assessed according to defined criteria. Assessments made from four photographs: anterior, posterior, lateral and oblique views. Through examination of the photographs a qualitative postural assessment scale was developed. This consisted of three categories for each aspect of posture, corresponding to: good posture, moderate defect, and severe defect. Definite assessment criteria for each of the 10 aspects of posture have been described. The above has resulted in an assessment procedure in which the reproducibility of the posture scores exceeded 85 % for all aspects assessed. Definite criteria for the examination of 10 different aspects of posture have been described and clear diagrams representing good posture, moderate and severe defects have been produced. The reproducibility of the assessment procedure described makes it suitable for investigating the relationships between posture and other health variables such as musculo-skeletal disorders.

  19. Postural behavior in children born preterm.

    PubMed

    Fallang, Bjørg; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2005-01-01

    The present paper presents clinical and neurophysiological data of postural behavior in preterm children without CP. Clinical follow-up studies of preterm infants until toddler and school age have reported that low-risk preterm infants may have atypical postural behavior in terms of reduced amount of rotation during crawling, delayed dynamic balance, delayed onset of and a poor quality of early walking behavior. At school age, dysfunctions such as problems in standing on one leg and poor hopping are reported. Neurophysiological data of postural control at early age indicated the presence of a dysfunction in the capacity to modulate postural activity, and the postural activity has been characterized by temporal disorganization of EMG responses. Postural responses to goal-directed reaching in supine lying have been recorded and analyzed in terms of the total body center of pressure. In this study, preterm infants show less mobile postural behavior compared with full-term infants. In infancy, the less mobile postural behavior seemed to be adequate as it was related to better goal-directed reaching quality, but the results indicated that the relatively immobile postural behavior during reaching in early age was related to less favorable neuromotor behavior in school-age.

  20. The dentist's operating posture - ergonomic aspects.

    PubMed

    Pîrvu, C; Pătraşcu, I; Pîrvu, D; Ionescu, C

    2014-06-15

    The practice of dentistry involves laborious high finesse dental preparations, precision and control in executions that require a particular attention, concentration and patience of the dentist and finally the dentist's physical and mental resistance. The optimal therapeutic approach and the success of practice involve special working conditions for the dentist and his team in an ergonomic environment. The meaning of the posture in ergonomics is the manner in which different parts of the body are located and thus the reports are established between them in order to allow a special task execution. This article discusses the posture adopted by dentists when they work, beginning with the balanced posture and going to different variants of posture. The ideal posture of a dentist gives him, on the one hand the optimal working conditions (access, visibility and control in the mouth) and on the other hand, physical and psychological comfort throughout the execution of the clinical acts. Although the theme of dentist posture is treated with great care and often presented in the undergraduate courses and the continuing education courses on ergonomics in dentistry, many dentists do not know the subject well enough nor the theoretical issues and therefore nor the practical applicability. The risk and perspective of the musculoskeletal disorders related to unbalanced postures should determine the dentists take postural corrective actions and compensation measures in order to limit the negative effects of working in a bad posture.

  1. Design and Validation of a Low-Cost Portable Device to Quantify Postural Stability †

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of the displacement of the center-of-pressure (COP) is an important tool used in biomechanics to assess postural stability and human balance. The goal of this research was to design and validate a low-cost portable device that can offer a quick indication of the state of postural stability and human balance related conditions. Approximate entropy (ApEn) values reflecting the amount of irregularity hiding in COP oscillations were used to calculate the index. The prototype adopted a portable design using the measurements of the load cells located at the four corners of a low-cost force platform. The test subject was asked to stand on the device in a quiet, normal, upright stance for 30 s with eyes open and subsequently for 30 s with eyes closed. Based on the COP displacement signals, the ApEn values were calculated. The results indicated that the prototype device was capable of capturing the increase in regularity of postural control in the visual-deprivation conditions. It was also able to decipher the subtle postural control differences along anterior–posterior and medial–lateral directions. The data analysis demonstrated that the prototype would enable the quantification of postural stability and thus provide a low-cost portable device to assess many conditions related to postural stability and human balance such as aging and pathologies. PMID:28335461

  2. Use of information entropy measures of sitting postural sway to quantify developmental delay in infants.

    PubMed

    Deffeyes, Joan E; Harbourne, Regina T; DeJong, Stacey L; Kyvelidou, Anastasia; Stuberg, Wayne A; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2009-08-11

    By quantifying the information entropy of postural sway data, the complexity of the postural movement of different populations can be assessed, giving insight into pathologic motor control functioning. In this study, developmental delay of motor control function in infants was assessed by analysis of sitting postural sway data acquired from force plate center of pressure measurements. Two types of entropy measures were used: symbolic entropy, including a new asymmetric symbolic entropy measure, and approximate entropy, a more widely used entropy measure. For each method of analysis, parameters were adjusted to optimize the separation of the results from the infants with delayed development from infants with typical development. The method that gave the widest separation between the populations was the asymmetric symbolic entropy method, which we developed by modification of the symbolic entropy algorithm. The approximate entropy algorithm also performed well, using parameters optimized for the infant sitting data. The infants with delayed development were found to have less complex patterns of postural sway in the medial-lateral direction, and were found to have different left-right symmetry in their postural sway, as compared to typically developing infants. The results of this study indicate that optimization of the entropy algorithm for infant sitting postural sway data can greatly improve the ability to separate the infants with developmental delay from typically developing infants.

  3. Use of information entropy measures of sitting postural sway to quantify developmental delay in infants

    PubMed Central

    Deffeyes, Joan E; Harbourne, Regina T; DeJong, Stacey L; Kyvelidou, Anastasia; Stuberg, Wayne A; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Background By quantifying the information entropy of postural sway data, the complexity of the postural movement of different populations can be assessed, giving insight into pathologic motor control functioning. Methods In this study, developmental delay of motor control function in infants was assessed by analysis of sitting postural sway data acquired from force plate center of pressure measurements. Two types of entropy measures were used: symbolic entropy, including a new asymmetric symbolic entropy measure, and approximate entropy, a more widely used entropy measure. For each method of analysis, parameters were adjusted to optimize the separation of the results from the infants with delayed development from infants with typical development. Results The method that gave the widest separation between the populations was the asymmetric symbolic entropy method, which we developed by modification of the symbolic entropy algorithm. The approximate entropy algorithm also performed well, using parameters optimized for the infant sitting data. The infants with delayed development were found to have less complex patterns of postural sway in the medial-lateral direction, and were found to have different left-right symmetry in their postural sway, as compared to typically developing infants. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that optimization of the entropy algorithm for infant sitting postural sway data can greatly improve the ability to separate the infants with developmental delay from typically developing infants. PMID:19671183

  4. Postural balance, visual verticality perception, and its association in individuals with and without neck pain.

    PubMed

    Hiengkaew, Vimonwan; Panichaporn, Wanvisa; Thanungkul, Sumethee

    2014-07-01

    To compare postural balance and visual verticality perception between neck pain and asymptomatic subjects; to determine its association within groups. Fourteen neck pain and 14 asymptomatic subjects participated in the study. Subjects stood on a force platform to measure the displacement of the center of pressure in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, total path length, and sway velocity. Subjects performed 10 patterns of the rod and frame test in the sitting position to measure absolute errors of visual verticality perception. Postural balance variables between neck pain and asymptomatic participants were determined by Independent t-test. Two-way analysis of variance determined the effect of absolute errors of visual verticality perception, groups and its interaction. The association between postural balance variables and absolute errors of visual verticality perception was determined by Pearson's correlation. Neck pain patients showed greater total path length and sway velocity than asymptomatic subjects. Similar absolute errors of visual verticality perception between groups were shown. No correlation between postural balance variables and absolute errors of visual verticality perception within groups was demonstrated. Postural balance, not visual verticality perception was disturbed in individuals with neck pain. Postural balance was not associated with visual verticality perception in individuals with and without neck pain.

  5. The effect of actual and imaginary handgrip on postural stability during different balance conditions.

    PubMed

    VanderHill, M S; Wolf, E E; Langenderfer, J E; Ustinova, K I

    2014-09-01

    The stabilizing effect of holding an object on upright posture has been demonstrated in a variety of settings. The mechanism of this effect is unknown but could be attributed to either additional sensorimotor activity triggered by a hand contact or cognitive efforts related to performance of a supra-postural task. A potential mechanism was investigated by comparing postural stability in young healthy individuals while gripping a custom instrumented wooden stick with a 5N force and while imagining holding the same stick in the hand. Twenty subjects were tested during three standing balance conditions: on a stationary surface, on a freely moving rockerboard, and with an unexpected perturbation of 10° forward rockerboard tipping. Postural stability was evaluated as velocity of the center of mass (COM) and center of pressure (COP) compared across all experimental conditions. COM and COP velocities were equally reduced when subjects gripped the stick and imagined gripping while standing stationary and on the rockerboard. When perturbed, subjects failed to show any postural stability improvements regardless of handgrip task. Results indicate a stabilizing effect of focusing attention on motor task performance. This cognitive strategy does not appear to contribute any additional stabilization when subjects are perturbed. This study adds to the current understanding of postural stabilization strategies.

  6. Design and Validation of a Low-Cost Portable Device to Quantify Postural Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong

    2017-03-18

    Measurement of the displacement of the center-of-pressure (COP) is an important tool used in biomechanics to assess postural stability and human balance. The goal of this research was to design and validate a low-cost portable device that can offer a quick indication of the state of postural stability and human balance related conditions. Approximate entropy (ApEn) values reflecting the amount of irregularity hiding in COP oscillations were used to calculate the index. The prototype adopted a portable design using the measurements of the load cells located at the four corners of a low-cost force platform. The test subject was asked to stand on the device in a quiet, normal, upright stance for 30 s with eyes open and subsequently for 30 s with eyes closed. Based on the COP displacement signals, the ApEn values were calculated. The results indicated that the prototype device was capable of capturing the increase in regularity of postural control in the visual-deprivation conditions. It was also able to decipher the subtle postural control differences along anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. The data analysis demonstrated that the prototype would enable the quantification of postural stability and thus provide a low-cost portable device to assess many conditions related to postural stability and human balance such as aging and pathologies.

  7. Aging and balance control in response to external perturbations: role of anticipatory and compensatory postural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Neeta; Aruin, Alexander S

    2014-06-01

    The ability to maintain balance deteriorates with increasing age. Anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments (APAs and CPAs, respectively), both, are known to be affected in the elderly. We examined the effect of aging on the ability of older adults to utilize APAs and its effect on subsequent control of posture (CPAs). Ten elderly individuals were exposed to external predictable and unpredictable perturbations applied to the upper body in the sagittal plane. Body kinematics, electromyographic activity of 13 muscles, and ground reaction forces were analyzed during the anticipatory and compensatory phases of postural control. The elderly were capable of recognizing an upcoming predictable perturbation and activated muscles prior to it. However, the older adults used different muscle strategies and sequence of muscle recruitment than that reported in young adults. Additionally, when the perturbations were unpredictable, no APAs were seen which resulted in large CPAs and greater peak displacements of the center of pressure (COP) and center of mass (COM) following perturbations. As opposed to this, when the perturbations were predictable, APAs were seen in older adults resulting in significantly smaller CPAs. The presence and utilization of APAs in older adults also improved postural stability following the perturbation as seen by significantly smaller COP and COM peak displacements. Using APAs in older adults significantly reduces the need for large CPAs, resulting in greater postural stability following a perturbation. The results provide a foundation for investigating the role of training in improving the interplay between anticipatory and compensatory postural control in older adults.

  8. Disturbance of contralateral unipedal postural control after stimulated and voluntary contractions of the ipsilateral limb.

    PubMed

    Paillard, Thierry; Chaubet, Vincent; Maitre, Julien; Dumitrescu, Michel; Borel, Liliane

    2010-12-01

    One session of sustained unilateral voluntary muscular contractions increases central fatigue and induces a cross-over of fatigue of homologous contralateral muscles. It is not known, however, how this cross-transfer affects contralateral unipedal postural control. Moreover, contralateral neurophysiological effects differ between voluntary muscular contractions and electrically stimulated contractions. The aims of this study were thus to examine the effects of muscle fatigue on contralateral unipedal postural control and to compare the effects of stimulated and voluntary contractions. Fifteen subjects took part in the protocol. Fatigue of the ipsilateral quadriceps femoris was generated either by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or by isometric voluntary muscular contraction (VOL). Postural control on the contralateral limb was measured before (PRE condition) and after the completion of the two fatiguing exercises (POST condition) using a force platform. We analyzed body sway area and the spectral power density given by the wavelet transform. In POST condition, postural control recorded in the unipedal stance on the contralateral limb was disturbed after NMES and VOL fatiguing exercises. In addition, postural control was similarly disturbed for both exercises. These results suggest that cross-over fatigue is able to disturb postural control after both stimulated and voluntary contractions.

  9. Dual-tasking postural control in patients with right brain damage.

    PubMed

    Bourlon, Clémence; Lehenaff, Laurent; Batifoulier, Cécile; Bordier, Aurélie; Chatenet, Aurélia; Desailly, Eric; Fouchard, Christian; Marsal, Muriel; Martinez, Marianne; Rastelli, Federica; Thierry, Anaïs; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Duret, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The control of dual-tasking effects is a daily challenge in stroke neurorehabilitation. It maybe one of the reasons why there is poor functional prognosis after a stroke in the right hemisphere, which plays a dominant role in posture control. The purpose of this study was to explore cognitive motor interference in right brain-lesioned and healthy subjects maintaining a standing position while performing three different tasks: a control task, a simple attentional task and a complex attentional task. We measured the sway area of the subjects on a force platform, including the center of pressure and its displacements. Results showed that stroke patients presented a reduced postural sway compared to healthy subjects, who were able to maintain their posture while performing a concomitant attentional task in the same dual-tasking conditions. Moreover, in both groups, the postural sway decreased with the increase in attentional load from cognitive tasks. We also noticed that the stability of stroke patients in dual-tasking conditions increased together with the weight-bearing rightward deviation, especially when the attentional load of the cognitive tasks and lower limb motor impairments were high. These results suggest that stroke patients and healthy subjects adopt a similar postural regulation pattern aimed at maintaining stability in dual-tasking conditions involving a static standing position and different attention-related cognitive tasks. Our results indicate that attention processes might facilitate static postural control.

  10. Knee posture predicted from subchondral apparent density in the distal femur: an experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Polk, John D; Blumenfeld, J; Ahluwalia, K; Ahluwalia, D

    2008-03-01

    Spatial patterning in the apparent density of subchondral bone can be used to discriminate between species that differ in their joint loading conditions. This study provides an experimental test of two hypotheses that relate aspects of subchondral apparent density patterns to joint loading conditions. First, the region of maximum subchondral apparent density (RMD) will correspond to differences in joint posture at the time of peak locomotor loads; and second, differences in maximum density between individuals will correspond to differences in exercise level. These hypotheses were tested using three age-matched samples of juvenile sheep. Two groups of five sheep were exercised, at moderate walking speeds, twice daily for 45 days on a treadmill with either a 0% or 15% grade. The remaining sheep were not exercised. Sheep walking on the inclined treadmill used more flexed knee postures than those in the level walking group at the time of peak vertical ground reaction forces. Kinematic measurements of knee posture were compared with knee postures estimated from the spatial position of the RMD on the medial femoral condyle. Our results show that the difference in the position of the RMD between the incline and level walking groups corresponded to the difference in knee postures obtained kinematically; however, exercised and nonexercised sheep did not differ in the magnitude of apparent density. These results suggest that patterns of subchondral apparent density are good indicators of the experimental modifications in joint posture during locomotion and may, therefore, be used to investigate differences between species in habitual joint loading.

  11. Influence of dental occlusion on postural control and plantar pressure distribution.

    PubMed

    Scharnweber, Benjamin; Adjami, Frederic; Schuster, Gabriele; Kopp, Stefan; Natrup, Jörg; Erbe, Christina; Ohlendorf, Daniela

    2016-10-20

    The number of studies investigating correlations between the temporomandibular system and body posture, postural control or plantar pressure distribution is continuously increasing. If a connection can be found, it is often of minor influence or for only a single parameter. However, small subject groups are critical. This study was conducted to define correlations between dental parameters, postural control and plantar pressure distribution in healthy males. In this study, 87 male subjects with an average age of 25.23 ± 3.5 years (ranging from 18 to 35 years) were examined. Dental casts of the subjects were analyzed. Postural control and plantar pressure distribution were recorded by a force platform. Possible orthodontic and orthopedic factors of influence were determined by either an anamnesis or a questionnaire. All tests performed were randomized and repeated three times each for intercuspal position (ICP) and blocked occlusion (BO). For a statistical analysis of the results, non-parametric tests (Wilcoxon-Matched-Pairs-Test, Kruskall-Wallis-Test) were used. A revision of the results via Bonferroni-Holm correction was considered. ICP increases body sway in the frontal (p ≤ 0.01) and sagittal planes (p ≤ 0.03) compared to BO, whereas all other 29 correlations were independent of the occlusion position. For both of the ICP or BO cases, Angle-class, midline-displacement, crossbite, or orthodontic therapy were found to have no influence on postural control or plantar pressure distribution (p > 0.05). However, the contact time of the left foot decreased (p ≤ 0.001) while detecting the plantar pressure distribution in each position. Persistent dental parameters have no effect on postural sway. In addition, postural control and plantar pressure distribution have been found to be independent postural criteria.

  12. The effect of combined mechanism ankle support on postural control of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Ismaeil; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Aminian, Gholamreza; Esteki, Ali; Rahgozar, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Chronic ankle instability is associated with neuromechanical changes and poor postural stability. Despite variety of mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses, almost none apply comprehensive mechanisms to improve postural control in all subgroups of chronic ankle instability patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an ankle support implementing combined mechanisms to improve postural control in chronic ankle instability patients. Cross-sectional study. An ankle support with combined mechanism was designed based on most effective action mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses. The effect of this orthosis on postural control was evaluated in 20 participants with chronic ankle instability and 20 matched healthy participants. The single-limb stance balance test was measured in both groups with and without the new orthosis using a force platform. The results showed that application of combined mechanism ankle support significantly improved all postural sway parameters in chronic ankle instability patients. There were no differences in means of investigated parameters with and without the orthosis in the healthy group. No statistically significant differences were found in postural sway between chronic ankle instability patients and healthy participants after applying the combined mechanism ankle support. The combined mechanism ankle support is effective in improving static postural control of chronic ankle instability patients to close to the postural sway of healthy individual. the orthosis had no adverse effects on balance performance of healthy individuals. Clinical relevance Application of the combined mechanism ankle support for patients with chronic ankle instability is effective in improving static balance. This may be helpful in reduction of recurrence of ankle sprain although further research about dynamic conditions is needed.

  13. Postural adjustment errors reveal deficits in inhibition during lateral step initiation in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrman, Susan I.; Redfern, Mark S.; Jennings, J. Richard; Perera, Subashan; Nebes, Robert D.; Furman, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Postural dual-task studies have demonstrated effects of various executive function components on gait and postural control in older adults. The purpose of the study was to explore the role of inhibition during lateral step initiation. Forty older adults participated (range 70–94 yr). Subjects stepped to the left or right in response to congruous and incongruous visual cues that consisted of left and right arrows appearing on left or right sides of a monitor. The timing of postural adjustments was identified by inflection points in the vertical ground reaction forces (VGRF) measured separately under each foot. Step responses could be classified into preferred and nonpreferred step behavior based on the number of postural adjustments that were made. Delays in onset of the first postural adjustment (PA1) and liftoff (LO) of the step leg during preferred steps progressively increased among the simple, choice, congruous, and incongruous tasks, indicating interference in processing the relevant visuospatial cue. Incongruous cues induced subjects to make more postural adjustments than they typically would (i.e., nonpreferred steps), representing errors in selection of the appropriate motor program. During these nonpreferred steps, the onset of the PA1 was earlier than during the preferred steps, indicating a failure to inhibit an inappropriate initial postural adjustment. The functional consequence of the additional postural adjustments was a delay in the LO compared with steps in which they did not make an error. These results suggest that deficits in inhibitory function may detrimentally affect step decision processing, by delaying voluntary step responses. PMID:23114211

  14. Fatiguing exercise intensity influences the relationship between parameters reflecting neuromuscular function and postural control variables.

    PubMed

    Boyas, Sébastien; Remaud, Anthony; Rivers, Erin; Bilodeau, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of fatiguing exercise intensity on the nature and extent of fatigue-induced changes in neuromuscular function and postural stability in quiet standing. We also explored the contribution of selected neuromuscular mechanisms involved in force production to postural stability impairment observed following fatigue using an approach based on multivariate regressions. Eighteen young subjects performed 30-s postural trials on one leg with their eyes closed. Postural trials were performed before and after fatiguing exercises of different intensities: 25, 50 and 75% of maximal isometric plantarflexor torque. Fatiguing exercises consisted of sustaining a plantarflexor isometric contraction at the target intensity until task failure. Maximal isometric plantarflexor torque, electromyographic activity of plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles, activation level (twitch interpolation technique) and twitch contractile properties of plantarflexors were used to characterize neuromuscular function. The 25% exercise was associated with greater central fatigue whereas the 50 and 75% exercises involved mostly peripheral fatigue. However, all fatiguing exercises induced similar alterations in postural stability, which was unexpected considering previous literature. Stepwise multiple regression analyses showed that fatigue-related changes in selected parameters related to neuromuscular function could explain more than half (0.51≤R(2)≤0.82) of the changes in postural variables for the 25% exercise. On the other hand, regression models were less predictive (0.17≤R(2)≤0.73) for the 50 and 75% exercises. This study suggests that fatiguing exercise intensity does not influence the extent of postural stability impairment, but does influence the type of fatigue induced and the neuromuscular function predictors explaining changes in postural variables.

  15. [Correlation between pulmonary function, posture, and body composition in patients with asthma].

    PubMed

    Almeida, V P; Guimarães, F S; Moço, V J R; Menezes, S L S; Mafort, T T; Lopes, A J

    2013-01-01

    Asthma may result in postural disorders due to increased activity of accessory respiratory muscles and hyperinflation. Our primary objective was to assess the correlation between pulmonary function and posture in adult patients with asthma. Secondarily, we aimed to study the correlation between body composition and body posture in this group of patients. This was a cross-sectional study including 34 patients with asthma who were subjected to postural assessment (photogrammetry), pulmonary function testing (spirometry, whole-body plethysmography, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, and respiratory muscle strength), and body composition estimation by means of bioelectrical impedance. Most patients were female (70.6%) with a median age of 32.5 years (range: 23-42 years old). We found a significant correlation between horizontal alignment of head (anterior view) and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC; ρ=-0,37; P=.03), total lung capacity (TLC; ρ=0,42; P=.01), and residual volume (RV; ρ=0,45; P<.001). Bronchial obstruction and respiratory muscle strength variables also correlated with postural assessment measures on the right and left lateral views. Both body mass index and the percentage of fat mass correlated with horizontal alignment of head, horizontal alignment of the pelvis, and the frontal angle of the lower limbs. Adult patients with asthma exhibit specific postural disorders that correlate with pulmonary function and body composition. The assessment of postural variables may provide a better pulmonary rehabilitation approach for these patients. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Aging worsens the effects of sleep deprivation on postural control.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Rébecca; Prince, François; Filipini, Daniel; Carrier, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Falls increase with age and cause significant injuries in the elderly. This study aimed to determine whether age modulates the interactions between sleep deprivation and postural control and to evaluate how attention influences these interactions in the elderly. Fifteen young (24±2.7 y.o.) and 15 older adults (64±3.2 y.o.) stood still on a force plate after a night of sleep and after total sleep deprivation. Center of pressure range and velocity were measured with eyes open and with eyes closed while participants performed an interference task, a control task, and no cognitive task. Sleep deprivation increased the antero-posterior range of center of pressure in both age groups and center of pressure speed in older participants only. In elderly participants, the destabilizing effects of sleep deprivation were more pronounced with eyes closed. The interference task did not alter postural control beyond the destabilization induced by sleep loss in older subjects. It was concluded that sleep loss has greater destabilizing effects on postural control in older than in younger participants, and may therefore increase the risk of falls in the elderly.

  17. White Matter Hyperintensities and Dynamics of Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Vera; Haertle, Mareile; Zhao, Peng; Hu, Kun; Munshi, Medha; Novak, Peter; Abduljalil, Amir; Alsop, David

    2009-01-01

    Background White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on MRI have been associated with age, cardiovascular risk factors, and falls in the elderly. This study evaluated the relationship between WMHs and dynamics of postural control in older adults without history of falls. Methods We studied 76 community living subjects without history of falls (age 64.5±7.3 yrs). Brain and WMHs volume calculations and clinical rating were done on FLAIR and MP-RAGE MR images on 3 Tesla. Balance was assessed from the center of pressure displacement using the force platform during 3 minutes of quiet standing using traditional and dynamic measures (using stabilogram-diffusion analysis). Gait speed was measured from 12 minute walk. Results Age-adjusted periventricular and focal WMHs were associated with changes in certain dynamic balance measures, including reduced range of postural sway in anteroposterior direction (fronto-temporal WMHs, p=0.045; parieto-occipital WMHs, p=0.009) and more irregular longterm mediolateral fluctuations (p=0.046). Normal walking speed was not affected by WMHs. Conclusions Periventricul and focal WMHs affect long-term dynamics of postural control, which requires engagement of feedback mechanisms, and may contribute to mobility decline in the elderly. PMID:19250785

  18. Postural balance in patients with social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Levitan, M N; Crippa, J A; Bruno, L M; Pastore, D L; Freire, R C; Arrais, K C; Hallak, J E; Nardi, A E

    2012-01-01

    Body stability is controlled by the postural system and can be affected by fear and anxiety. Few studies have addressed freezing posture in psychiatric disorders. The purpose of the present study was to assess posturographic behavior in 30 patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and 35 without SAD during presentation of blocks of pictures with different valences. Neutral images consisted of objects taken from a catalog of pictures, negative images were mutilation pictures and anxiogenic images were related to situations regarding SAD fears. While participants were standing on a force platform, similar to a balance, displacement of the center of pressure in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions was measured. We found that the SAD group exhibited a lower sway area and a lower velocity of sway throughout the experiment independent of the visual stimuli, in which the phobic pictures, a stimulus associated with a defense response, were unable to evoke a significantly more rigid posture than the others. We hypothesize that patients with SAD when entering in a situation of exposure, from the moment the pictures are presented, tend to move less than controls, remaining this way until the experiment ends. This discrete body manifestation can provide additional data to the characterization of SAD and its differentiation from other anxiety disorders, especially in situations regarding facing fear.

  19. Classification of posture maintenance data with fuzzy clustering algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezdek, James C.

    1991-01-01

    Sensory inputs from the visual, vestibular, and proprioreceptive systems are integrated by the central nervous system to maintain postural equilibrium. Sustained exposure to microgravity causes neurosensory adaptation during spaceflight, which results in decreased postural stability until readaptation occurs upon return to the terrestrial environment. Data which simulate sensory inputs under various conditions were collected in conjunction with JSC postural control studies using a Tilt-Translation Device (TTD). The University of West Florida proposed applying the Fuzzy C-Means Clustering (FCM) Algorithms to this data with a view towards identifying various states and stages. Data supplied by NASA/JSC were submitted to the FCM algorithms in an attempt to identify and characterize cluster substructure in a mixed ensemble of pre- and post-adaptational TTD data. Following several unsuccessful trials with FCM using a full 11 dimensional data set, a set of two channels (features) were found to enable FCM to separate pre- from post-adaptational TTD data. The main conclusions are that: (1) FCM seems able to separate pre- from post-TTD subject no. 2 on the one trial that was used, but only in certain subintervals of time; and (2) Channels 2 (right rear transducer force) and 8 (hip sway bar) contain better discrimination information than other supersets and combinations of the data that were tried so far.

  20. Hierarchical and multiple hand action representation using temporal postural synergies.

    PubMed

    Tessitore, G; Sinigaglia, C; Prevete, R

    2013-03-01

    The notion of synergy enables one to provide simplified descriptions of hand actions. It has been used in a number of different meanings ranging from kinematic and dynamic synergies to postural and temporal postural synergies. However, relatively little is known about how representing an action by synergies might take into account the possibility to have a hierarchical and multiple action representation. This is a key aspect for action representation as it has been characterized by action theorists and cognitive neuroscientists. Thus, the aim of the present paper is to investigate whether and to what extent a hierarchical and multiple action representation can be obtained by a synergy approach. To this purpose, we took advantage of representing hand action as a linear combination of temporal postural synergies (TPSs), but on the assumption that TPSs have a tree-structured organization. In a tree-structured organization, a hand action representation can involve a TPS only if the ancestors of the synergy in the tree are themselves involved in the action representation. The results showed that this organization is enough to force a multiple representation of hand actions in terms of synergies which are hierarchically organized.

  1. Postural strategies in Prader-Willi and Down syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Grugni, Graziano; Vismara, Luca; Precilios, Helmer; Albertini, Giorgio; Rigoldi, Chiara; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Patients affected by Down (DS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are characterised by some common clinical and functional features including gait disorders and reduced postural control. The aim of our study was to quantitatively compare postural control in adult PWS and DS. We studied 12 PWS and 19 DS adult patients matched for age, height, weight and body mass index. They were instructed to maintain an upright standing position on a force platform for 30s with open eyes (OE) and we calculated the range of center of pressure (CoP) displacement in the A/P direction (RANGE(AP)) and in the M/L direction (RANGE(ML)) and the total CoP trajectory length during quiet stance (Sway Path, SP). The range of oscillations in PWS and DS in both AP and ML direction were higher than in controls. PWS and DS were statistically different for RANGE(AP), with PWS showing higher mean values. Our results confirm a reduced capacity of both PWS and DS in maintaining postural stability. This appears to be in some respect different in PWS and DS, with PWS showing poorer control in AP. DS and, particularly, PWS should be encouraged to undergo specific balance training and strengthening of the ankle muscles as part of a comprehensive rehabilitation program to enhance daily functioning and quality of life. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cortical control of anticipatory postural adjustments prior to stepping.

    PubMed

    Varghese, J P; Merino, D M; Beyer, K B; McIlroy, W E

    2016-01-28

    Human bipedal balance control is achieved either reactively or predictively by a distributed network of neural areas within the central nervous system with a potential role for cerebral cortex. While the role of the cortex in reactive balance has been widely explored, only few studies have addressed the cortical activations related to predictive balance control. The present study investigated the cortical activations related to the preparation and execution of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) that precede a step. This study also examined whether the preparatory cortical activations related to a specific movement is dependent on the context of control (postural component vs. focal component). Ground reaction forces and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 14 healthy adults while they performed lateral weight shift and lateral stepping with and without initially preloading their weight to the stance leg. EEG analysis revealed that there were distinct movement-related potentials (MRPs) with concurrent event-related desynchronization (ERD) of mu and beta rhythms prior to the onset of APA and also to the onset of foot-off during lateral stepping in the fronto-central cortical areas. Also, the MRPs and ERD prior to the onset of APA and onset of lateral weight shift were not significantly different suggesting the comparable cortical activations for the generation of postural and focal movements. The present study reveals the occurrence of cortical activation prior to the execution of an APA that precedes a step. Importantly, this cortical activity appears independent of the context of the movement.

  3. a Review of the Biomechanics and Epidemiology of Working Postures (it Isn't always Vibration which is to BLAME!)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, M. L.; Pope, M. H.

    1998-08-01

    Many vibrational environments also subject the worker to awkward, asymmetric and prolonged postures. This paper reviews the epidemiological, biomechanical and physiological factors involved in working postures which could lead to musculoskeletal problems. Too little or too much sitting leads to low back pain. Sedentary postures, including driving, also lead to a higher risk of a herniated disc. In sitting the pelvis rotates and higher pressures exist in the disk. A backrest inclined to 110° or more and with a lumbar support will reduce the disk pressure. Jobs involving excessive force application will be more apt to cause muscular and ligamentous damage. However, these excessive demands can occur in whole body vibration environments too. Neck, shoulder and arm problems are usually related to posture but can occur in WBV environments. Knee problems, in the standing worker, may be due to a flexed knee posture in an attempt to attenuate vibrations. Excessive postural demands on the neck, shoulder and arm will lead to higher muscle forces and higher joint forces. Recommendations are given to reduce risk of disability.

  4. Associations between Tactile Sensory Threshold and Postural Performance and Effects of Healthy Aging and Subthreshold Vibrotactile Stimulation on Postural Outcomes in a Simple Dual Task.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Specific activities that require concurrent processing of postural and cognitive tasks may increase the risk for falls in older adults. We investigated whether peripheral receptor sensitivity was associated with postural performance in a dual-task and whether an intervention in form of subthreshold vibration could affect performance. Ten younger (age: 20-35 years) and ten older adults (70-85 years) performed repeated auditory-verbal 1-back tasks while standing quietly on a force platform. Foot sole vibration was randomly added during several trials. Several postural control and performance measures were assessed and statistically analyzed (significance set to α-levels of .05). There were moderate correlations between peripheral sensitivity and several postural performance and control measures (r = .45 to .59). Several postural performance measures differed significantly between older and younger adults (p < 0.05); addition of vibration did not affect outcome measures. Aging affects healthy older adults' performance in dual-tasks, and peripheral sensitivity may be a contributor to the observed differences. A vibration intervention may only be useful when there are more severe impairments of the sensorimotor system. Hence, future research regarding the efficacy of sensorimotor interventions in the form of vibrotactile stimulation should focus on older adults whose balance is significantly affected.

  5. Associations between Tactile Sensory Threshold and Postural Performance and Effects of Healthy Aging and Subthreshold Vibrotactile Stimulation on Postural Outcomes in a Simple Dual Task

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific activities that require concurrent processing of postural and cognitive tasks may increase the risk for falls in older adults. We investigated whether peripheral receptor sensitivity was associated with postural performance in a dual-task and whether an intervention in form of subthreshold vibration could affect performance. Ten younger (age: 20–35 years) and ten older adults (70–85 years) performed repeated auditory-verbal 1-back tasks while standing quietly on a force platform. Foot sole vibration was randomly added during several trials. Several postural control and performance measures were assessed and statistically analyzed (significance set to α-levels of .05). There were moderate correlations between peripheral sensitivity and several postural performance and control measures (r = .45 to .59). Several postural performance measures differed significantly between older and younger adults (p < 0.05); addition of vibration did not affect outcome measures. Aging affects healthy older adults' performance in dual-tasks, and peripheral sensitivity may be a contributor to the observed differences. A vibration intervention may only be useful when there are more severe impairments of the sensorimotor system. Hence, future research regarding the efficacy of sensorimotor interventions in the form of vibrotactile stimulation should focus on older adults whose balance is significantly affected. PMID:27143967

  6. Organization of Functional Postural Responses Following Perturbations in Multiple Directions in Elderly Fallers Standing Quietly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matjacic, Zlatko; Sok, David; Jakovljevic, Miroljub; Cikajlo, Imre

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess functional postural responses by analyzing the center-of-pressure trajectories resulting from perturbations delivered in multiple directions to elderly fallers. Ten elderly individuals were standing quietly on two force platforms while an apparatus delivered controlled perturbations at the level of pelvis…

  7. The Effect of Vision on Postural Strategies in Prader-Willi Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Vismara, Luca; Grugni, Graziano; Priano, Lorenzo; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the role of visual contribution in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) on balance maintenance using a force platform. We enrolled 14 individuals with PWS free from conditions associated with impaired balance, 44 obese (OG) and 20 healthy controls (CG). Postural sway was measured for 60 s while standing…

  8. Effects of cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide on forward head posture and respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Yoon; Kim, Nan-Soo; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] To determine the effects of cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide on forward head posture and respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male and female adults in their 20s with forward head posture were included in the study. The subjects were divided randomly into experimental and control groups (n=15 each). Subjects in the experimental group performed cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide three times/week for four weeks while subjects in the control group did not perform the intervention. The craniovertebral angle, forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, as well as the % predicted value of each measurement were assessed to determine the changes in respiration functions before and after the exercise. [Results] The craniovertebral angle four weeks after the experiment was increased in the experimental group, whereas the control group showed no significant difference compared to baseline. The forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and the % predicted values thereof were significantly increased in the experimental group four weeks after the experiment, but not in the control group. [Conclusion] Cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide was determined to be effective in improving neck posture and respiratory functions for patients with forward head posture.

  9. The Effect of Vision on Postural Strategies in Prader-Willi Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Vismara, Luca; Grugni, Graziano; Priano, Lorenzo; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the role of visual contribution in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) on balance maintenance using a force platform. We enrolled 14 individuals with PWS free from conditions associated with impaired balance, 44 obese (OG) and 20 healthy controls (CG). Postural sway was measured for 60 s while standing…

  10. Organization of Functional Postural Responses Following Perturbations in Multiple Directions in Elderly Fallers Standing Quietly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matjacic, Zlatko; Sok, David; Jakovljevic, Miroljub; Cikajlo, Imre

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess functional postural responses by analyzing the center-of-pressure trajectories resulting from perturbations delivered in multiple directions to elderly fallers. Ten elderly individuals were standing quietly on two force platforms while an apparatus delivered controlled perturbations at the level of pelvis…

  11. [Postural examination in daily occlusodontology].

    PubMed

    Serviere, F

    1989-03-01

    According to the osteopathic and chiropractic concepts, facing a TMJ problem, the practitioner has to determine if the trouble observed in the stomatognatic apparatus is the cause or the effect of the structural problems present anywhere else in the body. The postural examination allows to answer this question. Tow techniques can be used. First a static and dynamic posture test proposed by Bricot. The level of the cranium, the eyes, the shoulders, the wrists, the pelvis and the ankles is analysed, from a front view; from the side, the gravity line is inspected: vertex, auditory meatus, shoulder, hip joint, anterior side of the tibia, ankle joint. The vertical posture can be studied from the front: the arms are held straight and the antero-posterior length between the fingers is measured. From the back, one notes the recoil of the buttocks on one side. An ocular convergence test is performed. Then one uses a Romberg test (oscillation of the body when the eyes are closed), and a Fukuda stepping test. The patient is then asked to bite on a compress, and the same exams are redone. If no change occurs, we are dealing with an ascending problem: the origin of the problem is not the stomatognathic system. The second technique is the Meerssemann test that needs the practice of Applied Kinesiology muscle testing. The patient is lying supine and one tests: the dental occlusion, the two TMJs, the temporal muscles, masseters, pterygoids, sterno-cleido-mastoids, upper tapezius, left and right sacro-iliac joints, psoas muscles bilaterally.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Modeling the postural disturbances caused by upper extremity movements.

    PubMed

    Triolo, R J; Werner, K N; Kirsch, R F

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes the design, validation, and application of a dynamic, three-dimensional (3-D) model of the upper extremity for the purpose of estimating postural disturbances generated by movements of the arms. The model consists of two links representing the upper and lower arms, with the shoulder and elbow modeled as gimbal joints to allow three rotational degrees of freedom. With individualized segment inertial parameters based on anthropometric measurements, the model performs inverse dynamic analysis of recorded arm movements to calculate reaction forces and moments acting on the body at the shoulder in three dimensions. The method was validated by comparing the output of the model to estimates obtained from ground reaction loads during stereotypical and free form unilateral movements at various velocities and with different loads carried by human subjects while seated on biomechanical force platforms. The correlation between predicted and measured reaction forces and moments was very good under all conditions and across all subjects, with average rms errors less than 8% of measured peak-to-peak values. The model was then applied to bimanual activities representative of functional movements that would typically be performed while standing at a counter. The resulting estimates were consistent and adequate for the purpose of evaluating postural disturbances caused by upper extremity movements.

  13. Postural orientation and standing postural alignment in ambulant children with bilateral cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Szopa, Andrzej

    2017-08-16

    Standing postural alignment in children with cerebral palsy is usually altered by central postural control disorders. The primary aim of this study is to describe body alignment in a quiet standing position in ambulatory children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared with children with typical development. Fifty-eight children with bilateral cerebral palsy (aged 7-13years) and 45 age-matched children with typical development underwent a surface topography examination based on Moiré topography and were classified according to their sagittal postural profiles. The following eight grouping variables were extracted using a data reduction technique: angle of trunk inclination, pelvic tilt, and lordosis, the difference between kyphosis and lordosis, angle of vertebral lateral curvature, shoulder inclination, and shoulder and pelvic rotation. According to the cluster analysis results, 25% of the participants were classified into Cluster 1, 9% into Cluster 2, 49% in Cluster 3, and 17% in Cluster 4. Three different postural patterns emerged in accordance with the sagittal postural profiles in children with bilateral cerebral palsy and were defined as follows: 1) a lordotic postural pattern corresponding to forward-leaning posture; 2) a swayback postural pattern corresponding to backward-leaning posture; and 3) a balanced postural pattern corresponding to balanced posture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Postural stability in symmetrical gaits.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Teresa; Trojnacki, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the method of stability analysis of dynamic symmetrical gaits is discussed. The problem of dynamic postural equilibrium, taking into account the role of compliant feet, is solved. The equilibrium conditions are split between the foot attachment points and the points within the foot-end area. The present method is useful for motion synthesis, taking into account robot parameters. It also helps in the robot foot design. As an illustrative example a four-legged diagonal gait is considered. The theoretical results were verified by implementing and observing the diagonal gait in four-legged machine with and without feet.

  15. Vestibular plasticity following orbital spaceflight: recovery from postflight postural instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.; Doxey-Gasway, D. D.; Reschke, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Results of previous studies suggested that the vestibular mediated postural instability observed in astronauts upon return to earth from orbital spaceflight may be exacerbated by an increased weighting of visual inputs for spatial orientation and control of movement. This study was performed to better understand the roles of visual and somatosensory contributions to recovery of normal sensori-motor postural control in returning astronauts. Preflight and postflight, 23 astronaut volunteers were presented randomly with three trials of six sensory organization test (SOT) conditions in the EquiTest system test battery. Sagittal plane center-of-gravity (COG) excursions computed from ground reaction forces were significantly higher on landing day than preflight for those test conditions presenting sway-referenced visual and/or somatosensory orientation cues. The ratio of summed peak-to-peak COG sway amplitudes on the two sway-referenced vision tests (SOTs 3 + 6) compared to the two eyes closed tests (SOTs 2 + 5) was increased on landing day, indicating an increased reliance on visual orientation cues for postural control. The ratio of peak-to-peak COG excursions on sway-referenced surfaces (SOTs 4, 5 & 6) to an earth fixed support surfaces (SOTs 1, 2 & 3) increased even more after landing suggesting primary reliance on somatosensory orientation cues for recovery of postflight postural stability. Readaptation to sway-referenced support surfaces took longer than readaptation to sway-referenced vision. The increased reliance on visual and somatosensory inputs disappeared in all astronauts 4-8 days following return to earth.

  16. Can prepared anticipatory postural adjustments be updated by proprioception?

    PubMed

    Ruget, H; Blouin, J; Teasdale, N; Mouchnino, L

    2008-08-26

    Stepping over an obstacle is preceded by a center of pressure (CoP) shift, termed anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). It provides an acceleration of the center of mass forward and laterally prior to step initiation. The APAs are characterized in the lateral direction by a force exerted by the moving leg onto the ground, followed by an unloading of the stepping leg and completed by an adjustment corresponding to a slow CoP shift toward the supporting foot. While the importance of sensory information in the setting of the APAs is undisputed, it is currently unknown whether sensory information can also be used online to modify the feedforward command of the APAs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the CNS modulates the APAs when a modification of proprioceptive information (Ia) occurs before or during the initiation of the stepping movement. We used the vibration of ankle muscles acting in the lateral direction to induce modification of the afferent inflow. Subjects learned to step over an obstacle, eyes closed, in synchrony to a tone signal. When vibration was applied during the initiation of the APAs, no change in the early APAs was observed except in the case of a cutaneous stimulation (low frequency vibration); it is thus possible that the CNS relies less on proprioceptive information during this early phase. Only the final adjustment of the CoP seems to take into account the biased proprioceptive information. When vibration was applied well before the APAs onset, a postural reaction toward the side of the vibration was produced. When subjects voluntarily initiated a step after the postural reaction, the thrust amplitude was set according to the direction of the postural reaction. This suggests that the planned motor command of the APAs can be updated online before they are triggered.

  17. Vestibular plasticity following orbital spaceflight: recovery from postflight postural instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Paloski, W. H.; Doxey-Gasway, D. D.; Reschke, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    Results of previous studies suggested that the vestibular mediated postural instability observed in astronauts upon return to earth from orbital spaceflight may be exacerbated by an increased weighting of visual inputs for spatial orientation and control of movement. This study was performed to better understand the roles of visual and somatosensory contributions to recovery of normal sensori-motor postural control in returning astronauts. Preflight and postflight, 23 astronaut volunteers were presented randomly with three trials of six sensory organization test (SOT) conditions in the EquiTest system test battery. Sagittal plane center-of-gravity (COG) excursions computed from ground reaction forces were significantly higher on landing day than preflight for those test conditions presenting sway-referenced visual and/or somatosensory orientation cues. The ratio of summed peak-to-peak COG sway amplitudes on the two sway-referenced vision tests (SOTs 3 + 6) compared to the two eyes closed tests (SOTs 2 + 5) was increased on landing day, indicating an increased reliance on visual orientation cues for postural control. The ratio of peak-to-peak COG excursions on sway-referenced surfaces (SOTs 4, 5 & 6) to an earth fixed support surfaces (SOTs 1, 2 & 3) increased even more after landing suggesting primary reliance on somatosensory orientation cues for recovery of postflight postural stability. Readaptation to sway-referenced support surfaces took longer than readaptation to sway-referenced vision. The increased reliance on visual and somatosensory inputs disappeared in all astronauts 4-8 days following return to earth.

  18. Neuromechanical tuning of nonlinear postural control dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Lena H.; van Antwerp, Keith W.; Scrivens, Jevin E.; McKay, J. Lucas; Welch, Torrence D. J.; Bingham, Jeffrey T.; DeWeerth, Stephen P.

    2009-06-01

    Postural control may be an ideal physiological motor task for elucidating general questions about the organization, diversity, flexibility, and variability of biological motor behaviors using nonlinear dynamical analysis techniques. Rather than presenting "problems" to the nervous system, the redundancy of biological systems and variability in their behaviors may actually be exploited to allow for the flexible achievement of multiple and concurrent task-level goals associated with movement. Such variability may reflect the constant "tuning" of neuromechanical elements and their interactions for movement control. The problem faced by researchers is that there is no one-to-one mapping between the task goal and the coordination of the underlying elements. We review recent and ongoing research in postural control with the goal of identifying common mechanisms underlying variability in postural control, coordination of multiple postural strategies, and transitions between them. We present a delayed-feedback model used to characterize the variability observed in muscle coordination patterns during postural responses to perturbation. We emphasize the significance of delays in physiological postural systems, requiring the modulation and coordination of both the instantaneous, "passive" response to perturbations as well as the delayed, "active" responses to perturbations. The challenge for future research lies in understanding the mechanisms and principles underlying neuromechanical tuning of and transitions between the diversity of postural behaviors. Here we describe some of our recent and ongoing studies aimed at understanding variability in postural control using physical robotic systems, human experiments, dimensional analysis, and computational models that could be enhanced from a nonlinear dynamics approach.

  19. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    PubMed Central

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling. PMID:28122432

  20. Variations in Writing Posture and Cerebral Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jerre; Reid, Marylou

    1976-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between hand writing posture and cerebral dominance of 48 left handed writers and 25 right handed writers. Determined that cerebral dominance is related to handedness and to whether or not the writing hand posture is normal or inverted. (SL)

  1. Correcting Poor Posture without Awareness or Willpower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernik, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a new technique for correcting poor posture is presented. Rather than intentionally increasing awareness or mobilizing willpower to correct posture, this approach offers a game using randomly drawn cards with easy daily assignments. A case using the technique is presented to emphasize the subjective experience of living with poor…

  2. Articulatory Constraints on Interpersonal Postural Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shockley, Kevin; Baker, Aimee A.; Richardson, Michael J.; Fowler, Carol A.

    2007-01-01

    Cooperative conversation has been shown to foster interpersonal postural coordination. The authors investigated whether such coordination is mediated by the influence of articulation on postural sway. In Experiment 1, talkers produced words in synchrony or in alternation, as the authors varied speaking rate and word similarity. Greater shared…

  3. Postural Variables in Girls Practicing Volleyball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabara, Malgorzata; Hadzik, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To assess body posture of young female volleyball players in relation to their untrained mates. Material and methods: A group of 42 volleyball players and another of 43 untrained girls, all aged 13-16 years were studied with respect to their body posture indices by using computer posturography. Spinal angles and curvatures were…

  4. Correcting Poor Posture without Awareness or Willpower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernik, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a new technique for correcting poor posture is presented. Rather than intentionally increasing awareness or mobilizing willpower to correct posture, this approach offers a game using randomly drawn cards with easy daily assignments. A case using the technique is presented to emphasize the subjective experience of living with poor…

  5. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control.

    PubMed

    Takakusaki, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture-gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture-gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling.

  6. Neural control of unloaded leg posture and of leg swing in stick insect, cockroach, and mouse differs from that in larger animals.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Scott L; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Blümel, Marcus; Rosenbaum, Philipp; Gruhn, Matthias; Akay, Turgay; Büschges, Ansgar

    2009-04-01

    Stick insect (Carausius morosus) leg muscles contract and relax slowly. Control of stick insect leg posture and movement could therefore differ from that in animals with faster muscles. Consistent with this possibility, stick insect legs maintained constant posture without leg motor nerve activity when the animals were rotated in air. That unloaded leg posture was an intrinsic property of the legs was confirmed by showing that isolated legs had constant, gravity-independent postures. Muscle ablation experiments, experiments showing that leg muscle passive forces were large compared with gravitational forces, and experiments showing that, at the rest postures, agonist and antagonist muscles generated equal forces indicated that these postures depended in part on leg muscles. Leg muscle recordings showed that stick insect swing motor neurons fired throughout the entirety of swing. To test whether these results were specific to stick insect, we repeated some of these experiments in cockroach (Periplaneta americana) and mouse. Isolated cockroach legs also had gravity-independent rest positions and mouse swing motor neurons also fired throughout the entirety of swing. These data differ from those in human and horse but not cat. These size-dependent variations in whether legs have constant, gravity-independent postures, in whether swing motor neurons fire throughout the entirety of swing, and calculations of how quickly passive muscle force would slow limb movement as limb size varies suggest that these differences may be caused by scaling. Limb size may thus be as great a determinant as phylogenetic position of unloaded limb motor control strategy.

  7. Position Statements, Issue Briefs, Resolutions and Consensus Statements. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents position statements, issue briefs, and resolutions and consensus statements of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN). The Position Statements include: (1) Allergy/Anaphylaxis Management in the School Setting; (2) Caseload Assignments; (3) Child Mortality in the School Setting; (4) Chronic Health Conditions, Managed…

  8. Fear of falling modifies anticipatory postural control.

    PubMed

    Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Carpenter, Mark G; Peysar, Gerhard W

    2002-03-01

    This study investigated the influence of fear of falling or postural threat on the control of posture and movement during a voluntary rise to toes task for 12 healthy young adults. Postural threat was modified through alterations to the surface height at which individuals stood (low or high platform) and changes in step restriction (away from or at the edge of the platform) creating four levels of postural threat: LOW AWAY, LOW EDGE, HIGH AWAY and HIGH EDGE. To rise to the toes, an initial postural adjustment must destabilise the body so that it can be moved forward and elevated to a new position of support over the toes. Centre of pressure and centre of mass profiles, as well as tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SO) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscle activity patterns were used to describe this behaviour. The results showed that the performance of the rise to toes task was significantly modified when positioned at the edge of the high platform. In this situation, the central nervous system reduced the magnitude and rate of the postural adjustments and subsequent voluntary movement. Although the duration of the movement was lengthened for this most threatening condition, the sequencing and relative timing of TA, SO and GA muscle activity was preserved. These changes in rise to toes behaviour were accompanied by evidence of increased physiological arousal and participant reports of decreased confidence, increased anxiety and decreased stability. Evidence of fear of falling effects on anticipatory postural control is clinically relevant as it may explain deficits in this control observed in individuals with balance disorders. For example, individuals with Parkinson's disease or cerebellar dysfunction demonstrate impaired performance on the rise to toes task as reflected in alterations of both the timing and magnitude of their anticipatory postural adjustments. Our findings suggest alterations in the magnitude of postural adjustments may be magnified by fear of falling while

  9. Postural Coordination during Socio-motor Improvisation.

    PubMed

    Gueugnon, Mathieu; Salesse, Robin N; Coste, Alexandre; Zhao, Zhong; Bardy, Benoît G; Marin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Human interaction often relies on socio-motor improvisation. Creating unprepared movements during social interaction is not a random process but relies on rules of synchronization. These situations do not only involve people to be coordinated, but also require the adjustment of their posture in order to maintain balance and support movements. The present study investigated posture in such a context. More precisely, we first evaluated the impact of amplitude and complexity of arm movements on posture in solo situation. Then, we assessed the impact of interpersonal coordination on posture using the mirror game in which dyads performed improvised and synchronized movements (i.e., duo situation). Posture was measured through ankle-hip coordination in medio-lateral and antero-posterior directions (ML and AP respectively). Our results revealed the spontaneous emergence of in-phase pattern in ML direction and antiphase pattern in AP direction for solo and duo situations. These two patterns respectively refer to the simultaneous flexion/extension of the ankles and the hips in the same or opposite direction. It suggests different functional roles of postural coordination patterns in each direction, with in-phase supporting task performance in ML (dynamical stability) and antiphase supporting postural control in AP (mechanical stability). Although amplitude of movement did not influence posture, movement complexity disturbed postural stability in both directions. Conversely, interpersonal coordination promoted postural stability in ML but not in AP direction. These results are discussed in terms of the difference in coupling strength between ankle-hip coordination and interpersonal coordination.

  10. Postural Coordination during Socio-motor Improvisation

    PubMed Central

    Gueugnon, Mathieu; Salesse, Robin N.; Coste, Alexandre; Zhao, Zhong; Bardy, Benoît G.; Marin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Human interaction often relies on socio-motor improvisation. Creating unprepared movements during social interaction is not a random process but relies on rules of synchronization. These situations do not only involve people to be coordinated, but also require the adjustment of their posture in order to maintain balance and support movements. The present study investigated posture in such a context. More precisely, we first evaluated the impact of amplitude and complexity of arm movements on posture in solo situation. Then, we assessed the impact of interpersonal coordination on posture using the mirror game in which dyads performed improvised and synchronized movements (i.e., duo situation). Posture was measured through ankle-hip coordination in medio-lateral and antero-posterior directions (ML and AP respectively). Our results revealed the spontaneous emergence of in-phase pattern in ML direction and antiphase pattern in AP direction for solo and duo situations. These two patterns respectively refer to the simultaneous flexion/extension of the ankles and the hips in the same or opposite direction. It suggests different functional roles of postural coordination patterns in each direction, with in-phase supporting task performance in ML (dynamical stability) and antiphase supporting postural control in AP (mechanical stability). Although amplitude of movement did not influence posture, movement complexity disturbed postural stability in both directions. Conversely, interpersonal coordination promoted postural stability in ML but not in AP direction. These results are discussed in terms of the difference in coupling strength between ankle-hip coordination and interpersonal coordination. PMID:27547193

  11. Be Vigilant on Financial Statements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, DeBow

    2002-01-01

    Highlights areas on university's financial statements that warrant careful review by trustees and suggests ways they can check to see whether an institution's financial statements are clear and valid indicators of its financial status. (EV)

  12. Be Vigilant on Financial Statements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, DeBow

    2002-01-01

    Highlights areas on university's financial statements that warrant careful review by trustees and suggests ways they can check to see whether an institution's financial statements are clear and valid indicators of its financial status. (EV)

  13. Youth Employment. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on youth employment from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). An introduction briefly explains the role of the NCY with regard to youth employment and describes the types of programs and services supported by NCY. A section on background provides statistics on teenagers and employment from the Bureau…

  14. Relatives' Responsibility; Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Foundation for the Blind, New York, NY.

    Presented by the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) are background information and a policy statement on responsibility laws pertaining to relatives of applicants for public assistance. The laws are said to date to the Elizabethan Poor Laws, to vary state to state, and to mandate eligibility for public assistance on requirements of residence,…

  15. Sustainability Statement and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents nine resources that focus on environmental education and sustainability. These include: (1) "Sustainability Statement and Policy," Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2009, which is available at http://office.sustainability.dal.ca/Governance; (2) "Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate…

  16. Sustainability Statement and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents nine resources that focus on environmental education and sustainability. These include: (1) "Sustainability Statement and Policy," Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2009, which is available at http://office.sustainability.dal.ca/Governance; (2) "Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate…

  17. Environmental Impact Statements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietz, Reuel Henry

    The paper explores the role of geographers in preparing environmental impact statements (EISs). In 1969 the National Environmental Policy Act mandated that an EIS be prepared for every legislative proposal that significantly affects the environmental quality. EISs must be prepared by interdisciplinary teams representing natural and social sciences…

  18. Peer review statement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-09-01

    Peer review statement All papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the proceedings Editors. Reviews were conducted by expert referees to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing.

  19. Combination of BTrackS and Geri-Fit as a targeted approach for assessing and reducing the postural sway of older adults with high fall risk.

    PubMed

    Goble, Daniel J; Hearn, Mason C; Baweja, Harsimran S

    2017-01-01

    Atypically high postural sway measured by a force plate is a known risk factor for falls in older adults. Further, it has been shown that small, but significant, reductions in postural sway are possible with various balance exercise interventions. In the present study, a new low-cost force-plate technology called the Balance Tracking System (BTrackS) was utilized to assess postural sway of older adults before and after 90 days of a well-established exercise program called Geri-Fit. Results showed an overall reduction in postural sway across all participants from pre- to post-intervention. However, the magnitude of effects was significantly influenced by the amount of postural sway demonstrated by individuals prior to Geri-Fit training. Specifically, more participants with atypically high postural sway pre-intervention experienced an overall postural sway reduction. These reductions experienced were typically greater than the minimum detectable change statistic for the BTrackS Balance Test. Taken together, these findings suggest that BTrackS is an effective means of identifying older adults with elevated postural sway, who are likely to benefit from Geri-Fit training to mitigate fall risk.

  20. Combination of BTrackS and Geri-Fit as a targeted approach for assessing and reducing the postural sway of older adults with high fall risk

    PubMed Central

    Goble, Daniel J; Hearn, Mason C; Baweja, Harsimran S

    2017-01-01

    Atypically high postural sway measured by a force plate is a known risk factor for falls in older adults. Further, it has been shown that small, but significant, reductions in postural sway are possible with various balance exercise interventions. In the present study, a new low-cost force-plate technology called the Balance Tracking System (BTrackS) was utilized to assess postural sway of older adults before and after 90 days of a well-established exercise program called Geri-Fit. Results showed an overall reduction in postural sway across all participants from pre- to post-intervention. However, the magnitude of effects was significantly influenced by the amount of postural sway demonstrated by individuals prior to Geri-Fit training. Specifically, more participants with atypically high postural sway pre-intervention experienced an overall postural sway reduction. These reductions experienced were typically greater than the minimum detectable change statistic for the BTrackS Balance Test. Taken together, these findings suggest that BTrackS is an effective means of identifying older adults with elevated postural sway, who are likely to benefit from Geri-Fit training to mitigate fall risk. PMID:28228655

  1. Obstetrician-gynecologists' knowledge and opinions about the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) committee, the Women's Health Amendment, and the Affordable Care Act: national study after the release of the USPSTF 2009 Breast Cancer Screening Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Britta L; Urban, Renata R; Pearlman, Mark; Schulkin, Jay

    2014-02-01

    Investigate the knowledge and opinions of obstetrician and gynecologists (ob-gyns) regarding the USPSTF committee and statement, and to assess their reactions to healthcare legislation. A national cross-sectional survey study of ob-gyns was conducted six months after a controversial USPSTF recommendation statement was released in November 2009. Ob-gyns' opinions about the Women's Health Amendment (WHA) and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were also assessed. A total of 54% of ob-gyns knew that the USPSTF recommendations do not represent the position of the U.S. government and 40% knew that the USPSTF is not comprised of federal employees. A majority (60%) thought that the USPSTF was influenced by potential costs more than guidelines should be. When examining ob-gyns opinions about new national health policies, 88% support the mammography coverage provided by the WHA but support for the ACA varied. This study provides a snapshot of ob-gyns' knowledge and opinions about the USPSTF and breast cancer screening guidelines at a controversial point in time. Our findings are a unique contribution to larger efforts to understand health and political policy as the culture of medicine continues to evolve. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgery for aortic dilatation in patients with bicuspid aortic valves: A statement of clarification from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-04-01

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: The "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;55:e27-130) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014;63:e57-185). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline.

  3. Surgery for Aortic Dilatation in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valves: A Statement of Clarification From the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M; Halperin, Jonathan L; Levine, Glenn N; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Albert, Nancy M; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Birtcher, Kim K; Bozkurt, Biykem; Brindis, Ralph G; Cigarroa, Joaquin E; Curtis, Lesley H; Fleisher, Lee A; Gentile, Federico; Gidding, Samuel; Hlatky, Mark A; Ikonomidis, John; Joglar, José; Kovacs, Richard J; Ohman, E Magnus; Pressler, Susan J; Sellke, Frank W; Shen, Win-Kuang; Wijeysundera, Duminda N

    2016-02-16

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: the "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (Circulation. 2010;121:e266-e369) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (Circulation. 2014;129:e521-e643). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline.

  4. Surgery for Aortic Dilatation in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valves: A Statement of Clarification From the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Loren F; Creager, Mark A; Isselbacher, Eric M; Svensson, Lars G; Nishimura, Rick A; Bonow, Robert O; Guyton, Robert A; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-02-16

    Two guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and collaborating societies address the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and severe aortic enlargement: the "2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol 2010;55:e27-130) and the "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease" (J Am Coll Cardiol 2014;63:e57-185). However, the 2 guidelines differ with regard to the recommended threshold of aortic root or ascending aortic dilatation that would justify surgical intervention in patients with bicuspid aortic valves. The ACC and AHA therefore convened a subcommittee representing members of the 2 guideline writing committees to review the evidence, reach consensus, and draft a statement of clarification for both guidelines. This statement of clarification uses the ACC/AHA revised structure for delineating the Class of Recommendation and Level of Evidence to provide recommendations that replace those contained in Section 9.2.2.1 of the thoracic aortic disease guideline and Section 5.1.3 of the valvular heart disease guideline.

  5. Institutional VVM Statements on Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Wm. B.

    2011-01-01

    Educational leaders rely on compelling statements of institutional beliefs, strategic direction, and purpose (i.e., values, vision, and mission statements or VVM statements) as the three major pillars by which to launch new program/service initiatives, to enhance academic and administrative operations, and to chart sustainable options in building…

  6. 3 CFR - Presidential Signing Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... issued statements addressing constitutional or other legal questions upon signing bills into law (signing statements). Particularly since omnibus bills have become prevalent, signing statements have often been used... veto of the entire bill. In recent years, there has been considerable public discussion and criticism...

  7. Priorities Statements of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Each year since 1994, the 52 community colleges in Illinois prepare priority statements detailing specific college objectives for the current fiscal year (FY). This report provides the third update of the colleges' statements, covering FY 1998. Brief statements, from one to four pages, are provided for the following colleges: Belleville Area…

  8. Institutional VVM Statements on Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Wm. B.

    2011-01-01

    Educational leaders rely on compelling statements of institutional beliefs, strategic direction, and purpose (i.e., values, vision, and mission statements or VVM statements) as the three major pillars by which to launch new program/service initiatives, to enhance academic and administrative operations, and to chart sustainable options in building…

  9. Human posture experiments under water: ways of applying the findings to microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirlich, Thomas

    differences between underwater and real microgravity environment were analyzed in greater detail: external forces (buoyancy and grav-ity), required fixation, postural changes by breathing and subject orientation to gravitational vector. Goal of this analysis was to understand the respective effects of each environmental influence on subjects posture observed. Each of the different influences was then quantified and the postural change induced by it calculated. These were then combined using a specially programmed multi-body-simulation tool, making it possible to recompute 3D posture data dy-namically to the environmental influences. The simulation is based on the volumetric 3D model of each subject, specific anthropometric data, such as body-fat or muscle ratio, combined with external forces such as gravity and buoyancy. The recomputed data can then be compared independent from the environmental influences. The recomputed 3D posture data can then be re-evaluated focussing again on possible inter-personal neutral posture archetypes in the subject group. Some examples of recomputed data and inter-personal findings will be given.

  10. An Intelligent Body Posture Analysis Model Using Multi-Sensors for Long-Term Physical Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin-Feng; Hwang, Ren-Hung; Lai, Ying-Hsun

    2017-04-01

    Sensors can be installed on various body parts to provide information for computer diagnosis to identify the current body state. However, as human posture is subject to gravity, the direction of the force on each limb differs. For example, the directions of gravitational force on legs and trunk differ. In addition, each person's height and structure of limbs differs, hence, the acceleration and rotation resulted from such differences on force and length of the limbs of a person in motion would be different, and be presented by cases of different postures. Thus, how to present body postures through skeleton system equations, and achieve an long-term physical rehabilitation, according to the different limb characteristics of each person, is a challenging research issue. This paper proposes a novel scheme named as "Intelligent Body Posture Analysis Model", which uses multiple acceleration sensors and gyroscopes to detect body motion patterns. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is proved by conducting a large number of practical experiments and tests.

  11. Effect of light touch on postural sway in individuals with balance problems: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baldan, A M S; Alouche, S R; Araujo, I M G; Freitas, S M S F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present review was to examine the experimental, case-control studies that investigated the effect of light touch on postural sway in individuals with balance problems due to aging, brain lesion or other motor or sensory deficits. Articles published before the end of March of 2013 were searched in PubMed, Scielo and Lilacs databases using terms related to postural control and sensory information. Twelve studies that assessed the postural sway of individuals with balance problems during quiet standing with the light touch using a force plate were reviewed. Two reviewers rated all selected articles as having good quality. The effect of light touch on postural control was reported by all eligible studies regardless of the cause of the balance problem of the participants. Such effect was more evident when the applied vertical force was greater than 1N, but if individuals with poor balance took more advantage of the light touch than healthy ones it depended on the source of their balance problems and not the amount of the applied force. These findings suggested that the maintenance of the fingertip lightly touching an external surface could provide additional somatosensory information for individuals with poor balance and then it could be used as a strategy to improve the control of upright standing during intervention programs.

  12. Analysis of postural sway in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus: effects of shunt implantation.

    PubMed

    Czerwosz, L; Szczepek, E; Blaszczyk, J W; Sokolowska, B; Dmitruk, K; Dudzinski, K; Jurkiewicz, J; Czernicki, Z

    2009-12-07

    Poor postural balance is one of the major risk factors for falling in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Postural instability in the clinic is commonly assessed based upon force platform posturography. In this study we focused on the identification of changes in sway characteristics while standing quiet in patients with NPH before and after shunt implantation. Postural sway area and sway radius were analyzed in a group of 9 patients and 46 controls of both genders. Subject's spontaneous sway was recorded while standing quiet on a force platform for 30-60 s, with eyes open and then closed. Both analyzed sway descriptors identified between-group differences and also an effect of shunt implantation in the NPH group. Sway radius and sway area in patients exhibited very high values compared with those in the control group. Importantly, the effect of eyesight in patients was not observed before shunt implantation and reappeared after the surgical treatment. The study documents that static force platform posturography may be a reliable measure of postural control improvement due to shunt surgery.

  13. Effects of balance training on postural sway, leg extensor strength, and jumping height in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert; Kriemler, Susi

    2010-09-01

    Deficits in strength of the lower extremities and postural control have been associated with a high risk of sustaining sport-related injuries. Such injuries often occur during physical education (PE) classes and mostly affect the lower extremities. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of balance training on postural sway, leg extensor strength, and jumping height in adolescents. Twenty high school students participated in this study and were assigned to either an intervention (n = 10) or control group (n = 10). The intervention group participated in a 4-week balance-training program integrated in their physical education lessons. Pre- and posttests included the measurements of postural sway on a balance platform, jumping height on a force platform, and maximal isometric leg extension force on a leg-press. Balance training resulted in significantly improved postural control, increased jumping height, and enhanced rate of force development of the leg extensors. Physiological adaptations rather than learning effects seem to be responsible for the observed findings. These results could have an impact on improving the performance level in various sports and on reducing the injury prevalence of the lower extremities.

  14. Nuclear Weapons: DOD Assessed the Need for Each Leg of the Strategic Triad and C