Science.gov

Sample records for forcing parameters determination

  1. Evaluation of Three Methods for Determining EMG-Muscle Force Parameter Estimates for the Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Christopher J.; Doro, Lisa Case; Langenderfer, Joseph E.; Mell, Amy G.; Maratt, Joseph D.; Carpenter, James E.; Hughes, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate prediction of in vivo muscle forces is essential for relevant analyses of musculoskeletal biomechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three methods for predicting muscle forces of the shoulder by comparing calculated muscle parameters, which relate electromyographic activity to muscle forces. Methods Thirteen subjects performed sub-maximal, isometric contractions consisting of six actions about the shoulder and two actions about the elbow. Electromyography from 12 shoulder muscles and internal shoulder moments were used to determine muscle parameters using traditional multiple linear regression, principal-components regression, and a sequential muscle parameter determination process using principal-components regression. Muscle parameters were evaluated based on their sign (positive or negative), standard deviations, and error between the measured and predicted internal shoulder moments. Findings It was found that no method was superior with respect to all evaluation criteria. The sequential principal-components regression method most frequently produced muscle parameters that could be used to estimate muscle forces, multiple regression best predicted the measured internal shoulder moments, and the results of principal-components regression fell between those of sequential principal-components regression and multiple regression. Interpretation The selection of a muscle parameter estimation method should be based on the importance of the evaluation criteria. Sequential principal-components regression should be used if a greater number of physiologically accurate muscle forces are desired, while multiple regression should be used for a more accurate prediction of measured internal shoulder moments. However, all methods produced muscle parameters which can be used to predict in vivo muscle forces of the shoulder. PMID:17945401

  2. Compaction and Tensile Forces Determine the Accuracy of Folding Landscape Parameters from Single Molecule Pulling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Hyeon, Changbong; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-04-01

    We establish a framework for assessing whether the transition state location of a biopolymer, which can be inferred from single molecule pulling experiments, corresponds to the ensemble of structures that have equal probability of reaching either the folded or unfolded states (Pfold=0.5). Using results for the forced unfolding of a RNA hairpin, an exactly soluble model, and an analytic theory, we show that Pfold is solely determined by s, an experimentally measurable molecular tensegrity parameter, which is a ratio of the tensile force and a compaction force that stabilizes the folded state. Applications to folding landscapes of DNA hairpins and a leucine zipper with two barriers provide a structural interpretation of single molecule experimental data. Our theory can be used to assess whether molecular extension is a good reaction coordinate using measured free energy profiles.

  3. Compaction and tensile forces determine the accuracy of folding landscape parameters from single molecule pulling experiments.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Greg; Hyeon, Changbong; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2011-04-01

    We establish a framework for assessing whether the transition state location of a biopolymer, which can be inferred from single molecule pulling experiments, corresponds to the ensemble of structures that have equal probability of reaching either the folded or unfolded states (P(fold)=0.5). Using results for the forced unfolding of a RNA hairpin, an exactly soluble model, and an analytic theory, we show that P(fold) is solely determined by s, an experimentally measurable molecular tensegrity parameter, which is a ratio of the tensile force and a compaction force that stabilizes the folded state. Applications to folding landscapes of DNA hairpins and a leucine zipper with two barriers provide a structural interpretation of single molecule experimental data. Our theory can be used to assess whether molecular extension is a good reaction coordinate using measured free energy profiles. PMID:21517423

  4. Improved treatment of global positioning system force parameters in precise orbit determination applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Y.; Lichten, S. M.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Blewitt, G.; Heflin, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected from a worldwide 1992 experiment were processed at JPL to determine precise orbits for the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A filtering technique was tested to improve modeling of solar-radiation pressure force parameters for GPS satellites. The new approach improves orbit quality for eclipsing satellites by a factor of two, with typical results in the 25- to 50-cm range. The resultant GPS-based estimates for geocentric coordinates of the tracking sites, which include the three DSN sites, are accurate to 2 to 8 cm, roughly equivalent to 3 to 10 nrad of angular measure.

  5. Partial hessian fitting for determining force constant parameters in molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixing; Ozhgibesov, Mikhail; Hirao, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    We present a new protocol for deriving force constant parameters that are used in molecular mechanics (MM) force fields to describe the bond-stretching, angle-bending, and dihedral terms. A 3 × 3 partial matrix is chosen from the MM Hessian matrix in Cartesian coordinates according to a simple rule and made as close as possible to the corresponding partial Hessian matrix computed using quantum mechanics (QM). This partial Hessian fitting (PHF) is done analytically and thus rapidly in a least-squares sense, yielding force constant parameters as the output. We herein apply this approach to derive force constant parameters for the AMBER-type energy expression. Test calculations on several different molecules show good performance of the PHF parameter sets in terms of how well they can reproduce QM-calculated frequencies. When soft bonds are involved in the target molecule as in the case of secondary building units of metal-organic frameworks, the MM-optimized geometry sometimes deviates significantly from the QM-optimized one. We show that this problem is rectified effectively by use of a simple procedure called Katachi that modifies the equilibrium bond distances and angles in bond-stretching and angle-bending terms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27497261

  6. Partial hessian fitting for determining force constant parameters in molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixing; Ozhgibesov, Mikhail; Hirao, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    We present a new protocol for deriving force constant parameters that are used in molecular mechanics (MM) force fields to describe the bond-stretching, angle-bending, and dihedral terms. A 3 × 3 partial matrix is chosen from the MM Hessian matrix in Cartesian coordinates according to a simple rule and made as close as possible to the corresponding partial Hessian matrix computed using quantum mechanics (QM). This partial Hessian fitting (PHF) is done analytically and thus rapidly in a least-squares sense, yielding force constant parameters as the output. We herein apply this approach to derive force constant parameters for the AMBER-type energy expression. Test calculations on several different molecules show good performance of the PHF parameter sets in terms of how well they can reproduce QM-calculated frequencies. When soft bonds are involved in the target molecule as in the case of secondary building units of metal-organic frameworks, the MM-optimized geometry sometimes deviates significantly from the QM-optimized one. We show that this problem is rectified effectively by use of a simple procedure called Katachi that modifies the equilibrium bond distances and angles in bond-stretching and angle-bending terms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nonconservative force model parameter estimation strategy for TOPEX/Poseidon precision orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Marshall, J. A.

    1992-11-01

    The TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft was launched on August 10, 1992 to study the Earth's oceans. To achieve maximum benefit from the altimetric data it is to collect, mission requirements dictate that TOPEX/Poseidon's orbit must be computed at an unprecedented level of accuracy. To reach our pre-launch radial orbit accuracy goals, the mismodeling of the radiative nonconservative forces of solar radiation, Earth albedo an infrared re-radiation, and spacecraft thermal imbalances cannot produce in combination more than a 6 cm rms error over a 10 day period. Similarly, the 10-day drag modeling error cannot exceed 3 cm rms. In order to satisfy these requirements, a 'box-wing' representation of the satellite has been developed in which, the satellite is modelled as the combination of flat plates arranged in the shape of a box and a connected solar array. The radiative/thermal nonconservative forces acting on each of the eight surfaces are computed independently, yielding vector accelerations which are summed to compute the total aggregate effect on the satellite center-of-mass. Select parameters associated with the flat plates are adjusted to obtain a better representation of the satellite acceleration history. This study analyzes the estimation of these parameters from simulated TOPEX/Poseidon laser data in the presence of both nonconservative and gravity model errors. A 'best choice' of estimated parameters is derived and the ability to meet mission requirements with the 'box-wing' model evaluated.

  8. Nonconservative force model parameter estimation strategy for TOPEX/Poseidon precision orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Marshall, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft was launched on August 10, 1992 to study the Earth's oceans. To achieve maximum benefit from the altimetric data it is to collect, mission requirements dictate that TOPEX/Poseidon's orbit must be computed at an unprecedented level of accuracy. To reach our pre-launch radial orbit accuracy goals, the mismodeling of the radiative nonconservative forces of solar radiation, Earth albedo an infrared re-radiation, and spacecraft thermal imbalances cannot produce in combination more than a 6 cm rms error over a 10 day period. Similarly, the 10-day drag modeling error cannot exceed 3 cm rms. In order to satisfy these requirements, a 'box-wing' representation of the satellite has been developed in which, the satellite is modelled as the combination of flat plates arranged in the shape of a box and a connected solar array. The radiative/thermal nonconservative forces acting on each of the eight surfaces are computed independently, yielding vector accelerations which are summed to compute the total aggregate effect on the satellite center-of-mass. Select parameters associated with the flat plates are adjusted to obtain a better representation of the satellite acceleration history. This study analyzes the estimation of these parameters from simulated TOPEX/Poseidon laser data in the presence of both nonconservative and gravity model errors. A 'best choice' of estimated parameters is derived and the ability to meet mission requirements with the 'box-wing' model evaluated.

  9. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  10. Extension of the AMBER force field for nitroxide radicals and combined QM/MM/PCM approach to the accurate determination of EPR parameters of DMPOH in solution

    PubMed Central

    Hermosilla, Laura; Prampolini, Giacomo; Calle, Paloma; García de la Vega, José Manuel; Brancato, Giuseppe; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A computational strategy that combines both time-dependent and time-independent approaches is exploited to accurately model molecular dynamics and solvent effects on the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants of the DMPO-H nitroxide. Our recent general force field for nitroxides derived from AMBER ff99SB is further extended to systems involving hydrogen atoms in β-positions with respect to NO. The resulting force-field has been employed in a series of classical molecular dynamics simulations, comparing the computed EPR parameters from selected molecular configurations to the corresponding experimental data in different solvents. The effect of vibrational averaging on the spectroscopic parameters is also taken into account, by second order vibrational perturbation theory involving semi-diagonal third energy derivatives together first and second property derivatives. PMID:26584116

  11. The role of impulse parameters in force variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlton, L. G.; Newell, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    One of the principle limitations of the human motor system is the ability to produce consistent motor responses. When asked to repeatedly make the same movement, performance outcomes are characterized by a considerable amount of variability. This occurs whether variability is expressed in terms of kinetics or kinematics. Variability in performance is of considerable importance because for tasks requiring accuracy it is a critical variable in determining the skill of the performer. What has long been sought is a description of the parameter or parameters that determine the degree of variability. Two general experimental protocals were used. One protocal is to use dynamic actions and record variability in kinematic parameters such as spatial or temporal error. A second strategy was to use isometric actions and record kinetic variables such as peak force produced. What might be the important force related factors affecting variability is examined and an experimental approach to examine the influence of each of these variables is provided.

  12. Force-field parameters for beryllium complexes in amorphous layers.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Svetlana; Chashchikhin, Vladimir; Bagaturyants, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Unknown force-field parameters for metal organic beryllium complexes used in emitting and electron transporting layers of OLED structures are determined. These parameters can be used for the predictive atomistic simulations of the structure and properties of amorphous organic layers containing beryllium complexes. The parameters are found for the AMBER force field using a relaxed scan procedure and quantum-mechanical DFT calculations of potential energy curves for specific internal (angular) coordinates in a series of three Be complexes (Bebq2; Be(4-mpp)2; Bepp2). The obtained parameters are verified in calculations of some molecular and crystal structures available from either quantum-mechanical DFT calculations or experimental data. Graphical Abstract Beryllium complexes in amorphous layersᅟ. PMID:27550375

  13. Force-field parameters for beryllium complexes in amorphous layers.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Svetlana; Chashchikhin, Vladimir; Bagaturyants, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Unknown force-field parameters for metal organic beryllium complexes used in emitting and electron transporting layers of OLED structures are determined. These parameters can be used for the predictive atomistic simulations of the structure and properties of amorphous organic layers containing beryllium complexes. The parameters are found for the AMBER force field using a relaxed scan procedure and quantum-mechanical DFT calculations of potential energy curves for specific internal (angular) coordinates in a series of three Be complexes (Bebq2; Be(4-mpp)2; Bepp2). The obtained parameters are verified in calculations of some molecular and crystal structures available from either quantum-mechanical DFT calculations or experimental data. Graphical Abstract Beryllium complexes in amorphous layersᅟ.

  14. Concurrent validity and reliability of using ground reaction force and center of pressure parameters in the determination of leg movement initiation during single leg lift.

    PubMed

    Aldabe, Daniela; de Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Bussey, Melanie Dawn

    2016-09-01

    Postural adjustment evaluations during single leg lift requires the initiation of heel lift (T1) identification. T1 measured by means of motion analyses system is the most reliable approach. However, this method involves considerable workspace, expensive cameras, and time processing data and setting up laboratory. The use of ground reaction forces (GRF) and centre of pressure (COP) data is an alternative method as its data processing and setting up is less time consuming. Further, kinetic data is normally collected using frequency samples higher than 1000Hz whereas kinematic data are commonly captured using 50-200Hz. This study describes the concurrent-validity and reliability of GRF and COP measurements in determining T1, using a motion analysis system as reference standard. Kinematic and kinetic data during single leg lift were collected from ten participants. GRF and COP data were collected using one and two force plates. Displacement of a single heel marker was captured by means of ten Vicon(©) cameras. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected using a sample frequency of 1000Hz. Data were analysed in two stages: identification of key events in the kinetic data, and assessing concurrent validity of T1 based on the chosen key events with T1 provided by the kinematic data. The key event presenting the least systematic bias, along with a narrow 95% CI and limits of agreement against the reference standard T1, was the Baseline COPy event. Baseline COPy event was obtained using one force plate and presented excellent between-tester reliability.

  15. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Chung, P S; Steckel, J A; Jhon, M S; Biegler, L T

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraolwere evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  16. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chung, P.S.; Steckel, J; Jhon, M.S.; Biegler, L.T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in a hard disk drive can be considered to be one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models. In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  17. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chung, P.S.; Steckel, J; Jhon, M.S.; Biegler, L.T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  18. Force field parameter estimation of functional perfluoropolyether lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert; Seung Chung, Pil; Steckel, Janice A.; Jhon, Myung S.; Biegler, Lorenz T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  19. Drag force parameters of rigid and flexible vegetal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, John A.; Wilson, Bruce N.; Gulliver, John S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper compares parameters that characterize vegetation flexibility effects on flow resistance and drag. Drag forces have been measured in a flume for simple cylindrical obstructions of the same shape and size but with different flexibility under several flow conditions. This data set is used to fit drag parameters and to relate their value to flexibility through the Cauchy Number. A formulation is presented where the drag coefficient is evaluated as a function of a new calibration velocity parameter which is related to the elastic modulus of the obstruction. While the use of a Vogel exponent and reference velocity provides a similar response, the reference velocity when used is somewhat nebulous and appears to have a critical impact on the parameter and the drag force calculated. The proposed formulation for drag reduction is more consistently estimated for the range of flexibilities in this study.

  20. Radiation force modeling for ICESat precision orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Charles Edward

    2007-12-01

    Precision orbit determination (POD) for the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) relies on an epoch-state batch filter, in which the dynamic models play a central role. Its implementation in the Multi-Satellite Orbit Determination Program (MSODP) originally included a box-and-wing model, representing the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite, to compute solar radiation forces. This "macro-model" has been adapted to the ICESat geometry, and additionally, extended to the calculation of forces induced by radiation reflected and emitted from the Earth. To determine the area and reflectivity parameters of the ICESat macro-model surfaces, a high-fidelity simulation of the radiation forces in low-Earth orbit was first developed, using a detailed model of the satellite, called the "micro-model". In this effort, new algorithms to compute such forces were adapted from a Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method originally designed to determine incident heating rates. After working with the vendor of the Thermal Synthesizer System (TSS) to implement these algorithms, a modified version of this software was employed to generate solar and Earth radiation forces for all ICESat orbit and attitude geometries. Estimates of the macro-model parameters were then obtained from a least-squares fit to these micro-model forces, applying an algorithm that also incorporated linear equality and inequality constraints to ensure feasible solutions. Three of these fitted solutions were selected for post-launch evaluation. Two represented conditions at the start and at the end of the mission, while the third comprised four separate solutions, one for each of the nominal satellite attitudes. In addition, three other sets of macro-model parameters were derived from area-weighted averaging of the micro-model reflectivities. They included solar-only and infrared-only spectral parameters, as well as a set combining these parameters. Daily POD solutions were generated with each of these macro-model sets

  1. Implicit Solvation Parameters Derived from Explicit Water Forces in Large-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Implicit solvation is a mean force approach to model solvent forces acting on a solute molecule. It is frequently used in molecular simulations to reduce the computational cost of solvent treatment. In the first instance, the free energy of solvation and the associated solvent–solute forces can be approximated by a function of the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) of the solute and differentiated by an atom–specific solvation parameter σiSASA. A procedure for the determination of values for the σiSASA parameters through matching of explicit and implicit solvation forces is proposed. Using the results of Molecular Dynamics simulations of 188 topologically diverse protein structures in water and in implicit solvent, values for the σiSASA parameters for atom types i of the standard amino acids in the GROMOS force field have been determined. A simplified representation based on groups of atom types σgSASA was obtained via partitioning of the atom–type σiSASA distributions by dynamic programming. Three groups of atom types with well separated parameter ranges were obtained, and their performance in implicit versus explicit simulations was assessed. The solvent forces are available at http://mathbio.nimr.mrc.ac.uk/wiki/Solvent_Forces. PMID:23180979

  2. Identification of vehicle parameters and estimation of vertical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imine, H.; Fridman, L.; Madani, T.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to estimate the vertical forces and to identify the unknown dynamic parameters of a vehicle using the sliding mode observers approach. The estimation of vertical forces needs a good knowledge of dynamic parameters such as damping coefficient, spring stiffness and unsprung masses, etc. In this paper, suspension stiffness and unsprung masses have been identified by the Least Square Method. Real-time tests have been carried out on an instrumented static vehicle, excited vertically by hydraulic jacks. The vehicle is equipped with different sensors in order to measure its dynamics. The measurements coming from these sensors have been considered as unknown inputs of the system. However, only the roll angle and the suspension deflection measurements have been used in order to perform the observer. Experimental results are presented and discussed to show the quality of the proposed approach.

  3. Force Field Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cationic dummy atom approach provides a powerful nonbonded description for a range of alkaline-earth and transition-metal centers, capturing both structural and electrostatic effects. In this work we refine existing literature parameters for octahedrally coordinated Mn2+, Zn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+, as well as providing new parameters for Ni2+, Co2+, and Fe2+. In all the cases, we are able to reproduce both M2+–O distances and experimental solvation free energies, which has not been achieved to date for transition metals using any other model. The parameters have also been tested using two different water models and show consistent performance. Therefore, our parameters are easily transferable to any force field that describes nonbonded interactions using Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Finally, we demonstrate the stability of our parameters in both the human and Escherichia coli variants of the enzyme glyoxalase I as showcase systems, as both enzymes are active with a range of transition metals. The parameters presented in this work provide a valuable resource for the molecular simulation community, as they extend the range of metal ions that can be studied using classical approaches, while also providing a starting point for subsequent parametrization of new metal centers. PMID:24670003

  4. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  5. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  6. A preliminary study of using a strain-gauged balance and parameter estimation techniques for the determination of aerodynamic forces on a model in a very short duration wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. P.; Feik, R. A.

    1983-12-01

    This memo presents a preliminary study of a proposed method of measuring the aerodynamic forces on a supported model in an intermittent very short duration wind tunnel with a relatively high airflow dynamic pressure (of the orders of 200 microsec and 1/3 atmosphere respectively). A semiconductor strain gauged cantilever beam balance is used to record strain time histories associated with model displacement in response to aerodynamic force. The practical feasibility of obtaining sufficiently resolvable strains for the prescribed tunnel conditions with the given strain gauge configuration is established. The proposed method uses a system identification procedure to determine the system dynamic response characteristics using a known calibration force input. Subsequently, aerodynamic forces during a tunnel run follow from the recorded strain gauge time histories. The procedure has been demonstrated successfully using simulated data. However, the experimental situation did not lead to a successful analysis in the way proposed. Reasons for this are discussed and recommendations made for improvements. A brief series of shots in the ANU free piston shock tunnel also highlights the need to isolate as much as possible the model/balance from external vibrations.

  7. Determination of range parameters of observation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareła, J.; Kastek, M.; Firmanty, K.; Trzaskawka, P.; Dulski, R.; Kucharz, J.

    2012-10-01

    Range parameters of observation devices can be determined on the basis of numerical simulations (NVTherm) or on the basis of measured characteristics. Those measurements can be conducted in both laboratory and field conditions. It is, however, difficult to carry on reliable field measurements of range parameters because they are strongly depended on atmospheric conditions. Thus the laboratory measurements are more favorable option. Analysis of literature and catalogue specifications reveal, that range parameters are given mainly on the basis of Johnson criteria or TTP model. The Johnson criteria has been used since the 50s and most of catalogue range specifications are determined according to it. There are also NATO standards, which describe the measurement procedures and methodology required to define the detection, recognition and identification ranges for standard NATO targets. For the determination of range parameters the following device characteristics must be known: minimal resolvable temperature for thermal imaging devices and minimal resolvable contrast for VIS devices. The TTP model offers a new approach to the determination of range characteristics of observation devices. It has been developed by U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate since the year 2000. It was created because the modified Johnson criteria did not yield reliable results in case of modern systems with digital image processing. In order to determine the range parameters using TTP model, the modulation transfer function MTF, presample MTF function, and 3D noise of a tested system must be known as well as its basic design data as optical magnification and display type. The paper describes the measurement stand, measurement methodology and the procedure for the determination of range parameters. The results for thermal and VIS cameras are also presented, and they are analyzed and compared with the results obtained from current methods, including the measurement

  8. Influence of atmospheric forcing parameters on land surface simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, H. P.; Mandal, M.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2015-12-01

    The quality of atmospheric forcing plays important role on land surface simulation using decoupled land surface modeling system. In the present study, the influence of the various atmospheric forcing parameters on land surface simulation is assessed through sensitivity experiments. Numerical experiments are conducted towards preparation of land surface analysis for the period Jan-2011 - Dec-2013 using offline 2D-Noah land surface model (LSM) based land data assimilation system (LDAS) over Indian region (5 - 39N, 60 - 100E) hereafter referred as LDASI. The surface temperature, specific humidity, horizontal winds and pressure as atmospheric forcing parameters are derived from Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The downward (solar and thermal) radiation and precipitation is obtained from European Centre for Medium Range Forecast (ECMWF) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) respectively. The sensitivity experiments are conducted by introducing perturbation in one atmospheric forcing parameter at a time keeping the other parameters unchanged. Influence of temperature, specific humidity, downward (shortwave and long wave) radiation, rain-rate and wind speed is investigated by conducted 13 numerical experiments. It is observed that the land surface analysis from LDASI is most sensitive to the downward longwave radiation and least sensitive to wind speed. The analysis is also substantially influenced by the surface air temperature. The annual mean soil moisture at 5 cm is decreased by 12-15% if the downward long-wave radiation is increased by 20% and it is increased by 15% if the downward long-wave radiation is decreased by 20%. The influence is even more in the Himalayan region but the increase in long-wave radiation leads to increase in soil moisture and similar influence on decrease because downward long-wave radiation leads glacier melting. The annual mean soil temperature in the analysis is increased by 2.2 K if surface

  9. Drag Force Parameters of Flexible Elements and Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, J. A.; Wilson, B. N.; Gulliver, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation evaluates parameters that characterize flow resistance and drag resulting from vegetation flexibility. Drag forces have been measured in a flume for simple cylindrical obstructions of the same shape and size but with different flexibility under several flow conditions. This data set is used to fit drag parameters and to relate their value to flexibility, Cauchy Number, and elastic modulus. A formulation is presented where the drag coefficient is evaluated as a function of the relative velocity and the elastic modulus of the obstruction. While a Vogel exponent and reference velocity can be used to provide a similar predicted response, the new formulation provides more insight to the physical behaviour occurring in the element.

  10. Determining Spacecraft Reaction Wheel Friction Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarani, Siamak

    2009-01-01

    Software was developed to characterize the drag in each of the Cassini spacecraft's Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWAs) to determine the RWA friction parameters. This tool measures the drag torque of RWAs for not only the high spin rates (greater than 250 RPM), but also the low spin rates (less than 250 RPM) where there is a lack of an elastohydrodynamic boundary layer in the bearings. RWA rate and drag torque profiles as functions of time are collected via telemetry once every 4 seconds and once every 8 seconds, respectively. Intermediate processing steps single-out the coast-down regions. A nonlinear model for the drag torque as a function of RWA spin rate is incorporated in order to characterize the low spin rate regime. The tool then uses a nonlinear parameter optimization algorithm based on the Nelder-Mead simplex method to determine the viscous coefficient, the Dahl friction, and the two parameters that account for the low spin-rate behavior.

  11. Determining wave direction using curvature parameters.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Eduardo Vitarelli; de Carvalho, João Luiz Baptista

    2016-01-01

    The curvature of the sea wave was tested as a parameter for estimating wave direction in the search for better results in estimates of wave direction in shallow waters, where waves of different sizes, frequencies and directions intersect and it is difficult to characterize. We used numerical simulations of the sea surface to determine wave direction calculated from the curvature of the waves. Using 1000 numerical simulations, the statistical variability of the wave direction was determined. The results showed good performance by the curvature parameter for estimating wave direction. Accuracy in the estimates was improved by including wave slope parameters in addition to curvature. The results indicate that the curvature is a promising technique to estimate wave directions.•In this study, the accuracy and precision of curvature parameters to measure wave direction are analyzed using a model simulation that generates 1000 wave records with directional resolution.•The model allows the simultaneous simulation of time-series wave properties such as sea surface elevation, slope and curvature and they were used to analyze the variability of estimated directions.•The simultaneous acquisition of slope and curvature parameters can contribute to estimates wave direction, thus increasing accuracy and precision of results. PMID:27408830

  12. A novel force field parameter optimization method based on LSSVR for ECEPP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunling; Tao, Lan; Lu, Jianjun; Xu, Shuo; Ma, Qin; Duan, Qingling

    2011-03-23

    In this paper, we propose a novel force field parameter optimization method based on LSSVR and optimize the torsion energy parameters of ECEPP force field. In this method force field parameter optimization problem is turned into a support vector regression problem. Protein samples for regression model training are chosen from Protein Data Bank. The experiments show that the optimized force-field parameters make both α-helix and β-hairpin structures more consistent with the experimental implications than the original parameters.

  13. Determination of kinetic parameters for biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, A; Pizarro, C; García, R; Bueno, J L; Lavín, A G

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a wide database of kinetic data for the most common biomass by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). Due to the characteristic parameters of DTG curves, a two-stage reaction model is proposed and the kinetic parameters obtained from model-based methods with energy activation values for first and second stages in the range 1.75·10(4)-1.55·10(5)J/mol and 1.62·10(4)-2.37·10(5)J/mol, respectively. However, it has been found that Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose model-free methods are not suitable to determine the kinetic parameters of biomass combustion since the assumptions of these two methods were not accomplished in the full range of the combustion process.

  14. Determination of kinetic parameters for biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, A; Pizarro, C; García, R; Bueno, J L; Lavín, A G

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a wide database of kinetic data for the most common biomass by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). Due to the characteristic parameters of DTG curves, a two-stage reaction model is proposed and the kinetic parameters obtained from model-based methods with energy activation values for first and second stages in the range 1.75·10(4)-1.55·10(5)J/mol and 1.62·10(4)-2.37·10(5)J/mol, respectively. However, it has been found that Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose model-free methods are not suitable to determine the kinetic parameters of biomass combustion since the assumptions of these two methods were not accomplished in the full range of the combustion process. PMID:27233095

  15. Automated equipment for anaerobic sludge parameters determination.

    PubMed

    Fdz-Polanco, F; Nieto, P; Pérez Elvira, S; van der Zee, F P; Fdz-Polanc, M; García, P A

    2005-01-01

    Methanogenic activity, anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity are key parameters in the design and operation of anaerobic bioreactors. A large variety of methods exist for the determination of these parameters but a normalized method has not been established so far. This paper presents the development of an automated manometric system for the determination of these anaerobic sludge parameters. The system is based on monitoring the production of methane by using a pressure transducer that measures the pressure in a gas-collecting chamber of known adjustable volume, which is independent of the space where biogas production takes place. The evolution of pressure generated by the accumulation of methane relates to the conversion of COD. In this way, the methanogenic activity of the sludge can be determined, as well as the biodegradability of solids and liquid, as well as the methanogenic toxicity of compounds. The equipment permits gas sampling, as well as extraction and introduction of liquid, without losing the anaerobic conditions. Various assays have been conducted to test the reliability and reproducibility of the obtained results, showing a high level of both. The methanogenic activities obtained in the assays ranged between 0.1 and 1.8 g COD g(-1) VSS d(-1), and the biodegradability of the organic compounds tested ranged between 20 and 90%.

  16. Estimation of Transition-Metal Empirical Parameters for Molecular Mechanical Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Šebesta, Filip; Sláma, Vladislav; Melcr, Josef; Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2016-08-01

    Force-field parameters of the first row transition metals together with a few additional common elements such as those from the second (Rh, Ru) and third (Hg, Pt) rows of elements in ligated forms were determined based on the density functional theory calculations. Bonding characteristics were determined by averaging metal-ligand force constants in optimal geometries from several chosen complexes of each metal in the most common oxidation numbers and structural arrangements. Parameters of Lennard-Jones potential were determined based on a supermolecular model. Our determined molecular mechanical parameters are compared with presently available parameters published by other groups. We performed two different kinds of testing in order to demonstrate the reliability of these parameters in the case of ligated metallo complexes. First, the nonbonding potential was constructed for an additional set of 19 larger systems containing common complexes with organic molecules. The second test compares the Pt-O and Pt-H radial distribution functions for cisplatin in a box of TIP3P water with lately published studies. PMID:27337427

  17. CHARMM force field parameters for simulation of reactive intermediates in native and thio-substituted ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Mayaan, Evelyn; Moser, Adam; MacKerell, Alexander D; York, Darrin M

    2007-01-30

    Force field parameters specifically optimized for residues important in the study of RNA catalysis are derived from density-functional calculations, in a fashion consistent with the CHARMM27 all-atom empirical force field. Parameters are presented for residues that model reactive RNA intermediates and transition state analogs, thio-substituted phosphates and phosphoranes, and bound Mg(2+) and di-metal bridge complexes. Target data was generated via density-functional calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p)// B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level. Partial atomic charges were initially derived from CHelpG electrostatic potential fitting and subsequently adjusted to be consistent with the CHARMM27 charges. Lennard-Jones parameters were determined to reproduce interaction energies with water molecules. Bond, angle, and torsion parameters were derived from the density-functional calculations and renormalized to maintain compatibility with the existing CHARMM27 parameters for standard residues. The extension of the CHARMM27 force field parameters for the nonstandard biological residues presented here will have considerable use in simulations of ribozymes, including the study of freeze-trapped catalytic intermediates, metal ion binding and occupation, and thio effects.

  18. Force field parameters for S-nitrosocysteine and molecular dynamics simulations of S-nitrosated thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Sanghwa

    2008-12-12

    Estimation of structural perturbation induced by S-nitrosation is important to understand the mode of cellular signal transduction mediated by nitric oxide. Crystal structures of S-nitrosated proteins have been solved only for a few cases, however, so that molecular dynamics simulation may provide an alternative tool for probing structural perturbation. In this study AMBER-99 force field parameters for S-nitrosocysteine were developed and applied to molecular dynamics simulations of S-nitrosated thioredoxin. Geometry optimization at the level of HF/6-31G* was followed by a restrained electrostatic potential charge-fitting to obtain the atomic charges of S-nitrosocysteine. Force constants for bonds and angles were obtained from generalized AMBER force field. Torsional force constants for CC-SN and CS-NO were determined by fitting the torsional profiles obtained from geometry optimization with those from molecular mechanical energy minimization. Finally molecular dynamics simulations were performed with theses parameters on oxidized and reduced thioredoxin with and without S-nitrosocysteine. In all cases the root-mean-square deviations of {alpha}-carbons yielded well-behaved trajectories. The CC-SH dihedral angle which fluctuated severely during the simulation became quiet upon S-nitrosation. In conclusion the force field parameters developed in this study for S-nitrosocysteine appear to be suitable for molecular dynamics simulations of S-nitrosated proteins.

  19. Dynamic Parameters Variability: Time Interval Interference on Ground Reaction Force During Running.

    PubMed

    Pennone, Juliana; Mezêncio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto C; Serrão, Júlio C

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the time between measures on ground reaction force running variability; 15 healthy men (age = 23.8 ± 3.7 years; weight = 72.8 ± 7.7 kg; height 174.3 ± 8.4 cm) performed two trials of running 45 minutes at 9 km/hr at intervals of seven days. The ground reaction forces were recorded every 5 minutes. The coefficients of variation of indicative parameters of the ground reaction forces for each condition were compared. The coefficients of variations of the ground reaction forces curve analyzed between intervals and sessions were 21.9% and 21.48%, respectively. There was no significant difference for the ground reaction forces parameters Fy1, tFy1, TC1, Imp50, Fy2, and tFy2 between intervals and sessions. Although the ground reaction forces variables present a natural variability, this variability in intervals and in sessions remained consistent, ensuring a high reliability in repeated measures designs.

  20. Automation of the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) II: Assignment of bonded parameters and partial atomic charges

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.; Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular mechanics force fields are widely used in computer-aided drug design for the study of drug candidates interacting with biological systems. In these simulations, the biological part is typically represented by a specialized biomolecular force field, while the drug is represented by a matching general (organic) force field. In order to apply these general force fields to an arbitrary drug-like molecule, functionality for assignment of atom types, parameters and partial atomic charges is required. In the present article, algorithms for the assignment of parameters and charges for the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) are presented. These algorithms rely on the existing parameters and charges that were determined as part of the parametrization of the force field. Bonded parameters are assigned based on the similarity between the atom types that define said parameters, while charges are determined using an extended bond-charge increment scheme. Charge increments were optimized to reproduce the charges on model compounds that were part of the parametrization of the force field. A “penalty score” is returned for every bonded parameter and charge, allowing the user to quickly and conveniently assess the quality of the force field representation of different parts of the compound of interest. Case studies are presented to clarify the functioning of the algorithms and the significance of their output data. PMID:23145473

  1. Gravitational lens determinations of cosmological parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1991-01-01

    Currently available attempts to determine the three classical cosmological parameters (H(0), Omega(0), and Lambda), using gravitational lens techniques and arguments are reviewed. These suggest that H(0) greater than about 75 km/s/Mpc, that contributions to Omega(0) by certain hypothetical types of dark matter are less than 1, and that Lambda is considerably smaller than 3H(0)-squared if a flat cosmological model is assumed. Unfortunately, none of these three conclusions is satisfactorily free of model dependence, possible systematic error, and caveats.

  2. Parameters Determination of Oscillatory Impulse Current Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Nishimura, Seisuke; Seki, Shingo

    This paper proposes numerical techniques to distil waveform parameters out of digitally measured data of oscillatory impulse current. The first method, to be used for liner circuit, based on a curve-fitting technique in which a smooth analytical curve is defined to fit the noise-superposed measured data. The waveform parameters are derived from the curve. The algorithm is examined its performance using a measured waveform data which is obtained from a circuit composed of linear elements only. It is not rare when impulse current is measured in a circuit with non-linear element, namely an arrester. After carefully observed behaviours of the circuit current when the non-linear element turns on and off, authors developed two algorithms capable to determine the parameters from the recorded data obtained from a circuit having a ZnO arrester. The developed algorithm processed the waveform data generated by TDG which is to be issued in 2009 as a part of IEC 61083-2. The details of the algorithm are to be demonstrated in the paper.

  3. Gravity and Tide Parameters Determined from Satellite and Spacecraft Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    As part of our work on the development of the Jovian and Saturnian satellite ephemerides to support the Juno and Cassini missions, we determined a number of planetary system gravity parameters. This work did not take into account tidal forces. In fact, we saw no obvious observational evidence of tidal effects on the satellite or spacecraft orbits. However, Lainey et al. (2009 Nature 459, 957) and Lainey et. al (2012 Astrophys. J. 752, 14) have published investigations of tidal effects in the Jovian and Saturnian systems, respectively. Consequently, we have begun a re-examination of our ephemeris work that includes a model for tides raised on the planet by the satellites as well as tides raised on the satellites by the planet. In this paper we briefly review the observations used in our ephemeris production; they include astrometry from the late 1800s to 2014, mutual events, eclipses, occultatons, and data acquired by the Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Cassini, Galileo, and New Horizons spacecraft. We summarize the gravity parameter values found from our original analyses. Next we discuss our tidal acceleration model and its impact on the gravity parameter determination. We conclude with preliminary results found when the reprocessing of the observations includes tidal forces acting on the satellites and spacecraft.

  4. Determining safe limits for significant task parameters during manual lifting.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravindra Pratrap; Batish, Ajay; Singh, Tejinder Pal

    2014-04-01

    This experimental study investigated the effect of lifting task parameters (i.e., lifting weight, frequency, coupling, asymmetric angle, and vertical, horizontal, and travel distances) for various dynamic human lifting activities on the ground reaction forces of workers. Ten male workers loaded containers from different levels asymmetrically during experimental trials. The experimental design evolved using Taguchi's Fractional Factorial Experiments. Three factors (lifting weight, frequency, and vertical distance) were observed to be significant. The results showed that vertical reaction forces increase when workers lift weight from floor to shoulder height frequently. It was also observed that instantaneous loading rate increases with more weight, vertical distance, and frequency; a significant extra loading rate is required to change the lower level of load, frequency, and vertical distance to higher levels. Safe limits for significant factors were determined to result in optimal performance of the manual lifting task.

  5. The use of impact force as a scale parameter for the impact response of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The building block approach is currently used to design composite structures. With this approach, the data from coupon tests is scaled up to determine the design of a structure. Current standard impact tests and methods of relating test data to other structures are not generally understood and are often used improperly. A methodology is outlined for using impact force as a scale parameter for delamination damage for impacts of simple plates. Dynamic analyses were used to define ranges of plate parameters and impact parameters where quasi-static analyses are valid. These ranges include most low velocity impacts where the mass of the impacter is large and the size of the specimen is small. For large mass impacts of moderately thick (0.35 to 0.70 cm) laminates, the maximum extent of delamination damage increased with increasing impact force and decreasing specimen thickness. For large mass impact tests at a given kinetic energy, impact force and hence delamination size depends on specimen size, specimen thickness, boundary conditions, and indenter size and shape. If damage is reported in terms of impact force instead of kinetic energy, large mass test results can be applied directly to other plates of the same size.

  6. Determining Supersymmetric Parameters With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Taylor, Andrew M.; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-01

    In this article, we explore the ability of direct and indirect dark matter experiments to not only detect neutralino dark matter, but to constrain and measure the parameters of supersymmetry. In particular, we explore the relationship between the phenomenological quantities relevant to dark matter experiments, such as the neutralino annihilation and elastic scattering cross sections, and the underlying characteristics of the supersymmetric model, such as the values of {mu} (and the composition of the lightest neutralino), m{sub A} and tan {beta}. We explore a broad range of supersymmetric models and then focus on a smaller set of benchmark models. We find that by combining astrophysical observations with collider measurements, {mu} can often be constrained far more tightly than it can be from LHC data alone. In models in the A-funnel region of parameter space, we find that dark matter experiments can potentially determine m{sub A} to roughly {+-}100 GeV, even when heavy neutral MSSM Higgs bosons (A, H{sub 1}) cannot be observed at the LHC. The information provided by astrophysical experiments is often highly complementary to the information most easily ascertained at colliders.

  7. Isometric force production parameters during normal and experimental low back pain conditions

    PubMed Central

    Descarreaux, Martin; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Teasdale, Normand

    2005-01-01

    Background The control of force and its between-trial variability are often taken as critical determinants of motor performance. Subjects performed isometric trunk flexion and extension forces without and with experiment pain to examine if pain yields changes in the control of trunk forces. The objective of this study is to determine if experimental low back pain modifies trunk isometric force production. Methods Ten control subjects participated in this study. They were required to exert 50 and 75% of their isometric maximal trunk flexion and extension torque. In a learning phase preceding the non painful and painful trials, visual and verbal feedbacks were provided. Then, subjects were asked to perform 10 trials without any feedback. Time to peak torque, time to peak torque variability, peak torque variability as well as constant and absolute error in peak torque were calculated. Time to peak and peak dF/dt were computed to determine if the first peak of dF/dt could predict the peak torque achieved. Results Absolute and constant errors were higher in the presence of a painful electrical stimulation. Furthermore, peak torque variability for the higher level of force was increased with in the presence of experimental pain. The linear regressions between peak dF/dt, time to peak dF/dt and peak torque were similar for both conditions. Experimental low back pain yielded increased absolute and constant errors as well as a greater peak torque variability for the higher levels of force. The control strategy, however, remained the same between the non painful and painful condition. Cutaneous pain affects some isometric force production parameters but modifications of motor control strategies are not implemented spontaneously. Conclusions It is hypothesized that adaptation of motor strategies to low back pain is implemented gradually over time. This would enable LBP patients to perform their daily tasks with presumably less pain and more accuracy. PMID:15703067

  8. Relativity Parameters Determined from Lunar Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Newhall, X. X.; Dickey, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of 24 years of lunar laser ranging data is used to test the principle of equivalence, geodetic precession, the PPN parameters beta and gamma, and G/G. Recent data can be fitted with a rms scatter of 3 cm. (a) Using the Nordtvedt effect to test the principle of equivalence, it is found that the Moon and Earth accelerate alike in the Sun's field. The relative accelerations match to within 5 x 10(exp -13) . This limit, combined with an independent determination of y from planetary time delay, gives beta. Including the uncertainty due to compositional differences, the parameter beta differs from unity by no more than 0.0014; and, if the weak equivalence principle is satisfied, the difference is no more than 0.0006. (b) Geodetic precession matches its expected 19.2 marc sec/yr rate within 0.7%. This corresponds to a 1% test of gamma. (c) Apart from the Nordtvedt effect, beta and gamma can be tested from their influence on the lunar orbit. It is argued theoretically that the linear combination 0.8(beta) + 1.4(gamma) can be tested at the 1% level of accuracy. For solutions using numerically derived partial derivatives, higher sensitivity is found. Both 6 and y match the values of general relativity to within 0.005, and the linear combination beta+ gamma matches to within 0,003, but caution is advised due to the lack of theoretical understanding of these sensitivities. (d) No evidence for a changing gravitational constant is found, with absolute value of G/G less than or equal to 8 x lO(exp -12)/yr. There is significant sensitivity to G/G through solar perturbations on the lunar orbit.

  9. How Variability and Effort Determine Coordination at Large Forces

    PubMed Central

    Kolossiatis, Michalis; Charalambous, Themistoklis; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Motor control is a challenging task for the central nervous system, since it involves redundant degrees of freedom, nonlinear dynamics of actuators and limbs, as well as noise. When an action is carried out, which factors does your nervous system consider to determine the appropriate set of muscle forces between redundant degrees-of-freedom? Important factors determining motor output likely encompass effort and the resulting motor noise. However, the tasks used in many previous motor control studies could not identify these two factors uniquely, as signal-dependent noise monotonically increases as a function of the effort. To address this, a recent paper introduced a force control paradigm involving one finger in each hand that can disambiguate these two factors. It showed that the central nervous system considers both force noise and amplitude, with a larger weight on the absolute force and lower weights on both noise and normalized force. While these results are valid for the relatively low force range considered in that paper, the magnitude of the force shared between the fingers for large forces is not known. This paper investigates this question experimentally, and develops an appropriate Markov chain Monte Carlo method in order to estimate the weightings given to these factors. Our results demonstrate that the force sharing strongly depends on the force level required, so that for higher force levels the normalized force is considered as much as the absolute force, whereas the role of noise minimization becomes negligible. PMID:26934193

  10. Human capacity for explosive force production: neural and contractile determinants.

    PubMed

    Folland, J P; Buckthorpe, M W; Hannah, R

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the integrative neural and contractile determinants of human knee extension explosive force production. Forty untrained participants performed voluntary and involuntary (supramaximally evoked twitches and octets - eight pulses at 300 Hz that elicit the maximum possible rate of force development) explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors. Explosive force (F0-150 ms) and sequential rate of force development (RFD, 50-ms epochs) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) amplitude was recorded (superficial quadriceps and hamstrings, 50-ms epochs) and normalized (quadriceps to Mmax, hamstrings to EMGmax). Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was also assessed. Multiple linear regressions assessed the significant neural and contractile determinants of absolute and relative (%MVF) explosive force and sequential RFD. Explosive force production exhibited substantial interindividual variability, particularly during the early phase of contraction [F50, 13-fold (absolute); 7.5-fold (relative)]. Multiple regression explained 59-93% (absolute) and 35-60% (relative) of the variance in explosive force production. The primary determinants of explosive force changed during the contraction (F0-50, quadriceps EMG and Twitch F; RFD50-100, Octet RFD0-50; F100-150, MVF). In conclusion, explosive force production was largely explained by predictor neural and contractile variables, but the specific determinants changed during the phase of contraction.

  11. Isoelectronic determination of the thermal Casimir force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, G.; López, D.; Decca, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Differential force measurements between spheres coated with either nickel or gold and rotating disks with periodic distributions of nickel and gold are reported. The rotating samples are covered by a thin layer of titanium and a layer of gold. While titanium is used for fabrication purposes, the gold layer (nominal thicknesses of 21, 37, 47, and 87 nm) provides an isoelectronic environment, and is used to nullify the electrostatic contribution but allow the passage of long wavelength Casimir photons. A direct comparison between the experimental results and predictions from Drude and plasma models for the electrical permittivity is carried out. In the models, the magnetic permeability of nickel is allowed to change to investigate its effects. Possible sources of errors, both in the experimental and theoretical sides, are taken into account. It is found that a Drude response with magnetic properties of nickel taken into account is unequivocally ruled out. The full analysis of the data indicates that a dielectric plasma response with the magnetic properties of Ni included shows good agreement with the data. Neither a Drude nor a plasma dielectric response provide a satisfactory description if the magnetic properties of nickel are disregarded.

  12. Determining camera parameters for round glassware measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldner, F. O.; Costa, P. B.; Gomes, J. F. S.; Filho, D. M. E. S.; Leta, F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays there are many types of accessible cameras, including digital single lens reflex ones. Although these cameras are not usually employed in machine vision applications, they can be an interesting choice. However, these cameras have many available parameters to be chosen by the user and it may be difficult to select the best of these in order to acquire images with the needed metrological quality. This paper proposes a methodology to select a set of parameters that will supply a machine vision system with the needed quality image, considering the measurement required of a laboratory glassware.

  13. External Load Affects Ground Reaction Force Parameters Non-uniformly during Running in Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Schaffner, Grant; Laughlin, Mitzi; Loehr, James; Hagan, R. Donald

    2004-01-01

    Long-term exposure to microgravity induces detrimefits to the musculcskdetal system (Schneider et al., 1995; LeBlanc et al., 2000). Treadmill exercise is used onboard the International Space Station as an exercise countermeasure to musculoskeletal deconditioning due to spaceflight. During locomotive exercise in weightlessness (0G), crewmembers wear a harness attached to an external loading mechanism (EL). The EL pulls the crewmember toward the treadmill, and provides resistive load during the impact and propulsive phases of gait. The resulting forces may be important in stimulating bone maintenance (Turner, 1998). The EL can be applied via a bungee and carabineer clip configuration attached to the harness and can be manipulated to create varying amounts of load levels during exercise. Ground-based research performed using a vertically mounted treadmill found that peak ground reaction forces (GRF) during running at an EL of less than one body weight (BW) are less than those that occur during running in normal gravity (1G) (Davis et al., 1996). However, it is not known how the GRF are affected by the EL in a true OG environment. Locomotion while suspended may result in biomechanics that differ from free running. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how EL affects peak impact force, peak propulsive force, loading rate, and impulse of the GRF during running in 0G. It was hypothesized that increasing EL would result in increases in each GRF parameter.

  14. The Friction Force Determination of Large-Sized Composite Rods in Pultrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Krasnovskii, A. N.; Kazakov, I. A.

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, the simple pull-force models of pultrusion process are not suitable for large sized rods because they are not considered a chemical shrinkage and thermal expansion acting in cured material inside the die. But the pulling force of the resin-impregnated fibers as they travels through the heated die is essential factor in the pultrusion process. In order to minimize the number of trial-and-error experiments a new mathematical approach to determine the frictional force is presented. The governing equations of the model are stated in general terms and various simplifications are implemented in order to obtain solutions without extensive numerical efforts. The influence of different pultrusion parameters on the frictional force value is investigated. The results obtained by the model can establish a foundation by which process control parameters are selected to achieve an appropriate pull-force and can be used for optimization pultrusion process.

  15. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  16. An improved method for determining force balance calibration accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Alice T.

    The results of an improved statistical method used at Langley Research Center for determining and stating the accuracy of a force balance calibration are presented. The application of the method for initial loads, initial load determination, auxiliary loads, primary loads, and proof loads is described. The data analysis is briefly addressed.

  17. Determination of aluminum diffusion parameters in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, O.; Ryssel, H.; Pichler, P.

    2002-05-01

    Aluminum as the fastest diffusing acceptor dopant in silicon is commonly used for the fabrication of power semiconductors with p-n junction depths ranging from some microns to more than a hundred microns. Although long used, its diffusion behavior was not sufficiently characterized to support computer-aided design of devices. In this work, the intrinsic diffusion of aluminum was investigated in the temperature range from 850 to 1290 °C. Combining nitridation and oxidation experiments, the fractional diffusivity via self-interstitials was determined. By diffusion in high-concentration boron- and phosphorus-doped silicon the behavior of aluminum under extrinsic conditions was investigated.

  18. Kohlrausch Parameter Determination for Simple Chain Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, John; Dotson, Taylor; Heffernan, Julieanne; Dotson, Keenan; Budzien, Joanne; Adolf, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    The second Legendre polynomials of the end-to-end vector of freely jointed and freely rotating chains were extracted from molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed in terms of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) function. Of particular interest is the variation of the stretching exponent, β, as a function of state point and, consequently, of the detailed compliance with time-temperature superposition. A new analysis methodology is introduced that permits the determination of β at the needed level of precision. Detailed time-temperature superposition does not hold for freely-jointed or freely-rotating chain liquids. Indications of a breakdown in time-temperature superposition are also found in violations of Stokes-Einstein and Debye-Stokes-Einstein behavior.

  19. Determination of electroweak parameters at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Torrence, E.

    1996-09-01

    We present an improved measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z{sup 0} boson production by e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. The measurement was performed at a center-of-mass energy of 91.28 GeV with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) during the 1994-95 running period. The luminosity-weighted average polarization of the SLC electron beam during this run was measured to be (77.23 {+-} 0.52)%. Using a sample of 93,644 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays, we measure the pole asymmetry A{sub LR}{sup 0} to be 0.1512 {+-} 0.0042(stat.) {+-} 0.0011(syst.) which is equivalent to an effective weak mixing angle of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23100 {+-} 0.00054(stat.) {+-} 0.00014(syst.). We also present a preliminary direct measurement of the Z{sup 0}-lepton coupling asymmetries A{sub e}, A{sub {mu}}, and A{sub {tau}} extracted from the differential cross section observed in leptonic Z{sup 0} decays. We combine these results with our previous A{sub LR} measurement to obtain a combined determination of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23061 {+-} 0.00047.

  20. Force-field parameters of the Psi and Phi around glycosidic bonds to oxygen and sulfur atoms.

    PubMed

    Saito, Minoru; Okazaki, Isao

    2009-12-01

    The Psi and Phi torsion angles around glycosidic bonds in a glycoside chain are the most important determinants of the conformation of a glycoside chain. We determined force-field parameters for Psi and Phi torsion angles around a glycosidic bond bridged by a sulfur atom, as well as a bond bridged by an oxygen atom as a preparation for the next study, i.e., molecular dynamics free energy calculations for protein-sugar and protein-inhibitor complexes. First, we extracted the Psi or Phi torsion energy component from a quantum mechanics (QM) total energy by subtracting all the molecular mechanics (MM) force-field components except for the Psi or Phi torsion angle. The Psi and Phi energy components extracted (hereafter called "the remaining energy components") were calculated for simple sugar models and plotted as functions of the Psi and Phi angles. The remaining energy component curves of Psi and Phi were well represented by the torsion force-field functions consisting of four and three cosine functions, respectively. To confirm the reliability of the force-field parameters and to confirm its compatibility with other force-fields, we calculated adiabatic potential curves as functions of Psi and Phi for the model glycosides by adopting the Psi and Phi force-field parameters obtained and by energetically optimizing other degrees of freedom. The MM potential energy curves obtained for Psi and Phi well represented the QM adiabatic curves and also these curves' differences with regard to the glycosidic oxygen and sulfur atoms. Our Psi and Phi force-fields of glycosidic oxygen gave MM potential energy curves that more closely represented the respective QM curves than did those of the recently developed GLYCAM force-field.

  1. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-15

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  2. Molecular Modeling of Triton X Micelles: Force Field Parameters, Self-Assembly, and Partition Equilibria.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, D; Smirnova, I; Jakobtorweihen, S

    2015-05-12

    Nonionic surfactants of the Triton X-series find various applications in extraction processes and as solubilizing agents for the purification of membrane proteins. However, so far no optimized parameters are available to perform molecular simulations with a biomolecular force field. Therefore, we have determined the first optimized set of CHARMM parameters for the Triton X-series, enabling all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In order to validate the new parameters, micellar sizes (aggregation numbers) of Triton X-114 and Triton X-100 have been investigated as a function of temperature and surfactant concentration. These results are comparable with experimental results. Furthermore, we have introduced a new algorithm to obtain micelle structures from self-assembly MD simulations for the COSMOmic method. This model allows efficient partition behavior predictions once a representative micelle structure is available. The predicted partition coefficients for the systems Triton X-114/water and Triton X-100/water are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Therefore, this method can be applied as a screening tool to find optimal solute-surfactant combinations or suitable surfactant systems for a specific application.

  3. Paramfit: automated optimization of force field parameters for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Betz, Robin M; Walker, Ross C

    2015-01-15

    The generation of bond, angle, and torsion parameters for classical molecular dynamics force fields typically requires fitting parameters such that classical properties such as energies and gradients match precalculated quantum data for structures that scan the value of interest. We present a program, Paramfit, distributed as part of the AmberTools software package that automates and extends this fitting process, allowing for simplified parameter generation for applications ranging from single molecules to entire force fields. Paramfit implements a novel combination of a genetic and simplex algorithm to find the optimal set of parameters that replicate either quantum energy or force data. The program allows for the derivation of multiple parameters simultaneously using significantly fewer quantum calculations than previous methods, and can also fit parameters across multiple molecules with applications to force field development. Paramfit has been applied successfully to systems with a sparse number of structures, and has already proven crucial in the development of the Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement Lipid14 force field. PMID:25413259

  4. Paramfit: automated optimization of force field parameters for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Betz, Robin M; Walker, Ross C

    2015-01-15

    The generation of bond, angle, and torsion parameters for classical molecular dynamics force fields typically requires fitting parameters such that classical properties such as energies and gradients match precalculated quantum data for structures that scan the value of interest. We present a program, Paramfit, distributed as part of the AmberTools software package that automates and extends this fitting process, allowing for simplified parameter generation for applications ranging from single molecules to entire force fields. Paramfit implements a novel combination of a genetic and simplex algorithm to find the optimal set of parameters that replicate either quantum energy or force data. The program allows for the derivation of multiple parameters simultaneously using significantly fewer quantum calculations than previous methods, and can also fit parameters across multiple molecules with applications to force field development. Paramfit has been applied successfully to systems with a sparse number of structures, and has already proven crucial in the development of the Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement Lipid14 force field.

  5. Drag force measurement: A means for determining hysteresis loss

    SciTech Connect

    Garshelis, Ivan J.; Tollens, Stijn P. L.; Kari, Ryan J.; Vandenbossche, Lode P.; Dupre, Luc R.

    2006-04-15

    A method for determining hysteresis losses in thin strips of soft magnetic materials is described. It is based on the measurement of a drag force which arises with the movement of the sample through the strong field existing in the space near a permanent magnet. Not associated with macro eddy currents, the force is shown to originate from the magnetic hysteresis of the material, having, in fact, an amplitude equal to the product of hysteresis loss and the area of the sample cross section. Correlation within 18% with the measurements made by conventional methods is shown for a wide range of experimental materials.

  6. Experimental and analytical determination of stability parameters for a balloon tethered in a wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L. T.; Bennett, R. M.; Bland, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and analytical techniques for determining stability parameters for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are described. These techniques are applied to a particular 7.64-meter-long balloon, and the results are presented. The stability parameters of interest appear as coefficients in linearized stability equations and are derived from the various forces and moments acting on the balloon. In several cases the results from the experimental and analytical techniques are compared and suggestions are given as to which techniques are the most practical means of determining values for the stability parameters.

  7. Reparameterization of RNA chi Torsion Parameters for the AMBER Force Field and Comparison to NMR Spectra for Cytidine and Uridine.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Stern, Harry A; Kennedy, Scott D; Tubbs, Jason D; Turner, Douglas H

    2010-05-11

    A reparameterization of the torsional parameters for the glycosidic dihedral angle, chi, for the AMBER99 force field in RNA nucleosides is used to provide a modified force field, AMBER99chi. Molecular dynamics simulations of cytidine, uridine, adenosine, and guanosine in aqueous solution using the AMBER99 and AMBER99chi force fields are compared with NMR results. For each nucleoside and force field, 10 individual molecular dynamics simulations of 30 ns each were run. For cytidine with AMBER99chi force field, each molecular dynamics simulation time was extended to 120 ns for convergence purposes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, including one-dimensional (1D) (1)H, steady-state 1D (1)H nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), and transient 1D (1)H NOE, was used to determine the sugar puckering and preferred base orientation with respect to the ribose of cytidine and uridine. The AMBER99 force field overestimates the population of syn conformations of the base orientation and of C2'-endo sugar puckering of the pyrimidines, while the AMBER99chi force field's predictions are more consistent with NMR results. Moreover, the AMBER99 force field prefers high anti conformations with glycosidic dihedral angles around 310 degrees for the base orientation of purines. The AMBER99chi force field prefers anti conformations around 185 degrees , which is more consistent with the quantum mechanical calculations and known 3D structures of folded ribonucleic acids (RNAs). Evidently, the AMBER99chi force field predicts the structural characteristics of ribonucleosides better than the AMBER99 force field and should improve structural and thermodynamic predictions of RNA structures.

  8. Physical parameter determination of seven RR Lyrae stars in Bootes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, J. H.; Arellano, A.; Sareyan, J. P.; Peña, R.; Alvarez, M.

    2007-06-01

    uvbyβ photoelectric photometry of the RR Lyrae stars AE, RS, ST, TV, TW, UU, and XX Bootis has been acquired in order to determine the physical parameters of the stars. We used the correlation between the Fourier parameters derived from the light curves and the physical parameters such as the absolute magnitude M_v, intrinsic colour (B-V)_0 and metal abundance [Fe/H]. Once reddening has been determined, unreddened indices are obtained and T_{eff} and log g followed along the cycle, using a comparison with the theoretical models given for our determined metallicity.

  9. All-out Test in Tethered Canoe System can Determine Anaerobic Parameters of Elite Kayakers.

    PubMed

    Messias, L H D; Ferrari, H G; Sousa, F A B; Dos Reis, I G M; Serra, C C S; Gobatto, C A; Manchado-Gobatto, F B

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to use a specific all-out 30-sec tethered test to determine the anaerobic parameters in elite kayakers and verify the relationship between these results and sports performance. Twelve elite slalom kayakers were evaluated. The tethered canoe system was created and used for the all-out 30-sec test application. Measurements of peak force, mean force, minimum force, fatigue index and impulse were performed. Performance evaluation was determined by measuring the time of race in a simulated race containing 24 gates on a white-water course. Blood was collected (25-µl) for analysis of lactate concentration at rest and at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10-min intervals after both the all-out test and the simulated race. The Pearson product moment correlation shows a inverse and significant relationship of peak force, mean force and impulse with time of race. Blood lactate concentrations after the all-out test and the simulated race peak at same time (4 min). Additionally, no interaction was visualized between time and all-out test/simulated race for blood lactate concentrations (P <0.365). These results suggest a relationship between the parameters of the all-out test and performance. Thus, the tethered canoe system is a useful tool for determining parameters that could be used in training control of slalom kayakers.

  10. Application of Novel Lateral Tire Force Sensors to Vehicle Parameter Estimation of Electric Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kanghyun

    2015-11-11

    This article presents methods for estimating lateral vehicle velocity and tire cornering stiffness, which are key parameters in vehicle dynamics control, using lateral tire force measurements. Lateral tire forces acting on each tire are directly measured by load-sensing hub bearings that were invented and further developed by NSK Ltd. For estimating the lateral vehicle velocity, tire force models considering lateral load transfer effects are used, and a recursive least square algorithm is adapted to identify the lateral vehicle velocity as an unknown parameter. Using the estimated lateral vehicle velocity, tire cornering stiffness, which is an important tire parameter dominating the vehicle's cornering responses, is estimated. For the practical implementation, the cornering stiffness estimation algorithm based on a simple bicycle model is developed and discussed. Finally, proposed estimation algorithms were evaluated using experimental test data.

  11. Application of Novel Lateral Tire Force Sensors to Vehicle Parameter Estimation of Electric Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kanghyun

    2015-01-01

    This article presents methods for estimating lateral vehicle velocity and tire cornering stiffness, which are key parameters in vehicle dynamics control, using lateral tire force measurements. Lateral tire forces acting on each tire are directly measured by load-sensing hub bearings that were invented and further developed by NSK Ltd. For estimating the lateral vehicle velocity, tire force models considering lateral load transfer effects are used, and a recursive least square algorithm is adapted to identify the lateral vehicle velocity as an unknown parameter. Using the estimated lateral vehicle velocity, tire cornering stiffness, which is an important tire parameter dominating the vehicle’s cornering responses, is estimated. For the practical implementation, the cornering stiffness estimation algorithm based on a simple bicycle model is developed and discussed. Finally, proposed estimation algorithms were evaluated using experimental test data. PMID:26569246

  12. Application of Novel Lateral Tire Force Sensors to Vehicle Parameter Estimation of Electric Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kanghyun

    2015-01-01

    This article presents methods for estimating lateral vehicle velocity and tire cornering stiffness, which are key parameters in vehicle dynamics control, using lateral tire force measurements. Lateral tire forces acting on each tire are directly measured by load-sensing hub bearings that were invented and further developed by NSK Ltd. For estimating the lateral vehicle velocity, tire force models considering lateral load transfer effects are used, and a recursive least square algorithm is adapted to identify the lateral vehicle velocity as an unknown parameter. Using the estimated lateral vehicle velocity, tire cornering stiffness, which is an important tire parameter dominating the vehicle's cornering responses, is estimated. For the practical implementation, the cornering stiffness estimation algorithm based on a simple bicycle model is developed and discussed. Finally, proposed estimation algorithms were evaluated using experimental test data. PMID:26569246

  13. Real-time transverse force sensing using fiber Bragg grating through direct Stokes parameters measurement.

    PubMed

    Su, Yang; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Baofu; Zhou, Hua

    2015-12-14

    Characteristics of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) transverse force sensor based on Stokes parameters are presented. Real-time force measurement is achieved through direct measurement of the Stokes parameters at single wavelength. A proportional relationship and linear fit are found between Stokes parameters and applied force. The sensitivity and dynamic range dependence on the state of polarization (SOP) of the incident light is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A maximum sensitivity of 0.037/N is experimentally achieved and it can be improved further by adjusting the incident SOP. This design significantly reduces system complexity and improves data processing speed, which has great practical value in real-time FBG sensing applications. PMID:26699020

  14. VFFDT: A New Software for Preparing AMBER Force Field Parameters for Metal-Containing Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Suqing; Tang, Qing; He, Jian; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Shaofang; Wang, Chaojie; Xu, Yong; Lin, Fu

    2016-04-25

    Force fields are fundamental to molecular dynamics simulations. However, the incompleteness of force field parameters has been a long-standing problem, especially for metal-related systems. In our previous work, we adopted the Seminario method based on the Hessian matrix to systematically derive the zinc-related force field parameters for AMBER. In this work, in order to further simplify the whole protocol, we have implemented a user-friendly Visual Force Field Derivation Toolkit (VFFDT) to derive the force field parameters via simply clicking on the bond or angle in the 3D viewer, and we have further extended our previous program to support the Hessian matrix output from a variety of quantum mechanics (QM) packages, including Gaussian 03/09, ORCA 3.0, QChem, GAMESS-US, and MOPAC 2009/2012. In this toolkit, a universal VFFDT XYZ file format containing the raw Hessian matrix is available for all of the QM packages, and an instant force field parametrization protocol based on a semiempirical quantum mechanics (SQM) method is introduced. The new function that can automatically obtain the relevant parameters for zinc, copper, iron, etc., which can be exported in AMBER Frcmod format, has been added. Furthermore, our VFFDT program can read and write files in AMBER Prepc, AMBER Frcmod, and AMBER Mol2 format and can also be used to customize, view, copy, and paste the force field parameters in the context of the 3D viewer, which provides utilities complementary to ANTECHAMBER, MCPB, and MCPB.py in the AmberTools. PMID:26998926

  15. Stochastic order parameter equation of isometric force production revealed by drift-diffusion estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; Friedrich, R.; Beek, P. J.

    2006-11-01

    We address two questions that are central to understanding human motor control variability: what kind of dynamical components contribute to motor control variability (i.e., deterministic and/or random ones), and how are those components structured? To this end, we derive a stochastic order parameter equation for isometric force production from experimental data using drift-diffusion estimates. We show that the force variability increases with the required force output because of a decrease of deterministic stability and an accompanying increase of noise intensity. A structural analysis reveals that the deterministic component consists of a linear control loop, while the random component involves a noise source that scales with force output. In addition, we present evidence for the existence of a subject-independent overall noise level of human isometric force production.

  16. Effect of including torsional parameters for histidine-metal interactions in classical force fields for metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Sundholm, Dage; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-11-20

    Classical force-field parameters of the metal site of metalloproteins usually comprise only the partial charges of the involved atoms, as well as the bond-stretching and bending parameters of the metal-ligand interactions. Although for certain metal ligands such as histidine residues, the torsional motions at the metal site play an important role for the dynamics of the protein, no such terms have been considered to be crucial in the parametrization of the force fields, and they have therefore been omitted in the parametrization. In this work, we have optimized AMBER-compatible force-field parameters for the reduced state of the metal site of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and assessed the effect of including torsional parameters for the histidine-metal interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of the obtained results, we recommend that torsion parameters of the metal site are included when processes at the metal site are investigated or when free-energy calculations are performed. As the torsion parameters mainly affect the structure of the metal site, other kinds of structural studies can be performed without considering the torsional parameters of the metal site.

  17. Effect of including torsional parameters for histidine-metal interactions in classical force fields for metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Sundholm, Dage; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-11-20

    Classical force-field parameters of the metal site of metalloproteins usually comprise only the partial charges of the involved atoms, as well as the bond-stretching and bending parameters of the metal-ligand interactions. Although for certain metal ligands such as histidine residues, the torsional motions at the metal site play an important role for the dynamics of the protein, no such terms have been considered to be crucial in the parametrization of the force fields, and they have therefore been omitted in the parametrization. In this work, we have optimized AMBER-compatible force-field parameters for the reduced state of the metal site of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and assessed the effect of including torsional parameters for the histidine-metal interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of the obtained results, we recommend that torsion parameters of the metal site are included when processes at the metal site are investigated or when free-energy calculations are performed. As the torsion parameters mainly affect the structure of the metal site, other kinds of structural studies can be performed without considering the torsional parameters of the metal site. PMID:25410708

  18. Method and Apparatus for Determining Operational Parameters of Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zybała, Rafał; Schmidt, Maksymilian; Kaszyca, Kamil; Ciupiński, Łukasz; Kruszewski, Mirosław J.; Pietrzak, Katarzyna

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of this work was to construct and test an apparatus for characterization of high temperature thermoelectric modules to be used in thermoelectric generator (TEGs) applications. The idea of this apparatus is based on very precise measurements of heat fluxes passing through the thermoelectric (TE) module, at both its hot and cold sides. The electrical properties of the module, under different temperature and load conditions, were used to estimate efficiency of energy conversion based on electrical and thermal energy conservation analysis. The temperature of the cold side, T c, was stabilized by a precise circulating thermostat (≤0.1°C) in a temperature range from 5°C to 90°C. The amount of heat absorbed by a coolant flowing through the heat sink was measured by the calibrated and certified heat flow meter with an accuracy better than 1%. The temperature of the hot side, T h, was forced to assumed temperature (T max = 450°C) by an electric heater with known power (P h = 0-600 W) with ample thermal insulation. The electrical power was used in calculations. The TE module, heaters and cooling plate were placed in an adiabatic vacuum chamber. The load characteristics of the module were evaluated using an electronically controlled current source as a load. The apparatus may be used to determine the essential parameters of TE modules (open circuit voltage, U oc, short circuit current, I sc, internal electrical resistance, R int, thermal resistance, R th, power density, and efficiency, η, as a function of T c and T h ). Several commercially available TE modules based on Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 alloys were tested. The measurements confirmed that the constructed apparatus was highly accurate, stable and yielded reproducible results; therefore, it is a reliable tool for the development of thermoelectric generators.

  19. Method and Apparatus for Determining Operational Parameters of Thermoelectric Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zybała, Rafał; Schmidt, Maksymilian; Kaszyca, Kamil; Ciupiński, Łukasz; Kruszewski, Mirosław J.; Pietrzak, Katarzyna

    2016-10-01

    The main aim of this work was to construct and test an apparatus for characterization of high temperature thermoelectric modules to be used in thermoelectric generator (TEGs) applications. The idea of this apparatus is based on very precise measurements of heat fluxes passing through the thermoelectric (TE) module, at both its hot and cold sides. The electrical properties of the module, under different temperature and load conditions, were used to estimate efficiency of energy conversion based on electrical and thermal energy conservation analysis. The temperature of the cold side, T c, was stabilized by a precise circulating thermostat (≤0.1°C) in a temperature range from 5°C to 90°C. The amount of heat absorbed by a coolant flowing through the heat sink was measured by the calibrated and certified heat flow meter with an accuracy better than 1%. The temperature of the hot side, T h, was forced to assumed temperature ( T max = 450°C) by an electric heater with known power ( P h = 0-600 W) with ample thermal insulation. The electrical power was used in calculations. The TE module, heaters and cooling plate were placed in an adiabatic vacuum chamber. The load characteristics of the module were evaluated using an electronically controlled current source as a load. The apparatus may be used to determine the essential parameters of TE modules (open circuit voltage, U oc, short circuit current, I sc, internal electrical resistance, R int, thermal resistance, R th, power density, and efficiency, η, as a function of T c and T h ). Several commercially available TE modules based on Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 alloys were tested. The measurements confirmed that the constructed apparatus was highly accurate, stable and yielded reproducible results; therefore, it is a reliable tool for the development of thermoelectric generators.

  20. Silicone hydrogel contact lens surface analysis by atomic force microscopy: shape parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldez, M. J.; Garcia-Resua, C.; Lira, M.; Sánchez-Sellero, C.; Yebra-Pimentel, E.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Average roughness (Ra) is generally used to quantify roughness; however it makes no distinction between spikes and troughs. Shape parameters as kurtosis (Rku) and skewness (Rsk) serve to distinguish between two profiles with the same Ra. They have been reported in many biomedical fields, but they were no applied to contact lenses before. The aim of this study is to analyze surface properties of four silicone hydrogel contact lenses (CL) by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) evaluating Ra, Rku and Rsk. Methods: CL used in this study were disposable silicone hydrogel senofilcon A, comfilcon A, balafilcon A and lotrafilcon B. Unworn CL surfaces roughness and topography were measured by AFM (Veeco, multimode-nanoscope V) in tapping modeTM. Ra, Rku and Rsk for 25 and 196 μm2 areas were determined. Results: Surface topography and parameters showed different characteristics depending on the own nature of the contact lens (Ra/Rku/Rsk for 25 and 196 μm2 areas were: senofilcon A 3,33/3,74/0,74 and 3,76/18,16/1,75; comfilcon A: 1,56/31,09/2,93 and 2,76/45,82/3,60; balafilcon A: 2,01/33,62/-2,14 and 2,54/23,36/-1,96; lotrafilcon B: 26,97/4,11/-0,34 and 29,25/2,82/-0,23). In lotrafilcon B, with the highest Ra, Rku showed a lower degree of peakedness of its distribution. Negative Rsk value obtained for balafilcon A showed a clear predominance of valleys in this lens. Conclusions: Kku and Rsk are two statistical parameters useful to analyse CL surfaces, which complete information from Ra. Differences in values distribution and symmetry were observed between CL.

  1. Attitude determination and parameter estimation using vector observations - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1989-01-01

    Procedures for attitude determination based on Wahba's loss function are generalized to include the estimation of parameters other than the attitude, such as sensor biases. Optimization with respect to the attitude is carried out using the q-method, which does not require an a priori estimate of the attitude. Optimization with respect to the other parameters employs an iterative approach, which does require an a priori estimate of these parameters. Conventional state estimation methods require a priori estimates of both the parameters and the attitude, while the algorithm presented in this paper always computes the exact optimal attitude for given values of the parameters. Expressions for the covariance of the attitude and parameter estimates are derived.

  2. Determination of motility forces on isolated chromosomes with laser tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Bui, Ann A. M.; Rocha, Yesenia; Cruz, Gladys M.; Loke, Vince; Shi, Linda Z.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative determination of the motility forces of chromosomes during cell division is fundamental to understanding a process that is universal among eukaryotic organisms. Using an optical tweezers system, isolated mammalian chromosomes were held in a 1064 nm laser trap. The minimum force required to move a single chromosome was determined to be ≈0.8–5 pN. The maximum transverse trapping efficiency of the isolated chromosomes was calculated as ≈0.01–0.02. These results confirm theoretical force calculations of ≈0.1–12 pN to move a chromosome on the mitotic or meiotic spindle. The verification of these results was carried out by calibration of the optical tweezers when trapping microspheres with a diameter of 4.5–15 µm in media with 1–7 cP viscosity. The results of the chromosome and microsphere trapping experiments agree with optical models developed to simulate trapping of cylindrical and spherical specimens. PMID:25359514

  3. Effect of hinge-moment parameters on elevator stick forces in rapid maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert T; Greenberg, Harry

    1944-01-01

    The importance of the stick force per unit normal acceleration as a criterion of longitudinal stability and the critical dependence of this gradient on elevator hinge-moment parameters have been shown in previous reports. The present report continues the investigation with special reference to transient effects for maneuvers of short duration.

  4. Analysis of kinematic data and determination of ground reaction force of foot in slow squat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu-Shu; Guo, Yuan; An, Mei-Wen; Chen, Wei-Yi

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper, the ground reaction force (GRF) acting on foot in slow squat was determined through a force measuring system, and at the same time, the kinematic data of human squat were obtained by analyzing the photographed image sequences. According to the height and body weight, six healthy volunteers were selected, three men in one group and the other three women in another group, and the fundamental parameters of subjects were recorded, including body weight, height and age, etc. Based on the anatomy characteristics, some markers were placed on the right side of joints. While the subject squatted at slow speed on the force platform, the ground reaction forces on the forefoot and heel for each foot were obtained through calibrated force platform. The analysis results show that the reaction force on heel is greater than that on forefoot, and double feet have nearly constant force. Moreover, from processing and analyzing the synchronously photographed image sequences in squat, the kinematic data of human squat were acquired, including mainly the curves of angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration varied with time for knee, hip and ankle joints in a sagittal plane. The obtained results can offer instructive reference for photographing and analyzing the movements of human bodies, diagnosing some diseases, and establishing in the future appropriate mathematical models for the human motion.

  5. Determination of femto Newton forces and fluid viscosity using optical tweezers: application to Leishmania amazonensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes B., Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Marques, Gustavo P.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this research is to use the displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) as a force transducer in mechanical measurements in life sciences. To do this we compared the theoretical optical and hydrodynamic models with experimental data under a broad variation of parameters such as fluid viscosity, refractive index, drag velocity and wall proximities. The laser power was measured after the objective with an integration sphere because normal power meters do not provide an accurate measurement for beam with high numerical apertures. With this careful laser power determination the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under very different conditions shows an almost 45 degrees straight line. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces and vice-versa. With this calibration we observed the forces of polystyrene bead attached to the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. The force range is from 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons and these experiments shows that OT can be used for infection mechanism and chemotaxis studies in parasites. The other application was to use the optical force to measure viscosities of few microliters sample. Our result shows 5% accuracy measurements.

  6. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Taufiq; Moosmüller, H.; Chung, Chul E.

    2015-10-01

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  7. Determination of photosynthetic parameters in two seawater-tolerant vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Nianwei; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to determine the photosynthetic parameters of non-flat leaves/green stems using photosynthetic instruments, due to the unusual morphology of both organs, especially for Suaeda salsa and Salicornia bigelovii as two seawater-tolerant vegetables. To solve the problem, we developed a simple, practical, and effective method to measure and calculate the photosynthetic parameters (such as P N, g s, E) based on unit fresh mass, instead of leaf area. The light/CO2/temperature response curves of the plants can also be measured by this method. This new method is more effective, stable, and reliable than conventional methods for plants with non-flat leaves. In addition, the relative notes on measurements and calculation of photosynthetic parameters were discussed in this paper. This method solves technical difficulties in photosynthetic parameter determination of the two seawater-tolerant vegetables and similar plants.

  8. Magellan spacecraft - Attitude determination, updates and gyro parameter calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, W. H.; Reddy, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed mathematical algorithm for onboard autonomous attitude determination and parameter calibration in the Magellan Venus-orbiting spacecraft has been developed, and its performance has been estimated. This algorithm uses a contamination reduction attitude profile and retractive star scan maneuvers to minimize the interparameter error contamination and to maximize the parameter observability. The details of the underlying theory and strategy are described, and an extensive performance analysis with worst-case parameter errors is reported which indicates that the in-flight attitude determination unit/parameter calibration (ADU/PC) algorithm will be able to meet all the different mission phase requirements with comfortable margins. The problem of nonexact mapping retrace due to uncertain performance of control authority is addressed, and its lack of impact on the system performance is demonstrated.

  9. Bottled SAFT: A Web App Providing SAFT-γ Mie Force Field Parameters for Thousands of Molecular Fluids.

    PubMed

    Ervik, Åsmund; Mejía, Andrés; Müller, Erich A

    2016-09-26

    Coarse-grained molecular simulation has become a popular tool for modeling simple and complex fluids alike. The defining aspects of a coarse grained model are the force field parameters, which must be determined for each particular fluid. Because the number of molecular fluids of interest in nature and in engineering processes is immense, constructing force field parameter tables by individually fitting to experimental data is a futile task. A step toward solving this challenge was taken recently by Mejía et al., who proposed a correlation that provides SAFT-γ Mie force field parameters for a fluid provided one knows the critical temperature, the acentric factor and a liquid density, all relatively accessible properties. Building on this, we have applied the correlation to more than 6000 fluids, and constructed a web application, called "Bottled SAFT", which makes this data set easily searchable by CAS number, name or chemical formula. Alternatively, the application allows the user to calculate parameters for components not present in the database. Once the intermolecular potential has been found through Bottled SAFT, code snippets are provided for simulating the desired substance using the "raaSAFT" framework, which leverages established molecular dynamics codes to run the simulations. The code underlying the web application is written in Python using the Flask microframework; this allows us to provide a modern high-performance web app while also making use of the scientific libraries available in Python. Bottled SAFT aims at taking the complexity out of obtaining force field parameters for a wide range of molecular fluids, and facilitates setting up and running coarse-grained molecular simulations. The web application is freely available at http://www.bottledsaft.org . The underlying source code is available on Bitbucket under a permissive license.

  10. Bottled SAFT: A Web App Providing SAFT-γ Mie Force Field Parameters for Thousands of Molecular Fluids.

    PubMed

    Ervik, Åsmund; Mejía, Andrés; Müller, Erich A

    2016-09-26

    Coarse-grained molecular simulation has become a popular tool for modeling simple and complex fluids alike. The defining aspects of a coarse grained model are the force field parameters, which must be determined for each particular fluid. Because the number of molecular fluids of interest in nature and in engineering processes is immense, constructing force field parameter tables by individually fitting to experimental data is a futile task. A step toward solving this challenge was taken recently by Mejía et al., who proposed a correlation that provides SAFT-γ Mie force field parameters for a fluid provided one knows the critical temperature, the acentric factor and a liquid density, all relatively accessible properties. Building on this, we have applied the correlation to more than 6000 fluids, and constructed a web application, called "Bottled SAFT", which makes this data set easily searchable by CAS number, name or chemical formula. Alternatively, the application allows the user to calculate parameters for components not present in the database. Once the intermolecular potential has been found through Bottled SAFT, code snippets are provided for simulating the desired substance using the "raaSAFT" framework, which leverages established molecular dynamics codes to run the simulations. The code underlying the web application is written in Python using the Flask microframework; this allows us to provide a modern high-performance web app while also making use of the scientific libraries available in Python. Bottled SAFT aims at taking the complexity out of obtaining force field parameters for a wide range of molecular fluids, and facilitates setting up and running coarse-grained molecular simulations. The web application is freely available at http://www.bottledsaft.org . The underlying source code is available on Bitbucket under a permissive license. PMID:27556884

  11. Determining all parameters necessary to build Hill-type muscle models from experiments on single muscles.

    PubMed

    Blümel, Marcus; Hooper, Scott L; Guschlbauerc, Christoph; White, William E; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Characterizing muscle requires measuring such properties as force-length, force-activation, and force-velocity curves. These characterizations require large numbers of data points because both what type of function (e.g., linear, exponential, hyperbolic) best represents each property, and the values of the parameters in the relevant equations, need to be determined. Only a few properties are therefore generally measured in experiments on any one muscle, and complete characterizations are obtained by averaging data across a large number of muscles. Such averaging approaches can work well for muscles that are similar across individuals. However, considerable evidence indicates that large inter-individual variation exists, at least for some muscles. This variation poses difficulties for across-animal averaging approaches. Methods to fully describe all muscle's characteristics in experiments on individual muscles would therefore be useful. Prior work in stick insect extensor muscle has identified what functions describe each of this muscle's properties and shown that these equations apply across animals. Characterizing these muscles on an individual-by-individual basis therefore requires determining only the values of the parameters in these equations, not equation form. We present here techniques that allow determining all these parameter values in experiments on single muscles. This technique will allow us to compare parameter variation across individuals and to model muscles individually. Similar experiments can likely be performed on single muscles in other systems. This approach may thus provide a widely applicable method for characterizing and modeling muscles from single experiments.

  12. Heavy vehicle suspension parameters identification and estimation of vertical forces: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imine, H.; Madani, T.

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to estimate the vertical forces of heavy vehicle and identify the unknown dynamic parameters using sliding mode observer approach. This observation needs a good knowledge of dynamic parameters such as damping coefficient, spring stiffness, etc. In this paper, suspension stiffness and unsprung masses have been identified. Experimental results carried out on an instrumented tractor have been presented in order to show the quality of the state observation, parameters identification and force estimation. These estimation results are then compared to the measured one coming from the sensors installed in the tractor. Many scenarios have been tested. In this paper, the results coming from zigzag test have been shown and commented.

  13. Determining Stand Parameters from Uas-Based Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, V.; Serifoglu, C.; Gungor, O.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, forest management plans are produced by terrestrial surveying techniques for 10 or 20 year periods, which can be considered quite long to maintain the sustainability of forests. For a successful forest management plan, it is necessary to collect accurate information about the stand parameters and store them in dynamic and robust databases. The position, number, height and closure of trees are among the most important stand parameters required for a forest management plan. Determining the position of each single tree is challenging in such an area consisting of too many interlocking trees. Hence, in this study, an object-based tree detection methodology has been developed in MATLAB programming language to determine the position of each tree top in a highly closed area. The developed algorithm uses the Canopy Height Model (CHM), which is computed from the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and Digital Surface Model (DSM) generated by using the point cloud extracted from the images taken from a UAS (Unmanned Aerial System). The heights of trees have been determined by using the CHM. The closure of the trees has been determined with the written MATLAB script. The results show that the developed tree detection methodology detected more than 70% of the trees successfully. It can also be concluded that the stand parameters may be determined by using the UAS-based point clouds depending on the characteristics of the study area. In addition, determination of the stand parameters by using point clouds reduces the time needed to produce forest management plans.

  14. Determining Kinetic Parameters for Isothermal Crystallization of Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Zhang, T.; Reis, S. T.; Brow, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    Non-isothermal crystallization techniques are frequently used to determine the kinetic parameters for crystallization in glasses. These techniques are experimentally simple and quick compared to the isothermal techniques. However, the analytical models used for non-isothermal data analysis, originally developed for describing isothermal transformation kinetics, are fundamentally flawed. The present paper describes a technique for determining the kinetic parameters for isothermal crystallization in glasses, which eliminates most of the common problems that generally make the studies of isothermal crystallization laborious and time consuming. In this technique, the volume fraction of glass that is crystallized as a function of time during an isothermal hold was determined using differential thermal analysis (DTA). The crystallization parameters for the lithium-disilicate (Li2O.2SiO2) model glass were first determined and compared to the same parameters determined by other techniques to establish the accuracy and usefulness of the present technique. This technique was then used to describe the crystallization kinetics of a complex Ca-Sr-Zn-silicate glass developed for sealing solid oxide fuel cells.

  15. Parameter sensitivity analysis of nonlinear piezoelectric probe in tapping mode atomic force microscopy for measurement improvement

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Rachael; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2014-02-21

    The equations of motion for a piezoelectric microcantilever are derived for a nonlinear contact force. The analytical expressions for natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, the method of multiple scales is used to analyze the analytical frequency response of the piezoelectric probe. The effects of nonlinear excitation force on the microcantilever beam's frequency and amplitude are analytically studied. The results show a frequency shift in the response resulting from the force nonlinearities. This frequency shift during contact mode is an important consideration in the modeling of AFM mechanics for generation of more accurate imaging. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the system parameters on the nonlinearity effect is performed. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that it is possible to choose parameters such that the frequency shift minimizes. Certain parameters such as tip radius, microcantilever beam dimensions, and modulus of elasticity have more influence on the nonlinearity of the system than other parameters. By changing only three parameters—tip radius, thickness, and modulus of elasticity of the microbeam—a more than 70% reduction in nonlinearity effect was achieved.

  16. Atmosphere models and the determination of stellar parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2014-11-01

    We present the basic concepts necessary to build atmosphere models for any type of star. We then illustrate how atmosphere models can be used to determine stellar parameters. We focus on the effects of line-blanketing for hot stars, and on non-LTE and three dimensional effects for cool stars. We illustrate the impact of these effects on the determination of the ages of stars from the HR diagram.

  17. On the Accuracy of Atmospheric Parameter Determination in BAFGK Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T.; Piskunov, N.; Shulyak, D.

    2015-04-01

    During the past few years, many papers determining the atmospheric parameters in FGK stars appeared in the literature where the accuracy of effective temperatures is given as 20-40 K. For main sequence stars within the 5 000-13 000 K temperature range, we have performed a comparative analysis of the parameters derived from the spectra by using the SME (Spectroscopy Made Easy) package and those found in the literature. Our sample includes standard stars Sirius, Procyon, δ Eri, and the Sun. Combining different spectral regions in the fitting procedure, we investigated an effect different atomic species have on the derived atmospheric parameters. The temperature difference may exceed 100 K depending on the spectral regions used in the SME procedure. It is shown that the atmospheric parameters derived with the SME procedure which includes wings of hydrogen lines in fitting agrees better with the results derived by the other methods and tools across a large part of the main sequence. For three stars—π Cet, 21 Peg, and Procyon—the atmospheric parameters were also derived by fitting a calculated energy distribution to the observed one. We found a substantial difference in the parameters inferred from different sets and combinations of spectrophotometric observations. An intercomparison of our results and literature data shows that the average accuracy of effective temperature determination for cool stars and for the early B-stars is 70-85 K and 170-200 K, respectively.

  18. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  19. Determination of Complex Microcalorimeter Parameters with Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saab, T.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lindeman, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J.

    2005-01-01

    The proper understanding and modeling of a microcalorimeter s response requires the accurate knowledge of a handful of parameters, such as C, G, alpha, . . . . While a few of these, such 8s the normal state resistance and the total thermal conductance to the heat bath (G) are directly determined from the DC IV characteristics, some others, notoriously the heat capacity (C) and alpha, appear in degenerate combinations in most measurable quantities. The case of a complex microcalorimeter, i.e. one in which the absorber s heat capacity is connected by a finite thermal impedance to the sensor, and subsequently by another thermal impedance to the heat bath, results in an added ambiguity in the determination of the individual C's and G's. In general, the dependence of the microcalorimeter s complex impedance on these parameters varies with frequency. This variation allows us to determine the individual parameters by fitting the prediction of the microcalorimeter model to the impedance data. We describe in this paper our efforts at characterizing the Goddard X-ray microcalorimeters. Using the parameters determined with this method we them compare the pulse shape and noise spectra predicted by the microcalorimeter model to data taken with the same devices.

  20. Determination of Parameters of PV Concentrating System With Heliostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, R.; Norsoyan, A.; Dallakyan, V.

    2010-10-01

    The structure of PV concentrating system with heliostat is analyzed. The mathematical model of system consisting of PV concentrating module and heliostat is developed. With the use of developed mathematical model the optimal parameters of the system are determined. The results of this work can be used during the design of PV concentrating systems with heliostats.

  1. Intermolecular potential parameters and combining rules determined from viscosity data

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Lucas A.J.; Price, Phillip N.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2010-05-07

    The Law of Corresponding States has been demonstrated for a number of pure substances and binary mixtures, and provides evidence that the transport properties viscosity and diffusion can be determined from a molecular shape function, often taken to be a Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, that requires two scaling parameters: a well depth {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and a collision diameter {sigma}{sub ij}, both of which depend on the interacting species i and j. We obtain estimates for {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and {sigma}{sub ij} of interacting species by finding the values that provide the best fit to viscosity data for binary mixtures, and compare these to calculated parameters using several 'combining rules' that have been suggested for determining parameter values for binary collisions from parameter values that describe collisions of like molecules. Different combining rules give different values for {sigma}{sub ij} and {var_epsilon}{sub ij} and for some mixtures the differences between these values and the best-fit parameter values are rather large. There is a curve in ({var_epsilon}{sub ij}, {sigma}{sub ij}) space such that parameter values on the curve generate a calculated viscosity in good agreement with measurements for a pure gas or a binary mixture. The various combining rules produce couples of parameters {var_epsilon}{sub ij}, {sigma}{sub ij} that lie close to the curve and therefore generate predicted mixture viscosities in satisfactory agreement with experiment. Although the combining rules were found to underpredict the viscosity in most of the cases, Kong's rule was found to work better than the others, but none of the combining rules consistently yields parameter values near the best-fit values, suggesting that improved rules could be developed.

  2. An experimental assessment of catheter trackability forces with tortuosity parameters along patient-specific coronary phantoms.

    PubMed

    Finn, Ronan; Morris, Liam

    2016-02-01

    Coronary artery disease is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular deaths worldwide. Approximately 70% of patients requiring coronary revascularisation receive endovascular stents. The endovascular procedure is the preferred option due to its minimally invasive nature when compared to open heart surgery. Stent delivery is paramount for the success of the endovascular procedure. Catheter delivery forces within tortuous blood vessels can produce vasoconstriction and injury, resulting in reactive intimal proliferation or distal embolisation associated with end-organ ischaemia and infarction. Trackability is evaluated by most medical device companies for further development of their delivery systems. Relevant device design attributes must be tested in settings which simulate aspects of the intended use conditions, such as vessel geometry and compliance. Various tortuosity parameters are used to facilitate endovascular intervention planning. This study assessed the significance and correlation between the trackability forces for a coronary stent system with various geometrical parameters based on patient-specific geometries. A motorised delivery system delivered a commercially available coronary stent system and monitored the trackability forces along three phantom patient-specific thin-walled, compliant coronary vessels supported by a cardiac phantom model. The maximum trackability forces, curvature and torsion values ranged from 0.31 to 0.87 N, 0.06 to 0.22 mm(-1) and -11.1 to 5.8 mm(-1), respectively. The trackability forces were significantly different between all vessels (p < 0.002), while the tortuosity parameters were not significantly different (p > 0.05). A new tortuosity parameter-coined tracking curvature which considers the lumen radius as well as the curvature along the centreline was statistically different (p < 0.002) for all vessels and correlated with the trackability forces. There was a strong correlation between the cumulative

  3. General AMBER Force Field Parameters for Diphenyl Diselenides and Diphenyl Ditellurides.

    PubMed

    Torsello, Mauro; Pimenta, Antonio C; Wolters, Lando P; Moreira, Irina S; Orian, Laura; Polimeno, Antonino

    2016-06-30

    The General AMBER Force Field (GAFF) has been extended to describe a series of selenium and tellurium diphenyl dichalcogenides. These compounds, besides being eco-friendly catalysts for numerous oxidations in organic chemistry, display peroxidase activity, i.e., can reduce hydrogen peroxide and harmful organic hydroperoxides to water/alcohols and as such are very promising antioxidant drugs. The novel GAFF parameters are tested in MD simulations in different solvents and the (77)Se NMR chemical shift of diphenyl diselenide is computed using structures extracted from MD snapshots and found in nice agreement with the measured value in CDCl3. The whole computational protocol is described in detail and integrated with in-house code to allow easy derivation of the force field parameters for analogous compounds as well as for Se/Te organocompounds in general. PMID:27267296

  4. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOEpatents

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  5. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids.

    PubMed

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this "thermal noise method" is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities. PMID:19334955

  6. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-15

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this 'thermal noise method' is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  7. Determining prestressing forces for inspection of prestressed concrete containments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    General Design Criterion 53, Provisions for Containment Testing and Inspection,'' of Appendix A, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,'' to 10 CFR Part 50, Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,'' requires, in part, that the reactor containment be designed to permit (1) periodic inspection of all important areas and (2) an appropriate surveillance program. Regulatory Guide 1.35, Inservice Inspection of Ungrouted Tendons in Prestressed Concrete Containment Structures,'' describes a basis acceptable to the NRC staff for developing an appropriate inservice inspection and surveillance program for ungrouted tendons in prestressed concrete containment structures of light-water-cooled reactors. This guide expands and clarifies the NRC staff position on determining prestressing forces to be used for inservice inspections of prestressed concrete containment structures.

  8. Determination of Solubility Parameters of Ibuprofen and Ibuprofen Lysinate.

    PubMed

    Kitak, Teja; Dumičić, Aleksandra; Planinšek, Odon; Šibanc, Rok; Srčič, Stanko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in formulating solid dispersions, which purposes mainly include solubility enhancement, sustained drug release and taste masking. The most notable problem by these dispersions is drug-carrier (in)solubility. Here we focus on solubility parameters as a tool for predicting the solubility of a drug in certain carriers. Solubility parameters were determined in two different ways: solely by using calculation methods, and by experimental approaches. Six different calculation methods were applied in order to calculate the solubility parameters of the drug ibuprofen and several excipients. However, we were not able to do so in the case of ibuprofen lysinate, as calculation models for salts are still not defined. Therefore, the extended Hansen's approach and inverse gas chromatography (IGC) were used for evaluating of solubility parameters for ibuprofen lysinate. The obtained values of the total solubility parameter did not differ much between the two methods: by the extended Hansen's approach it was δt = 31.15 MPa(0.5) and with IGC it was δt = 35.17 MPa(0.5). However, the values of partial solubility parameters, i.e., δd, δp and δh, did differ from each other, what might be due to the complex behaviour of a salt in the presence of various solvents.

  9. Determination of Joint Roughness Coefficients Using Roughness Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sic; Kang, Seong-Seung; Jang, Bo-An

    2014-11-01

    This study used precisely digitized standard roughness profiles to determine roughness parameters such as statistical and 2D discontinuity roughness, and fractal dimensions. Our methods were based on the relationship between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC) values and roughness parameters calculated using power law equations. Statistical and 2D roughness parameters, and fractal dimensions correlated well with JRC values, and had correlation coefficients of over 0.96. However, all of these relationships have a 4th profile (JRC 6-8) that deviates by more than ±5 % from the JRC values given in the standard roughness profiles. This indicates that this profile is statistically different than the others. We suggest that fractal dimensions should be measured within the entire range of the divider, instead of merely measuring values within a suitable range. Normalized intercept values also correlated with the JRC values, similarly to the fractal dimension values discussed above. The root mean square first derivative values, roughness profile indexes, 2D roughness parameter, and fractal dimension values decreased as the sampling interval increased. However, the structure function values increased very rapidly with increasing sampling intervals. This indicates that the roughness parameters are not independent of the sampling interval, and that the different relationships between the JRC values and these roughness parameters are dependent on the sampling interval.

  10. Accuracy of stellar parameters determined from multicolor photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.; Mironov, A. V.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    2014-04-01

    The development and application of new methods for intelligent analysis and extraction of information from digital sky surveys carried out in various spectral domains have now become a popular field in astrophysical research and, in particular, in stellar studies. Modern large-scale photometric surveys provide data for 105-106 relatively faint objects, and the lack of spectroscopic data can be compensated by the cross identification of the objects followed by an analysis of all catalogued photometric data. In this paper we investigate the possibility of determining the effective temperature, surface gravity, total extinction, and the total-to-selective extinction ratio based on the photometry provided in the 2MASS, SDSS, and GALEX surveys, and estimate the accuracy of the inferred parameters. We use a library of theoretical spectra to compute the magnitudes of stars in the photometric bands of the above surveys for various sets of input parameters. We compare the differences between the computed magnitudes with the errors of the corresponding surveys. We find that stellar parameters can be computed over a sizable domain of the parameter space. We estimate the accuracy of the resulting parameters. We show that the presence of far-ultraviolet data in the available set of observed magnitudes increases the accuracy of the inferred parameters.

  11. Analysis of hydration parameter for sugars determined from viscosity and its relationship with solution parameters.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukinori; Miyawaki, Osato

    2016-01-01

    The hydration parameter h was obtained from the viscosity B-coefficients and the partial molar volume of solute, V2, for various sugars and urea in aqueous solutions. The parameter h showed a good correlation with the parameter α, determined from the activity coefficient of water, representing the solute-solvent interaction. The parameter h also showed a good correlation with the number of equatorial-OH groups (e-OH) for sugars, suggesting that the sugar molecules with the higher e-OH fit more to the water-structure. From the temperature dependence of the parameter h (dh/dT), the negative dh/dT for sugars suggested their water-structure making activity while the positive dh/dT for urea corresponded to its structure breaking effect. From the Arrhenius plot, the activation energy for h, Ea, was determined to be as low as 10 kJ/mol for disaccharides suggesting the stable hydration structure. The Ea increased with a decrease in molecular weight for sugars.

  12. Analysis of hydration parameter for sugars determined from viscosity and its relationship with solution parameters.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukinori; Miyawaki, Osato

    2016-01-01

    The hydration parameter h was obtained from the viscosity B-coefficients and the partial molar volume of solute, V2, for various sugars and urea in aqueous solutions. The parameter h showed a good correlation with the parameter α, determined from the activity coefficient of water, representing the solute-solvent interaction. The parameter h also showed a good correlation with the number of equatorial-OH groups (e-OH) for sugars, suggesting that the sugar molecules with the higher e-OH fit more to the water-structure. From the temperature dependence of the parameter h (dh/dT), the negative dh/dT for sugars suggested their water-structure making activity while the positive dh/dT for urea corresponded to its structure breaking effect. From the Arrhenius plot, the activation energy for h, Ea, was determined to be as low as 10 kJ/mol for disaccharides suggesting the stable hydration structure. The Ea increased with a decrease in molecular weight for sugars. PMID:26213015

  13. Forced unfolding of protein domains determines cytoskeletal rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, John

    2005-03-01

    Cells have recently been shown to have a power-law dynamic shear modulus over wide frequency range; the value of the exponent being non-universal, varying from 0.1-0.25 depending on cell type. This observation has been interpreted as evidence for the Soft Glassy Rheology (SGR) model, a trap-type glass model with an effective granular temperature. We propose a simple, alternative model of cytoskeletal mechanics based on the thermally activated, forced unfolding of domains in proteins cross-linking a stressed semi-flexible polymer gel. It directly relates a cell’s mechanical response to biophysical parameters of the cytoskeleton’s molecular constituents. Simulations indicate that unfolding events in a random network display a collective self-organization, giving rise to an exponential distribution of crosslink stress that can reproduce cell viscoelasticity. The model suggests natural explanations for the observed correlation between cell rheology and intracellular static stress, including those previously explained using the tensegrity concept. Moreover, our model provides insight into potential mechanisms of mechanotransduction as well as cell shape sensing and maintenance.

  14. [Microcalorimetric determination of thermochemical parameters of the phosphofructokinase reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhme, H J; Schellenberger, W; Hofmann, E

    1975-01-01

    A calorimetric procedure for determining deltaH, deltaG, deltaS and Keq of a bimolecular reaction with two or more products is described. By using this method the thermodynamic parameters of the phosphofructokinase reaction are determined. At pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C a reaction enthalpy of-6.96kcal/mole was found after correction for the neutralization enthalpy of the buffer and of the enthalpy difference of the magnesium complexes of ATP and ADP, respectively. The free energy of the phosphofructokinase reaction has been found under these conditions to be -3.96kcal/mole.

  15. Determining the alpha dynamo parameter in incompressible homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lantz, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Alpha, an important parameter in dynamo theory, is proportional to either the kinetic, current, magnetic, or velocity helicity of the fluctuating magnetic field and fluctuating velocity field. The particular helicity to which alpha is proportional depends on the assumptions used in deriving the first order smoothed equations that describe the alpha effect. In two cases, when alpha is proportional to either the magnetic helicity or velocity helicity, alpha is determined experimentally from two point measurements of the fluctuating fields in incompressible, homogeneous turbulence having arbitrary symmetry. For the other two possibilities, alpha is determined if the turbulence is isotropic.

  16. The effect of perturbing body segment parameters on calculated joint moments and muscle forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-22

    This study examined the effect of body segment parameter (BSP) perturbations on joint moments calculated using an inverse dynamics procedure and muscle forces calculated using computed muscle control (CMC) during gait. BSP (i.e. segment mass, center of mass location (com) and inertia tensor) of the left thigh, shank and foot of a scaled musculoskeletal model were perturbed. These perturbations started from their nominal value and were adjusted to ±40% in steps of 10%, for both individual as well as combined perturbations in BSP. For all perturbations, an inverse dynamics procedure calculated the ankle, knee and hip moments based on an identical inverse kinematics solution. Furthermore, the effect of applying a residual reduction algorithm (RRA) was investigated. Muscle excitations and resulting muscle forces were calculated using CMC. The results show only a limited effect of an individual parameter perturbation on the calculated moments, where the largest effect is found when perturbing the shank com (MS(com,shank), the ratio of absolute difference in torque and relative parameter perturbation, is maximally -7.81 N m for hip flexion moment). The additional influence of perturbing two parameters simultaneously is small (MS(mass+com,thigh) is maximally 15.2 N m for hip flexion moment). RRA made small changes to the model to increase the dynamic consistency of the simulation (after RRA MS(com,shank) is maximally 5.01 N m). CMC results show large differences in muscle forces when BSP are perturbed. These result from the underlying forward integration of the dynamic equations. PMID:24332615

  17. The effect of perturbing body segment parameters on calculated joint moments and muscle forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-22

    This study examined the effect of body segment parameter (BSP) perturbations on joint moments calculated using an inverse dynamics procedure and muscle forces calculated using computed muscle control (CMC) during gait. BSP (i.e. segment mass, center of mass location (com) and inertia tensor) of the left thigh, shank and foot of a scaled musculoskeletal model were perturbed. These perturbations started from their nominal value and were adjusted to ±40% in steps of 10%, for both individual as well as combined perturbations in BSP. For all perturbations, an inverse dynamics procedure calculated the ankle, knee and hip moments based on an identical inverse kinematics solution. Furthermore, the effect of applying a residual reduction algorithm (RRA) was investigated. Muscle excitations and resulting muscle forces were calculated using CMC. The results show only a limited effect of an individual parameter perturbation on the calculated moments, where the largest effect is found when perturbing the shank com (MS(com,shank), the ratio of absolute difference in torque and relative parameter perturbation, is maximally -7.81 N m for hip flexion moment). The additional influence of perturbing two parameters simultaneously is small (MS(mass+com,thigh) is maximally 15.2 N m for hip flexion moment). RRA made small changes to the model to increase the dynamic consistency of the simulation (after RRA MS(com,shank) is maximally 5.01 N m). CMC results show large differences in muscle forces when BSP are perturbed. These result from the underlying forward integration of the dynamic equations.

  18. Force field parameters for rotation around chi torsion axis in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ode, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Yuri; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2008-11-30

    To raise the accuracy of the force field for nucleic acids, several parameters were elaborated, focusing on the rotation around chi torsion axis. The reliability of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was significantly increased by improving the torsion parameters at C8--N9--C1'--X (X = H1', C2', O4') in A, G and those at C6--N1--C1'--X in C, T, and U. In this work, we constructed small models representing the chemical structure of A, G, C, T, and U, and estimated energy profile for chi-axis rotation by executing numerous quantum mechanical (QM) calculations. The parameters were derived by discrete Fourier transformation of the calculated QM data. A comparison in energy profile between molecular mechanical (MM) calculation and QM one shows that our presently derived parameters well reproduce the energy surface of QM calculation for all the above torsion terms. Furthermore, our parameters show a good performance in MD simulations of some nucleic acids. Hence, the present refinement of parameters will enable us to perform more accurate simulations for various types of nucleic acids.

  19. Determining hydrodynamic forces in bursting bubbles using DNA nanotube mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Winfree, Erik; Yurke, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the mechanical forces produced by fluid flows within the ocean is critical to understanding the ocean’s environmental phenomena. Such forces may have been instrumental in the origin of life by driving a primitive form of self-replication through fragmentation. Among the intense sources of hydrodynamic shear encountered in the ocean are breaking waves and the bursting bubbles produced by such waves. On a microscopic scale, one expects the surface-tension–driven flows produced during bubble rupture to exhibit particularly high velocity gradients due to the small size scales and masses involved. However, little work has examined the strength of shear flow rates in commonly encountered ocean conditions. By using DNA nanotubes as a novel fluid flow sensor, we investigate the elongational rates generated in bursting films within aqueous bubble foams using both laboratory buffer and ocean water. To characterize the elongational rate distribution associated with a bursting bubble, we introduce the concept of a fragmentation volume and measure its form as a function of elongational flow rate. We find that substantial volumes experience surprisingly large flow rates: during the bursting of a bubble having an air volume of 10 mm3, elongational rates at least as large as ϵ˙=1.0×108 s−1 are generated in a fragmentation volume of ∼2×10−6 μL. The determination of the elongational strain rate distribution is essential for assessing how effectively fluid motion within bursting bubbles at the ocean surface can shear microscopic particles and microorganisms, and could have driven the self-replication of a protobiont. PMID:26504222

  20. Determining hydrodynamic forces in bursting bubbles using DNA nanotube mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Winfree, Erik; Yurke, Bernard

    2015-11-10

    Quantifying the mechanical forces produced by fluid flows within the ocean is critical to understanding the ocean's environmental phenomena. Such forces may have been instrumental in the origin of life by driving a primitive form of self-replication through fragmentation. Among the intense sources of hydrodynamic shear encountered in the ocean are breaking waves and the bursting bubbles produced by such waves. On a microscopic scale, one expects the surface-tension-driven flows produced during bubble rupture to exhibit particularly high velocity gradients due to the small size scales and masses involved. However, little work has examined the strength of shear flow rates in commonly encountered ocean conditions. By using DNA nanotubes as a novel fluid flow sensor, we investigate the elongational rates generated in bursting films within aqueous bubble foams using both laboratory buffer and ocean water. To characterize the elongational rate distribution associated with a bursting bubble, we introduce the concept of a fragmentation volume and measure its form as a function of elongational flow rate. We find that substantial volumes experience surprisingly large flow rates: during the bursting of a bubble having an air volume of 10 mm(3), elongational rates at least as large as [Formula: see text] s(-1) are generated in a fragmentation volume of [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. The determination of the elongational strain rate distribution is essential for assessing how effectively fluid motion within bursting bubbles at the ocean surface can shear microscopic particles and microorganisms, and could have driven the self-replication of a protobiont. PMID:26504222

  1. Determining hydrodynamic forces in bursting bubbles using DNA nanotube mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Winfree, Erik; Yurke, Bernard

    2015-11-10

    Quantifying the mechanical forces produced by fluid flows within the ocean is critical to understanding the ocean's environmental phenomena. Such forces may have been instrumental in the origin of life by driving a primitive form of self-replication through fragmentation. Among the intense sources of hydrodynamic shear encountered in the ocean are breaking waves and the bursting bubbles produced by such waves. On a microscopic scale, one expects the surface-tension-driven flows produced during bubble rupture to exhibit particularly high velocity gradients due to the small size scales and masses involved. However, little work has examined the strength of shear flow rates in commonly encountered ocean conditions. By using DNA nanotubes as a novel fluid flow sensor, we investigate the elongational rates generated in bursting films within aqueous bubble foams using both laboratory buffer and ocean water. To characterize the elongational rate distribution associated with a bursting bubble, we introduce the concept of a fragmentation volume and measure its form as a function of elongational flow rate. We find that substantial volumes experience surprisingly large flow rates: during the bursting of a bubble having an air volume of 10 mm(3), elongational rates at least as large as [Formula: see text] s(-1) are generated in a fragmentation volume of [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. The determination of the elongational strain rate distribution is essential for assessing how effectively fluid motion within bursting bubbles at the ocean surface can shear microscopic particles and microorganisms, and could have driven the self-replication of a protobiont.

  2. An automatic method to generate force-field parameters for hetero-compounds.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kristina; Lecerof, David; Sigfridsson, Emma; Ryde, Ulf

    2003-02-01

    A program, Hess2FF, has been developed that automatically constructs parameter and topology files to be used in crystallographic refinement for any molecule, based on a Hessian (force-constant) matrix estimated by any method. The program is tested by redefining hetero-compounds in five different proteins: the inhibitor N-methylmesoporphyrin bound to ferrochelatase, the haem group and its axial ligands in cyctochrome c(553), the active-site metal ion in iron superoxide dismutase, the catalytic zinc ion in alcohol dehydrogenase with a bound trifluoroethanol molecule and the 5'-deoxyadenosyl group in methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase. It is shown that the resulting structures are improved in several aspects. In particular, the free R(free) factor always decreases and it is shown that a 1.70 A structure of cyctochrome c(553) becomes more similar to a high-resolution (0.97 A) structure of the same protein after re-refinement with Hess2FF. Thus, the force field used in crystallographic refinement significantly affects the final structure and therefore should be published together with the structure to ensure reproducibility. Various methods of obtaining the Hessian matrix employed by Hess2FF are discussed and some recommendations are given. Hess2FF allows the user to divide the atoms of the molecule into atom types that share the same force-field parameters. However, it seems to be favourable to assign a separate type to each atom, which can be performed automatically.

  3. The determination of the constitutive parameters of a medium with application to a reinforced concrete pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poggio, A. J.; Burke, G. L.; Pennock, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the experimental and analytical efforts performed to determine the constitutive parameters of a reinforced concrete pad on which an aircraft (the NASA Boeing 757) was parked while its internal electromagnetic environment was measured. This concrete pad is part of the Large Electromagnetic System-Level Illuminator (LESLI) test facility at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. The relative dielectric constant, conductivity, index of refraction, and reflection coefficient have been determined over the frequency range of 0 to 300 MHz and are presented.

  4. Revised force-field parameters for chlorophyll-a, pheophytin-a and plastoquinone-9.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Federico; Adam, Suliman; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2015-05-01

    Biological photosynthetic machineries, such as photosystem I, photosystem II, or the bacterial reaction center, use cofactor molecules that absorb light or directly participate in chemical reactions. Accurate description of the structure of the cofactors, and of their interactions with protein groups, is an important step toward understanding how photosynthetic machineries work. Here we revisit the classical force field parameters for chlorophyll-a, pheophytin-a and plastoquinone-9. We present systematic quantum mechanical and classical mechanical computations that lead to a good description of the structure and non-bonded interactions of these cofactors.

  5. Parameter estimation of social forces in pedestrian dynamics models via a probabilistic method.

    PubMed

    Corbetta, Alessandro; Muntean, Adrian; Vafayi, Kiamars

    2015-04-01

    Focusing on a specific crowd dynamics situation, including real life experiments and measurements, our paper targets a twofold aim: (1) we present a Bayesian probabilistic method to estimate the value and the uncertainty (in the form of a probability density function) of parameters in crowd dynamic models from the experimental data; and (2) we introduce a fitness measure for the models to classify a couple of model structures (forces) according to their fitness to the experimental data, preparing the stage for a more general model-selection and validation strategy inspired by probabilistic data analysis. Finally, we review the essential aspects of our experimental setup and measurement technique.

  6. Determination of critical anthropometric parameters for design of respirators

    SciTech Connect

    You-Hin Liau

    1982-12-01

    Anthropometric data were collected from 243 workers in a respirator fit-test programme, and an attempt was made to determine a correlation between these data and the Protection Factor obtained from quantitative fit-testing for half-mask respirators. Data were collected for two direct and five indirect facial measurements from front- and side-view slides of test subjects. For analysis, the data were normalized with relevant respirators dimensions (4 brands and 10 sizes). Results of linear regression analysis indicated that correlation coefficients between Protection Factor and anthropometric data (face length, mouth width, face width, nasal root breadth) were, respectively, 0.04, 0.22, 0.30 and 0.04. These correlation coefficients are for white males without facial hair. The analysis showed the 'critical' parameters to be mouth width and face width; however, a person with certain combinations of anthropometric parameters may provide a better correlation with Protection Factor.

  7. Bicycle ergometer instrumentation to determine muscle and bone forces during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    1995-01-01

    It is hypothesized that bone loss experienced by astronauts in zero gravity conditions may be curtailed by appropriate exercise. According to Wolf's law, bone regenerates when muscles produce stresses by pulling on the bone during daily activity and/or exercise on Earth. to use this theory to prevent or decrease bone loss, one needs to quantify musculoskeletal loads and relate them to bone density changes. In the context of the space program, it is desirable to determine musculoskeletal loads during exercise (using the bicycle ergometer in this case) so that one may make similar measurements on Earth and in space. In this manner, load measurements on Earth may be used as reference to generate similar loads during exercise in space. The work reported in this document entails a musculoskeletal load measurement system that, when complete, will provide forces at muscle insertion points and other contact points, on bone. This data will be used by Dr. Beth A. Todd, who is also a SSF working with Dr. Shackelford, as input to a finite element model of bone sections to determine stress distributions. A bicycle ergometer has been instrumented to measure parameters needed to determine musculoskeletal forces during exercise. A primary feature of the system is its compactness. It uses small/light sensors without line-of-sight requirements. The system developed includes sensors, signal processing, a data acquisition system, and software to collect the data. The sensors used include optical encoders to measure position and orientation of the pedal (foot), accelerometers to determine kinematic parameters of the shank and thigh, load cells to measure pedal forces on the sagittal plane, and EMG probes to measure muscle activity. The signals are processed using anti-aliasing filters and amplifiers. The sensors' output is digitized using 30 channels of a board mounted inside a 486 class PC. A program sets the data acquisition parameters and collects data during a time period specified

  8. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  9. Behavior of temporal parameters of the ground reactive forces for the walking of postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    DE Sousa, Adriana Leite; Calçadas Dias Gabriel, Ronaldo Eugênio; Faria, Aurélio Marques; Aragão, Florbela R; Rodrigues Moreira, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the influence of body composition and menopause characteristics on certain temporal parameters of the behavior of vertical and anteroposterior components of ground reactive forces, as well as the vertical and anteroposterior rates on the walking of postmenopausal women. The sample consisted of 67 postmenopausal women, average age 59 years. Body composition was assessed by octapolar bioimpedance and ground reactive force by the Kistler force platform. Vertical loading rate correlated positively with age (r = 0.02) and negatively with weight (r = -0.33). The relationship between the rates of vertical loading and unloading associated positively with menopause time (r = 0.27) but negatively with weight (r = -0.27). Vertical unloading rate showed a negative association with abdominal visceral adiposity (r = -0.27). The relationship between the times of the intermediate and final phases of the support correlated significantly with abdominal visceral adiposity (r = 0.25) and fat mass (r = 0.24). The study suggests that fat mass and abdominal visceral adiposity affect the support time, and increased abdominal visceral adiposity implies a slower pre-suspension phase during the walking of postmenopausal women. Hormone replacement therapy was shown to be an enhancer of steeper vertical loading and anteroposterior unloading and longer time in the double support phase, indicating a greater stability of postmenopausal women when walking. PMID:26686563

  10. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary.

  11. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary. PMID:26224547

  12. Analyzing a hydrocarbon reservoir by determining the response of that reservoir to tidal forces

    SciTech Connect

    Graebner, P.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a method for determining a component of the response of a hydrocarbons reservoir to tidal forces. It comprises measuring a variable responsive to tidal forces within the reservoir over a measurement time period; determining a theoretical earth-tide for the reservoir over the measurement time period; and determining the component of the response to tidal forces by comparing the variable measurements and the theoretical earth-tide determinations.

  13. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. PMID:12203646

  14. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature.

  15. 40 CFR 86.094-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... characteristics including emission characteristics. (iv) Manual chokes of heavy-duty engines only will not be... the force is removed (plastic or spring steel materials); (D) In the case of any parameter, the...) performance characteristics other than emission characteristics. (3) The Administrator shall determine...

  16. An improved method to determine neuromuscular properties using force laws - From single muscle to applications in human movements.

    PubMed

    Siebert, T; Sust, M; Thaller, S; Tilp, M; Wagner, H

    2007-04-01

    We evaluate an improved method for individually determining neuromuscular properties in vivo. The method is based on Hill's equation used as a force law combined with Newton's equation of motion. To ensure the range of validity of Hill's equation, we first perform detailed investigations on in vitro single muscles. The force-velocity relation determined with the model coincides well with results obtained by standard methods (r=.99) above 20% of the isometric force. In addition, the model-predicted force curves during work loop contractions very well agree with measurements (mean difference: 2-3%). Subsequently, we deduce theoretically under which conditions it is possible to combine several muscles of the human body to model muscles. This leads to a model equation for human leg extension movements containing parameters for the muscle properties and for the activation. To numerically determine these invariant neuromuscular properties we devise an experimental method based on concentric and isometric leg extensions. With this method we determine individual muscle parameters from experiments such that the simulated curves agree well with experiments (r=.99). A reliability test with 12 participants revealed correlations r=.72-.91 for the neuromuscular parameters (p<.01). Predictions of similar movements under different conditions show mean errors of about 5%. In addition, we present applications in sports practise and theory.

  17. Determination of the Fracture Parameters in a Stiffened Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chung-Yi

    2000-01-01

    A modified J-integral, namely the equivalent domain integral, is derived for a three-dimensional anisotropic cracked solid to evaluate the stress intensity factor along the crack front using the finite element method. Based on the equivalent domain integral method with auxiliary fields, an interaction integral is also derived to extract the second fracture parameter, the T-stress, from the finite element results. The auxiliary fields are the two-dimensional plane strain solutions of monoclinic materials with the plane of symmetry at x(sub 3) = 0 under point loads applied at the crack tip. These solutions are expressed in a compact form based on the Stroh formalism. Both integrals can be implemented into a single numerical procedure to determine the distributions of stress intensity factor and T-stress components, T11, T13, and thus T33, along a three-dimensional crack front. The effects of plate thickness and crack length on the variation of the stress intensity factor and T-stresses through the thickness are investigated in detail for through-thickness center-cracked plates (isotropic and orthotropic) and orthotropic stiffened panels under pure mode-I loading conditions. For all the cases studied, T11 remains negative. For plates with the same dimensions, a larger size of crack yields larger magnitude of the normalized stress intensity factor and normalized T-stresses. The results in orthotropic stiffened panels exhibit an opposite trend in general. As expected, for the thicker panels, the fracture parameters evaluated through the thickness, except the region near the free surfaces, approach two-dimensional plane strain solutions. In summary, the numerical methods presented in this research demonstrate their high computational effectiveness and good numerical accuracy in extracting these fracture parameters from the finite element results in three-dimensional cracked solids.

  18. Determination of the fracture parameters in a stiffened composite panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chung-Yi

    A modified J-integral, namely the equivalent domain integral, is derived for a three-dimensional anisotropic cracked solid to evaluate the stress intensity factor along the crack front using the finite element method. Based on the equivalent domain integral method with auxiliary fields, an interaction integral is also derived to extract the second fracture parameter, the T-stress, from the finite element results. The auxiliary fields are the two-dimensional plane strain solutions of monoclinic materials with the plane of symmetry at x3 = 0 under point loads applied at the crack tip. These solutions are expressed in a compact form based on the Stroh formalism. Both integrals can be implemented into a single numerical procedure to determine the distributions of stress intensity factor and T-stress components, T 11, T13, and thus T 33, along a three-dimensional crack front. The effects of plate thickness and crack length on the variation of the stress intensity factor and T-stresses through the thickness are investigated in detail for through-thickness center-cracked plates (isotropic and orthotropic) and orthotropic stiffened panels under pure mode-I loading conditions. For all the cases studied, T11 remains negative. For plates with the same dimensions, a larger size of crack yields larger magnitude of the normalized stress intensity factor and normalized T-stresses. The results in orthotropic stiffened panels exhibit an opposite trend in general. As expected, for the thicker panels, the fracture parameters evaluated through the thickness, except the region near the free surfaces, approach two-dimensional plane strain solutions. In summary, the numerical methods presented in this research demonstrate their high computational effectiveness and good numerical accuracy in extracting these fracture parameters from the finite element results in three-dimensional cracked solids.

  19. Evolutionary determination of experimental parameters for ptychographical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shenfield, Alex; Rodenburg, John M.

    2011-06-15

    The Ptychographical Iterative Engine (PIE) algorithm is a recently developed novel method of Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI) that uses multiple overlapping diffraction patterns to reconstruct an image. This method has successfully produced high quality reconstructions at both optical and X-ray wavelengths but the need for accurate knowledge of the probe positions is currently a limiting factor in the production of high resolution reconstructions at electron wavelengths. This paper examines the shape of the search landscape for producing optimal image reconstructions in the specific case of electron microscopy and then shows how evolutionary search methods can be used to reliably determine experimental parameters in the electron microscopy case (such as the spherical aberration in the probe and the probe positions).

  20. Complementary interference method for determining optical parameters of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowiorski, K.; Kędzierski, J.; Raszewski, Z.; Kojdecki, M. A.; Chojnowska, O.; Garbat, K.; Miszczyk, E.; Piecek, W.

    2016-04-01

    Wedge cells of small apex angle, filled with liquid crystals, were used to determining optical characteristics as functions of temperature for three liquid crystalline mixtures recently produced and a reference nematic. The interference fringes appearing in polarised monochromatic light (of sodium yellow line) normally incident on the cell were exploited to measure the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices in the reflection mode and birefringence in the transmission mode. The measurements were repeated using Abbe's refractometer for 6CHBT as the reference to verifying the precision. Additionally the order parameter was computed from birefringence as a function of temperature. The results confirm the usefulness of the method and provide the properties of two nematic liquid crystals of small and large birefringence and one smectic liquid crystal of medium birefringence, recently produced. The experimental systems served also to investigating phase transition between the liquid crystals and the isotropic liquid at near-clearing temperature.

  1. Quantitative Determination of Lineshape Parameters from Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) has stood as the gold standard in molecular ion spectroscopy for 30 years. Whether in a traditional uni-directional experiment or more complicated cavity-enhanced layouts with additional layers of modulation, VMS remains the preferred ion detection scheme and is responsible for the detection and transition frequency determination of around 50 molecules. Despite its success, VMS still has a great deal of untapped potential. There have only been two other published studies of VMS lineshapes and both struggle with the highly correlated parameters: linewidth, intensity, and velocity modulation amplitude, i.e. the maximum Doppler shift during a period of the discharge. Due to this difficulty, both Gao and Civis made concessions to achieve a good fit. Careful analysis of the contour of the transition profile allows us to properly disentangle those parameters in order to probe the environment of the positive column. We can extract the precise values for the translational temperature of the ion, the relative transition intensity, the ion mobility, and the electric field strength just from the lineshape of a single transition. A firm understanding of the lineshape will facilitate chemical and physical investigations of positive columns and allow for a better understanding of more complicated detection schemes. H. Gao et al., Acta Phys. Sin. 50, 1463 (2001) S. Civis, Chem. Phys. 186, 63 (1994)

  2. The Relationship Between Biomechanical-Anthropometrical Parameters and the Force Exerted on the Head When Heading Free Kicks in Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Teymouri, Meghdad; Sadeghi, Heydar; Nabaei, Amir; Kasaeian, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Background: Soccer is a contact sport in which the players are frequently faced with the risk of injury. It has been shown that the force exerted on the head during heading can be as much as 500–1200 Newton (N). Objectives: The main objective of this study was to determine whether there was any relationship between the force exerted on the head and several biomechanical and anthropometrical parameters related to heading free kicks. Patients and Methods: A total of 16 semi-professional soccer players with at least 5 years experience participated in this study. The mean age, height, and weight of the study participants were 21.36 ± 5.67, 178 ± 5.99 cm, and 70.55 ± 8.55 kg, respectively. To measure the force exerted on the heads of the players, a pressure gauge was installed on their foreheads. Each participant was asked to defend the ball using the heading technique three times. A camera with a sampling frequency of 150 frames per second was used to record the moment of impact between the ball and head during each heading event. For each participant and replicate, the ball and head velocity (m/s) as well as the angular body changes (degrees) were calculated using MATLAB and AutoCAD softwares, respectively. Descriptive statistics, including means and standard deviations were used to describe the data. Pearson correlation coefficient (alpha = 0.05) was used to examine potential relationships between the variables of interest. Results: Significant correlations existed between the force exerted on the head during heading, participant age, body mass, body fat percentage, and head perimeter (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study revealed the significance of anthropometric variables related to heading, such as age and head perimeter. Therefore, it was concluded that these variables should be considered when teaching and practicing the heading technique with players of different ages and anthropometric sizes. PMID:24719842

  3. Experimental determination of optimum gutter brush parameters and road sweeping criteria for different types of waste.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Magd M; Wang, Chong; Vanegas-Useche, Libardo V; Parker, Graham A

    2011-06-01

    The removal ability of gutter brushes for road sweeping for various debris types and different sweeping parameters is studied through experimental tests. The brushing test rig used comprises two commercial gutter brushes, a concrete test bed, and an asphalt test road with a gutter of 0.25 cm width and 10° slope. The brush-surface contact area is determined by sweeping sand on the concrete test bed. Sweeping problems are identified and discussed, and sweeping criteria for the different debris types are suggested. Also, optimum sweeping parameters are proposed for each debris type. In addition, debris removal mechanisms are discussed and analysed. The results indicate that for large heavy debris such as stones and gravel, it is not difficult to achieve large removal forces, because the steel bristles are relatively stiff. Conversely, high removal forces are not needed for particles of millimetre or micron sizes, but bristle curvature has to be appropriate to remove particles from road concavities. Finally, it is found that mud, especially dry mud on a rough surface, is the hardest debris to sweep, requiring a brush with a large tilt angle and a very large penetration to produce large removal forces.

  4. Probe-rotating atomic force microscopy for determining material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a probe-rotating atomic force microscope that enables scan in an arbitrary direction in the contact imaging mode, which is difficult to achieve using a conventional atomic force microscope owing to the orientation-dependent probe and the inability to rotate the probe head. To enable rotation of the probe about its vertical axis, we employed a compact and light probe head, the sensor of which is made of an optical disk drive pickup unit. Our proposed mechanical configuration, operating principle, and control system enables axial and lateral scan in various directions.

  5. Evaluation of higher order statistics parameters for multi channel sEMG using different force levels.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ganesh R; Kumar, Dinesh K

    2011-01-01

    The electromyograpy (EMG) signal provides information about the performance of muscles and nerves. The shape of the muscle signal and motor unit action potential (MUAP) varies due to the movement of the position of the electrode or due to changes in contraction level. This research deals with evaluating the non-Gaussianity in Surface Electromyogram signal (sEMG) using higher order statistics (HOS) parameters. To achieve this, experiments were conducted for four different finger and wrist actions at different levels of Maximum Voluntary Contractions (MVCs). Our experimental analysis shows that at constant force and for non-fatiguing contractions, probability density functions (PDF) of sEMG signals were non-Gaussian. For lesser MVCs (below 30% of MVC) PDF measures tends to be Gaussian process. The above measures were verified by computing the Kurtosis values for different MVCs.

  6. Toward Improved Description of DNA Backbone: Revisiting Epsilon and Zeta Torsion Force Field Parameters.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Luque, F Javier; Sponer, Jiří; Cheatham, Thomas E; Otyepka, Michal; Jurečka, Petr

    2013-05-14

    We present a refinement of the backbone torsion parameters ε and ζ of the Cornell et al. AMBER force field for DNA simulations. The new parameters, denoted as εζOL1, were derived from quantum-mechanical calculations with inclusion of conformation-dependent solvation effects according to the recently reported methodology (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 7(9), 2886-2902). The performance of the refined parameters was analyzed by means of extended molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several representative systems. The results showed that the εζOL1 refinement improves the backbone description of B-DNA double helices and G-DNA stem. In B-DNA simulations, we observed an average increase of the helical twist and narrowing of the major groove, thus achieving better agreement with X-ray and solution NMR data. The balance between populations of BI and BII backbone substates was shifted towards the BII state, in better agreement with ensemble-refined solution experimental results. Furthermore, the refined parameters decreased the backbone RMS deviations in B-DNA MD simulations. In the antiparallel guanine quadruplex (G-DNA) the εζOL1 modification improved the description of non-canonical α/γ backbone substates, which were shown to be coupled to the ε/ζ torsion potential. Thus, the refinement is suggested as a possible alternative to the current ε/ζ torsion potential, which may enable more accurate modeling of nucleic acids. However, long-term testing is recommended before its routine application in DNA simulations.

  7. An individual and dynamic Body Segment Inertial Parameter validation method using ground reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Clint; Venture, Gentiane; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe; Isableu, Brice

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decades a variety of research has been conducted with the goal to improve the Body Segment Inertial Parameters (BSIP) estimations but to our knowledge a real validation has never been completely successful, because no ground truth is available. The aim of this paper is to propose a validation method for a BSIP identification method (IM) and to confirm the results by comparing them with recalculated contact forces using inverse dynamics to those obtained by a force plate. Furthermore, the results are compared with the recently proposed estimation method by Dumas et al. (2007). Additionally, the results are cross validated with a high velocity overarm throwing movement. Throughout conditions higher correlations, smaller metrics and smaller RMSE can be found for the proposed BSIP estimation (IM) which shows its advantage compared to recently proposed methods as of Dumas et al. (2007). The purpose of the paper is to validate an already proposed method and to show that this method can be of significant advantage compared to conventional methods.

  8. Ground reaction forces are more sensitive gait measures than temporal parameters in rodents following rotator cuff injury.

    PubMed

    Pardes, A M; Freedman, B R; Soslowsky, L J

    2016-02-01

    Gait analysis is a quantitative, non-invasive technique that can be used to investigate functional changes in animal models of musculoskeletal disease. Changes in ground reaction forces following injury have been observed that coincide with differences in tissue mechanical and histological properties during healing. However, measurement of these kinetic gait parameters can be laborious compared to the simpler and less time-consuming analysis of temporal gait parameters alone. We compared the sensitivity of temporal and kinetic gait parameters in detecting functional changes following rotator cuff injury in rats. Although these parameters were strongly correlated, temporal measures were unable to detect greater than 50% of the functional gait differences between injured and uninjured animals identified simultaneously by ground reaction forces. Regression analysis was used to predict ground reaction forces from temporal parameters. This model improved the ability of temporal parameters to identify known functional changes, but only when these differences were large in magnitude (i.e., between injured vs. uninjured animals, but not between different post-operative treatments). The results of this study suggest that ground reaction forces are more sensitive measures of limb/joint function than temporal parameters following rotator cuff injury in rats. Therefore, although gait analysis systems without force plates are typically efficient and easy to use, they may be most appropriate for use when major functional changes are expected. PMID:26768230

  9. Determination of radiative forcing of Saharan dust using combined TOMS and ERBE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Herman, Jay R.; Weaver, Clark

    2000-08-01

    We determine the direct radiative forcing of Saharan dust aerosols by combining aerosol information derived from Nimbus-7 TOMS with radiation measurements observed at the top of atmosphere (TOA) by NOAA-9 ERBE made during February-July 1985. Cloud parameters and precipitable water derived from NOAA-9 HIRS2 were used to aid in screening for clouds and water vapor in the analyses. Our results indicate that under "cloud-free" and "dry" conditions there is a good correlation between the ERBE TOA outgoing longwave fluxes and the TOMS aerosol index measurements over both land and ocean in areas under the influence of airborne Saharan dust. The ERBE TOA outgoing shortwave fluxes were also found to correlate well with the dust loading derived from TOMS over ocean. However, the calculated shortwave forcing of Saharan dust aerosols is very weak and noisy over land for the range of solar zenith angle viewed by the NOAA-9 ERBE in 1985. Sensitivity factors of the TOA outgoing fluxes to changes in aerosol index were estimated using a linear regression fit to the ERBE and TOMS measurements. The ratio of the shortwave-to-longwave response to changes in dust loading over the ocean is found to be roughly 2 to 3 but opposite in sign. The monthly averaged "clear-sky" TOA direct forcing of airborne Saharan dust was also calculated by multiplying these sensitivity factors by the TOMS monthly averaged "clear-sky" aerosol index. Both the observational and theoretical analyses indicate that the underlying surface properties, dust layer height, ambient moisture content, and the presence of cloud all play important roles in determining the TOA direct radiative forcing due to mineral aerosols.

  10. Determination of Radiative Forcing of Saharan Dust using Combined TOMS and ERBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Herman, Jay R.; Weaver, Clark

    1999-01-01

    The direct radiative forcing of Saharan dust aerosols has been determined by combining aerosol information derived from Nimbus-7 TOMS with radiation measurements observed at the top of atmosphere (TOA) by NOAA-9 ERBE made during February-July 1985. Cloud parameters and precipitable water derived from the NOAA-9 HIRS2 instrument were used to aid in screening for clouds and water vapor in the analyses. Our results indicate that under "cloud-free" and "dry" conditions there is a good correlation between the ERBE TOA outgoing longwave fluxes and the TOMS aerosol index measurements over both land and ocean in areas under the influence of airborne Saharan dust. The ERBE TOA outgoing shortwave fluxes were also found to correlate well with the dust loading derived from TOMS over ocean. However, the calculated shortwave forcing of Saharan dust aerosols is very weak and noisy over land for the range of solar zenith angle viewed by the NOAA-9 ERBE in 1985. Sensitivity factors of the TOA outgoing fluxes to changes in aerosol index were estimated using a linear regression fit to the ERBE and TOMS measurements. The ratio of the shortwave-to-longwave response to changes in dust loading over the ocean is found to be roughly 2 to 3, but opposite in sign. The monthly averaged "clear-sky" TOA direct forcing of airborne Saharan dust was also calculated by multiplying these sensitivity factors by the TOMS monthly averaged "clear-sky" aerosol index. Both the observational and theoretical analyses indicate that the dust layer height, ambient moisture content as well as the presence of cloud all play an important role in determining the TOA direct radiative forcing due to mineral aerosols.

  11. Determining CME-driven shock parameters from remote sensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale eruptions of magnetized plasma propagating from the Sun into interplanetary space with speeds varying from a few tens to more than 2500 km s-1. They cause large-scale turbulence in the heliosphere and are the major drivers of space weather. Fast CMEs drive strong shocks in the corona and interplanetary medium and generate plasma turbulence in the post-shock regions ahead of the CME bodies. In this work results from the detailed analysis of a strong CME and shock event on April 3, 2010 are summarized. For this event the solar source region is identified and the CME and shock kinematics are determined from time series of white light images obtained by the SECCHI suite on board the STEREO spacecrafts. The shock's standoff distance, compression ratio and Mach number are derived. A comparison of the derived values with the in-situ measurements shows good agreement. Further comparison of the shock MHD parameters determined from remote sensing observations with in-situ data, including the calculation of power-spectra, will help validating the results and provide new insights into CME generated turbulence. The study will be extended to further events identified in STEREO observations.

  12. Determination of fundamental asteroseismic parameters using the Hilbert transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, René; Schad, Ariane; Herzberg, Wiebke; Roth, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Context. Solar-like oscillations exhibit a regular pattern of frequencies. This pattern is dominated by the small and large frequency separations between modes. The accurate determination of these parameters is of great interest, because they give information about e.g. the evolutionary state and the mass of a star. Aims: We want to develop a robust method to determine the large and small frequency separations for time series with low signal-to-noise ratio. For this purpose, we analyse a time series of the Sun from the GOLF instrument aboard SOHO and a time series of the star KIC 5184732 from the NASA Kepler satellite by employing a combination of Fourier and Hilbert transform. Methods: We use the analytic signal of filtered stellar oscillation time series to compute the signal envelope. Spectral analysis of the signal envelope then reveals frequency differences of dominant modes in the periodogram of the stellar time series. Results: With the described method the large frequency separation Δν can be extracted from the envelope spectrum even for data of poor signal-to-noise ratio. A modification of the method allows for an overview of the regularities in the periodogram of the time series.

  13. Determination of plasma parameters in solar zebra radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We present a new method for determining the magnetic field strength and plasma density in the solar zebra radio sources. Methods: Using the double plasma resonance (DPR) model of the zebra emission, we analytically derived the equations for computing the gyroharmonic number s of selected zebra lines and then solved these equations numerically. Results: The method was successfully tested on artificially generated zebras and then applied to observed ones. The magnetic field strength and plasma density in the radio sources were determined. Simultaneously, we evaluated the parameter Lnb = 2Lb/ (2Ln - Lb), where Ln and Lb are the characteristic scale-heights of the plasma density and magnetic field strength in the zebra source, respectively. Computations show that the maximum frequency of the low-polarized zebras is about 8 GHz, in very good agreement with observations. For the high-polarized zebras, this limit is about four times lower. Microwave zebras are preferentially generated in the regions with steep gradients of the plasma density, such as in the transition region. In models with smaller density gradients, such as those with a barometric density profile, the microwave zebras cannot be produced owing to the strong bremsstrahlung and cyclotron absorptions. We also show that our DPR model is able to explain the zebras with frequency-equidistant zebra lines.

  14. Determination of the key parameters affecting historic communications satellite trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1984-01-01

    Data representing 13 series of commercial communications satellites procured between 1968 and 1982 were analyzed to determine the factors that have contributed to the general reduction over time of the per circuit cost of communications satellites. The model by which the data were analyzed was derived from a general telecommunications application and modified to be more directly applicable for communications satellites. In this model satellite mass, bandwidth-years, and technological change were the variable parameters. A linear, least squares, multiple regression routine was used to obtain the measure of significance of the model. Correlation was measured by coefficient of determination (R super 2) and t-statistic. The results showed that no correlation could be established with satellite mass. Bandwidth-year however, did show a significant correlation. Technological change in the bandwidth-year case was a significant factor in the model. This analysis and the conclusions derived are based on mature technologies, i.e., satellite designs that are evolutions of earlier designs rather than the first of a new generation. The findings, therefore, are appropriate to future satellites only if they are a continuation of design evolution.

  15. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Road load force, test weight, and... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels, electrical forces, or other means of simulating test weight as shown in the table in this paragraph shall...

  16. A method for the on-site determination of prestressing forces using long-gauge fiber optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Jaber, H.; Glisic, B.

    2014-07-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) consists of the continuous or periodic measurement of structural parameters and their analysis with the aim of deducing information about the performance and health condition of a structure. The significant increase in the construction of prestressed concrete bridges motivated this research on an SHM method for the on-site determination of the distribution of prestressing forces along prestressed concrete beam structures. The estimation of the distribution of forces is important as it can give information regarding the overall performance and structural integrity of the bridge. An inadequate transfer of the designed prestressing forces to the concrete cross-section can lead to a reduced capacity of the bridge and consequently malfunction or failure at lower loads than predicted by design. This paper researches a universal method for the determination of the distribution of prestressing forces along concrete beam structures at the time of transfer of the prestressing force (e.g., at the time of prestressing or post-tensioning). The method is based on the use of long-gauge fiber optic sensors, and the sensor network is similar (practically identical) to the one used for damage identification. The method encompasses the determination of prestressing forces at both healthy and cracked cross-sections, and for the latter it can yield information about the condition of the cracks. The method is validated on-site by comparison to design forces through the application to two structures: (1) a deck-stiffened arch and (2) a curved continuous girder. The uncertainty in the determination of prestressing forces was calculated and the comparison with the design forces has shown very good agreement in most of the structures’ cross-sections, but also helped identify some unusual behaviors. The method and its validation are presented in this paper.

  17. Determining extreme parameter correlation in ground water models.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, M.C.; Osterby, O.

    2003-01-01

    In ground water flow system models with hydraulic-head observations but without significant imposed or observed flows, extreme parameter correlation generally exists. As a result, hydraulic conductivity and recharge parameters cannot be uniquely estimated. In complicated problems, such correlation can go undetected even by experienced modelers. Extreme parameter correlation can be detected using parameter correlation coefficients, but their utility depends on the presence of sufficient, but not excessive, numerical imprecision of the sensitivities, such as round-off error. This work investigates the information that can be obtained from parameter correlation coefficients in the presence of different levels of numerical imprecision, and compares it to the information provided by an alternative method called the singular value decomposition (SVD). Results suggest that (1) calculated correlation coefficients with absolute values that round to 1.00 were good indicators of extreme parameter correlation, but smaller values were not necessarily good indicators of lack of correlation and resulting unique parameter estimates; (2) the SVD may be more difficult to interpret than parameter correlation coefficients, but it required sensitivities that were one to two significant digits less accurate than those that required using parameter correlation coefficients; and (3) both the SVD and parameter correlation coefficients identified extremely correlated parameters better when the parameters were more equally sensitive. When the statistical measures fail, parameter correlation can be identified only by the tedious process of executing regression using different sets of starting values, or, in some circumstances, through graphs of the objective function.

  18. Comparison of Methods to Obtain Force-Field Parameters for Metal Sites.

    PubMed

    Hu, LiHong; Ryde, Ulf

    2011-08-01

    We have critically examined and compared various ways to obtain standard harmonic molecular mechanics (MM) force-field parameters for metal sites in proteins, using the 12 most common Zn(2+) sites as test cases. We show that the parametrization of metal sites is hard to treat with automatic methods. The choice of method is a compromise between speed and accuracy and therefore depends on the intended use of the parameters. If the metal site is not of central interest in the investigation, for example, a structural metal far from the active site, a simple and fast parametrization is normally enough, using either a nonbonded model with restraints or a bonded parametrization based on the method of Seminario. On the other hand, if the metal site is of central interest in the investigation, a more accurate method is needed to give quantitative results, for example, the method by Norrby and Liljefors. The former methods are semiautomatic and can be performed in seconds, once a quantum mechanical (QM) geometry optimization and frequency calculation has been performed, whereas the latter method typically takes several days and requires significant human intervention. All approaches require a careful selection of the atom types used. For a nonbonded model, standard atom types can be used, whereas for a bonded model, it is normally wise to use special atom types for each metal ligand. For accurate results, new atom types for all atoms in the metal site can be used. Atomic charges should also be considered. Typically, QM restrained electrostatic potential charges are accurate and easy to obtain once the QM calculation is performed, and they allow for charge transfer within the complex. For negatively charged complexes, it should be checked that hydrogen atoms of the ligands get proper charges. Finally, water ligands pose severe problems for bonded models in force fields that ignore nonbonded interactions for atoms separated by two bonds. Complexes with a single water ligand

  19. Determination of edible oil parameters by near infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Armenta, S; Garrigues, S; de la Guardia, M

    2007-07-23

    A chemometric method has been developed for the determination of acidity and peroxide index in edible oils of different types and origins by using near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) measurements. Different methods for selecting the calibration set, after an hierarchical cluster analysis, were applied. After discrimination of olive oils from maize, seed and sunflower, the prediction capabilities of partial least squares (PLS) multivariate calibration of NIR data were evaluated. Several preprocessing alternatives (first derivative, multiplicative scatter correction, vector normalization, constant offset elimination, mean centering and standard normal variate) were investigated by using the root mean square error of validation (RMSEV) and prediction (RMSEP), as control parameters. Under the best conditions studied, the validation set provides RMSEP values of 0.034 and 0.037% (w/w) for acidity in (I) olive oil group and (II) sunflower, seed and maize oils group. RMSEP values for peroxide in both sample groups, expressed as mequiv.O2 kg(-1), were, respectively 1.87 and 0.79. The limit of detection of the methodology developed was 0.03% for acidity in both groups of edible oils (I and II), and 0.9 and 0.8 mequiv.O2 kg(-1) for peroxide in the olive oil and other edible oils groups, respectively. In fact, the methodology developed is proposed for direct acidity quantification and for the screening of peroxide index in edible oils, requiring less than 30 s per sample without any previous treatment.

  20. Experimental determination of force and displacement of a car suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, Aleksandra; Đukić, Rade

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a dynamical laboratory testing of experimental car body connection with real elastic suspension system (ESS) is described. During the experiment a horizontal force in longitudinal direction was applied, in order to simulate an acceleration and deceleration regime of a vehicle. The experiment was carried out on the example of two car bodies, with identical geometric behavior but implemented engine compartment was made of different materials: in one case it was made of steel and in another one of Al-alloys. The obtained displacement results were compared.

  1. Tissue Composition Determination via Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, Erich Carr

    In this thesis, methods are described by which the concentrations of water, protein, and fat present in a biological tissue can be inferred from measurements made of its bulk acoustic properties, including the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, B/A. We review the physical significance of this parameter and its use as a descriptor in the mixture methodologies of Apfel and Sehgal et al., and explore the theoretical implications of both methodologies and their underlying relations. One important result is that Apfel's methodology applies strictly only to mixtures whose components are finely mixed on the scale of an acoustic wavelength, while Sehgal's methodology applies strictly only to mixtures whose components are arranged in layers or regions of thickness (in the direction of propagation) larger than an acoustic wavelength. Another result is the prediction of a mechanism for enhanced nonlinearity based upon the application of Apfel's perfect-mixture relation for B/A to gas-liquid mixtures. Also in this thesis we describe a new in vitro technique for precise determination of B/A, and use this technique to measure a wide range of protein solutions, lipid oils, and their mixtures, as well as biological tissues. On the basis of these data, we compare and evaluate the mixture methodologies and suggest ways in which these models may be improved and extended. We show that when Apfel's and Sehgal's methodologies are applied to fine and coarse mixtures, respectively, they predict the actual component volume fractions to an accuracy of within 5%. For two-component mixtures, the perfect-mixture relations involving density, sound speed and B/A were obeyed to within about 2%, 3%, and 5%, respectively. For protein solutions, no dependence of B/A with protein molecular weight was observed. Also, no significant dependence of B/A or the inferred component volume fractions was observed for changes in tissue structure including denaturization of proteins, clotting of blood plasma

  2. Thermodynamic properties of liquid Au–Cu–Sn alloys determined from electromotive force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongnan; Hindler, Michael; Yuan, Wenxia; Mikula, Adolf

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the ternary Au–Cu–Sn system were determined with the electromotive force (EMF) method using a liquid electrolyte. Three different cross-sections with constant Au:Cu ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 were applied to measure the thermodynamic properties of the ternary system in the temperature range between the liquidus temperature of the alloys and 1023 K. The partial free energies of Sn in liquid Au–Cu–Sn alloys were obtained from EMF data. The integral Gibbs free energy and the integral enthalpy at 900 K were calculated by Gibbs–Duhem integration. The ternary interaction parameters were evaluated using the Redlich–Kister–Muggianu polynomial. PMID:22039311

  3. Determining charge state of graphene vacancy by noncontact atomic force microscopy and first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Weinert, M.; Li, L.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene vacancies are engineered for novel functionalities, however, the charge state of these defects, the key parameter that is vital to charge transfer during chemical reactions and carrier scattering, is generally unknown. Here, we carried out atomic resolution imaging of graphene vacancy defects created by Ar plasma using noncontact atomic force microscopy, and made the first determination of their charge state by local contact potential difference measurements. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we show that graphene vacancies are typically positively charged, with size-dependent charge states that are not necessarily integer-valued. These findings provide new insights into carrier scattering by vacancy defects in graphene, as well as its functionalization for chemical sensing and catalysis, and underline the tunability of these functions by controlling the size of vacancy defect.

  4. Determining important parameters related to cyanobacterial alkaloid toxin exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Love, A H

    2005-09-16

    Science-based decision making required robust and high-fidelity mechanistic data about the system dynamics and impacts of system changes. Alkaloid cyanotoxins have the characteristics to warrant consideration for their potential threat. Since insufficient information is available to construct a systems model for the alkaloid cyanotoxins, saxitoxins, anatoxins, and anatoxin-a(S), an accurate assessments of these toxins as a potential threat for use for intentional contamination is not possible. Alkaloid cyanotoxin research that contributed to such a model has numerous areas of overlap for natural and intentional health effects issues that generates dual improvements to the state of the science. The use of sensitivity analyses of systems models can identify parameters that, when determined, result in the greatest impact to the overall system and may help to direct the most efficient use of research funding. This type of modeling-assisted experimentation may allow rapid progress for overall system understanding compared to observational or disciplinary research agendas. Assessment and management of risk from intentional contamination can be performed with greater confidence when mechanisms are known and the relationships between different components are validated. This level of understanding allows high-fidelity assessments that do not hamper legitimate possession of these toxins for research purposes, while preventing intentional contamination that would affect public health. It also allows for appropriate response to an intentional contamination event, even if the specific contamination had not been previous considered. Development of science-based decision making tools will only improve our ability to address the new requirements addressing potential threats to our nation.

  5. Mathematical modeling of drying of potato slices in a forced convective dryer based on important parameters.

    PubMed

    Naderinezhad, Samira; Etesami, Nasrin; Poormalek Najafabady, Arefe; Ghasemi Falavarjani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    The effect of air temperature, air velocity, and sample shapes (circle and square with the same cross-sectional area) on kinetic drying of potato slices in a tunnel dryer was investigated experimentally and a suitable drying model was developed. The experiments of drying of potato slices were conducted at an air temperature of 45-70°C with an air velocity 1.60 and 1.81 m sec(-1). Results showed that drying temperature was the most effective parameter in the drying rate. The influence of air velocity was more profound in low temperature. The time for drying square slices was lower compared to the circle ones. Furthermore, drying data were fitted to different empirical models. Among the models, Midilli-Kucuk was the best to explain the single layer drying of potato slices. The parameters of this model were determined as functions of air velocity and temperature by multiple regression analysis for circle and square slices. Various statistical parameters were examined for evaluating the model.

  6. Plasma parameters and electromagnetic forces induced by the magneto hydro dynamic interaction in a hypersonic argon flow experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofolini, Andrea; Neretti, Gabriele; Borghi, Carlo A.

    2012-08-01

    This work proposes an experimental analysis on the magneto hydro dynamic (MHD) interaction induced by a magnetic test body immersed into a hypersonic argon flow. The characteristic plasma parameters are measured. They are related to the voltages arising in the Hall direction and to the variation of the fluid dynamic properties induced by the interaction. The tests have been performed in a hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 6 and Mach 15. The plasma parameters are measured in the stagnation region in front of the nozzle of the wind tunnel and in the free stream region at the nozzle exit. The test body has a conical shape with the cone axis in the gas flow direction and the cone vertex against the flow. It is placed at the nozzle exit and is equipped with three permanent magnets. In the configuration adopted, the Faraday current flows in a closed loop completely immersed into the plasma of the shock layer. The electric field and the pressure variation due to MHD interaction have been measured on the test body walls. Microwave adsorption measurements have been used for the determination of the electron number density and the electron collision frequency. Continuum recombination radiation and line radiation emissions have been detected. The electron temperature has been determined by means of the spectroscopic data by using different methods. The electron number density has been also determined by means of the Stark broadening of Hα and the Hβ lines. Optical imaging has been utilized to visualize the pattern of the electric current distribution in the shock layer around the test body. The experiments show a considerable effect of the electromagnetic forces produced by the MHD interaction acting on the plasma flow around the test body. A comparison of the experimental data with simulation results shows a good agreement.

  7. Plasma parameters and electromagnetic forces induced by the magneto hydro dynamic interaction in a hypersonic argon flow experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cristofolini, Andrea; Neretti, Gabriele; Borghi, Carlo A.

    2012-08-01

    This work proposes an experimental analysis on the magneto hydro dynamic (MHD) interaction induced by a magnetic test body immersed into a hypersonic argon flow. The characteristic plasma parameters are measured. They are related to the voltages arising in the Hall direction and to the variation of the fluid dynamic properties induced by the interaction. The tests have been performed in a hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 6 and Mach 15. The plasma parameters are measured in the stagnation region in front of the nozzle of the wind tunnel and in the free stream region at the nozzle exit. The test body has a conical shape with the cone axis in the gas flow direction and the cone vertex against the flow. It is placed at the nozzle exit and is equipped with three permanent magnets. In the configuration adopted, the Faraday current flows in a closed loop completely immersed into the plasma of the shock layer. The electric field and the pressure variation due to MHD interaction have been measured on the test body walls. Microwave adsorption measurements have been used for the determination of the electron number density and the electron collision frequency. Continuum recombination radiation and line radiation emissions have been detected. The electron temperature has been determined by means of the spectroscopic data by using different methods. The electron number density has been also determined by means of the Stark broadening of H{sub {alpha}} and the H{sub {beta}} lines. Optical imaging has been utilized to visualize the pattern of the electric current distribution in the shock layer around the test body. The experiments show a considerable effect of the electromagnetic forces produced by the MHD interaction acting on the plasma flow around the test body. A comparison of the experimental data with simulation results shows a good agreement.

  8. Determination of parameters of a nuclear reactor through noise measurements

    DOEpatents

    Cohn, C.E.

    1975-07-15

    A method of measuring parameters of a nuclear reactor by noise measurements is described. Noise signals are developed by the detectors placed in the reactor core. The polarity coincidence between the noise signals is used to develop quantities from which various parameters of the reactor can be calculated. (auth)

  9. Phase equilibrium calculations of ternary liquid mixtures with binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk Yung; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-07-15

    The method presented in this paper was developed to predict liquid-liquid equilibria in ternary liquid mixtures by using a combination of a thermodynamic model and molecular dynamics simulations. In general, common classical thermodynamic models have many parameters which are determined by fitting a model with experimental data. This proposed method, however, provides a simple procedure for calculating liquid-liquid equilibria utilizing binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics simulations. This method was applied to mixtures containing water, hydrocarbons, alcohols, chlorides, ketones, acids, and other organic liquids over various temperature ranges. The predicted results agree well with the experimental data without the use of adjustable parameters.

  10. A test method for determining adhesion forces and Hamaker constants of cementitious materials using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang Kejin; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2011-11-15

    A method for determining Hamaker constant of cementitious materials is presented. The method involved sample preparation, measurement of adhesion force between the tested material and a silicon nitride probe using atomic force microscopy in dry air and in water, and calculating the Hamaker constant using appropriate contact mechanics models. The work of adhesion and Hamaker constant were computed from the pull-off forces using the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts and Derjagin-Muller-Toropov models. Reference materials with known Hamaker constants (mica, silica, calcite) and commercially available cementitious materials (Portland cement (PC), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS)) were studied. The Hamaker constants of the reference materials obtained are consistent with those published by previous researchers. The results indicate that PC has a higher Hamaker constant than GGBFS. The Hamaker constant of PC in water is close to the previously predicted value C{sub 3}S, which is attributed to short hydration time ({<=} 45 min) used in this study.

  11. On the ability of molecular dynamics force fields to recapitulate NMR derived protein side chain order parameters.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Evan S; Wand, A Joshua; Sharp, Kim A

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become a central tool for investigating various biophysical questions with atomistic detail. While many different proxies are used to qualify MD force fields, most are based on largely structural parameters such as the root mean square deviation from experimental coordinates or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings. NMR derived Lipari-Szabo squared generalized order parameter (O(2) ) values of amide NH bond vectors of the polypeptide chain were also often employed for refinement and validation. However, with a few exceptions, side chain methyl symmetry axis order parameters have not been incorporated into experimental reference sets. Using a test set of five diverse proteins, the performance of several force fields implemented in the NAMDD simulation package was examined. It was found that simulations employing explicit water implemented using the TIP3 model generally performed significantly better than those using implicit water in reproducing experimental methyl symmetry axis O(2) values. Overall the CHARMM27 force field performs nominally better than two implementations of the Amber force field. It appeared that recent quantum mechanics modifications to side chain torsional angles of leucine and isoleucine in the Amber force field have significantly hindered proper motional modeling for these residues. There remained significant room for improvement as even the best correlations of experimental and simulated methyl group Lipari-Szabo generalized order parameters fall below an R(2) of 0.8.

  12. Effect on the parameters of the high-heel shoe and transfer time of ground reaction force during level walking

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Pyo; Ryew, Che-Cheong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze an effect on the parameters of high-heel shoe and transfer time of ground reaction force during level walking and subjects participated were composed of adult female subjects (n=13) of 20s with height of high heel (0 cm, 9 cm, respectively). Instrument used for the study was 1 set force plate (AMTI-OR9-7) and sampling rate for data collection of analysis parameters was set-up at 1,000 Hz. The revelation of required coefficient of friction (RCOF) maximum showed significant difference with more rapid than that of 1st peak vertical force (1 PVF). Transfer time of body weight showed significant difference with more delay at 9 cm than that of 0 cm. RCOF required more frictional force required because PVF showed significant difference with larger value on 9 cm than that of 3 cm at 1 PVF. Both center of pressure (COP) x and COPy showed rather less displacement on 9 cm than that of 0 cm. In addition, level walking by high heel shoe did not control efficiently the ground reaction force due to restricted control capacity of coefficient of frictional force and therefore could suggest an inducement of muscle fatigue, heightening a possibility of sliding and falling due to decrease of frictional force. PMID:27807524

  13. A Comparison of Ground Reaction Forces Determined by Portable Force-Plate and Pressure-Insole Systems in Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Kosuke; Scheiber, Peter; Müller, Erich

    2011-01-01

    For the determination of ground reaction forces in alpine skiing, pressure insole (PI) systems and portable force plate (FP) systems are well known and widely used in previous studies. The purposes of this study were 1) to provide reference data for the vertical component of the ground reaction forces (vGRF) during alpine skiing measured by the PI and FP systems, and 2) to analyze whether the differences in the vGRF measured by the PI and the FP depend on a skier’s level, skiing mode and pitch. Ten expert and ten intermediate level skiers performed 10 double turns with the skiing technique “Carving in Short Radii” as High Dynamic Skiing mode and “Parallel Ski Steering in Long Radii” as Low Dynamic Skiing mode on both the steep (23 °) and the flat (15 °) slope twice. All subjects skied with both the PI and the FP system simultaneously. During the outside phase, the mean vGRF and the maximum vGRF determined by the FP are greater than the PI (p < 0.01). Additionally during the inside phase, the mean vGRF determined by the FP were greater than the PI (p < 0.01). During the edge changing phases, the mean vGRF determined by the FP were greater than the PI (p < 0.01). However, the minimum vGRF during the edge changing phases determined by the FP were smaller than the PI (p < 0.01) in the High-Steep skiing modes of Experts and Intermediates (p < 0.001). We have found that generally, the PI system underestimates the total vGRF compared to the FP system. However, this difference depends not only the phase in the turn (inside, outside, edge changing), but also is affected by the skier’s level, the skiing mode performed and pitch. Key points Typically, during the steering phases of the ski turns the total vGRFs measured by the pressure-insole system were lower compared to the portable force-plate system. However, in some skiing modes during the edge changing phase, the pressure-insole system overestimates the total vGRF compared to the portable force-plate system

  14. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome. PMID:26797435

  15. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome.

  16. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-01-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome. PMID:26797435

  17. Surface tension-like forces determine bacterial shapes: Streptococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Koch, A L; Higgins, M L; Doyle, R J

    1981-03-01

    The same tendency that causes soap bubbles to achieve a minimum surface area for the volume enclosed seems to account for many of the features of growth and division of bacteria, including both bacilli and cocci. It is only necessary to assume that growth takes place in zones and that only in these zones does the tension caused by hydrostatic pressure create the strain that forces the cell to increase the wall area. The stress developed by osmotic pressure creates strains that significantly lower the free energy of bond splitting by hydrolysis or transfer. We believe this is sufficient to make growing wall have some of the properties ordinarily associated with surface tension. The feature common to all bacterial cell wall growth is that peptidoglycan is inserted under strain-free conditions. Only after the covalent links have been formed are the intervening stressed peptide bonds cleaved so that the new unit supports the stress due to hydrostatic pressure. The present paper analyses the growth of Streptococcus faecium in these terms. This is a particularly simple case and detailed data concerning morphology are available. The best fit to the data is achieved by assuming that growth takes place in a narrow region near the splitting septum and that the septal material is already under tension as it is externalized and is twice as thick as the external wall throughout the development of the nascent poles. Constancy of the ratio of hydrostatic pressure to the effective surface tension, P/T, is also consistent with electron microscopic observations. PMID:7320694

  18. Online Determination of Graphene Lattice Orientation Through Lateral Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Fanhua; Li, Guangyong; Liu, Lianqing; Liu, Guangjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuechao; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C.; Xi, Ning

    2016-08-01

    Rapid progress in graphene engineering has called for a simple and effective method to determine the lattice orientation on graphene before tailoring graphene to the desired edge structures and shapes. In this work, a wavelet transform-based frequency identification method is developed to distinguish the lattice orientation of graphene. The lattice orientation is determined through the different distribution of the frequency power spectrum just from a single scan line. This method is proven both theoretically and experimentally to be useful and controllable. The results at the atomic scale show that the frequencies vary with the lattice orientation of graphene. Thus, an adjusted angle to the desired lattice orientation (zigzag or armchair) can easily be calculated based on the frequency obtained from the single scan line. Ultimately, these results will play a critical role in wafer-size graphene engineering and in the manufacturing of graphene-based nanodevices.

  19. Online Determination of Graphene Lattice Orientation Through Lateral Forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Fanhua; Li, Guangyong; Liu, Lianqing; Liu, Guangjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuechao; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C; Xi, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Rapid progress in graphene engineering has called for a simple and effective method to determine the lattice orientation on graphene before tailoring graphene to the desired edge structures and shapes. In this work, a wavelet transform-based frequency identification method is developed to distinguish the lattice orientation of graphene. The lattice orientation is determined through the different distribution of the frequency power spectrum just from a single scan line. This method is proven both theoretically and experimentally to be useful and controllable. The results at the atomic scale show that the frequencies vary with the lattice orientation of graphene. Thus, an adjusted angle to the desired lattice orientation (zigzag or armchair) can easily be calculated based on the frequency obtained from the single scan line. Ultimately, these results will play a critical role in wafer-size graphene engineering and in the manufacturing of graphene-based nanodevices. PMID:27484859

  20. [Study on Indicator Densitometry Determination Method of Hemodynamic Parameters].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-da; Zhou, Run-dong; Zha, Yu-tong; Cai, Jing; Niu, Jun-qi; Gao, Pu-jun; Liu, Li-li

    2016-03-01

    Measurement for hemodynamic parameters has always been a hot spot of clinical research. Methods for measuring hemodynamic parameters clinically have the problems of invasiveness, complex operation and being unfit for repeated measurement. To solve the problems, an indicator densitometry analysis method is presented based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and indicator dilution theory, which realizes the hemodynamic parameters measured noninvasively. While the indocyanine green (ICG) was injected into human body, circulation carried the indicator mixing and diluting with the bloodstream. Then the near-nfrared probe was used to emit near-infrared light at 735, 805 and 940 nm wavelengths through the sufferer's fingertip and synchronously capture the transmission light containing the information of arterial pulse wave. By uploading the measured data, the computer would calculate the ICG concentration, establish continuous concentration curve and compute some intermediate variables such as the mean transmission time (MTT) and the initial blood ICG concentration (c(t0)). Accordingly Cardiac Output (CO) and Circulating Blood Volume (CBV) could be calculated. Compared with the clinical "gold standard" methods of thermodilution and I-131 isotope-labelling method to measure the two parameters by clinical controlled trials, ten sets of data were obtained. The maximum relative errors of this method were 8.88% and 4.28% respectively, and both of the average relative errors were below 5%. The result indicates that this method can meet the clinical accuracy requirement and can be used as a noninvasive, repeatable and applied solution for clinical hemodynamnic parameters measurement. PMID:27400501

  1. Determining frequentist confidence limits using a directed parameter space search

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Schneider, Jeff

    2014-10-10

    We consider the problem of inferring constraints on a high-dimensional parameter space with a computationally expensive likelihood function. We propose a machine learning algorithm that maps out the Frequentist confidence limit on parameter space by intelligently targeting likelihood evaluations so as to quickly and accurately characterize the likelihood surface in both low- and high-likelihood regions. We compare our algorithm to Bayesian credible limits derived by the well-tested Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm using both multi-modal toy likelihood functions and the seven yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmic microwave background likelihood function. We find that our algorithm correctly identifies the location, general size, and general shape of high-likelihood regions in parameter space while being more robust against multi-modality than MCMC.

  2. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  3. Three Structural Determinants of Participation of Women in the Labor Force: A Cross-National Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorin, Zeev

    A natural study was conducted to determine the effects of division of labor (level of socio-economic development), dependency, and mode of production on participation of women in the labor force. Participation of women in the labor force was operationalized by two indicators: (1) women as percentage of the total number of wage earners and salaried…

  4. Development of a subsidence database and determination of subsidence parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.; Luo, Y.; Zhang, Z.M.

    1995-11-01

    A total of 209 cases of subsidence data over longwall panels in 16 US coal seams have been collected and built into a subsidence database. The database is developed under MS Windows environment. It uses a very user-friendly menu driven system. The empirical formulae for a number of commonly used subsidence parameters have been derived from those collected subsidence data.

  5. Unsaturated hydraulic parameters determined from direct and indirect methods

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, Lorraine E.; Hudson, David B.; Flint, Alan L.

    1997-10-22

    Hydraulic parameters are required for numerical simulations of unsaturated flow at Yucca Mountain, a vertically heterogeneous volcanic site for a potential high-level waste repository in the desert southwest. In this paper, direct measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using a centrifuge with a specialized rotor are compared to those estimated using a predictive conductivity equation and two methods of measuring moisture retention.

  6. Determining the Kinetic Parameters Characteristic of Microalgal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez Sancho, Maria Eugenie; And Others

    1991-01-01

    An activity in which students obtain a growth curve for algae, identify the exponential and linear growth phases, and calculate the parameters which characterize both phases is described. The procedure, a list of required materials, experimental conditions, analytical technique, and a discussion of the interpretations of individual results are…

  7. Analysis of Muscle Force-Velocity Parameter Changes in Elderly Women Resulting from Physical Activity--In Continuous Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrzek, Anna; Stefanska, Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to evaluate changes in muscle force-velocity parameters (F-v) in elderly women subjected to physical exercise. The examinations encompassed 20 women, aged 62-71, who were students at the University of the Third Age in Wroclaw. The evaluation of flexors and extensors of the knee joint, as well as flexors and extensors of…

  8. Hill-type muscle model parameters determined from experiments on single muscles show large animal-to-animal variation.

    PubMed

    Blümel, Marcus; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia; Hooper, Scott L; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-11-01

    Models built using mean data can represent only a very small percentage, or none, of the population being modeled, and produce different activity than any member of it. Overcoming this "averaging" pitfall requires measuring, in single individuals in single experiments, all of the system's defining characteristics. We have developed protocols that allow all the parameters in the curves used in typical Hill-type models (passive and active force-length, series elasticity, force-activation, force-velocity) to be determined from experiments on individual stick insect muscles (Blümel et al. 2012a). A requirement for means to not well represent the population is that the population shows large variation in its defining characteristics. We therefore used these protocols to measure extensor muscle defining parameters in multiple animals. Across-animal variability in these parameters can be very large, ranging from 1.3- to 17-fold. This large variation is consistent with earlier data in which extensor muscle responses to identical motor neuron driving showed large animal-to-animal variability (Hooper et al. 2006), and suggests accurate modeling of extensor muscles requires modeling individual-by-individual. These complete characterizations of individual muscles also allowed us to test for parameter correlations. Two parameter pairs significantly co-varied, suggesting that a simpler model could as well reproduce muscle response.

  9. Modal parameter determination of a lightweight aerospace panel using laser Doppler vibrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Kleverson C.; Domingues, Allan C.; Pereira, Pedro P. de S.; Carneiro, Sergio H.; de Morais, Marcus V. G.; Fabro, Adriano T.

    2016-06-01

    The experimental determination of modal parameters, i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratio, are key in characterizing the dynamic behaviour of structures. Typically, such parameters are obtained from dynamic measurements using one or a set of accelerometers, for response measurements, along with force transducers from an impact hammer or an electrodynamic actuator, i.e. a shaker. However, lightweight structures, commonly applied in the aerospace industry, can be significantly affected by the added mass from accelerometers. Therefore, non-contact measurement techniques, like Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV), are a more suitable approach in determining the dynamic characteristics of such structures. In this article, the procedures and results of a modal test for a honeycomb sandwich panel for aerospace applications are presented and discussed. The main objectives of the test are the identification of natural frequencies and mode shapes in order to validate a numerical model, as well as the identification of the damping characteristics of the panel. A validated numerical model will be necessary for future detailed response analysis of the satellite, including vibroacoustic investigations to account for acoustic excitations encountered during launching. The numerical model using homogenised material properties is updated to fit the experimental results and very good agreement between experimental and numerically obtained natural frequencies and mode shapes.

  10. Instrument for the measurement and determination of chemical pulse column parameters

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, Norman J.; Morgan, John P.

    1990-01-01

    An instrument for monitoring and measuring pneumatic driving force pulse parameters applied to chemical separation pulse columns obtains real time pulse frequency and root mean square amplitude values, calculates column inch values and compares these values against preset limits to alert column operators to the variations of pulse column operational parameters beyond desired limits.

  11. Possibility of determination of the asymptotic level-density parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Kudyaev, G.A.; Ostapenko, Y.B.; Svirin, M.I.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1988-02-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the fissility of nuclei to the parameters of the density of excited levels and conclude that the nuclei in the region of Pb are most favorable for an experimental estimate of the asymptotic parameter a-italic-tilde = ..cap alpha..A. The mean value ..cap alpha.. = 0.086 +- 0.009 MeV/sup -1/ is found from analysis of the fission of seven nuclei from /sup 201/Tl to /sup 213/At. This value is in agreement with the phenomenological description of the energy dependence a(U) (..cap alpha.. = 0.093 MeV/sup -1/) and with the theoretical prediction ..cap alpha.. = 0.09 MeV/sup -1/ obtained for a Woods-Saxon potential.

  12. Automated inference procedure for the determination of cell growth parameters.

    PubMed

    Harris, Edouard A; Koh, Eun Jee; Moffat, Jason; McMillen, David R

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate and carrying capacity of a cell population are key to the characterization of the population's viability and to the quantification of its responses to perturbations such as drug treatments. Accurate estimation of these parameters necessitates careful analysis. Here, we present a rigorous mathematical approach for the robust analysis of cell count data, in which all the experimental stages of the cell counting process are investigated in detail with the machinery of Bayesian probability theory. We advance a flexible theoretical framework that permits accurate estimates of the growth parameters of cell populations and of the logical correlations between them. Moreover, our approach naturally produces an objective metric of avoidable experimental error, which may be tracked over time in a laboratory to detect instrumentation failures or lapses in protocol. We apply our method to the analysis of cell count data in the context of a logistic growth model by means of a user-friendly computer program that automates this analysis, and present some samples of its output. Finally, we note that a traditional least squares fit can provide misleading estimates of parameter values, because it ignores available information with regard to the way in which the data have actually been collected. PMID:26871096

  13. Automated inference procedure for the determination of cell growth parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Edouard A.; Koh, Eun Jee; Moffat, Jason; McMillen, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate and carrying capacity of a cell population are key to the characterization of the population's viability and to the quantification of its responses to perturbations such as drug treatments. Accurate estimation of these parameters necessitates careful analysis. Here, we present a rigorous mathematical approach for the robust analysis of cell count data, in which all the experimental stages of the cell counting process are investigated in detail with the machinery of Bayesian probability theory. We advance a flexible theoretical framework that permits accurate estimates of the growth parameters of cell populations and of the logical correlations between them. Moreover, our approach naturally produces an objective metric of avoidable experimental error, which may be tracked over time in a laboratory to detect instrumentation failures or lapses in protocol. We apply our method to the analysis of cell count data in the context of a logistic growth model by means of a user-friendly computer program that automates this analysis, and present some samples of its output. Finally, we note that a traditional least squares fit can provide misleading estimates of parameter values, because it ignores available information with regard to the way in which the data have actually been collected.

  14. Determination of combustion parameters using engine crankshaft speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taglialatela, F.; Lavorgna, M.; Mancaruso, E.; Vaglieco, B. M.

    2013-07-01

    Electronic engine controls based on real time diagnosis of combustion process can significantly help in complying with the stricter and stricter regulations on pollutants emissions and fuel consumption. The most important parameter for the evaluation of combustion quality in internal combustion engines is the in-cylinder pressure, but its direct measurement is very expensive and involves an intrusive approach to the cylinder. Previous researches demonstrated the direct relationship existing between in-cylinder pressure and engine crankshaft speed and several authors tried to reconstruct the pressure cycle on the basis of the engine speed signal. In this paper we propose the use of a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network to model the relationship between the engine crankshaft speed and some parameters derived from the in-cylinder pressure cycle. This allows to have a non-intrusive estimation of cylinder pressure and a real time evaluation of combustion quality. The structure of the model and the training procedure is outlined in the paper. A possible combustion controller using the information extracted from the crankshaft speed information is also proposed. The application of the neural network model is demonstrated on a single-cylinder spark ignition engine tested in a wide range of speeds and loads. Results confirm that a good estimation of some combustion pressure parameters can be obtained by means of a suitable processing of crankshaft speed signal.

  15. Interactions among thermal parameters determine offspring sex under temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Warner, Daniel A; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-22

    In many animals, temperatures experienced by developing embryos determine offspring sex (e.g. temperature-dependent sex determination, TSD), but most studies focus strictly on the effects of mean temperature, with little emphasis on the importance of thermal fluctuations. In the jacky dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus), an Australian lizard with TSD, data from nests in the field demonstrate that offspring sex ratios are predictable from thermal fluctuations but not from mean nest temperatures. To clarify this paradox, we incubated eggs in a factorial experiment with two levels of mean temperature and three levels of diel fluctuation. We show that offspring sex is determined by an interaction between these critical thermal parameters. Intriguingly, because these two thermal descriptors shift in opposing directions throughout the incubation season, this interactive effect inhibits seasonal shifts in sex ratio. Hence, our results suggest that TSD can yield offspring sex ratios that resemble those produced under genotypic sex-determining systems. These findings raise important considerations for understanding the diversity of TSD reaction norms, for designing experiments that evaluate the evolutionary significance of TSD, and for predicting sex ratios under past and future climate change scenarios.

  16. Interactions among thermal parameters determine offspring sex under temperature-dependent sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Daniel A.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    In many animals, temperatures experienced by developing embryos determine offspring sex (e.g. temperature-dependent sex determination, TSD), but most studies focus strictly on the effects of mean temperature, with little emphasis on the importance of thermal fluctuations. In the jacky dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus), an Australian lizard with TSD, data from nests in the field demonstrate that offspring sex ratios are predictable from thermal fluctuations but not from mean nest temperatures. To clarify this paradox, we incubated eggs in a factorial experiment with two levels of mean temperature and three levels of diel fluctuation. We show that offspring sex is determined by an interaction between these critical thermal parameters. Intriguingly, because these two thermal descriptors shift in opposing directions throughout the incubation season, this interactive effect inhibits seasonal shifts in sex ratio. Hence, our results suggest that TSD can yield offspring sex ratios that resemble those produced under genotypic sex-determining systems. These findings raise important considerations for understanding the diversity of TSD reaction norms, for designing experiments that evaluate the evolutionary significance of TSD, and for predicting sex ratios under past and future climate change scenarios. PMID:20685704

  17. Correlations between forced oscillation technique parameters and pulmonary densitovolumetry values in patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, G.B.; Carvalho, A.R.S.; Machado, D.C.; Mogami, R.; Kasuki, L.; Gadelha, M.R.; Melo, P.L.; Lopes, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and pulmonary densitovolumetry in acromegalic patients and to examine the correlations between these findings. In this cross-sectional study, 29 non-smoking acromegalic patients and 17 paired controls were subjected to the FOT and quantification of lung volume using multidetector computed tomography (Q-MDCT). Compared with the controls, the acromegalic patients had a higher value for resonance frequency [15.3 (10.9-19.7) vs 11.4 (9.05-17.6) Hz, P=0.023] and a lower value for mean reactance [0.32 (0.21-0.64) vs 0.49 (0.34-0.96) cm H2O/L/s2, P=0.005]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, the acromegalic patients had higher percentages of total lung volume (TLV) for nonaerated and poorly aerated areas [0.42% (0.30-0.51%) vs 0.25% (0.20-0.32%), P=0.039 and 3.25% (2.48-3.46%) vs 1.70% (1.45-2.15%), P=0.001, respectively]. Furthermore, the acromegalic patients had higher values for total lung mass in both inspiratory and expiratory Q-MDCT [821 (635-923) vs 696 (599-769) g, P=0.021 and 844 (650-945) vs 637 (536-736) g, P=0.009, respectively]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, TLV showed significant correlations with all FOT parameters. The TLV of hyperaerated areas showed significant correlations with intercept resistance (rs=−0.602, P<0.001) and mean resistance (rs=−0.580, P<0.001). These data showed that acromegalic patients have increased amounts of lung tissue as well as nonaerated and poorly aerated areas. Functionally, there was a loss of homogeneity of the respiratory system. Moreover, there were correlations between the structural and functional findings of the respiratory system, consistent with the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26445330

  18. Correlations between forced oscillation technique parameters and pulmonary densitovolumetry values in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Camilo, G B; Carvalho, A R S; Machado, D C; Mogami, R; Kasuki, L; Gadelha, M R; Melo, P L; Lopes, A J

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and pulmonary densitovolumetry in acromegalic patients and to examine the correlations between these findings. In this cross-sectional study, 29 non-smoking acromegalic patients and 17 paired controls were subjected to the FOT and quantification of lung volume using multidetector computed tomography (Q-MDCT). Compared with the controls, the acromegalic patients had a higher value for resonance frequency [15.3 (10.9-19.7) vs 11.4 (9.05-17.6) Hz, P=0.023] and a lower value for mean reactance [0.32 (0.21-0.64) vs 0.49 (0.34-0.96) cm H2O/L/s2, P=0.005]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, the acromegalic patients had higher percentages of total lung volume (TLV) for nonaerated and poorly aerated areas [0.42% (0.30-0.51%) vs 0.25% (0.20-0.32%), P=0.039 and 3.25% (2.48-3.46%) vs 1.70% (1.45-2.15%), P=0.001, respectively]. Furthermore, the acromegalic patients had higher values for total lung mass in both inspiratory and expiratory Q-MDCT [821 (635-923) vs 696 (599-769) g, P=0.021 and 844 (650-945) vs 637 (536-736) g, P=0.009, respectively]. In inspiratory Q-MDCT, TLV showed significant correlations with all FOT parameters. The TLV of hyperaerated areas showed significant correlations with intercept resistance (rs=-0.602, P<0.001) and mean resistance (rs=-0.580, P<0.001). These data showed that acromegalic patients have increased amounts of lung tissue as well as nonaerated and poorly aerated areas. Functionally, there was a loss of homogeneity of the respiratory system. Moreover, there were correlations between the structural and functional findings of the respiratory system, consistent with the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26445330

  19. Contact inhibition of locomotion determines cell–cell and cell–substrate forces in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Juliane; Camley, Brian A.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Cells organized in tissues exert forces on their neighbors and their environment. Those cellular forces determine tissue homeostasis as well as reorganization during embryonic development and wound healing. To understand how cellular forces are generated and how they can influence the tissue state, we develop a particle-based simulation model for adhesive cell clusters and monolayers. Cells are contractile, exert forces on their substrate and on each other, and interact through contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), meaning that cell–cell contacts suppress force transduction to the substrate and propulsion forces align away from neighbors. Our model captures the traction force patterns of small clusters of nonmotile cells and larger sheets of motile Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. In agreement with observations in a spreading MDCK colony, the cell density in the center increases as cells divide and the tissue grows. A feedback between cell density, CIL, and cell–cell adhesion gives rise to a linear relationship between cell density and intercellular tensile stress and forces the tissue into a nonmotile state characterized by a broad distribution of traction forces. Our model also captures the experimentally observed tissue flow around circular obstacles, and CIL accounts for traction forces at the edge. PMID:26903658

  20. Contact inhibition of locomotion determines cell-cell and cell-substrate forces in tissues.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Juliane; Camley, Brian A; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Cells organized in tissues exert forces on their neighbors and their environment. Those cellular forces determine tissue homeostasis as well as reorganization during embryonic development and wound healing. To understand how cellular forces are generated and how they can influence the tissue state, we develop a particle-based simulation model for adhesive cell clusters and monolayers. Cells are contractile, exert forces on their substrate and on each other, and interact through contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), meaning that cell-cell contacts suppress force transduction to the substrate and propulsion forces align away from neighbors. Our model captures the traction force patterns of small clusters of nonmotile cells and larger sheets of motile Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. In agreement with observations in a spreading MDCK colony, the cell density in the center increases as cells divide and the tissue grows. A feedback between cell density, CIL, and cell-cell adhesion gives rise to a linear relationship between cell density and intercellular tensile stress and forces the tissue into a nonmotile state characterized by a broad distribution of traction forces. Our model also captures the experimentally observed tissue flow around circular obstacles, and CIL accounts for traction forces at the edge. PMID:26903658

  1. 77 FR 66595 - U.S. Air Force Broadcast of Consent Order, and Determination of Interest Level for a United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Broadcast of Consent Order, and Determination of Interest Level for a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Consent Order Industry Day AGENCY: Headquarters Air Force, Deputy Under Secretary of the Air Force (Space). ACTION: Publicize Consent Order, and Determine Level...

  2. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  3. Parameters for determining the origin of illicit heroin samples.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswami, K

    1985-01-01

    A method has been evolved for assigning the source of supply or origin of illicit heroin samples. The content of morphine, codeine and acetyl products and the ratios of morphine to codeine and heroin to acetylcodeine obtained from opium samples of known origin as well as the content of heroin (diacetylmorphine) and acetylcodeine and their ratios in illicit heroin samples that have been found to belong to the same source of supply as the known opium samples are used as the basic criteria for a comparison to determine the origin of illicit heroin samples. Because the content of alkaloids in opium and heroin samples varies considerably, the number of opium and illicit heroin samples of known origin analysed should be sufficient to determine a representative composition of alkaloids in such samples for a given geographical area and period of production. It was observed that the theoretical ratio of heroin to acetylcodeine increases two-fold at each stage of the chemical conversion in the series opium-morphine-heroin. The ratios of heroin to acetylcodeine obtained from opium samples of known origin showed significant variation, which enabled the author to make distinct composition profiles of the alkaloids for each geographical area studied. Such profiles made it possible to compare heroin samples of known origin with illicit heroin samples of unknown origin and to determine the geographical area from which the latter originated. This method can also be applied in determining the origin of illicit morphine samples.

  4. Determination of nuclear tracks parameters on sequentially etched PADC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwacik, Tomasz; Bilski, Pawel; Koerner, Christine; Facius, Rainer; Berger, Thomas; Nowak, Tomasz; Reitz, Guenther; Olko, Pawel

    Polyallyl Diglycol Carbonate (PADC) detectors find many applications in radiation protection. One of them is the cosmic radiation dosimetry, where PADC detectors measure the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles (from protons to heavy ions), supplementing TLD detectors in the role of passive dosemeter. Calibration exposures to ions of known LET are required to establish a relation between parameters of track observed on the detector and LET of particle creating this track. PADC TASTRAK nuclear track detectors were exposed to 12 C and 56 Fe ions of LET in H2 O between 10 and 544 keV/µm. The exposures took place at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project "Space Radiation Dosimetry-Ground Based Verification of the MATROSHKA Facility" (20P-240). Detectors were etched in water solution of NaOH with three different temperatures and for various etching times to observe the appearance of etched tracks, the evolution of their parameters and the stability of the etching process. The applied etching times (and the solution's concentrations and temperatures) were: 48, 72, 96, 120 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 50 O C), 20, 40, 60, 80 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 60 O C) and 8, 12, 16, 20 hours (7N NaOH, 70 O C). The analysis of the detectors involved planimetric (2D) measurements of tracks' entrance ellipses and mechanical measurements of bulk layer thickness. Further track parameters, like angle of incidence, track length and etch rate ratio were then calculated. For certain tracks, results of planimetric measurements and calculations were also compared with results of optical track profile (3D) measurements, where not only the track's entrance ellipse but also the location of the track's tip could be directly measured. All these measurements have been performed with the 2D/3D measurement system at DLR. The collected data allow to create sets of V(LET in H2 O) calibration curves suitable for short, intermediate and

  5. Efficient Parameter Estimation of Generalizable Coarse-Grained Protein Force Fields Using Contrastive Divergence: A Maximum Likelihood Approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Maximum Likelihood (ML) optimization schemes are widely used for parameter inference. They maximize the likelihood of some experimentally observed data, with respect to the model parameters iteratively, following the gradient of the logarithm of the likelihood. Here, we employ a ML inference scheme to infer a generalizable, physics-based coarse-grained protein model (which includes Go̅-like biasing terms to stabilize secondary structure elements in room-temperature simulations), using native conformations of a training set of proteins as the observed data. Contrastive divergence, a novel statistical machine learning technique, is used to efficiently approximate the direction of the gradient ascent, which enables the use of a large training set of proteins. Unlike previous work, the generalizability of the protein model allows the folding of peptides and a protein (protein G) which are not part of the training set. We compare the same force field with different van der Waals (vdW) potential forms: a hard cutoff model, and a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential with vdW parameters inferred or adopted from the CHARMM or AMBER force fields. Simulations of peptides and protein G show that the LJ model with inferred parameters outperforms the hard cutoff potential, which is consistent with previous observations. Simulations using the LJ potential with inferred vdW parameters also outperforms the protein models with adopted vdW parameter values, demonstrating that model parameters generally cannot be used with force fields with different energy functions. The software is available at https://sites.google.com/site/crankite/. PMID:24683370

  6. Determination of fluid viscosity and femto Newton forces of Leishmania amazonensis using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes, Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; de Y. Pozzo, Liliana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-08-01

    The displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences such as the measurement of forces of living microorganisms or the viscosity of local fluids. The technique we used allowed us to measure forces on the 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons range of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. These observations can be used to understand the infection mechanism and chemotaxis of these parasites. The same technique was used to measure viscosities of few microliters sample with agreement with known samples better than 5%. To calibrate the force as a function of the microsphere displacement we first dragged the microsphere in a fluid at known velocity for a broad range of different optical and hydrodynamical parameters. The hydrodynamical model took into account the presence of two walls and the force depends on drag velocity, fluid viscosity and walls proximities, while the optical model in the geometric optics regime depends on the particle and fluid refractive indexes and laser power. To measure the high numerical (NA) aperture laser beam power after the objective we used an integration sphere to avoid the systematic errors of usual power meters for high NA beams. After this careful laser power measurement we obtained an almost 45 degrees straight line for the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle horizontal displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under variation of all the parameters described below. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces, as we have done for the parasite force measurement, or vice-versa, as we did for the viscosity measurements.

  7. A Novel Approach for Deriving Force Field Torsion Angle Parameters Accounting for Conformation-Dependent Solvation Effects.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Luque, F Javier; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Jurečka, Petr

    2012-09-11

    A procedure for deriving force field torsion parameters including certain previously neglected solvation effects is suggested. In contrast to the conventional in vacuo approaches, the dihedral parameters are obtained from the difference between the quantum-mechanical self-consistent reaction field and Poisson-Boltzmann continuum solvation models. An analysis of the solvation contributions shows that two major effects neglected when torsion parameters are derived in vacuo are (i) conformation-dependent solute polarization and (ii) solvation of conformation-dependent charge distribution. Using the glycosidic torsion as an example, we demonstrate that the corresponding correction for the torsion potential is substantial and important. Our approach avoids double counting of solvation effects and provides parameters that may be used in combination with any of the widely used nonpolarizable discrete solvent models, such as TIPnP or SPC/E, or with continuum solvent models. Differences between our model and the previously suggested solvation models are discussed. Improvements were demonstrated for the latest AMBER RNA χOL3 parameters derived with inclusion of solvent effects in a previous publication (Zgarbova et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2886). The described procedure may help to provide consistently better force field parameters than the currently used parametrization approaches.

  8. Collision rates and the determination of atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielfiedel, A.; Feautrier, N.; Guitou, M.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-LTE modelisation of stellar atmospheres requires an accurate knowledge of collisional rate coefficients (mainly with H atoms) that compete with radiative rates to populate the atomic levels. In the framework of the SAM-GAIA project, we carry out, with colleagues from Uppsala, St. Petersburg and Nice, an interdisciplinary work combining quantum chemistry, collision physics and astrophysical modeling. Present studies concern collisional excitation of Mg and O by H-atoms. In the particular case of Mg, 15 electronic states of the MgH molecule as well as the associated couplings that mix the states during the collision were calculated. The resulting cross sections and rate coefficients point out the sensitivity of the results with the quantum chemistry data. Our detailed calculations show that the usual approximate formulae (Drawin, Kaulakys) lead to errors by factors up to 10^6. Consequences on atmospheric parameters are analyzed.

  9. Contact Transformations and Determinable Parameters in Spectroscopic Fitting Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhtiev, Mirza A.; Hougen, Jon T.

    2000-02-01

    In recent least-squares fits of torsion-rotation spectra of acetaldehyde and methanol it was found possible to adjust more fourth-order parameters than would be expected from traditional contact-transformation considerations. To investigate this discrepancy between theory and practice we have carried out numerical fitting experiments on the simpler three-dimensional (three-Eulerian-angle) asymmetric rotor problem, using J ≤ 20 unitless energy levels generated artificially from a full orthorhombic Hamiltonian with quadratic through octic operators in the angular momentum components. Results are analyzed using the condition number κ of the least-squares matrix, which is a measure of its invertibility in the presence of round-off and other errors. When κ is very large, parameters must be removed from the fit until κ becomes acceptably small, corresponding to procedures which lead to reduced Hamiltonians in molecular spectroscopy. We find that under certain circumstances κ can be decreased to an acceptable level for Hamiltonians which are only partially reduced when compared to Watson A and S reductions. Some insight into this behavior is obtained from classical mechanics and from the concept of delayed contact transformations. Transferring this numerical and algebraic understanding to the more complicated four-dimensional methyl-top internal rotor problem supports the empirical observation that presently existing data sets for methanol and acetaldehyde are most efficiently fit using partially reduced Hamiltonians and further suggests that expanding the methanol data set to transitions involving levels of higher J, K, and vt would favor even more strongly the use of partially reduced fourth-order Hamiltonians.

  10. What are the stimulation parameters that affect the extent of twitch force potentiation in the adductor pollicis muscle?

    PubMed

    Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Muscle force potentiation affects force output during electrical stimulation. Few studies have examined stimulation train parameters that influence potentiation such as pulse number, stimulation frequency, train duration, and force-time integral and peak force produced during the train. Pulse-matched trains (100 pulses) at 7.5, 15, 25, 30, 50, and 100 Hz, and trains of varying pulse number (50, 100, and 200 pulses) at 30 and 50 Hz were delivered to the ulnar nerve of 10 (5 male, 5 female; 23.4 ± 0.9 years), healthy individuals in random order. Single twitches of the adductor pollicis muscle were elicited before and after each train with a rest interval of at least 5 min between each train. No differences in potentiation occurred across the pulse-matched trains at frequencies of 15-50 Hz (38.9 ± 5.4-44.6 ± 5.5%). Twitch force potentiation following the highest (100 Hz) and lowest (7.5 Hz) frequency trains were not significantly different and were lower than the other 100 pulse-matched trains. As pulse number increased, potentiation increased for both the 30 and 50-Hz trains. There was a significant positive correlation between force potentiation and force-time integral produced by the stimulation train, r = 0.70. The results indicate that potentiation magnitude is dependent on the force-time integral produced during the test train and the number of pulses delivered, independent of stimulation frequency. PMID:20737164

  11. Ground Reaction Forces and Gait Parameters during Motorized and Non-Motorized Treadmill Walking and Runing on the International Space Station Treadmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, Ronald Donald; Norcross, Jason; DeWitt, John; Lee, Stuart M.; McCleary, Frank; Edwards, W. Brent

    2006-01-01

    Both motorized (T-M) and non-motorized (T-NM) treadmill locomotion are used on the International Space Station (ISS) as countermeasures to the deleterious effects of prolonged weightlessness. However, the ground reaction forces (GRF) and gait parameters of these exercise modes have not been examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in GRF and gait parameters exist while walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on T-M and T-NM. Dissimilar GRF and gait parameters suggest that T-M and T-NM locomotion may elicit different physiologic effects. T-NM may result in a reduced stimulus to bone formation due to a lower LR, but an increased energy cost as a result of shorter, more frequent strides. Therefore, the usage of each mode should depend upon the desired training stimulus.

  12. Use of the force-velocity test to determine the optimal braking force for a sprint exercise on a friction-loaded cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Linossier, M T; Dormois, D; Fouquet, R; Geyssant, A; Denis, C

    1996-01-01

    A group of 15 untrained male subjects pedalled on a friction-loaded cycle ergometer as fast as possible for 5-7 s to reach the maximal velocity (vmax) against different braking forces (FB). Power was averaged during a complete crank rotation by adding the power dissipated against FB to the power necessary to accelerate the flywheel. For each sprint, determinations were made of peak power output (Wpeak), power output attained at vmax (Wvmax) calculated as the product of vmax and FB and the work performed to reach vmax expressed in mean power output (Wvmax). The relationships between these parameters and FB were examined. A biopsy taken from the vastus lateralis muscle and tomodensitometric radiographs of both thighs were taken at rest to identify muscle metabolic and morphometric properties. The Wpeak value was similar for all FB. Therefore, the average of values was defined as corrected maximal power (Wmax). This value was 11% higher than the maximal power output uncorrected for the acceleration. Whereas the Wmax determination did not require high loads, the highest Wvmax value (Wmax) was produced when loading was heavy, as evidenced by the Wvmax-FB parabolic relationship. For each subject, the braking force (FB,Wmax) giving Wmax was defined as optimal. The FB,Wmax, equal to 0.844 (SD 0.108) N.kg-1 bodymass, was related to thigh muscle area (r = 0.78, P < 0.05). The maximal velocity (vm,Wmax) reached against this force seemed to be related more to intrinsic fibre properties (% fast twitch b fibre area and adenylate kinase activity). Thus, from the Wmax determination, it is suggested that it should be possible to predict the conditions for optimal exercise on a cycle ergometer.

  13. Soil hydrodynamic parameter determination using Ground-Penetrating Radar monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil hydraulic properties, represented by the soil water retention andhydraulic conductivity functions, dictate water flow in the vadosezone, from surface to aquifers. Understanding the water flow dynamichas important implications for estimating available water resourcesand flood forecasting. It is also crucial in evaluating the dynamicsof chemical pollutants in soil and in assessing the risks ofgroundwater pollution. Ground Penetrating Radar is a geophysicalmethod particularly suited to measure contrasts of electromagneticparameters such as those created by water content variations in soils.We developed coupled hydrodynamic and electromagnetic numericalmodeling to invert the two way travel times associated withreflections corresponding to strong dielectric permittivity contrastssuch as wetting front and wetting bulb.We will present three different techniques using Ground PenetratingRadar monitoring: one using a single ring infiltrometer, an other oneusing shallow boreholes and the last one being a laboratory largecylindrical tank in which we applied different water table levels.We used the parametrical Mualem-van Genuchten model to fit soil-waterretention and hydraulic conductivity functions. Using GroundPenetrating Radar data inversion, we optimized the Mualem-vanGenuchten parameters using Shuffled Complex Evolution algorithm.Results are compared with classical laboratory and field methods.

  14. Experimental Determination of Metal Fuel Point Defect Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; McCall, S

    2008-06-03

    Nuclear metallic fuels are one of many options for advanced nuclear fuel cycles because they provide dimensional stability, mechanical integrity, thermal efficiency, and irradiation resistance while the associated pyro-processing is technically relevant to concerns about proliferation and diversion of special nuclear materials. In this presentation we will discuss recent success that we have had in studying isochronal annealing of damage cascades in Pu and Pu(Ga) arising from the self-decay of Pu as well as the annealing characteristics of noninteracting point defect populations produced by ion accelerator irradiation. Comparisons of the annealing properties of these two populations of defects arising from very different source terms are enlightening and point to complex defect and mass transport properties in the plutonium specimens which we are only now starting to understand as a result of many follow-on studies. More importantly however, the success of these measurements points the way to obtaining important mass transport parameters for comparison with theoretical predictions or to use directly in existing and future materials modeling of radiation effects in nuclear metallic fuels. The way forward on such measurements and the requisite theory and modeling will be discussed.

  15. Method for experimental determination of flutter speed by parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1989-01-01

    A method for flight flutter testing is proposed which enables one to determine the flutter dynamic pressure from flights flown far below the flutter dynamic pressure. The method is based on the identification of the coefficients of the equations of motion at low dynamic pressures, followed by the solution of these equations to compute the flutter dynamic pressure. The initial results of simulated data reported in the present work indicate that the method can accurately predict the flutter dynamic pressure, as described. If no insurmountable difficulties arise in the implementation of this method, it may significantly improve the procedures for flight flutter testing.

  16. Improved Force Field Parameters Lead to a Better Description of RNA Structure.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    We compare the performance of two different RNA force fields in four water models in simulating the conformational ensembles r(GACC) and r(CCCC). With the increased sampling facilitated by multidimensional replica exchange molecular dynamics (M-REMD), populations are compared to NMR data to evaluate force field reliability. The combination of AMBER ff12 with vdW(bb) modifications and the OPC water model produces results in quantitative agreement with the NMR ensemble that have eluded us to date. PMID:26575892

  17. Energetics of shortening muscles in twitches and tetanic contractions. II. Force-determined shortening heat.

    PubMed

    Homsher, E; Mommaerts, W F; Ricchiuti, N V

    1973-12-01

    The extra heat liberation accompanying muscular shortening, the force-determined shortening heat, is defined as the difference between the heat produced when shortening occurs and that produced in an isometric contraction developing the same amount of force and performing the same amount of internal work. Based on this definition, the initial energy production in twitches and tetanic contractions (E) is given by E = A + f (P, t) + alpha(F)x + W, where A is the activation heat, f(P, t), the tension-related heat (a heat production associated with the development and maintenance of tension), alpha(F)x, the force-determined shortening heat, and W, the external work. It is demonstrated that this equation accurately accounts for the time-course of heat evolution and the total initial energy production in both twitches and tetani at 0 degrees C. The force-determined shortening heat is liberated, during shortening, in direct proportion to (a) the distance shortened, and (b) the force against which shortening occurs. The normalized value of the force-determined shortening heat coefficient, alpha(F)/P(o), is the same in both the twitch and the tetanus. Finally, this formulation of the muscle's energy production also accounts for the total energy production in afterload isotonic twitches at 20 degrees C, where a Fenn effect is not demonstrable. PMID:4548714

  18. Crushable structure performance determined from reconstructed dynamic forces during impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    A force reconstruction technique has been used to assess the dynamic performance of a crushable structure (a bomb nose) in both the axial (90{degrees}) and slapdown (30{degrees}) impact conditions. The dynamic force characteristics for the nose design, determined from these test results, have been used to write a dynamic force specification for a new nose design that will replace the old nose. The dynamic forces are reconstructed from measured acceleration responses with the Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT) developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Axial characterizations for the old nose are presented from tests at two SNL facilities: a rocket rail launcher facility and an 18-Inch horizontal actuator facility. The characterizations for the old nose are compared to the characterizations for two new nose designs. Slapdown characterizations for the old nose are presented. Incorporation of the test results into a dynamic force specification is discussed.

  19. Optimal Parameter Determination for Tritiated Water Storage in Polyacrylic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Postolache, C.; Matei, Lidia; Georgescu, Rodica; Ionita, Gh.

    2005-07-15

    Due to the remarkable capacity of water retaining, croslinked polyacrylic acids (PAA) represent an interesting alternative for tritiated water trapping. The study was developed on radiolytical processes in PAA:HTO systems derivated from irradiation of polymeric network by disintegration of tritium atoms from HTO. The aim of these studies is the identification of polymeric structures and optimal storage conditions.Sol and gel fractions were determinated by radiometrical methods using PAA labeled with 14-C at carboxylic groups and T at main chains of the polymer. Simulation of radiolytical processes was realized using {gamma} radiation field emitted by a irradiation source of 60-Co which ensures a maximum of absorbed dose rate of 3 kGy/h. Self-radiolytical effects were investigated using labeled PAA in HTO with great radioactive concentration (37-185 GBq/mL). The experiment suggests as optimum for HTO storage as tritium liquid wastes a 1:30 PAA:HTO swelling degree at 18.5-37 MBqL. HTO radioactive concentration.RES studies of radiolytical processes were also realized on dry polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyacrylic based hydrogels irradiated and determined at 77 K. In the study we observed the effect of swelling capacity of hydrogel o the formation of free radicals.

  20. Experimental determination of visibility modeling parameters for aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Evelyn J.; Maurer, Tana; Murrill, Steven R.; Miller, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is presently engaged in research to quantify the visibility of aircraft under two important scenarios: aircraft observed directly by human operators in air traffic control towers (ATCT's), and aircraft observed by human operators through unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) sensors viewed through ground-based display systems. Previously, an ATCT visibility analysis software tool (FAA Vis) was developed by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in collaboration with the U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the FAA. This tool predicts the probability of detection, recognition, and identification of various aircraft by human observers as a function of range and ATCT height. More recently, a baseline version of a UAV See-And- Avoid visibility analysis software tool was also developed by ARL, again in collaboration with NVESD and the FAA. Important to the calibration of these tools is the empirical determination of target discrimination difficulty criteria. Consequently, a set of human perception experiments were designed and conducted to empirically determine the target recognition and identification discrimination difficulty criteria for a representative set of aircraft. This paper will report on the results and analyses of those experiments.

  1. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inertia weight class determination. 86.229-94 Section 86.229-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels... vehicle weight (pounds) Equivalent test weight (pounds) Inertia weight class (pounds) Up-1,062 1,000...

  2. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inertia weight class determination. 86.229-94 Section 86.229-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... § 86.229-94 Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. (a) Flywheels... vehicle weight (pounds) Equivalent test weight (pounds) Inertia weight class (pounds) Up-1,062 1,000...

  3. The Social Determinants of Health in Military Forces of Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Sanaeinasab, Hormoz; Ghanei, Mostafa; Mehrabi Tavana, Ali; Ravangard, Ramin; Karamali, Mazyar

    2015-01-01

    Providing effective health interventions and achieving equity in health need to apply the community-based approaches such as social determinants of health. In the military organizations, these determinants have received less attention from the military health researchers and policymakers. Therefore, this study aimed to identify and explain the social determinants affecting the health of military forces in Iran. This was a qualitative study which was conducted in 2014. The required data were collected through semistructured interviews and analyzed through Conventional Content Analysis. The studied sample consisted of 22 military health experts, policymakers, and senior managers selected using purposeful sampling method with maximum variation sampling. MAXQDA.2007 was used to analyze the collected data. After analyzing the collected data, two main contents, that is, “general social determinants of health” and “military social determinants of health,” with 22 themes and 90 subthemes were identified as the social determinants of military forces' health. Main themes were religious rule, spirituality promotion policies, international military factors, military command, and so forth. Given the role and importance of social factors determining the military forces' health, it can be recommended that the military organizations should pay more attention to these determinants in making policies and creating social, economic, and cultural structures for their forces. PMID:26379716

  4. Gamete quality in fish: evaluation parameters and determining factors.

    PubMed

    Valdebenito, Iván I; Gallegos, Patricia C; Effer, Brian R

    2015-04-01

    The quality of fish gametes, both male and female, are determined by several factors (age, management, feeding, chemical and physical factors, water quality, etc.) that have an impact on the survivability of embryos, larvae and/or fry in the short or long term. One of the most important factors is gamete ageing, especially for those species that are unable to spawn naturally in hatcheries. The chemical and physical factors in hatcheries and the nutrition that they provide can significantly alter harvest quality, especially from females; as a rule, males are more tolerant of stress conditions produced by inadequate feeding, management and/or poor water conditions. The stress produced on broodstock by inadequate conditions in hatcheries can produce adverse effects on gamete quality, survival rates, and the embryonic eggs after hatching.

  5. Practical implementation of the corrected force analysis technique to identify the structural parameter and load distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Quentin; Ablitzer, Frédéric; Pézerat, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The paper aims to combine two objectives of the Force Analysis Technique (FAT): vibration source identification and material characterization from the same set of measurement. Initially, the FAT was developed for external load location and identification. It consists in injecting measured vibration displacements in the discretized equation of motion. Two developments exist: FAT and CFAT (Corrected Force Analysis Technique) where two finite difference schemes are used. Recently, the FAT was adapted for the identification of elastic and damping properties in a structure. The principal interests are that the identification is local and allows mapping of material characteristics, the identification can be made at all frequencies, especially in medium and high frequency domains. The paper recalls the development of FAT and CFAT on beams and plates and how it can be possible to extract material characteristics in areas where no external loads are applied. Experimental validations are shown on an aluminum plate with arbitrary boundary conditions, excited by a point force and where a piece of foam is glued on a sub-surface of the plate. Contactless measurements were made using a scanning laser vibrometer. The results of FAT and CFAT are compared and discussed for material property identifications in the regions with and without foam. The excitation force identification is finally made by using the identified material properties. CFAT gives excellent results comparable to a direct measurement obtained by a piezoelectric sensor. The relevance of the corrected scheme is then underlined for both source identification and material characterization from the same measurements.

  6. Drag force acting on a neuromast in the fish lateral line trunk canal. II. Analytical modelling of parameter dependencies.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Joseph A C

    2009-07-01

    In Part I of this two-part study, the coupled flows external and internal to the fish lateral line trunk canal were consecutively calculated by solving the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations numerically in each domain. With the external flow known, the solution for the internal flow was obtained using a parallelepiped to simulate the neuromast cupula present between a pair of consecutive pores, allowing the calculation of the drag force acting on the neuromast cupula. While physically rigorous and accurate, the numerical approach is tedious and inefficient since it does not readily reveal the parameter dependencies of the drag force. In Part II of this work we present an analytically based physical-mathematical model for rapidly calculating the drag force acting on a neuromast cupula. The cupula is well approximated as an immobile sphere located inside a tube-shaped canal segment of circular cross section containing a constant property fluid in a steady-periodic oscillating state of motion. The analytical expression derived for the dimensionless drag force is of the form |F(N)/(|P(L) - P(R)|pi(D/2)(2) = f(d/D, L(t)/D, omega(*)(D), where |F(N)| is the amplitude of the drag force; |P(L)-P(R)| is the amplitude of the pressure difference driving the flow in the interpore tube segment; d/D is the ratio of sphere diameter to tube diameter; L(t)/D is the ratio of interpore tube segment length to tube diameter; and omega(*)(D) = omega(D/2)(2) /v is the oscillating flow kinetic Reynolds number (a dimensionless frequency). Present results show that the dimensionless drag force amplitude increases with decreasing L(t)/D and maximizes in the range 0.65< or =d/D< or =0.85, depending on the values of L(t)/D and omega(*)(D). It is also found that in the biologically relevant range of dimensionless frequencies 1< or = omega(*)(D) < or =20 and segment lengths 4< or =L(t)/D< or =16, the sphere tube (neuromast-canal) system acts as a low-pass filter for values d/D< or =0.75, approximately

  7. Determination of some parameters for pion radiobiology studies.

    PubMed

    Nordell, B; Baarli, J; Sullivan, A H; Zielczynski, M

    1977-05-01

    An experimental investigation of the central axis depth-dose and stopping rate distribution of the SIN biomedical pion beam is reported. The pion stopping rate in a thin disc of tissue-equivalent plastic was determined using a counter telescope. The dose rate at the position of this dic 'target' was measured using a specially designed parallel-plate tissue-equivalent ionization chamber. Both dose rate and pion stopping rate are given as a function of depth for beams of two different momenta spread. The energy deposition required per pion stop to fit the measured dose rate curves was calculated and found to be between 37 and 40 MeV. From the stopping rate measurements the depth-dose distribution of pion interaction dose (star-dose) and the dose due to the pion slowing down have been evaluated. The maximum star-dose is found at a depth of about 2 g cm-2 beyound the maximum of the ionization dose.

  8. STEP and STEPSPL: Computer programs for aerodynamic model structure determination and parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The successful parametric modeling of the aerodynamics for an airplane operating at high angles of attack or sideslip is performed in two phases. First the aerodynamic model structure must be determined and second the associated aerodynamic parameters (stability and control derivatives) must be estimated for that model. The purpose of this paper is to document two versions of a stepwise regression computer program which were developed for the determination of airplane aerodynamic model structure and to provide two examples of their use on computer generated data. References are provided for the application of the programs to real flight data. The two computer programs that are the subject of this report, STEP and STEPSPL, are written in FORTRAN IV (ANSI l966) compatible with a CDC FTN4 compiler. Both programs are adaptations of a standard forward stepwise regression algorithm. The purpose of the adaptation is to facilitate the selection of a adequate mathematical model of the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients of an airplane from flight test data. The major difference between STEP and STEPSPL is in the basis for the model. The basis for the model in STEP is the standard polynomial Taylor's series expansion of the aerodynamic function about some steady-state trim condition. Program STEPSPL utilizes a set of spline basis functions.

  9. Determining the interparticle force laws in amorphous solids from a visual image.

    PubMed

    Gendelman, Oleg; Pollack, Yoav G; Procaccia, Itamar

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of how to determine the force laws in an amorphous system of interacting particles. Given the positions of the centers of mass of the constituent particles we propose an algorithm to determine the interparticle force laws. Having n different types of constituents we determine the coefficients in the Laurent polynomials for the n(n+1)/2 possibly different force laws. A visual providing the particle positions in addition to a measurement of the pressure is all that is required. The algorithm proposed includes a part that can correct for experimental errors in the positions of the particles. Such a correction of unavoidable measurement errors is expected to benefit many experiments in the field. PMID:27415195

  10. Determining the interparticle force laws in amorphous solids from a visual image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendelman, Oleg; Pollack, Yoav G.; Procaccia, Itamar

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of how to determine the force laws in an amorphous system of interacting particles. Given the positions of the centers of mass of the constituent particles we propose an algorithm to determine the interparticle force laws. Having n different types of constituents we determine the coefficients in the Laurent polynomials for the n (n +1 )/2 possibly different force laws. A visual providing the particle positions in addition to a measurement of the pressure is all that is required. The algorithm proposed includes a part that can correct for experimental errors in the positions of the particles. Such a correction of unavoidable measurement errors is expected to benefit many experiments in the field.

  11. Determination of External Forces in Alpine Skiing Using a Differential Global Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2013-01-01

    In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS). The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD) were −26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and −6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force) allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions. PMID:23917257

  12. Determination of external forces in alpine skiing using a differential global navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2013-08-02

    In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS). The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD) were -26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and -6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force) allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions.

  13. Use of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second quality criteria for determining a valid test.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, John L; Eschenbacher, Bill; Townsend, Mary; Stocks, Janet; Quanjer, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) spirometry guidelines define valid tests as having three acceptable blows and a repeatable forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The aim of this study was to determine how reviewer and computer-determined ATS/ERS quality could affect population reference values for FVC and FEV1. Spirometry results from 7777 normal subjects aged 8-80 years (NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III) were assigned quality grades A to F for FVC and FEV1 by a computer and one reviewer (reviewer 1). Results from a subgroup of 1466 Caucasian adults (aged 19-80 years ) were reviewed by two additional reviewers. Mean deviations from NHANES III predicted for FVC and FEV1 were examined by quality grade (A to F). Reviewer 1 rejected (D and F grade) 5.2% of the 7777 test sessions and the computer rejected ∼16%, primarily due to end-of-test (EOT) failures. Within the subgroup, the computer rejected 11.5% of the results and the three reviewers rejected 3.7-5.9%. Average FEV1 and FVC were minimally influenced by grades A to C allocated by reviewer 1. Quality assessment of individual blows including EOT assessments should primarily be used as an aid to good quality during testing rather than for subsequently disregarding data. Reconsideration of EOT criteria and its application, and improved grading standards and training in over-reading are required. Present EOT criteria results in the exclusion of too many subjects while having minimal impact on predicted values.

  14. Use of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second quality criteria for determining a valid test.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, John L; Eschenbacher, Bill; Townsend, Mary; Stocks, Janet; Quanjer, Philip H

    2015-05-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) spirometry guidelines define valid tests as having three acceptable blows and a repeatable forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The aim of this study was to determine how reviewer and computer-determined ATS/ERS quality could affect population reference values for FVC and FEV1. Spirometry results from 7777 normal subjects aged 8-80 years (NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III) were assigned quality grades A to F for FVC and FEV1 by a computer and one reviewer (reviewer 1). Results from a subgroup of 1466 Caucasian adults (aged 19-80 years ) were reviewed by two additional reviewers. Mean deviations from NHANES III predicted for FVC and FEV1 were examined by quality grade (A to F). Reviewer 1 rejected (D and F grade) 5.2% of the 7777 test sessions and the computer rejected ∼16%, primarily due to end-of-test (EOT) failures. Within the subgroup, the computer rejected 11.5% of the results and the three reviewers rejected 3.7-5.9%. Average FEV1 and FVC were minimally influenced by grades A to C allocated by reviewer 1. Quality assessment of individual blows including EOT assessments should primarily be used as an aid to good quality during testing rather than for subsequently disregarding data. Reconsideration of EOT criteria and its application, and improved grading standards and training in over-reading are required. Present EOT criteria results in the exclusion of too many subjects while having minimal impact on predicted values. PMID:25537554

  15. Use of forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second quality criteria for determining a valid test

    PubMed Central

    Eschenbacher, Bill; Townsend, Mary; Stocks, Janet; Quanjer, Philip H.

    2014-01-01

    The 2005 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) spirometry guidelines define valid tests as having three acceptable blows and a repeatable forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The aim of this study was to determine how reviewer and computer-determined ATS/ERS quality could affect population reference values for FVC and FEV1. Spirometry results from 7777 normal subjects aged 8–80 years (NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III) were assigned quality grades A to F for FVC and FEV1 by a computer and one reviewer (reviewer 1). Results from a subgroup of 1466 Caucasian adults (aged 19–80 years) were reviewed by two additional reviewers. Mean deviations from NHANES III predicted for FVC and FEV1 were examined by quality grade (A to F). Reviewer 1 rejected (D and F grade) 5.2% of the 7777 test sessions and the computer rejected ∼16%, primarily due to end-of-test (EOT) failures. Within the subgroup, the computer rejected 11.5% of the results and the three reviewers rejected 3.7–5.9%. Average FEV1 and FVC were minimally influenced by grades A to C allocated by reviewer 1. Quality assessment of individual blows including EOT assessments should primarily be used as an aid to good quality during testing rather than for subsequently disregarding data. Reconsideration of EOT criteria and its application, and improved grading standards and training in over-reading are required. Present EOT criteria results in the exclusion of too many subjects while having minimal impact on predicted values. PMID:25537554

  16. Strike a balance: optimization of backbone torsion parameters of AMBER polarizable force field for simulations of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Chun; Lei, Hongxing; Cieplak, Piotr; Duan, Yong

    2006-04-30

    Based on the AMBER polarizable model (ff02), we have re-optimized the parameters related to the main-chain (Phi, Psi) torsion angles by fitting to the Boltzmann-weighted average quantum mechanical (QM) energies of the important regions (i.e., beta, P(II), alpha(R), and alpha(L) regions). Following the naming convention of the AMBER force field series, this release will be called ff02pol.rl The force field has been assessed both by energetic comparison against the QM data and by the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of short alanine peptides in water. For Ace-Ala-Nme, the simulated populations in the beta, P(II) and alpha(R) regions were approximately 30, 43, and 26%, respectively. For Ace-(Ala)(7)-Nme, the populations in these three regions were approximately 24, 49, and 26%. Both were in qualitative agreement with the NMR and CD experimental conclusions. In comparison with the previous force field, ff02pol.rl demonstrated good balance among these three important regions. The optimized torsion parameters, together with those in ff02, allow us to carry out simulations on proteins and peptides with the consideration of polarization.

  17. Aerosol Forcing During INDOEX and ACE-Asia as Determined From Aircraft and Grou nd Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, D. C.; Valero, F. P.; Bush, B. C.; Pope, S. K.; Leitner, A. S.

    2002-12-01

    A suite of radiometers was flown on the NCAR C-130 aircraft throughout the INDOEX and ACE-Asia experiments to measure broadband and spectral irradiances. Identical instruments were placed in the zenith and nadir positions, allowing net flux and optical depth to be determined. The radiative forcing efficiency (aerosol forcing per unit optical depth) was determined below the aerosol layer, i.e. at an altitude of about 40 meters. This was measured in the spectral range s 220 to 3910 nm (total solar forcing) and 680 to 3300 nm (near infrared) and in seven spectral channels covering contiguously the visible range from 400 to 700 nm. Surface measurements of solar insolation as well as aerosol column optical depth were made at Kaashidoo, Maldives (INDOEX) and at Cheju Island, South Korea (ACE-Asia). These measurements, in conjunction with aerosol-free model simulations, are used to determine the radiative forcing at the surface for the visible, near-infrared, and total solar spectral bandpasses. During INDOEX the diurnally averaged broadband surface aerosol radiative forcing was -72.2+/- 5.5 W m-2 per unit optical depth at 500 nm with roughly half being contributed from the visible (-38.5+/- 4.0 W m-2). The corresponding results during ACE-Asia were: broadband -73.1+/- 9.7 W m-2, visible -41.7+/- 4.7 W m-2, and near infrared -36.3+/- -5.6 W m-2.

  18. Engagement Control of Automotive Clutch by Mechatronic System Using Pre-determined Force Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, K.

    2014-04-01

    In automated manual clutch (AMC), the mechatronic system is required to generate appropriate clutch force trajectory to achieve good engagement quality. For this purpose, four generic force trajectories were analyzed and engagement quality was assessed, using four parameters—peak engine speed, clutch lockup time, vehicle lurch, and shuffle. Magnitudes of these parameters were obtained from results of simulation on a complete dynamic model of vehicle driveline. It was observed that parabolic trajectory gives satisfactory overall performance in terms of engagement quality, but results into higher lurch. However, it can be modified further to reduce lurch. A set of such trajectories may be obtained for different driving conditions, for use in mechatronic system, for control of AMC. This approach is an alternative to costlier and more difficult method of real-time control of force trajectory during clutch engagement. Schematic implementation of proposed mechatronic system, with driver interface, is also outlined in this work.

  19. Local force variations caused by isoelectric impurities: Method of determination from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunc, K.

    1983-02-01

    It is shown how the variation of lattice dynamical force constants caused by substitutional isoelectronic impurities can be evaluated ab initio. The approach, illustrated on the example of Al in GaAs, is based on local density functional and uses ionic pseudopotentials of Al, Ga, As as the only input; Hellmann-Feynman theorem is applied in order to extract from self-consistent electronic charge densities the forces acting on atoms in periodic patterns in which entire planes of impurities are displaced. The defect-induced variations of inter planar force constants are converted into the inter atomic ones, which can be compared with those determined by phenomenological models from the measured local mode frequencies. A method is presented which allows to account for the effect of relaxation without requiring an explicit determination of the latter. Particular problems resulting from dealing with entire plane of defects are discussed and an estimate for relaxation is given.

  20. Comparison between power-law rheological parameters of living cells in frequency and time domains measured by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Okajima, Takaharu

    2016-08-01

    We investigated how stress relaxation mapping is quantified compared with the force modulation mapping of confluent epithelial cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using a multi-frequency AFM technique, we estimated the power-law rheological behaviors of cells simultaneously in time and frequency domains. When the power-law exponent α was low (<0.1), the α values were almost the same in time and frequency domains. On the other hand, we found that at the high values (α > 0.1), α in the time domain was underestimated relative to that in the frequency domain, and the difference increased with α, whereas the cell modulus was overestimated in the time domain. These results indicate that power-law rheological parameters estimated by stress relaxation are sensitive to lag time during initial indentation, which is inevitable in time-domain AFM experiments.

  1. Conservative force model performance for TOPEX/Poseidon precision orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. Andrew; Luthcke, Scott B.

    The TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft was launched on August 10, 1992 to study the Earth's oceans. To achieve maximum benefit from the altimetric data collected, mission requirements dictate that TOPEX/Poseidon's orbit must be computed at an unprecedented level of accuracy. In order to satisfy these requirements, a model which accounts for the satellite's complex geometry, attitude, and surface properties has been developed. This `box-wing' representation treats the spacecraft as the combination of flat plates arranged in the shape of a box and a connecetd solar array. The nonconservative forces acting on each of the eight surfaces are computed independently, yielding vector accelerations which are summed to compute the total aggregate effect on the satellite center-of-mass. Parameters associated with each flat plate were derived from a finite element analysis of the spacecraft. Certain parameters can be inferred from tracking data and have been adjusted to obtain a better representation of the satellite acceleration history. Changes in the nominal mission profile and the presence of an `anomalistic' force have complicated this tuning process. Model performance, parameter sensitivities, and the `anomalistic' force will be discussed.

  2. Determination of ITM Key Parameters By the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immel, T. J.; England, S.; Mende, S. B.; Makela, J. J.; Harding, B. J.; Stephan, A. W.; Kamalabadi, F.; Heelis, R. A.; Englert, C. R.; Edelstein, J.; Forbes, J. M.; Maute, A. I.; Crowley, G.; Huba, J. D.; Harlander, J.; Swenson, G. R.; Frey, H. U.; Bust, G. S.; Gerard, J. C. M. C.; Hubert, B. A.; Rowland, D. E.; Hysell, D. L.; Saito, A.; Frey, S.; Bester, M.; Craig, W.

    2014-12-01

    Selected for development by NASA in 2013, ICON is a mission that will launch in 2017 to discover the source of strong day-to-day variability in Earth's space environment. Recent observations continue to raise questions about the effects and interaction of these in our geospace environment, and how these vary between extremes in solar activity. To address these, ICON will measure all key parameters of the atmosphere and ionosphere simultaneously and continuously with a combination of remote sensing and in-situ measurements. ICON will fly in a 27-degree inclination orbit with a payload designed to observe the processes of vertical wave coupling in the Ionosphere/Thermosphere/Mesosphere system, how these processes influence the state of the system itself, and how that state preconditions the system for modification by external influence (e.g. solar and solar wind forcing). ICON will remotely observe winds and temperatures in the 90-150 km region while measuring the highly variable electric field in the ionosphere on magnetically connected field lines. Simultaneous to these observations, ICON remotely observes the thermospheric composition and density, and ionospheric density in day and night. The retrievals involved and resultant precision in the determination of key parameters will be presented. The scientific return from ICON is enhanced by dynamic operational modes of the observatory that provide capabilities well beyond that afforded by a static space platform. Careful selection of these modes and the selective implementation of instrument redundancy provide the ability to operate with large technical margins that support the greatest return of science data.

  3. Acceptance criteria for determining armed response force size at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    This guidance document contains acceptance criteria to be used in the NRC license review process. It consists of a scored worksheet and guidelines for interpreting the worksheet score that can be used in determining the adequacy of the armed response force size at a nuclear power reactor facility.

  4. 40 CFR 86.229-94 - Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Road load force, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. 86.229-94 Section 86.229-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Vehicles, New Light-Duty Trucks and New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test...

  5. Forces and shapes as determinants of micro-swimming: effect on synchronisation and the utilisation of drag.

    PubMed

    Pande, Jayant; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2015-03-28

    In this analytical study we demonstrate the richness of behaviour exhibited by bead-spring micro-swimmers, both in terms of known yet not fully explained effects such as synchronisation, and hitherto undiscovered phenomena such as the existence of two transport regimes where the swimmer shape has fundamentally different effects on the velocity. For this purpose we employ a micro-swimmer model composed of three arbitrarily-shaped rigid beads connected linearly by two springs. By analysing this swimmer in terms of the forces on the different beads, we determine the optimal kinematic parameters for sinusoidal driving, and also explain the pusher/puller nature of the swimmer. Moreover, we show that the phase difference between the swimmer's arms automatically attains values which maximise the swimming speed for a large region of the parameter space. Apart from this, we determine precisely the optimal bead shapes that maximise the velocity when the beads are constrained to be ellipsoids of a constant volume or surface area. On doing so, we discover the surprising existence of the aforementioned transport regimes in micro-swimming, where the motion is dominated by either a reduction of the drag force opposing the beads, or by the hydrodynamic interaction amongst them. Under some conditions, these regimes lead to counter-intuitive effects such as the most streamlined shapes forming locally the slowest swimmers.

  6. GNSS orbit determination by precise modeling of non-gravitational forces acting on satellite's body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgosz, Agata; Kalarus, Maciej; Liwosz, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Satellites orbiting around Earth are affected by gravitational forces and non-gravitational perturbations (NGP). While the perturbations caused by gravitational forces, which are due to central body gravity (including high-precision geopotential field) and its changes (due to secular variations and tides), solar bodies attraction and relativistic effects are well-modeled, the perturbations caused by the non-gravitational forces are the most limiting factor in Precise Orbit Determination (POD). In this work we focused on very precise non-gravitational force modeling for medium Earth orbit satellites by applying the various models of solar radiation pressure including changes in solar irradiance and Earth/Moon shadow transition, Earth albedo and thermal radiation. For computing influence of aforementioned forces on spacecraft the analytical box-wing satellite model was applied. Smaller effects like antenna thrust or spacecraft thermal radiation were also included. In the process of orbit determination we compared the orbit with analytically computed NGP with the standard procedure in which CODE model is fitted for NGP recovery. We considered satellites from several systems and on different orbits and for different periods: when the satellite is all the time in full sunlight and when transits the umbra and penumbra regions.

  7. Time-Dependent Nuclear Decay Parameters: New Evidence for New Forces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbach, E.; Buncher, J. B.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Jenkins, J. H.; Krause, D. E.; Mattes, J. J.; Newport, J. R.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent research dealing with the question of whether nuclear decay rates (or half-lives) are time-independent constants of nature, as opposed to being parameters which can be altered by an external perturbation. If the latter is the case, this may imply the existence of some new interaction(s) which would be responsible for any observed time variation. Interest in this question has been renewed recently by evidence for a correlation between nuclear decay rates and Earth-Sun distance, and by the observation of a dip in the decay rate for 54Mn coincident in time with the solar flare of 2006 December 13. We discuss these observations in detail, along with other hints in the literature for time-varying decay parameters, in the framework of a general phenomenology that we develop. One consequence of this phenomenology is that it is possible for different experimental groups to infer discrepant (yet technically correct) results for a half-life depending on where and how their data were taken and analyzed. A considerable amount of attention is devoted to possible mechanisms which might give rise to the reported effects, including fluctuations in the flux of solar neutrinos, and possible variations in the magnitudes of fundamental parameters, such as the fine structure constant and the electron-to-proton mass ratio. We also discuss ongoing and future experiments, along with some implications of our work for cancer treatments, 14C dating, and for the possibility of detecting the relic neutrino background.

  8. SMA actuators for vibration control and experimental determination of model parameters dependent on ambient airflow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.

    2016-05-01

    This article demonstrates the practical applicability of a method of modelling shape memory alloys (SMAs) as actuators. For this study, a pair of SMA wires was installed in an antagonistic manner to form an actuator, and a linear differential equation that describes the behaviour of the actuator’s generated force relative to its input voltage was derived for the limited range below the austenite onset temperature. In this range, hysteresis need not be considered, and the proposed SMA actuator can therefore be practically applied in linear control systems, which is significant because large deformations accompanied by hysteresis do not necessarily occur in most vibration control cases. When specific values of the parameters used in the differential equation were identified experimentally, it became clear that one of the parameters was dependent on ambient airflow velocity. The values of this dependent parameter were obtained using an additional SMA wire as a sensor. In these experiments, while the airflow distribution around the SMA wires was varied by changing the rotational speed of the fans in the wind tunnels, an input voltage was conveyed to the SMA actuator circuit, and the generated force was measured. In this way, the parameter dependent on airflow velocity was estimated in real time, and it was validated that the calculated force was consistent with the measured one.

  9. Valence state parameters of all transition metal atoms in metalloproteins--development of ABEEMσπ fluctuating charge force field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Zhi; Wang, Jian-Jiang; Zhao, Dong-Xia

    2014-09-01

    To promote accuracy of the atom-bond electronegativity equalization method (ABEEMσπ) fluctuating charge polarizable force fields, and extend it to include all transition metal atoms, a new parameter, the reference charge is set up in the expression of the total energy potential function. We select over 700 model molecules most of which model metalloprotein molecules that come from Protein Data Bank. We set reference charges for different apparent valence states of transition metals and calibrate the parameters of reference charges, valence state electronegativities, and valence state hardnesses for ABEEMσπ through linear regression and least square method. These parameters can be used to calculate charge distributions of metalloproteins containing transition metal atoms (Sc-Zn, Y-Cd, and Lu-Hg). Compared the results of ABEEMσπ charge distributions with those obtained by ab initio method, the quite good linear correlations of the two kinds of charge distributions are shown. The reason why the STO-3G basis set in Mulliken population analysis for the parameter calibration is specially explained in detail. Furthermore, ABEEMσπ method can also quickly and quite accurately calculate dipole moments of molecules. Molecular dynamics optimizations of five metalloproteins as the examples show that their structures obtained by ABEEMσπ fluctuating charge polarizable force field are very close to the structures optimized by the ab initio MP2/6–311G method. This means that the ABEEMσπ/MM can now be applied to molecular dynamics simulations of systems that contain metalloproteins with good accuracy.

  10. The capillary adhesion technique: a versatile method for determining the liquid adhesion force and sample stiffness.

    PubMed

    Gandyra, Daniel; Walheim, Stefan; Gorb, Stanislav; Barthlott, Wilhelm; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel, practical technique for the concerted, simultaneous determination of both the adhesion force of a small structure or structural unit (e.g., an individual filament, hair, micromechanical component or microsensor) to a liquid and its elastic properties. The method involves the creation and development of a liquid meniscus upon touching a liquid surface with the structure, and the subsequent disruption of this liquid meniscus upon removal. The evaluation of the meniscus shape immediately before snap-off of the meniscus allows the quantitative determination of the liquid adhesion force. Concurrently, by measuring and evaluating the deformation of the structure under investigation, its elastic properties can be determined. The sensitivity of the method is remarkably high, practically limited by the resolution of the camera capturing the process. Adhesion forces down to 10 µN and spring constants up to 2 N/m were measured. Three exemplary applications of this method are demonstrated: (1) determination of the water adhesion force and the elasticity of individual hairs (trichomes) of the floating fern Salvinia molesta. (2) The investigation of human head hairs both with and without functional surface coatings (a topic of high relevance in the field of hair cosmetics) was performed. The method also resulted in the measurement of an elastic modulus (Young's modulus) for individual hairs of 3.0 × 10(5) N/cm(2), which is within the typical range known for human hair. (3) Finally, the accuracy and validity of the capillary adhesion technique was proven by examining calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilevers, reproducing the spring constants calibrated using other methods.

  11. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomi, Visa; Han, Yang; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2016-10-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1–200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 °C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with respect to the conventional model with up to two orders of magnitude lower sum of squared errors (SSE). The characteristics of experimental displacement data were also seen in the simulations due to the changes in attenuation coefficient and lesion development. At low temperatures before thermal ablation, attenuation was found to affect the displacement amplitude. At higher temperature, the decrease in displacement amplitude occurs approximately at 60–70 °C due to the combined effect of viscoelasticity changes and lesion growth overpowering the effect of attenuation. The results suggest that it is necessary to monitor displacement continuously during HIFU therapy in order to ascertain when ablation occurs.

  12. A Study of Parameters Affecting Fibroblast Morphology in Response to an Applied Mechanical Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.; Sawyer, Christine

    1994-01-01

    A precisely controlled stretch/relaxation regimen (20% elongation at 6.6 cycles/min) was applied to normal human fetal, neonatal and aged dermal fibroblasts cultured on flexible membranes. Culture conditions included poly (NH2) or collagen type I coated substrate membranes; control cultures were grown on the same pliable material in the absence of applied stretch. Direct observation and immunofluorescence analyses revealed a progressive change in cell body orientation limited to the stretched dermal fibroblast cultures. Monolayers gradually (over 4 days) acquired a symmetric, radial distribution equivalent to the biaxial array of the applied force. At high seeding density, alignment was inhibited in the fetal cell cultures. This cell strain required collagen type I coating for optimal attachment to the flexible membrane, preferring growth in three-dimensional cell 'balls' on the poly(NH2) coated substrate. Neonatal cells also required the collagen type I coating, but both neonatal and aged dermal fibroblasts aligned efficiently at all seeding densities examined. The randomly oriented neonatal cells on the unstretched control membranes spontaneously detached at confluence, as a single cell sheet. Their aligned counterparts did not detach until the applied stretch stimulus was removed. Low concentrations of cytochalasin D (62.5 ng/ml) disrupted the stretch-related alignment response. Rhodamine phalloidin staining visualized fewer actin stress fibers in stretched, aligned cells than in controls. Both intercellular interactions and cytoskeletal integrity mediate the response to mechanical strain. Normal rabbit corneal stroma fibroblasts (NRC) were also analyzed, and failed to orient under these conditions. This cell type may require a different regimen, or a longer time period, to demonstrate alignment behavior. Supported by NASA Space Biology RTOP 199-40-22 and the NASA-ARC Director's Discretionary Fund.

  13. Water temperature determines neurochemical and behavioural responses to forced swim stress: an in vivo microdialysis and biotelemetry study in rats.

    PubMed

    Linthorst, Astrid C E; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2008-03-01

    Forced swimming is a behavioural stress model increasingly used to investigate the neurocircuitry of stress responses. Although forced swim stress clearly is a psychological stressor (anxiety, panic), its physical aspects are often neglected. There are indications that behavioural and neurochemical responses to swim stress depend on the water temperature. Thus, we investigated the responsiveness of hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission (important in the coordination of stress responses), and of behaviour and core body temperature to forced swimming at different water temperatures (19, 25 and 35 degrees C). In vivo microdialysis and biotelemetry in freely-behaving rats were used. Dialysates were analysed for serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-HIAA (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Forced swimming in water at 25 and 19 degrees C decreased core body temperature by 8 and 12 degrees C, respectively. A rapid and pronounced increase in hippocampal 5-HT and 5-HIAA was found in rats that swam at 35 degrees C, whereas biphasic responses in 5-HT and 5-HIAA were observed at 25 and 19 degrees C. Also swim stress behaviour and post-stress home cage behaviour depended on the water temperature. Comparing the serotonergic and core body temperature changes revealed that a combination of two different 5-HT and 5-HIAA responses seems to shape the neurotransmitter response. Swimming-induced increases in hippocampal extracellular concentrations of 5-HT and 5-HIAA occurred at all water temperatures, but these increases were temporarily quenched, or concentrations were transistently decreased, when core body temperature fell below 31 degrees C in water at 25 or 19 degrees C. These data demonstrate that water temperature is a key factor determining the impact of forced swim stress on behaviour and neurochemistry, and underscore that changes in these parameters should be interpreted in the light of the autonomic responses induced by this stressor

  14. Cell Shapes and Traction Forces Determine Stress in Motile Confluent Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Bi, Dapeng; Czajkowski, Michael; Manning, Lisa; Marchetti, Cristina

    Collective cell migration is a highly regulated process involved in wound healing, cancer metastasis and morphogenesis. The understanding of the regulatory mechanism requires the study of mechanical interactions among cells that coordinate their active motion. To this end, we develop a method that determines cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces. This approach allows us for the first time to calculate membrane tensions and hydrostatic pressures at a cellular level in collective migrating cell layers out of equilibrium. It helps us understand the mechanical origin of tissue stresses as previous inferred using Traction Force Microscopy (TFM). We test this approach on a new model of motile confluent tissue, which we term Self-propelled Voronoi Model (SPV) that incorporates cell elasticity, Contractility and motility. With the model, we explore the mechanical properties of confluent motile tissue as a function of cell activities and cell shapes in various geometries.

  15. Determination of Entrapment Victim Extrication Forces with and without Use of a Grain Rescue Tube.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M J; Field, W E; Maier, D E; Stroshine, R L

    2015-04-01

    The forces required to extricate a test mannequin from a grain mass when buried at different depths with and without a grain restraint system were determined. When there was no grain restraint system in place, the vertical force required to pull the mannequin from the grain when it was buried waist deep and to the underarms was 1259 and 1766 N (283 and 397 lb(f)), respectively. It increased to 1584 N (356 lb(f)) (+26%) and 2153 N (484 lb(f)) (+22%), respectively, with the restraint in place due to the changes in grain properties brought about by the insertion of the rescue tube. It was concluded that the use of a grain restraint during extrication of a victim does not reduce the forces required and that forcefully pulling an entrapped victim, especially with mechanical assistance, with or without a grain restraint system could result in severe injuries and possible death due to the forces exerted on the victim. The authors recommend that these findings be incorporated into current grain extrication training for emergency first responders. PMID:26204783

  16. Determining parameters and mechanisms of colloid retention and release in porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A framework is presented to determine fundamental parameters and mechanisms controlling colloid (including microbes and nanoparticles) retention and release on hypothetical porous medium surfaces that exhibit distributions of nanoscale chemical heterogeneity, nano- to microscale roughness, and spati...

  17. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path–Force Matching QM/MM Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Ojeda-May, P.; Nagaraju, M.; Pu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path–force matching (RP–FM) has been developed. In RP–FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP–FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  18. Invariance of Hypersonic Normal Force Coefficients with Reynolds Number and Determination of Inviscid Wave Drag from Laminar Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Richard; Penland, Jim A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations have been made and reported that the experimental normal force coefficients at a constant angle of attack were constant with a variation of more than 2 orders of magnitude of Reynolds number at a free-stream Mach number M(sub infinity) of 8.00 and more than 1 order of magnitude variation at M(sub infinity) = 6.00 on the same body-wing hypersonic cruise configuration. These data were recorded under laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layer conditions with both hot-wall and cold-wall models. This report presents experimental data on 25 configurations of 17 models of both simple and complex geometry taken at M(sub infinity) = 6.00, 6.86, and 8.00 in 4 different hypersonic facilities. Aerodynamic calculations were made by computational fluid dynamics (CID) and engineering methods to analyze these data. The conclusions were that the normal force coefficients at a given altitude are constant with Reynolds numbers at hypersonic speeds and that the axial force coefficients recorded under laminar boundary-layer conditions at several Reynolds numbers may be plotted against the laminar parameter (the reciprocal of the Reynolds number to the one-half power) and extrapolated to the ordinate axis to determine the inviscid-wave-drag coefficient at the intercept.

  19. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path-Force Matching QM/MM Method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Ojeda-May, P; Nagaraju, M; Pu, J

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path-force matching (RP-FM) has been developed. In RP-FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP-FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  20. Determination of the Johnson-Cook Constitutive Model Parameters of Materials by Cluster Global Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhipeng; Gao, Lihong; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi

    2016-06-01

    The Johnson-Cook (J-C) constitutive model is widely used in the finite element simulation, as this model shows the relationship between stress and strain in a simple way. In this paper, a cluster global optimization algorithm is proposed to determine the J-C constitutive model parameters of materials. A set of assumed parameters is used for the accuracy verification of the procedure. The parameters of two materials (401 steel and 823 steel) are determined. Results show that the procedure is reliable and effective. The relative error between the optimized and assumed parameters is no more than 4.02%, and the relative error between the optimized and assumed stress is 0.2% × 10-5. The J-C constitutive parameters can be determined more precisely and quickly than the traditional manual procedure. Furthermore, all the parameters can be simultaneously determined using several curves under different experimental conditions. A strategy is also proposed to accurately determine the constitutive parameters.

  1. Determination of the Johnson-Cook Constitutive Model Parameters of Materials by Cluster Global Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhipeng; Gao, Lihong; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi

    2016-09-01

    The Johnson-Cook (J-C) constitutive model is widely used in the finite element simulation, as this model shows the relationship between stress and strain in a simple way. In this paper, a cluster global optimization algorithm is proposed to determine the J-C constitutive model parameters of materials. A set of assumed parameters is used for the accuracy verification of the procedure. The parameters of two materials (401 steel and 823 steel) are determined. Results show that the procedure is reliable and effective. The relative error between the optimized and assumed parameters is no more than 4.02%, and the relative error between the optimized and assumed stress is 0.2% × 10-5. The J-C constitutive parameters can be determined more precisely and quickly than the traditional manual procedure. Furthermore, all the parameters can be simultaneously determined using several curves under different experimental conditions. A strategy is also proposed to accurately determine the constitutive parameters.

  2. Determination of representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints for knee joint implant design.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dai Soon; Tao, Quang Bang; Todo, Mitsugu; Jeon, Insu

    2012-05-01

    Knee joint implants developed by western companies have been imported to Korea and used for Korean patients. However, many clinical problems occur in knee joints of Korean patients after total knee joint replacement owing to the geometric mismatch between the western implants and Korean knee joint structures. To solve these problems, a method to determine the representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints is introduced to aid in the design of knee joint implants appropriate for Korean patients. Measurements of the dimension parameters of 88 male Korean knee joint subjects were carried out. The distribution of the subjects versus each measured parameter value was investigated. The measured dimension parameter values of each parameter were grouped by suitable intervals called the "size group," and average values of the size groups were calculated. The knee joint subjects were grouped as the "patient group" based on "size group numbers" of each parameter. From the iterative calculations to decrease the errors between the average dimension parameter values of each "patient group" and the dimension parameter values of the subjects, the average dimension parameter values that give less than the error criterion were determined to be the representative dimension parameter values for designing knee joint implants for Korean patients.

  3. New Combined Parameter of Liver and Splenic Stiffness as Determined by Elastography in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kassym, Laura; Nounou, Mohammed A.; Zhumadilova, Zauresh; Dajani, Asad I.; Barkibayeva, Nurgul; Myssayev, Ayan; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Abuhammour, Adnan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of chronic liver disease (CLD) leading to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension had witnessed dramatic changes after the introduction of noninvasive figure accessible tools over the past few years. Imaging techniques that are based on evaluation of the liver stiffness was particularly useful in this respect. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) emerged as an interesting figure tool with reliable repute and high precision. Aims: To evaluate liver stiffness measurement (LSM) and splenic stiffness measurement (SSM) in healthy volunteers as concluded by the ARFI technique and to out a numeric calculated ratio that may reflect their correlation in the otherwise healthy liver. Patients and Methods: A ratio (splenic stiffness/liver stiffness in kPa) was determined in 207 consenting healthy subjects and was investigated with respect to age, gender, ethnic origin, body mass index (BMI), liver and spleen sizes healthy volunteers, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), platelet count (PLT), APRI, and FIB-4 scores. Results: Data from this work led to computing an index of 4.72 (3.42–7.33) in healthy persons on an average. Females had a higher index than males 6.37 vs 4.92, P=0.002. There was not any significant difference of the ratio in different age groups; ethnic origins; any correlation between SSM/LSM ratio and BMI; liver and spleen sizes; or ALT, AST, PLT, APRI, and FIB-4 scores. Conclusions: A quantifiable numeric relationship between splenic and liver stiffness in the healthy subjects could be computed to a parameter expressed as SSM/LSM ratio. We believe that this ratio can be a useful reference tool for further researches in CLD. PMID:27488328

  4. Native topology determines force-induced unfolding pathways in globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, D. K.; Thirumalai, D.

    2000-06-01

    Single-molecule manipulation techniques reveal that stretching unravels individually folded domains in the muscle protein titin and the extracellular matrix protein tenascin. These elastic proteins contain tandem repeats of folded domains with -sandwich architecture. Herein, we propose by stretching two model sequences (S1 and S2) with four-stranded -barrel topology that unfolding forces and pathways in folded domains can be predicted by using only the structure of the native state. Thermal refolding of S1 and S2 in the absence of force proceeds in an all-or-none fashion. In contrast, phase diagrams in the force-temperature (f,T) plane and steered Langevin dynamics studies of these sequences, which differ in the native registry of the strands, show that S1 unfolds in an allor-none fashion, whereas unfolding of S2 occurs via an obligatory intermediate. Force-induced unfolding is determined by the native topology. After proving that the simulation results for S1 and S2 can be calculated by using native topology alone, we predict the order of unfolding events in Ig domain (Ig27) and two fibronectin III type domains (9FnIII and 10FnIII). The calculated unfolding pathways for these proteins, the location of the transition states, and the pulling speed dependence of the unfolding forces reflect the differences in the way the strands are arranged in the native states. We also predict the mechanisms of force-induced unfolding of the coiled-coil spectrin (a three-helix bundle protein) for all 20 structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Our approach suggests a natural way to measure the phase diagram in the (f,C) plane, where C is the concentration of denaturants.

  5. Determination of the effective constitutive parameters of bianisotropic planar metamaterials in the terahertz region.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xufeng; Xia, Rui; Wang, Weimin; Tian, Ying; Hong, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    We propose analytical expressions to determine the effective constitutive parameters of a planar bianisotropic metamaterial from scattering parameters in the terahertz region. In our retrieval method, the transmission and reflection coefficients in only one wave propagation direction are applied. Considering the nonsymmetry of planar metamaterials in the wave propagation direction, the effective refractive index and the impedance should be obtained by a modified S parameters retrieval process. The effective parameters of the permittivity, permeability, and magnetoelectric coupling coefficient of planar bianisotropic metamaterials can be retrieved by derived equations. Specifically, the constitutive parameters for different planar metamaterials, among which two are isotropic and the other two are bianisotropic metamaterials, are determined. The intrinsic differences between the normal planar metamaterials and the bianisotropic metamaterials are evidently illustrated. The phenomenon including electric coupling to magnetic resonance and only electric response in the transmission spectrum is confirmed by retrieval effective permittivity and permeability.

  6. Determination of Critical Parameters Based on the Intensity of Transmitted Light Around Gas-Liquid Interface: Critical Parameters of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Masaki; Katano, Hiroaki; Sato, Haruki

    2014-05-01

    A precise determination of the critical temperature and density for technically important fluids would be possible on the basis of the digital image for the visual observation of the phase boundary in the vicinity of the critical point since the sensitivity and resolution are higher than those of naked eyes. In addition, the digital image can avoid the personal uncertainty of an observer. A strong density gradient occurs in a sample cell at the critical point due to gravity. It was carefully assessed to determine the critical density, where the density profile in the sample cell can be observed from the luminance profile of a digital image. The density-gradient profile becomes symmetric at the critical point. One of the best fluids, whose thermodynamic properties have been measured with the highest reliability among technically important fluids, would be carbon dioxide. In order to confirm the reliability of the proposed method, the critical temperature and density of carbon dioxide were determined using the digital image. The critical temperature and density values of carbon dioxide are ( and ( kg m, respectively. The critical temperature and density values agree with the existing best values within estimated uncertainties. The reliability of the method was confirmed. The critical pressure, 7.3795 MPa, corresponding to the determined critical temperature of 304.143 K is also proposed. A new set of parameters for the vapor-pressure equation is also provided.

  7. New method of determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, Patrick; Bach, Stephane

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, we describe a new methodology for the determination of Dill parameters based on reflectivity measurements. In opposition to previous methods, samples are produced using the usual process steps. Silicon wafers and standard photoresist coating procedures are used. Moreover, reflectivity measurements can be performed on any reflectometer, a piece of equipment universally present in an industrial environment. A fitting procedure is performed on the reflectivity data in order to extract the ABC parameters. The delicate steps of the methods are described in the paper. Comparison with other exposure parameter extraction methods on I line resist shows good agreement. Dependence between exposure parameters and development parameter extraction is also discussed. It is shown that several empirical parameter sets can be equivalent, at least from the simulation point of view.

  8. Determination and optimization of joint torques and joint reaction forces in therapeutic exercises with elastic resistance.

    PubMed

    Biscarini, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    A model has been developed to definitively characterize the resistance properties and the joint loading (i.e., shear and compressive components of the joint reaction force) in single-joint exercises with ideal elastic bands. The model accounts for the relevant geometric and elastic properties of the band, the band pre-stretching, and the relative positioning among the joint center of rotation and the fixation points of the band. All the possible elastic torque profiles of ascending-descending, descending, or ascending type were disclosed in relation to the different ranges of joint angles. From these results the elastic resistance setting that best reproduces the average-user's knee extensor torque in maximal isometric/isokinetic efforts was determined. In this optimized setting, the shear tibiofemoral reaction force corresponding to an anterior (posterior) tibial displacement was 65% smaller than (nearly the same as) that obtained in a cam-equipped leg-extension equipment for equal values of resistance torque peak, whereas the compressive tibiofemoral reaction force was 22% higher. Compared to a weight-stack leg-extension equipment, an elastic resistance optimized setting has the potential to give a more effective quadriceps activation across the range of motion, and greatly reduces the anterior cruciate ligament strain force, which represents the main drawback of existing open kinetic-chain knee-extension exercises. PMID:21757393

  9. Determination and optimization of joint torques and joint reaction forces in therapeutic exercises with elastic resistance.

    PubMed

    Biscarini, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    A model has been developed to definitively characterize the resistance properties and the joint loading (i.e., shear and compressive components of the joint reaction force) in single-joint exercises with ideal elastic bands. The model accounts for the relevant geometric and elastic properties of the band, the band pre-stretching, and the relative positioning among the joint center of rotation and the fixation points of the band. All the possible elastic torque profiles of ascending-descending, descending, or ascending type were disclosed in relation to the different ranges of joint angles. From these results the elastic resistance setting that best reproduces the average-user's knee extensor torque in maximal isometric/isokinetic efforts was determined. In this optimized setting, the shear tibiofemoral reaction force corresponding to an anterior (posterior) tibial displacement was 65% smaller than (nearly the same as) that obtained in a cam-equipped leg-extension equipment for equal values of resistance torque peak, whereas the compressive tibiofemoral reaction force was 22% higher. Compared to a weight-stack leg-extension equipment, an elastic resistance optimized setting has the potential to give a more effective quadriceps activation across the range of motion, and greatly reduces the anterior cruciate ligament strain force, which represents the main drawback of existing open kinetic-chain knee-extension exercises.

  10. Experimental and numerical determination of cellular traction force on polymeric hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Soon Seng; Li, Chuan; Chan, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells such as smooth muscle cells (SMCs) rely on the transmission of actomyosin-generated traction forces to adhere and migrate on the extracellular matrix. The cellular traction forces exerted by SMCs on substrate can be measured from the deformation of substrate with embedded fluorescent markers. With the synchronous use of phase-contrast and fluorescent microscopy, the deformation of polyacrylamide (PAM) gel substrate can be quantitatively determined using particle image velocimetry. This displacement map is then input as boundary conditions for the stress analysis on PAM gel by the finite-element method. In addition to optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy was also used to characterize the PAM substrate using the contact mode, from which the elasticity of PAM can be quantified using Hertzian theory. This provides baseline information for the stress analysis of PAM gel deformation. The material model introduced for the computational part is the Mooney–Rivlin constitutive law because of its long proven usefulness in predicting polymers' mechanical behaviour. Numerical results showed that adhesive stresses are high around the cell edges, which is in accordance with the general phenomena of cellular focal adhesion. Further calculations on the total traction forces indicate a slightly contact-dominated regime for a broad range of Mooney–Rivlin stiffnesses. PMID:23050082

  11. Molecular Simulations of Dodecyl-β-maltoside Micelles in Water: Influence of the Headgroup Conformation and Force field Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Stéphane; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Marchi, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the development and validation of new potential parameter sets, based on the CHARMM36 and GLYCAM06 force fields, to simulate micelles of the two anomeric forms (α and β) of N-Dodecyl-ß-maltoside (C12G2), a surfactant widely used in the extraction and purification of membrane proteins. In this context, properties such as size, shape, internal structure and hydration of the C12G2 anomer micelles were thoroughly investigated by molecular dynamics simulations and the results compared with experiments. Additional simulations were also performed with the older CHARMM22 force field for carbohydrates (Kuttel, M. et al. J. Comp. Chem. 2002, 23, 1236-1243). We find that our CHARMM and GLYCAM parameter sets yields similar results in case of properties related to the micelle structure, but differ for other properties such as the headgroup conformation or the micelle hydration. In agreement with experiments, our results show that for all model potentials the β-C12G2 micelles have a more pronounced ellipsoidal shape than those containing α anomers. The computed radius of gyration is 20.2 Å and 25.4 Å for the α- and β-anomer micelles, respectively. Finally, we show that depending on the potential the water translational diffusion of the interfacial water is 7 - 11.5 times slower than that of bulk water due to the entrapment of the water in the micelle crevices. This retardation is independent of the headgroup in α- or β- anomers. PMID:21192681

  12. Orbit Determination and Parameter Estimation: Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) Versus Least Squares Orbit Determination (LSQOD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segan, S.; Marceta, D.

    2009-09-01

    In the age of intensive exploring of the solar system, many professionals and non-professionals become interested in calculating the basic data regarding the solar system planets. We have considered some concepts of the physical ephemeris calculation for the natural and artificial solar system bodies. As an effective result, during a conference session, we presented an oral explanation of an interactive program for practical calculation of the physical ephemeris of the planets as a problem of general interest. As a specific example, in this article the readers can find the theoretical and practical elements and procedure explanation for two useful methods of the satellite orbit determination: LSQOD and EKF.

  13. Determination of nuclear quadrupolar parameters using singularities in field-swept NMR patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichijo, Naoki; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Takegoshi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a simple data-analysis scheme to determine the coupling constant and the asymmetry parameter of nuclear quadrupolar interactions in field-swept nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for static powder samples. This approach correlates the quadrupolar parameters to the positions of the singularities, which can readily be found out as sharp peaks in the field-swept pattern. Moreover, the parameters can be determined without quantitative acquisition and elaborate calculation of the overall profile of the pattern. Since both experimental and computational efforts are significantly reduced, the approach presented in this work will enhance the power of the field-swept NMR for yet unexplored quadrupolar nuclei. We demonstrate this approach in 33S in α-S8 and 35Cl in chloranil. The accuracy of the obtained quadrupolar parameters is also discussed.

  14. Effects of wing modification on an aircraft's aerodynamic parameters as determined from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    A study of the effects of four wing-leading-edge modifications on a general aviation aircraft's stability and control parameters is presented. Flight data from the basic aircraft configuration and configurations with wing modifications are analyzed to determine each wing geometry's stability and control parameters. The parameter estimates and aerodynamic model forms are obtained using the stepwise regression and maximum likelihood techniques. The resulting parameter estimates and aerodynamic models are verified using vortex-lattice theory and by analysis of each model's ability to predict aircraft behavior. Comparisons of the stability and control derivative estimates from the basic wing and the four leading-edge modifications are accomplished so that the effects of each modification on aircraft stability and control derivatives can be determined.

  15. Theoretical determination of design parameters for an arrayed heat sink with vertical plate fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Jiun; Chen, Yi-Jin

    2016-05-01

    This paper employs theoretical approach to determine the adequate design parameters of an arrayed plate-fins heat sink based on maximizing heat flow. According to analyzed results, increasing the dimensions of configurative parameters does not always yield the significant increase in the heat flow. As the fin length and fin space increases until a critical value, the heat flow will significantly reduce the increment or decay, respectively.

  16. Determination of Structural Parameters of Thin-Film Photocatalytic Materials by BDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Dorota; Franko, Mladen

    2015-09-01

    A method for determination of structural parameters of some thin-film photocatalytic materials is presented. The analysis was based on the material's thermal parameter dependences on its surface structure or porosity and was thus performed by the use of beam deflection spectroscopy (BDS) supported by theoretical analysis made in the framework of complex geometrical optics. The results obtained by BDS were than compared with those received on the basis of AFM and SEM measurements and found to be in good agreement.

  17. Thermal parameters determination of battery cells by local heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashko, K. A.; Mityakov, A. V.; Pyrhönen, J.; Mityakov, V. Y.; Sapozhnikov, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    A new approach to define of the thermal parameters, such as heat capacity and through-plane thermal conductivity, of pouch-type cells is introduced. Application of local heat flux measurement with a gradient heat flux sensor (GHFS) allows determination of the cell thermal parameters in different surface points of the cell. The suggested method is not cell destructive as it does not require deep discharge of the cell or application of any charge/discharge cycles during the measurements of the thermal parameters of the cell. The complete procedure is demonstrated on a high-power lithium-ion (Li-ion) pouch cell, and it is verified on a sample with well-known thermal parameters. A comparison of the experimental results with conventional thermal characterization methods shows an acceptably low error. The dependence of the cell thermal parameters on the state of charge (SoC) and measurement points on the surface was studied by the proposed measurement approach.

  18. Determination of α and f parameters at the 14-MW TRIGA reactor at Pitesti, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bărbos, D.; Păunoiu, C.; Roth, C.

    2010-10-01

    For experimental α determination the two-monitor method has been applied to determine α parameter in the irradiation channels at TRIGA 14 MW reactor (SCN Pitesti). The modified two-monitor method by using Cd ratio measurements eliminates the introducing of systematic errors due to the inaccuracy of absolute nuclear data. This characterization of the epithermal neutron spectrum is used in the k0-method of NAA, implemented at the SCN Pitesti. Neutron spectrum parameters were determined in the inner irradiation channel XC-1 and for outer irradiation channels: Beryllium J-6, Beryllium J-7, and Beryllium K-11. For α and f parameter verification a standard reference material denominated ECRM379-1 was analyzed using k0 standardization.

  19. Use of a Force Sensor in Archimedes' Principle Experiment, Determination of Buoyant Force and Acceleration Due To Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurora, Tarlok

    2013-04-01

    In introductory physics, students verify Archimedes' principle by immersing an object in water in a container, with a side-spout to collect the displaced water, resulting in a large uncertainty, due to surface tension. A modified procedure was introduced, in which a plastic bucket is suspended from a force sensor, and an object hangs underneath the bucket. The object is immersed in water in a glass beaker (without any side spout), and the weight loss is measured with a computer-controlled force sensor. Instead of collecting the water displaced by the object, tap water was added to the bucket to compensate for the weight loss, and the Archimedes' principle was verified within less than a percent. With this apparatus, buoyant force was easily studied as a function of volume of displaced water; as well as a function of density of saline solution. By graphing buoyant force as a function of volume (or density of liquid), value of g was obtained from slope. Apparatus and sources of error will be discussed.

  20. The application of virtual prototyping methods to determine the dynamic parameters of mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurc, Krzysztof; Szybicki, Dariusz; Burghardt, Andrzej; Muszyńska, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents methods used to determine the parameters necessary to build a mathematical model of an underwater robot with a crawler drive. The parameters present in the dynamics equation will be determined by means of advanced mechatronic design tools, including: CAD/CAE software andMES modules. The virtual prototyping process is described as well as the various possible uses (design adaptability) depending on the optional accessories added to the vehicle. A mathematical model is presented to show the kinematics and dynamics of the underwater crawler robot, essential for the design stage.

  1. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response. PMID:27466086

  2. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. But, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. We suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. This combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute tomore » the EM response.« less

  3. Topologies, structures and parameter files for lipid simulations in GROMACS with the OPLS-aa force field: DPPC, POPC, DOPC, PEPC, and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    In this data article we provide topologies and force field parameters files for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids in the OPLS-aa force field using the GROMACS package. This is the first systematic parameterization of lipid molecules in this force field. Topologies are provided for four phosphatidylcholines: saturated DPPC, mono-cis unsaturated POPC and DOPC, and mono-trans unsaturated PEPC. Parameterization of the phosphatidylcholines was achieved in two steps: first, we supplemented the OPLS force field parameters for DPPC with new parameters for torsion angles and van der Waals parameters for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the acyl chains, as well as new partial atomic charges and parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties [1]. Next, we derived parameters for the cis and trans double bonds and the neighboring them single bonds [2]. Additionally, we provide GROMACS input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp), which are strongly recommended to be used with these lipids models. The data are associated with the research article "Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a molecular dynamics simulation study" [2] and provided as supporting materials. PMID:26568975

  4. Topologies, structures and parameter files for lipid simulations in GROMACS with the OPLS-aa force field: DPPC, POPC, DOPC, PEPC, and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    In this data article we provide topologies and force field parameters files for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids in the OPLS-aa force field using the GROMACS package. This is the first systematic parameterization of lipid molecules in this force field. Topologies are provided for four phosphatidylcholines: saturated DPPC, mono-cis unsaturated POPC and DOPC, and mono-trans unsaturated PEPC. Parameterization of the phosphatidylcholines was achieved in two steps: first, we supplemented the OPLS force field parameters for DPPC with new parameters for torsion angles and van der Waals parameters for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the acyl chains, as well as new partial atomic charges and parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties [1]. Next, we derived parameters for the cis and trans double bonds and the neighboring them single bonds [2]. Additionally, we provide GROMACS input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp), which are strongly recommended to be used with these lipids models. The data are associated with the research article "Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a molecular dynamics simulation study" [2] and provided as supporting materials.

  5. Determination of solubility parameters of ionic liquids and ionic liquid/solvent mixtures from intrinsic viscosity.

    PubMed

    Weerachanchai, Piyarat; Wong, Yuewen; Lim, Kok Hwa; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-11-10

    The total and partial solubility parameters (dispersion, polar and hydrogen-bonding solubility parameters) of ten ionic liquids were determined. Intrinsic viscosity approaches were used that encompassed a one-dimensional method (1D-Method), and two different three-dimensional methods (3D-Method1 and 3D-Method2). The effect of solvent type, the dimethylacetamide (DMA) fraction in the ionic liquid, and dissolution temperature on solubility parameters were also investigated. For all types of effect, both the 1D-Method and 3D-Method2 present the same trend in the total solubility parameter. The partial solubility parameters are influenced by the cation and anion of the ionic liquid. Considering the effect on partial solubility parameters of the solvent type in the ionic liquid, it was observed that in both 3D methods, the dispersion and polar parameters of a 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate/solvent (60:40 vol %) mixture tend to increase as the total solubility parameter of the solvent increases. PMID:25145759

  6. Calibration of parallel kinematic devices using sequential determination of kinematic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR.,BERNHARD; BIEG,LOTHAR F.; ZIEGERT,JOHN C.

    2000-04-06

    In PKM Machines, the Cartesian position and orientation of the tool point carried on the platform is obtained from a kinematic model of the particular machine. Accurate positioning of these machines relies on the accurate knowledge of the parameters of the kinematic model unique to the particular machine. The parameters in the kinematic model include the spatial locations of the joint centers on the machine base and moving platform, the initial strut lengths, and the strut displacements. The strut displacements are readily obtained from sensors on the machine. However, the remaining kinematic parameters (joint center locations, and initial strut lengths) are difficult to determine when these machines are in their fully assembled state. The size and complexity of these machines generally makes it difficult and somewhat undesirable to determine the remaining kinematic parameters by direct inspection such as in a coordinate measuring machine. In order for PKMs to be useful for precision positioning applications, techniques must be developed to quickly calibrate the machine by determining the kinematic parameters without disassembly of the machine. A number of authors have reported techniques for calibration of PKMs (Soons, Masory, Zhuang et. al., Ropponen). In two other papers, the authors have reported on work recently completed by the University of Florida and Sandia National Laboratories on calibration of PKMs, which describes a new technique to sequentially determine the kinematic parameters of an assembled parallel kinematic device. The technique described is intended to be used with a spatial coordinate measuring device such as a portable articulated CMM measuring arm (Romer, Faro, etc.), a Laser Ball Bar (LBB), or a laser tracker (SMX< API, etc.). The material to be presented is as follows: (1) methods to identify the kinematic parameters of 6--6 variant Stewart platform manipulators including joint center locations relative to the workable and spindle nose

  7. A new trend to determine biochemical parameters by quantitative FRET assays

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jia-yu; Song, Yang; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been widely used in biological and biomedical research because it can determine molecule or particle interactions within a range of 1–10 nm. The sensitivity and efficiency of FRET strongly depend on the distance between the FRET donor and acceptor. Historically, FRET assays have been used to quantitatively deduce molecular distances. However, another major potential application of the FRET assay has not been fully exploited, that is, the use of FRET signals to quantitatively describe molecular interactive events. In this review, we discuss the use of quantitative FRET assays for the determination of biochemical parameters, such as the protein interaction dissociation constant (Kd), enzymatic velocity (kcat) and Km. We also describe fluorescent microscopy-based quantitative FRET assays for protein interaction affinity determination in cells as well as fluorimeter-based quantitative FRET assays for protein interaction and enzymatic parameter determination in solution. PMID:26567729

  8. Non-specific binding of Na+ and Mg2+ to RNA determined by force spectroscopy methods.

    PubMed

    Bizarro, C V; Alemany, A; Ritort, F

    2012-08-01

    RNA duplex stability depends strongly on ionic conditions, and inside cells RNAs are exposed to both monovalent and multivalent ions. Despite recent advances, we do not have general methods to quantitatively account for the effects of monovalent and multivalent ions on RNA stability, and the thermodynamic parameters for secondary structure prediction have only been derived at 1M [Na(+)]. Here, by mechanically unfolding and folding a 20 bp RNA hairpin using optical tweezers, we study the RNA thermodynamics and kinetics at different monovalent and mixed monovalent/Mg(2+) salt conditions. We measure the unfolding and folding rupture forces and apply Kramers theory to extract accurate information about the hairpin free energy landscape under tension at a wide range of ionic conditions. We obtain non-specific corrections for the free energy of formation of the RNA hairpin and measure how the distance of the transition state to the folded state changes with force and ionic strength. We experimentally validate the Tightly Bound Ion model and obtain values for the persistence length of ssRNA. Finally, we test the approximate rule by which the non-specific binding affinity of divalent cations at a given concentration is equivalent to that of monovalent cations taken at 100-fold concentration for small molecular constructs. PMID:22492710

  9. Age determination of blood spots in forensic medicine by force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Kada, Gerald; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Peschel, Oliver; Heckl, Wolfgang M; Nerlich, Andreas G; Thalhammer, Stefan

    2007-07-20

    We present a new tool for the estimation of the age of bloodstains, which could probably be used during forensic casework. For this, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) for high-resolution imaging of erythrocytes in a blood sample and the detection of elasticity changes on a nanometer scale. For the analytic procedure we applied a fresh blood spot on a glass slide and started the AFM detection after drying of the blood drop. In a first step, an overview image was generated showing the presence of several red blood cells, which could easily be detected due to their typical "doughnut-like" appearance. The consecutively morphological investigations in a timeframe of 4 weeks could not show any alterations. Secondly, AFM was used to test the elasticity by recording force-distance curves. The measurements were performed immediately after drying, 1.5 h, 30 h and 31 days. The conditions were kept constant at room temperature (20 degrees C) and a humidity of 30%. The obtained elasticity parameters were plotted against a timeline and repeated several times. The elasticity pattern showed a decrease over time, which are most probably influenced by the alteration of the blood spot during the drying and coagulation process. The preliminary data demonstrates the capacity of this method to use it for development of calibration curves, which can be used for estimation of bloodstain ages during forensic investigations.

  10. A determination of the radio-planetary frame tie from comparison of Earth orientation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, M. H.; Folkner, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The orientation of the reference frame of radio source catalogs relative to that of planetary ephemerides, or 'frame tie,' can be a major systematic error source for interplanetary spacecraft orbit determination. This work presents a method of determining the radio-planetary frame tie from a comparison of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and lunar laser ranging (LLR) station coordinate and earth orientation parameter estimates. A frame tie result is presented with an accuracy of 25 nrad.

  11. A determination of the radio-planetary frame tie from comparison of Earth orientation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Mark Harold; Folkner, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The orientation of the reference frame of radio source catalogs relative to that of planetary ephemerides, or 'frame tie,' can be a major systematic error source for interplanetary spacecraft orbit determination. This work presents a method of determining the radio-planetary frame tie from a comparison of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and lunar laser ranging (LLR) station coordinate and Earth orientation parameter estimates. A frame tie result is presented with an accuracy of 25 nrad.

  12. Determination of friction and pulling forces during a weighted sled pull.

    PubMed

    Andre, Matthew J; Fry, Andrew C; Bradford, Luke A; Buhr, Kevin W

    2013-05-01

    Pulling or pushing weighted sleds has been included in various exercise programs. Coaches and researchers may wish to calculate work performed or estimate forces during these exercises, which would involve calculating coefficients of friction: static friction coefficient (μs) and dynamic friction coefficient (μd). The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable method for determining μs, μd, and pulling forces while pulling a weighted sled with different loads to quantify horizontal forces and work performed for training, assessment, and/or research. A nylon tether was attached to a sled-mounted force transducer, and a winch was used to pull the tethered sled at a constant velocity for 20 seconds. Three different loads were pulled: 44.8 kg (the unloaded weight of the sled), 90.0 kg (44.8 kg sled with an additional load of 45.2 kg), and 136.2 kg (44.8 kg sled with an additional load of 91.4 kg). Each load was pulled 10 times using the winch for a total of 30 trials. The static friction coefficient (mean ± SD) was 0.47 ± 0.01 (coefficient of variation [CV] = 2.2%), 0.42 ± 0.01 (CV = 3.0%), and 0.39 ± 0.01 (CV = 2.7%), whereas dynamic friction coefficient (mean ± SD) was 0.35 ± 0.01 (CV = 1.6%), 0.33 ± 0.01 (CV = 3.7%), 0.31 ± 0.00 (CV = 1.0%) for 44.8, 90.0, and 136.2 kg, respectively (p < 0.01). When all trials and loads were combined, μs = 0.43 ± 0.04 and μd = 0.33 ± 0.02 with CV of 8.3 and 5.6%, respectively. The friction coefficients determined in this study were very repeatable, as indicated by the low CV. Coaches, athletes, and researchers who wish to determine μs and μd for their own specific equipment and surfaces can use the methods described here to do so.

  13. Fast Determination of the Planar Body Segment Inertial Parameters Using Affordable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Vincent; Venture, Gentiane

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed at developing and evaluating a new method for the fast and reliable identification of body segment inertial parameters with a planar model using affordable sensors. A Kinect sensor, with a new marker-based tracking system, and a Wii balance board were used as an affordable and portable motion capture system. A set of optimal exciting motions was used in a biofeedback interface to identify the body segment parameters. The method was validated with 12 subjects performing various standardized motions. The same dynamometric quantities estimated both with the proposed system and, as a reference, with a laboratory grade force-plate were compared. The results showed that the proposed method could successfully estimate the resultant moment and the vertical ground reaction force (rms errors less than 8 Nm and 12 N, respectively). Finally, when local segment values were artificially varied, the proposed method was able to detect and estimate the additional masses accurately and with an error of less than 0.5 Kg, contrary to values generated with commonly used anthropometric tables.

  14. Determining Structure Distribution In Inhomogenous Samples On The Nanometer Scale By Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranchida, Davide; Piccarolo, Stefano

    2007-04-01

    A nanoindentation technique using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was applied to characterize the mechanical behaviour of several polymeric samples. Samples with well-defined morphologies, spanning from amorphous to rubbery and semi-crystalline ones, were studied for identifying experimental conditions determining contact mechanics within the elastic range such that Young's moduli could be drawn by the Sneddon's elastic contact model. Structure homogeneity, up to the scale of macroscopic samples used to evaluate the elastic moduli, allowed a successful comparison of these values with those determined by macroscopic tension test on full size samples (a few mm), provided that comparable "overall" deformation rates are used (approx. 10∧-5 m/s). Therefore, it is possible to scale down the measurement of mechanical properties by AFM to the typical resolution of nanoindentations. With this method the distribution of mechanical properties on systems with a spatial distribution of morphology (injection moulded samples) is presented..

  15. Relationships between the pulmonary densitometry values obtained by CT and the forced oscillation technique parameters in patients with silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Mogami, R; Camilo, G B; Machado, D C; Melo, P L; Carvalho, A R S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlations between pulmonary densitometry values and forced oscillation technique (FOT) parameters in patients with silicosis. Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 36 non-smoker patients with silicosis and 20 matched control subjects who were submitted to FOT and multidetector CT (MDCT). Results: Compared with the control subjects, the MDCT evaluation demonstrated that patients with silicosis exhibited greater total lung mass. These patients also had larger non-aerated and poorly aerated compartments, which included nodules and scarring. Compared with the control subjects, FOT evaluation demonstrated that patients with silicosis exhibited changes in both reactive and resistive properties of the respiratory system. In these patients, there was a greater heterogeneity of the respiratory system and increased work of breathing. Significant correlations between non-aerated compartment size and FOT parameters that reflect the non-homogeneity of the respiratory system were observed. The dynamic compliance of the respiratory system was negatively correlated with non-aerated compartment size, while the impedance at 4 Hz was positively correlated with non-aerated compartment size. Conclusion: Patients with silicosis have heavier lungs. In these patients, a larger non-aerated compartment is associated with a worsening of lung function. A more significant pulmonary involvement is associated with a loss of homogeneity and increased mechanical load of the respiratory system. Advances in knowledge The findings provided by both pulmonary densitometry and FOT may add valuable information to the subjective analysis of silicosis; however, more studies are necessary to evaluate the potential use of these methods for assessing disease progression. PMID:25747897

  16. Determination of relevant parameters for the use of electronic dosemeters in pulsed fields of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Zutz, H; Hupe, O; Ambrosi, P; Klammer, J

    2012-09-01

    Active electronic dosemeters using counting techniques are used for radioprotection purposes in pulsed radiation fields in X-ray diagnostics or therapy. The disadvantage of the limited maximum measurable dose rate becomes significant in these radiation fields and leads to some negative effects. In this study, a set of relevant parameters for a dosemeter is described, which can be used to decide whether it is applicable in a given radiation field or not. The determination of these relevant parameters-maximum measurable dose rate in the radiation pulse, dead time of the dosemeter, indication per counting event and measurement cycle time-is specified. The results of the first measurements on the determination of these parameters for an electronic personal dosemeter of the type Thermo Fisher Scientific EPD Mk2 are shown.

  17. Determination of modeling parameters for power IGBTs under pulsed power conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Van Gordon, Jim A; Kovaleski, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    While the power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGRT) is used in many applications, it is not well characterized under pulsed power conditions. This makes the IGBT difficult to model for solid state pulsed power applications. The Oziemkiewicz implementation of the Hefner model is utilized to simulate IGBTs in some circuit simulation software packages. However, the seventeen parameters necessary for the Oziemkiewicz implementation must be known for the conditions under which the device will be operating. Using both experimental and simulated data with a least squares curve fitting technique, the parameters necessary to model a given IGBT can be determined. This paper presents two sets of these seventeen parameters that correspond to two different models of power IGBTs. Specifically, these parameters correspond to voltages up to 3.5 kV, currents up to 750 A, and pulse widths up to 10 {micro}s. Additionally, comparisons of the experimental and simulated data will be presented.

  18. Determination of discharge parameters via OES at the Linac4 H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briefi, S.; Fink, D.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.; Fantz, U.

    2016-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of the atomic Balmer series and the molecular Fulcher transition have been carried out at the Linac4 ion source in order to determine plasma parameters. As the spectroscopic system was only relatively calibrated, the data evaluation only yielded rough estimates of the plasma parameters (Te ≈ 1.2 eV, ne ≈ 1 × 1019 m-3, and nH/nH2 ≈ 0.5 at standard operational parameters). The analysis of the Fulcher transition revealed a non-thermal "hockey-stick" rotational population of the hydrogen molecules. At varying RF power, the measurements at the on-axis line of sight (LOS) showed a peak in the rotational temperatures between 25 and 40 kW of RF power, whereas a steady decrease with power was observed at a tilted LOS, indicating the presence of strong plasma parameter gradients.

  19. Determination of discharge parameters via OES at the Linac4 H⁻ ion source.

    PubMed

    Briefi, S; Fink, D; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Fantz, U

    2016-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of the atomic Balmer series and the molecular Fulcher transition have been carried out at the Linac4 ion source in order to determine plasma parameters. As the spectroscopic system was only relatively calibrated, the data evaluation only yielded rough estimates of the plasma parameters (T(e) ≈ 1.2 eV, n(e) ≈ 1 × 10(19) m(-3), and n(H/)n(H2) ≈ 0.5 at standard operational parameters). The analysis of the Fulcher transition revealed a non-thermal "hockey-stick" rotational population of the hydrogen molecules. At varying RF power, the measurements at the on-axis line of sight (LOS) showed a peak in the rotational temperatures between 25 and 40 kW of RF power, whereas a steady decrease with power was observed at a tilted LOS, indicating the presence of strong plasma parameter gradients. PMID:26931986

  20. A System for Determining Parameters of a Particle by Radiant Energy Scattering Techniques, Patent Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The system for determining parameters of a particle described in this document is a government-owned invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the system together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A collector contains a hole and annular apertures for transmitting…

  1. On the precise determination of the differences of ρ-meson family parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoš, Erik; Dubnička, Stanislav; Dubničková, Anna Z.; Hayashi, Hisaki

    2014-11-01

    Unlike previous approaches to determine the known ρ-meson family parameters, we have proposed new phenomenological approach based on the exploiting experimental data on e+e- → π+ π- and τ- → π- π0 ντ processes and on the Unitary and Analytic models of the corresponding electromagnetic and weak pion form factors.

  2. Evaluation of A MBER force field parameters for copper(II) with pyridylmethyl-amine and benzimidazolylmethyl-amine ligands: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanyan; Su, Yanwei; Li, Xichen; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2008-04-01

    We present the theoretical evaluations on the two new sets of A MBER force field parameters for the two copper(II) nucleases, Cu(BPA)Cl 2 (BPA = bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) and Cu(IDB)Cl 2 (IDB = N, N-bis(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine) based on the DFT/B3LYP level of theory, incorporating with atomic charges calculated by the RESP method. The new force field parameters have been successfully applied in the testing molecular dynamic simulations for the nuclease-DNA combining systems. The developed force field parameters in this work can be applied in DNA-binding modeling for other artificial copper nucleases with same Cu-N type environments.

  3. Modeling of Non-Gravitational Forces for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Gisinger, Christoph; Steigenberger, Peter; Balss, Ulrich; Montenbruck, Oliver; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The precise reconstruction of the satellite's trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) onboard the spacecraft. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. An analysis of the orbit quality by means of internal and external validation methods on long and short timescales shows systematics, which reflect deficits in the employed force models. Following the proper analysis of this deficits, possible solution strategies are highlighted in the presentation. The employed Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). The satellite TerraSAR-X flies on a dusk-dawn orbit with an altitude of approximately 510 km above ground. Due to this constellation, the Sun almost constantly illuminates the satellite, which causes strong across-track accelerations on the plane rectangular to the solar rays. The indirect effect of the solar radiation is called Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). This force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface (visible spectra) and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed. The scope of

  4. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  5. Parameter determination of a compression model for landfilled municipal solid waste: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao Bing; Zhan, Tony Liang Tong; Chen, Yun Min; Guo, Qi Gang

    2015-02-01

    The methods to determine the parameters of a one-dimensional compression model for landfilled municipal solid waste were investigated. In order to test the methods for parameter determination, long-term laboratory compression experiments were carried out under different surcharge loads (i.e. 100, 200 and 400 kPa). Based on the measured compression strain and the reported creep index, the modified primary compression indexes, pre-consolidation pressure and ultimate biodegradation-induced secondary compression strain were determined using the proposed methods. It was found that the simulated compression could not capture the measured secondary compression behavior when using a constant value of biodegradation-induced compression rate coefficient. The variation of the rate coefficient with the change of decomposition rate should be considered during modeling. Accordingly, the biodegradation-induced secondary compression strain in the compression model should be expressed in an incremental form in order to consider the variation of the rate coefficient. PMID:25649408

  6. Inverse parameter determination in the development of an optimized lithium iron phosphate - Graphite battery discharge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Arpit; Dumitrescu, Mihaela Aneta; Destro, Matteo; Santarelli, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Battery models are riddled with incongruous values of parameters considered for validation. In this work, thermally coupled electrochemical model of the pouch is developed and discharge tests on a LiFePO4 pouch cell at different discharge rates are used to optimize the LiFePO4 battery model by determining parameters for which there is no consensus in literature. A discussion on parameter determination, selection and comparison with literature values has been made. The electrochemical model is a P2D model, while the thermal model considers heat transfer in 3D. It is seen that even with no phase change considered for LiFePO4 electrode, the model is able to simulate the discharge curves over a wide range of discharge rates with a single set of parameters provided a dependency of the radius of the LiFePO4 electrode on discharge rate. The approach of using a current dependent radius is shown to be equivalent to using a current dependent diffusion coefficient. Both these modelling approaches are a representation of the particle size distribution in the electrode. Additionally, the model has been thermally validated, which increases the confidence level in the selection of values of parameters.

  7. Determination of hydraulic fracture parameters using a non-stationary fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valov, A. V.; Golovin, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, one provides a theoretical justification of the possibility of hydraulic fracture parameters determination by using a non-stationary fluid injection. It is assumed that the fluid is pumped into the fractured well with the time-periodic flow rate. It is shown that there is a phase shift between waves of fluid pressure and velocity. For the modelling purposes, the length and width of the fracture are assumed to be fixed. In the case of infinite fracture, one constructs an exact solution that ensures analytical determination of the phase shift in terms of the physical parameters of the problem. In the numerical calculation, the phase shift between pressure and velocity waves is found for a finite fracture. It is shown that the value of the phase shift depends on the physical parameters and on the fracture geometry. This makes it possible to determine parameters of hydraulic fracture, in particular its length, by the experimental measurement of the time shift and comparison with the numerical solution.

  8. AUTOMATIC DETERMINATION OF STELLAR PARAMETERS VIA ASTEROSEISMOLOGY OF STOCHASTICALLY OSCILLATING STARS: COMPARISON WITH DIRECT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Arentoft, Torben E-mail: jcd@phys.au.d

    2010-12-20

    Space-based projects are providing a wealth of high-quality asteroseismic data, including frequencies for a large number of stars showing solar-like oscillations. These data open the prospect for precise determinations of key stellar parameters, of particular value to the study of extra-solar planetary systems. Given the quantity of the available and expected data, it is important to develop efficient and reliable techniques for analyzing them, including the determination of stellar parameters from the observed frequencies. Here we present the SEEK package developed for the analysis of asteroseismic data from the Kepler mission. A central goal of the package is to obtain a fast and automatic determination of the stellar radius and other parameters in a form that is statistically well defined. The algorithms are tested by comparing the results of the analysis with independent measurements of stellar radius and mass for a sample of well-observed stars. We conclude that the SEEK package fixes stellar parameters with accuracy and precision.

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of turbid optical parameters without using an integrating sphere.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaohui; Li, Meihua; Lu, Jun Q; Huang, Chuanwei; Feng, Yuanming; Sa, Yu; Ding, Junhua; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-03-10

    Spectrophotometric quantification of turbidity by multiple optical parameters has wide-ranging applications in material analysis and life sciences. A robust system design needs to combine hardware for precise measurement of light signals with software to accurately model measurement configuration and rapidly solve a sequence of challenging inverse problems. We have developed and validated a design approach and performed system validation based on radiative transfer theory for determination of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and anisotropy factor without using an integrating sphere. Accurate and rapid determination of parameters and spectra is achieved for microsphere suspension samples by combining photodiode-based measurement of four signals with the Monte Carlo simulation and perturbation-based inverse calculations. The three parameters of microsphere suspension samples have been determined from the measured signals as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm and agree with calculated results based on the Mie theory. It has been shown that the inverse problems in the cases of microsphere suspension samples are well posed with convex cost functions to yield unique solutions, and it takes about 1 min to obtain the three parameters per wavelength.

  10. Sick Leave and Its Determinants in Professional Soldiers of the Slovenian Armed Forces

    PubMed Central

    Selič, Polona; Petek, Davorina; Serec, Maša; Rus, Maja; Makovec

    2010-01-01

    Aim To assess whether demographic characteristics, self-rated health status, coping behaviors, satisfaction with important interpersonal relationships, financial situation, and current overall quality of life are determinants of sick leave duration in professional soldiers of the Slovenian Armed Forces. Methods In 2008, 448 military personnel on active duty in the Slovenian Armed Forces were invited to participate in the study and 390 returned the completed questionnaires (response rate 87%). The questionnaires used were the self-rated health scale, sick leave scale, life satisfaction scale, Folkman-Lazarus' Ways of Coping Questionnaire, and a demographic data questionnaire. To partition the variance across a wide variety of indicators of participants’ experiences, ordinal modeling procedures were used. Results A multivariate ordinal regression model, explaining 24% of sick leave variance, showed that the following variables significantly predicted longer sick leave duration: female sex (estimate, 1.185; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.579-1.791), poorer self-rated health (estimate, 3.243; 95% CI, 1.755-4.731), lower satisfaction with relationships with coworkers (estimate, 1.333; 95% CI, 0.399-2.267), and lower education (estimate, 1.577; 95% CI, 0.717-2.436). The impact of age and coping mechanisms was not significant. Conclusion Longer sick leave duration was found in women and respondents less satisfied with their relationships with coworkers, and these are the groups to which special attention should be awarded when planning supervision, work procedures, and gender equality policy of the Armed Forces. A good way of increasing the quality of interpersonal relationships at work would be to teach such skills in teaching programs for commanding officers. PMID:21162167

  11. Determination of anisotropic surface characteristics of different phyllosilicates by direct force measurements.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lujie; Englert, Alexandre H; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe

    2011-11-01

    To fundamentally understand the electrokinetic behavior of clay minerals, it is necessary to study the anisotropic surface charge properties of clay surfaces. In this study, two 2:1 layer natural minerals, talc and muscovite, were chosen as representatives of magnesium and aluminum phyllosilicate minerals, respectively. The molecularly smooth basal planes of both platy minerals were obtained by cleavage along the basal planes, while suitable edge surfaces were prepared by an ultramicrotome cutting technique. Silicon nitride atomic force microscopy tip was used as a probe to study the interaction forces between the tip and clay basal/edge surfaces in aqueous solutions of various pH values. The measured interaction force profiles between the tip and clay basal/edge surfaces were fitted with the classical DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) theory, which allows direct determination of electrical surface potential of talc and muscovite surfaces. The surface potential of muscovite basal planes was found to be significantly more negative than the basal plane of talc, both being pH insensitive. In contrast, the surface potential of edge surfaces was highly pH-dependent, exhibiting a point of zero charge (PZC) at pH 7.5 and 8.1 for edges of muscovite and talc, respectively. The observed differences in surface potential of basal planes and edge surfaces for both talc and muscovite are closely related to their crystal structure and ionization characteristics. The protonation reactivity and the contribution of each surface group to the surface charging behavior are modeled using their protonation constants.

  12. Determination of Geometric and Kinematical Parameters of Coronal Mass Ejections Using STEREO Data

    SciTech Connect

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Tsivileva, D. M.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2010-03-25

    We present a new, relatively simple and fast method to determine true geometric and kinematical CME parameters from simultaneous STEREO A, B observations of CMEs. These parameters are the three-dimensional direction of CME propagation, velocity and acceleration of CME front, CME angular sizes and front position depending on time. The method is based on the assumption that CME shape may be described by a modification of so-called ice-cream cone models. The method has been tested for several CMEs.

  13. Determination of Geometric and Kinematical Parameters of Coronal Mass Ejections Using STEREO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Tsivileva, D. M.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2010-03-01

    We present a new, relatively simple and fast method to determine true geometric and kinematical CME parameters from simultaneous STEREO A, B observations of CMEs. These parameters are the three-dimensional direction of CME propagation, velocity and acceleration of CME front, CME angular sizes and front position depending on time. The method is based on the assumption that CME shape may be described by a modification of so-called ice-cream cone models. The method has been tested for several CMEs.

  14. Determination of the statistical distributions of model parameters for probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Glandon, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    Successful probabilistic risk assessment depends heavily on knowledge of the distribution of model parameters we have developed. The TERPED computer code is a versatile methodology for determining with what confidence a parameter set may be considered to have a normal or lognormal frequency distribution. Several measures of central tendency are computed. Other options include computation of the chi-square statistic, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov non-parametric statistic, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Cumulative probability plots are produced either in high resolution (pen-and-ink or film) or in printerplot form.

  15. [Determination of kinetic parameters lymphocyte populations in cows with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V A; Feofanova, T V; Busol, V A; Nikolaeva, N V

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed changes in the number of lymphocytes in the blood of cows with chronic lymphoid leukemia using the Gomperts equation of population dynamics. The parameters of this equation were determined. Coefficients beta and gamma proved to be the most variable. The former reflects the delay and the latter characterizes the maximum rate of growth of the lymphocyte population. According to these parameters, three groups of animals were distinguished with different kinetics of leucosis and different correlations between immuno-hematological indices. PMID:7670356

  16. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  17. Determining the accuracy of maximum likelihood parameter estimates with colored residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Klein, Vladislav

    1994-01-01

    An important part of building high fidelity mathematical models based on measured data is calculating the accuracy associated with statistical estimates of the model parameters. Indeed, without some idea of the accuracy of parameter estimates, the estimates themselves have limited value. In this work, an expression based on theoretical analysis was developed to properly compute parameter accuracy measures for maximum likelihood estimates with colored residuals. This result is important because experience from the analysis of measured data reveals that the residuals from maximum likelihood estimation are almost always colored. The calculations involved can be appended to conventional maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Simulated data runs were used to show that the parameter accuracy measures computed with this technique accurately reflect the quality of the parameter estimates from maximum likelihood estimation without the need for analysis of the output residuals in the frequency domain or heuristically determined multiplication factors. The result is general, although the application studied here is maximum likelihood estimation of aerodynamic model parameters from flight test data.

  18. [Determination of solubility parameters for asymmetrical dicationic ionic liquids by inverse gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Yang, Xuzhao; Wu, Jinchao; Song, Hao; Zou, Wenyuan

    2015-12-01

    Inverse gas chromatographic (IGC) technology was used to determine the solubility parameters of three asymmetrical dicationic ionic liquids ([ PyC5Pi] [ NTf2]2, [MpC5Pi] [NTf2]2 and [PyC6Pi] [NTf2]2) at 343.15-363.15 K. Five alkanes were applied as test probes including octane (n-C8) , decane (n-C10), dodecane (n-C12), tetradecane (n-C14), hexadecane (n-C16). Some thermodynamic parameters were obtained by IGC data analysis, such as the specific retention volumes of the solvents (V0(g)), the molar enthalpies of sorption (ΔHs(1)), the partial molar enthalpies of mixing at infinite dilution (ΔH∞91)), the molar enthalpies of vaporization (ΔH)v)), the activity coefficients at infinite dilution (Ω∞(1)), and Flory-Huggins interaction parameters (χ∞(12)) between ionic liquids and probes. The solubility parameters (δ2) of the three dicationic ionic liquids at room temperature (298.15 K) were 28.52-32.66 (J x cm(-3)) ½. The solubility parameters (δ2) of cationic structure with 4-methyl morpholine are bigger than those of the cationic structure with pyridine. The bigger the solubility parameter (δ2) is, the more the carbon numbers of linking group of the ionic liquids are. The results are of great importance to the study of the solution behavior and the applications of ionic liquid. PMID:27097464

  19. Using Maximal Isometric Force to Determine the Optimal Load for Measuring Dynamic Muscle Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Barry A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bentley, Jason R.; Nash, Roxanne E.; Sinka, Joseph; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2009-01-01

    Maximal power output occurs when subjects perform ballistic exercises using loads of 30-50% of one-repetition maximum (1-RM). However, performing 1-RM testing prior to power measurement requires considerable time, especially when testing involves multiple exercises. Maximal isometric force (MIF), which requires substantially less time to measure than 1-RM, might be an acceptable alternative for determining the optimal load for power testing. PURPOSE: To determine the optimal load based on MIF for maximizing dynamic power output during leg press and bench press exercises. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers (12 men and 8 women; mean +/- SD age: 31+/-6 y; body mass: 72 +/- 15 kg) performed isometric leg press and bench press movements, during which MIF was measured using force plates. Subsequently, subjects performed ballistic leg press and bench press exercises using loads corresponding to 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of MIF presented in randomized order. Maximal instantaneous power was calculated during the ballistic exercise tests using force plates and position transducers. Repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher LSD post hoc tests were used to determine the load(s) that elicited maximal power output. RESULTS: For the leg press power test, six subjects were unable to be tested at 20% and 30% MIF because these loads were less than the lightest possible load (i.e., the weight of the unloaded leg press sled assembly [31.4 kg]). For the bench press power test, five subjects were unable to be tested at 20% MIF because these loads were less than the weight of the unloaded aluminum bar (i.e., 11.4 kg). Therefore, these loads were excluded from analysis. A trend (p = 0.07) for a main effect of load existed for the leg press exercise, indicating that the 40% MIF load tended to elicit greater power output than the 60% MIF load (effect size = 0.38). A significant (p . 0.05) main effect of load existed for the bench press exercise; post hoc analysis indicated that the effect of

  20. Determination of Eros Physical Parameters for Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Orbit Phase Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. K.; Antreasian, P. J.; Georgini, J.; Owen, W. M.; Williams, B. G.; Yeomans, D. K.

    1995-01-01

    Navigation of the orbit phase of the Near Earth steroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission will re,quire determination of certain physical parameters describing the size, shape, gravity field, attitude and inertial properties of Eros. Prior to launch, little was known about Eros except for its orbit which could be determined with high precision from ground based telescope observations. Radar bounce and light curve data provided a rough estimate of Eros shape and a fairly good estimate of the pole, prime meridian and spin rate. However, the determination of the NEAR spacecraft orbit requires a high precision model of Eros's physical parameters and the ground based data provides only marginal a priori information. Eros is the principal source of perturbations of the spacecraft's trajectory and the principal source of data for determining the orbit. The initial orbit determination strategy is therefore concerned with developing a precise model of Eros. The original plan for Eros orbital operations was to execute a series of rendezvous burns beginning on December 20,1998 and insert into a close Eros orbit in January 1999. As a result of an unplanned termination of the rendezvous burn on December 20, 1998, the NEAR spacecraft continued on its high velocity approach trajectory and passed within 3900 km of Eros on December 23, 1998. The planned rendezvous burn was delayed until January 3, 1999 which resulted in the spacecraft being placed on a trajectory that slowly returns to Eros with a subsequent delay of close Eros orbital operations until February 2001. The flyby of Eros provided a brief glimpse and allowed for a crude estimate of the pole, prime meridian and mass of Eros. More importantly for navigation, orbit determination software was executed in the landmark tracking mode to determine the spacecraft orbit and a preliminary shape and landmark data base has been obtained. The flyby also provided an opportunity to test orbit determination operational procedures that will be

  1. Force-velocity profile: imbalance determination and effect on lower limb ballistic performance.

    PubMed

    Samozino, P; Edouard, P; Sangnier, S; Brughelli, M; Gimenez, P; Morin, J-B

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to lend experimental support to the theoretical influence of force-velocity (F-v) mechanical profile on jumping performance independently from the effect of maximal power output (P max ). 48 high-level athletes (soccer players, sprinters, rugby players) performed maximal squat jumps with additional loads from 0 to 100% of body mass. During each jump, mean force, velocity and power output were obtained using a simple computation method based on flight time, and then used to determine individual linear F-v relationships and P max values. Actual and optimal F-v profiles were computed for each subject to quantify mechanical F-v imbalance. A multiple regression analysis showed, with a high-adjustment quality (r²=0.931, P<0.001, SEE=0.015 m), significant contributions of P max , F-v imbalance and lower limb extension range (h PO ) to explain interindividual differences in jumping performance (P<0.001) with positive regression coefficients for P max and h PO and a negative one for F-v imbalance. This experimentally supports that ballistic performance depends, in addition to P max , on the F-v profile of lower limbs. This adds support to the actual existence of an individual optimal F-v profile that maximizes jumping performance, a F-v imbalance being associated to a lower performance. These results have potential strong applications in the field of strength and conditioning.

  2. Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M.

    2014-10-28

    The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

  3. Determination of the elastic properties of tomato fruit cells with an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zdunek, Artur; Kurenda, Andrzej

    2013-09-11

    Since the mechanical properties of single cells together with the intercellular adhesive properties determine the macro-mechanical properties of plants, a method for evaluation of the cell elastic properties is needed to help explanation of the behavior of fruits and vegetables in handling and food processing. For this purpose, indentation of tomato mesocarp cells with an atomic force microscope was used. The Young's modulus of a cell using the Hertz and Sneddon models, and stiffness were calculated from force-indentation curves. Use of two probes of distinct radius of curvature (20 nm and 10,000 nm) showed that the measured elastic properties were significantly affected by tip geometry. The Young's modulus was about 100 kPa ± 35 kPa and 20 kPa ± 14 kPa for the sharper tip and a bead tip, respectively. Moreover, large variability regarding elastic properties (>100%) among cells sampled from the same region in the fruit was observed. We showed that AFM provides the possibility of combining nano-mechanical properties with topography imaging, which could be very useful for the study of structure-related properties of fruits and vegetables at the cellular and sub-cellular scale.

  4. Yield strength of glued Langmuir-Blodgett films determined by friction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kyle C; Wang, Yao; Regen, Steven L; Vezenov, Dmitri V

    2013-09-01

    We used friction force microscopy measurements to determine the yield strength of several structurally similar Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) bilayer films deposited on a hydrophobic substrate. Film failure was initiated by increasing the load applied by the probe of the atomic force microscope in the course of continuous scanning at nominally the same location on the sample. This film failure was readily detected in friction versus load curves, as well as by imaging of trenches created due to removal of the film. The depths of the trenches formed in the course of these yield strength experiments were consistent with complete removal of these bilayer films, as evidenced by comparisons to film thicknesses measured by ellipsometry. The structure of the LB bilayer was modified by replacing a tetra-chain amphiphile bearing four quaternary ammonium groups with a polymeric surfactant resulting in little change in the yield strength. On the other hand, the addition of a polyanionic gluing layer at the central interface of the bilayers almost doubled the yield strength of the films. To uncover any possible structural effects created by changes in the terminal functionality, the hydrocarbon top layer of the bilayer was replaced with a perfluorinated capping layer. In spite of the changes in frictional properties, the yield strength of this film also appeared to be dominated by the presence of the glued interface.

  5. Determination of Force Coresponding to Maximal Lactate Steady State in Tethered Swimming

    PubMed Central

    PAPOTI, MARCELO; VITÓRIO, RICARDO; ARAÚJO, GUSTAVO G.; DA SILVA, ADELINO S. R.; SANTHIAGO, VANESSA; MARTINS, LUIZ E. B.; CUNHA, SÉRGIO A.; GOBATTO, CLAUDIO A.

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of the present investigation was to verify if the aerobic capacity (AC) measured in tethered swimming corresponds to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) and its correlation with 30 min and 400m free style swimming. Twenty-five swimmers were submitted to an incremental tethered swimming test (ITS) with an initial load of 20N and increments of 10N each 3min. After each stage of 3min, the athletes had 30s of interval to blood sample collections that were used to measure blood lactate concentrations ([La−]). The ACBI was determined by the abrupt increase in [La−] versus force (F). The points obtained between [La−] versus force (N) were adjusted by an exponential curve model to determine AC corresponding to 3.5mmol.l−1 (AC3.5) and 4.0mmol.l−1 (AC4.0). After these procedures, the swimmers performed maximal efforts of 30min and 400m in free style swimming. We used the distance performed in 30min and the time performed in 400m to calculate the median velocities (i.e. V30 and V400) of these protocols. After one week, in order to measure the MLSS, nine athletes performed three 30-min tethered swimming efforts with intensities of 90, 100, and 110% of ACBI. The ANOVA one-way was used to compare the ACBI, AC3.5 and AC4.0. Correlations between ACs, and between ACs and V30 and V400 (p<0.05) were determined using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. The intensity corresponding to 100% of ACBI was similar to the MLSS. It was observed significant correlations of the aerobic capacities (i.e. ACBI, AC3.5 and AC4.0) with V30 (r>0.91) and V400 (r>0.63). According to our results, it is possible to conclude that the ACBI corresponds to the MLSS, and both the AC - individually determined - and the AC - determined using fixed blood lactate concentrations of 3.5 and 4.0mmol.l−1 - can be used to predict the mean velocity of 30min and 400m in free style swimming. In addition to that, the tethered swimming system can be used for aerobic development in places

  6. Determination of the actuator sensitivity of electromechanical polypropylene films by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltonen, Jouko; Paajanen, Mika; Lekkala, Jukka

    2000-10-01

    The actuator functionality of electromechanical polypropylene films was studied using atomic force microscopy. The film carries a permanent electric charge and includes microbubbles as a result of two-dimensional stretching of the film. The thickness change of various film structures covered with electrodes was measured as a function of external voltage. The dependence was found to be nonlinear, the thickness change in the range 0.001%-0.1% of the total film thickness and affected by the internal charge density of the film. Applying a capacitor model including an air gap within the polymer layer enabled the determination of the Young's modulus, the interfacial charge density and the actuator sensitivity of the studied structures.

  7. A GROMOS-Compatible Force Field for Small Organic Molecules in the Condensed Phase: The 2016H66 Parameter Set.

    PubMed

    Horta, Bruno A C; Merz, Pascal T; Fuchs, Patrick F J; Dolenc, Jozica; Riniker, Sereina; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2016-08-01

    This article reports on the calibration and validation of a new GROMOS-compatible parameter set 2016H66 for small organic molecules in the condensed phase. The calibration is based on 62 organic molecules spanning the chemical functions alcohol, ether, aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic acid, ester, amine, amide, thiol, sulfide, and disulfide, as well as aromatic compounds and nucleic-acid bases. For 57 organic compounds, the calibration targets are the experimental pure-liquid density ρliq and the vaporization enthalpy ΔHvap, as well as the hydration free energy ΔGwat and the solvation free energy ΔGche in cyclohexane, at atmospheric pressure and at (or close to) room temperature. The final root-mean-square deviations (RMSD) for these four quantities over the set of compounds are 32.4 kg m(-3), 3.5 kJ mol(-1), 4.1 kJ mol(-1), and 2.1 kJ mol(-1), respectively, and the corresponding average deviations (AVED) are 1.0 kg m(-3), 0.2 kJ mol(-1), 2.6 kJ mol(-1), and 1.0 kJ mol(-1), respectively. For the five nucleic-acid bases, the parametrization is performed by transferring the final 2016H66 parameters from analogous organic compounds followed by a slight readjustment of the charges to reproduce the experimental water-to-chloroform transfer free energies ΔGtrn. The final RMSD for this quantity over the five bases is 1.7 kJ mol(-1), and the corresponding AVED is 0.8 kJ mol(-1). As an initial validation of the 2016H66 set, seven additional thermodynamic, transport, and dielectric properties are calculated for the 57 organic compounds in the liquid phase. The agreement with experiment in terms of these additional properties is found to be reasonable, with significant deviations typically affecting either a specific chemical function or a specific molecule. This suggests that in most cases, a classical force-field description along with a careful parametrization against ρliq, ΔHvap, ΔGwat, and ΔGche results in a model that appropriately describes the liquid in terms of

  8. Numerical evaluation of apparent transport parameters from forced-gradient tracer tests in statistically anisotropic heterogeneous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, D.; Fernandez-Garcia, D.; Bolster, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Benson, D.

    2012-04-01

    For risk assessment and adequate decision making regarding remediation strategies in contaminated aquifers, solute fate in the subsurface must be modeled correctly. In practical situations, hydrodynamic transport parameters are obtained by fitting procedures, that aim to mathematically reproduce solute breakthrough (BTC) observed in the field during tracer tests. In recent years, several methods have been proposed (curve-types, moments, nonlocal formulations) but none of them combine the two main characteristic effects of convergent flow tracer tests (which are the most used tests in the practice): the intrinsic non-stationarity of the convergent flow to a well and the ubiquitous multiscale hydraulic heterogeneity of geological formations. These two effects separately have been accounted for by a lot of methods that appear to work well. Here, we investigate both effects at the same time via numerical analysis. We focus on the influence that measurable statistical properties of the aquifers (such as the variance and the statistical geometry of correlation scales) have on the shape of BTCs measured at the pumping well during convergent flow tracer tests. We built synthetic multigaussian 3D fields of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields with variable statistics. A well is located in the center of the domain to reproduce a forced gradient towards it. Constant-head values are imposed on the boundaries of the domains, which have 251x251x100 cells. Injections of solutes take place by releasing particles at different distances from the well and using a random walk particle tracking scheme with constant local coefficient of dispersivity. The results show that BTCs partially display the typical anomalous behavior that has been commonly referred to as the effect of heterogeneity and connectivity (early and late arrival times of solute differ from the one predicted by local formulations). Among the most salient features, the behaviors of BTCs after the peak (the slope

  9. Determination of meteor parameters based on the trajectory length and duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupyrev, Yury; Gritsevich, Maria; Esko, Lyytinen

    We describe a new method to determine parameters of meteoroids based on the observed deceleration rate in the atmosphere. The input parameters in the problem are time and length of a visible path of a meteor detected in different points along its atmospheric trajectory. By introducing physically based parameterization and integrating equations of motion the following dependency may be obtained between the meteor height above planetary surface and its velocity (see, e.g. Gritsevich, 2009): $ y=ln 2alpha+beta-ln(operatorname{/line Ei}(beta)-operatorname{/line Ei}(beta v(2)).) Here alpha =frac12 c_{mathrm d}frac{rho_0h_0S_{mathrm e}}{M_{mathrm e}singamma},qquad beta =frac12(1-mu)frac{c_{mathrm h}V(2__{mathrm) e}}{c_{mathrm d}H(*}) $ are ballistic coefficient and mass loss parameter. These are the key parameters which have to be identified and can be further resolved to determine other important quantities, such as meteoroid mass and ablation coefficient. While in ``direct'' method for solving the equations of motion the number of input parameters reaches 8 (and thus significantly exceeds the number of physical equations), in this case all variables are grouped together in definition of these two parameters. The above mentioned equation was previously successfully used to fit the observational data. In this study we develop a novel algorithm where the length along trajectory may be used as input parameter. To demonstrate the method, we analyze data recorded with two or more monitoring stations of fireball network operating in Finland (Lyytinen and Gritsevich, 2013). Acknowledgements: This work is conducted under the partial support from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research projects Nos. 14-08-00204 and 13-07-00276 and the Academy of Finland. We thank Pekka Kokko, Jarmo Moilanen and the whole Finnish Fireball Working Group for their thorough help with data collection. textit{References}: Gritsevich (2009): Determination of parameters of meteor bodies based on

  10. Determination of Optimum Cutting Parameters for Surface Roughness in Turning AL-B4C Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channabasavaraja, H. K.; Nagaraj, P. M.; Srinivasan, D.

    2016-09-01

    Many materials such as alloys, composites find their applications on the basis of machinability, cost and availability. In the present work, machinability of Aluminium 1100 and Boron carbide (AL+ B4C) composite material is examined by using lathe tool dynometers (BANKA Lathe) by varying the cutting parameters like spindle speed, Depth of cut and Feed rate in 3 levels. Also, surface roughness is measured against the weight % of reinforcement in the composite (0, 4 and 8 %). From the study it is observed that the hardness of a composite material increases with increase in weight % of reinforcement material (B4C) by 26.27 and 66.7 % respectively. The addition of reinforcement materials influences the machinability. The cutting force in both X and Z direction were also found increment with the reinforcement percentage.

  11. Accuracy of atmospheric parameters of FGK dwarfs determined by spectrum fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T.; Piskunov, N.; Pakhomov, Yu.; Tsymbal, V.; Titarenko, A.; Sitnova, T.; Alexeeva, S.; Fossati, L.; Mashonkina, L.

    2016-02-01

    We performed extensive tests of the accuracy of atmospheric parameter determination for FGK stars based on the spectrum fitting procedure Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME). Our stellar sample consists of 13 objects, including the Sun, in the temperature range 5000-6600 K and metallicity range -1.4-+0.4. The analysed stars have the advantage of having parameters derived by interferometry. For each star, we use spectra obtained with different spectrographs and different signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). For the fitting, we adopted three different sets of constraints and test how the derived parameters depend upon the spectral regions (masks) used in SME. We developed and implemented in SME a new method for estimating uncertainties in the resulting parameters based on fitting residuals, partial derivatives, and data uncertainties. For stars in the 5700-6600 K range, the best agreement with the effective temperatures derived by interferometry is achieved when spectrum fitting includes the H α and H β lines, while for cooler stars the choice of the mask does not affect the results. The derived atmospheric parameters do not strongly depend on spectral resolution and S/N of the observations, while the uncertainties in temperature and surface gravity increase with increasing effective temperature, with minima at 50 K in Teff and 0.1 dex in log g, for spectra with S/N=150-200. A non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) analysis of the Ti I/Ti II and Fe I/Fe II ionization equilibria and abundances determined from the atomic C I (NLTE) and molecular CH species supports the parameters we derived with SME by fitting the observed spectra including the hydrogen lines.

  12. Determining hypocentral parameters for local earthquakes under ill conditions using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woohan; Hahm, In-Kyeong; Kim, Won-Young; Lee, Jung Mo

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate that GA-MHYPO determines accurate hypocentral parameters for local earthquakes under ill conditions, such as limited number of stations (phase data), large azimuthal gap, and noisy data. The genetic algorithm (GA) in GA-MHYPO searches for the optimal 1-D velocity structure which provides the minimum traveltime differences between observed (true) and calculated P and S arrivals within prescribed ranges. GA-MHYPO is able to determine hypocentral parameters more accurately in many circumstances than conventional methods which rely on an a priori (and possibly incorrect) 1-D velocity model. In our synthetic tests, the accuracy of hypocentral parameters obtained by GA-MHYPO given ill conditions is improved by more than a factor of 20 for error-free data, and by a factor of five for data with errors, compared to that obtained by conventional methods such as HYPOINVERSE. In the case of error-free data, GA-MHYPO yields less than 0.1 km errors in focal depths and hypocenters without strong dependence on azimuthal coverage up to 45°. Errors are less than 1 km for data with errors of a 0.1-s standard deviation. To test the performance using real data, a well-recorded earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone and earthquakes recorded under ill conditions in the High Himalaya are relocated by GA-MHYPO. The hypocentral parameters determined by GA-MHYPO under both good and ill conditions show similar computational results, which suggest that GA-MHYPO is robust and yields more reliable hypocentral parameters than standard methods under ill conditions for natural earthquakes.

  13. Note: A calibration method to determine the lumped-circuit parameters of a magnetic probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuming; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhu, Lizhi; Liu, Hai; Wang, Zhijiang; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a novel method to determine the lumped-circuit parameters of a magnetic inductive probe for calibration by using Helmholtz coils with high frequency power supply (frequency range: 10 kHz-400 kHz). The whole calibration circuit system can be separated into two parts: "generator" circuit and "receiver" circuit. By implementing the Fourier transform, two analytical lumped-circuit models, with respect to these separated circuits, are constructed to obtain the transfer function between each other. Herein, the precise lumped-circuit parameters (including the resistance, inductance, and capacitance) of the magnetic probe can be determined by fitting the experimental data to the transfer function. Regarding the fitting results, the finite impedance of magnetic probe can be used to analyze the transmission of a high-frequency signal between magnetic probes, cables, and acquisition system. PMID:27370503

  14. Note: A calibration method to determine the lumped-circuit parameters of a magnetic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fuming; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhu, Lizhi; Liu, Hai; Wang, Zhijiang; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a novel method to determine the lumped-circuit parameters of a magnetic inductive probe for calibration by using Helmholtz coils with high frequency power supply (frequency range: 10 kHz-400 kHz). The whole calibration circuit system can be separated into two parts: "generator" circuit and "receiver" circuit. By implementing the Fourier transform, two analytical lumped-circuit models, with respect to these separated circuits, are constructed to obtain the transfer function between each other. Herein, the precise lumped-circuit parameters (including the resistance, inductance, and capacitance) of the magnetic probe can be determined by fitting the experimental data to the transfer function. Regarding the fitting results, the finite impedance of magnetic probe can be used to analyze the transmission of a high-frequency signal between magnetic probes, cables, and acquisition system.

  15. Updated determination of stress parameters for nine well-recorded earthquakes in eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Stress parameters (????) are determined for nine relatively wellrecorded earthquakes in eastern North America for ten attenuation models. This is an update of a previous study by Boore et al. (2010). New to this paper are observations from the 2010 Val des Bois earthquake, additional observations for the 1988 Saguenay and 2005 Riviere du Loup earthquakes, and consideration of six attenuation models in addition to the four used in the previous study. As in that study, it is clear that ???? depends strongly on the rate of geometrical spreading (as well as other model parameters). The observations necessary to determine conclusively which attenuation model best fits the data are still lacking. At this time, a simple 1/R model seems to give as good an overall fit to the data as more complex models.

  16. Structural parameters determining the transition temperature of tetragonal KH2PO4-type crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, M.; Amasaki, D.; Gustafsson, T.; Olovsson, I.

    2001-09-01

    A systematic study of the structural parameters determining the ferroelectric phase transition temperature Tc in tetragonal KH2PO4 (KDP)-type crystals MH2XO4 has been performed by searching the correlation between different structural parameters and Tc. It has been revealed that the transition temperature is determined not only by the hydrogen-bond distance R, as reported earlier, but also by the distortion of XO4 (via O-X-O angle α1) and the packing of M and XO4 along the c axis (via the rotation angle θ around the c axis); α1 reflects the dipole moment of XO4 and θ may influence the amplitude of optical vibration of M and XO4. The contribution of each structural part to the transition temperature Tc in the tetragonal KDP family has been revealed in a comprehensive way for ferroelectrics.

  17. Online determination of biophysical parameters of mucous membranes of a human body

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M

    2013-07-31

    We have developed a method for online determination of biophysical parameters of mucous membranes (MMs) of a human body (transport scattering coefficient, scattering anisotropy factor, haemoglobin concentration, degrees of blood oxygenation, average diameter of capillaries with blood) from measurements of spectral and spatial characteristics of diffuse reflection. The method is based on regression relationships between linearly independent components of the measured light signals and the unknown parameters of MMs, obtained by simulation of the radiation transfer in the MM under conditions of its general variability. We have proposed and justified the calibration-free fibre-optic method for determining the concentration of haemoglobin in MMs by measuring the light signals diffusely reflected by the tissue in four spectral regions at two different distances from the illumination spot. We have selected the optimal wavelengths of optical probing for the implementation of the method. (laser applications in biology and medicine)

  18. Note: A calibration method to determine the lumped-circuit parameters of a magnetic probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuming; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhu, Lizhi; Liu, Hai; Wang, Zhijiang; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a novel method to determine the lumped-circuit parameters of a magnetic inductive probe for calibration by using Helmholtz coils with high frequency power supply (frequency range: 10 kHz-400 kHz). The whole calibration circuit system can be separated into two parts: "generator" circuit and "receiver" circuit. By implementing the Fourier transform, two analytical lumped-circuit models, with respect to these separated circuits, are constructed to obtain the transfer function between each other. Herein, the precise lumped-circuit parameters (including the resistance, inductance, and capacitance) of the magnetic probe can be determined by fitting the experimental data to the transfer function. Regarding the fitting results, the finite impedance of magnetic probe can be used to analyze the transmission of a high-frequency signal between magnetic probes, cables, and acquisition system.

  19. The in vitro effect of drugs on biochemical parameters determined by a SMAC system.

    PubMed

    Vinet, B; Letellier, G

    1977-02-01

    1. We have studied the in vitro effect of 39 drugs on 17 biochemical parameters determined by a SMAC System. Only two drugs were found to interfere: ascorbic and theophyline. 2. The ascorbic acid lowers the glucose and the bilirubine values; it increases the creatinine and the uric acid concentration. At concentration smaller than 5 mg/dl of this drug, these effects are negligible. 3. We have found a new drug interference: theophylline inhibits the alkaline phosphatase and LDH activities. This effect is not negligible on alkaline phosphatase for therapeutic levels of this drug; the action on LDH can be ignored at normal therapeutic range. 4. For a given drug, we have found different interference with biochemical parameters determined with various commercial lyophlised control sera or a liquid pool of sera. This indicates that the type of sera used in drug interference studies must be described.

  20. Parameter determination and validation for a mechanistic model of the enzymatic saccharification of cellulose-Iβ.

    PubMed

    Nag, Ambarish; Sprague, Michael A; Griggs, Andrew J; Lischeske, James J; Stickel, Jonathan J; Mittal, Ashutosh; Wang, Wei; Johnson, David K

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass often involves enzymatic saccharification, which has been the subject of intense research and development. Recently, a mechanistic model for the enzymatic saccharification of cellulose has been developed that accounts for distribution of cellulose chain lengths, the accessibility of insoluble cellulose to enzymes, and the distinct modes of action of the component cellulases [Griggs et al. (2012) Biotechnol. Bioeng., 109(3):665-675; Griggs et al. (2012) Biotechnol. Bioeng., 109(3):676-685]. However, determining appropriate values for the adsorption, inhibition, and rate parameters required further experimental investigation. In this work, we performed several sets of experiments to aid in parameter estimation and to quantitatively validate the model. Cellulosic materials differing in degrees of polymerization and crystallinity (α-cellulose-Iβ and highly crystalline cellulose-Iβ ) were digested by component enzymes (EGI/CBHI/βG) and by mixtures of these enzymes. Based on information from the literature and the results from these experiments, a single set of model parameters was determined, and the model simulation results using this set of parameters were compared with the experimental data of total glucan conversion, chain-length distribution, and crystallinity. Model simulations show significant agreement with the experimentally derived glucan conversion and chain-length distribution curves and provide interesting insights into multiple complex and interacting physico-chemical phenomena involved in enzymatic hydrolysis, including enzyme synergism, substrate accessibility, cellulose chain length distribution and crystallinity, and inhibition of cellulases by soluble sugars.

  1. A new approach to determine geomechanical parameters of Vertical Transverse Isotropic media using VSP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Moradzadeh, Ali; Rasouli, Vamegh; Hanachi, Javid

    2014-12-01

    Conventionally, high frequency Dipole Shear sonic Imager (DSI) logs are used for anisotropic modeling where fast and slow shear wave's velocities are required. However, the results obtained from a DSI log are restricted to a specific and possibly short interval of the wellbore. The aims of this paper are to use Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) data and show its application in geomechanical analysis of subsurface layers under anisotropic condition. After processing and separating upgoing and downgoing P- and S-waves, a methodology based Vertical Transverse Isotropic (VTI) condition was presented to determine elastic stiffness parameters. Having stiffness parameters determined, elastic modulus, strength and in-situ stress parameters were estimated and calibrated against the field and core sample data. Although the VSP based geomechanical parameters were calibrated against the real field data, the accuracy of the method cannot be as much as that of the well logs. However, the method presented in this paper may become a very good asset for geomechanical evaluation of the intervals where well log data are not available.

  2. Determination of Resonance Parameters and their Covariances from Neutron Induced Reaction Cross Section Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Danon, Y.; Guber, K.; Harada, H.; Heyse, J.; Junghans, A.R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.C.; Otuka, N.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2012-12-15

    Cross section data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are represented by nuclear reaction formalisms using parameters which are determined by fitting them to experimental data. Therefore, the quality of evaluated cross sections in the resonance region strongly depends on the experimental data used in the adjustment process and an assessment of the experimental covariance data is of primary importance in determining the accuracy of evaluated cross section data. In this contribution, uncertainty components of experimental observables resulting from total and reaction cross section experiments are quantified by identifying the metrological parameters involved in the measurement, data reduction and analysis process. In addition, different methods that can be applied to propagate the covariance of the experimental observables (i.e. transmission and reaction yields) to the covariance of the resonance parameters are discussed and compared. The methods being discussed are: conventional uncertainty propagation, Monte Carlo sampling and marginalization. It is demonstrated that the final covariance matrix of the resonance parameters not only strongly depends on the type of experimental observables used in the adjustment process, the experimental conditions and the characteristics of the resonance structure, but also on the method that is used to propagate the covariances. Finally, a special data reduction concept and format is presented, which offers the possibility to store the full covariance information of experimental data in the EXFOR library and provides the information required to perform a full covariance evaluation.

  3. Exclusive SUSY measurements and determination of SUSY parameters from LHC data

    SciTech Connect

    Wienemann, Peter

    2008-11-23

    A selection of exclusive SUSY measurements is presented which can be performed provided SUSY will be discovered at the LHC. Such measurements allow to determine the properties of supersymmetry and thus help to pin down the underlying theoretical model. It is described on an mSUGRA example point how sparticle masses can be reconstructed from endpoints in mass spectra using early LHC data. Finally it is shown how well mSUGRA model parameters can be derived from these measurements.

  4. Determination of the photosynthesizing organisms photophysical parameters by the method of nonlinear fluorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, Viktor V.; Maslov, D. V.; Litvinov, P. N.; Burikov, S. A.

    2002-05-01

    There is a set of discussed questions in the study of primary processes of the photosynthesis. Solution of these problems stimulates development of new methods for determination of the photo synthetic unit photo physical parameters in-vivo. In the report possibilities of non- linear fluorimetry method in this problem are investigated. The first step requires creation of low-parametrical model of the photosynthesizing organisms fluorescence response formation. The corresponding inverse rpobe4lm can be solved for this model.

  5. Determination of Plasma Sheath and Dust Parameters from Dust Particle Oscillation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Smith, Bernard; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Hyde, Truell

    2007-11-01

    The fundamental parameters of a complex dusty plasma system, including particle charge and dust Debye length, can be determined from the thermally excited oscillation modes of an arbitrary number of dust particles (either a dust cluster or plasma crystal) confined on a 2D plane within the plasma sheath produced above the lower electrode of a GEC reference cell [Ref. 1-2]. This paper will discuss an experimental technique allowing the strength of the confining potential well on the horizontal direction to be determined in the same manner. This technique will be further applied to systems of dust grains comprised of both melamine formaldehyde and ferromagnetic monodisperse particles.

  6. Asteroseismic determination of fundamental parameters of Sun-like stars using multilayered neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Hanasoge, Shravan; Bhattacharya, Jishnu; Antia, H. M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2016-10-01

    The advent of space-based observatories such as Convection, Rotation and planetary Transits (CoRoT) and Kepler has enabled the testing of our understanding of stellar evolution on thousands of stars. Evolutionary models typically require five input parameters, the mass, initial helium abundance, initial metallicity, mixing length (assumed to be constant over time), and the age to which the star must be evolved. Some of these parameters are also very useful in characterizing the associated planets and in studying Galactic archaeology. How to obtain these parameters from observations rapidly and accurately, specifically in the context of surveys of thousands of stars, is an outstanding question, one that has eluded straightforward resolution. For a given star, we typically measure the effective temperature and surface metallicity spectroscopically and low-degree oscillation frequencies through space observatories. Here we demonstrate that statistical learning, using artificial neural networks, is successful in determining the evolutionary parameters based on spectroscopic and seismic measurements. Our trained networks show robustness over a broad range of parameter space, and critically, are entirely computationally inexpensive and fully automated. We analyse the observations of a few stars using this method and the results compare well to inferences obtained using other techniques. This method is both computationally cheap and inferentially accurate, paving the way for analysing the vast quantities of stellar observations from past, current, and future missions.

  7. Determining the bistability parameter ranges of artificially induced lac operon using the root locus method.

    PubMed

    Avcu, N; Alyürük, H; Demir, G K; Pekergin, F; Cavas, L; Güzeliş, C

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs the root locus method to conduct a detailed investigation of the parameter regions that ensure bistability in a well-studied gene regulatory network namely, lac operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In contrast to previous works, the parametric bistability conditions observed in this study constitute a complete set of necessary and sufficient conditions. These conditions were derived by applying the root locus method to the polynomial equilibrium equation of the lac operon model to determine the parameter values yielding the multiple real roots necessary for bistability. The lac operon model used was defined as an ordinary differential equation system in a state equation form with a rational right hand side, and it was compatible with the Hill and Michaelis-Menten approaches of enzyme kinetics used to describe biochemical reactions that govern lactose metabolism. The developed root locus method can be used to study the steady-state behavior of any type of convergent biological system model based on mass action kinetics. This method provides a solution to the problem of analyzing gene regulatory networks under parameter uncertainties because the root locus method considers the model parameters as variable, rather than fixed. The obtained bistability ranges for the lac operon model parameters have the potential to elucidate the appearance of bistability for E. coli cells in in vivo experiments, and they could also be used to design robust hysteretic switches in synthetic biology. PMID:25864166

  8. Considering uncertainties in the determination of earthquake source parameters from seismic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Aristizabal, Alexander; Caciagli, Marco; Selva, Jacopo

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a method for handling uncertainties in the determination of the source parameters of earthquakes from spectral data. We propose a robust framework for estimating earthquake source parameters and relative uncertainties, which are propagated down to the estimation of basic seismic parameters of interest such as the seismic moment, the moment magnitude, the source size and the static stress drop. In practice, we put together a Bayesian approach for model parameter estimation and a weighted statistical mixing of multiple solutions obtained from a network of instruments, providing a useful framework for extracting meaningful data from intrinsically uncertain data sets. The Bayesian approach used to estimate the source spectra parameters is a simple but powerful mechanism for non-linear model fitting, providing also the opportunity to naturally propagate uncertainties and to assess the quality and uniqueness of the solution. Another important added value of such an approach is the possibility of integrating information from the expertise of seismologists. Such data can be encoded in a prior state of information that is then updated with the information provided by seismological data. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated analysing data from the 1909 April 23 earthquake occurred near Benavente (Portugal).

  9. Determination of fundamental supersymmetry parameters from chargino production at CERN LEP II

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.L.; Strassler, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    If accessible at CERN LEP II, chargino production is likely to be one of the few available supersymmetric signals for many years. We consider the prospects for the determination of fundamental supersymmetry parameters in such a scenario. The study is complicated by the dependence of observables on a large number of these parameters. We propose a straightforward procedure for disentangling these dependences and demonstrate its effectiveness by presenting a number of case studies at representative points in parameter space. Working in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, we find that chargino production by itself is a fairly sensitive probe of the supersymmetry-breaking sector. For significant regions of parameter space, it is possible to test the gaugino mass unification hypothesis and to measure the gaugino contents of the chargionos and neutralinos, thereby testing the predictions of grand unification and the viability of the lightest supersymmetric particle as a dark matter candidate. For much of the parameter space, it is also possible to set limits on the mass of the electron sneutrino, which provide a valuable guide for future particle searches.

  10. Determination of the kinetic parameters of BeO using isothermal decay method.

    PubMed

    Azorin Nieto, Juan; Vega, Claudia Azorin; Montalvo, Teodoro Rivera; Cabrera, Eugenio Torijano

    2016-02-01

    Most of the existing methods for obtaining the frequency factors make use of the trap depth (activation energy) making some assumptions about the order of the kinetics. This causes inconsistencies in the reported values of trapping parameters due that the values of the activation energy obtained by different methods differ appreciably among them. Then, it is necessary to use a method independent of the trap depth making use of the isothermal luminescence decay (ILD) method. The trapping parameters associated with the prominent glow peak of BeO (280°C) are reported using ILD method. As a check, the trap parameters are also calculated by glow curve shape (Chen's) method after isolating the prominent glow peak by thermal cleaning technique. Our results show a very good agreement between the trapping parameters calculated by the two methods. ILD method was used for determining the trapping parameters of BeO. Results obtained applying this method are in good agreement with those obtained using other methods, except in the value of the frequency factor.

  11. Determination of Optical and Microvascular Parameters of Port Wine Stains Using Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihai; Yao, Guangping; Chen, Defu; Wang, Ying; Gu, Ying; Li, Buhong

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing port wine stains (PWS) with its optical parameters [i.e. absorption coefficient (μ a) and reduced scattering coefficient (μ s')] and microvascular parameters [i.e. blood volume fraction (BVF), mean vessel diameter (MVD), and oxygen saturation (StO2)] is extremely important for elucidating the mechanisms for its light-based treatments, such as pulsed dye laser and photodynamic therapy. In this study, a customized diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) probe with an appropriate source-detector distance was used to measure the diffuse reflectance spectra of PWS lesions in clinical practice. The results demonstrate that optical parameters of different types of PWS lesions can be accurately extracted by fitting the DRS with diffusion equation. Since the sampling depth of the probe coincides with the depth distribution of abnormal vasculature in PWS, the obtained microvascular parameters of PWS lesions that changed from pink to purple are in agreement with the corresponding physiological conditions. This study suggests that DRS can be utilized to quantitatively determine the optical and microvascular parameters of PWS lesions, which have the potential for planning the protocol and predicting the efficiency for light-based PWS treatments. PMID:27526164

  12. Determining Reliability of Existing Gravitational Waveforms in Parameter Estimation for Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos, Cesar; Sandeen, Ben; Chennakesavalu, Shriram; Littenberg, Tyson; Farr, Ben; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational Waves (GWs) were predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity as ripples in space-time that propagate outward from a source. Strong GW sources consist of compact binary systems such as Binary Neutron Stars (BNS) or Binary Black Holes (BBHs) that experience orbital shrinkage (inspiral) and eventual merger. Indirect evidence for the existence of GWs has been obtained through radio pulsar studies in BNS systems. A study of BBHs and other compact objects has limitations in the electromagnetic spectrum, therefore direct detections of GWs will open a new window into their nature. The effort targeting direct GWs detection is anchored on the development of a detector known as Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observation). Although detecting GW sources represents an anticipated breakthrough in physics, making GW astrophysics a reality critically relies on our ability to determine and measure the physical parameters associated with GW sources. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations on high-performance computing clusters for parameter estimation on high dimensional spaces (GW sources - 15 parameters). The quality of GW parameter estimation greatly depends on having the best possible knowledge of the expected waveform. Unfortunately, BBH GW production is very complex and our best waveforms are not valid across the full parameter space. With large-scale simulations we examine quantitatively the limitations of these waveforms in terms of extracting the astrophysical properties of BBH GW sources. We find that current waveforms are inadequate for BBH of unequal masses and demonstrate that improved waveforms are critically needed.

  13. Determination of MSSM Parameters from LHC and ILCObservables in a Global Fit

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtle, Philip; Desch, Klaus; Porod, Werner; Wienemann, Peter; /Freiburg U.

    2005-12-02

    We present the results of a realistic global fit of the Lagrangian parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model assuming universality for the first and second generation and real parameters. No assumptions on the SUSY breaking mechanism are made. The fit is performed using the precision of future mass measurements of superpartners at the LHC and mass and polarized topological cross-section measurements at the ILC. Higher order radiative corrections are accounted for wherever possible to date. Results are obtained for a modified SPS1a MSSM benchmark scenario but they were checked not to depend critically on this assumption. Exploiting a simulated annealing algorithm, a stable result is obtained without any a priori assumptions on the values of the fit parameters. Most of the Lagrangian parameters can be extracted at the percent level or better if theoretical uncertainties are neglected. Neither LHC nor ILC measurements alone will be sufficient to obtain a stable result. The effects of theoretical uncertainties arising from unknown higher-order corrections and parametric uncertainties are examined qualitatively. They appear to be relevant and the result motivates further precision calculations. The obtained parameters at the electroweak scale are used for a fit of the parameters at high energy scales within the bottom-up approach. In this way regularities at these scales are explored and the underlying model can be determined with hardly any theoretical bias. Fits of high-scale parameters to combined LHC+ILC measurements within the mSUGRA framework reveal that even tiny distortions in the low-energy mass spectrum already lead to unacceptable {chi}{sup 2} values. This does not hold for ''LHC only'' inputs.

  14. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  15. Determination of a silane intermolecular force field potential model from an ab initio calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Arvin Huang-Te; Chao, Sheng D.; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2010-12-15

    Intermolecular interaction potentials of the silane dimer in 12 orientations have been calculated by using the Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent theory and the second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory. We employed basis sets from Pople's medium-size basis sets [up to 6-311++G(3df, 3pd)] and Dunning's correlation consistent basis sets (up to the triply augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta basis set). We found that the minimum energy orientations were the G and H conformers. We have suggested that the Si-H attractions, the central silicon atom size, and electronegativity play essential roles in weakly binding of a silane dimer. The calculated MP2 potential data were employed to parametrize a five-site force field for molecular simulations. The Si-Si, Si-H, and H-H interaction parameters in a pairwise-additive, site-site potential model for silane molecules were regressed from the ab initio energies.

  16. Motion Parameters Determination of the SC and Phobos in the Project Phobos-Grunt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akim, E. L.; Stepanyants, V. A.; Tuchin, A. G.; Shishov, V. A.

    2007-01-01

    The SC "Phobos-Grunt" flight is planned to 2009 in Russia with the purpose to deliver to the Earth the soil samples of the Mars satellite Phobos. The mission will pass under the following scheme [1-4]: the SC flight from the Earth to the Mars, the SC transit on the Mars satellite orbit, the motion round the Mars on the observation orbit and on the quasi-synchronous one [5], landing on Phobos, taking of a ground and start in the direction to the Earth. The implementation of complicated dynamical operations in the Phobos vicinity is foreseen by the project. The SC will be in a disturbance sphere of gravitational fields from the Sun, the Mars and the Phobos. The SC orbit determination is carried out on a totality of trajectory measurements executed from ground tracking stations and measurements of autonomous systems onboard space vehicle relatively the Phobos. As ground measurements the radio engineering measurements of range and range rate are used. There are possible as onboard optical observations of the Phobos by a television system and ranges from the SC up to the Phobos surface by laser locator. As soon as the Phobos orbit accuracy is insufficient for a solution of a problem of landing its orbit determination will be carried out together with determination of the SC orbit. Therefore the algorithms for joint improving of initial conditions of the SC and the Phobos are necessary to determine parameters of the SC relative the Phobos motion within a single dynamical motion model. After putting on the martial satellite orbit, on the Phobos observation orbit, on the quasi-synchronous orbit in the Phobos vicinity the equipment guidance and the following process of the SC orbit determination relatively Phobos requires a priori knowledge of the Phobos orbit parameters with sufficiently high precision. These parameters should be obtained beforehand using both all modern observations and historical ones.

  17. Determination of HCME 3-D parameters using a full ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Harim

    2016-05-01

    It is very essential to determine three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) for space weather forecast. Several cone models (e.g., an elliptical cone model, an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model) have been examined to estimate these parameters. In this study, we investigate which cone type is close to a halo CME morphology using 26 CMEs: halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From cone shape parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone type CMEs are much closer to observations than shallow ice-cream cone type CMEs. Thus we develop a new cone model in which a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3-D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (a geometrical triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model) based on multi-spacecraft data. We are developing a general ice-cream cone model whose front shape is a free parameter determined by observations.

  18. Determining the mechanical properties of human corneal basement membranes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Last, Julie A.; Liliensiek, Sara J.; Nealey, Paul F.; Murphya, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Biophysical cues such as substrate modulus have been shown to influence a variety of cell behaviors. We have determined the elastic modulus of the anterior basement membrane and Descemet’s membrane of the human cornea with atomic force microscopy (AFM). A spherical probe was used with a radius approximating that of a typical cell focal adhesion. Values obtained for the elastic modulus of the anterior basement membrane range from 2 kPa to 15 kPa, with a mean of 7.5 ± 4.2 kPa. The elastic modulus of Descemet’s membrane was found to be slightly higher than those observed for the anterior basement membrane, with a mean of 50 ± 17.8 kPa and a range of 20 kPa — 80 kPa. The topography of Descemet’s membrane has been shown to be similar to that of the anterior basement, but with smaller pore sizes resulting in a more tightly packed structure. This structural difference may account for the observed modulus differences. The determination of these values will allow for the design of a better model of the cellular environment as well as aid in the design and fabrication of artificial corneas. PMID:19341800

  19. Determining the Molecular Packing Arrangements on Protein Crystal Faces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Perozzo, Mary A.; Konnert, John H.; Nadarajan, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Periodic Bond Chain (PBC) analysis of the packing of tetragonal lysozyme crystals have revealed that there are two possible molecular packing arrangements for the crystal faces. The analysis also predicted that only one of these, involving the formation of helices about the 4(sub 3) axes, would prevail during crystal growth. In this study high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to verify these predictions for the (110) crystal face. A computer program was developed which constructs the expected AFM image for a given tip shape for each possible molecular packing arrangement. By comparing the actual AFM image with the predicted images the correct packing arrangement was determined. The prediction of an arrangement involving 4(sub 3) helices was confirmed in this manner,"while the alternate arrangement was not observed. The investigation also showed the protein molecules were packed slightly closer about the 4(sub 3) axes than in the crystallographic arrangement of the crystal interior. This study demonstrates a new approach for determining the molecular packing arrangements on protein crystal faces. It also shows the power of combining a theoretical PBC analysis with experimental high resolution AFM techniques in probing protein crystal growth processes at the molecular level.

  20. Determining Parameters and Mechanisms of Colloid Retention and Release in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed

    2015-11-10

    A modeling framework is presented to determine fundamental parameters and controlling mechanisms of colloid (microbes, clays, and nanoparticles) retention and release on surfaces of porous media that exhibit wide distributions of nanoscale chemical heterogeneity, nano- to microscale roughness, and pore water velocity. Primary and/or secondary minimum interactions in the zone of electrostatic influence were determined over the heterogeneous solid surface. The Maxwellian kinetic energy model was subsequently employed to determine the probability of immobilization and diffusive release of colloids from each of these minima. In addition, a balance of applied hydrodynamic and resisting adhesive torques was conducted to determine locations of immobilization and hydrodynamic release in the presence of spatially variable water flow and microscopic roughness. Locations for retention had to satisfy both energy and torque balance conditions for immobilization, whereas release could occur either due to diffusion or hydrodynamics. Summation of energy and torque balance results over the elementary surface area of the porous medium provided estimates for colloid retention and release parameters that are critical to predicting environmental fate, including the sticking and release efficiencies and the maximum concentration of retained colloids on the solid phase. Nanoscale roughness and chemical heterogeneity produced localized primary minimum interactions that controlled long-term retention, even when mean chemical conditions were unfavorable. Microscopic roughness played a dominant role in colloid retention under low ionic strength and high hydrodynamic conditions, especially for larger colloids.

  1. Determination of optical constants and morphological parameters of biological particles from multiple light-scattering characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairullina, Alphiya Y.

    1993-07-01

    Unified approach is suggested to determine the real (n) and imaginary (x) parts of refractive index and average size r of biological particle suspensions, biopolymers, and so on for a wide range of sizes (r equals 10-1 - 102 micrometers , n equals 1.02 - 1.15 and x equals 10 -6 - 10-4). The values to be measured are the diffuse reflection and transmission coefficients and the temporal spectra scattering intensity fluctuations of optically thick layers in the case of weak absorption (this condition is determined experimentally). The sensitivity of the proposed approach for the determination of n and x (as well as the average cosine of the phase function of light scattering and radiation pressure cross section (beta) for finding the force acting on the particle) is very high and exceeds the known methods. The methods of determining n, x, r, , (beta) have been evaluated for suspensions of erythrocytes, blood substitute (emulsions of PFC), and latexes.

  2. Determination of optical parameters and thickness of weakly absorbing thin films from reflectance and transmittance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutavichus, Vitaly P.; Filippov, Valery V.; Huzouski, Vitali H.

    2006-07-01

    A method for determining the optical constants and the thickness of weakly absorbing thin films on substrates is proposed. In this method only the reflectance and transmittance spectra obtained at a single arbitrary angle of incidence are used, provided that the former reveals several interference extrema. The calculation procedure is based on relatively simple relations suitable for the programmed realization and does not call for the prescription of the initial values of the parameters to be determined. The method proposed is fairly accurate and allows one to uniquely solve the inverse problem of spectrophotometry. The optical constants and the thickness of an AsxSey film formed on a glass substrate have been determined by the proposed method in the visible region of the spectrum.

  3. Determining Experimental Parameters for Thermal-Mechanical Forming Simulation considering Martensite Formation in Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Philipp; Liewald, Mathias

    2011-08-01

    The forming behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steel is mainly dominated by the temperature-dependent TRIP effect (transformation induced plasticity). Of course, the high dependency of material properties on the temperature level during forming means the temperature must be considered during the FE analysis. The strain-induced formation of α'-martensite from austenite can be represented by using finite element programs utilizing suitable models such as the Haensel-model. This paper discusses the determination of parameters for a completely thermal-mechanical forming simulation in LS-DYNA based on the material model of Haensel. The measurement of the martensite evolution in non-isothermal tensile tests was performed with metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4301 at different rolling directions between 0° and 90 °. This allows an estimation of the influence of the rolling direction to the martensite formation. Of specific importance is the accuracy of the martensite content measured by magnetic induction methods (Feritscope). The observation of different factors, such as stress dependence of the magnetisation, blank thickness and numerous calibration curves discloses a substantial important influence on the parameter determination for the material models. The parameters obtained for use of Haensel model and temperature-dependent friction coefficients are used to simulate forming process of a real component and to validate its implementation in the commercial code LS-DYNA.

  4. Determination and measurement of soil parameters for characterizing radon hazard of soils

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.

    1992-12-31

    There is little correlation between radon concentrations in soil and radon concentrations in homes. One explanation is that the soil radon concentration does not fully characterize the soil as a radon hazard. A mathematical model for the determination of important soil parameters for characterizing the flow of radon into a basement has been analyzed. We have identified important soil properties by mathematically modeling ventilated air enclosed in basement walls of thickness T (through which radon convects) and surrounded by soil of infinite extent (through which radon diffuses). The radon instantaneously mixed uniformly with the basement air and is lost from the basement air by ventilation ({lambda}{sub v}) and decay ({lambda}). It was found that not only the soil pore gas radon concentration, C{sub s}, but also the radon gas diffusion length, L{sub 3}, and the soil porosity, {epsilon}{sub 3}, are important to characterize the soil as a radon hazard. A model for determining the parameters C{sub s}, L{sub 3}, and {epsilon}{sub 3} has also been analyzed. It was found that it is possible to measure in situ these important soil parameters by monitoring the radon gas concentration time history of two cavities of different radii formed in the same soil.

  5. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist DIll parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulate directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  6. New method for determination of the photoresist Dill parameters using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Defranoux, Christophe; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Stehle, Jean-Louis P.

    1999-04-01

    In this paper a new method to determine photoresist Dill parameters is presented. Based on spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements, this new method is more precise than standard techniques based on transmittance measurements. Indeed, compared to photometry, SE technique is a self calibrated technique which provide directly two independent parameters Tan (Psi) and Cos (Delta) which can be used to extract directly thickness but also optical indices of a layer inside a multilayer structure. Moreover, the wavelength dependence introduces more restrictions for the data analysis since thickness and optical indices can be deduced directly in many cases. We apply this technique to different kinds of photoresist designed for 365nm and 248nm. At each wavelength ellipsometric parameters are simulated directly versus the exposure dose without any assumption on the thickness and on the index of refraction evolution. On 365nm photoresist this new method provides Dill parameters in good agreement with the standard method. On 248nm photoresist we show that the influence of the exposure is more important on the refractive index and on the thickness of the layer than on its absorption.

  7. Intrinsic parameter determination of a paracatadioptric camera by the intersection of two sphere projections.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Wang, Yalin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a linear calibration method is proposed for a paracatadioptric camera using the images of two spheres. Two spheres are selected in space, and the two groups of their projection circles on the unit viewing sphere are made to intersect at four points. The quadrilateral consisting of four points is a rectangle, so a group of orthogonal directions can be determined in space to obtain a group of orthogonal vanishing points in the paracatadioptric image plane. Because of the relationship between orthogonal vanishing points and intrinsic camera parameters, the intrinsic parameters of a paracatadioptric camera can be linearly solved by at least five views satisfying the above conditions. First, one estimates the sphere images and their antipodal sphere images. Second, by solving the intersection of the images of two spheres and the intersection of the images of their antipodal spheres, a group of orthogonal vanishing points can be obtained in the image plane. Finally, by taking the relationship between the orthogonal vanishing points and the intrinsic camera parameters as constraint conditions, the intrinsic parameters of the paracatadioptric camera can be obtained. Simulation results and real image data demonstrate the effectiveness of our new algorithms.

  8. Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination

    DOEpatents

    McEvilly, Thomas V.

    1985-01-01

    An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

  9. Image parameters for maturity determination of a composted material containing sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawa, S.; Nowakowski, K.; Tomczak, R. J.; Boniecki, P.; Dach, J.

    2013-07-01

    Composting is one of the best methods for management of sewage sludge. In a reasonably conducted composting process it is important to early identify the moment in which a material reaches the young compost stage. The objective of this study was to determine parameters contained in images of composted material's samples that can be used for evaluation of the degree of compost maturity. The study focused on two types of compost: containing sewage sludge with corn straw and sewage sludge with rapeseed straw. The photographing of the samples was carried out on a prepared stand for the image acquisition using VIS, UV-A and mixed (VIS + UV-A) light. In the case of UV-A light, three values of the exposure time were assumed. The values of 46 parameters were estimated for each of the images extracted from the photographs of the composted material's samples. Exemplary averaged values of selected parameters obtained from the images of the composted material in the following sampling days were presented. All of the parameters obtained from the composted material's images are the basis for preparation of training, validation and test data sets necessary in development of neural models for classification of the young compost stage.

  10. Monte Carlo Method for Determining Earthquake Recurrence Parameters from Short Paleoseismic Catalogs: Example Calculations for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Paleoearthquake observations often lack enough events at a given site to directly define a probability density function (PDF) for earthquake recurrence. Sites with fewer than 10-15 intervals do not provide enough information to reliably determine the shape of the PDF using standard maximum-likelihood techniques [e.g., Ellsworth et al., 1999]. In this paper I present a method that attempts to fit wide ranges of distribution parameters to short paleoseismic series. From repeated Monte Carlo draws, it becomes possible to quantitatively estimate most likely recurrence PDF parameters, and a ranked distribution of parameters is returned that can be used to assess uncertainties in hazard calculations. In tests on short synthetic earthquake series, the method gives results that cluster around the mean of the input distribution, whereas maximum likelihood methods return the sample means [e.g., NIST/SEMATECH, 2006]. For short series (fewer than 10 intervals), sample means tend to reflect the median of an asymmetric recurrence distribution, possibly leading to an overestimate of the hazard should they be used in probability calculations. Therefore a Monte Carlo approach may be useful for assessing recurrence from limited paleoearthquake records. Further, the degree of functional dependence among parameters like mean recurrence interval and coefficient of variation can be established. The method is described for use with time-independent and time-dependent PDF?s, and results from 19 paleoseismic sequences on strike-slip faults throughout the state of California are given.

  11. Monte Carlo method for determining earthquake recurrence parameters from short paleoseismic catalogs: Example calculations for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2008-01-01

    Paleoearthquake observations often lack enough events at a given site to directly define a probability density function (PDF) for earthquake recurrence. Sites with fewer than 10-15 intervals do not provide enough information to reliably determine the shape of the PDF using standard maximum-likelihood techniques (e.g., Ellsworth et al., 1999). In this paper I present a method that attempts to fit wide ranges of distribution parameters to short paleoseismic series. From repeated Monte Carlo draws, it becomes possible to quantitatively estimate most likely recurrence PDF parameters, and a ranked distribution of parameters is returned that can be used to assess uncertainties in hazard calculations. In tests on short synthetic earthquake series, the method gives results that cluster around the mean of the input distribution, whereas maximum likelihood methods return the sample means (e.g., NIST/SEMATECH, 2006). For short series (fewer than 10 intervals), sample means tend to reflect the median of an asymmetric recurrence distribution, possibly leading to an overestimate of the hazard should they be used in probability calculations. Therefore a Monte Carlo approach may be useful for assessing recurrence from limited paleoearthquake records. Further, the degree of functional dependence among parameters like mean recurrence interval and coefficient of variation can be established. The method is described for use with time-independent and time-dependent PDFs, and results from 19 paleoseismic sequences on strike-slip faults throughout the state of California are given.

  12. Assessing the Uncertainties on Seismic Source Parameters: Towards Realistic Estimates of Moment Tensor Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoni, F.; Scognamiglio, L.; Tinti, E.; Casarotti, E.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic moment tensor is one of the most important source parameters defining the earthquake dimension and style of the activated fault. Moment tensor catalogues are ordinarily used by geoscientists, however, few attempts have been done to assess possible impacts of moment magnitude uncertainties upon their own analysis. The 2012 May 20 Emilia mainshock is a representative event since it is defined in literature with a moment magnitude value (Mw) spanning between 5.63 and 6.12. An uncertainty of ~0.5 units in magnitude leads to a controversial knowledge of the real size of the event. The possible uncertainty associated to this estimate could be critical for the inference of other seismological parameters, suggesting caution for seismic hazard assessment, coulomb stress transfer determination and other analyses where self-consistency is important. In this work, we focus on the variability of the moment tensor solution, highlighting the effect of four different velocity models, different types and ranges of filtering, and two different methodologies. Using a larger dataset, to better quantify the source parameter uncertainty, we also analyze the variability of the moment tensor solutions depending on the number, the epicentral distance and the azimuth of used stations. We endorse that the estimate of seismic moment from moment tensor solutions, as well as the estimate of the other kinematic source parameters, cannot be considered an absolute value and requires to come out with the related uncertainties and in a reproducible framework characterized by disclosed assumptions and explicit processing workflows.

  13. The determination of the operation parameters at the axial hydraulic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simedru, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    In the operating point of the monitoring moment there are assumed from process the monitoring measured parameters: the active and reactive power, upstream and downstream water levels (after the intake trash rake and at the outlet of the turbine draft tube), wicket gate and runner opening blades, the differential pressure in the spiral chamber and the hydrounit speed. So, there was established the characteristic curves obtained on analytic basis and similitude and compared with the curves measured experimentally on the hydraulic machines from the power plant. The cavitational coefficient of the machine and the cavitational coefficient of the equipment are in function of the system parameters between them especially the suction head, the runner and wicket gates blades angles of opening. The solution proposed is a method of determining the operating turbine parameters and of the cavitation, by reducing the error caused by the similitude phenomenon, using an accurate estimation of the turbine operating parameters according to the universal diagram of the turbine. The numerical obtained values permit the necessary correlation through a complex function which is able to reduce or eliminate the unwished effects of the cavitation phenomena on the hydraulic turbines of the Iron Gates power plant.

  14. Deformation Parameters Determination From The GPS Permanent and Epoch Observations In Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeil, M.; Jarosinski, M.

    The paper presents preliminary results of deformation parameters calculation from GPS observations for Poland. From geological point of view, the study area covers complex structural junction comprises of the Precambrian East European craton, heav- ily tectonised Teisseyre-Tornquist zone, the Palaeozoic platform, and also of young thrust and fold belt of the Carpathians. Complicated tectonic evolution, together with thermal field differentiation cause rheological contrasts and mechanical heterogene- ity in the earth crust that are expected to affect recent geokinematics of this area. Locations of the GPS stations have been chosen in order to sample major tectonic units of Poland representatively. For several stations coordinates changes had been computed and on that base, deformation parameters have been determined. Quality of these parameters depends on a distance between sites, utilised for their evaluation. This paper presents examples of deformation parameters, computed for GPS perma- nent and epoch observations, chosen from CERGOP, EXTENDED SAGET and EPN campaigns and supplemented by data from the EUREF network. Obtained deforma- tion have been compared with recent stress directions for the uppermost crust, as de- termined by mean of borehole breakout analysis.

  15. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  16. Determination of the initial beam parameters in Monte Carlo linac simulation.

    PubMed

    Aljarrah, Khaled; Sharp, Greg C; Neicu, Toni; Jiang, Steve B

    2006-04-01

    For Monte Carlo linac simulations and patient dose calculations, it is important to accurately determine the phase space parameters of the initial electron beam incident on the target. These parameters, such as mean energy and radial intensity distribution, have traditionally been determined by matching the calculated dose distributions with the measured dose distributions through a trial and error process. This process is very time consuming and requires a lot of Monte Carlo simulation experience and computational resources. In this paper, we propose an easy, efficient, and accurate method for the determination of the initial beam parameters. We hypothesize that (1) for one type of linacs, the geometry and material of major components of the treatment head are the same; the only difference is the phase space parameters of the initial electron beam incident on the target, and (2) most linacs belong to a limited number of linac types. For each type of linacs, Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MC-TPS) vendors simulate the treatment head and calculate the three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution in water phantom for a grid of initial beam energies and radii. The simulation results (phase space files and dose distribution files) are then stored in a data library. When a MC-TPS user tries to model their linac which belongs to the same type, a standard set of measured dose data is submitted and compared with the calculated dose distributions to determine the optimal combination of initial beam energy and radius. We have applied this method to the 6 MV beam of a Varian 21EX linac. The linac was simulated using EGSNRC/BEAM code and the dose in water phantom was calculated using EGSNRC/DOSXYZ. We have also studied issues related to the proposed method. Several common cost functions were tested for comparing measured and calculated dose distributions, including chi2, mean absolute error, dose difference at the penumbra edge point, slope of the dose difference of the

  17. Determination of Cole-Cole parameters using only the real part of electrical impedivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Miranda, David A; Rivera, S A López

    2008-05-01

    An algorithm is presented to determine the Cole-Cole parameters of electrical impedivity using only measurements of its real part. The algorithm is based on two multi-fold direct inversion methods for the Cole-Cole and Debye equations, respectively, and a genetic algorithm for the optimization of the mean square error between experimental and calculated data. The algorithm has been developed to obtain the Cole-Cole parameters from experimental data, which were used to screen cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia. The proposed algorithm was compared with different numerical integrations of the Kramers-Kronig relation and the result shows that this algorithm is the best. A high immunity to noise was obtained.

  18. Numerical method to determine mechanical parameters of engineering design in rock masses.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ting-He; Xiang, Yi-Qiang; Guo, Fa-Zhong

    2004-07-01

    This paper proposes a new continuity model for engineering in rock masses and a new schematic method for reporting the engineering of rock continuity. This method can be used to evaluate the mechanics of every kind of medium; and is a new way to determine the mechanical parameters used in engineering design in rock masses. In the numerical simulation, the experimental parameters of intact rock were combined with the structural properties of field rock. The experimental results for orthogonally-jointed rock are given. The results included the curves of the stress-strain relationship of some rock masses, the curve of the relationship between the dimension Delta and the uniaxial pressure-resistant strength sc of these rock masses, and pictures of the destructive procedure of some rock masses in uniaxial or triaxial tests, etc. Application of the method to engineering design in rock masses showed the potential of its application to engineering practice.

  19. Determination of orientational order parameters from 2H NMR spectra of magnetically partially oriented lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, H; Mädler, B; Sternin, E

    1998-01-01

    The partial orientation of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) in high magnetic fields is known to affect the shape of 2H NMR spectra. There are numerical methods for extracting either the orientational order parameters of lipid molecules for a random distribution of domain orientations in the sample, or the distribution of orientations for a known set of spectral anisotropies. A first attempt at determining the orientational order parameters in the presence of an unknown nonrandom distribution of orientations is presented. The numerical method is based on the Tikhonov regularization algorithm. It is tested using simulated partially oriented spectra. An experimental spectrum of a phospholipid-ether mixture in water is analyzed as an example. The experimental spectrum is consistent with an ellipsoidal shape of MLVs with a ratio of semiaxes of approximately 3.4. PMID:9533713

  20. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners

    PubMed Central

    Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R; Noo, F

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each view. The parameter values are found directly using formulae applied to the projected positions of the test object marker points onto the detector. Each view is treated independently, and no restrictions are made on the position of the cone vertex, or on the position or orientation of the detector. The proposed test object consists of 14 small point-like objects arranged with four points on each of three orthogonal lines, and two points on a diagonal line. This test object is shown to provide unique solutions for all possible scanner geometries, even when partial measurement information is lost by points superimposing in the calibration scan. For the many situations where the cone vertex stays reasonably close to a central plane (for circular, planar, or near-planar trajectories), a simpler version of the test object is appropriate. The simpler object consists of six points, two per orthogonal line, but with some restrictions on the positioning of the test object. This paper focuses on the principles and mathematical justifications for the method. Numerical simulations of the calibration process and reconstructions using estimated parameters are also presented to validate the method and to provide evidence of the robustness of the technique. PMID:19242049

  1. An Intensive Research of Satellite Orbit Theory and Application in Orbit Determination, Forecast and Parameter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. S.

    2011-03-01

    It has been over half a century since the launch of the first artificial satellite Sputnik in 1957, which marks the beginning of the Space Age. During the past 50 years, with the development and innovations in various fields and technologies, satellite application has grown more and more intensive and extensive. This thesis is based on three major research projects which the author joined in. These representative projects cover main aspects of satellite orbit theory and application of precise orbit determination (POD), and also show major research methods and important applications in orbit dynamics. Chapter 1 is an in-depth research on analytical theory of satellite orbits. This research utilizes general transformation theory to acquire high-order analytical solutions when mean-element method is not applicable. These solutions can be used in guidance and control or rapid orbit forecast within the accuracy of 10-6. We also discuss other major perturbations, each of which is considered with improved models, in pursuit of both convenience and accuracy especially when old models are hardly applicable. Chapter 2 is POD research based on observations. Assuming a priori force model and estimation algorithm have reached their accuracy limits, we introduce empirical forces to Shenzhou-type orbit in order to compensate possible unmodeled or mismodeled perturbations. Residuals are analyzed first and only empirical force models with actual physical background are considered. This not only enhances a posteriori POD accuracy, but also considerably improves the accuracy of orbit forecast. This chapter also contains theoretical discussions on modeling of empirical forces, computation of partial derivatives and propagation of various errors. Error propagation helps to better evaluate orbital accuracy in future missions. Chapter 3 is an application of POD in space geodesy. GRACE satellites are used to obtain Antarctic temporal gravity field between 2004 and 2007. Various changes

  2. Label-Free Determination of Hemodynamic Parameters in the Microcirculaton with Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dietzel, Steffen; Pircher, Joachim; Nekolla, A. Katharina; Gull, Mazhar; Brändli, André W.; Pohl, Ulrich; Rehberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Determination of blood flow velocity and related hemodynamic parameters is an important aspect of physiological studies which in many settings requires fluorescent labeling. Here we show that Third Harmonic Generation (THG) microscopy is a suitable tool for label-free intravital investigations of the microcirculation in widely-used physiological model systems. THG microscopy is a non-fluorescent multi-photon scanning technique combining the advantages of label-free imaging with restriction of signal generation to a focal spot. Blood flow was visualized and its velocity was measured in adult mouse cremaster muscle vessels, non-invasively in mouse ear vessels and in Xenopus tadpoles. In arterioles, THG line scanning allowed determination of the flow pulse velocity curve and hence the heart rate. By relocating the scan line we obtained velocity profiles through vessel diameters, allowing shear rate calculations. The cell free layer containing the glycocalyx was also visualized. Comparison of the current microscopic resolution with theoretical, diffraction limited resolution let us conclude that an about sixty-fold THG signal intensity increase may be possible with future improved optics, optimized for 1200–1300 nm excitation. THG microscopy is compatible with simultaneous two-photon excited fluorescence detection. It thus also provides the opportunity to determine important hemodynamic parameters in parallel to common fluorescent observations without additional label. PMID:24933027

  3. Development of quantitative radioactive methodologies on paper to determine important lateral-flow immunoassay parameters.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Garrett L; Nguyen, Phuong; Wu, Benjamin M; Kamei, Daniel T

    2016-08-01

    The lateral-flow immunoassay (LFA) is a well-established diagnostic technology that has recently seen significant advancements due in part to the rapidly expanding fields of paper diagnostics and paper-fluidics. As LFA-based diagnostics become more complex, it becomes increasingly important to quantitatively determine important parameters during the design and evaluation process. However, current experimental methods for determining these parameters have certain limitations when applied to LFA systems. In this work, we describe our novel methods of combining paper and radioactive measurements to determine nanoprobe molarity, the number of antibodies per nanoprobe, and the forward and reverse rate constants for nanoprobe binding to immobilized target on the LFA test line. Using a model LFA system that detects for the presence of the protein transferrin (Tf), we demonstrate the application of our methods, which involve quantitative experimentation and mathematical modeling. We also compare the results of our rate constant experiments with traditional experiments to demonstrate how our methods more appropriately capture the influence of the LFA environment on the binding interaction. Our novel experimental approaches can therefore more efficiently guide the research process for LFA design, leading to more rapid advancement of the field of paper-based diagnostics.

  4. Stochastically established resolution analysis helps to determine empirical tuning parameters in general interpolation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Z.; Chiao, L.

    2013-12-01

    Resolution analysis has been a crucial appraisal procedure in general estimation problems to help with the correct interpretation. However, complete resolution information is usually inaccessible due to the sizeable matrix inversion involved with the construction of the resolution matrix. Furthermore, there are not explicit forward kernels embedded within formulations for popular interpolation algorithms such as the kriging and the minimum curvature gridding schemes. Stochastic simulation has recently been proposed to make resolution evaluation for sizeable inverse problems tractable. We generalize the method of getting resolution information to the popular interpolation schemes. There are usually certain empirically determined tuning parameters involved in these interpolation schemes, for example, the ideal function and radius of influence for fitting the semi-variogram in the kriging method and the relative weighting of the membrane stress term in the minimum curvature gridding scheme. We show that our proposed resolution analysis not only provide the crucial spatial resolution pattern, more importantly, it helps to determine those critical tuning parameters that have been determined empirically and arbitrarily. Keywords: resolution analysis; stochastic simulation; kriging; minimum curvature gridding

  5. Determination of Groundwater Velocity and Dispersion Parameters by Borehole Wall Multielectrode Geoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessels, W.; Wuttke, M. W.

    2007-05-01

    A single well technique to determine groundwater flow values and transport parameters is presented. Multielectrode arrays are placed at the filtered casing depth by an inflatable packer or are installed on the borehole wall behind the casing.Tracer water with a higher or lower specific electrical conductivity (salinity) which is injected between the electrodes. This tracer plume then moves into the natural groundwater flow field. The observation of this movement by geoelectric logging enables the determination of the groundwater velocity and salinity. The transport parameters "effective porosity" and "dispersion length" can also be derived. The geoelectric logging uses n borehole electrodes and two grounding electrodes. Thus, either n independent two point measurements or n*(n-1)/2 pole-to-pole measurements can be conducted to obtain a full set of geoelectric measurements. This set is used to derive all electrode combinations by applying the law of superposition and reciprocity. The tracer distribution around the borehole during and after injection depends on the hydraulic and transport parameters of the aquifer and the filter sand. The transport parameter "porosity" plus the total injected tracer volume determines the tracer distribution around the borehole. The transport parameter "dispersivity" determines the abruptness of the tracer front. The method was tested by undertaking measurements in a lab aquifer filled with sand. The results are discussed and the limitations of the method are shown. Multielectrode installations behind casing were tested in situ in the two scientific boreholes CAT-LUD-1 and CAT- LUD-1A drilled in the northern part of Germany. A multielectrode packer system was designed, built and tested in these boreholes. The results are compared with colloid observations in the borehole and hydraulic triangulation in surrounded observation wells. Here, the interpretation of these in situ measurements is mainly restricted to two point geoelectric

  6. Methodology for Determining Optimal Exposure Parameters of a Hyperspectral Scanning Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczykowski, P.; Siok, K.; Jenerowicz, A.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the presented research was to establish a methodology that would allow the registration of hyperspectral images with a defined spatial resolution on a horizontal plane. The results obtained within this research could then be used to establish the optimum sensor and flight parameters for collecting aerial imagery data using an UAV or other aerial system. The methodology is based on an user-selected optimal camera exposure parameters (i.e. time, gain value) and flight parameters (i.e. altitude, velocity). A push-broom hyperspectral imager- the Headwall MicroHyperspec A-series VNIR was used to conduct this research. The measurement station consisted of the following equipment: a hyperspectral camera MicroHyperspec A-series VNIR, a personal computer with HyperSpec III software, a slider system which guaranteed the stable motion of the sensor system, a white reference panel and a Siemens star, which was used to evaluate the spatial resolution. Hyperspectral images were recorded at different distances between the sensor and the target- from 5m to 100m. During the registration process of each acquired image, many exposure parameters were changed, such as: the aperture value, exposure time and speed of the camera's movement on the slider. Based on all of the registered hyperspectral images, some dependencies between chosen parameters had been developed: - the Ground Sampling Distance - GSD and the distance between the sensor and the target, - the speed of the camera and the distance between the sensor and the target, - the exposure time and the gain value, - the Density Number and the gain value. The developed methodology allowed us to determine the speed and the altitude of an unmanned aerial vehicle on which the sensor would be mounted, ensuring that the registered hyperspectral images have the required spatial resolution.

  7. Determining global parameters of the oscillations of solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Régulo, C.; Creevey, O. L.; Ballot, J.; Salabert, D.; Arentoft, T.; Quirion, P.-O.; Chaplin, W. J.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Helioseismology has enabled us to better understand the solar interior, while also allowing us to better constrain solar models. But now is a tremendous epoch for asteroseismology as space missions dedicated to studying stellar oscillations have been launched within the last years (MOST and CoRoT). CoRoT has already proved valuable results for many types of stars, while Kepler, which was launched in March 2009, will provide us with a huge number of seismic data very soon. This is an opportunity to better constrain stellar models and to finally understand stellar structure and evolution. Aims: The goal of this research work is to estimate the global parameters of any solar-like oscillating target in an automatic manner. We want to determine the global parameters of the acoustic modes (large separation, range of excited pressure modes, maximum amplitude, and its corresponding frequency), retrieve the surface rotation period of the star and use these results to estimate the global parameters of the star (radius and mass). Methods: To prepare for the arrival and the analysis of hundreds of solar-like oscillating stars, we have developed a robust and automatic pipeline, which was partially adapted from helioseismic methods. The pipeline consists of data analysis techniques, such as Fast Fourier Transform, wavelets, autocorrelation, as well as the application of minimisation algorithms for stellar-modelling. Results: We apply our pipeline to some simulated lightcurves from the asteroFLAG team and the Aarhus-asteroFLAG simulator, and obtain results that are consistent with the input data to the simulations. Our strategy gives correct results for stars with magnitudes below 11 with only a few 10% of bad determinations among the reliable results. We then apply the pipeline to the Sun and three CoRoT targets. In particular we determine the large separation and radius of the Sun, HD49933, HD181906, and HD181420.

  8. Can Establishment Success Be Determined through Demographic Parameters? A Case Study on Five Introduced Bird Species

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Aguilar, Ana; Anadón, José D.; Edelaar, Pim; Carrete, Martina; Tella, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    The dominant criterion to determine when an introduced species is established relies on the maintenance of a self-sustaining population in the area of introduction, i.e. on the viability of the population from a demographic perspective. There is however a paucity of demographic studies on introduced species, and establishment success is thus generally determined by expert opinion without undertaking population viability analyses (PVAs). By means of an intensive five year capture-recapture monitoring program (involving >12,000 marked individuals) we studied the demography of five introduced passerine bird species in southern Spain which are established and have undergone a fast expansion over the last decades. We obtained useful estimates of demographic parameters (survival and reproduction) for one colonial species (Ploceus melanocephalus), confirming the long-term viability of its local population through PVAs. However, extremely low recapture rates prevented the estimation of survival parameters and population growth rates for widely distributed species with low local densities (Estrilda troglodytes and Amandava amandava) but also for highly abundant yet non-colonial species (Estrilda astrild and Euplectes afer). Therefore, determining the establishment success of introduced passerine species by demographic criteria alone may often be troublesome even when devoting much effort to field-work. Alternative quantitative methodologies such as the analysis of spatio-temporal species distributions complemented with expert opinion deserve thus their role in the assessment of establishment success of introduced species when estimates of demographic parameters are difficult to obtain, as is generally the case for non-colonial, highly mobile passerines. PMID:25333743

  9. A partition function-based weighting scheme in force field parameter development using ab initio calculation results in global configurational space.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Dai, Xiaodong; Huang, Niu; Zhao, Lifeng

    2013-06-01

    In force field parameter development using ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES) as target data, an important but often neglected matter is the lack of a weighting scheme with optimal discrimination power to fit the target data. Here, we developed a novel partition function-based weighting scheme, which not only fits the target potential energies exponentially like the general Boltzmann weighting method, but also reduces the effect of fitting errors leading to overfitting. The van der Waals (vdW) parameters of benzene and propane were reparameterized by using the new weighting scheme to fit the high-level ab initio PESs probed by a water molecule in global configurational space. The molecular simulation results indicate that the newly derived parameters are capable of reproducing experimental properties in a broader range of temperatures, which supports the partition function-based weighting scheme. Our simulation results also suggest that structural properties are more sensitive to vdW parameters than partial atomic charge parameters in these systems although the electrostatic interactions are still important in energetic properties. As no prerequisite conditions are required, the partition function-based weighting method may be applied in developing any types of force field parameters.

  10. Altimeter crossover methods for precision orbit determination and the mapping of geophysical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, C. K.; Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.; Zhang, B. H.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate orbit determination and the recovery of geophysical parameters are presently attempted via methodologies which use differenced height measurements at the points where the ground tracks of the altimetric satellite orbits intersect. Such 'crossover measurements' could significantly improve the earth's gravity field model. Attention is given to a novel technique employing crossover measurements from two satellites carrying altimeter instruments; this method can observe zonal harmonics of the earth's geopotential which are weakly observed through single-satellite crossovers. This dual-satellite crossover technique will be applicable to data from such future oceanographic satellites as ERS-1.

  11. k-Cone analysis: determining all candidate values for kinetic parameters on a network scale.

    PubMed

    Famili, Iman; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2005-03-01

    The absence of comprehensive measured kinetic values and the observed inconsistency in the available in vitro kinetic data has hindered the formulation of network-scale kinetic models of biochemical reaction networks. To meet this challenge we present an approach to construct a convex space, termed the k-cone, which contains all the allowable numerical values of the kinetic constants in large-scale biochemical networks. The definition of the k-cone relies on the incorporation of in vivo concentration data and a simplified approach to represent enzyme kinetics within an established constraint-based modeling approach. The k-cone approach was implemented to define the allowable combination of numerical values for a full kinetic model of human red blood cell metabolism and to study its correlated kinetic parameters. The k-cone approach can be used to determine consistency between in vitro measured kinetic values and in vivo concentration and flux measurements when used in a network-scale kinetic model. k-Cone analysis was successful in determining whether in vitro measured kinetic values used in the reconstruction of a kinetic-based model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae central metabolism could reproduce in vivo measurements. Further, the k-cone can be used to determine which numerical values of in vitro measured parameters are required to be changed in a kinetic model if in vivo measured values are not reproduced. k-Cone analysis could identify what minimum number of in vitro determined kinetic parameters needed to be adjusted in the S. cerevisiae model to be consistent with the in vivo data. Applying the k-cone analysis a priori to kinetic model development may reduce the time and effort involved in model building and parameter adjustment. With the recent developments in high-throughput profiling of metabolite concentrations at a whole-cell scale and advances in metabolomics technologies, the k-cone approach presented here may hold the promise for kinetic

  12. k-Cone Analysis: Determining All Candidate Values for Kinetic Parameters on a Network Scale

    PubMed Central

    Famili, Iman; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2005-01-01

    The absence of comprehensive measured kinetic values and the observed inconsistency in the available in vitro kinetic data has hindered the formulation of network-scale kinetic models of biochemical reaction networks. To meet this challenge we present an approach to construct a convex space, termed the k-cone, which contains all the allowable numerical values of the kinetic constants in large-scale biochemical networks. The definition of the k-cone relies on the incorporation of in vivo concentration data and a simplified approach to represent enzyme kinetics within an established constraint-based modeling approach. The k-cone approach was implemented to define the allowable combination of numerical values for a full kinetic model of human red blood cell metabolism and to study its correlated kinetic parameters. The k-cone approach can be used to determine consistency between in vitro measured kinetic values and in vivo concentration and flux measurements when used in a network-scale kinetic model. k-Cone analysis was successful in determining whether in vitro measured kinetic values used in the reconstruction of a kinetic-based model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae central metabolism could reproduce in vivo measurements. Further, the k-cone can be used to determine which numerical values of in vitro measured parameters are required to be changed in a kinetic model if in vivo measured values are not reproduced. k-Cone analysis could identify what minimum number of in vitro determined kinetic parameters needed to be adjusted in the S. cerevisiae model to be consistent with the in vivo data. Applying the k-cone analysis a priori to kinetic model development may reduce the time and effort involved in model building and parameter adjustment. With the recent developments in high-throughput profiling of metabolite concentrations at a whole-cell scale and advances in metabolomics technologies, the k-cone approach presented here may hold the promise for kinetic

  13. Albedo of the south pole on Mars determined by topographic forcing of atmosphere dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colaprete, A.; Barnes, J.R.; Haberle, R.M.; Hollingsworth, J.L.; Kieffer, H.H.; Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    The nature of the martian south polar cap has remained enigmatic since the first spacecraft observations. In particular, the presence of a perennial carbon dioxide ice cap, the formation of a vast area of black 'slab ice' known as the Cryptic region and the asymmetric springtime retreat of the cap have eluded explanation. Here we present observations and climate modelling that indicate the south pole of Mars is characterized by two distinct regional climates that are the result of dynamical forcing by the largest southern impact basins, Argyre and Hellas. The style of surface frost deposition is controlled by these regional climates. In the cold and stormy conditions that exist poleward of 60?? S and extend 180?? in longitude west from the Mountains of Mitchel (???30?? W), surface frost accumulation is dominated by precipitation. In the opposite hemisphere, the polar atmosphere is relatively warm and clear and frost accumulation is dominated by direct vapour deposition. It is the differences in these deposition styles that determine the cap albedo.

  14. Effect of Cutting Parameters on Thrust Force and Surface Roughness in Drilling of Al-2219/B4C/Gr Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindranath, V. M.; Basavarajappa, G. S. Shiva Shankar S.; Suresh, R.

    2016-09-01

    In aluminium matrix composites, reinforcement of hard ceramic particle present inside the matrix which causes tool wear, high cutting forces and poor surface finish during machining. This paper focuses on effect of cutting parameters on thrust force, surface roughness and burr height during drilling of MMCs. In the present work, discuss the influence of spindle speed and feed rate on drilling the pure base alloy (Al-2219), mono composite (Al- 2219+8% B4C) and hybrid composite (Al-2219+8%B4C+3%Gr). The composites were fabricated using liquid metallurgy route. The drilling experiments were conducted by CNC machine with TiN coated HSS tool, M42 (Cobalt grade) and carbide tools at various spindle speeds and feed rates. The thrust force, surface roughness and burr height of the drilled hole were investigated in mono composite and hybrid composite containing graphite particles, the experimental results show that the feed rate has more influence on thrust force and surface roughness. Lesser thrust force and discontinuous chips were produced during machining of hybrid composites when compared with mono and base alloy during drilling process. It is due to solid lubricant property of graphite which reduces the lesser thrust force, burr height and lower surface roughness. When machining with Carbide tool at low feed and high speeds good surface finish was obtained compared to other two types of cutting tool materials.

  15. Changes in force production and stroke parameters of trained able-bodied and unilateral arm-amputee female swimmers during a 30 s tethered front-crawl swim.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey Jane; Sanders, Ross H; Payton, Carl J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined changes in the propulsive force and stroke parameters of arm-amputee and able-bodied swimmers during tethered swimming. Eighteen well-trained female swimmers (nine unilateral arm amputees and nine able-bodied) were videotaped performing maximal-effort 30 s front-crawl swims, while attached to a load cell mounted on a pool wall. Tether force, stroke rate, stroke phase durations and inter-arm angle were quantified. The able-bodied group produced significantly higher mean and maximum tether forces than the amputee group. The mean of the intra-cyclic force peaks was very similar for both groups. Mean and maximum tether force had significant negative associations with 100 m swim time, for both groups. Both groups exhibited a similar fatigue index (relative decrease in tether force) during the test, but the amputees had a significantly greater stroke rate decline. A significant positive association between stroke rate decline and fatigue index was obtained for the able-bodied group only. Inter-arm angle and relative phase durations did not change significantly during the test for either group, except the recovery phase duration of the arm amputees, which decreased significantly. This study's results can contribute to the development of a more evidence-based classification system for swimmers with a disability.

  16. Experimental determination of solvent-water partition coefficients and Abraham parameters for munition constituents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuzhen; Kuo, Dave T F; Allen, Herbert E; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-10-01

    There is concern about the environmental fate and effects of munition constituents (MCs). Polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs) that employ Abraham solute parameters can aid in evaluating the risk of MCs to the environment. However, poor predictions using pp-LFERs and ABSOLV estimated Abraham solute parameters are found for some key physico-chemical properties. In this work, the Abraham solute parameters are determined using experimental partition coefficients in various solvent-water systems. The compounds investigated include hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5- nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 4-nitroanisole. The solvents in the solvent-water systems are hexane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, octanol, and toluene. The only available reported solvent-water partition coefficients are for octanol-water for some of the investigated compounds and they are in good agreement with the experimental measurements from this study. Solvent-water partition coefficients fitted using experimentally derived solute parameters from this study have significantly smaller root mean square errors (RMSE = 0.38) than predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters (RMSE = 3.56) for the investigated compounds. Additionally, the predictions for various physico-chemical properties using the experimentally derived solute parameters agree with available literature reported values with prediction errors within 0.79 log units except for water solubility of RDX and HMX with errors of 1.48 and 2.16 log units respectively. However, predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters have larger prediction errors of up to 7.68 log units. This large discrepancy is probably due to the missing R2NNO2

  17. 40 CFR 86.094-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas... plastic, or an inverted elliptical spacer or sheared off after adjustment at the factory, and the... the force is removed (plastic or spring steel materials); (D) In the case of any parameter,...

  18. 40 CFR 86.094-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas... plastic, or an inverted elliptical spacer or sheared off after adjustment at the factory, and the... the force is removed (plastic or spring steel materials); (D) In the case of any parameter,...

  19. 40 CFR 86.094-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the force is removed (plastic or spring steel materials); (D) In the case of any parameter, the... for $20 (1978 dollars) or less; (B) In the case of a choke bimetal spring, the plate covering the bimetal spring is riveted or welded in place, or held in place with nonreversible screws; (C) In the...

  20. Determination of Spectral Line Parameters in Selected Portions of the Infrared Spectrum of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Karen Keppler

    1999-01-01

    Pressure broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients due to water and nitrogen have been determined for water vapor transitions in the CO2 region of interest to Project HALOE. The temperature dependences of the widths and shifts have also been determined for selected transitions in this region. Results have been compared with values available in the literature. The line parameters have been obtained from the analysis of room temperature recordings of the spectrum of pure water and recordings of the spectra of heated water/nitrogen mixtures. The recordings of the water vapor spectrum were obtained with Fourier Transform Spectrometers at Kitt Peak and at the Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen. Up to eighteen spectra have been fitted simultaneously with a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique developed by Dr. D. Chris Benner and colleagues.

  1. Direct determination of the driving forces for taurocholate uptake into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M C; Blitzer, B L; Boyer, J L

    1983-01-01

    To determine directly the driving forces for bile acid entry into the hepatocyte, the uptake of [3H]taurocholic acid into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles was studied. The membrane preparation contained predominantly right-side-out vesicles, and was highly enriched in plasma membrane marker enzymes. The uptake of taurocholate at equilibrium was inversely related to medium osmolarity, indicating transport into an osmotically sensitive space. In the presence of an inwardly directed sodium gradient (NaCl or sodium gluconate), the initial rate of uptake was rapid and taurocholate was transiently accumulated at a concentration twice that at equilibrium (overshoot). Other inwardly directed cation gradients (K+, Li+, choline+) or the presence of sodium in the absence of a gradient (Na+ equilibrated) resulted in a slower initial uptake rate and did not sustain an overshoot. Bile acids inhibited sodium-dependent taurocholate uptake, whereas bromsulphthalein inhibited both sodium-dependent and sodium-independent uptake and D-glucose had no effect on uptake. Uptake was temperature dependent, with maximal overshoots occurring at 25 degrees C. Imposition of a proton gradient across the vesicle (pHo less than pHi) in the absence of a sodium gradient failed to enhance taurocholate uptake, indicating that double ion exchange (Na+-H+, OH- -anion) is unlikely. Creation of a negative intravesicular potential by altering accompanying anions or by valinomycin-induced K+-diffusion potentials did not enhance taurocholate uptake, suggesting an electroneutral transport mechanism. The kinetics of taurocholate uptake demonstrated saturability with a Michaelis constant at 52 microM and maximum velocity of 4.5 nmol X mg-1 X protein X min-1. These studies provide definitive evidence for a sodium gradient-dependent, carrier-mediated, electrically neutral transport mechanism for hepatic taurocholate uptake. These findings are consistent with a model for bile secretion in which the basolateral

  2. Determination of Cosmological Parameters from GRB Correlation between E_iso (gamma) and Afterglow Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Zitouni; Guessoum, Nidhal; Azzam, Walid

    2016-07-01

    Context: We use the correlation relations between the energy emitted by the GRBs in their prompt phases and the X-ray afterglow fluxes, in an effort to constrain cosmological parameters and construct a Hubble diagram at high redshifts, i.e. beyond those found in Type Ia supernovae. Methods: We use a sample of 128 Swift GRBs, which we have selected among more than 800 ones observed until July 2015. The selection is based on a few observational constraints: GRB flux higher than 0.4 photons/cm^2/s in the band 15-150 keV; spectrum fitted with simple power law; redshift accurately known and given; and X-ray afterglow observed and flux measured. The statistical method of maximum likelihood is then used to determine the best cosmological parameters (Ω_M, Ω_L) that give the best correlation between the isotropic gamma energies E_{iso} and the afterglow fluxes at the break time t_{b}. The χ^2 statistical test is also used as a way to compare results from two methods. Results & Conclusions: Although the number of GRBs with high redshifts is rather small, and despite the notable dispersion found in the data, the results we have obtained are quite encouraging and promising. The values of the cosmological parameters obtained here are close to those currently used.

  3. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for on-line determination of quality parameters in intact olives.

    PubMed

    Salguero-Chaparro, Lourdes; Baeten, Vincent; Fernández-Pierna, Juan A; Peña-Rodríguez, Francisco

    2013-08-15

    The acidity, moisture and fat content in intact olive fruits were determined on-line using a NIR diode array instrument, operating on a conveyor belt. Four sets of calibrations models were obtained by means of different combinations from samples collected during 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, using full-cross and external validation. Several preprocessing treatments such as derivatives and scatter correction were investigated by using the root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) and prediction (RMSEP), as control parameters. The results obtained showed RMSECV values of 2.54-3.26 for moisture, 2.35-2.71 for fat content and 2.50-3.26 for acidity parameters, depending on the calibration model developed. Calibrations for moisture, fat content and acidity gave residual predictive deviation (RPD) values of 2.76, 2.37 and 1.60, respectively. Although, it is concluded that the on-line NIRS prediction results were acceptable for the three parameters measured in intact olive samples in movement, the models developed must be improved in order to increase their accuracy before final NIRS implementation at mills. PMID:23561217

  4. Improving Stellar Parameter and Abundance Determinations of Early B-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieva, M.-F.; Przybilla, N.

    2010-06-01

    In the past years we have made great efforts to reduce the statistical and systematic uncertainties in stellar parameter and chemical abundance determinations of early B-type stars. Both the construction of robust model atoms for non-LTE line-formation calculations and a novel self-consistent spectral analysis methodology were decisive to achieve results of unprecedented precision. They were extensively tested and applied to high-quality spectra of stars from OB associations and the field in the solar neighborhood, covering a broad parameter range. Initially, most lines of hydrogen, helium and carbon in the optical/near-IR spectral range were reproduced simultaneously in a consistent way for the first time, improving drastically on the accuracy of results in published work. By taking additional ionization equilibria of oxygen, neon, silicon, and iron into account, uncertainties as low as ˜1% in effective temperature, ˜10% in surface gravity and ˜20% in elemental abundances are achieved—compared to ˜5-10%, ˜25% and a factor ˜2-3 using standard methods. Several sources of systematic errors have been identified by comparison of our analysis methods for early B-type stars with previously used standard techniques, e.g., the VLT-FLAMES survey of massive stars. Improvements in automatic analyses are strongly recommended for meaningful comparisons of spectroscopic stellar parameters and chemical abundances (“observational constraints”) with predictions of stellar and galactic chemical evolution models.

  5. [Determination of the solubility parameter of organosolv lignin by inverse gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yachen; Li, Kunlan; Ma, Yingchong; Wei, Ligang

    2013-02-01

    An inverse gas chromatographic (IGC) method has been used to measure the solubility parameters (delta2) of organosolv lignin at the absolute temperatures from 333.15 K to 373.15 K. The test probe solvents were n-octane (n-C8), n-decane (n-C10), n-dodecane (n-C12), and n-tetradecane (n-C14). The specific retention volumes of the solvents (Vg0), the molar enthalpy of sorption (deltaH1S), the partial molar enthalpy of mixing at infinite dilution (deltaH1infinity), the molar enthalpy of vaporization (deltaHv), the activity coefficients at infinite dilution (Omega1- infinity), and Flory-Huggins inter action parameters (chi12infinity) between organosolv lignin and probe solvents were obtained. The results showed that the above four probes are poor solvents for organosolv lignin; at the same temperature, the chi12infinity reduced with the increase of the carbon number of probe solvents. The average solubility parameter of organosolv lignin was determined as 19.03 (J x cm(-3))1/2.

  6. [Determination of the solubility parameter of organosolv lignin by inverse gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yachen; Li, Kunlan; Ma, Yingchong; Wei, Ligang

    2013-02-01

    An inverse gas chromatographic (IGC) method has been used to measure the solubility parameters (delta2) of organosolv lignin at the absolute temperatures from 333.15 K to 373.15 K. The test probe solvents were n-octane (n-C8), n-decane (n-C10), n-dodecane (n-C12), and n-tetradecane (n-C14). The specific retention volumes of the solvents (Vg0), the molar enthalpy of sorption (deltaH1S), the partial molar enthalpy of mixing at infinite dilution (deltaH1infinity), the molar enthalpy of vaporization (deltaHv), the activity coefficients at infinite dilution (Omega1- infinity), and Flory-Huggins inter action parameters (chi12infinity) between organosolv lignin and probe solvents were obtained. The results showed that the above four probes are poor solvents for organosolv lignin; at the same temperature, the chi12infinity reduced with the increase of the carbon number of probe solvents. The average solubility parameter of organosolv lignin was determined as 19.03 (J x cm(-3))1/2. PMID:23697179

  7. Determination of the D2 parameter for (d,t) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, L. D.; Colby, P. C.; Hichwa, B. P.

    1981-08-01

    Measurements of the tensor analyzing powers have been obtained for (d-->,t) reactions on 91Zr, 118Sn, 119Sn, and 208Pb for deuteron energies both above and below the Coulomb barrier. The measurements are sensitive to the presence of D-state components in the triton wave function and allow the determination of a parameter D2. This parameter is a measure of the importance of triton wave function components in which one neutron moves with orbital angular momentum L=2 relative to the deuteron center of mass. Values of D2 are extracted from the tensor analyzing power measurements by making use of distorted-wave Born approximation calculations. Analysis of the sub-Coulomb measurements leads to D2=-0.279+/-0.012 fm2, which is somewhat larger in magnitude than recent theoretical predictions. [NUCLEAR REACTIONS 91Zr(d,t), Ed=6.0,7.5 MeV, 118Sn(d,t), Ed=12.0 MeV, 119Sn(d,t), Ed=6.0,7.5,9.0 MeV, 208Pb(d,t), Ed=10.0,12.3 MeV; measured polarization parameters T20(θ), T21(θ), T22(θ) deduced D2. Enriched targets, DWBA analysis.

  8. Determination of spatially dependent diffusion parameters in bovine bone using Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Shokry, Abdallah; Ståhle, Per; Svensson, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    Although many studies have been made for homogenous constant diffusion, bone is an inhomogeneous material. It has been suggested that bone porosity decreases from the inner boundaries to the outer boundaries of the long bones. The diffusivity of substances in the bone matrix is believed to increase as the bone porosity increases. In this study, an experimental set up is used where bovine bone samples, saturated with potassium chloride (KCl), were put into distilled water and the conductivity of the water was followed. Chloride ions in the bone samples escaped out in the water through diffusion and the increase of the conductivity was measured. A one-dimensional, spatially dependent mathematical model describing the diffusion process is used. The diffusion parameters in the model are determined using a Kalman filter technique. The parameters for spatially dependent at endosteal and periosteal surfaces are found to be (12.8 ± 4.7) × 10(-11) and (5 ± 3.5) × 10(-11)m(2)/s respectively. The mathematical model function using the obtained diffusion parameters fits very well with the experimental data with mean square error varies from 0.06 × 10(-6) to 0.183 × 10(-6) (μS/m)(2).

  9. Determination of Meta-Parameters for Support Vector Machine Linear Combinations.

    PubMed

    Jasial, Swarit; Balfer, Jenny; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Support vector machines (SVMs) are among the most popular machine learning methods for compound classification and other chemoinformatics tasks such as, for example, the prediction of ligand-target pairs or compound activity profiles. Depending on the specific applications, different SVM strategies can be used. For example, in the context of potency-directed virtual screening, linear combinations of multiple SVM models have been shown to enrich database selection sets with potent compounds compared to individual models. An open question concerning the use of SVM linear combinations (SVM-LCs) is how to best weight the models on a relative scale. Typically, linear weights are subjectively set. Herein, preferred weighting factors for SVM-LC were systematically determined. Therefore, weights were treated as meta-parameters and optimized by machine learning to enrich data set rankings with highly active compounds. The meta-parameter approach has been applied to 10 screening data sets and found to further improve SVM performance over other SVM-LCs and support vector regression (SVR) models. The results show that optimal weights depend on data set characteristics and chosen molecular representations. In addition, individual models often do not contribute to the performance of SVM-LCs. Taken together, these findings emphasize the need for systematic meta-parameter estimation.

  10. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  11. Determination of Meta-Parameters for Support Vector Machine Linear Combinations.

    PubMed

    Jasial, Swarit; Balfer, Jenny; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Support vector machines (SVMs) are among the most popular machine learning methods for compound classification and other chemoinformatics tasks such as, for example, the prediction of ligand-target pairs or compound activity profiles. Depending on the specific applications, different SVM strategies can be used. For example, in the context of potency-directed virtual screening, linear combinations of multiple SVM models have been shown to enrich database selection sets with potent compounds compared to individual models. An open question concerning the use of SVM linear combinations (SVM-LCs) is how to best weight the models on a relative scale. Typically, linear weights are subjectively set. Herein, preferred weighting factors for SVM-LC were systematically determined. Therefore, weights were treated as meta-parameters and optimized by machine learning to enrich data set rankings with highly active compounds. The meta-parameter approach has been applied to 10 screening data sets and found to further improve SVM performance over other SVM-LCs and support vector regression (SVR) models. The results show that optimal weights depend on data set characteristics and chosen molecular representations. In addition, individual models often do not contribute to the performance of SVM-LCs. Taken together, these findings emphasize the need for systematic meta-parameter estimation. PMID:27490035

  12. Comparing different approaches for determining joint torque parameters from isovelocity dynamometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Forrester, S E; Yeadon, M R; King, M A; Pain, M T G

    2011-03-15

    Strength, or maximum joint torque, is a fundamental factor governing human movement, and is regularly assessed for clinical and rehabilitative purposes as well as for research into human performance. This study aimed to identify the most appropriate protocol for fitting a maximum voluntary torque function to experimental joint torque data. Three participants performed maximum isometric and concentric-eccentric knee extension trials on an isovelocity dynamometer and a separate experimental protocol was used to estimate maximum knee extension angular velocity. A nine parameter maximum voluntary torque function, which included angle, angular velocity and neural inhibition effects, was fitted to the experimental torque data and three aspects of this fitting protocol were investigated. Using an independent experimental estimate of maximum knee extension angular velocity gave lower variability in the high concentric velocity region of the maximum torque function compared to using dynamometer measurements alone. A weighted root mean square difference (RMSD) score function, that forced the majority (73-92%) of experimental data beneath the maximum torque function, was found to best account for the one-sided noise in experimental torques resulting from sub-maximal effort by the participants. The suggested protocol (an appropriately weighted RMSD score function and an independent estimate of maximum knee extension angular velocity) gave a weighted RMSD of between 11 and 13 Nm (4-5% of maximum isometric torque). It is recommended that this protocol be used in generating maximum voluntary joint torque functions in all torque-based modelling of dynamic human movement.

  13. 40 CFR 86.001-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification and..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas...; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification...

  14. 40 CFR 86.001-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification and..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas...; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification...

  15. 40 CFR 86.001-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification and..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas...; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification...

  16. 40 CFR 86.001-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification and..., and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas...; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification...

  17. 40 CFR 86.094-22 - Approval of application for certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certification; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification and...; test fleet selections; determinations of parameters subject to adjustment for certification and... may approve the application and select a test fleet in accordance with § 86.094-24. (b) Disapproval...

  18. Determining appropriate imaging parameters for kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring: an experimental phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, D.; Ng, J. A.; Keall, P. J.; O'Brien, R. T.; Poulsen, P. R.; Juneja, P.; Booth, J. T.

    2015-06-01

    Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) utilises the kV imager during treatment for real-time tracking of prostate fiducial markers. However, its effectiveness relies on sufficient image quality for the fiducial tracking task. To guide the performance characterisation of KIM under different clinically relevant conditions, the effect of different kV parameters and patient size on image quality, and quantification of MV scatter from the patient to the kV detector panel were investigated in this study. Image quality was determined for a range of kV acquisition frame rates, kV exposure, MV dose rates and patient sizes. Two methods were used to determine image quality; the ratio of kV signal through the patient to the MV scatter from the patient incident on the kilovoltage detector, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The effect of patient size and frame rate on MV scatter was evaluated in a homogeneous CIRS pelvis phantom and marker segmentation was determined utilising the Rando phantom with embedded markers. MV scatter incident on the detector was shown to be dependent on patient thickness and frame rate. The segmentation code was shown to be successful for all frame rates above 3 Hz for the Rando phantom corresponding to a kV to MV ratio of 0.16 and an SNR of 1.67. For a maximum patient dimension less than 36.4 cm the conservative kV parameters of 5 Hz at 1 mAs can be used to reduce dose while retaining image quality, where the current baseline kV parameters of 10 Hz at 1 mAs is shown to be adequate for marker segmentation up to a patient dimension of 40 cm. In conclusion, the MV scatter component of image quality noise for KIM has been quantified. For most prostate patients, use of KIM with 10 Hz imaging at 1 mAs is adequate however image quality can be maintained and imaging dose reduced by altering existing acquisition parameters.

  19. Determining appropriate imaging parameters for kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring: an experimental phantom study.

    PubMed

    Wallace, D; Ng, J A; Keall, P J; O'Brien, R T; Poulsen, P R; Juneja, P; Booth, J T

    2015-06-21

    Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) utilises the kV imager during treatment for real-time tracking of prostate fiducial markers. However, its effectiveness relies on sufficient image quality for the fiducial tracking task. To guide the performance characterisation of KIM under different clinically relevant conditions, the effect of different kV parameters and patient size on image quality, and quantification of MV scatter from the patient to the kV detector panel were investigated in this study. Image quality was determined for a range of kV acquisition frame rates, kV exposure, MV dose rates and patient sizes. Two methods were used to determine image quality; the ratio of kV signal through the patient to the MV scatter from the patient incident on the kilovoltage detector, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The effect of patient size and frame rate on MV scatter was evaluated in a homogeneous CIRS pelvis phantom and marker segmentation was determined utilising the Rando phantom with embedded markers. MV scatter incident on the detector was shown to be dependent on patient thickness and frame rate. The segmentation code was shown to be successful for all frame rates above 3 Hz for the Rando phantom corresponding to a kV to MV ratio of 0.16 and an SNR of 1.67. For a maximum patient dimension less than 36.4 cm the conservative kV parameters of 5 Hz at 1 mAs can be used to reduce dose while retaining image quality, where the current baseline kV parameters of 10 Hz at 1 mAs is shown to be adequate for marker segmentation up to a patient dimension of 40 cm. In conclusion, the MV scatter component of image quality noise for KIM has been quantified. For most prostate patients, use of KIM with 10 Hz imaging at 1 mAs is adequate however image quality can be maintained and imaging dose reduced by altering existing acquisition parameters. PMID:26057776

  20. A new methodology to determine kinetic parameters for one- and two-step chemical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantel, T.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Bowman, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a new methodology to determine kinetic parameters for simple chemical models and simple transport properties classically used in DNS of premixed combustion is presented. First, a one-dimensional code is utilized to performed steady unstrained laminar methane-air flame in order to verify intrinsic features of laminar flames such as burning velocity and temperature and concentration profiles. Second, the flame response to steady and unsteady strain in the opposed jet configuration is numerically investigated. It appears that for a well determined set of parameters, one- and two-step mechanisms reproduce the extinction limit of a laminar flame submitted to a steady strain. Computations with the GRI-mech mechanism (177 reactions, 39 species) and multicomponent transport properties are used to validate these simplified models. A sensitivity analysis of the preferential diffusion of heat and reactants when the Lewis number is close to unity indicates that the response of the flame to an oscillating strain is very sensitive to this number. As an application of this methodology, the interaction between a two-dimensional vortex pair and a premixed laminar flame is performed by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) using the one- and two-step mechanisms. Comparison with the experimental results of Samaniego et al. (1994) shows a significant improvement in the description of the interaction when the two-step model is used.

  1. The Determination of Forces and Moments on a Gimballed SRM Nozzle Using a Cold Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Bacchus, David L.; Hengel, John E.

    1994-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Facility (SAF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to characterize the flow in the critical aft end and nozzle of a solid propellant rocket motor (SRM) as part of the design phase of development. The SAF is a high pressure, blowdown facility which supplies a controlled flow of air to a subscale model of the internal port and nozzle of a SRM to enable measurement and evaluation of the flow field and surface pressure distributions. The ASRM Aft Section/Nozzle Model is an 8 percent scale model of the 19 second burn time aft port geometry and nozzle of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, the now canceled new generation space Shuttle Booster. It has the capability to simulate fixed nozzle gimbal angles of 0, 4, and 8 degrees. The model was tested at full scale motor Reynolds Numbers with extensive surface pressure instrumentation to enable detailed mapping of the surface pressure distributions over the nozzle interior surface, the exterior surface of the nozzle nose and the surface of the simulated propellant grain in the aft motor port. A mathematical analysis and associated numerical procedure were developed to integrate the measured surface pressure distributions to determine the lateral and axial forces on the moveable section of the nozzle, the effective model thrust and the effective aerodynamic thrust vector (as opposed to the geometric nozzle gimbal angle). The nozzle lateral and axial aerodynamic loads and moments about the pivot point are required for design purposes and require complex, three dimensional flow analyses. The alignment of the thrust vector with the nozzle geometric centerline is also a design requirement requiring three dimensional analyses which were supported by this experimental program. The model was tested with all three gimbal angles at three pressure levels to determine Reynolds number effects and reproducibility. This program was successful in demonstrating that a measured surface pressure

  2. Determination of the force constant of a single-beam gradient trap by measurement of backscattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, M. E. J.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H.; Heckenberg, N. R.; Dearden, E. W.

    1996-12-01

    A single-beam gradient trap could potentially be used to hold a stylus for scanning force microscopy. With a view to development of this technique, we modeled the optical trap as a harmonic oscillator and therefore characterized it by its force constant. We measured force constants and resonant frequencies for 1 4- m-diameter polystyrene spheres in a single-beam gradient trap using measurements of backscattered light. Force constants were determined with both Gaussian and doughnut laser modes, with powers of 3 and 1 mW, respectively. Typical values for spring constants were measured to be between 10 6 and 4 10 6 N m. The resonant frequencies of trapped particles were measured to be between 1 and 10 kHz, and the rms amplitudes of oscillations were estimated to be around 40 nm. Our results confirm that the use of the doughnut mode for single-beam trapping is more efficient in the axial direction.

  3. The determination of the constitutive parameters of a medium with application to a reinforced concrete pad

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.; Burke, G.J.; Pennock, S.T.

    1995-01-15

    This report describes the experimental and analytical program performed to determine the constitutive parameters of the reinforced concrete pad in the test facility used during the Low Power On-the-Ground portion of the NASA Boeing 757 HIRF Tests. These tests were conducted during the period September 20 to October 21, 1994 in the LESLI facility at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM. The on-the-ground tests were designed to meet several objectives including support of a flight test series and the generation of data for the validation of codes and models that could be used to predict the electromagnetic environment in transport aircraft. To satisfy these objectives, tests were to be executed in a known environment and the data compared to modeling results. A critical feature of this testing was the ``known environment`` which implies knowledge of the parameters which are critical to an effective modeling activity and which could include, among many other things, definitions of the airplane and its physical and electrical configuration, the ground upon which it sits when stationary, the fields impinging on the aircraft, and the radiating or bounding structure in the simulator. The authors would want to specify the electromagnetic characteristics of the entire space that would likely enter into a mathematical modeling effort so that the model can be made as ``close`` to physical reality as desired prior to exercising computational algorithms which might introduce their own uncertainties. Since the authors are evaluating codes used for determination of the electromagnetic environment in aircraft and since the on-the-ground test involved an airplane parked on a pad in the simulator facility, they would require a definition of the constitutive parameters of the pad.

  4. Accuracy of the atmospheric parameters determination in FGK stars based on spectral fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, Lyudmila

    2015-08-01

    We perform an extensive testing of the accuracy of atmospheric parameters determination in FGK stars based on the spectral fitting procedure SME (Spectroscopy Made Easy). Our set of stars consists of 13 objects, including the Sun, in temperature range 5000-6600 K and metallicity range -1.4 to +0.4. For these stars the parameters derived by means of interferometry are known. For each star we use spectra obtained with different echelle spectrographs (42000 <= R <= 110000) and different signal-to-noise ratios. We also test how the values of the derived parameters depend on the spectral regions used in the fitting procedure. We tested three different constraints on the spectral masks; four regions of 100 A, each, 4485-4590, 5100-5200, 5600-5700, and 6100-6200 A, the same regions plus Halpha and Hbeta, and the mask employed by Valenti & Fischer (2005). We propose a new method for estimating the uncertainties of the free parameters in SME, based on the fit residuals, partial derivatives and data uncertainties. To construct the distribution for a given free parameter (Teff, log g, etc.) we estimate the change required to match the observations in every pixel involved in the fit. The main difficulty in estimating uncertainties is a non-Gaussian shape of the resulting distribution. This difficulty is alleviated by constructing a cumulative distribution. For stars in the 5700-6600 K temperature range the closest agreement with the effective temperatures derived by interferometry is achieved when the spectral fitting includes the Halpha and Hbeta lines, while for cooler stars the choice of the mask does not effect the results. The derived values of atmospheric parameters do not strongly depend on the spectral resolution and S/N ratio, while the uncertainty both in temperature and surface gravity grows with the effective temperature never being smaller than 50 K in Teff and 0.1 in log g, for typical S/N = 150-200. Better accuracy Delta Teff = 20-30 K and Delta log g = 0

  5. New force field parameters for metalloproteins I: Divalent copper ion centers including three histidine residues and an oxygen-ligated amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Wise, Olivia; Coskuner, Orkid

    2014-06-30

    Transition metal ion complexation with proteins is ubiquitous across such diverse fields as neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In this study, the structures of divalent copper ion centers including three histidine and one oxygen-ligated amino acid residues and the relative binding affinities of the oxygen-ligated amino acid residues with these metal ion centers, which are debated in the literature, are presented. Furthermore, new force field parameters, which are currently lacking for the full-length metal-ligand moieties, are developed for metalloproteins that have these centers. These new force field parameters enable investigations of metalloproteins possessing these binding sites using molecular simulations. In addition, the impact of using the atom equivalence and inequivalence atomic partial charge calculation procedures on the simulated structures of these metallopeptides, including hydration properties, is described.

  6. Aging related changes in determinants of muscle force generating capacity: a comparison of muscle aging in men and male rodents.

    PubMed

    Ballak, Sam B; Degens, Hans; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-03-01

    Human aging is associated with a progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and force generating capacity, however the exact mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. Rodents models have often been used to enhance our understanding of mechanisms of age-related changes in human skeletal muscle. However, to what extent age-related alterations in determinants of muscle force generating capacity observed in rodents resemble those in humans has not been considered thoroughly. This review compares the effect of aging on muscle force generating determinants (muscle mass, fiber size, fiber number, fiber type distribution and muscle specific tension), in men and male rodents at similar relative age. It appears that muscle aging in male F344*BN rat resembles that in men most; 32-35-month-old rats exhibit similar signs of muscle weakness to those of 70-80-yr-old men, and the decline in 36-38-month-old rats is similar to that in men aged over 80 yrs. For male C57BL/6 mice, age-related decline in muscle force generating capacity seems to occur only at higher relative age than in men. We conclude that the effects on determinants of muscle force differ between species as well as within species, but qualitatively show the same pattern as that observed in men.

  7. Determination of the vertical ground reaction forces acting upon individual limbs during healthy and clinical gait.

    PubMed

    Meurisse, Guillaume M; Dierick, Frédéric; Schepens, Bénédicte; Bastien, Guillaume J

    2016-01-01

    In gait lab, the quantification of the ground reaction forces (GRFs) acting upon individual limbs is required for dynamic analysis. However, using a single force plate, only the resultant GRF acting on both limbs is available. The aims of this study are (a) to develop an algorithm allowing a reliable detection of the front foot contact (FC) and the back foot off (FO) time events when walking on a single plate, (b) to reconstruct the vertical GRFs acting upon each limb during the double contact phase (DC) and (c) to evaluate this reconstruction on healthy and clinical gait trials. For the purpose of the study, 811 force measurements during DC were analyzed based on walking trials from 27 healthy subjects and 88 patients. FC and FO are reliably detected using a novel method based on the distance covered by the centre of pressure. The algorithm for the force reconstruction is a revised version of the approach of Davis and Cavanagh [24]. In order to assess the robustness of the algorithm, we compare the resulting GRFs with the real forces measured with individual force plates. The median of the relative error on force reconstruction is 1.8% for the healthy gait and 2.5% for the clinical gait. The reconstructed and the real GRFs during DC are strongly correlated for both healthy and clinical gait data (R(2)=0.998 and 0.991, respectively).

  8. Determination of the vertical ground reaction forces acting upon individual limbs during healthy and clinical gait.

    PubMed

    Meurisse, Guillaume M; Dierick, Frédéric; Schepens, Bénédicte; Bastien, Guillaume J

    2016-01-01

    In gait lab, the quantification of the ground reaction forces (GRFs) acting upon individual limbs is required for dynamic analysis. However, using a single force plate, only the resultant GRF acting on both limbs is available. The aims of this study are (a) to develop an algorithm allowing a reliable detection of the front foot contact (FC) and the back foot off (FO) time events when walking on a single plate, (b) to reconstruct the vertical GRFs acting upon each limb during the double contact phase (DC) and (c) to evaluate this reconstruction on healthy and clinical gait trials. For the purpose of the study, 811 force measurements during DC were analyzed based on walking trials from 27 healthy subjects and 88 patients. FC and FO are reliably detected using a novel method based on the distance covered by the centre of pressure. The algorithm for the force reconstruction is a revised version of the approach of Davis and Cavanagh [24]. In order to assess the robustness of the algorithm, we compare the resulting GRFs with the real forces measured with individual force plates. The median of the relative error on force reconstruction is 1.8% for the healthy gait and 2.5% for the clinical gait. The reconstructed and the real GRFs during DC are strongly correlated for both healthy and clinical gait data (R(2)=0.998 and 0.991, respectively). PMID:26549482

  9. Determination of μd chemistry kinetic parameters for the MuSun Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raha, Nandita

    2014-09-01

    The MuSun experiment at PSI will measure the muon doublet capture rate Λd in ultra pure deuterium gas to 1.5% precision from the measured decay-electron time distribution. This reaction cleanly determines the strength of the two-nucleon weak axial current interaction. The kinetic parameters of the μd chemistry are essential for extracting Λd, which in turn are determined from the process of muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium. This process yields 3 He recoils and 2.45 MeV monoenergetic neutrons from the reaction ddμ -->3 He + n + μ . Encoded in the time dependence of the fusion products are the ddμ molecular formation rates from the F = 1 / 2 , 3 / 2 hyperfine states (λd and λq) and the hyperfine transition rate (λqd) from the higher-energy F = 3 / 2 state to the lower-energy F = 1 / 2 state. This work concentrates on the analysis of the fusion neutrons, which are detected by an array of eight neutron detectors. Pulse shape discrimination was used to distinguish neutrons from background gamma rays. A least squared fit to the time spectrum of the fusion neutrons determines the μd chemistry kinetic parameters λqd and the ratio λq / λd. The MuSun experiment at PSI will measure the muon doublet capture rate Λd in ultra pure deuterium gas to 1.5% precision from the measured decay-electron time distribution. This reaction cleanly determines the strength of the two-nucleon weak axial current interaction. The kinetic parameters of the μd chemistry are essential for extracting Λd, which in turn are determined from the process of muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium. This process yields 3 He recoils and 2.45 MeV monoenergetic neutrons from the reaction ddμ -->3 He + n + μ . Encoded in the time dependence of the fusion products are the ddμ molecular formation rates from the F = 1 / 2 , 3 / 2 hyperfine states (λd and λq) and the hyperfine transition rate (λqd) from the higher-energy F = 3 / 2 state to the lower-energy F = 1 / 2 state. This work concentrates

  10. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  11. Effects of Water-misting Sprays with Forced Ventilation after Transport during Summer on Meat Quality, Stress Parameters, Glycolytic Potential and Microstructures of Muscle in Broilers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, N N; Xing, T; Wang, P; Xie, C; Xu, X L

    2015-12-01

    Effects of water-misting sprays with forced ventilation after transport during summer on meat quality, stress parameters, glycolytic potential and microstructures of muscle in broilers were investigated. A total of 105 mixed-sex Arbor Acres broilers were divided into three treatment groups: i) 45-min transport without rest (T group), ii) 45-min transport with 1-h rest (TR group), iii) 45-min transport with 15-min water-misting sprays with forced ventilation and 45-min rest (TWFR group). The results showed the TWFR group significantly increased (p<0.05) initial muscle pH (pHi) and ultimate pH (pHu) and significantly reduced L* (p<0.05), drip loss, cook loss, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase activity, plasma glucose content, lactate and glycolytic potential when compared with other groups. Microstructure of the muscle from TWFR group broilers under light microscopy showed smaller intercellular spaces among muscle fibers and bundles compared with T group. In conclusion this study indicated water-misting sprays with forced ventilation after transport could relieve the stress caused by transport under high temperature, which was favorable for the broilers' welfare. Furthermore, water-misting sprays with forced ventilation after transport slowed down the postmortem glycolysis rate and inhibited the occurrence of PSE-like meat in broilers. Although rest after transport could also improve the meat quality, the effect was not as significant as water-misting sprays with forced ventilation after transport. PMID:26580445

  12. Effects of Water-misting Sprays with Forced Ventilation after Transport during Summer on Meat Quality, Stress Parameters, Glycolytic Potential and Microstructures of Muscle in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, N. N.; Xing, T.; Wang, P.; Xie, C.; Xu, X. L.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of water-misting sprays with forced ventilation after transport during summer on meat quality, stress parameters, glycolytic potential and microstructures of muscle in broilers were investigated. A total of 105 mixed-sex Arbor Acres broilers were divided into three treatment groups: i) 45-min transport without rest (T group), ii) 45-min transport with 1-h rest (TR group), iii) 45-min transport with 15-min water-misting sprays with forced ventilation and 45-min rest (TWFR group). The results showed the TWFR group significantly increased (p<0.05) initial muscle pH (pHi) and ultimate pH (pHu) and significantly reduced L* (p<0.05), drip loss, cook loss, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase activity, plasma glucose content, lactate and glycolytic potential when compared with other groups. Microstructure of the muscle from TWFR group broilers under light microscopy showed smaller intercellular spaces among muscle fibers and bundles compared with T group. In conclusion this study indicated water-misting sprays with forced ventilation after transport could relieve the stress caused by transport under high temperature, which was favorable for the broilers’ welfare. Furthermore, water-misting sprays with forced ventilation after transport slowed down the postmortem glycolysis rate and inhibited the occurrence of PSE-like meat in broilers. Although rest after transport could also improve the meat quality, the effect was not as significant as water-misting sprays with forced ventilation after transport. PMID:26580445

  13. Determining fate and transport parameters for nitroglycerine, 2,4-dinitrotoluine, and nitroguanidine in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosch, D. L.; Dontsova, K.; Chorover, J.; Ferré, T.; Taylor, S.

    2010-12-01

    During military operations, a small fraction of propellant mass is not consumed during firing and is deposited onto the ground surface (Jenkins et al., 2006). Soluble propellant constituents can be released from particulate residues into the environment. Propellant constituents of interest for this study are nitroglycerine (NG), 2,4-dinitrotoluine (2,4-DNT), 2,6-dinitrotoluine (2,6-DNT), and nitroguanidine (NQ). The goal of this work is to determine fate and transport parameters for these constituents in three soils that represent a range of geographic locations and soil properties. This supports a companion study that looks at dissolution of NG, 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, and NQ from fired and unfired solid propellant formulations and their transport in soils. The three soils selected for the study are Catlin silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, mesic, superactive Oxyaquic Argiudoll), Plymouth sandy loam (mesic, coated Typic Quartzipsamment), and Sassafras loam (fine loamy, siliceous, mesic Typic Hapudult). Two of these soils, Plymouth sandy loam and Sassafras loam, were collected on military installations. Linear adsorption coefficients and transformation rates of propellant constituents were determined in batch kinetic experiments. Soils were mixed with propellant constituent solutions (2 mg L-1) at 4:1 solution/soil mass ratio and equilibrated for 0, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 120 hr at which time samples were centrifuged and supernatant solutions were analyzed for target compounds by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using U.S. EPA Method 8330b for NG, 2,4-DNT, and 2,6-DNT, and Walsh (1989) method for NQ. Adsorption and transformation of propellant constituents were determined from the decrease in solution concentration of these compounds. It was determined that all studied compounds were subjected to sorption by the solid phase and degradation. Catlin soil, with finer texture and high organic matter content, influenced solution concentration of NG, 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT

  14. Reciprocity-based experimental determination of dynamic forces and moments: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, Istvan L.; Howe, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    BBN Systems and Technologies has been tasked by the Georgia Tech Research Center to carry Task Assignment No. 7 for the NASA Langley Research Center to explore the feasibility of 'In-Situ Experimental Evaluation of the Source Strength of Complex Vibration Sources Utilizing Reciprocity.' The task was carried out under NASA Contract No. NAS1-19061. In flight it is not feasible to connect the vibration sources to their mounting points on the fuselage through force gauges to measure dynamic forces and moments directly. However, it is possible to measure the interior sound field or vibration response caused by these structureborne sound sources at many locations and invoke principle of reciprocity to predict the dynamic forces and moments. The work carried out in the framework of Task 7 was directed to explore the feasibility of reciprocity-based measurements of vibration forces and moments.

  15. Determination of Specific Forces and Tool Deflections in Micro-milling of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using Finite Element Simulations and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Simone; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Thepsonti, Thanongsak; Oezel, Tugrul

    2011-05-04

    Titanium alloys offer superb properties in strength, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility and are commonly utilized in medical devices and implants. Micro-end milling process is a direct and rapid fabrication method for manufacturing medical devices and implants in titanium alloys. Process performance and quality depend upon an understanding of the relationship between cutting parameters and forces and resultant tool deflections to avoid tool breakage. For this purpose, FE simulations of chip formation during micro-end milling of Ti-6Al-4V alloy with an ultra-fine grain solid carbide two-flute micro-end mill are investigated using DEFORM software.At first, specific forces in tangential and radial directions of cutting during micro-end milling for varying feed advance and rotational speeds have been determined using designed FE simulations for chip formation process. Later, these forces are applied to the micro-end mill geometry along the axial depth of cut in 3D analysis of ABAQUS. Consequently, 3D distributions for tool deflections and von Misses stress are determined. These analyses will yield in establishing integrated multi-physics process models for high performance micro-end milling and a leap-forward to process improvements.

  16. Determination of fiber-matrix interface failure parameters from off-axis tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Critical fiber-matrix (FM) interface strength parameters were determined using a micromechanics-based approach together with failure data from off-axis tension (OAT) tests. The ply stresses at failure for a range of off-axis angles were used as input to a micromechanics analysis that was performed using the personal computer-based MICSTRAN code. FM interface stresses at the failure loads were calculated for both the square and the diamond array models. A simple procedure was developed to determine which array had the more severe FM interface stresses and the location of these critical stresses on the interface. For the cases analyzed, critical FM interface stresses were found to occur with the square array model and were located at a point where adjacent fibers were closest together. The critical FM interface stresses were used together with the Tsai-Wu failure theory to determine a failure criterion for the FM interface. This criterion was then used to predict the onset of ply cracking in angle-ply laminates for a range of laminate angles. Predictions for the onset of ply cracking in angle-ply laminates agreed with the test data trends.

  17. 76 FR 61131 - Determination and Certification Related to Colombian Armed Forces Under Section 7046(b) of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Determination and Certification Related to Colombian Armed Forces Under Section 7046(b) of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2010 Pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary of State, including...

  18. 75 FR 57826 - Determination and Certification Related to Colombian Armed Forces Under Section 7046(B) of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Determination and Certification Related to Colombian Armed Forces Under Section 7046(B) of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2010 (Division F, Pub. L. 111- 117) Pursuant to the authority vested in...

  19. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  20. Determination of Preferential Flow Parameters by Means of Inverse Simulation of Tension Disc Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumr, D.; Snehota, M.; Nemcova, R.; Cislerova, M.

    2008-12-01

    The field tension and ponded infiltration experiments were conducted to estimate the soil hydraulic properties of the soils with preferential pathways (Distric Cambisol, Sumava). Zones of preferential flow were determined through analyses of photographs taken during laboratory dye tracer infiltration experiments performed on undisturbed soil samples. Connectivity, volumetric ratio and spatial development of preferential pathways were evaluated as the necessary information for numerical simulations of flow using dual-permeability approach. The field infiltration experiment was carried out in a shallow pit for a period of one day. The upper boundary condition was controlled by the tension disk infiltrometer, the propagation of a water front was monitored by two tensiometers installed in two depths below the infiltration disk. 2D axisymetric numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate the results of the experiment. Two different approaches were used: 1. Single-domain approach based on Richards' equation. 2. Dual-permeability approach based on two interacting water flow domains (matrix and preferential domains), each governed by one Richards' equation. In the first simulation, the reference parameters derived from retention curves obtained by standard pressure extractor method were taken as properties of the soil matrix. The input hydraulic parameters were subsequently inversely optimized. In the second approach, the saturated hydraulic conductivities of the preferential flow domain were optimized to fit rapid response of the tensiometers after the start of ponded infiltration. Objective function consisted of infiltration fluxes and suction pressure head data. The parameter estimator PEST coupled with the simulation code S2D_DUAL (Vogel et al.,2000) were used. Concerning the existence of preferential flow on investigated soil, the dual-permeability model gives a better picture of the flow regime. The research has been carried out within the projects VZ03 CEZ MSM

  1. Decomposing the electromagnetic response of magnetic dipoles to determine the geometric parameters of a dipole conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmarais, Jacques K.; Smith, Richard S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel automatic data interpretation algorithm is presented for modelling airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data acquired over resistive environments, using a single-component (vertical) transmitter, where the position and orientation of a dipole conductor is allowed to vary in three dimensions. The algorithm assumes that the magnetic fields produced from compact vortex currents are expressed as a linear combinations of the fields arising from dipoles in the subsurface oriented parallel to the [1, 0, 0], [0, 1, 0], and [0, 0, 1], unit vectors. In this manner, AEM responses can be represented as 12 terms. The relative size of each term in the decomposition can be used to determine geometrical information about the orientation of the subsurface conductivity structure. The geometrical parameters of the dipole (location, depth, dip, strike) are estimated using a combination of a look-up table and a matrix inverted in a least-squares sense. Tests on 703 synthetic models show that the algorithm is capable of extracting most of the correct geometrical parameters of a dipole conductor when three-component receiver data is included in the interpretation procedure. The algorithm is unstable when the target is perfectly horizontal, as the strike is undefined. Ambiguities may occur in predicting the orientation of the dipole conductor if y-component data is excluded from the analysis. Application of our approach to an anomaly on line 15 of the Reid Mahaffy test site yields geometrical parameters in reasonable agreement with previous authors. However, our algorithm provides additional information on the strike and offset from the traverse line of the conductor. Disparities in the values of predicted dip and depth are within the range of numerical precision. The index of fit was better when strike and offset were included in the interpretation procedure. Tests on the data from line 15701 of the Chibougamau MEGATEM survey shows that the algorithm is applicable to situations where

  2. Application of expert systems for determination of machining parameters in milling operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolouei-Rad, M.; Bidhendi, Essie

    1995-08-01

    An expert system has been developed which is capable of selecting appropriate cutting tools and determining required machining parameters for milling operations. One feature of this system which distinguishes it from conventional applications of expert systems is that it uses information stored in database files. This causes the existence of a limited umber of expertise rules stored in the knowledge base; bringing up the advantage of shorter running time for the system. Another advantage of this system is its ability to retrieve required information from computer-aided design (CAD) systems through an input file, run the program, and restore the resulting information in an output file without any user interaction. These advantages make it an ideal system to be used in computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems.

  3. Tissue welding with 980-nm diode laser system: preliminary study for determination of optimal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Zeynep D.; Tabakoglu, Haşim Ö.; Bozkulak, Özgüncem; Aksel, Ayla A.; Gulsoy, Murat

    2006-02-01

    In this study, tissue welding with 980-nm laser system, which is first-time in the literature, was performed. Hence, a preliminary study was done to determine optimal parameters for further studies. 1 cm long incisions done on the Wistar rat's dorsal skin were welded. Tissue welding with 980-nm wavelength depends on the degree of photothermal interaction. Thus, different power levels and exposure schedule were investigated. Dorsal sides of all animals were photographed from the date of surgery until they were sacrificed. The clinical examination - opening of wound and presence of infection - was noted. The rats did not show any abnormality on their health, behavior and nutrition manner. As a result, 980-nm diode laser was concluded to be a good candidate for tissue welding applications.

  4. Enhanced orbit determination filter: Inclusion of ground system errors as filter parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, W. C.; Scheeres, D. J.; Thurman, S. W.

    1994-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of an orbit determination filter that incorporates ground-system error sources as model parameters for use in interplanetary navigation are presented in this article. This filter, which is derived from sequential filtering theory, allows a systematic treatment of errors in calibrations of transmission media, station locations, and earth orientation models associated with ground-based radio metric data, in addition to the modeling of the spacecraft dynamics. The discussion includes a mathematical description of the filter and an analytical comparison of its characteristics with more traditional filtering techniques used in this application. The analysis in this article shows that this filter has the potential to generate navigation products of substantially greater accuracy than more traditional filtering procedures.

  5. Determination of the parameter k of the generalized Dynamic Preisach Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rouve, L.L.; Waeckerle, T.; Kedous-Lebouc, A.; Coulomb, J.L.

    1996-05-01

    In order to design electrical engineering devices, C.A.D. tools are used more and more. To improve the accuracy of these tools, a special effort is made to better model the magnetic behavior of the electric steels that mainly make up electrical devices. In order to use the Dynamic Preisach Model for the further study of magnetic diffusion, the paper aims to determine its main parameter k. The proposed method requires the field to be homogeneous enough to describe the sheet magnetization by a single Preisach Plane. Moreover, frequency and induction ranges are chosen to allow the field being analytically calculated in the sheet cross section by taking into account weak macroscopic eddy currents.

  6. Rotation Period and H-G Parameters Determination for 248 Lameia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilcher, Frederick; Benishek, Vladimir; Hills, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    For 248 Lameia, which has a rotation period nearly commensurate with an Earth day, lightcurves from three observers at widely different longitudes are needed for full phase coverage. These were obtained and provide a good fit to a lightcurve phased to 11.912 ± 0.001 hours with an amplitude of 0.17 ± 0.01 mag. A color index V-R = 0.40 ± 0.03 was found. The R- and V-band absolute magnitudes HR and HV were determined to be 9.91 ± 0.02 and 10.31 ± 0.04 mag, respectively. The slope parameter of G = 0.05 ± 0.03 was found. These led to an estimated size of D = 47 ± 3 km.

  7. Determination of isotropic layer parameters from spatiotemporal signals of an ultrasonic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, S. A.; Maev, R. G.

    2013-09-01

    The paper discusses a method for measuring the velocities and attenuation of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves and the density and thickness of the isotropic layer with an array placed in an immersion liquid parallel to the sample. The method is based on the recording of the total spatiotemporal signal of the array and its expansion into a spatial spectrum of pulse plane wave response. The ultrasonic velocity and sample thickness depend on the response delay of the plane wave in the layer from the transverse projection of the slowness vector. The density and attenuation are determined from the behavior of the amplitudes of spectral responses. To confirm this method in experiment, the parameters of a polystyrene plate have been measured using a linear 32-element array with a central frequency of 17 MHz.

  8. Multilevel Selection 2: Estimating the Genetic Parameters Determining Inheritance and Response to Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bijma, Piter; Muir, William M.; Ellen, Esther D.; Wolf, Jason B.; Van Arendonk, Johan A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions among individuals are universal, both in animals and in plants and in natural as well as domestic populations. Understanding the consequences of these interactions for the evolution of populations by either natural or artificial selection requires knowledge of the heritable components underlying them. Here we present statistical methodology to estimate the genetic parameters determining response to multilevel selection of traits affected by interactions among individuals in general populations. We apply these methods to obtain estimates of genetic parameters for survival days in a population of layer chickens with high mortality due to pecking behavior. We find that heritable variation is threefold greater than that obtained from classical analyses, meaning that two-thirds of the full heritable variation is hidden to classical analysis due to social interactions. As a consequence, predicted responses to multilevel selection applied to this population are threefold greater than classical predictions. This work, combined with the quantitative genetic theory for response to multilevel selection presented in an accompanying article in this issue, enables the design of selection programs to effectively reduce competitive interactions in livestock and plants and the prediction of the effects of social interactions on evolution in natural populations undergoing multilevel selection. PMID:17110493

  9. Determination of Structural and Morphological Parameters of Human Bulbar Conjunctiva from Optical Diffuse Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Firago, V. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.; Kubarko, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a method for on-the-fl y retrieval of the volume concentration of blood vessels, the average diameter of the blood vessels, the blood oxygenation level, and the molar concentrations of chromophores in the bulbar conjunctiva from its diffuse reflectance spectra, measured when the radiation delivery and detection channels are spatially separated. The relationship between the diffuse reflectance spectrum of the conjunctiva and its unknown parameters is described in terms of an analytical model, constructed on the basis of a highly accurate approximation analog of the Monte Carlo method. We have studied the effect of localization of hemoglobin in erythrocytes and localization of erythrocytes in the blood vessels on the power of the retrieval of structural and morphological parameters for the conjunctiva. We developed a device for obtaining video images of the conjunctiva and contactless measurements of its diffuse reflectance spectrum. By comparing simulated diffuse reflectance spectra of the conjunctiva with the experimental measurements, we established a set of chromophores which must be taken into account in the model for reproducing the experimental data within the measurement error. We observed absorption bands for neuroglobin in the experimental spectra, and provided a theoretical basis for the possibility of determining its absolute concentrations in the conjunctiva. We have shown that our method can detect low bilirubin concentrations in blood.

  10. Fetal kidney length as a useful adjunct parameter for better determination of gestational age

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Mete G.; Mustafa, Aynur; Ozcan, Huseyin C.; Tepe, Neslihan B.; Kurt, Huseyin; Akcil, Emre; Gunduz, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the validity of fetal kidney length and amniotic fluid index (AFI) in labor dating. Methods: This prospective study included 180 pregnant women followed up in the outpatient clinic at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gaziantep University, Turkey, between January 2014 and January 2015. The gestational age (GA) was estimated by early fetal ultrasound measures and last menstrual period. Routine fetal biometric parameters, fetal kidney length, and amniotic fluid index were measured. We studied the correlation between fetal kidney length, amniotic fluid index, and gestational age. Result: The mean gestational age depending on last menstrual period and early ultrasound was 31.98±4.29 (24-39 weeks). The mean kidney length was 35.66±6.61 (19-49 mm). There was a significant correlation between gestational age and fetal kidney length (r=0.947, p=0.001). However, there was a moderate negative correlation between GA and AFI. Adding fetal kidney length to the routine biometrics improved the effectiveness of the model used to estimate GA (R2=0.965 to R2=0.987). Conclusion: Gestational age can be better predicted by adding fetal kidney length to other routine parameters. PMID:27146616

  11. Reactive decontamination of absorbing thin film polymer coatings: model development and parameter determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, Mark; Mantooth, Brent; Pearl, Thomas; Willis, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    A continuum model of reactive decontamination in absorbing polymeric thin film substrates exposed to the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (known as VX) was developed to assess the performance of various decontaminants. Experiments were performed in conjunction with an inverse analysis method to obtain the necessary model parameters. The experiments involved contaminating a substrate with a fixed VX exposure, applying a decontaminant, followed by a time-resolved, liquid phase extraction of the absorbing substrate to measure the residual contaminant by chromatography. Decontamination model parameters were uniquely determined using the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear least squares fitting technique to best fit the experimental time evolution of extracted mass. The model was implemented numerically in both a 2D axisymmetric finite element program and a 1D finite difference code, and it was found that the more computationally efficient 1D implementation was sufficiently accurate. The resulting decontamination model provides an accurate quantification of contaminant concentration profile in the material, which is necessary to assess exposure hazards.

  12. USE OF SPATIOTEMPORAL GAIT PARAMETERS TO DETERMINE RETURN TO SPORTS AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    LEPORACE, GUSTAVO; METSAVAHT, LEONARDO; ZEITOUNE, GABRIEL; MARINHO, THIAGO; OLIVEIRA, TAINÁ; PEREIRA, GLAUBER RIBEIRO; OLIVEIRA, LISZT PALMEIRA DE; BATISTA, LUIZ ALBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To compare gait spatiotemporal parameters of healthy and ACL reconstructed subjects in order to classify the status of gait normality. Methods : Fourteen healthy subjects and eight patients submitted to ACL reconstruction walked along a walkway while the lower limbs movement was captured by an infrared camera system. The frames where the initial contact and toe-off took place were determined and the following dependent variables, which were compared between groups through the Mann-Whitney test (a=0.05) were calculated: percentage of time in initial double stance, percentage of time in single stance, percentage of time in terminal double stance, stride length and gait velocity. Initially, all variables were compared between groups using a Mann-Whitney test. A logistic regression was applied, including all dependent variables, to create a model that could differentiate healthy and ACL reconstructed subjects. Results : ACL reconstructed group showed no differences in any spatiotemporal parameter of gait (p > 0.05) in relation to the control group, although the angular kinematic differences of the knee remained altered, as evidenced in a study with a similar sample. Conclusion : The regression classified all subjects as healthy, including the ACL reconstructed group, suggesting the spatiotemporal variables should not be used as the sole criterion of return to sports activities at the same level as prior to injury. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study. PMID:26981039

  13. Optimized external IR reflection spectroscopy for quantitative determination of borophosphosilicate glass parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Franke, J.E.; Niemczyk, T.M.; Haaland, D.M.

    1997-02-01

    Infrared (IR) external reflection spectroscopy has been optimized for the quantitative determination of composition and film thickness of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) deposited on silicon wafer substrates. The precision of the partial least-squares calibrations for boron and phosphorus contents and thin-film thickness were measured as the cross-validated standard error of prediction statistic. The results showed that BPSG IR reflection spectra collected over a wide range of incident IR radiation angles (15{degree}, 25{degree}, 45{degree}, and 60{degree}) can be used for the simultaneous quantification of these three BPSG parameters. When high angles of incidence were employed, the measurement was found to be more sensitive to small errors in the angle of incidence. The polarization state of the incident IR radiation did not noticeably affect the prediction of the three calibrated BPSG parameters. The results achieved in this study provide guidelines for at-line process monitoring and quality control of BPSG thin films used in the fabrication of microelectronic devices. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  14. Determination of full piezoelectric complex parameters using gradient-based optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, C. Y.; Pérez, N.; Silva, E. C. N.

    2016-02-01

    At present, numerical techniques allow the precise simulation of mechanical structures, but the results are limited by the knowledge of the material properties. In the case of piezoelectric ceramics, the full model determination in the linear range involves five elastic, three piezoelectric, and two dielectric complex parameters. A successful solution to obtaining piezoceramic properties consists of comparing the experimental measurement of the impedance curve and the results of a numerical model by using the finite element method (FEM). In the present work, a new systematic optimization method is proposed to adjust the full piezoelectric complex parameters in the FEM model. Once implemented, the method only requires the experimental data (impedance modulus and phase data acquired by an impedometer), material density, geometry, and initial values for the properties. This method combines a FEM routine implemented using an 8-noded axisymmetric element with a gradient-based optimization routine based on the method of moving asymptotes (MMA). The main objective of the optimization procedure is minimizing the quadratic difference between the experimental and numerical electrical conductance and resistance curves (to consider resonance and antiresonance frequencies). To assure the convergence of the optimization procedure, this work proposes restarting the optimization loop whenever the procedure ends in an undesired or an unfeasible solution. Two experimental examples using PZ27 and APC850 samples are presented to test the precision of the method and to check the dependency of the frequency range used, respectively.

  15. Determination of some dominant parameters of the global dynamic sea surface topography from GEOS-3 altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.; Lerch, F. J.; Rizos, C.; Masters, E. G.; Hirsch, B.

    1978-01-01

    The 1977 altimetry data bank is analyzed for the geometrical shape of the sea surface expressed as surface spherical harmonics after referral to the higher reference model defined by GEM 9. The resulting determination is expressed as quasi-stationary dynamic SST. Solutions are obtained from different sets of long arcs in the GEOS-3 altimeter data bank as well as from sub-sets related to the September 1975 and March 1976 equinoxes assembled with a view to minimizing seasonal effects. The results are compared with equivalent parameters obtained from the hydrostatic analysis of sporadic temperature, pressure and salinity measurements of the oceans and the known major steady state current systems with comparable wavelengths. The most clearly defined parameter (the zonal harmonic of degree 2) is obtained with an uncertainty of + or - 6 cm. The preferred numerical value is smaller than the oceanographic value due to the effect of the correction for the permanent earth tide. Similar precision is achieved for the zonal harmonic of degree 3. The precision obtained for the fourth degree zonal harmonic reflects more closely the accuracy expected from the level of noise in the orbital solutions.

  16. Determining the mechanism and parameters of hydrate formation and loss in glucose.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Sarah K; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2014-11-01

    Water-solid interactions are known to play a major role in the chemical and physical stability of food materials. Despite its extensive use throughout the food industry, the mechanism and parameters of hydrate formation and loss in glucose are not well characterized. Hydrate formation in alpha-anhydrous glucose (α-AG) and hydrate loss in glucose monohydrate (GM) were studied under equilibrium conditions at various relative humidity (RH) values using saturated salt slurries for 1 y. The mechanism of hydrate formation and hydrate loss were determined through mathematical modeling of Dynamic Vapor Sorption data and Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the mechanisms. The critical temperature for hydrate loss in GM was determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The moisture sorption profiles of α-AG and GM were also studied under dynamic conditions using an AquaSorp Isotherm Generator. Hydrate formation was observed at and above 68% RH at 25 °C and the conversion of α-AG to GM can best be described as following a nucleation mechanism, however, diffusion and/or geometric contraction mechanisms were also observed by Raman spectroscopy subsequent to the coalescence of initial nucleation sites. Hydrate loss was observed to occur at and below 11% RH at 25 °C during RH storage and at 70 °C during TGA. The conversion of GM to α-AG follows nucleation and diffusion mechanisms. Hydrate formation was evident under dynamic conditions in α-AG and GM prior to deliquescence. This research is the first to report hydrate formation and loss parameters for crystalline α-AG and GM during extended storage at 25 ˚C.

  17. Determination of stress parameters for eight well-recorded earthquakes in eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Campbell, K.W.; Atkinson, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    We determined the stress parameter, Δσ, for the eight earthquakes studied by Atkinson and Boore (2006), using an updated dataset and a revised point-source stochastic model that captures the effect of a finite fault. We consider four geometrical-spreading functions, ranging from 1/R at all distances to two- or three-part functions. The Δσ values are sensitive to the rate of geometrical spreading at close distances, with 1/R1.3 spreading implying much higher Δσ than models with 1/R spreading. The important difference in ground motions of most engineering concern, however, arises not from whether the geometrical spreading is 1/R1.3 or 1/R at close distances, but from whether a region of flat or increasing geometrical spreading at intermediate distances is present, as long as Δσ is constrained by data that are largely at distances of 100 km–800 km. The simple 1/R model fits the sparse data for the eight events as well as do more complex models determined from larger datasets (where the larger datasets were used in our previous ground-motion prediction equations); this suggests that uncertainty in attenuation rates is an important component of epistemic uncertainty in ground-motion modeling. For the attenuation model used by Atkinson and Boore (2006), the average value of Δσ from the point-source model ranges from 180 bars to 250 bars, depending on whether or not the stress parameter from the 1988 Saguenay earthquake is included in the average. We also find that Δσ for a given earthquake is sensitive to its moment magnitude M, with a change of 0.1 magnitude units producing a factor of 1.3 change in the derived Δσ.

  18. A feasibility study for experimentally determining dynamic force distribution in a lap joint.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Randall Lee

    2013-11-01

    Developing constitutive models of the physics in mechanical joints is currently stymied by inability to measure forces and displacements within the joint. The current state of the art estimates whole joint stiffness and energy loss per cycle from external measured force input and one or two acceleration responses. To validate constitutive models beyond this state requires a measurement of the distributed forces and displacements at the joint interface. Unfortunately, introducing measurement devices at the interface completely disrupts the desired physics. A feasibility study is presented for a non-intrusive method of solving for the interface dynamic forces from an inverse problem using full field measured responses. The responses come from the viewable surface of a beam. The noise levels associated with digital image correlation and continuous scanning laser Doppler velocimetry are evaluated from typical beam experiments. Two inverse problems are simulated. One utilizes the extended Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT). The second is a new approach dubbed the method of truncated orthogonal forces. These methods are much more robust if the contact patch geometry is well identified. Various approaches to identifying the contact patch are investigated, including ion marker tracking, Prussian blue and ultrasonic measurements. A typical experiment is conceived for a beam which has a lap joint at one end with a single bolt connecting it to another identical beam. In a virtual test using the beam finite element analysis, it appears that the SWAT inverse method requires evaluation of too many coefficients to adequately identify the force distribution to be viable. However, the method of truncated orthogonal forces appears viable with current digital image correlation (and probably other) imaging techniques.

  19. Determination of Constant Parameters of Copper as Power-Law Hardening Material at Different Test Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowser, Md. A.; Mahiuddin, Md.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper a technique has been developed to determine constant parameters of copper as a power-law hardening material by tensile test approach. A work-hardening process is used to describe the increase of the stress level necessary to continue plastic deformation. A computer program is used to show the variation of the stress-strain relation for different values of stress hardening exponent, n and power-law hardening constant, α . Due to its close tolerances, excellent corrosion resistance and high material strength, in this analysis copper (Cu) has been selected as the material. As a power-law hardening material, Cu has been used to compute stress hardening exponent, n and power-law hardening constant, α from tensile test experiment without heat treatment and after heat treatment. A wealth of information about mechanical behavior of a material can be determined by conducting a simple tensile test in which a cylindrical specimen of a uniform cross-section is pulled until it ruptures or fractures into separate pieces. The original cross sectional area and gauge length are measured prior to conducting the test and the applied load and gauge deformation are continuously measured throughout the test. Based on the initial geometry of the sample, the engineering stress-strain behavior (stress-strain curve) can be easily generated from which numerous mechanical properties, such as the yield strength and elastic modulus, can be determined. A universal testing machine is utilized to apply the load in a continuously increasing (ramp) manner according to ASTM specifications. Finally, theoretical results are compared with these obtained from experiments where the nature of curves is found similar to each other. It is observed that there is a significant change of the value of n obtained with and without heat treatment it means the value of n should be determined for the heat treated condition of copper material for their applications in engineering fields.

  20. Multi Electrode Geoelectric on the Borehole Wall. Determination of Groundwater Velocity and Dispersion Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessels, W.; Thorenz, C.; Rifai, H.

    2002-05-01

    A single well technique to determine groundwater flow and transport parameters is presented. Multi-electrode arrays are placed on a borehole wall by an inflatable packer or are installed behind the plastic casing. For measurements, a salt tracer is injected between the electrodes. This salt tracer cloud is afterwards moving in the natural groundwater flow field. The observation of this movement by geoelectric measurements is the basis for the determination of groundwater velocity and the dispersion parameters. The geoelectric observations are performed with n borehole electrodes and one earth connection. Thus, either n independent two point measurements or n*(n-1)/2 pole-to-pole measurements can be performed. The whole procedure consists of three phases: 1. Measurement of the basic conductivity without tracer. 2. Measurement during the injection. 3. Measurement after injection To test the method, measurements in a lab aquifer filled with sand are carried out. The results are discussed and the limitations of the method are shown. Here, the interpretation is restricted on two point geoelectric measurements and the transport equation for NaCl-tracered water. Due to the density contrast, the tracer shows a vertical movement which is not related to the natural velocity field. Numerical calculations with the finite-element-method simulator ROCKFLOW (Kolditz et al., 1999) reproduced this behaviour. The currently used interpretation code is based on an analytic solution of the transport equation. The parameters velocity and dispersion length are calculated by inversion. In the two scientific drillings CAT-LUD1 and CAT-LUD1A in the northern part of Germany multi-electrode installations behind the casing are tested in situ. A multi-electrode packer system is designed and build. References: Kessels, W., Zoth, G.(1997): Doppelmantel - Packers mit geoelektrischer Meßtechnik zur Bestimmung der Abstandsgeschwindigkeit des Grundwassers, Patentanmeldung Az:19855048.0 NLf

  1. Molecular Line Parameters Precisely Determined by a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shui-Ming; Tan, Yan; Wang, Jin; Lu, Yan; Cheng, Cunfeng; Sun, Yu Robert; Liu, An-Wen

    2015-06-01

    A cavity ring-down spectrometer calibrated with a set of precise atomic lines was built to retrieve precise line parameters in the near infrared.~[1,2] The spectrometer allows us to detect absorptions with a sensitivity of 10-11~cm-1 and a spectral precision up to 10-6~cm-1. Ro-vibrational lines in the second overtone of H_2 have been observed, including the extremely weak S_3(5) line with a line intensity less than 1× 10-30cm/molecule, which is among the weakest molecular lines detected by absorption in the gas phase. The absolute line positions of H_2 agree well with the high-level quantum chemical calculations including relativistic and QED corrections, with the deviation being less than 5× 10-4~cm-1.~[3,4] A quantitative study has also been carried out on the ν_1+5ν_3 band of CO_2.~[5] It was the first CO_2 band observed 80 years ago in the spectrum of Venus. We determined the line positions with an accuracy of 3× 10-5~cm-1, two orders of magnitude better than previous studies. Similar studies have been carried out to determine the line parameters of H_2O~[6] and CO~[7] in the spectral regions near 0.8~μm. The spectroscopic parameters can be used in varies studies, from the atmospheres of the earth-like planets to the test of fundamental physics. References [1] H. Pan, et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 103110 (2011). [2] C.-F. Cheng, Opt. Expr. 20, 9956 (2012). [3] C.-F. Cheng, et al. Phys. Rev. A 85, 024501 (2012). [4] y. Tan, et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 300, 60 (2014). [5] Y. Lu, et al. Astrophys. J. 775, 71 (2013). [6] Y. Lu, et al. JQSRT 118, 96 (2013). [7] Y. Tan, et al. ``Ro-vibrational analysis of the fifth overtone of CO at 802~nm'', under preparation.

  2. User's manual for a parameter identification technique. [with options for model simulation for fixed input forcing functions and identification from wind tunnel and flight measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanning, G.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program written in FORTRAN is presented that implements the system identification theory for deterministic systems using input-output measurements. The user supplies programs simulating the mathematical model of the physical plant whose parameters are to be identified. The user may choose any one of three options. The first option allows for a complete model simulation for fixed input forcing functions. The second option identifies up to 36 parameters of the model from wind tunnel or flight measurements. The third option performs a sensitivity analysis for up to 36 parameters. The use of each option is illustrated with an example using input-output measurements for a helicopter rotor tested in a wind tunnel.

  3. Height and body composition determine arm propulsive force in youth swimmers independent of a maturation stage.

    PubMed

    Moura, Tatiane; Costa, Manoel; Oliveira, Saulo; Júnior, Marcos Barbosa; Ritti-Dias, Raphael; Santos, Marcos

    2014-09-29

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between anthropometric variables, body composition and propulsive force in swimmers aged 9-17 years. Anthropometric characteristics (body height and mass, sitting height, arm span, arm muscle area and body composition) and the propulsive force of the arm (tethered swimming test) were evaluated in 56 competitive male swimmers. Tanner's stages of genital maturation (P1-5) were used. The data analysis included correlations and multiple linear regression. The propulsive force of the arm was correlated with body height (r = 0.34; p =0.013), arm span (r = 0.29; p =0.042), sitting height (r = 0.36; p =0.009), % body fat (r = 0.33; p =0.016), lean body mass (r = 0.34; p =0.015) and arm muscle area (r = 0.31; p =0.026). Using multiple linear regression models, the percent body fat and height were identified as significant predictors of the propulsive force of the arm after controlling for the maturation stage. This model explained 22% (R2 = 0.22) of associations. In conclusion, the propulsive force of swimmers was related to body height and percent body fat. PMID:25414760

  4. Lack of evidence for a marked endogenous component determining food intake in humans during forced desynchrony.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Jim; Jones, Kay; Edwards, Ben; Harrison, Yvonne; Nevill, Alan; Reilly, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    In an attempt to investigate the relative importance of endogenous and exogenous factors in determining food intake, 14 healthy subjects were studied while living in an Isolation Unit (where external time cues were absent) for eighteen 28 h "days" (equal to 21 solar days). The subjects were free to spend their waking time as they chose, and they had a free choice of what they ate and when they ate it. The only restrictions were that no naps were allowed in the "daytime," that some time was required to perform a variety of tests at regular intervals throughout the 18.67 h waking periods, and that any food preparation had to be performed by the subjects themselves. Core (rectal) temperature and activity were monitored throughout, and the subjects answered a questionnaire on their eating habits at 3 h intervals during the waking periods. The questionnaire investigated reasons for eating or not eating a meal during the previous 3 h and, if a meal had been eaten, its type, the factors influencing that choice, and the subjects' subjective responses (hunger before, enjoyment during, and satiety after) to it. The results were analyzed (two-way ANOVA) in terms of both the imposed day length (the exogenous component) and the free-running period of the temperature rhythm (the endogenous component). Results indicated that by far the main reason for eating/not eating was hunger/lack of hunger rather than factors such as food availability and time-pressure. There were statistically significant effects of time within the imposed waking periods upon the type of meal eaten--"breakfast" tending to be a snack, "lunch" a small hot meal, and the "evening meal" a large hot meal. Hot meals (whether small or large) were associated with more hunger before the meal, more enjoyment of the meal, and a greater degree of satiety afterward than were cold meals. These effects suggest that the individuals adjusted their eating habits to fit in with the imposed wake times. By contrast, the effect

  5. Non-invasive determination of external forces in vortex-pair-cylinder interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, D.; Schröder, W.; Shashikanth, B. N.

    2012-06-01

    Expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta of a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system are derived. Based on the knowledge of the flow velocity field, these expressions allow the determination of the external forces exerted on a body moving in the fluid such as, e.g., swimming fish. The verification of the derived conserved quantities is done numerically. The interaction of a vortex pair with a circular cylinder in various configurations of motions representing a generic test case for a dynamically coupled fluid + solid system is investigated in a weakly compressible Navier-Stokes setting using a Cartesian cut-cell method, i.e., the moving circular cylinder is represented by cut cells on a moving mesh. The objectives of this study are twofold. The first objective is to show the robustness of the derived expressions for the conserved linear and angular momenta with respect to bounded and discrete data sets. The second objective is to study the coupled dynamics of the vortex pair and a neutrally buoyant cylinder free to move in response to the fluid stresses exerted on its surface. A comparison of the vortex-body interaction with the case of a fixed circular cylinder evidences significant differences in the vortex dynamics. When the cylinder is fixed strong secondary vorticity is generated resulting in a repeating process between the primary vortex pair and the cylinder. In the neutrally buoyant cylinder case, a stable structure consisting of the primary vortex pair and secondary vorticity shear layers stays attached to the moving cylinder. In addition to these fundamental cases, the vortex-pair-cylinder interaction is studied for locomotion at constant speed and locomotion at constant thrust. It is shown that a similar vortex structure like in the neutrally buoyant cylinder case is obtained when the cylinder moves away from the approaching vortex pair at a constant speed smaller than the vortex pair translational velocity. Finally, the idealized

  6. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A.

    2012-07-01

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  7. Determining the response of sea level to atmospheric pressure forcing using TOPEX/POSEIDON data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Pihos, Greg

    1994-01-01

    The static response of sea level to the forcing of atmospheric pressure, the so-called inverted barometer (IB) effect, is investigated using TOPEX/POSEIDON data. This response, characterized by the rise and fall of sea level to compensate for the change of atmospheric pressure at a rate of -1 cm/mbar, is not associated with any ocean currents and hence is normally treated as an error to be removed from sea level observation. Linear regression and spectral transfer function analyses are applied to sea level and pressure to examine the validity of the IB effect. In regions outside the tropics, the regression coefficient is found to be consistently close to the theoretical value except for the regions of western boundary currents, where the mesoscale variability interferes with the IB effect. The spectral transfer function shows near IB response at periods of 30 degrees is -0.84 +/- 0.29 cm/mbar (1 standard deviation). The deviation from = 1 cm /mbar is shown to be caused primarily by the effect of wind forcing on sea level, based on multivariate linear regression model involving both pressure and wind forcing. The regression coefficient for pressure resulting from the multivariate analysis is -0.96 +/- 0.32 cm/mbar. In the tropics the multivariate analysis fails because sea level in the tropics is primarily responding to remote wind forcing. However, after removing from the data the wind-forced sea level estimated by a dynamic model of the tropical Pacific, the pressure regression coefficient improves from -1.22 +/- 0.69 cm/mbar to -0.99 +/- 0.46 cm/mbar, clearly revealing an IB response. The result of the study suggests that with a proper removal of the effect of wind forcing the IB effect is valid in most of the open ocean at periods longer than 20 days and spatial scales larger than 500 km.

  8. The determination of parameters of the upper atmosphere by the radio-meteor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamukov, Damir; Fahrutdinova, Antonina; Nugmanov, Ildus

    Study of the parameters of the upper atmosphere on the basis of amplitude-time characteristics of meteor ionization. Together with various methods meteor observations (optical, photographic, visual, spectral, television), the most effective modern method of studying meteors means is radar. The development of modern radar technology allows us to apply this tool to monitor meteors. This method allows to determine the parameters of temperature and atmospheric pressure. Actual issue is the development of methods of determining the coefficient of ambipolar diffusion, pressure, density and temperature of the atmosphere in the meteor zone. Graph of amplitude-time characteristic has the exponential form. This fact allows to determine the coefficient of ambipolar diffusion. New algorithm for estimation of the ambipolar diffusion coefficient based on a set of statistical methods and techniques of digital signal processing. There are decomposition of data on singular values and Prony's method. This method of modeling the sample data as a linear combination of exponential. Prony’s method approximates the amplitude-time characteristics of using a deterministic exponential model. Input data is amplitude-time characteristics of the meteor trail x[1]…x[N]. The method allows to estimate x[n] p-membered exponential model: begin{center} x[n]=Sigma2A_{k}exp[a _{k}(n-1)]Cos[2Pif_{k}(n-1)T+Fi_{k}] (1) end{center} 1<=n<=N, T - time range in seconds, A_{k} and a_{k} - amplitude and damping coefficient, f_{k} and Fi_{k} - frequency and initial phase. The equation describing the decay of radio signal: begin{center} A=A_{0}exp(-16Pi^{2}$D_{a}t/λ (2) ). (2) lambdaλ - radar wavelength. The output of the algorithm - the ambipolar diffusion coefficient values D_{a}. begin{center} T=0.5lnD-T_{0}+mg/2kT_{0} (3) Last equation allows to obtain temperature values ​​using the coefficient of ambipolar diffusion depends on the height.

  9. Testing of the GROMOS Force-Field Parameter Set 54A8: Structural Properties of Electrolyte Solutions, Lipid Bilayers, and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Reif, Maria M; Winger, Moritz; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-02-12

    The GROMOS 54A8 force field [Reif et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2012, 8, 3705-3723] is the first of its kind to contain nonbonded parameters for charged amino acid side chains that are derived in a rigorously thermodynamic fashion, namely a calibration against single-ion hydration free energies. Considering charged moieties in solution, the most decisive signature of the GROMOS 54A8 force field in comparison to its predecessor 54A7 can probably be found in the thermodynamic equilibrium between salt-bridged ion pair formation and hydration. Possible shifts in this equilibrium might crucially affect the properties of electrolyte solutions or/and the stability of (bio)molecules. It is therefore important to investigate the consequences of the altered description of charged oligoatomic species in the GROMOS 54A8 force field. The present study focuses on examining the ability of the GROMOS 54A8 force field to accurately model the structural properties of electrolyte solutions, lipid bilayers, and proteins. It is found that (i) aqueous electrolytes involving oligoatomic species (sodium acetate, methylammonium chloride, guanidinium chloride) reproduce experimental salt activity derivatives for concentrations up to 1.0 m (1.0-molal) very well, and good agreement between simulated and experimental data is also reached for sodium acetate and methylammonium chloride at 2.0 m concentration, while not even qualitative agreement is found for sodium chloride throughout the whole range of examined concentrations, indicating a failure of the GROMOS 54A7 and 54A8 force-field parameter sets to correctly account for the balance between ion-ion and ion-water binding propensities of sodium and chloride ions; (ii) the GROMOS 54A8 force field reproduces the liquid crystalline-like phase of a hydrated DPPC bilayer at a pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 323 K, the area per lipid being in agreement with experimental data, whereas other structural properties (volume per lipid, bilayer

  10. Testing of the GROMOS Force-Field Parameter Set 54A8: Structural Properties of Electrolyte Solutions, Lipid Bilayers, and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The GROMOS 54A8 force field [Reif et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2012, 8, 3705–3723] is the first of its kind to contain nonbonded parameters for charged amino acid side chains that are derived in a rigorously thermodynamic fashion, namely a calibration against single-ion hydration free energies. Considering charged moieties in solution, the most decisive signature of the GROMOS 54A8 force field in comparison to its predecessor 54A7 can probably be found in the thermodynamic equilibrium between salt-bridged ion pair formation and hydration. Possible shifts in this equilibrium might crucially affect the properties of electrolyte solutions or/and the stability of (bio)molecules. It is therefore important to investigate the consequences of the altered description of charged oligoatomic species in the GROMOS 54A8 force field. The present study focuses on examining the ability of the GROMOS 54A8 force field to accurately model the structural properties of electrolyte solutions, lipid bilayers, and proteins. It is found that (i) aqueous electrolytes involving oligoatomic species (sodium acetate, methylammonium chloride, guanidinium chloride) reproduce experimental salt activity derivatives for concentrations up to 1.0 m (1.0-molal) very well, and good agreement between simulated and experimental data is also reached for sodium acetate and methylammonium chloride at 2.0 m concentration, while not even qualitative agreement is found for sodium chloride throughout the whole range of examined concentrations, indicating a failure of the GROMOS 54A7 and 54A8 force-field parameter sets to correctly account for the balance between ion–ion and ion–water binding propensities of sodium and chloride ions; (ii) the GROMOS 54A8 force field reproduces the liquid crystalline-like phase of a hydrated DPPC bilayer at a pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 323 K, the area per lipid being in agreement with experimental data, whereas other structural properties (volume per lipid

  11. The influence of the pressure force control signal on selected parameters of the vehicle continuously variable transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniek, A.; Graba, M.; Prażnowski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results of research on the effect of frequency control signal on the course selected operating parameters of the continuously variable transmission CVT. The study used a gear Fuji Hyper M6 with electro-hydraulic control system and proprietary software for control and data acquisition developed in LabView environment.

  12. Contact-free experimental determination of the static flexural spring constant of cantilever sensors using a microfluidic force tool.

    PubMed

    Parkin, John D; Hähner, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanocantilevers are employed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) as sensing elements. They enable nanomechanical measurements, are essential for the characterization of nanomaterials, and form an integral part of many nanoscale devices. Despite the fact that numerous methods described in the literature can be applied to determine the static flexural spring constant of micro- and nanocantilever sensors, experimental techniques that do not require contact between the sensor and a surface at some point during the calibration process are still the exception rather than the rule. We describe a noncontact method using a microfluidic force tool that produces accurate forces and demonstrate that this, in combination with a thermal noise spectrum, can provide the static flexural spring constant for cantilever sensors of different geometric shapes over a wide range of spring constant values (≈0.8-160 N/m). PMID:27335740

  13. Contact-free experimental determination of the static flexural spring constant of cantilever sensors using a microfluidic force tool

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, John D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Micro- and nanocantilevers are employed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) as sensing elements. They enable nanomechanical measurements, are essential for the characterization of nanomaterials, and form an integral part of many nanoscale devices. Despite the fact that numerous methods described in the literature can be applied to determine the static flexural spring constant of micro- and nanocantilever sensors, experimental techniques that do not require contact between the sensor and a surface at some point during the calibration process are still the exception rather than the rule. We describe a noncontact method using a microfluidic force tool that produces accurate forces and demonstrate that this, in combination with a thermal noise spectrum, can provide the static flexural spring constant for cantilever sensors of different geometric shapes over a wide range of spring constant values (≈0.8–160 N/m). PMID:27335740

  14. Contact-free experimental determination of the static flexural spring constant of cantilever sensors using a microfluidic force tool.

    PubMed

    Parkin, John D; Hähner, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanocantilevers are employed in atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) as sensing elements. They enable nanomechanical measurements, are essential for the characterization of nanomaterials, and form an integral part of many nanoscale devices. Despite the fact that numerous methods described in the literature can be applied to determine the static flexural spring constant of micro- and nanocantilever sensors, experimental techniques that do not require contact between the sensor and a surface at some point during the calibration process are still the exception rather than the rule. We describe a noncontact method using a microfluidic force tool that produces accurate forces and demonstrate that this, in combination with a thermal noise spectrum, can provide the static flexural spring constant for cantilever sensors of different geometric shapes over a wide range of spring constant values (≈0.8-160 N/m).

  15. Methodologies to determine forces on bones and muscles of body segments during exercise, employing compact sensors suitable for use in crowded space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    1994-01-01

    A complete description of an instrumented ergometer system, including the sensors, the data acquisition system, and the methodologies to calculate the kinematic parameters were initially developed at Tulane University. This work was continued by the PI at NASA Johnson Space Center, where a flight ergometer was instrumented and tested during a KC-135 Zero-Gravity flight. The sensors that form part of the system include EMG probes and accelerometers mounted on the subject using the ergometer, load cells to measure pedal forces, and encoders to measure position and orientation of the pedal (foot). Currently, data from the flight test is being analyzed and processed to calculate the kinematic parameters of the individual. The formulation developed during the initial months of the grant will be used for this purpose. The system's components are compact (all sensors are very small). A salient feature of the system and associated methodology to determine the kinematics is that although it uses accelerometers, position is not determined by integration. Position is determined by determining the angle of two frames of reference for which acceleration at one point is known in coordinates of both frames.

  16. Determination of interaction forces between parallel dislocations by the evaluation of J integrals of plane elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarda, Vlado A.

    2016-03-01

    The Peach-Koehler expressions for the glide and climb components of the force exerted on a straight dislocation in an infinite isotropic medium by another straight dislocation are derived by evaluating the plane and antiplane strain versions of J integrals around the center of the dislocation. After expressing the elastic fields as the sums of elastic fields of each dislocation, the energy momentum tensor is decomposed into three parts. It is shown that only one part, involving mixed products from the two dislocation fields, makes a nonvanishing contribution to J integrals and the corresponding dislocation forces. Three examples are considered, with dislocations on parallel or intersecting slip planes. For two edge dislocations on orthogonal slip planes, there are two equilibrium configurations in which the glide and climb components of the dislocation force simultaneously vanish. The interactions between two different types of screw dislocations and a nearby circular void, as well as between parallel line forces in an infinite or semi-infinite medium, are then evaluated.

  17. Determining dynamic parameters of different-scale ionospheric irregularities over northern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Lipko, Y. V. Y. V.; Vugmeister, B. O.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995-1996, observations were carried out at Norilsk (geomagnetic latitude and longitude 64.2 degN and 160.4 degE) to determine dynamic parameters of irregularities in the high-latitude ionosphere. The short-baseline spaced-receiver method that has been implemented at the ionospheric facility of the Norilsk Integrated Magnetic-Ionospheric Station, provides a means of simultaneously measuring parameters of small-scale irregularities (spatial scale of 3-5 km) by the Similar-Fading Method (SFM), as well as of medium-scale irregularities (time scale of 10-30 min, spatial scale of hundreds of kilometres) by the Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method (SADM). About 20 h of the observational data for the F2-layer under quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp < 3), 20 h under disturbed conditions (Kp >= 3) and about 15 h for the sporadic E-layer (Kp ~ 3) were processed. It has been found that the propagation directions and velocities of different-scale irregularities do not coincide. Small-scale irregularities of the F2-layer travel predominantly eastward or westward. The velocity of the F2-layer irregularities is about 100 m/s, and under disturbed conditions it is up to 200-250 m/s. Small-scale irregularities of the sporadic E-layer travel mostly in the northward direction. It is confirmed that the Es-layer is characterised by high velocities of the irregularities (as high as 1000 m/s). Medium-scale irregularities with periods in the range of 10-30 min travel mostly in a southward direction with velocities of 20-40 m/s.

  18. Determination of Parameters of Meteor Bodies from Observational Data with High Accuracy of Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, Maria

    A great volume of data has been accumulated thus far related to the photoregistration of the paths of meteor bodies in the terrestrial atmosphere. Most images have been obtained by four fireball networks, which operate in the USA, Canada, Europe, and Spain in different time periods. The approximation of the actual data using theoretical models makes it possible to achieve additional estimates, which do not directly follow from the observations. For example, the correct mathematical modeling of meteor events in the atmosphere is necessary for further estimates of the key parameters, including the extra-atmospheric mass, the ablation coefficient, and the effective enthalpy of evaporation of entering bodies. In turn, this information is needed by some applications, namely, those aimed at studying the problems of asteroid and comet security, to develop measures of planetary defense, and to determine the bodies that can reach Earth's surface. In the report, the mathematical technique to find basic dynamic parameters of the theoretical relationship between the height and the velocity of the meteor body motion that help to fit observations along the luminous part of the trajectories in the best way is suggested. The main difference from previous studies is that the given observations are approximated using the analytical solution of the equations of meteor physics. Note that, for the limited values of the mass loss parameter, analytical solution is usually replaced by the simpler expression (e.g., Stulov et al., 1995). In particular, this approximate solution was earlier used as a trial function during the implementation of the least-squares method. New model presented in the report was applied to a number of bright meteors observed by the Canadian camera network and by the US Prairie network. Results of such calculation are partly presented. During our data processing we discovered several sufficiently thermostable meteor bodies whose mass loss parameters were almost

  19. A comparison of methods for determining the rate of force development during isometric midthigh clean pulls.

    PubMed

    Haff, G Gregory; Ruben, Ryan P; Lider, Joshua; Twine, Corey; Cormie, Prue

    2015-02-01

    Twelve female division I collegiate volleyball players were recruited to examine the reliability of several methods for calculating the rate of force development (RFD) during the isometric midthigh clean pull. All subjects were familiarized with the isometric midthigh clean pull and participated in regular strength training. Two isometric midthigh clean pulls were performed with 2 minutes rest between each trail. All measures were performed in a custom isometric testing device that included a step-wise adjustable bar and a force plate for measuring ground reaction forces. The RFD during predetermined time zone bands (0-30, 0-50, 0-90, 0-100, 0-150, 0-200, and 0-250 milliseconds) was then calculated by dividing the force at the end of the band by the band's time interval. The peak RFD was then calculated with the use of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 milliseconds sampling windows. The average RFD (avgRFD) was calculated by dividing the peak force (PF) by the time to achieve PF. All data were analyzed with the use of intraclass correlation alpha (ICCα) and the coefficient of variation (CV) and 90% confidence intervals. All predetermined RFD time bands were deemed reliable based on an ICCα >0.95 and a CV <4%. Conversely, the avgRFD failed to meet the reliability standards set for this study. Overall, the method used to assess the RFD during an isometric midthigh clean pull impacts the reliability of the measure and predetermined RFD time bands should be used to quantify the RFD. PMID:25259470

  20. A comparison of methods for determining the rate of force development during isometric midthigh clean pulls.

    PubMed

    Haff, G Gregory; Ruben, Ryan P; Lider, Joshua; Twine, Corey; Cormie, Prue

    2015-02-01

    Twelve female division I collegiate volleyball players were recruited to examine the reliability of several methods for calculating the rate of force development (RFD) during the isometric midthigh clean pull. All subjects were familiarized with the isometric midthigh clean pull and participated in regular strength training. Two isometric midthigh clean pulls were performed with 2 minutes rest between each trail. All measures were performed in a custom isometric testing device that included a step-wise adjustable bar and a force plate for measuring ground reaction forces. The RFD during predetermined time zone bands (0-30, 0-50, 0-90, 0-100, 0-150, 0-200, and 0-250 milliseconds) was then calculated by dividing the force at the end of the band by the band's time interval. The peak RFD was then calculated with the use of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 milliseconds sampling windows. The average RFD (avgRFD) was calculated by dividing the peak force (PF) by the time to achieve PF. All data were analyzed with the use of intraclass correlation alpha (ICCα) and the coefficient of variation (CV) and 90% confidence intervals. All predetermined RFD time bands were deemed reliable based on an ICCα >0.95 and a CV <4%. Conversely, the avgRFD failed to meet the reliability standards set for this study. Overall, the method used to assess the RFD during an isometric midthigh clean pull impacts the reliability of the measure and predetermined RFD time bands should be used to quantify the RFD.

  1. Effect of simultaneous state-parameter estimation and forcing uncertainties on root-zone soil moisture for dynamic vegetation using EnKF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsivais-Huertero, Alejandro; Graham, Wendy D.; Judge, Jasmeet; Agrawal, Divya

    2010-04-01

    In this study, an EnKF-based assimilation algorithm was implemented to estimate root-zone soil moisture (RZSM) using the coupled LSP-DSSAT model during a growing season of corn. Experiments using both synthetic and field observations were conducted to understand effects of simultaneous state-parameter estimation, spatial and temporal update frequency, and forcing uncertainties on RZSM estimates. Estimating the state-parameters simultaneously with every 3-day assimilation of volumetric soil moisture (VSM) observations at 5 depths lowered the average standard deviation (ASD) and the root mean square error (RMSE) for RZSM by approximately 1.77% VSM (78%) and 2.18% VSM (93%), respectively, compared to the open-loop ASD where as estimating only states lowered the ASD by approximately 1.26% VSM (56%) and the RMSE by 1.66% VSM (71%). The synthetic case obtained RZSM estimates closer to the observations than the MicroWEX-2 case, particularly after precipitation/irrigation events. The differences in EnKF performance between MicroWEX-2 and synthetic observations may indicate other sources of errors in addition to those in parameters and forcings, such as errors in model biophysics.

  2. Application of a submillimetre HCN laser for determining the electrodynamic parameters of one-dimensional wire gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, Yu E; Masalov, S A; Filimonova, A A

    2005-04-30

    A method is proposed and a device is described for determining the electrodynamic parameters of one-dimensional wire gratings in the submillimetre range. The grating under study was used as the output mirror of the laser. The transmission coefficient and the phase shift are determined experimentally for several gratings with different parameters at a wavelength of 337 {mu}m. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Repeated forced swimming impairs prepulse inhibition and alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor and astroglial parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila Boque; Müller, Liz Girardi; Viana, Alice Fialho; Hertzfeldt, Vivian; Lunardi, Paula Santana; Zanotto, Caroline; Nardin, Patrícia; Ravazzolo, Ana Paula; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate perturbations and altered neurotrophin levels have been strongly associated with the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Environmental stress is a risk factor for mood disorders, disrupting glutamatergic activity in astrocytes in addition to cognitive behaviours. Despite the negative impact of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders on public health, the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress has yet to be fully elucidated. Exposure to repeated swimming has proven useful for evaluating the loss of cognitive function after pharmacological and behavioural interventions, but its effect on glutamate function has yet to be fully explored. In the present study, rats previously exposed to repeated forced swimming were evaluated using the novel object recognition test, object location test and prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. In addition, quantification of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein levels, glutamate uptake, glutathione, S100B, GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and calmodulin were evaluated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after various swimming time points. We found that swimming stress selectively impaired PPI but did not affect memory recognition. Swimming stress altered the frontal cortical and hippocampal BDNF expression and the activity of hippocampal astrocytes by reducing hippocampal glutamate uptake and enhancing glutathione content in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data support the assumption that astrocytes may regulate the activity of brain structures related to cognition in a manner that alters complex behaviours. Moreover, they provide new insight regarding the dynamics immediately after an aversive experience, such as after behavioural despair induction, and suggest that forced swimming can be employed to study altered glutamatergic activity and PPI disruption in rodents. PMID:25444867

  4. Repeated forced swimming impairs prepulse inhibition and alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor and astroglial parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila Boque; Müller, Liz Girardi; Viana, Alice Fialho; Hertzfeldt, Vivian; Lunardi, Paula Santana; Zanotto, Caroline; Nardin, Patrícia; Ravazzolo, Ana Paula; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate perturbations and altered neurotrophin levels have been strongly associated with the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Environmental stress is a risk factor for mood disorders, disrupting glutamatergic activity in astrocytes in addition to cognitive behaviours. Despite the negative impact of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders on public health, the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress has yet to be fully elucidated. Exposure to repeated swimming has proven useful for evaluating the loss of cognitive function after pharmacological and behavioural interventions, but its effect on glutamate function has yet to be fully explored. In the present study, rats previously exposed to repeated forced swimming were evaluated using the novel object recognition test, object location test and prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. In addition, quantification of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein levels, glutamate uptake, glutathione, S100B, GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and calmodulin were evaluated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after various swimming time points. We found that swimming stress selectively impaired PPI but did not affect memory recognition. Swimming stress altered the frontal cortical and hippocampal BDNF expression and the activity of hippocampal astrocytes by reducing hippocampal glutamate uptake and enhancing glutathione content in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data support the assumption that astrocytes may regulate the activity of brain structures related to cognition in a manner that alters complex behaviours. Moreover, they provide new insight regarding the dynamics immediately after an aversive experience, such as after behavioural despair induction, and suggest that forced swimming can be employed to study altered glutamatergic activity and PPI disruption in rodents.

  5. Direct Determination of the Equilibrium Unbinding Potential Profile for a Short DNA Duplex from Force Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A

    2004-05-04

    Modern force microscopy techniques allow researchers to use mechanical forces to probe interactions between biomolecules. However, such measurements often happen in non-equilibrium regime, which precludes straightforward extraction of the equilibrium energy information. Here we use the work averaging method based on Jarzynski equality to reconstruct the equilibrium interaction potential from the unbinding of a complementary 14-mer DNA duplex from the results of non-equilibrium single-molecule measurements. The reconstructed potential reproduces most of the features of the DNA stretching transition, previously observed only in equilibrium stretching of long DNA sequences. We also compare the reconstructed potential with the thermodynamic parameters of DNA duplex unbinding and show that the reconstruction accurately predicts duplex melting enthalpy.

  6. Determinants of child and forced marriage in Morocco: stakeholder perspectives on health, policies and human rights

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Morocco, the social and legal framework surrounding sexual and reproductive health has transformed greatly in the past decade, especially with the introduction of the new Family Law or Moudawana. Yet, despite raising the minimum age of marriage for girls and stipulating equal rights in the family, child and forced marriage is widespread. The objective of this research study was to explore perspectives of a broad range of professionals on factors that contribute to the occurrence of child and forced marriage in Morocco. Methods A qualitative approach was used to generate both primary and secondary data for the analysis. Primary data consist of individual semi-structured interviews that were conducted with 22 professionals from various sectors: health, legal, education, NGO’s and government. Sources of secondary data include academic papers, government and NGO reports, various legal documents and media reports. Data were analyzed using thematic qualitative analysis. Results Four major themes arose from the data, indicating that the following elements contribute to child and forced marriage: (1) the legal and social divergence in conceptualizing forced and child marriage; (2) the impact of legislation; (3) the role of education; and (4) the economic factor. Emphasis was especially placed on the new Family Code or Moudawana as having the greatest influence on advancement of women's rights in the sphere of marriage. However, participants pointed out that embedded patriarchal attitudes and behaviours limit its effectiveness. Conclusion The study provided a comprehensive understanding of the factors that compound the problem of child and forced marriage in Morocco. From the viewpoint of professionals, who are closely involved in tackling the issue, policy measures and the law have the greatest potential to bring child and forced marriage to a halt. However, the implementation of new legal tools is facing barriers and resistance. Additionally, the legal and

  7. Determination of Earths transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities from observations over the twentieth century: Strong dependence on assumed forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz S. E.

    2012-05-04

    Relations among observed changes in global mean surface temperature, ocean heat content, ocean heating rate, and calculated radiative forcing, all as a function of time over the twentieth century, that are based on a two-compartment energy balance model, are used to determine key properties of Earth's climate system. The increase in heat content of the world ocean, obtained as the average of several recent compilations, is found to be linearly related to the increase in global temperature over the period 1965-2009; the slope, augmented to account for additional heat sinks, which is an effective heat capacity of the climate system, is 21.8 {+-} 2.1 W year m{sup -2} K{sup -1} (one sigma), equivalent to the heat capacity of 170 m of seawater (for the entire planet) or 240 m for the world ocean. The rate of planetary heat uptake, determined from the time derivative of ocean heat content, is found to be proportional to the increase in global temperature relative to the beginning of the twentieth century with proportionality coefficient 1.05 {+-} 0.06 W m{sup -2} K{sup -1}. Transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities were evaluated for six published data sets of forcing mainly by incremental greenhouse gases and aerosols over the twentieth century as calculated by radiation transfer models; these forcings ranged from 1.1 to 2.1 W m{sup -2}, spanning much of the range encompassed by the 2007 assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). For five of the six forcing data sets, a rather robust linear proportionality obtains between the observed increase in global temperature and the forcing, allowing transient sensitivity to be determined as the slope. Equilibrium sensitivities determined by two methods that account for the rate of planetary heat uptake range from 0.31 {+-} 0.02 to 1.32 {+-} 0.31 K (W m{sup -2}){sup -1} (CO{sub 2} doubling temperature 1.16 {+-} 0.09-4.9 {+-} 1.2 K), more than spanning the IPCC estimated 'likely' uncertainty range

  8. Comparisons of selected methods for the determination of kinetic parameters from electrothermal atomic absorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Rodney W.; Pfefferkorn, Lisa L.; Holcombe, James A.

    1994-12-01

    Three of the methods available for the determination of kinetic parameters for atom formation in ETAAS were compared. In the approach of mcnally and holcombe [ Anal. Chem. 59, 1015 (1987)], Arrhenius-type plots are used to extract activation energy values while an approximation of the order of release is obtained by studying the alignment of the absorption maxima at increasing analyte concentrations. In the method of rojas and olivares [ Spectrochim. Acta47B, 387 (1992)], plots are prepared for different orders of release, with the correct order yielding a longer linear region from whose slope the activation energy is calculated. The method of yan et al. [ Spectrochim. Acta48B, 605 (1993)] uses a single absorption profile for the calculations. Activation energy and the order of release are obtained from the slope and intercept, respectively, on their graph. All three methods assume linear heating rate, constant activation energies, and furnace isothermality. The methods were tested with the same experimental data sets for Cu, Au and Ni using a spatially isothermal cuvette. Since intensive mathematical treatments commonly have deleterious effects on the uncertainty of the final result, the methods were compared using both the original data and a smoothed version of it. In general, the three methods yielded comparable results for the metals studied. However, choosing the most linear plot to determine the correct order of release when using Rojas and Olivares' method was sometimes subjective, and McNally and Holcombe's method provided only estimates for the orders of release that were neither zero nor unity.

  9. Photometric and Spectroscopic Analysis for the Determination of Physical Parameters of an Eclipsing Binary Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Piper

    2013-01-01

    A binary star system is a pair of stars that are bound together by gravity. Most of the stars that we see in the night sky are members of multiple star systems. A system of stars where one star passes in front of the other (as observed from Earth) on a periodic basis is called an eclipsing binary. Eclipsing binaries can have very short rotational periods and in all cases these pairs of stars are so far away that they can only be resolved from Earth as a single point of light. The interaction of the two stars serves to produce physical phenomena that can be observed and used to study stellar properties. By careful data collection and analysis is it possible for an amateur astronomer using commercial, low cost equipment (including a home built spectroscope) to gather photometric (brightness versus time) and spectroscopic (brightness versus wavelength) data, analyze the data, and calculate the physical properties of a binary star system? Using a CCD camera, tracking mount and telescope photometric data of BB Pegasi was collected and a light curve produced. 57 Cygni was also studied using a spectroscope, tracking mount and telescope to prove that Doppler shift of Hydrogen Balmer absorption lines can be used to determine radial velocity. The orbital period, orbital velocity, radius of each star, separation of the two stars and mass of each star was calculated for the eclipsing binary BB Pegasi using photometric and spectroscopic data and Kepler’s 3rd Law. These data were then compared to published data. By careful use of consumer grade astronomical equipment it is possible for an amateur astronomer to determine an array of physical parameters of a distant binary star system from a suburban setting.

  10. An observational approach for determining aerosol surface radiative forcing: Results from the first field phase of INDOEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, William C.

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents one of the few quantitative estimates of surface aerosol forcing made directly from surface irradiance observations. The method described within yields estimates of the forcing accurate to 20%. The study was conducted from February to March 1998 at the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO) during the First Field Phase of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX-FFP). For the 400-700 nm region studied here, the forcing is -7.6±1.5 W m-2. The data are obtained from two photodiode radiometers measuring global and diffuse irradiance in five channels in the visible and ultraviolet. The instruments were chosen, calibrated, and deployed specifically for a precise measurement of aerosol forcing. The angular, spectral, and absolute response characteristics of the instruments are determined in the laboratory and used to calibrate the data, as described here. The accuracy in the calibrated data is 2.4% for the global irradiance and 1.8% for the diffuse irradiance. Direct aerosol forcing is obtained from the measured aerosol forcing efficiency, which is determined by two methods: hybrid and differential. The hybrid method uses a radiative transfer model to subtract out the contribution from the aerosol-free atmosphere. The differential method assumes that changes in 400-700 nm solar flux are forced by changes in aerosol optical depth. By using flux changes, the differential method is not sensitive to the small calibration uncertainties, and is independent of model assumptions about the single-scatter properties of the aerosol. For this soot-laden marine region south of India, a 0.1 change in aerosol optical depth produces a -4.0±0.8 W m-2; change in the 400-700 nm surface flux; 55% of this forcing is observed in the 400-540 nm region. The global and diffuse data agree to within 5 W m-2 of results calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. The model assumes an aerosol consistent with the spectral optical depth, lidar vertical profiles, and surface

  11. Determination of background concentrations of hydrochemical parameters and water quality assessment in the Akhuryan River Basin (Armenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpine, Hovhannisyan; Gayane, Shahnazaryan

    2016-08-01

    The determination of background values of hydrochemical parameters, to distinguish between natural concentration and anthropogenically-influenced concentrations, is highly relevant. In presented study, to estimate the background values of hydrochemical parameters in Akhuryan River Basin, log-normal probability functions on the hydrochemical parameters concentrations was applied. The study is carried out on the basis of hydrochemical data of surface water quality monitoring for the period of 2010-2013. This study highlights the usefulness of application of site-specific background concentrations for the evaluation, interpretation of surface water quality and for determination of pollution sources.

  12. The effects of machine parameters on residual stress determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of machine parameters on residual stresses in single point diamond turned silicon and germanium have been investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Residual stresses were sampled across ductile feed cuts in < 100 > silicon and germanium which were single point diamond turned using a variety of feed rates, rake angles and clearance angles. High spatial resolution micro-Raman spectra (1{mu}m spot) were obtained in regions of ductile cutting where no visible surface damage was present. The use of both 514-5nm and 488.0nm excitation wavelengths, by virtue of their differing characteristic penetration depths in the materials, allowed determinations of stress profiles as a function of depth into the sample. Previous discussions have demonstrated that such Raman spectra will exhibit asymmetrically broadened peaks which are characteristic of the superposition of a continuum of Raman scatterers from the various depths probed. Depth profiles of residual stress were obtained using computer deconvolution of the resulting asymmetrically broadened raman spectra.

  13. Determination of Aluminium and Physicochemical Parameters in the Palm Oil Estates Water Supply at Johor, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Siti Farizwana, M. R.; Mazrura, S.; Zurahanim Fasha, A.; Ahmad Rohi, G.

    2010-01-01

    The study was to determine the concentration of aluminium (Al) and study the physicochemical parameters (pH, total dissolved solids (TDS), turbidity, and residual chlorine) in drinking water supply in selected palm oil estates in Kota Tinggi, Johor. Water samples were collected from the estates with the private and the public water supplies. The sampling points were at the water source (S), the treatment plant outlet (TPO), and at the nearest houses (H1) and the furthest houses (H2) from the TPO. All estates with private water supply failed to meet the NSDWQ for Al with mean concentration of 0.99 ± 1.52 mg/L. However, Al concentrations in all public water supply estates were well within the limit except for one estate. The pH for all samples complied with the NSDWQ except from the private estates for the drinking water supply with an acidic pH (5.50 ± 0.90). The private water supply showed violated turbidity value in the drinking water samples (14.2 ± 24.1 NTU). Insufficient amount of chlorination was observed in the private water supply estates (0.09 ± 0.30 mg/L). Private water supplies with inefficient water treatment served unsatisfactory drinking water quality to the community which may lead to major health problems. PMID:21461348

  14. Determination of the basic optical parameters of ZnSnN(2).

    PubMed

    Deng, Fuling; Cao, Hongtao; Liang, Lingyan; Li, Jun; Gao, Junhua; Zhang, Hongliang; Qin, Ruifeng; Liu, Caichi

    2015-04-01

    Polycrystalline ZnSnN(2) thin films were successfully prepared by DC magnetron sputtering at room temperature. Both the as-deposited and annealed films showed n-type conduction, with electron concentration varying between 1.6×10(18) and 2.3×10(17)  cm(-3) and the maximum mobility of 3.98  cm(2)  V(-1) s(-1). The basic optical parameters such as the refraction index, extinction coefficient, and absorption coefficient were precisely determined through the spectroscopic ellipsometry measurement and analysis. The optical bandgap of the ZnSnN(2)films was calculated to around 1.9 eV, with the absorption coefficient greater than 10(4)  cm(-1) at wavelengths less than 845 nm. The easy-fabricated ZnSnN(2) possesses a sound absorption coefficient ranging from the ultraviolet through visible light and into the near-infrared, comparable to some typical photovoltaic materials such as GaAs, CdTe, and InP. PMID:25831313

  15. THE FIRST DETERMINATION OF THE VISCOSITY PARAMETER IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK OF A Be STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Carciofi, Alex C.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Haubois, Xavier; Otero, Sebastian A.; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Stefl, Stanislav; Rivinius, Thomas; Baade, Dietrich E-mail: jon@physics.utoledo.edu

    2012-01-15

    Be stars possess gaseous circumstellar decretion disks, which are well described using standard {alpha}-disk theory. The Be star 28 CMa recently underwent a long outburst followed by a long period of quiescence, during which the disk dissipated. Here we present the first time-dependent models of the dissipation of a viscous decretion disk. By modeling the rate of decline of the V-band excess, we determine that the viscosity parameter {alpha} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2, corresponding to a mass injection rate M-dot =(3.5{+-}1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Such a large value of {alpha} suggests that the origin of the turbulent viscosity is an instability in the disk whose growth is limited by shock dissipation. The mass injection rate is more than an order of magnitude larger than the wind mass-loss rate inferred from UV observations, implying that the mass injection mechanism most likely is not the stellar wind, but some other mechanism.

  16. Kinetic parameters and tissue distribution of 5-oxo-L-prolinase determined by a fluorimetric assay.

    PubMed

    Weber, P; Jäger, M; Bangsow, T; Knell, G; Piechaczek, K; Koch, J; Wolf, S

    1999-01-13

    5-Oxo-L-prolinase (5-OPase) catalyses the hydrolysis of 5-oxo-L-proline to glutamate with concomitant stoichiometric cleavage of ATP to ADP, a reaction which is known to be part of the gamma-glutamyl cycle-an interrelated series of reactions involved in the synthesis and metabolism of glutathione. As recent studies indicate, this cyclic pathway plays a crucial role in the regulation of amino acid transport. Apparently, the intermediate product 5-oxo-L-proline functions as a second messenger molecule that upregulates the activity of certain amino acid transport systems. Thus, the degradation of 5-oxo-L-proline by 5-OPase leads to the downregulation of this stimulus. In this study, a new sensitive fluorimetric assay for 5-OPase activity was established which is based on the derivatization of glutamate with o-phthaldialdehyde in the presence of thiols and subsequent separation of the products by HPLC. The method is suitable for the screening of chromatography fractions as well as for the determination of the kinetic parameters Km and Vmax of purified 5-OPase. Additionally, it can be used for the measurement of enzyme activity in crude cell extracts and evaluation of tissue distribution.

  17. Determination of the pathological state of skin samples by optical polarimetry parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Buelta, L.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetry is widely known to involve a series of powerful optical techniques that characterize the polarization behaviour of a sample. In this work, we propose a method for applying polarimetric procedures to the characterization of biological tissues, in order to differentiate between healthy and pathologic tissues on a polarimetric basis. Usually, medical morphology diseases are diagnosed based on histological alterations of the tissue. The fact that these alterations will be reflected in polarization information highlights the suitability of polarimetric procedures for diagnostic purposes. The analysis is mainly focused on the depolarization properties of the media, as long as the internal structure strongly affects the polarization state of the light that interacts with the sample. Therefore, a method is developed in order to determine the correlation between pathological ultraestructural characteristics and the subsequent variations in the polarimetric parameters of the backscattered light. This study is applied to three samples of porcine skin corresponding to a healthy region, a mole, and a cancerous region. The results show that the method proposed is indeed an adequate technique in order to achieve an early, accurate and effective cancer detection.

  18. Arrhenius parameter determination for the reaction of methyl radicals with iodine species in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mezyk, S.P.; Madden, K.P.

    1996-05-30

    The techniques of electron pulse radiolysis and direct ESR detection have been used to determine Arrhenius parameters for the recombination reaction of methyl radicals and methyl radical reaction with iodine in aqueous solution. At 22.8 {degree}C, rate constants of 2k{sub 7} = (1.77{+-}0.16) x 10{sup 9} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} and k{sub 1} = (2.75{+-}0.43) x 10{sup 9} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} with corresponding activation energies of 14.89{+-}0.87 and 13.10{+-}0.71 kJ mol{sup -1} (5.7-39.6 {degree}C), were obtained respectively for these two reactions. The analogous reaction of methyl radicals with iodide or iodate was found to be much slower, with the room temperature rate constant for both reactions estimated as k < 10{sup 6} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -}. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  20. Determination of certain geodynamic parameters from observations on the LAGEOS and ETALON-1 satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, A. N.

    Laser observations have been used to refine the orbital elements of the LAGEOS and ETALON-1 satellites, the Earth's rotation parameters (ERP), the coefficients of direct light pressure CR and empirical acceleration CT, the coordinates of 30 tracking stations, certain fundamental constants of geodesy and astrometry, together with the secular variations of the zonal geopotential coefficients, dJ/dt2, dJ/dt3, and dJ/dt4. The GEORAN-2 program system was used for the following purposes: 1) to reduce the LAGEOS laser ranging data, 2) to reduce the ETALON-1 laser ranging data, and 3) to reduce simultaneously the two sets (combined solution). In the latter case (as compared to case 2), the solution becomes more stable for ERP and the station coordinates. Close correlation is indicated if CT and dJ/dtn are determined simultaneously. dJ/dt2 is the most reliable when derived from the simultaneous solution, and it is in good agreement with the other results.