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Sample records for forensic paternity testing

  1. [Forensic hematology genetics--paternity testing].

    PubMed

    Kratzer, A; Bär, W

    1997-05-01

    In Switzerland paternity investigations are carried out using DNA analysis only since 1991. DNA patterns are inherited and only with the exception of genetically identical twins they are different in everyone and therefore unique to an individual. Hence DNA-systems are an excellent tool to resolve paternity disputes. DNA polymorphisms used for paternity diagnosis are length polymorphisms of the highly polymorphic VNTR loci [variable number of tandem repeats]. The most frequently applied systems are the DNA single locus systems. In addition to the DNA single locus systems the application of PCR (PCR = polymerase chain reaction) based DNA systems has increased particularly in difficult deficiency cases or in cases where only small evidential samples or partially degraded DNA are available. Normally four independent DNA single probes are used to produce a DNA profile from the mother, the child and the alleged father. A child inherits half the DNA patterns from its mother and the other half from its true biological father. If an alleged father doesn't possess the paternal specific DNA pattern in his DNA profile he is excluded from the paternity. In case of non-exclusion the probability for paternity is calculated according to Essen-Möller. When applying four highly polymorphic DNA single locus systems the biostatistical evaluation leads always to W-values exceeding 99.8% [= required value for positive proof of paternity]. DNA analysis is currently the best available method to achieve such effective conclusions in paternity investigations.

  2. [Microsatellite DNA analysis as a tool for forensic paternity testing (DNA paternity testing)].

    PubMed

    Veselinović, Igor

    2006-01-01

    MICROSATELLITE ANALYSIS: By using serological or HLA-testing, the alleged father can be excluded as the biological father, but, regardless of the degree of probability, positive paternity results cannot be obtained without DNA testing. According to the results of the National Human Genome Project, human genome consists of approximately 30.000 genes. The vast majority of human DNA is not organized in genes and has no genetic expression or visible function. Non-coding DNA contains genetic markers important for human identification. Short tandem repeats, or STRs, are a class of microsatellites consisting of tandemly repeated sequences of 2 to 6 base pair length monomers. Most of the microsatellites show a high degree of polymorphism, which can be evaluated by PCR technique, and used in criminalistics, forensic identification and parentage testing. A source of DNA in parentage testing are blood samples or buccal swabs which are routinelly used. Amplification of isolated DNA can be performed in 25-30 cycles by PCR, and fragments are separated by capillary electrophoresis. The probability of paternity of 99.99% or higher corresponds to the paternity "practically proven", indicating that the alleged father is the biological father. Such results can be obtained only by DNA testing. DNA-testing laboratories are required to conduct validation of laboratory facilities, equipment and staff and are subject to permanent control by the society.

  3. Paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Onoja, A M

    2011-01-01

    Molecular diagnostic techniques have found application in virtually all areas of medicine, including criminal investigations and forensic analysis. The techniques have become so precise that it is now possible to conclusively determine paternity using DNA from grand parents, cousins, or even saliva left on a discarded cigarette butt. This is a broad overview of paternity testing.

  4. Assessment of application value of 19 autosomal short tandem repeat loci of GoldenEye 20A kit in forensic paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Wang, Jie; Jiao, Zhangping; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Xinning; Tang, Hui; Liu, Yacheng

    2013-05-01

    This study was carried out to assess the application value of 19 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci of GoldenEye 20A kit, in which 13 combined DNA index system core STR loci and PentaE, PentaD, D2S1338, D19S433, D12S391, and D6S1043 of six STR loci could be used in forensic paternity testing in Chinese population. We amplified the genomic DNA from blood samples on FTA paper of 289 paternity testing cases by using the GoldenEye 20A kit. The amplified products were detected by capillary electrophoresis, and then the genotypes of 20 genetic markers including 19 STR loci as well as Amelogenin for sex determination were analyzed by GeneMapper v3.2 and GeneMarker HID Software. The results of genotypes were compared to the three commonly used commercial kits including AmpFℓSTR Identifiler, PowerPlex16, and AmpFℓSTR Sinofiler kits. Compared to the three other common commercial kits, the GoldenEye 20A kit had higher value of combined paternity index in certainty of paternity or non-exclusion paternity cases, and more numbers of STR loci were excluded in exclusionary paternity cases. Our data in this study showed that the GoldenEye 20A kit has a higher application value in forensic paternity testing and will be of help for kinship analysis.

  5. [Mono- and dizygotic twins in forensic paternity testing in practice at the Department of Forensic Medicine (Silesian Academy of Medicine, Katowice) in the years 1996-2003].

    PubMed

    Raczek, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    Giving an opinion on disputable paternity, concerning monozygotic twins in practice at the Department of Forensic Medicine (Silesian Academy of Medicine, Katowice) demonstrated their ideal agreement according to examined genetic markers possible. Even the mutation, which was revealed using the RFLP-VNTR method was the same for both twin sisters. In the case of dizygotic twins a firm differentiation of paternity index and probability of paternity was proved. This was the consequence of independent features segregation in first, reductive meiotic division. While the rare, out-ladder allele 16 at the CSF1PO locus was transmitted to both twins: a daughter and a son by the putative father.

  6. Finding the needle in the haystack: differentiating "identical" twins in paternity testing and forensics by ultra-deep next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Weber-Lehmann, Jacqueline; Schilling, Elmar; Gradl, Georg; Richter, Daniel C; Wiehler, Jens; Rolf, Burkhard

    2014-03-01

    Monozygotic (MZ) twins are considered being genetically identical, therefore they cannot be differentiated using standard forensic DNA testing. Here we describe how identification of extremely rare mutations by ultra-deep next generation sequencing can solve such cases. We sequenced DNA from sperm samples of two twins and from a blood sample of the child of one twin. Bioinformatics analysis revealed five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present in the twin father and the child, but not in the twin uncle. The SNPs were confirmed by classical Sanger sequencing. Our results give experimental evidence for the hypothesis that rare mutations will occur early after the human blastocyst has split into two, the origin of twins, and that such mutations will be carried on into somatic tissue and the germline. The method provides a solution to solve paternity and forensic cases involving monozygotic twins as alleged fathers or originators of DNA traces. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. [Basic concepts about paternity testing].

    PubMed

    Lagos, Marcela; Poggi, Helena; Mellado, Cecilia

    2011-04-01

    Nowadays, the analysis of genetic markers is a very important and validated tool for the identification of individuals, and for paternity testing. To do so, highly variable regions of the human genome are analyzed, making it possible to obtain the genetic profile of an individual, and to distinguish between different individuals. The methodology used is basically the same all over the world, consisting in the analysis of 13 to 15 markers. To assign biological paternity the child must have inherited the characteristics from the alleged father in each of the genetic markers analyzed. This analysis achieves a certainty higher than with any other test, which is expressed as the probability of paternity. This probability has to be at least 99.9%, but greater probabilities are usually obtained, especially if the mother is included in the analysis. If the characteristics of two or more genetic markers from the alleged father are absent in the child, biological paternity is excluded.

  8. Paternity tests in Mexico: Results obtained in 3005 cases.

    PubMed

    García-Aceves, M E; Romero Rentería, O; Díaz-Navarro, X X; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2018-04-01

    National and international reports regarding the paternity testing activity scarcely include information from Mexico and other Latin American countries. Therefore, we report different results from the analysis of 3005 paternity cases analyzed during a period of five years in a Mexican paternity testing laboratory. Motherless tests were the most frequent (77.27%), followed by trio cases (20.70%); the remaining 2.04% included different cases of kinship reconstruction. The paternity exclusion rate was 29.58%, higher but into the range reported by the American Association of Blood Banks (average 24.12%). We detected 65 mutations, most of them involving one-step (93.8% and the remaining were two-step mutations (6.2%) thus, we were able to estimate the paternal mutation rate for 17 different STR loci: 0.0018 (95% CI 0.0005-0.0047). Five triallelic patterns and 12 suspected null alleles were detected during this period; however, re-amplification of these samples with a different Human Identification (HID) kit confirmed the homozygous genotypes, which suggests that most of these exclusions actually are one-step mutations. HID kits with ≥20 STRs detected more exclusions, diminishing the rate of inconclusive results with isolated exclusions (<3 loci), and leading to higher paternity indexes (PI). However, the Powerplex 21 kit (20 STRs) and Powerplex Fusion kit (22 STRs) offered similar PI (p = 0.379) and average number of exclusions (PE) (p = 0.339) when a daughter was involved in motherless tests. In brief, besides to report forensic parameters from paternity tests in Mexico, results describe improvements to solve motherless paternity tests using HID kits with ≥20 STRs instead of one including 15 STRs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Applying massively parallel sequencing to paternity testing on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhao, Xueying; Ma, Ke; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Huaigu; Ping, Yuan; Shao, Chengchen; Xie, Jianhui; Liu, Wenbin

    2017-11-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) is a promising supplementary method for forensic genetics and has gradually been applied to forensic casework. In this study, we applied MPS to forensic casework on an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine to evaluate its performance in paternity testing with mismatched STR loci. A total of 15 samples from seven cases containing one mismatched locus by capillary electrophoresis typing were analyzed. Combined paternity index (CPI) and relative chance of paternity were calculated according to the International Society for Forensic Genetics guidelines and the Chinese national standards recommended for paternity testing. With simultaneous analysis of enough STR loci, the results support the certainty of paternity, and the mismatched alleles were considered to be mutations (CPI>10,000). With the detection of allele sequence structures, the origins of the mutations were inferred in some cases. Meanwhile, nine STRs (CSF1PO, D1S1656, D2S441, D2S1338, D3S1358, D8S1179, D12S391, D21S11 and D4S2408) were found in an increased number of unique alleles and three new alleles in three STRs (D2S441, D21S11, and FGA) that have not been reported before were detected. Therefore, MPS can provide valuable information for forensic genetics research and play a promising role in paternity testing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Noninvasive Prenatal Paternity Testing (NIPAT) through Maternal Plasma DNA Sequencing: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haojun; Xie, Yifan; Li, Xuchao; Ge, Huijuan; Deng, Yongqiang; Mu, Haofang; Feng, Xiaoli; Yin, Lu; Du, Zhou; Chen, Fang; He, Nongyue

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been already used to perform noninvasive prenatal paternity testing from maternal plasma DNA. The frequently used technologies were PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and SNP typing array, respectively. Here, we developed a noninvasive prenatal paternity testing (NIPAT) based on SNP typing with maternal plasma DNA sequencing. We evaluated the influence factors (minor allele frequency (MAF), the number of total SNP, fetal fraction and effective sequencing depth) and designed three different selective SNP panels in order to verify the performance in clinical cases. Combining targeted deep sequencing of selective SNP and informative bioinformatics pipeline, we calculated the combined paternity index (CPI) of 17 cases to determine paternity. Sequencing-based NIPAT results fully agreed with invasive prenatal paternity test using STR multiplex system. Our study here proved that the maternal plasma DNA sequencing-based technology is feasible and accurate in determining paternity, which may provide an alternative in forensic application in the future.

  11. Paternity testing that involves a DNA mixture.

    PubMed

    Mortera, Julia; Vecchiotti, Carla; Zoppis, Silvia; Merigioli, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Here we analyse a complex disputed paternity case, where the DNA of the putative father was extracted from his corpse that had been inhumed for over 20 years. This DNA was contaminated and appears to be a mixture of at least two individuals. Furthermore, the mother's DNA was not available. The DNA mixture was analysed so as to predict the most probable genotypes of each contributor. The major contributor's profile was then used to compute the likelihood ratio for paternity. We also show how to take into account a dropout allele and the possibility of mutation in paternity testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic patterns of paternity and testes size in mammals.

    PubMed

    Soulsbury, Carl D

    2010-03-08

    Testes size is used as a proxy of male intrasexual competition, with larger testes indicative of greater competition. It has been shown that in some taxa, social mating systems reflect variance in testes size, but results are not consistent, and instead it has been suggested that genetic patterns of mating may reflect testes size. However, there are different measures of genetic patterns of mating. Multiple paternity rates are the most widely used measure but are limited to species that produce multi-offspring litters, so, at least for group living species, other measures such as loss of paternity to males outside the social group (extra group paternity) or the proportion of offspring sired by the dominant male (alpha paternity) might be appropriate. This study examines the relationship between testes size and three genetic patterns of mating: multiple paternity, extragroup paternity and alpha paternity. Using data from mammals, phylogenetically corrected general linear models demonstrate that both multiple paternity and alpha paternity, but not extra group paternity, relate to testes size. Testes size is greater in species with high multiple paternity rates, whereas the converse is found for alpha paternity. Additionally, length of mating season, ovulation mode and litter size significantly influenced testes size in one model. These results demonstrate that patterns of mating (multiple paternity and alpha paternity rates) determined by genetic analysis can provide reliable indicators of male postcopulatory intrasexual competition (testes size), and that other variables (length of mating season, ovulation mode, litter size) may also be important.

  13. Paternity Testing in a PBL Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casla, Alberto Vicario; Zubiaga, Isabel Smith

    2010-01-01

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) makes use of real-life scenarios to stimulate students' prior knowledge and to provide a meaningful context that is also related to the student's future professional work. In this article, Paternity testing is presented using a PBL approach that involves a combination of classroom, laboratory, and out-of-class…

  14. Blood Group ABO Genotyping in Paternity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Bugert, Peter; Rink, Gabriele; Kemp, Katharina; Klüter, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background The ABO blood groups result from DNA sequence variations, predominantly single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (SNPs and indels), in the ABO gene encoding a glycosyltransferase. The ABO blood groups A1, A2, B and O predominantly result from the wild type allele A1 and the major gene variants that are characterized by four diallelic markers (261G>del, 802G>A, 803G>C, 1061C>del). Here, we were interested to evaluate the impact of ABO genotyping compared to ABO phenotyping in paternity testing. Methods The major ABO alleles were determined by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in a representative sample of 1,335 blood donors. The genotypes were compared to the ABO blood groups registered in the blood donor files. Then, the ABO phenotypes and genotypes were determined in 95 paternity trio cases that have been investigated by 12 short tandem repeat (STR) markers before. We compared statistical parameters (PL, paternity likelihood; PE, power of exclusion) of both blood grouping approaches. Results The prevalence of the major ABO alleles and genotypes corresponded to the expected occurrence of ABO blood groups in a Caucasian population. The low resolution genotyping of 4 diallelic markers revealed a correct genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,331 of 1,335 samples (99.7%). In 60 paternity trios with confirmed paternity of the alleged father based on STR analysis both PL and PE of the ABO genotype was significantly higher than of the ABO phenotype. In 12 of 35 exclusion cases (34.3%) the ABO genotype also excluded the alleged father, whereas the ABO phenotype excluded the alleged father only in 7 cases (20%). Conclusion In paternity testing ABO genotyping is superior to ABO phenotyping with regard to PL and PE, however, ABO genotyping is not sufficient for valid paternity testing. Due to the much lower mutation rate compared to STR markers, blood group SNPs in addition to anonymous SNPs could be considered for future

  15. Genetic Patterns of Paternity and Testes Size in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Soulsbury, Carl D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Testes size is used as a proxy of male intrasexual competition, with larger testes indicative of greater competition. It has been shown that in some taxa, social mating systems reflect variance in testes size, but results are not consistent, and instead it has been suggested that genetic patterns of mating may reflect testes size. However, there are different measures of genetic patterns of mating. Multiple paternity rates are the most widely used measure but are limited to species that produce multi-offspring litters, so, at least for group living species, other measures such as loss of paternity to males outside the social group (extra group paternity) or the proportion of offspring sired by the dominant male (alpha paternity) might be appropriate. This study examines the relationship between testes size and three genetic patterns of mating: multiple paternity, extragroup paternity and alpha paternity. Methodology/Principal Findings Using data from mammals, phylogenetically corrected general linear models demonstrate that both multiple paternity and alpha paternity, but not extra group paternity, relate to testes size. Testes size is greater in species with high multiple paternity rates, whereas the converse is found for alpha paternity. Additionally, length of mating season, ovulation mode and litter size significantly influenced testes size in one model. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that patterns of mating (multiple paternity and alpha paternity rates) determined by genetic analysis can provide reliable indicators of male postcopulatory intrasexual competition (testes size), and that other variables (length of mating season, ovulation mode, litter size) may also be important. PMID:20221392

  16. [The evaluation of Identifiler system in paternity testing].

    PubMed

    Que, Ting-Zhi; Yan, Pin-Hua; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Yan; Li, Li

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the power of Identifiler System for paternity testing. A total of 3 277 paternity testing cases were studied using Identifiler System. The exclusion power and mutation rates of the Identifiler System were analysed in the paternity testing. The cumulated power of exclusion was 0.999 998 827, and the cumulated discriminating power was 0.999 999 999 999 999 98, respectively. Of the 3 277 cases, paternity was confirmed in 2 863, but excluded in 347. Among this paternity testing, mutations involving a single STR locus were observed in 65 cases, while mutations involving 2 STR loci were observed in 2 cases. The Identifiler System is powerful and reliable for paternity testing.

  17. Noninvasive Prenatal Paternity Testing (NIPAT) through Maternal Plasma DNA Sequencing: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Huijuan; Deng, Yongqiang; Mu, Haofang; Feng, Xiaoli; Yin, Lu; Du, Zhou; Chen, Fang; He, Nongyue

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been already used to perform noninvasive prenatal paternity testing from maternal plasma DNA. The frequently used technologies were PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and SNP typing array, respectively. Here, we developed a noninvasive prenatal paternity testing (NIPAT) based on SNP typing with maternal plasma DNA sequencing. We evaluated the influence factors (minor allele frequency (MAF), the number of total SNP, fetal fraction and effective sequencing depth) and designed three different selective SNP panels in order to verify the performance in clinical cases. Combining targeted deep sequencing of selective SNP and informative bioinformatics pipeline, we calculated the combined paternity index (CPI) of 17 cases to determine paternity. Sequencing-based NIPAT results fully agreed with invasive prenatal paternity test using STR multiplex system. Our study here proved that the maternal plasma DNA sequencing-based technology is feasible and accurate in determining paternity, which may provide an alternative in forensic application in the future. PMID:27631491

  18. A case study of SNPSTR efficiency in paternity testing with locus incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yi; Luo, Haibo; Liao, Linchuan; Zhang, Ji; Wei, Wei; Wang, Zheng; Hou, Yiping

    2014-03-01

    Instead of testing the additional STR loci, SNPSTR was included in the paternity testing for an alleged father-son duo case, with one inconsistency at the CSF1PO locus. We have chosen CSF1PO STR and five closely linked SNPs rs10077461, rs2569076, rs2228422, rs3733673 and rs3829987 to establish the SNPSTR and examined its potential use in paternity testing. A total of 152 haplotypes from 76 unrelated individuals were obtained by the nested-AS-PCR and 60 SNPSTR haplotypes were observed. The discrimination power of the SNPSTR haplotype was greater than either the STR or SNP haplotype alone. Its SNP part could be used to distinguish fathers from uncles. When SNPSTR was introduced into the calculation of parentage statistics, the paternity probability increased to 99.998%. Based on our findings, we concluded that SNPSTR could be considered a useful tool in forensic science. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Proof of paternity: historical reflections on an andrological-forensic challenge.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, K; Schultheiss, D

    2004-02-01

    Throughout the history of medicine, there have been difficulties in forensic proving of unsolved paternities, making this a major andrological-forensic challenge. In the Roman empire, children procreated by incest, called 'incestuosi', had no rights at all and other illegitimates, e.g. children born of prostitutes or as a result of adultery, could not assert rights towards the father. Only through the 'corpus iuris civilis' of the Roman Emperor Justinian I (6th century ad) could claims of alimony be made in some cases. In later times, evidence of presumable impotence of a potential father was determined by the congressus, where defined juristical 'sexual fights' had to be held before official matrons, surgeons and priests. Men had to demonstrate their erectile and ejaculatory function. A special significance must be attributed to the microscopical discovery of spermatozoa by the medical student Johann Ham in 1677 and the further investigation by Antoni van Leeuwenhoek. After centuries of personally biased and scientifically incorrect concepts of paternity determination, the discovery of the blood grouping system by Karl Landsteiner at the beginning of the 20th century paved the way for sophisticated techniques to prove or rather to disprove paternity. In 1921, Reuben Ottenberg from New York was the first to suggest the application of the system to medico-legal questions, but it was not before the 1950s that legal courts accepted this method. A famous example of disregarding clear blood grouping results was the case of the movie star Charles Chaplin in California in 1946. Modern DNA techniques, today the golden standard in forensic medicine, have also been applied recently for historical investigations. One of the very illustrious examples is the dispute about Thomas Jefferson, third President of the US, fathering a child of one of his slaves.

  20. Paternal exclusion: allele sharing in microsatellite testing.

    PubMed

    Narkuti, Venkanna; Vellanki, Ravi N; Oraganti, Narasimha M; Mangamoori, Lakshmi N

    2008-01-01

    A paternity disagreement analyzed with 15 autosomal microsatellite markers indicated allele sharing between the mother, questioned child and the alleged father generating an inconclusive paternity result. In total, 15 autosomal and 17 Y tandem repeat loci were analyzed using AmpF/STR Identifiler, AmpF/STR Y-filer kits followed by six microsatellite markers on X chromosome in DNA extracted from peripheral blood samples of the mother, questioned child and alleged father. Microsatellite analysis examined with 15 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) indicated at least one allele sharing at 14 loci between the mother, questioned child and alleged father except for the TPOX locus where a paternal-child allele mismatch was observed. Y chromosome investigations using 17 repeat markers signified the case as non-paternity (exclusion). A complete match of the six X chromosome loci in the questioned child with the mother was observed. Our investigations on inconclusive paternity due to atypical allele sharing in autosomal microsatellites were resolved with X- and Y-chromosome STR analyses confirming the case as non-paternity.

  1. Informatics-based, highly accurate, noninvasive prenatal paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Allison; Baner, Johan; Demko, Zachary; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Baird, Michael L; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an informatics-based, noninvasive, prenatal paternity test using array-based single-nucleotide polymorphism measurements of cell-free DNA isolated from maternal plasma. Blood samples were taken from 21 adult pregnant women (with gestational ages between 6 and 21 weeks), and a genetic sample was taken from the corresponding biological fathers. Paternity was confirmed by genetic testing of the infant, products of conception, control of fertilization, and/or preimplantation genetic diagnosis during in vitro fertilization. Parental DNA samples and maternal plasma cell-free DNA were amplified and analyzed using a HumanCytoSNP-12 array. An informatics-based method measured single-nucleotide polymorphism data, confirming or rejecting paternity. Each plasma sample with a sufficient fetal cell-free DNA fraction was independently tested against the confirmed father and 1,820 random, unrelated males. One of the 21 samples had insufficient fetal cell-free DNA. The test correctly confirmed paternity for the remaining 20 samples (100%) when tested against the biological father, with P values of <10(-4). For the 36,400 tests using an unrelated male as the alleged father, 99.95% (36,382) correctly excluded paternity and 0.05% (18) were indeterminate. There were no miscalls. A noninvasive paternity test using informatics-based analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism array measurements accurately determined paternity early in pregnancy.

  2. Informatics-based, highly accurate, noninvasive prenatal paternity testing

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Allison; Baner, Johan; Demko, Zachary; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Baird, Michael L.; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an informatics-based, noninvasive, prenatal paternity test using array-based single-nucleotide polymorphism measurements of cell-free DNA isolated from maternal plasma. Methods: Blood samples were taken from 21 adult pregnant women (with gestational ages between 6 and 21 weeks), and a genetic sample was taken from the corresponding biological fathers. Paternity was confirmed by genetic testing of the infant, products of conception, control of fertilization, and/or preimplantation genetic diagnosis during in vitro fertilization. Parental DNA samples and maternal plasma cell-free DNA were amplified and analyzed using a HumanCytoSNP-12 array. An informatics-based method measured single-nucleotide polymorphism data, confirming or rejecting paternity. Each plasma sample with a sufficient fetal cell-free DNA fraction was independently tested against the confirmed father and 1,820 random, unrelated males. Results: One of the 21 samples had insufficient fetal cell-free DNA. The test correctly confirmed paternity for the remaining 20 samples (100%) when tested against the biological father, with P values of <10−4. For the 36,400 tests using an unrelated male as the alleged father, 99.95% (36,382) correctly excluded paternity and 0.05% (18) were indeterminate. There were no miscalls. Conclusion: A noninvasive paternity test using informatics-based analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism array measurements accurately determined paternity early in pregnancy. PMID:23258349

  3. Canine Paternity Testing--Using Personal Experiences To Teach Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rascati, Ralph J.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines how an example from the field of animal husbandry is used in a DNA Technology course to motivate students to take a deeper interest in the material. Focuses on paternity testing in dogs. (DDR)

  4. DNA paternity tests in Spain without the mother's consent: the legal responsibility of the laboratories.

    PubMed

    Barrot, C; Sánchez, C; Ortega, M; De Alcaraz-Fossoul, J; Carreras, C; Medallo, J; Bono, N; Royes, A; Gené, M

    2014-01-01

    It is technically feasible to perform paternity diagnosis testing solely involving an alleged father and his descendent. However, there are serious legal and ethical problems for forensic genetics laboratories when it comes to paternity testing cases for investigating the alleged father-child relationship if the biological mother has not given consent to access her genetic information. Based on the Spanish Constitution, the new Code of Ethics of the Spanish Medical Association includes several articles on studies about genetic information and their acceptance by all the individuals involved. This problem is greater when the child is a minor, mentally incapacitated or psychologically incapable, because current Spanish law requires informed consent from legal representatives, but the law does not typify what happens when one parent gives consent (the putative father) and the other parent (the mother) does not agree. The aim of this study is to put forward legal solutions to avoid potential legal problems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Paternity testing under the cloak of recreational genetics.

    PubMed

    Moray, Nathalie; Pink, Katherina E; Borry, Pascal; Larmuseau, Maarten Hd

    2017-06-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) internet companies are selling widely advertised and highly popular genetic ancestry tests to the broad public. These tests are often classified as falling within the scope of so-called 'recreational genetics', but little is known about the impact of using these services. In this study, a particular focus is whether minors (and under what conditions) should be able to participate in the use of these DTC tests. Current ancestry tests are easily able to reveal whether participants are related and can, therefore, also reveal misattributed paternity, with implications for the minors and adults involved in the testing. We analysed the publicly available privacy policies and terms of services of 43 DTC genetic ancestry companies to assess whether minors are able to participate in testing DTC genetic ancestry, and also whether and how companies ethically account for the potential of paternity inference. Our results indicated that the majority of DTC genetic ancestry testing companies do not specifically address whether minors are able to participate in testing. Furthermore, the majority of the policies and terms of services fail to mention the vulnerability of minors and family members in receiving unexpected information, in particular, in relation to (misattributed) paternity. Therefore, recreational genetics carries both the risk of unintentionally revealing misidentified paternity, and also the risk that fathers will deliberately use these services to test their children's paternity without revealing their intentions to the mother or any other third party.

  6. Combination of DNA-based and conventional methods to detect human leukocyte antigen polymorphism and its use for paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Kereszturya, László; Rajczya, Katalin; Lászikb, András; Gyódia, Eva; Pénzes, Mária; Falus, András; Petrányia, Gyõzõ G

    2002-03-01

    In cases of disputed paternity, the scientific goal is to promote either the exclusion of a falsely accused man or the affiliation of the alleged father. Until now, in addition to anthropologic characteristics, the determination of genetic markers included human leukocyte antigen gene variants; erythrocyte antigens and serum proteins were used for that reason. Recombinant DNA techniques provided a new set of highly variable genetic markers based on DNA nucleotide sequence polymorphism. From the practical standpoint, the application of these techniques to paternity testing provides greater versatility than do conventional genetic marker systems. The use of methods to detect the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigen loci significantly increases the chance of validation of ambiguous results in paternity testing. The outcome of 2384 paternity cases investigated by serologic and/or DNA-based human leukocyte antigen typing was statistically analyzed. Different cases solved by DNA typing are presented involving cases with one or two accused men, exclusions and nonexclusions, and tests of the paternity of a deceased man. The results provide evidence for the advantage of the combined application of various techniques in forensic diagnostics and emphasizes the outstanding possibilities of DNA-based assays. Representative examples demonstrate the strength of combined techniques in paternity testing.

  7. Paternity testing in an autotetraploid alfalfa breeding polycross

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Determining unknown parentage in autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) (2n = 4x = 32) can improve breeding gains. Exclusion analysis based paternity testing SAS code is presented, amenable to genotyping errors, for autotetraploid species utilizing co-dominant molecular markers with ambiguous d...

  8. [A study on paternity testing with 96 autosomal SNPs].

    PubMed

    Lee, Li; Wang, Li; Feng, Qing-chuan; Zhu, Yun-liang; Cheng, Xiao-li; Kong, Xiang-dong; Huang, Yan-mei; Wang, Wen-fei; Zeng, Zhao-shu

    2012-02-01

    To explore the feasibility of applying autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on parentage testing. All SNP genotyping results of HapMap (r27) were downloaded from the website. With self-made computer programs, SNPs were extracted when their minor allele frequency (MAF) were ≥ 0.30 among all of the 11 HapMap populations. Ninety-six SNPs were chosen and integrated into the Illumina Goldengate bead arrays on the condition that no linkage disequilibrium was found between them. Three father-child-mother trios (9 samples in total) were tested with the arrays. Cumulative paternity index (CPI) was then calculated and compared with genotyping results using 15 short tandem repeats (STRs)(Identifiler(TM)). Family 1 was found to have nine SNPs or seven STRs that did not conform to the Mendelian laws, Family 2 had 13 such SNPs or seven STRs, and Family 3 only had one such SNP but no STR. For Family 3, when all of the 96 SNPs were used in combine, the CPI was 1207, which had contrasted with the CPI by the 15 STRs, i.e., 355 869. When applied to paternity testing, the paternity exclusion (PE) value for a SNP is usually less than 1/3 of that of a STR. The proportion of SNPs not comforming to the Mendelian laws for the tested SNPs may not be as high as that of inconsistent STRs over all tested STRs. Because of the low mutation rate of a SNP, the CPI will be greatly reduced even if one SNP did not conform to the Mendelian laws. Therefore, highly accurate testing methods are required to reduce artificial errors when applying SNPs for paternity testing.

  9. [1483 cases of paternity test with STR loci mutation].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Li; Wang, Jun; Jing, Qiang; Xu, Bin; Su, Qin; Li, Yun-Juan; Li, Hui

    2014-02-01

    To observe and analyze the mutation phenomenon of 17 STR loci of PowerPlex 18D Kit in paternity test of Yunnan population. The DNA was extracted by Chelex-100 method. The PowerPlex 18D Kit was used to test 1,483 cases and their conclusions of paternity tests were verified. In the 1,483 cases, 1,047 were parental triplet and 436 were uniparental diad. A total of 2,530 times of meiosis was observed. One STR locus mutation was observed in 24 cases. And 11 mutation loci were found in the 17 STR loci. STR loci mutation is a common phenomenon. We should collect the data of STR loci mutation, choose other good polymorphism, low mutation rate of genetic markers, to ensure that the results are accurate and reliable.

  10. Robust Correctness Testing for Digital Forensic Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lei; Batten, Lynn M.

    In previous work, the authors presented a theoretical lower bound on the required number of testing runs for performance testing of digital forensic tools. We also demonstrated a practical method of testing showing how to tolerate both measurement and random errors in order to achieve results close to this bound. In this paper, we extend the previous work to the situation of correctness testing.

  11. Analysis of microsatellites and paternity testing in Rasa Aragonesa sheep.

    PubMed

    Arruga, M V; Monteagudo, L V; Tejedor, M T; Barrao, R; Ponz, R

    2001-06-01

    Four microsatellite loci (MAF50, MAF18, OarFCB20 and MCM527) were studied in Rasa Aragonesa sheep in order to evaluate their use in paternity testing. Several population characteristics were estimated [allele frequencies. effective allele number (Ne), polymorphism informative content (PIC) and probability of excluding wrong paternities (Pe)]. In 32 randomly chosen individuals, four alleles were detected for MAF50, with 2.55 effective alleles, 0.58 PIC and 0.35 Pe. For MAF18, five alleles were identified, with 2.99 effective alleles, 0.51 PIC and 0.32 Pe. For oarFCB20, 10 alleles were observed, with 6.06 effective alleles, 0.82 PIC and 0.68 Pe. Finally, for MCM527, six alleles were found, with 3.75 effective alleles, 0.69 PIC and 0.50 Pe. When these loci were used together with serum transferrin locus, Pe rose to 97.20 per cent. Field trials confirmed the real usefulness of these techniques.

  12. Amelogenin test abnormalities revealed in Belarusian population during forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Borovko, Sergey; Shyla, Alena; Korban, Victorya; Borovko, Alexandra

    2015-03-01

    Study of gender markers is a part of routine forensic genetic examination of crime scene and reference samples, paternity testing and personal identification. Amelogenin locus as a gender marker is included in majority of forensic STR kits of different manufacturers. In current study we report 11 cases of amelogenin abnormalities identified in males of Belarusian origin: 9 cases of AMELY dropout and 2 cases of AMELX dropout. Cases were obtained from forensic casework (n=9) and paternity testing (n=2) groups. In 4 out of 9 AMELY-negative cases deletion of AMELY was associated with the loss of DYS458 marker. In addition, we identified 3 males with SRY-positive XX male syndrome. Deletion of the long arm of the Y-chromosome was detected in two XX males. Loss of the major part of the Y-chromosome was identified in the third XX male. The presence of two X-chromosomes in XX males was confirmed with the use of Mentype(®) Argus X-8 PCR Amplification Kit. AMELY null allele observed in 2 out of 9 cases with AMELY dropout can be caused by mutation in the primer-binding site of AMELY allele. Primer-binding site mutations of AMELX can result in AMELX dropout identified in 2 cases with amplification failure of AMELX. Our study represents the first report and molecular genetic investigation of amelogenin abnormalities in the Belarusian population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Paternity testing and other inference about relationships from DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter J; Mortera, Julia

    2017-05-01

    We present methods for inference about relationships between contributors to a DNA mixture and other individuals of known genotype: a basic example would be testing whether a contributor to a mixture is the father of a child of known genotype. The evidence for such a relationship is evaluated as the likelihood ratio for the specified relationship versus the alternative that there is no relationship. We analyse real casework examples from a criminal case and a disputed paternity case; in both examples part of the evidence was from a DNA mixture. DNA samples are of varying quality and therefore present challenging problems in interpretation. Our methods are based on a recent statistical model for DNA mixtures, in which a Bayesian network (BN) is used as a computational device; the present work builds on that approach, but makes more explicit use of the BN in the modelling. The R code for the analyses presented is freely available as supplementary material. We show how additional information of specific genotypes relevant to the relationship under analysis greatly strengthens the resulting inference. We find that taking full account of the uncertainty inherent in a DNA mixture can yield likelihood ratios very close to what one would obtain if we had a single source DNA profile. Furthermore, the methods can be readily extended to analyse different scenarios as our methods are not limited to the particular genotyping kits used in the examples, to the allele frequency databases used, to the numbers of contributors assumed, to the number of traces analysed simultaneously, nor to the specific hypotheses tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. STR polymorphisms in Sri Lanka: evaluation of forensic utility in identification of individuals and parentage testing.

    PubMed

    Manamperi, Aresha; Hapuarachchi, Chanditha; Gunawardene, Nilmini Silva; Bandara, Anura; Dayanath, Damsiri; Abeyewickreme, Wimaladharma

    2009-09-01

    This preliminary study was carried out to determine the allele frequencies and forensic efficiency parameters for the short tandem repeat loci CSF1PO, TPOX, THO1, D16S539, D7S820, D13S317, vWA, FESFPS and F13B in a test sample population of Sri Lankans. Test samples were obtained from 305 non-related individuals originating from all 9 provinces of Sri Lanka. DNA was extracted from whole blood using chelex-100 and amplified by PCR using the GenePrint STR kit and silver stained. Final DNA profiles were analysed for forensic efficiency parameters and paternity indices using PowerStats version 12. Possible divergence from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was tested using the chi-square test and exact test. All common alleles in the allelic ladders were found in the test sample studied. PIC values >0.5 for all 9 STR loci indicate this STR system to be informative and useful for identification purposes. The D13S317, vWA and D7S820 loci were found to be the most polymorphic markers of the system studied. No deviations from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium were found for any of the loci examined. The results indicate that the 9 STR loci system described here is suitable for estimating DNA profile frequencies in human identification and forensic and parentage testing for legal purposes among Sri Lankans.

  15. Exploring the efficacy of paternity and kinship testing based on single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Mo, Shao-Kang; Liu, Ya-Cheng; Wang, Sheng-Qi; Bo, Xiao-Chen; Li, Zhen; Chen, Ying; Ni, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are conventional genetic markers typically used for paternity and kinship testing. As supplementary markers of STRs, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have less discrimination power but broader applicability to degraded samples. The rapid improvement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and multiplex amplification technologies also make it possible now to simultaneously identify dozens or even hundreds of SNP loci in a single pool. However, few studies have been endeavored to kinship testing based on SNP loci. In this study, we genotyped 90 autosomal human identity SNP loci with NGS, and investigated their testing efficacies based on the likelihood ratio model in eight pedigree scenarios involving paternity, half/full-sibling, uncle/nephew, and first-cousin relationships. We found that these SNPs might be sufficient to discriminate paternity and full-sibling, but impractical for more distant relatives such as uncle and cousin. Furthermore, we conducted an in silico study to obtain the theoretical tendency of how testing efficacy varied with increasing number of SNP loci. For each testing battery in a given pedigree scenario, we obtained distributions of logarithmic likelihood ratio for both simulated relatives and unrelated controls. The proportion of the overlapping area between the two distributions was defined as a false testing level (FTL) to evaluate the testing efficacy. We estimated that 85, 127, 491, and 1,858 putative SNP loci were required to discriminate paternity, full-sibling, half-sibling/uncle-nephew, and first-cousin (FTL, 0.1%), respectively. To test a half-sibling or nephew, an additional uncle relative could be included to decrease the required number of putative SNP loci to ∼320 (FTL, 0.1%). As a systematic computation of paternity and kinship testing based only on SNPs, our results could be informative for further studies and applications on paternity and kinship testing using SNP loci. Copyright © 2016

  16. Information and consent in internet paternity testing: focus on minors' protection in Italy.

    PubMed

    Caenazzo, Luciana; Tozzo, Pamela; Benciolini, Paolo; Rodriguez, Daniele

    2008-12-01

    Paternity testing in Italy is usually performed by private laboratories and universities having direct contacts with the applicants. Recently, the number of paternity tests offered through laboratory websites has increased in Italy and Europe. The execution of genetic tests, including paternity testing based on DNA analysis, represents a complex act, which contains three main steps. Paternity analyses carried out by laboratories via Internet are performed on samples collected by the applicants and then mailed back to the laboratories without any patient-physician relationship. Information is given to the subjects through the laboratory's website or mailed with the test order form. The execution of "household" DNA analysis without technical precautions may provide an incorrect response with severe consequences on the individual who has undergone testing, on the family involved, and on society in general. The problems connected with this kind of analysis are not technical, but ethical and deontological. In this work, we will discuss the problems related to information and consent by way of outlining the relevant Italian laws and codes of medical ethics. The Italian Privacy's Guarantor is assessing the ethical and legal implications, but regulations are not yet in place. We believe that adequate information related to this practice cannot be given via Internet, and, consequently, the validity of the consent expressed during this kind of procedure can be uncertain. Further, we will analyze issues regarding the importance of minors' protection when a paternity test is performed via Internet. In our opinion, the complexity of the situations and expectations linked to paternity investigations require a special sensitivity in dealing with each case, based on a patient-physician relationship in the decision-making process especially referring to the defense of the minors' well-being.

  17. IN SEARCH OF A FATHER: LEGAL CHALLENGES SURROUNDING POSTHUMOUS PATERNITY TESTING.

    PubMed

    Stirton, Ruth H; Wilkinson, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    This article interrogates the workings of the Human Tissue Act 2004, as it applies to paternity testing by DNA analysis after the death of the putative father. We use a case series methodology more usually seen in medical research, through which we present three real case studies involving posthumous paternity testing of retained tissue. We argue that the criminal offence in section 45 of the Human Tissue Act 2004, which is being used to regulate this activity, is inappropriate and inadequate to do so. The threat of the shadow of the criminal law is too blunt an instrument to address the subtleties of the issues that arise in the context of posthumous paternity testing. We call for reform of the Human Tissue Act 2004 and the creation of a specific exception to properly deal with requests of this nature. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Mutations or exclusion: an unusual case in paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Junge, A; Brinkmann, B; Fimmers, R; Madea, B

    2006-11-01

    In an immigration case with the scope of family reunification, the DNA extracted from the saliva samples of the male child, the alleged mother and the putative father was typed with 22 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) systems. In seven STR systems, the alleged mother could be excluded from maternity, and the case then had to be regarded as a deficiency case. Taking this fact into consideration, only two exclusions were found for the putative father, and the question arose whether there was an exclusion of the putative father or the existence of two mutations. Autosomal STR typing could not clarify the case, but the application of eight Y-chromosomal markers showed that the alleged father could be excluded from paternity.

  19. Brief report of a test of differential alcohol risk using sibling attributions of paternal alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Boynton, Marcella H; Arkes, Jeremy; Hoyle, Rick H

    2011-11-01

    Parental alcoholism is generally found to be a strong predictor of alcohol misuse. Although the majority of siblings agree on the presence of parental alcohol issues, there is a significant minority who do not. The current study analyzed sibling data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth using multilevel modeling, which accounts for the nested structure of the data. These analyses permitted a test of whether (a) identifying one's father as an alcoholic predicted greater risk of alcohol problems, (b) being from a family whose siblings did not all agree on the presence of paternal alcoholism increased the likelihood of alcohol problems, and (c) risk of alcohol misuse significantly differed among individuals from families in which there was familial disagreement about paternal alcoholism. Results show that individuals who identified their father as an alcoholic were themselves more likely to have alcohol issues as compared with individuals both within and between families who did not identify their father as an alcoholic. Risk was similar for individuals in families in which there was disagreement about paternal alcoholism compared with individuals from families in which everyone agreed on the presence of paternal alcoholism. Moreover, there was not a significant interaction between paternal alcoholism attributions and familial disagreement. Findings indicate that in the case of child reports of paternal alcoholism, the increased risk of alcohol problems holds true regardless of the accuracy of an individual's assessment. These results may be not only because of the impact of paternal alcoholism on a person's alcohol misuse but also because of a person's alcohol problems potentially influencing his or her perceptions of familial alcohol-related behaviors.

  20. Inference of maternal uniparental disomy of the entire chromosome 2 from a paternity test.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Alberto, Jesica Carina; Martínez-Cortes, Gabriela; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2018-03-06

    Atypical situations arise during the constant resolution of paternity cases, which constitute challenges requiring additional genetic systems and non-standard methods. We report a paternity case presenting three alleged father (AF)-child incompatibilities for the markers TPOX, D2S441, and the indel locus B02 (11/11 vs 8/8; 14/14 vs 10/10; 2/2 vs1/1, respectively). Considering the presence of mutations/null alleles, the residual paternity indexes (PI) obtained with 23 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) and 38 indels suggest that the AF is the father (PI = 1.94e+011). Although the presence of few incompatibilities also could imply paternity of the AF brother, this hypothesis was less probable (PI = 3.20e+9) (W = 98.4 vs 1.6%, respectively). The inclusion of 23 Y-STR loci confirmed the paternity relationship in this case (global PI = 6.08e+15). However, the two multistep STRs and one indel incompatibilities allow discarding the mutation possibility. On the other hand, the confirmation of the homozygous STR genotypes with two different human identification kits and the low probability to find three null alleles (3.10e-8) allow rejecting the null allele presence hypothesis. Conversely, the child's homozygous genotype for maternal alleles in four markers located in the p and q arms of the chromosome 2 (TPOX, D2S441, D2S1338, and B02) suggests that maternal uniparental isodisomy better explains the relationship despite the presence of three paternal incompatibilities. In brief, when multiple incompatibilities are observed in paternity testing, the chromosomal location of the excluding loci and the use of additional genetic systems can be crucial to get confident kinship conclusions.

  1. Mutations of short tandem repeat loci in cases of paternity testing in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mao; Zhang, XiaoNan; Wu, Dan; Shen, Qi; Wu, YuanMing; Fu, ShanMin

    2016-09-01

    In order to find out the characteristics of genetic mutations in 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci, 3734 parentage cases were analyzed using AmpFlSTR Sinofiler kit. The allele source, mutation rate, and mutation rule of the STR loci were determined. Seventy mutations were observed in all cases for paternity testing. Among 15 STR loci, the highest mutation rate was observed in D12S391 (0.21 %), but the D5S818 gene mutation rate was relatively low (0.02 %). One-step mutation cases accounted for 95.7 % of all of the cases monitored. And the mutations in this study mainly showed paternal mutation (64/70). The research results are of great significance for identification and paternity tests and for the improvement of genetic studies on Chinese population in the future.

  2. Paternity testing a non-linkage based marker assisted selection scheme for outbred forage species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In many major perennial forage species, genomic tools and infrastructure development has advanced enough that their utilization in marker assisted selection (MAS) can be cheaply explored. This paper presents a paternity testing MAS in diploid red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). Utilizing individual ...

  3. Distinguishing between forensic science and forensic pseudoscience: testing of validity and reliability, and approaches to forensic voice comparison.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Geoffrey Stewart

    2014-05-01

    In this paper it is argued that one should not attempt to directly assess whether a forensic analysis technique is scientifically acceptable. Rather one should first specify what one considers to be appropriate principles governing acceptable practice, then consider any particular approach in light of those principles. This paper focuses on one principle: the validity and reliability of an approach should be empirically tested under conditions reflecting those of the case under investigation using test data drawn from the relevant population. Versions of this principle have been key elements in several reports on forensic science, including forensic voice comparison, published over the last four-and-a-half decades. The aural-spectrographic approach to forensic voice comparison (also known as "voiceprint" or "voicegram" examination) and the currently widely practiced auditory-acoustic-phonetic approach are considered in light of this principle (these two approaches do not appear to be mutually exclusive). Approaches based on data, quantitative measurements, and statistical models are also considered in light of this principle. © 2013.

  4. Forensic-paternity effectiveness and genetics population analysis of six non-CODIS mini-STR loci (D1S1656, D2S441, D6S1043, D10S1248, D12S391, D22S1045) and SE33 in Mestizo and Amerindian populations from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Burguete-Argueta, Nelsi; Martínez De la Cruz, Braulio; Camacho-Mejorado, Rafael; Santana, Carla; Noris, Gino; López-Bayghen, Esther; Arellano-Galindo, José; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Antonio Meraz-Ríos, Marco; Gómez, Rocío

    2016-11-01

    STRs are powerful tools intensively used in forensic and kinship studies. In order to assess the effectiveness of non-CODIS genetic markers in forensic and paternity tests, the genetic composition of six mini short tandem repeats-mini-STRs-(D1S1656, D2S441, D6S1043, D10S1248, D12S391, D22S1045) and the microsatellite SE33 in Mestizo and Amerindian populations from Mexico were studied. Using multiplex polymerase chain reactions and capillary electrophoresis, this study genotyped all loci from 870 chromosomes and evaluated the statistical genetic parameters. All mini-STRs studied were in agreement with HW and linkage equilibrium; however, an important HW departure for SE33 was found in the Mestizo population (p ≤ 0.0001). Regarding paternity and forensic statistical parameters, high values of combined power discrimination and mean power of exclusion were found using these seven markers. The principal co-ordinate analysis based on allele frequencies of three mini-STRs showed the complex genetic architecture of the Mestizo population. The results indicate that this set of loci is suitable to genetically identify individuals in the Mexican population, supporting its effectiveness in human identification casework. In addition, these findings add new statistical values and emphasise the importance of the use of non-CODIS markers in complex populations in order to avoid erroneous assumptions.

  5. Loss of heterozygosity detected at three short tandem repeat locus commonly used for human DNA identification in a case of paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Wang, Haili; Wang, Qing K; Wang, Pengyun; Wang, Fengyu; Xu, Chengqi

    2017-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) is widely used for DNA profiling in forensic sciences for its stable inheritance. Genomic variations in STR loci may affect the results of the genotyping. In this study, using STR profiling and genome-wide chromosomal microarray assay, we detected the incidence of uniparental disomy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in a case of a parental testing, which altered the genotype of three commonly used STR markers including D2S1338, D2S441 and D2S1776. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time found that LOH affect the genotyping of STR markers commonly used for paternity testing. Our findings demonstrated that the incidence of LOH in the genome may dramatically alter the results of DNA identification, and suggested that genomic structure variation need to be taking into consideration in the DNA identification using STR markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-invasive prenatal paternity testing using cell-free fetal DNA from maternal plasma: DNA isolation and genetic marker studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanshan; Han, Shuyi; Zhang, Maoxiu; Wang, Yunshan

    2018-04-01

    Invasive prenatal paternity tests can result in miscarriage and congenital malformations; therefore, a non-invasive method of testing is preferable. However, little progress could be made in this field until the introduction of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in 2009. In this review, two aspects regarding the history and development of non-invasive prenatal paternity testing (NIPAT) are summarized: (1) extraction and enrichment of cffDNA and (2) genetic marker-based studies. Although column-based kits are used widely for NIPAT, some researchers have suggested that an automated method, such as magnetic extraction, generally has a higher cffDNA yield than that of manual column-based extraction; therefore, its popularity might increase in the near future. In addition, size- and methylation-based enrichment methods are expected to perform better than formaldehyde-based methods. On the other hand, single nucleotide polymorphism-based techniques have contributed to NIPAT, whereas the application of short tandem repeat testing has so far been restricted to pregnant women bearing male fetuses only. Additional methods and techniques are expected to be innovated to facilitate the forensic practice of NIPAT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Paternity testing using microsatellite DNA markers in captive Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae).

    PubMed

    Sakaoka, Ken; Suzuki, Isao; Kasugai, Naeko; Fukumoto, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the paternity of 39 Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) hatched at the Port of Nagoya Public Aquarium between 1995 and 2005 breeding seasons using microsatellite DNA markers. Among the 13 microsatellite marker loci tested in this study, eight markers amplified and were found to be polymorphic in the colony's founders of the captive population (n = 26). Multiple marker analysis confirmed that all the hatchlings shared alleles with their social fathers and that none of them were sired by any male (all males ≥4 years old in the exhibit tank during each reproductive season; n = 9-15) other than the one carrying out parental duties, except in the case of two inbred hatchlings whose half-sibling parents shared the same father. These results demonstrated that extra-pair paternity (EPP) did not occur in this captive population and that even if EPP has been detected among them, the probability of excluding all other possible fathers in the exhibit tank is extremely high based on paternity exclusion probabilities across the investigated loci. The paternity exclusion probabilities were almost the same between 1994 and 2005. The probability of identity across the investigated loci declined between the two time points, but was still high. These results are reflected in a very short history of breeding in this captive population. In other words, the parentage analyses using a suite of microsatellite markers will be less effective as generations change in small closed populations, such as zoo and aquarium populations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Paternity balancing.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark I; Andriole, Stephanie; Pergament, Eugene; Speer, Jamie; Curtis, Jenifer; Britt, David W

    2013-01-01

    Gestational carriers and egg donors have been used by 'traditional' and now increasingly, gay couples. Three gay male couples, all using egg donors and gestational carriers with semen from both partners, had triplets. All desired reductions to twins for the standard medical indications, but requested, if reasonably possible, to have twins with one fathered by each partner. Following our usual clinical protocol, we performed chorionic villus sampling at 12 weeks on all fetuses obtaining FISH and karyotype. For paternity analysis, 14 polymorphic molecular markers on villi were compared to DNA samples from the two men to include or exclude each. Standard assessments were all normal. Paternity testing showed that one partner fathered two of the triplets, and the other one. In all cases, one of the 'twins' was reduced with good clinical outcomes ensuing. Paternity balancing increases options for satisfying family planning desires of gay male couples. We believe it comparable to gender preferences in reductions, i.e. it can be considered but only completely subservient to any clinical criteria. Paternity balancing raises similar ethical issues as reduction with gender preferences, but may increase patient autonomy and mainstream acceptance of stable, gay families. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Forensic Medicine: Age Written in Teeth by Nuclear Bomb Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2005-05-04

    Establishing the age of individuals is an important step in identification and a frequent challenge in forensic medicine. This can be done with high precision up to adolescence by analysis of dentition, but establishing the age of adults has remained difficult. Here we show that measuring {sup 14}C from nuclear bomb tests in tooth enamel provides a sensitive way to establish when a person was born.

  10. Facial averageness and genetic quality: Testing heritability, genetic correlation with attractiveness, and the paternal age effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Mitchem, Dorian G; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2016-01-01

    Popular theory suggests that facial averageness is preferred in a partner for genetic benefits to offspring. However, whether facial averageness is associated with genetic quality is yet to be established. Here, we computed an objective measure of facial averageness for a large sample ( N = 1,823) of identical and nonidentical twins and their siblings to test two predictions from the theory that facial averageness reflects genetic quality. First, we use biometrical modelling to estimate the heritability of facial averageness, which is necessary if it reflects genetic quality. We also test for a genetic association between facial averageness and facial attractiveness. Second, we assess whether paternal age at conception (a proxy of mutation load) is associated with facial averageness and facial attractiveness. Our findings are mixed with respect to our hypotheses. While we found that facial averageness does have a genetic component, and a significant phenotypic correlation exists between facial averageness and attractiveness, we did not find a genetic correlation between facial averageness and attractiveness (therefore, we cannot say that the genes that affect facial averageness also affect facial attractiveness) and paternal age at conception was not negatively associated with facial averageness. These findings support some of the previously untested assumptions of the 'genetic benefits' account of facial averageness, but cast doubt on others.

  11. Further development of forensic eye color predictive tests.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Y; Phillips, C; Gomez-Tato, A; Alvarez-Dios, J; Casares de Cal, M; Cruz, R; Maroñas, O; Söchtig, J; Fondevila, M; Rodriguez-Cid, M J; Carracedo, A; Lareu, M V

    2013-01-01

    In forensic analysis predictive tests for external visible characteristics (or EVCs), including inference of iris color, represent a potentially useful tool to guide criminal investigations. Two recent studies, both focused on forensic testing, have analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes underlying common eye color variation (Mengel-From et al., Forensic Sci. Int. Genet. 4:323 and Walsh et al., Forensic Sci. Int. Genet. 5:170). Each study arrived at different recommendations for eye color predictive tests aiming to type the most closely associated SNPs, although both confirmed rs12913832 in HERC2 as the key predictor, widely recognized as the most strongly associated marker with blue and brown iris colors. Differences between these two studies in identification of other eye color predictors may partly arise from varying approaches to assigning phenotypes, notably those not unequivocally blue or dark brown and therefore occupying an intermediate iris color continuum. We have developed two single base extension assays typing 37 SNPs in pigmentation-associated genes to study SNP-genotype based prediction of eye, skin, and hair color variation. These assays were used to test the performance of different sets of eye color predictors in 416 subjects from six populations of north and south Europe. The presence of a complex and continuous range of intermediate phenotypes distinct from blue and brown eye colors was confirmed by establishing eye color populations compared to genetic clusters defined using Structure software. Our study explored the effect of an expanded SNP combination beyond six markers has on the ability to predict eye color in a forensic test without extending the SNP assay excessively - thus maintaining a balance between the test's predictive value and an ability to reliably type challenging DNA with a multiplex of manageable size. Our evaluation used AUC analysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curves) and na

  12. Molecular medicine: a primer for clinicians--Part VIII: Forensic DNA testing.

    PubMed

    1995-02-01

    Forensic DNA analysis or "DNA fingerprinting" represents a specific application of DNA testing methods. Previously, we have discussed DNA testing to determine carrier status or to provide confirmatory or presymptomatic diagnosis. Forensic DNA testing seeks to determine the identity of an individual to the exclusion of all others. The most common application of forensic DNA testing is in criminalistics and establishing parentage. In this paper we discuss the application of molecular biology methods to the analysis of DNA for forensic purposes. We also consider some of the controversial issues that surround such uses of DNA testing.

  13. [Evaluation of three methods for forensic diatom test].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhong; Zhao, Jian; Li, Peng; Hu, Sunlin; Wang, Huipin; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Chao

    2015-03-01

    To compare the efficacy of three methods for forensic diatom test, namely strong acid digestion-centrifuge enrichment-light microscopy (SD-CE-LM), microwave digestion-membrane filtration-automated scanning electron microscopy (MD-ME-SEM), and microwave digestion-membrane filtration-light microscopy (MD-MF-LM). Sixty samples were randomly divided into 3 groups for diatom test using three methods, and the sample preparation time, degree of digestion and recovery rate of diatoms were compared. The sample preparation time was the shortest with MD-MF-LM and the longest with SD-CE-LM (P<0.05). MD-ME-SEM and MD-MF-LM allowed more thorough tissue digestion than SD-CE-LM. MD-ME-SEM resulted in the highest total recovery rate of diatom, followed by MD-MF-LM and then by SD-CE-LM (P<0.05); the recover rate of different diatom species was the highest with MD-ME-SEM, followed by MD-MF-LM and SD-CE-LM (P<0.05). SD-CE-LM has a low recovery rate of diatoms especially for those with lengths shorter than 40 µm or densities less than 1/5. With a high recovery rate and accuracy in diatom test, MD-ME-SEM is suitable for diagnosis of suspected drowning cases. MD-MF-LM is highly efficient, sensitive and convenient for forensic diatom test.

  14. Men's preference for women's facial features: testing homogamy and the paternity uncertainty hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bovet, Jeanne; Barthes, Julien; Durand, Valérie; Raymond, Michel; Alvergne, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Male mate choice might be based on both absolute and relative strategies. Cues of female attractiveness are thus likely to reflect both fitness and reproductive potential, as well as compatibility with particular male phenotypes. In humans, absolute clues of fertility and indices of favorable developmental stability are generally associated with increased women's attractiveness. However, why men exhibit variable preferences remains less studied. Male mate choice might be influenced by uncertainty of paternity, a selective factor in species where the survival of the offspring depends on postnatal paternal care. For instance, in humans, a man might prefer a woman with recessive traits, thereby increasing the probability that his paternal traits will be visible in the child and ensuring paternity. Alternatively, attractiveness is hypothesized to be driven by self-resembling features (homogamy), which would reduce outbreeding depression. These hypotheses have been simultaneously evaluated for various facial traits using both real and artificial facial stimuli. The predicted preferences were then compared to realized mate choices using facial pictures from couples with at least 1 child. No evidence was found to support the paternity uncertainty hypothesis, as recessive features were not preferred by male raters. Conversely, preferences for self-resembling mates were found for several facial traits (hair and eye color, chin dimple, and thickness of lips and eyebrows). Moreover, realized homogamy for facial traits was also found in a sample of long-term mates. The advantages of homogamy in evolutionary terms are discussed.

  15. The right to know your genetic parents: from open-identity gamete donation to routine paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Ravelingien, An; Pennings, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Over the years a number of countries have abolished anonymous gamete donation and shifted toward open-identity policies. Donor-conceived children are said to have a fundamental "right to know" the identity of their donor. In this article, we trace the arguments that underlie this claim and question its implications. We argue that, given the status attributed to the right to know one's gamete donor, it would be discriminatory not to extend this right to naturally conceived children with misattributed paternity. One way to facilitate this would be through routine paternity testing at birth. While this proposal is likely to raise concerns about the conflicting interests and rights of other people involved, we show that similar concerns apply to the context of open-identity gamete donation. Unless one can identify a rational basis for treating the two groups differently, one's stance toward both cases should be the same.

  16. How female reed buntings benefit from extra-pair mating behaviour: testing hypotheses through patterns of paternity in sequential broods.

    PubMed

    Bouwman, Karen M; Burke, Terry; Komdeur, Jan

    2006-08-01

    Extra-pair paternity is an important aspect of reproductive strategies in many species of birds. Given that in most species females control whether fertilization occurs, they are expected to benefit in some way from the extra-pair matings. In this study we use patterns of extra-pair paternity (EPP) in broods of individual reed buntings (Emberiza schoeniclus), both within and between seasons, to test four hypothesized female benefits: (1) assessing potential future partners and seeking (2) genetic diversity (3) good genes, or (4) compatible genes. Reed buntings are socially monogamous, multibrooded passerines with extremely high levels of extra-pair paternity. We studied a population of reed buntings in the Netherlands in 2002 and 2003; 51% of offspring in 74% of nests were extra-pair. We showed that patterns of EPP did not support the first and second hypotheses, since females did not form a pair with previous extra-pair partners, EPP was not evenly distributed among broods and more broods than expected were sired by a single male. Furthermore, there was no relation between a male's within- and extra-pair fertilization success, no consistency in EPP between breeding attempts, no effect of parental relatedness on EPP and several cases of reciprocal paternity. These patterns do not support the good genes hypothesis and are most consistent with the genetic compatibility hypothesis. However, our previous finding that older males are more successful in gaining EPP, suggests some effect of good genes. These hypotheses need not be mutually exclusive, as females may select compatible males above a certain quality threshold (e.g. old males).

  17. Testing of microsatellite multiplexes for individual identification of Cape Parrots (Poicephalus robustus): paternity testing and monitoring trade.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, Willem G; Downs, Colleen T; Perrin, Mike R; Willows-Munro, Sandi

    2017-01-01

    Illegal trade in rare wildlife species is a major threat to many parrot species around the world. Wildlife forensics plays an important role in the preservation of endangered or threatened wildlife species. Identification of illegally harvested or traded animals through DNA techniques is one of the many methods used during forensic investigations. Natural populations of the South African endemic Cape Parrot ( Poicephalus robustus ) are negatively affected by the removal of eggs and chicks for the pet trade. In this study, 16 microsatellite markers specifically designed for the South African endemic Cape Parrot ( P. robustus ) are assessed for their utility in forensic casework. Using these 16 loci, the genetic diversity of a subset of the captive Cape Parrot population was also assessed and compared to three wild Cape Parrot populations. It was determined that the full 16 locus panel has sufficient discriminatory power to be used in parentage analyses and can be used to determine if a bird has been bred in captivity and so can be legally traded or if it has been illegally removed from the wild. In cases where birds have been removed from the wild, this study suggests that a reduced 12 locus microsatellite panel has sufficient power to assign confiscated birds to geographic population of origin. The level of genetic diversity observed within the captive Cape Parrot population was similar to that observed in the wild populations, which suggests that the captive population is not suffering from decreased levels of genetic diversity. The captive Cape Parrots did however have double the number of private alleles compared to that observed in the most genetically diverse wild population. This is probably due to the presence of rare alleles present in the founder population, which has not been lost due to genetic drift, as many of the individuals tested in this study are F1-F3 wild descendants. The results from this study provide a suit of markers that can be used to aid

  18. Testing of microsatellite multiplexes for individual identification of Cape Parrots (Poicephalus robustus): paternity testing and monitoring trade

    PubMed Central

    Coetzer, Willem G.; Downs, Colleen T.; Perrin, Mike R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Illegal trade in rare wildlife species is a major threat to many parrot species around the world. Wildlife forensics plays an important role in the preservation of endangered or threatened wildlife species. Identification of illegally harvested or traded animals through DNA techniques is one of the many methods used during forensic investigations. Natural populations of the South African endemic Cape Parrot (Poicephalus robustus) are negatively affected by the removal of eggs and chicks for the pet trade. Methods In this study, 16 microsatellite markers specifically designed for the South African endemic Cape Parrot (P. robustus) are assessed for their utility in forensic casework. Using these 16 loci, the genetic diversity of a subset of the captive Cape Parrot population was also assessed and compared to three wild Cape Parrot populations. Results It was determined that the full 16 locus panel has sufficient discriminatory power to be used in parentage analyses and can be used to determine if a bird has been bred in captivity and so can be legally traded or if it has been illegally removed from the wild. In cases where birds have been removed from the wild, this study suggests that a reduced 12 locus microsatellite panel has sufficient power to assign confiscated birds to geographic population of origin. Discussion The level of genetic diversity observed within the captive Cape Parrot population was similar to that observed in the wild populations, which suggests that the captive population is not suffering from decreased levels of genetic diversity. The captive Cape Parrots did however have double the number of private alleles compared to that observed in the most genetically diverse wild population. This is probably due to the presence of rare alleles present in the founder population, which has not been lost due to genetic drift, as many of the individuals tested in this study are F1–F3 wild descendants. The results from this study provide a suit

  19. Paternity fraud and compensation for misattributed paternity

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Claims for reimbursement of child support, the reversal of property settlements and compensation can arise when misattributed paternity is discovered. The ethical justifications for such claims seem to be related to the financial cost of bringing up children, the absence of choice about taking on these expenses, the hard work involved in child rearing, the emotional attachments that are formed with children, the obligation of women to make truthful claims about paternity, and the deception involved in infidelity. In this paper it is argued that there should not be compensation for infidelity and that reimbursement is appropriate where the claimant has made child support payments but has not taken on the social role of father. Where the claimant's behaviour suggests a social view of fatherhood, on the other hand, claims for compensation are less coherent. Where the genetic model of fatherhood dominates, the “other” man (the woman's lover and progenitor of the children) might also have a claim for the loss of the benefits of fatherhood. It is concluded that claims for reimbursement and compensation in cases of misattributed paternity produce the same distorted and thin view of what it means to be a father that paternity testing assumes, and underscores a trend that is not in the interests of children. PMID:17664309

  20. Forensic use of Y-chromosome DNA: a general overview.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    The male-specific part of the human Y chromosome is widely used in forensic DNA analysis, particularly in cases where standard autosomal DNA profiling is not informative. A Y-chromosomal gene fragment is applied for inferring the biological sex of a crime scene trace donor. Haplotypes composed of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms (Y-STRs) are used to characterise paternal lineages of unknown male trace donors, especially suitable when males and females have contributed to the same trace, such as in sexual assault cases. Y-STR haplotyping applied in crime scene investigation can (i) exclude male suspects from involvement in crime, (ii) identify the paternal lineage of male perpetrators, (iii) highlight multiple male contributors to a trace, and (iv) provide investigative leads for finding unknown male perpetrators. Y-STR haplotype analysis is employed in paternity disputes of male offspring and other types of paternal kinship testing, including historical cases, as well as in special cases of missing person and disaster victim identification involving men. Y-chromosome polymorphisms are applied for inferring the paternal bio-geographic ancestry of unknown trace donors or missing persons, in cases where autosomal DNA profiling is uninformative. In this overview, all different forensic applications of Y-chromosome DNA are described. To illustrate the necessity of forensic Y-chromosome analysis, the investigation of a prominent murder case is described, which initiated two changes in national forensic DNA legislation both covering Y-chromosome use, and was finally solved via an innovative Y-STR dragnet involving thousands of volunteers after 14 years. Finally, expectations for the future of forensic Y-chromosome DNA analysis are discussed.

  1. Is there a Role for Genetic Counselors in Prenatal Paternity Testing? - an Assessment Based on Audit of 13 years of Clinical Experience in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kate E; Salvemini, Hayley; Haan, Eric; Fitzgerald, Lara; Stallard, Kirsty; Borrie, Sarah; Pontikinas, Electra; Baxendale, Anne

    2017-02-01

    The role of genetic counselors in prenatal paternity testing has not been widely studied in the genetic counseling literature. In South Australia, the genetic counselors of the State's public sector clinical genetics service are the primary contact point for women seeking information and testing, also coordinating the testing process. This has provided the opportunity to review all prenatal paternity testing performed in the State over a 13 year period and to consider the role played by the genetic counselor. We explored the reasons why women requested prenatal paternity testing and whether the genetic counselor was an appropriate health professional to facilitate this testing for women. The study had two parts, an audit of the clinical genetics files of 160 women who requested prenatal paternity testing between March 2001 and March 2014, and qualitative interviews of genetic counselors, clinical geneticists, obstetricians and social workers with involvement in this area. The audit determined that in 69.9 % of cases the long-term partner was the father of the pregnancy, for 23.7 % the short-term or other partner was the father and for 6.4 % the paternity results were not known by the genetic counselor. For 45.5 % of women whose long-term partner was excluded as the father, the women chose to have a termination of pregnancy. The results of the qualitative interviews yielded five major themes: accessibility of testing, role of the genetic counselor, social and relationship issues, decision making in pregnancy and emotional issues. We conclude that the genetic counselor is an appropriate health professional to facilitate prenatal paternity testing. Genetic counselors did not view their role as significantly different from a request for prenatal testing for another indication.

  2. Forensic individual age estimation with DNA: From initial approaches to methylation tests.

    PubMed

    Freire-Aradas, A; Phillips, C; Lareu, M V

    2017-07-01

    Individual age estimation is a key factor in forensic science analysis that can provide very useful information applicable to criminal, legal, and anthropological investigations. Forensic age inference was initially based on morphological inspection or radiography and only later began to adopt molecular approaches. However, a lack of accuracy or technical problems hampered the introduction of these DNA-based methodologies in casework analysis. A turning point occurred when the epigenetic signature of DNA methylation was observed to gradually change during an individual´s lifespan. In the last four years, the number of publications reporting DNA methylation age-correlated changes has gradually risen and the forensic community now has a range of age methylation tests applicable to forensic casework. Most forensic age predictor models have been developed based on blood DNA samples, but additional tissues are now also being explored. This review assesses the most widely adopted genes harboring methylation sites, detection technologies, statistical age-predictive analyses, and potential causes of variation in age estimates. Despite the need for further work to improve predictive accuracy and establishing a broader range of tissues for which tests can analyze the most appropriate methylation sites, several forensic age predictors have now been reported that provide consistency in their prediction accuracies (predictive error of ±4 years); this makes them compelling tools with the potential to contribute key information to help guide criminal investigations. Copyright © 2017 Central Police University.

  3. Paternal Effectiveness in a Selected Cognitive Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acuff, Nancy Hamblen

    The immediate effectiveness of paternal instruction in a selected cognitive task was investigated. The sub-problems were (1) to compare paternal and maternal instruction, and (2) to analyze paternal instructional effectiveness with the son or the daughter. The cognitive task selected was the Goodenough-Harris Draw-A-Man Test. Subjects were 42…

  4. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  5. Paternity analysis in Excel.

    PubMed

    Rocheta, Margarida; Dionísio, F Miguel; Fonseca, Luís; Pires, Ana M

    2007-12-01

    Paternity analysis using microsatellite information is a well-studied subject. These markers are ideal for parentage studies and fingerprinting, due to their high-discrimination power. This type of data is used to assign paternity, to compute the average selfing and outcrossing rates and to estimate the biparental inbreeding. There are several public domain programs that compute all this information from data. Most of the time, it is necessary to export data to some sort of format, feed it to the program and import the output to an Excel book for further processing. In this article we briefly describe a program referred from now on as Paternity Analysis in Excel (PAE), developed at IST and IBET (see the acknowledgments) that computes paternity candidates from data, and other information, from within Excel. In practice this means that the end user provides the data in an Excel sheet and, by pressing an appropriate button, obtains the results in another Excel sheet. For convenience PAE is divided into two modules. The first one is a filtering module that selects data from the sequencer and reorganizes it in a format appropriate to process paternity analysis, assuming certain conventions for the names of parents and offspring from the sequencer. The second module carries out the paternity analysis assuming that one parent is known. Both modules are written in Excel-VBA and can be obtained at the address (www.math.ist.utl.pt/~fmd/pa/pa.zip). They are free for non-commercial purposes and have been tested with different data and against different software (Cervus, FaMoz, and MLTR).

  6. Impact of a chromosome X STR Decaplex in deficiency paternity cases

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-Filho, Aluisio; Ferreira, Samuel; Oliveira, Silviene F.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency paternity cases, characterized by the absence of the alleged father, are a challenge for forensic genetics. Here we present four cases with a female child and a deceased alleged father in which the analysis of a set of 21 or 22 autosomal STRs (AS STRs) produced results within a range of doubt when genotyping relatives of the alleged father. Aiming to increase the Paternity Index (PI) and obtain more reliable results, a set of 10 X-linked STR markers, developed by the Spanish and Portuguese Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG), was then added. Statistical analysis substantially shifted the results towards the alleged fatherhood in all four cases, with more dramatic changes when the supposed half-sister and respective mother were the relatives tested. PMID:24385853

  7. A case of chimerism-induced paternity confusion: what ART practitioners can do to prevent future calamity for families.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kayla M; Baird, Michael L; Heinig, Julie; Davis, Debra; Sabatini, Mary; Starr, D Barry

    2018-02-01

    In the fertility clinic setting, a negative DNA paternity test result usually suggests a sample mix-up likely occurred at the testing company or in the clinic. However, we report a case where, despite repeat negative paternity test results, the alleged father (referred to as "the proband") was confirmed to be the baby's father. The proband, a 34 year-old male, contacted our research group when routine blood testing revealed discrepant blood types between the parents and the baby, repeat paternity tests were negative (excluding the proband as the baby's father), and the fertility clinic found no evidence of any wrongdoing. Microarray technology was utilized to confirm biological relatedness, which revealed an avuncular (uncle/nephew) relationship. Additional tissue samples were analyzed and family studies were conducted at paternity and forensic laboratories using STR-based DNA tests to elucidate the proband's condition of congenital tetragametic chimerism. His paternity was subsequently affirmed and the fertility clinic exonerated of claims of a semen sample mix-up. This case underscores the possibility that some allegations of fertility clinic missteps may be explained by undiagnosed chimerism, a condition where an individual harbors two distinct genomes. We offer specific suggestions for improving laboratory reporting and creating clinical guidelines to aid in identifying and rectifying future cases of false exclusions of paternity due to chimerism.

  8. Statistical hypothesis testing and common misinterpretations: Should we abandon p-value in forensic science applications?

    PubMed

    Taroni, F; Biedermann, A; Bozza, S

    2016-02-01

    Many people regard the concept of hypothesis testing as fundamental to inferential statistics. Various schools of thought, in particular frequentist and Bayesian, have promoted radically different solutions for taking a decision about the plausibility of competing hypotheses. Comprehensive philosophical comparisons about their advantages and drawbacks are widely available and continue to span over large debates in the literature. More recently, controversial discussion was initiated by an editorial decision of a scientific journal [1] to refuse any paper submitted for publication containing null hypothesis testing procedures. Since the large majority of papers published in forensic journals propose the evaluation of statistical evidence based on the so called p-values, it is of interest to expose the discussion of this journal's decision within the forensic science community. This paper aims to provide forensic science researchers with a primer on the main concepts and their implications for making informed methodological choices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychophysiologic testing for post-traumatic stress disorder: forensic psychiatric application.

    PubMed

    Pitman, R K; Orr, S P

    1993-01-01

    The validity of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis is limited by both the illusory objectivity of the traumatic event and the subjectivity of the ensuing syndrome. These limitations are especially problematic in the forensic setting. Psychophysiologic measurements may strengthen PTSD's forensic value by offering a more objective assessment technique for cases that find their way into the courtroom. Based upon the results of published research studies conducted in a range of military and civilian, PTSD and non-PTSD subjects, psychophysiologic data can provide evidence helping to establish or refute the presence of the DSM-III-R PTSD arousal criteria, as well as aid psychiatric experts in estimating the probability of the disorder's presence in a given claimant. Psychophysiologic testing should be viewed as one component of a multimethod forensic psychiatric evaluation for PTSD. It is likely that it will soon be offered and, given current legal standards, admitted as evidence in civil and criminal litigation.

  10. Digital Forensics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harron, Jason; Langdon, John; Gonzalez, Jennifer; Cater, Scott

    2017-01-01

    The term forensic science may evoke thoughts of blood-spatter analysis, DNA testing, and identifying molds, spores, and larvae. A growing part of this field, however, is that of digital forensics, involving techniques with clear connections to math and physics. This article describes a five-part project involving smartphones and the investigation…

  11. [Genetic polymorphisms of nine non-DNA combined index system short tandem repeat loci in Hebei Han population and application in paternity testing].

    PubMed

    Guan, Ya-qing; Fu, Li-hong; Zhang, Xiao-jing; Li, Shu-jin; Cong, Bin; Ma, Chun-ling

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the polymorphisms of 9 non-DNA combined index system (CODIS) short tandem repeats (STRs), i.e., D7S3048, D8S1132, D11S2368, D2S1772, D6S1043, D13S325, D12S391, GATA198B05, D18S1364 in Hebei Han population, and evaluate the usage of them in paternity testing. One hundred and forty-seven unrelated healthy individuals from the Han population of Hebei province were genotyped using STRtyper10G kit including 9 STR loci on ABI 3130 Genetic Analyzer. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population genetic parameters were calculated. Fourteen cases of motherless paternity testing and 2 cases of standard trios with mutation in 1 locus were detected using STRtyper10G. (1) Ninety-nine alleles and 336 genotypes were observed in the 9 STR loci in the population. The cumulative discrimination power(DP) was higher than 0.999,999,999. The cumulative probability of exclusion (PE) for trios and duos were 0.999,974 and 0.998,759 respectively. Departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not observed in any of the 9 loci. (2) The combined paternity index (PI) of the 14 cases of motherless paternity testing ranged from 10³-10⁶ for 15 STR loci in ID, whereas it reached 10⁵-10⁹ for 22 independent STR loci included in ID and STRtyper 10G. Possible mutation in FGA and vWA was observed in 2 cases of trios, and the combined PI was 5945 and 1840 respectively for 15 STR loci in ID. Adding STRtyper 10G to detect these 2 cases, the combined PI reached 2.76 × 10⁷ and 4.88 × 10⁷ respectively. The genetic polymorphism of the 9 non-CODIS STR loci included in STRtyper 10G was quite high in Chinese Hebei Han population, indicating the 9 STR loci are valuable as complement markers for ID and PP16 kit in motherless paternity testing, paternity testing with mutation and other kinds of complicated paternity testing.

  12. Toward generally accepted forensic assessment practices among clinical neuropsychologists: a survey of professional practice and common test use.

    PubMed

    LaDuke, Casey; Barr, William; Brodale, Donald L; Rabin, Laura A

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated professional practice and common test use among clinical neuropsychologists engaging in forensic assessment.  Doctorate-level psychologists active in the practice of neuropsychology and on the INS and NAN membership listings (n = 502) were surveyed about their demographics, professional practice, and common test use. Participants who reported engaging in forensic practice (n = 255) were further surveyed about their forensic practice. Forensic participants were more likely to be male and Caucasian, and reported higher ages, more years of professional experience, and a higher prevalence of board certification. While characteristics of their professional and forensic practice varied, forensic participants reported spending most of their professional time conducting neuropsychological assessments with adult clients in a private or group practice setting, focusing on civil referrals and civil legal questions involving older adult issues, developmental issues, head injury, and psychiatric issues. Common test use across neuropsychological assessment domains is presented for board-certified forensic participants (n = 77). An examination of these results reveals that the current pattern of test use is similar to the results of a more general survey of neuropsychological test use.  The findings provide insight into the practice of forensic neuropsychological assessment, and further establish the admissibility of neuropsychological evidence in the United States legal system. Results will be useful for clinical neuropsychologists, field leaders, and legal professionals hoping to gain insight into the role of clinical neuropsychology in civil and criminal legal decision-making.

  13. Detection Strategies for Malingering with the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Its Underlying Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitacco, Michael J.; Jackson, Rebecca L.; Rogers, Richard; Neumann, Craig S.; Miller, Holly A.; Gabel, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Two of the most widely used measures for the assessment of malingering in forensic populations are the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST) and the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS). The underlying dimensions of the SIRS have been well established in the literature, but the structure of the M-FAST remains relatively…

  14. Investigating CSI: portrayals of DNA testing on a forensic crime show and their potential effects.

    PubMed

    Ley, Barbara L; Jankowski, Natalie; Brewer, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    The popularity of forensic crime shows such as CSI has fueled debate about their potential social impact. This study considers CSI's potential effects on public understandings regarding DNA testing in the context of judicial processes, the policy debates surrounding crime laboratory procedures, and the forensic science profession, as well as an effect not discussed in previous accounts: namely, the show's potential impact on public understandings of DNA and genetics more generally. To develop a theoretical foundation for research on the "CSI effect," it draws on cultivation theory, social cognitive theory, and audience reception studies. It then uses content analysis and textual analysis to illuminate how the show depicts DNA testing. The results demonstrate that CSI tends to depict DNA testing as routine, swift, useful, and reliable and that it echoes broader discourses about genetics. At times, however, the show suggests more complex ways of thinking about DNA testing and genetics.

  15. [Opinion-forming difficulties in establishing paternity resulting from the lack of data on the relationship between biological and putative father].

    PubMed

    Droździok, Kornelia; Kabiesz, Jadwiga; Chowaniec, Czesław

    2011-01-01

    Among a large number of expert opinions concerning disputed paternity cases prepared in the Chair of Forensic Medicine and Medico-Legal Toxicology, Silesian University of Medicine, Katowice, there were those in which the use of a standard 15 autosomal loci AmpFISTR Identifiler kit was not sufficient to give an unequivocal opinion. The authors report a case of disputed paternity, in which the analysis done by applying an AmpFISTR Identifiler kit showed no paternity heredity in 2 loci in the child. As allele distribution did not exclude mutation, further genetic markers were determined using PowerPlex ESX and FFFL kits and further three exclusions were found. Moreover, X-chromosome loci were determined using a MentypeAngusX8 test, which confirmed the exclusion of paternity in further 4 loci.

  16. A ranking index for quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles forensic DNA profiles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Assessment of DNA profile quality is vital in forensic DNA analysis, both in order to determine the evidentiary value of DNA results and to compare the performance of different DNA analysis protocols. Generally the quality assessment is performed through manual examination of the DNA profiles based on empirical knowledge, or by comparing the intensities (allelic peak heights) of the capillary electrophoresis electropherograms. Results We recently developed a ranking index for unbiased and quantitative quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles, the forensic DNA profile index (FI) (Hedman et al. Improved forensic DNA analysis through the use of alternative DNA polymerases and statistical modeling of DNA profiles, Biotechniques 47 (2009) 951-958). FI uses electropherogram data to combine the intensities of the allelic peaks with the balances within and between loci, using Principal Components Analysis. Here we present the construction of FI. We explain the mathematical and statistical methodologies used and present details about the applied data reduction method. Thereby we show how to adapt the ranking index for any Short Tandem Repeat-based forensic DNA typing system through validation against a manual grading scale and calibration against a specific set of DNA profiles. Conclusions The developed tool provides unbiased quality assessment of forensic DNA profiles. It can be applied for any DNA profiling system based on Short Tandem Repeat markers. Apart from crime related DNA analysis, FI can therefore be used as a quality tool in paternal or familial testing as well as in disaster victim identification. PMID:21062433

  17. Forensics Investigator

    MedlinePlus

    ... as criminalistics, pathology, jurisprudence, odontology, toxicology, or forensic accounting. In contrast to some other science technician positions ... DNA testing Tour of the National Institute of Standards and Technology * Information regarding income is cited from ...

  18. Identification of a rare off-ladder allele of the D13S325 locus during paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjing; Cheng, Jianding; Tong, Dayue; Liu, Sujuan; Zhang, Yinming; Sun, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates an unusual rare allele of D13S325 that was falsely categorized as an allele of D12S391 under the STRtyper™-10F/G system. The parentage cases with these rare alleles were analyzed using the Sinofiler™ system and singleplex amplification system, and the alleles of D13S325 extracted from the electrophoresis gel were sequenced. 5 Cases with the rare alleles misread as allele 20 of D12S391 were identified in total 2618 cases (including 3200 unrelated parents). This rare allele was designated as allele 5.1 of D13S325 based on its DNA sequence. Its frequency in the Chinese population was 1.6×10(-3). Because the rare allele 5.1 of D13S325 locus tends to be incorrectly labeled in the STRtyper™-10F/G system, particular attention should be paid when the system is used in paternity testing, personal identification, and DNA database comparisons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Men’s Preference for Women’s Facial Features: Testing Homogamy and the Paternity Uncertainty Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bovet, Jeanne; Barthes, Julien; Durand, Valérie; Raymond, Michel; Alvergne, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Male mate choice might be based on both absolute and relative strategies. Cues of female attractiveness are thus likely to reflect both fitness and reproductive potential, as well as compatibility with particular male phenotypes. In humans, absolute clues of fertility and indices of favorable developmental stability are generally associated with increased women’s attractiveness. However, why men exhibit variable preferences remains less studied. Male mate choice might be influenced by uncertainty of paternity, a selective factor in species where the survival of the offspring depends on postnatal paternal care. For instance, in humans, a man might prefer a woman with recessive traits, thereby increasing the probability that his paternal traits will be visible in the child and ensuring paternity. Alternatively, attractiveness is hypothesized to be driven by self-resembling features (homogamy), which would reduce outbreeding depression. These hypotheses have been simultaneously evaluated for various facial traits using both real and artificial facial stimuli. The predicted preferences were then compared to realized mate choices using facial pictures from couples with at least 1 child. No evidence was found to support the paternity uncertainty hypothesis, as recessive features were not preferred by male raters. Conversely, preferences for self-resembling mates were found for several facial traits (hair and eye color, chin dimple, and thickness of lips and eyebrows). Moreover, realized homogamy for facial traits was also found in a sample of long-term mates. The advantages of homogamy in evolutionary terms are discussed. PMID:23185437

  20. The forensic application of testing hair for drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Miller, M L; Donnelly, B; Martz, R M

    1997-01-01

    Hair testing is only used by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) when other information exists that indicates drug use and can remove a person from suspicion or associate them with criminal activity. The detection of cocaine in hair has been the FBI's first priority in hair testing for drugs of abuse because of its prevalence. Several cases when hair testing was used are reported in this chapter. Further, analysis of over 100 samples was performed on hair obtained from a medical examiner's random autopsy collection. Sixty-five percent of the samples tested positive for cocaine or opiates. The results of hair testing for drugs of abuse were found to be consistent with autopsy toxicology reports. The analysis of hair washes and nails from the autopsy samples suggests external contamination of hair with drugs is not widespread.

  1. Use of microsatellite markers in an American beech (Fagus grandifolia) population and paternity testing

    Treesearch

    Jennifer Koch; Dave Carey; M.E. Mason

    2010-01-01

    Cross-species amplification of six microsatellite markers from European beech (Fagus sylvatica Linn) and nine markers from Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume) was tested in American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.). Three microsatellites from each species were successfully adapted for use in American beech...

  2. Failings of trauma-specific and related psychological tests in detecting post-traumatic stress disorder in forensic settings.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Stuart B; Martell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Judges and juries tend to be particularly impressed by test data, especially quantitative test data. Psychometric tests specific for assessing the presence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are commonly employed by forensic mental health evaluators. Most of these instruments, however, have been designed to detect PTSD in treatment or research, and not forensic, settings. Those who rely on these measures without adequate awareness of their often significant limits in correctly identifying malingering may induce finders of fact to inordinately confidently accept the presence of PTSD. This article reviews problematic structural and content components of trauma-specific and related instruments used to evaluate PTSD and discusses the utility of specific techniques liable to be used in forensic settings to "fool" these measures. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Performance of Hispanic inmates on the Spanish Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST).

    PubMed

    Montes, Orbelin; Guyton, Michelle R

    2014-10-01

    The few psychological assessment measures commercially available for the assessment of Spanish-speaking populations lack strong empirical foundation. This is concerning given the rising numbers of Spanish speakers entering the forensic and correctional systems for whom valid assessment is difficult without linguistically and culturally appropriate measures. In this study, we translated and adapted the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST) into Spanish. The general purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric, linguistic, and conceptual equivalence of the English- and Spanish-language versions of the M-FAST in a sample of 102 bilingual Hispanic incarcerated males. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three feigning conditions (honest, uncoached, or coached) and completed the M-FAST in both English and Spanish on two separate occasions. Both language versions were psychometrically, linguistically, and conceptually equivalent. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of performance of the test of memory malingering and word memory test in a criminal forensic sample.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Rachel L; Sanders, James Forrest; Denney, Robert L

    2015-06-01

    Compared with the amount of neuropsychological literature surrounding response bias in civil litigation, there is little regarding criminal cases. This study adds to the criminal forensic neuropsychological literature by comparing the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) and the Word Memory Test (WMT) in a criminal forensic setting utilizing a criterion-groups design. Subjects were classified into two groups based on their performance on at least two other freestanding performance validity tests. The WMT demonstrated good sensitivity (95.1%) but poor specificity (68.4%) when Genuine Memory Impaired Profiles (GMIPs) were not considered. Inclusion of GMIPs reduced the sensitivity to 56.1% but increased the specificity to 94.7%. The TOMM evidenced better sensitivity but poorer specificity than the WMT with GMIPs. Conjoint use of the tests was also considered. Receiver operating characteristics and other classification statistics for each measure are presented. Results support the use of these measures in a criminal forensic population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Microbial soil community analyses for forensic science: Application to a blind test.

    PubMed

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Schauser, Leif; Dawson, Lorna; Franqueville, Laure; Simonet, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Soil complexity, heterogeneity and transferability make it valuable in forensic investigations to help obtain clues as to the origin of an unknown sample, or to compare samples from a suspect or object with samples collected at a crime scene. In a few countries, soil analysis is used in matters from site verification to estimates of time after death. However, up to date the application or use of soil information in criminal investigations has been limited. In particular, comparing bacterial communities in soil samples could be a useful tool for forensic science. To evaluate the relevance of this approach, a blind test was performed to determine the origin of two questioned samples (one from the mock crime scene and the other from a 50:50 mixture of the crime scene and the alibi site) compared to three control samples (soil samples from the crime scene, from a context site 25m away from the crime scene and from the alibi site which was the suspect's home). Two biological methods were used, Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA), and 16S rRNA gene sequencing with Illumina Miseq, to evaluate the discriminating power of soil bacterial communities. Both techniques discriminated well between soils from a single source, but a combination of both techniques was necessary to show that the origin was a mixture of soils. This study illustrates the potential of applying microbial ecology methodologies in soil as an evaluative forensic tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Testing the fetal overnutrition hypothesis; the relationship of maternal and paternal adiposity to adiposity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in Indian children

    PubMed Central

    Veena, Sargoor R; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Karat, Samuel C; Osmond, Clive; Fall, Caroline HD

    2012-01-01

    Objective We aimed to test the fetal overnutrition hypothesis by comparing the associations of maternal and paternal adiposity (sum of skinfolds) with adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors in children. Design Children from a prospective birth cohort had anthropometry, fat percentage (bio-impedance), plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations and blood pressure measured at 9·5 years of age. Detailed anthropometric measurements were recorded for mothers (at 30 ± 2 weeks’ gestation) and fathers (5 years following the index pregnancy). Setting Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India. Subjects Children (n 504), born to mothers with normal glucose tolerance during pregnancy. Results Twenty-eight per cent of mothers and 38 % of fathers were overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25·0 kg/m2), but only 4 % of the children were overweight/obese (WHO age- and sex-specific BMI ≥ 18·2 kg/m2). The children’s adiposity (BMI, sum of skinfolds, fat percentage and waist circumference), fasting insulin concentration and insulin resistance increased with increasing maternal and paternal sum of skinfolds adjusted for the child’s sex, age and socio-economic status. Maternal and paternal effects were similar. The associations with fasting insulin and insulin resistance were attenuated after adjusting for the child’s current adiposity. Conclusions In this population, both maternal and paternal adiposity equally predict adiposity and insulin resistance in the children. This suggests that shared family environment and lifestyle, or genetic/epigenetic factors, influence child adiposity. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that there is an intrauterine overnutrition effect of maternal adiposity in non-diabetic pregnancies, although we cannot rule out such an effect in cases of extreme maternal obesity, which is rare in our population. PMID:22895107

  7. Hair testing of GHB: an everlasting issue in forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Pichini, Simona; Zaami, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta; Kintz, Pascal

    2018-01-26

    In this paper, the authors present a critical review of different studies regarding hair testing of endogenous γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), concentrations in chronic users, and values measured after a single GHB exposure in drug facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) cases together with the role of a recently identified GHB metabolite, GHB-glucuronide. The following databases (up to March 2017) PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science were used, searching the following key words: γ-hydroxybutyrate, GHB, GHB glucuronide, hair. The main key words "GHB" and "γ-hydroxybutyrate" were searched singularly and then associated individually to each of the other keywords. Of the 2304 sources found, only 20 were considered appropriate for the purpose of this paper. Summing up all the studies investigating endogenous GHB concentration in hair, a very broad concentration range from 0 to 12 ng/mg was found. In order to detect a single GHB dose in hair it is necessary to commonly wait 1 month for collecting hair and a segmental analysis of 3 or 5 mm fragments and the calculation of a ratio between the targeted segment and the others represent a reliable method to detect a single GHB intake considering that the ratios presently proposed vary from 3 and 10. The only two studies so far performed, investigating GHB-Glucuronide in hair, show that the latter does not seem to provide any diagnostic information regarding GHB exposure. A practical operative protocol is proposed to be applied in all suspected cases of GHB-facilitated sexual assault (GHB-FSA).

  8. Paternity-parasitism trade-offs: a model and test of host-parasite cooperation in an avian conspecific brood parasite.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Bruce E; Hochachka, Wesley M; Eadie, John M

    2002-06-01

    Efforts to evaluate the evolutionary and ecological dynamics of conspecific brood parasitism in birds and other animals have focused on the fitness costs of parasitism to hosts and fitness benefits to parasites. However, it has been speculated recently that, in species with biparental care, host males might cooperate with parasitic females by allowing access to the host nest in exchange for copulations. We develop a cost-benefit model to explore the conditions under which such host-parasite cooperation might occur. When the brood parasite does not have a nest of her own, the only benefit to the host male is siring some of the parasitic eggs (quasi-parasitism). Cooperation with the parasite is favored when the ratio of host male paternity of his own eggs relative to his paternity of parasitic eggs exceeds the cost of parasitism. When the brood parasite has a nest of her own, a host male can gain additional, potentially more important benefits by siring the high-value, low-cost eggs laid by the parasite in her own nest. Under these conditions, host males should be even more likely to accept parasitic eggs in return for copulations with the parasitic female. We tested these predictions for American coots (Fulica americana), a species with a high frequency of conspecific brood parasitism. Multilocus DNA profiling indicated that host males did not sire any of the parasitic eggs laid in host nests, nor did they sire eggs laid by the parasite in her own nest. We used field estimates of the model parameters from a four-year study of coots to predict the minimum levels of paternity required for the costs of parasitism to be offset by the benefits of mating with brood parasites. Observed levels of paternity were significantly lower than those predicted under a variety of assumptions, and we reject the hypothesis that host males cooperated with parasitic females. Our model clarifies the specific costs and benefits that influence host-parasite cooperation and, more generally

  9. Testing photogrammetry-based techniques for three-dimensional surface documentation in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr; Jurda, Mikoláš

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface technologies particularly close range photogrammetry and optical surface scanning have recently advanced into affordable, flexible and accurate techniques. Forensic postmortem investigation as performed on a daily basis, however, has not yet fully benefited from their potentials. In the present paper, we tested two approaches to 3D external body documentation - digital camera-based photogrammetry combined with commercial Agisoft PhotoScan(®) software and stereophotogrammetry-based Vectra H1(®), a portable handheld surface scanner. In order to conduct the study three human subjects were selected, a living person, a 25-year-old female, and two forensic cases admitted for postmortem examination at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic (both 63-year-old males), one dead to traumatic, self-inflicted, injuries (suicide by hanging), the other diagnosed with the heart failure. All three cases were photographed in 360° manner with a Nikon 7000 digital camera and simultaneously documented with the handheld scanner. In addition to having recorded the pre-autopsy phase of the forensic cases, both techniques were employed in various stages of autopsy. The sets of collected digital images (approximately 100 per case) were further processed to generate point clouds and 3D meshes. Final 3D models (a pair per individual) were counted for numbers of points and polygons, then assessed visually and compared quantitatively using ICP alignment algorithm and a cloud point comparison technique based on closest point to point distances. Both techniques were proven to be easy to handle and equally laborious. While collecting the images at autopsy took around 20min, the post-processing was much more time-demanding and required up to 10h of computation time. Moreover, for the full-body scanning the post-processing of the handheld scanner required rather time-consuming manual image alignment. In all instances the applied approaches

  10. Comparison of the analytical capabilities of the BAC Datamaster and Datamaster DMT forensic breath testing devices.

    PubMed

    Glinn, Michele; Adatsi, Felix; Curtis, Perry

    2011-11-01

    The State of Michigan uses the Datamaster as an evidential breath testing device. The newest version, the DMT, will replace current instruments in the field as they are retired from service. The Michigan State Police conducted comparison studies to test the analytical properties of the new instrument and to evaluate its response to conditions commonly cited in court defenses. The effects of mouth alcohol, objects in the mouth, and radiofrequency interference on paired samples from drinking subjects were assessed on the DMT. The effects of sample duration and chemical interferents were assessed on both instruments, using drinking subjects and wet-bath simulators, respectively. Our testing shows that Datamaster and DMT results are essentially identical; the DMT gave accurate readings as compared with measurements made using simulators containing standard ethanol solutions and that the DMT did not give falsely elevated breath alcohol results from any of the influences tested. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. The FAA's postmortem forensic toxicology self-evaluated proficiency test program: the first seven years.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, A K

    2000-03-01

    Existing proficiency-testing (PT) programs do not address the complexity of postmortem forensic toxicology. These programs do not include decomposed samples and solid tissues. Therefore, the Federal Aviation Administration in July 1991 started such a needed PT program. This program is used to: (i) professionally develop and maintain technical currency on a voluntary, interlaboratory, and self-evaluation basis, and (ii) quantifiably assess methods in the absence and presence of interfering substances. There are currently about 30 laboratories in the program. Functioning under various governmental/non-governmental agencies and academic institutions, these laboratories represent a broad cross-section of the country. PT samples are distributed quarterly, and result summaries are sent to the participants, while maintaining their anonymity. Since the inception of the program, 28 PT samples encompassing whole blood, plasma, urine, kidney, or liver, with (or without) drugs, metabolites, and common chemicals (nicotine, caffeine, beta-phenylethylamine, etc.) have been analyzed by the participants. Analytical findings were generally consistent with the anticipated values, but they were dependent on the nature and conditions of the specimens and types of the added analytes. Some incidences of false positives of concern were noted, as well. This PT program is one of the few programs recommended by the American Board of Forensic Toxicology in which laboratories may participate for their accreditation by the Board. It is anticipated that this PT program will continue to play a critical part in supporting the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) component of forensic toxicology, thereby enhancing operational performance.

  12. The importance of microbiological testing for establishing cause of death in 42 forensic autopsies.

    PubMed

    Christoffersen, S

    2015-05-01

    Microorganisms have always been one of the great challenges of humankind, being responsible for both high morbidity and mortality throughout history. In a forensic setting microbiological information will always be difficult to interpret due to lack of antemortem information and changes in flora postmortem. With this study we aim to review the use of microbiological procedures at our forensic institute. In a retrospective study including 42 autopsies performed at our Institute, where microbiological test had been applied, analyses were made with regard to: type of microbiological tests performed, microorganisms found, histological findings, antemortem information, C-reactive protein measurement and cause of death. Fiftyone different microorganisms were found distributed among 37 cases, bacteria being the most abundant. Nineteen of the cases were classified as having a microbiological related cause of death. C-reactive protein levels were raised in 14 cases of the 19 cases, histological findings either supported or were a decisive factor for the classification of microbiologically related cause of death in 14 cases. As a multitude of abundant microorganisms are able to cause infection under the right circumstances, all findings should be compared to anamnestic antemortem information, before conclusions are drawn. A definite list of true pathogens is nearly impossible to compile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Capillary electrophoresis of 38 noncoding biallelic mini-Indels for degraded samples and as complementary tool in paternity testing.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rui; Gusmão, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the main advantages and the steps involved in the optimization of a multiplex system able to characterize 38 noncoding biallelic Insertion Deletion Polymorphisms(Indels). With this methodology, all markers are amplified in a single PCR, using short amplicons (up to 160 bp) in order to improve its performance in degraded samples. Alleles are easily detected using capillary electrophoresis.The Indel multiplex typing strategy here described has the same desirable characteristics of forensic SNP assays, including genetic markers (a) with low mutation rates, increasing their usefulness in some kinship cases where few or single incompatibilities can be explained by mutation, and (b) that can be typed using a short amplicon strategy, increasing their usefulness in cases where degraded samples are available. Moreover, this approach uses simple and well-established methodologies already applied in forensic STR assays.

  14. Men's desire for children carrying their genes and sexual jealousy: a test of paternity uncertainty as an explanation of male sexual jealousy.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Eugene W

    2005-06-01

    In a classic study, Buss, Larson, Westen, and Semmelroth found that men were more distressed by the thought of a partner's sexual infidelity (labeled sexual jealousy) and women were more distressed by the thought of a partner's emotional infidelity (labeled emotional jealousy). Buss and his associates explained the results by suggesting that men are concerned about uncertainty of paternity, that is, the possibility of raising another man's child while believing that the child is their own. To test this explanation, the Desire for Children Scale was created. Its internal consistency and test-retest reliabilities were .86 and .89, respectively. Scores correlate with stated Number of Children Desired (convergent validity) but none of the Big-Five traits (divergent validity). It was hypothesized that for men scores on this scale would correlate positively with scores on sexual jealousy. The Desire for Children Scale and the two Sexual vs Emotional Jealousy items of Buss and his associates were given to 49 men and 55 women college students enrolled in psychology courses. Their average age was 19.9 yr. (SD= 3.7), and average year in school was 2.0 (SD= 1.2). Subjects volunteered to participate in the study in exchange for course credit. The hypothesis was confirmed and gives support to the uncertainty of paternity explanation.

  15. An overview to the investigative approach to species testing in wildlife forensic science

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The extent of wildlife crime is unknown but it is on the increase and has observable effects with the dramatic decline in many species of flora and fauna. The growing awareness of this area of criminal activity is reflected in the increase in research papers on animal DNA testing, either for the identification of species or for the genetic linkage of a sample to a particular organism. This review focuses on the use of species testing in wildlife crime investigations. Species identification relies primarily on genetic loci within the mitochondrial genome; focusing on the cytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase 1 genes. The use of cytochrome b gained early prominence in species identification through its use in taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, while the gene sequence for cytochrome oxidase was adopted by the Barcode for Life research group. This review compares how these two loci are used in species identification with respect to wildlife crime investigations. As more forensic science laboratories undertake work in the wildlife area, it is important that the quality of work is of the highest standard and that the conclusions reached are based on scientific principles. A key issue in reporting on the identification of a particular species is a knowledge of both the intraspecies variation and the possible overlap of sequence variation from one species to that of a closely related species. Recent data showing this degree of genetic separation in mammalian species will allow greater confidence when preparing a report on an alleged event where the identification of the species is of prime importance. The aim of this review is to illustrate aspects of species testing in wildlife forensic science and to explain how a knowledge of genetic variation at the genus and species level can aid in the reporting of results. PMID:21232099

  16. Evidence of 2 Populations of Mephedrone Abusers by Hair Testing. Application to 4 Forensic Expertises.

    PubMed

    Kintz, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    New psychoactive substances are conquering the drug scene. Among these substances, cathinone derivatives have been observed since late in the years 2000. At that time, there was evidence of increasing use of the synthetic cathinone mephedrone, particularly amongst clubbers. Although the emergent drugs have an aura of safety, there is an increasing amount of experiences on their secondary effects. Mephedrone is known to induce psychosis. Given the potential negative effects of mephedrone, the laboratory was asked to test for the drug in hair, a cumulative matrix that can document single, occasional or repetitive abuse of xenobiotics. Mephedrone was tested in hair by GC/MS, using a standard procedure developed for stimulants such as amphetamine or ecstasy. In the head hair of 24 positive abusers, mephedrone was identified in the range 0.1 to 87 ng/mg, clearly determining 2 populations, one with co-administration of ecstasy and a second without ecstasy. In the first population, mephedrone concentrations were 0.1 to 5 ng/mg; in the second population, mephedrone concentrations were 3 to 87 ng/mg. These findings should help in the understanding the addiction of subjects. In 4 separate forensic cases, mephedrone was identified in hair of abusers, including a rape case (0.54 ng/mg), a fatal car crash (0.38 ng/mg), a fatal drowning (1.21 ng/mg), and a fatal overdose (6.99 ng/mg). Hair testing for new psychoactive substances appears as a good complement to standard urine analyses. This study confirms the increasing diffusion of new drugs among the forensic population of abusers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Evidence of 2 Populations of Mephedrone Abusers by Hair Testing. Application to 4 Forensic Expertises

    PubMed Central

    Kintz, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Background New psychoactive substances are conquering the drug scene. Among these substances, cathinone derivatives have been observed since late in the years 2000. At that time, there was evidence of increasing use of the synthetic cathinone mephedrone, particularly amongst clubbers. Although the emergent drugs have an aura of safety, there is an increasing amount of experiences on their secondary effects. Mephedrone is known to induce psychosis. Method Given the potential negative effects of mephedrone, the laboratory was asked to test for the drug in hair, a cumulative matrix that can document single, occasional or repetitive abuse of xenobiotics. Mephedrone was tested in hair by GC/MS, using a standard procedure developed for stimulants such as amphetamine or ecstasy. Results In the head hair of 24 positive abusers, mephedrone was identified in the range 0.1 to 87 ng/mg, clearly determining 2 populations, one with co-administration of ecstasy and a second without ecstasy. In the first population, mephedrone concentrations were 0.1 to 5 ng/mg; in the second population, mephedrone concentrations were 3 to 87 ng/mg. These findings should help in the understanding the addiction of subjects. In 4 separate forensic cases, mephedrone was identified in hair of abusers, including a rape case (0.54 ng/mg), a fatal car crash (0.38 ng/mg), a fatal drowning (1.21 ng/mg), and a fatal overdose (6.99 ng/mg). Conclusion Hair testing for new psychoactive substances appears as a good complement to standard urine analyses. This study confirms the increasing diffusion of new drugs among the forensic population of abusers. PMID:27784226

  18. Forensic microbiology.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    The field of forensic microbiology is fairly new and still evolving. With a threat of bioterror and biocrime, the rapid identification and subtyping of infectious agents is of upmost importance. Microbial genetic analysis is a valuable tool in this arena. The cost to sequence a microbial genome has fallen dramatically in recent years making this method more widely available. Surveillance and vigilance are important as is further research. The United States Department of Homeland Security established the Bioforensics Analysis Center to become the foremost U.S. biodefense research institution involved with bioforensics. Many countries are better prepared for biologic events than ever before, but more work is needed. Most medical laboratory scientists are not familiar with forensic principles or testifying in court. Demonstrating chain of custody and quality assurance are critical so that test results will be admissible in a court of law. The Scientific Working Group on Microbial Genetics and Forensics has published guidelines for forensic microbiology laboratories. Incorporating these guidelines help to provide test results that are useful in legal proceedings. If a laboratory scientist suspects bioterror or biocrime, or other legal case, law enforcement agents must be notified and diagnostic samples preserved. Additional sample testing might be necessary in court cases.

  19. Defense Biometric and Forensic Office Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-06

    investments in biometric and forensic RDT&E. From refining biometric modalities to exploring ‘game changing’ forensic technologies such as rapid DNA to the...Defense Biometric and  Forensic  Office  RDT&E Strategy    C‐1  ANNEX C—DBFO PROJECT IDENTIFICATION AND FUNDING PROCESS Overview The DBFO...DEFENSE 3030 DEFENSE PENTAGON WASHINGTON, DC 20301-3030 6 January 2015 I am pleased to present the Defense Biometric and Forensic Office’s (DBFO

  20. Analysis of fingerprint samples, testing various conditions, for forensic DNA identification.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Lana; Wurmbach, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Fingerprints can be of tremendous value for forensic biology, since they can be collected from a wide variety of evident types, such as handles of weapons, tools collected in criminal cases, and objects with no apparent staining. DNA obtained from fingerprints varies greatly in quality and quantity, which ultimately affects the quality of the resulting STR profiles. Additional difficulties can arise when fingerprint samples show mixed STR profiles due to the handling of multiple persons. After applying a tested protocol for sample collection (swabbing with 5% Triton X-100), DNA extraction (using an enzyme that works at elevated temperatures), and PCR amplification (AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® using 31cycles) extensive analysis was performed to better understand the challenges inherent to fingerprint samples, with the ultimate goal of developing valuable profiles (≥50% complete). The impact of time on deposited fingerprints was investigated, revealing that while the quality of profiles deteriorated, full STR profiles could still be obtained from samples after 40days of storage at room temperature. By comparing the STR profiles from fingerprints of the dominant versus the non-dominant hand, we found a slightly better quality from the non-dominant hand, which was not always significant. Substrates seem to have greater effects on fingerprints. Tests on glass, plastic, paper and metal (US Quarter dollar, made of Cu and Ni), common substrates in offices and homes, showed best results for glass, followed by plastic and paper, while almost no profiles were obtained from a Quarter dollar. Important for forensic casework, we also assessed three-person mixtures of touched fingerprint samples. Unlike routinely used approaches for sampling evidence, the surface of an object (bottle) was sectioned into six equal parts and separate samples were taken from each section. The samples were processed separately for DNA extraction and STR amplification. The results included a few single

  1. Final report on forensic study for section 390101 of Ohio SHRP U.S. 23 test pavement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1988-02-01

    The forensic study for Section 390101 of the Ohio-SHRP U.S. 23 Test Road was conducted : from July 8 to 10, 1997. The main objective of the investigation was to obtain critical data relevant : to the performance and cause of excessive rutting at a li...

  2. Could ethanol-induced alterations in the expression of glutamate transporters in testes contribute to the effect of paternal drinking on the risk of abnormalities in the offspring?

    PubMed

    Kashem, Mohammed Abul; Lee, Aven; Pow, David V; Šerý, Omar; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2017-01-01

    It has been known that a preconception paternal alcoholism impacts adversely on the offspring but the mechanism of the effect is uncertain. Several findings suggest that there are signalling systems in testis that are analogous to those known to be altered by alcoholism in brain. We propose that chronic alcohol affects these systems in a manner similar to that in brain. Specifically, we hypothesise that excessive alcohol may disturb glutamatergic-like signalling in testis by increasing expression of the glutamate transporter GLAST (EAAT1). We discuss ways how to test the hypothesis as well as potential significance of some of the tests as tools in the diagnostics of chronic alcoholism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing the impact of common forensic presumptive tests on the ability to obtain results using a novel rapid DNA platform.

    PubMed

    Donachie, Gillian E; Dawnay, Nick; Ahmed, Romana; Naif, Sarah; Duxbury, Nicola J; Tribble, Nicholas D

    2015-07-01

    The rise of DNA evidence to the forefront of forensic science has led to high sample numbers being submitted for profiling by investigators to casework laboratories: bottleneck effects are often seen resulting in slow turnaround times and sample backlog. The ParaDNA(®) Screening and Intelligence Tests have been designed to guide investigators on the viability of potential sources of DNA allowing them to determine which samples should be sent for full DNA analysis. Both tests are designed to augment the arsenal of available forensic tests for end users and be used concurrently to those commonly available. Therefore, assessing the impact that common forensic tests have on such novel technology is important to measure. The systems were tested against various potential inhibitors to which samples may be exposed as part of the investigative process. Presumptive test agents for biological materials (blood, semen and saliva) and those used as fingerprint enhancement agents were both used. The Screening Test showed a drop in performance following application of aluminium powder and cyanoacrylate (CNA) on fingerprints samples; however this drop in performance was not replicated with high template DNA. No significant effect was observed for any agent using the Intelligence Test. Therefore, both tests stand up well to the chemical agents applied and can be used by investigators with confidence that system performance will be maintained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Birth of a child with trisomy 9 mosaicism syndrome associated with paternal isodisomy 9: case of a positive noninvasive prenatal test result unconfirmed by invasive prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingmei; Cram, David S; Zhang, Jianguang; Shang, Ling; Yang, Huixia; Pan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is currently used as a frontline screening test to identify fetuses with common aneuploidies. Occasionally, incidental NIPT results are conveyed to the clinician suggestive of fetuses with rare chromosome disease syndromes. We describe a child with trisomy 9 (T9) mosaicism where the prenatal history reported a positive NIPT result for T9 that was unconfirmed by conventional prenatal diagnosis. NIPT was performed by low coverage whole genome plasma DNA sequencing. Karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with chromosome 9p-ter and 9q-ter probes was used to determine the somatic cell level of T9 mosaicism in the fetus and child. Quantitative fluorescent PCR (Q-PCR) of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) chromosome 9 markers was also performed to investigate the nature of the T9 mosaicism and the parental origin. A 22 month old girl presented with severe developmental delay, congenital cerebral dysplasia and congenital heart disease consistent with phenotypes associated with T9 mosaicism syndrome. Review of the prenatal testing history revealed a positive NIPT result for chromosome T9. However, follow up confirmatory karyotyping and FISH analysis of fetal cells returned a normal karyotype. Post-natal studies of somatic cell T9 mosaicism by FISH detected levels of approximately 20 % in blood and buccal cells. Q-PCR STR analysis of family DNA samples suggested that the T9 mosaicism originated by post-zygotic trisomic rescue of a paternal meiotic II chromosome 9 non-disjunction error resulting in the formation of two distinct somatic cell lines in the proband, one with paternal isodisomy 9 and one with T9. This study shows that NIPT may also be a useful screening technology to increase prenatal detection rates of rare fetal chromosome disease syndromes.

  5. Germline and somatic mosaicism for FGFR2 mutation in the mother of a child with Crouzon syndrome: Implications for genetic testing in “paternal age-effect” syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goriely, Anne; Lord, Helen; Lim, Jasmine; Johnson, David; Lester, Tracy; Firth, Helen V; Wilkie, Andrew OM

    2010-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by craniosynostosis and facial dysostosis, caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene; it belongs to a class of disorders that mostly arise as de novo mutations and exhibit a near-exclusive paternal origin of mutation and elevated paternal age (“paternal age effect”). However, even if this is the major mode of origin of mutations in paternal age-effect disorders, germline mosaicism may also occur. Here we describe the first molecularly documented evidence of germline and somatic mosaicism for FGFR2 mutation, identified in the mother of a child with Crouzon syndrome caused by a heterozygous c.1007A>G (p.Asp336Gly) substitution. Levels of maternal somatic mosaicism for this mutation, estimated by pyrosequencing, ranged from 3.3% in hair roots to 14.1% in blood. Our observation underlines the importance of parental molecular testing for accurate genetic counseling of the risk of recurrence for Crouzon, and other paternal age-effect syndromes. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20635358

  6. Forensic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brettell, T. A.; Saferstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of articles appealing to forensic practitioners. Topics include: drugs and poisons, forensic biochemistry, and trace evidence. Lists noteworthy books published on forensic science topics since 1986. (MVL)

  7. Likelihood of obtaining Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) and SIRS-2 elevations among forensic psychiatric inpatients with screening elevations on the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test.

    PubMed

    Glassmire, David M; Tarescavage, Anthony M; Gottfried, Emily D

    2016-12-01

    The Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST) was designed as a screening measure for feigned psychiatric symptoms. When M-FAST Total Scores are elevated (raw score ≥6), the test manual recommends follow-up with a more comprehensive measure of feigning, such as the widely used and researched Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) or the revised version of the test (SIRS-2). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate how often M-FAST screening elevations are associated with subsequent elevations on the SIRS or SIRS-2. The sample included archival data from 100 forensic psychiatric inpatients who obtained M-FAST Total Score elevations ≥6 during screening and were subsequently administered the SIRS (that was also rescored using SIRS-2 criteria). Among examinees who elevated the M-FAST over the recommended cutoff, 66.0% met standard SIRS feigning criteria, 42% met SIRS-2 criteria for feigning, and 81.0% obtained at least 1 SIRS/SIRS-2 elevation in the Probable Feigning range or higher. These results are consistent with the M-FAST manual guidelines, which support the use of the ≥6 M-FAST cutoff score to screen for potential feigning (but not as an independent marker of feigning). A higher M-FAST cutoff score of ≥16 was associated with subsequently meeting full SIRS criteria for feigning in 100.0% of protocols. Because the SIRS criteria were designed to have very low false positive rates, these findings indicate that more confident assertions about feigning can be made when elevations reach this level on the MFAST. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Forgotten evidence: A mixed methods study of why sexual assault kits (SAKs) are not submitted for DNA forensic testing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rebecca; Fehler-Cabral, Giannina; Bybee, Deborah; Shaw, Jessica

    2017-10-01

    Throughout the United States, hundreds of thousands of sexual assault kits (SAKs) (also termed "rape kits") have not been submitted by the police for forensic DNA testing. DNA evidence can help sexual assault investigations and prosecutions by identifying offenders, revealing serial offenders through DNA matches across cases, and exonerating those who have been wrongly accused. In this article, we describe a 5-year action research project conducted with 1 city that had large numbers of untested SAKs-Detroit, Michigan-and our examination into why thousands of rape kits in this city were never submitted for forensic DNA testing. This mixed methods study combined ethnographic observations and qualitative interviews to identify stakeholders' perspectives as to why rape kits were not routinely submitted for testing. Then, we quantitatively examined whether these factors may have affected police practices regarding SAK testing, as evidenced by predictable changes in SAK submission rates over time. Chronic resource scarcity only partially explained why the organizations that serve rape victims-the police, crime lab, prosecution, and victim advocacy-could not test all rape kits, investigate all reported sexual assaults, and support all rape survivors. SAK submission rates significantly increased once criminal justice professionals in this city had full access to the FBI DNA forensic database Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), but even then, most SAKs were still not submitted for DNA testing. Building crime laboratories' capacities for DNA testing and training police on the utility of forensic evidence and best practices in sexual assault investigations can help remedy, and possibly prevent, the problem of untested rape kits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Reinvestigations of six unusual paternity cases by typing of autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2012-02-01

    In some relationship cases, the initial investigations of autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) lead to an ambiguous conclusion and supplementary investigations become necessary. Six unusual paternity cases were previously investigated by other researchers and published as case work examples in forensic journals. Here, the cases were reinvestigated by typing the samples for 49 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the SNPforID multiplex assay. Three cases were solved by the SNP investigation without the need for any additional testing. In two cases, the SNP results supported the conclusions based on STRs. In the last case, the SNP results spoke in favor of paternity, and the combined paternity index based on autosomal STRs and SNPs was 12.3 billion. Nevertheless, the alleged father was excluded by X-chromosome typing. The case work examples underline the importance of performing supplementary investigations, and they advocate for the implementation of several panels that may be used in the highly unusual cases. Panels with SNPs or other markers with low mutation probabilities are preferable as supplementary markers, because the risk of detecting (additional) mutations is very low. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. [Research Progress on Forensic Dentistry].

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Dang, Y H

    2017-04-01

    Forensic dentistry is an interdiscipline of forensic medicine and stomatology, which provides legal information by collecting, testing and assessing the dental evidence scientifically. In this review, the present application of forensic dentistry has been described, such as the estimation of age, sex, species, occupation and living habit, as well as the identification of individual, domestic violence or abuse, which aims to enrich and improve forensic dentistry for making it be more useful in forensic medicine even in juridical practice. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine.

  11. Multiple paternity in reptiles: patterns and processes.

    PubMed

    Uller, Tobias; Olsson, Mats

    2008-06-01

    The evolution of female promiscuity poses an intriguing problem as benefits of mating with multiple males often have to arise via indirect, genetic, effects. Studies on birds have documented that multiple paternity is common in natural populations but strong evidence for selection via female benefits is lacking. In an attempt to evaluate the evidence more broadly, we review studies of multiple paternity in natural populations of all major groups of nonavian reptiles. Multiple paternity has been documented in all species investigated so far and commonly exists in over 50% of clutches, with particularly high levels in snakes and lizards. Marine turtles and lizards with prolonged pair-bonding have relatively low levels of multiple paternity but levels are nevertheless higher than in many vertebrates with parental care. There is no evidence that high levels of polyandry are driven by direct benefits to females and the evidence that multiple paternity arises from indirect genetic benefits is weak. Instead, we argue that the most parsimonious explanation for patterns of multiple paternity is that it represents the combined effect of mate-encounter frequency and conflict over mating rates between males and females driven by large male benefits and relatively small female costs, with only weak selection via indirect benefits. A crucial step for researchers is to move from correlative approaches to experimental tests of assumptions and predictions of theory under natural settings, using a combination of molecular techniques and behavioural observations.

  12. Development and testing of an audio forensic software for enhancing speech signals masked by loud music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobre, Robert A.; Negrescu, Cristian; Stanomir, Dumitru

    2016-12-01

    In many situations audio recordings can decide the fate of a trial when accepted as evidence. But until they can be taken into account they must be authenticated at first, but also the quality of the targeted content (speech in most cases) must be good enough to remove any doubt. In this scope two main directions of multimedia forensics come into play: content authentication and noise reduction. This paper presents an application that is included in the latter. If someone would like to conceal their conversation, the easiest way to do it would be to turn loud the nearest audio system. In this situation, if a microphone was placed close by, the recorded signal would be apparently useless because the speech signal would be masked by the loud music signal. The paper proposes an adaptive filters based solution to remove the musical content from a previously described signal mixture in order to recover the masked vocal signal. Two adaptive filtering algorithms were tested in the proposed solution: the Normalised Least Mean Squares (NLMS) and Recursive Least Squares (RLS). Their performances in the described situation were evaluated using Simulink, compared and included in the paper.

  13. Permutation Tests of Hierarchical Cluster Analyses of Carrion Communities and Their Potential Use in Forensic Entomology.

    PubMed

    van der Ham, Joris L

    2016-05-19

    Forensic entomologists can use carrion communities' ecological succession data to estimate the postmortem interval (PMI). Permutation tests of hierarchical cluster analyses of these data provide a conceptual method to estimate part of the PMI, the post-colonization interval (post-CI). This multivariate approach produces a baseline of statistically distinct clusters that reflect changes in the carrion community composition during the decomposition process. Carrion community samples of unknown post-CIs are compared with these baseline clusters to estimate the post-CI. In this short communication, I use data from previously published studies to demonstrate the conceptual feasibility of this multivariate approach. Analyses of these data produce series of significantly distinct clusters, which represent carrion communities during 1- to 20-day periods of the decomposition process. For 33 carrion community samples, collected over an 11-day period, this approach correctly estimated the post-CI within an average range of 3.1 days. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Sex and race determination of crania by calipers and computer : a test of the Giles and Elliot discriminant functions in 52 forensic cases.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-01-01

    The Giles and Elliot discriminant functions diagnosing sex and race from cranial measurements were tested on a series of forensically examined crania of known sex and race. Of 52 crania of known sex, 46 (88%) were correctly diagnosed. Racial diagnose...

  15. Respect for patient autonomy in forensic psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald N

    2005-01-01

    A fundamental issue that forensic psychiatric nurses struggle with is respect for patient autonomy, as the two liberal prerequisites for autonomy, liberty and rationality, are either absent or compromised in forensic psychiatric settings. In this paper, a contemporary feminist perspective of autonomy, relational autonomy, will be advanced as an alternative approach to the traditional liberalist, Kantian, perspective of autonomy. The concepts of autonomy, paternalism, and justice will be discussed in relation to forensic psychiatric nursing.

  16. Use of heterospermic inseminations and paternity testing to evaluate the relative contributions of common sperm traits and seminal plasma proteins in boar fertility.

    PubMed

    Flowers, W L; Deller, F; Stewart, K R

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between common semen quality estimates including sperm motility, sperm morphology, spontaneous capacitation status and seminal plasma proteins and boar fertility using heterospermic inseminations and subsequent paternity testing. All boars (n=12) used in the study had excellent semen quality (≥70% normal sperm) that resulted in average farrowing rates and litter sizes of 88.9±0.7% and 11.7±0.1 pigs, respectively. Their ejaculates were combined to make heterospermic insemination doses in such a way that each boar was tested against all of his contemporaries. The proportion of piglets sired by each individual was used to separate boars into three fertility groups: High (71.6±4.8%; n=3); Medium (51.6±3.8%; n=6); and Low (25.2%±5.3%; n=3). Ejaculates from High fertility boars had more motile sperm with normal acrosomes that moved faster in a straight-line and were more likely to undergo an acrosome reaction (p≤0.05) compared with their counterparts in the Low fertility group. Ejaculates from High fertility boars contained the greatest concentrations of three seminal plasma proteins (25.9kD/5.9pI; 55.1kD/4.8pI; and 70.1kD/5.2pI; p≤0.05), whereas concentrations of a 19.1kD/6.8pI were highest in semen from Low fertility boars (p≤0.05). Multiple regression analyses indicated that concentrations of the 25.9kD/5.9pI seminal plasma protein explained 66% of the variation observed in the proportion of pigs sired within a litter among boars (p≤0.00001). These results demonstrate that heterospermic inseminations and subsequent paternity testing is an effective technique for defining relationships between common semen quality tests and fertility, especially in situations where reproductive performance of all the boars is high. Motility, normal acrosome morphology, average linear velocity of motile sperm, and the proportion of sperm capable of an acrosome reaction were all positively associated with boar

  17. Effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in forensic drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    In forensic drug testing, it is important to immediately take biological specimens from suspects and victims to prove their drug intake. We evaluated the effectiveness of saliva and fingerprints as alternative specimens to urine and blood in terms of ease of sampling, drug detection sensitivity, and drug detection periods for each specimen type. After four commercially available pharmaceutical products were administered to healthy subjects, each in a single dose, their urine, blood, saliva, and fingerprints were taken at predetermined sampling times over approximately four weeks. Fourteen analytes (the administered drugs and their main metabolites) were extracted from each specimen using simple pretreatments, such as dilution and deproteinization, and were analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Most of the analytes were detected in saliva and fingerprints, as well as in urine and blood. The time-courses of drug concentrations were similar between urine and fingerprints, and between blood and saliva. Compared to the other compounds, the acidic compounds, for example ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid, were more difficult to detect in all specimens. Acetaminophen, dihydrocodeine, and methylephedrine were detected in fingerprints at later sampling times than in urine. However, a relationship between the drug structures and their detection periods in each specimen was not found. Saliva and fingerprints could be easily sampled on site without using special techniques or facilities. In addition, fingerprints could be immediately analyzed after simple and rapid treatment. In cases where it would be difficult to immediately obtain urine and blood, saliva and fingerprints could be effective alternative specimens for drug testing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Cementum as a source of DNA in challenging forensic cases.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Hussam; Krebs, Oliver; Sperhake, Jan Peter; Augustin, Christa; Koehne, Till; Amling, Michael; Püschel, Klaus

    2018-02-01

    Each forensic case is characterized by its own uniqueness. Deficient forensic cases require additional sources of human identifiers to assure the identity. We report on two different cases illustrating the role of teeth in answering challenging forensic questions. The first case involves identification of an adipocere male found in a car submersed in water for approximately 2 years. The second scenario, which involves paternity DNA testing of an exhumed body, was performed approximately 2.8 years post-mortem. The difficulty in anticipating the degradation of the DNA is one of the main obstacles. DNA profiling of dental tissues, DNA quantification by using real-time PCR (PowerQuant™ System/Promega) and a histological dental examination have been performed to address the encountered impediments of adverse post-mortem changes. Our results demonstrate that despite the adverse environmental conditions, a successful STR profile of DNA isolated from the root of teeth can be generated with respect to tooth type and apportion. We conclude that cementocytes are a fruitful source of DNA. Cementum resists DNA degradation in comparison to other tissues with respect to the intra- and inter-individual variation of histological and anatomical structures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. Forensic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, P. G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the type of work carried out by forensic chemists and the minimum qualification needed for appointment. Indicates that there are eight Home Office regional forensic science laboratories in addition to the Central Research Establishment at Aldermaston. (CC)

  20. Forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2012-04-01

    Forensic odontology is a specialized field of dentistry which analyses dental evidence in the interest of justice. Forensic odontology embraces all dental specialities and it is almost impossible to segregate this branch from other dental specialities. This review aims to discuss the utility of various dental specialities with forensic odontology.

  1. Wine authenticity verification as a forensic problem: an application of likelihood ratio test to label verification.

    PubMed

    Martyna, Agnieszka; Zadora, Grzegorz; Stanimirova, Ivana; Ramos, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the applicability of the likelihood ratio (LR) approach for verifying the authenticity of 178 samples of 3 Italian wine brands: Barolo, Barbera, and Grignolino described by 27 parameters describing their chemical compositions. Since the problem of products authenticity may be of forensic interest, the likelihood ratio approach, expressing the role of the forensic expert, was proposed for determining the true origin of wines. It allows us to analyse the evidence in the context of two hypotheses, that the object belongs to one or another wine brand. Various LR models were the subject of the research and their accuracy was evaluated by the Empirical cross entropy (ECE) approach. The rates of correct classifications for the proposed models were higher than 90% and their performance evaluated by ECE was satisfactory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Testing a Novel 3D Printed Radiographic Imaging Device for Use in Forensic Odontology.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Tara L; Bruhn, Ann M; Giles, Bridget; Garcia, Hector M; Diawara, Norou

    2017-01-01

    There are specific challenges related to forensic dental radiology and difficulties in aligning X-ray equipment to teeth of interest. Researchers used 3D printing to create a new device, the combined holding and aiming device (CHAD), to address the positioning limitations of current dental X-ray devices. Participants (N = 24) used the CHAD, soft dental wax, and a modified external aiming device (MEAD) to determine device preference, radiographer's efficiency, and technique errors. Each participant exposed six X-rays per device for a total of 432 X-rays scored. A significant difference was found at the 0.05 level between the three devices (p = 0.0015), with the MEAD having the least amount of total errors and soft dental wax taking the least amount of time. Total errors were highest when participants used soft dental wax-both the MEAD and the CHAD performed best overall. Further research in forensic dental radiology and use of holding devices is needed. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Forensic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  4. Demonstrating Cost-Effective Marker Assisted Selection for Biomass Yield in Red Clover (Trifolium pratense L.) – Part 1: Paternity Testing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many methods have been proposed to incorporate molecular markers into breeding programs. Presented is a cost effective marker assisted selection (MAS) methodology that utilizes individual plant phenotypes, seed production-based knowledge of maternity, and molecular marker-determined paternity. Proge...

  5. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin – Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Larmuseau, Maarten H. D.; Vessi, Andrea; Jobling, Mark A.; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Primativo, Giuseppina; Biondi, Gianfranco; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Ottoni, Claudio; Decorte, Ronny; Rickards, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY) has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample. Therefore, the uniquely

  6. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin - Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers.

    PubMed

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Vessi, Andrea; Jobling, Mark A; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Primativo, Giuseppina; Biondi, Gianfranco; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Ottoni, Claudio; Decorte, Ronny; Rickards, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY) has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample. Therefore, the uniquely

  7. The genetics of skin, hair, and eye color variation and its relevance to forensic pigmentation predictive tests.

    PubMed

    Maroñas, O; Söchtig, J; Ruiz, Y; Phillips, C; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the potential application of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based predictive tests for skin, hair, and eye color to forensic analysis in support of police investigations lacking DNA database matches or eyewitness testimony. Brief descriptions of the biology of melanogenesis and the main genes involved are presented in order to understand the basis of common pigmentation variation in humans. We outline the most recently developed forensically sensitive multiplex tests that can be applied to investigative analyses. The review also describes the biology of the SNPs with the closest associations to, and therefore the best predictors for, common variation in eye, hair, and skin pigmentation. Because pigmentation pathways are complex in their patterns, many of the better-studied human albinism traits provide insight into how pigmentation SNPs interact, control, or modify gene expression and show varying degrees of association with the key genes identified to date. These aspects of SNP action are discussed in an overview of each of the functional groups of pigmentation genes. Copyright © 2015 Central Police University.

  8. Single cells for forensic DNA analysis--from evidence material to test tube.

    PubMed

    Brück, Simon; Evers, Heidrun; Heidorn, Frank; Müller, Ute; Kilper, Roland; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a method that, while providing morphological quality control, allows single cells to be obtained from the surfaces of various evidence materials and be made available for DNA analysis in cases where only small amounts of cell material are present or where only mixed traces are found. With the SteREO Lumar.V12 stereomicroscope and UV unit from Zeiss, it was possible to detect and assess single epithelial cells on the surfaces of various objects (e.g., glass, plastic, metal). A digitally operated micromanipulator developed by aura optik was used to lift a single cell from the surface of evidence material and to transfer it to a conventional PCR tube or to an AmpliGrid(®) from Advalytix. The actual lifting of the cells was performed with microglobes that acted as carriers. The microglobes were held with microtweezers and were transferred to the DNA analysis receptacles along with the adhering cells. In a next step, the PCR can be carried out in this receptacle without removing the microglobe. Our method allows a single cell to be isolated directly from evidence material and be made available for forensic DNA analysis. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Isotocin regulates paternal care in a monogamous cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Lauren A; Matthews, Bryan J; Hofmann, Hans A

    2012-05-01

    While the survival value of paternal care is well understood, little is known about its physiological basis. Here we investigate the neuroendocrine contributions to paternal care in the monogamous cichlid, Amatitlania nigrofasciata. We first explored the dynamic range of paternal care in three experimental groups: biparental males (control fathers housed with their mate), single fathers (mate removed), or lone males (mate and offspring removed). We found that control males gradually increase paternal care over time, whereas single fathers increased care immediately after mate removal. Males with offspring present had lower levels of circulating 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) yet still maintained aggressive displays toward brood predators. To determine what brain regions may contribute to paternal care, we quantified induction of the immediate early gene c-Fos, and found that single fathers have more c-Fos induction in the forebrain area Vv (putative lateral septum homologue), but not in the central pallium (area Dc). While overall preoptic area c-Fos induction was similar between groups, we found that parvocellular preoptic isotocin (IST) neurons in single fathers showed increased c-Fos induction, suggesting IST may facilitate the increase of paternal care after mate removal. To functionally test the role of IST in regulating paternal care, we treated biparental males with an IST receptor antagonist, which blocked paternal care. Our results indicate that isotocin plays a significant role in promoting paternal care, and more broadly suggest that the convergent evolution of paternal care across vertebrates may have recruited similar neuroendocrine mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, Lorie M.; Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexicomore » Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.« less

  11. Paternalism and partial autonomy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, O

    1984-01-01

    A contrast is often drawn between standard adult capacities for autonomy, which allow informed consent to be given or withheld, and patients' reduced capacities, which demand paternalistic treatment. But patients may not be radically different from the rest of us, in that all human capacities for autonomous action are limited. An adequate account of paternalism and the role that consent and respect for persons can play in medical and other practice has to be developed within an ethical theory that does not impose an idealised picture of unlimited autonomy but allows for the variable and partial character of actual human autonomy. PMID:6520849

  12. Truth, trust, and paternalism.

    PubMed

    Brewin, T B

    1985-08-31

    The emphasis on the necessity for fully informed consent in two new books, Doctors' Dilemmas by M. Phillips and J. Dawson and Whose Body Is It? by C. Faulder, is found to be "lacking in balance" by Brewin. The doctor's discretion in dealing with each patient is considered to be the key to determining priorities between paternalism and communication. Rigid rules, Brewin argues, may not be in the patient's best interest and thus should not be forced on doctors and nurses by "philosophers or experts in ethics."

  13. Forensic Luminol Blood Test for Preventing Cross-contamination in Dentistry: An Evaluation of a Dental School Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Cadore, Peterson; Gallon, Andrea; Imanishi, Soraia Almeida Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Background: More than 200 different diseases may be transmitted from exposure to blood in the dental setting. The aim of this study is to identify possible faults in the crosscontamination chain control in a dental school clinic searching for traces of blood in the clinical contact surfaces (CCS) through forensic luminol blood test. Methods: Traces of invisible blood where randomly searched in CCS of one dental school clinic. Results: Forty eight surfaces areas in the CCS were tested and the presence of invisible and remnant blood was identified in 28 (58.3%) items. Conclusions: We suggest that the luminol method is suitable for identifying contamination with invisible blood traces and this method may be a useful tool to prevent cross-contamination in the dental care setting. PMID:25400895

  14. Specificity and false positive rates of the Test of Memory Malingering, Rey 15-item Test, and Rey Word Recognition Test among forensic inpatients with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Love, Christopher M; Glassmire, David M; Zanolini, Shanna Jordan; Wolf, Amanda

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the specificity and false positive (FP) rates of the Rey 15-Item Test (FIT), Word Recognition Test (WRT), and Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) in a sample of 21 forensic inpatients with mild intellectual disability (ID). The FIT demonstrated an FP rate of 23.8% with the standard quantitative cutoff score. Certain qualitative error types on the FIT showed promise and had low FP rates. The WRT obtained an FP rate of 0.0% with previously reported cutoff scores. Finally, the TOMM demonstrated low FP rates of 4.8% and 0.0% on Trial 2 and the Retention Trial, respectively, when applying the standard cutoff score. FP rates are reported for a range of cutoff scores and compared with published research on individuals diagnosed with ID. Results indicated that although the quantitative variables on the FIT had unacceptably high FP rates, the TOMM and WRT had low FP rates, increasing the confidence clinicians can place in scores reflecting poor effort on these measures during ID evaluations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. orchard: Paternity program for autotetraploid species.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, A; Harris, S A; Boshier, D H; Vinson, C C

    2015-07-01

    Advances in molecular marker technology have provided new opportunities to study the population genetics of polyploid taxa. Paternity analysis using microsatellite markers can be used in detection of gene flow between individuals and populations, in mating system analysis, to identify factors that influence fecundity and fertility, to identify behaviour of parent-offspring relationships and in the analysis of the reproductive success of different ecological groups. As there is no specific program for carrying out paternity analysis in tetraploid species, specialized software was designed for the assignment of paternity for autotetraploid species. orchard is a novel implementation of exclusion and likelihood statistics for carrying out paternity analysis of autotetraploids. First, the program performs an exclusion method, and then, a likelihood statistic is used with nonexcluded candidate fathers. Optional features include estimation of allele dosage of known mother trees and the estimation of pollen flow distances. orchard was tested using a data set of microsatellite data of Dipteryx odorata, a tetraploid Amazonian tree species. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. STR polymorphisms in Philippine ethnolinguistic groups: evaluation of forensic utility.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jasmin Jiji; Halos, Saturnina C

    2004-01-01

    Population data was collected for the STR loci F13AO1, FES/FPS, HUMvWA, and HUMTHO1, in three major Philippine ethnolinguistic groups and used to estimate statistical parameters for identity testing in forensic work on Filipinos. The Cebuano, Ilocano, and Pampango populations in the Philippines were studied because they are among the biggest linguistic groups in the country, thus their genotypic profiles should substantially represent those of many Filipinos. The number of alleles varied from 4 to 9 at all loci, falling within the range observed for other local and world populations. Pairwise comparisons of the allele frequency distributions showed no statistical differences among the populations. The test for linkage equilibrium showed no evidence of non-random association of alleles across the physically unlinked loci in any of the three populations. The four loci combined gave an exclusion power of > or =0.9995 and a power of paternity exclusion of 0.8859-0.9389.

  17. [Paternity process in the adolescence].

    PubMed

    Luz, Ana Maria Hecker; Berni, Neiva Iolanda de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed at learning the masculine conception of paternity and understanding the masculine strategies to cope the legal, social and affective pressures of this process. The collection of information was done through semi-structured interview with eight adolescents from Porto Alegre - RS, Brasil, ranging between 15 and 19 years old, who experienced paternity. The interpretation and analysis were based on the content analysis. From the analysis of these youngsters' reports the following categories have emerged: Adolescents Relationship; Paternity and Gender; and, Meaning of Being a Father. The attentive look to paternity in adolescence brings to light the comprehension of issues regarding the masculine exclusion in objective life experiences marked by the commitment with paternity.

  18. FORENSIC SCIENCE:

    PubMed Central

    Brkić, Hrvoje

    2014-01-01

    Data from available literature point to an early beginning of Forensic Dentistry in Croatia relating to a post-mortem examination of a female patient after a dental procedure in the 1930s. Later on, there were several mass casualties due to collisions and airplane crashes and a railway accident at the Zagreb Main Railway Station wherein the identity of the victims was established based on dental features. Foreign experts in forensics helped identify those victims, particularly forensic dentists because this specialty was almost unknown in our region at the time. During the twenty-year period of the development of Forensic Dentistry at the University of Zagreb, the School of Dental Medicine, the city of Zagreb and Croatia have become internationally recognised on the forensic map of the world. PMID:27688352

  19. Peri-implant test is a proposal of a new procedure to prevent peri-implantitis and forensic claims.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, R M; Ottria, L; Lauritano, D; Palmieri, A; Cura, F; Tagliabue, A; Tettamanti, L

    2018-01-01

    Implant dentistry has become one of the most successful techniques for oral rehabilitation over the last 20 years. The success rate of implant oral rehabilitation is above 80% while peri-implant disease (PID) is the most important complication of implant dentistry. The main cause of PID is considered bacterial leakage at the implant-abutment connection of a two-piece implant system. Prevention and control of bacterial leakage at the implant-abutment connection is mandatory for reducing inflammation process around implants neck and achieving bone stability. Since bacteria leakage at implant-abutment connection level is the main cause of PID, a microbiological test should be important to identify bacteria that cause PID. According with the conclusion of workshop of the European Federation on Periodontology, a test that detects the most frequent bacterial species involved in the onset of PID (Actinobacillus actinomycetecomitans, Porphyromonas gengivalis, Tannnerella forsythia, Treponema denticola) should be used in clinical practice. In fact, PID progression depends on the typology, quantity and composition of bacterial flora in peri-implant pockets, so controlling PID onset and progression, is a keystone for preventing implant failures and consequently forensic conflicts. The effort to prevent PID and consequently assurance or forensic conflicts have become one of the main focal points of all dental professionals. Behind these efforts lie, above all, ethical but also economic reasons, as well as a desire to prevent PID, improving implant care quality and increasing the legal security of health care professionals themselves. Since the legal decisions in our society influence how we practice dentistry, especially in the fast-evolving field of implant dentistry, using diagnostic tools that will allow dentists to demonstrate that they have acted correctly in accordance with the knowledge of modern medicine, it is of great importance to defend themselves in the case of

  20. Male age mediates reproductive investment and response to paternity assurance.

    PubMed

    Benowitz, Kyle M; Head, Megan L; Williams, Camellia A; Moore, Allen J; Royle, Nick J

    2013-08-07

    Theory predicts that male response to reduced paternity will depend on male state and interactions between the sexes. If there is little chance of reproducing again, then males should invest heavily in current offspring, regardless of their share in paternity. We tested this by manipulating male age and paternity assurance in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We found older males invested more in both mating effort and parental effort than younger males. Furthermore, male age, a component of male state, mediated male response to perceived paternity. Older males provided more prenatal care, whereas younger males provided less prenatal care, when perceived paternity was low. Adjustments in male care, however, did not influence selection acting indirectly on parents, through offspring performance. This is because females adjusted their care in response to the age of their partner, providing less care when paired with older males than younger males. As a result offspring, performance did not differ between treatments. Our study shows, for the first time, that a male state variable is an important modifier of paternity-parental care trade-offs and highlights the importance of social interactions between males and females during care in determining male response to perceived paternity.

  1. Establishment of Legal Paternity for Children of Unmarried American Women : Trade-Offs in Male Commitment to Paternal Investment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kermyt G

    2017-06-01

    The establishment of a legal father for children of unmarried parents reflects both high paternity confidence and male willingness to commit to paternal investment. Whether an unmarried man voluntarily acknowledges paternity after a child is born has important consequences for both the mother and child. This paper brings to bear a life history perspective on paternity establishment, noting that men face trade-offs between mating and parental effort and that women will adjust their investment in children based on expected male investment. I predict that paternity establishment will be more likely when the mother has high socioeconomic status, when maternal health is good, and when the child is male, low parity, or a singleton (versus multiple) birth. I further predict that establishment of paternity will be associated with increased maternal investment in offspring, resulting in healthier babies with higher birthweights who are more likely to be breastfed. These predictions are tested using data on 5.4 million births in the United States from 2009 through 2013. Overall the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the trade-offs men face between reproductive and parental investment influence whether men voluntarily acknowledge paternity when a child is born.

  2. The making and breaking of paternity secrets in donor insemination.

    PubMed

    Turney, Lyn

    2010-07-01

    This paper analyses the complex issues faced by regulators of the infertility treatment industry in response to the social and technological changes that heralded a new openness in knowledge about genetics, paternity and the concomitant need for donor offspring to know their genetic origins. The imperative for full information about their donor and biological father, who contributed to their creation and half of their genome, was an outcome unanticipated by the architects of the donor insemination programme. Genetic paternity testing realised the possibility of fixed and certain knowledge about paternity. This paper outlines medicine's role in the formation of normative families through the use of donor insemination. Extending information from an Australian study on the use of DNA paternity testing, it analyses what the social and scientific changes that have emerged and gained currency in the last several decades mean for the new 'openness' and the role of paternity testing in this context. It concludes with recommendations about how to deal with the verification of paternity in linking donor conceived adult children to their donor.

  3. Forensic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Keith O.; Nigh, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    A course is described, which was given during an interim, with an enrollment of 41 students. The course involved an in-depth study of forensic science, involving students with the methodology of science. (DF)

  4. Paternal occupation and Wilms' tumour in offspring.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, J R; Sinks, T H

    1984-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to test the hypothesis that paternal occupation is a risk factor for Wilms' tumour in offspring. Occupations associated with exposure to lead (Pb) and to hydrocarbons were examined by computing odds ratios, all of which were greater than unity but not by a statistically significant margin. When painters were considered separately, children whose fathers had been so employed were six times more likely to develop Wilms' tumour than children whose fathers had other occupations. Like the results for the Pb and hydrocarbon related occupations, the estimated relative risk associated with painters did not reach statistical significance. Although these data require cautious interpretation because of the relatively small number of subjects, the results reported here are not wholly consistent with the results of the one previous study of paternal occupation and Wilms' tumour in offspring. PMID:6323612

  5. [POST MORTEM PATERNITY].

    PubMed

    Marguénaud, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Post mortem paternity, namely the procreation after the death of the man whom is part of the couple, is one of the questions which raised the most hesitations since the first bioethics laws of 1994. The National Assembly, encouraged by several opinions of the CCNE (National advisory committee of ethics) had let itself convince that the transfer had, at least, to be authorized in utero embryos preserved at the regard of which no one could not claim to have rights equal or higher than those of the woman concerned. However, the Senate always ended up obtaining the maintenance of an absolute prohibition of posthumous procreation (starting) from the spermatozoids or frozen embryos. This indifference with the cruelty of the application of the law to the women plunged into mourning--based on a paradoxical appreciation of the interest of the child not to be born orphan, and on a not very glorious taking into account of the interest of the Body of notaries not to change its practices--is particularly debatable. One can, nevertheless, try to understand it according to the obsession of the legalization of surrogate motherhood by application of the principle of nondiscrimination which could justify the requests of the men who, thanks to a surrogate mother, would wish to become fathers starting from gametes or embryos taken or created before the death of their wife or partner.

  6. Object-oriented Bayesian networks for paternity cases with allelic dependencies.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Amanda B; Weir, Bruce S

    2008-06-01

    This study extends the current use of Bayesian networks by incorporating the effects of allelic dependencies in paternity calculations. The use of object-oriented networks greatly simplify the process of building and interpreting forensic identification models, allowing researchers to solve new, more complex problems. We explore two paternity examples: the most common scenario where DNA evidence is available from the alleged father, the mother and the child; a more complex casewhere DNA is not available from the alleged father, but is available from the alleged father's brother. Object-oriented networks are built, using HUGIN, for each example which incorporate the effects of allelic dependence caused by evolutionary relatedness.

  7. A quantitative method for determining a representative detection limit of the forensic luminol test for latent bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Brianna M; Lu, Zhenyu; Martin, Jennifer P; Tazik, Shawna K; Kellogg, Katie W; DeJong, Stephanie A; Belliveau, Elle O; Kilgore, Katherine E; Ervin, Samantha M; Meece-Rayle, Mackenzie; Abraham, Alyssa M; Myrick, Michael L; Morgan, Stephen L

    2017-09-01

    The luminol test has been used for over 60 years by forensic investigators for presumptive identification of blood and visualization of blood splatter patterns. Multiple studies have estimated the limit of detection (LD) for bloodstains when luminol is employed, with results ranging from 100× to 5,000,000× dilute. However, these studies typically have not identified and controlled important experimental variables which may affect the luminol LD for bloodstains. Without control of experimental parameters in the laboratory, variables which affect the potential of presumptive bloodstain test methods remain largely unknown, and comparisons required to establish new, more powerful detection methods are simply impossible. We have developed a quantitative method to determine the relationship between the amount of blood present and its reaction with luminol by measuring, under controlled conditions, the resulting chemiluminescent intensity with a video camera, combined with processing of the digital intensity data. The method resulted in an estimated LD for bloodstains on cotton fabric at ∼200,000× diluted blood with a specific luminol formulation. Although luminol is the focus of this study, the experimental protocol used could be modified to study effects of variables using other blood detection reagents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Research in Computer Forensics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    3 D. WHAT IS COMPUTER FORENSICS ..........................................................6 E. SURVEY OF AGENCIES AND VENDORS PROVIDING COMPUTER...lead to the formulation of computer forensic material for a potential Computer Forensic Course at NPS. 6 D. WHAT IS COMPUTER FORENSICS...Individualization 8. Reconstruction 63 What is Computer Forensics? Computer Forensics involves the identification, extraction, preservation and

  9. Evaluation of reliability on STR typing at leukemic patients used for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Filoglu, G; Bulbul, O; Rayimoglu, G; Yediay, F E; Zorlu, T; Ongoren, S; Altuncul, H

    2014-06-01

    Over the past decades, main advances in the field of molecular biology, coupled with benefits in genomic technologies, have led to detailed molecular investigations in the genetic diversity generated by researchers. Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are polymorphic loci found throughout all eukaryotic genome. DNA profiling identification, parental testing and kinship analysis by analysis of STR loci have been widely used in forensic sciences since 1993. Malignant tissues may sometimes be the source of biological material for forensic analysis, including identification of individuals or paternity testing. There are a number of studies on microsatellite instability in different types of tumors by comparing the STR profiles of malignant and healthy tissues on the same individuals. Defects in DNA repair pathways (non-repair or mis-repair) and metabolism lead to an accumulation of microsatellite alterations in genomic DNA of various cancer types that result genomic instabilities on forensic analyses. Common forms of genomic instability are loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI). In this study, the applicability of autosomal STR markers, which are routinely used in forensic analysis, were investigated in order to detect genotypes in blood samples collected from leukemic patients to estimate the reliability of the results when malignant tissues are used as a source of forensic individual identification. Specimens were collected from 90 acute and 10 chronic leukemia volunteers with oral swabs as well as their paired peripheral blood samples from the Oncology Centre of the Department of Hematology at Istanbul University, during the years 2010-2011. Specimens were tested and compared with 16 somatic STR loci (CSFIPO, THO1, TPOX, vWA, D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11 and FGA) widely used in forensic identification and kinship. Only two STR instabilities were encountered among 100 specimens. An MSI in

  10. Male age mediates reproductive investment and response to paternity assurance

    PubMed Central

    Benowitz, Kyle M.; Head, Megan L.; Williams, Camellia A.; Moore, Allen J.; Royle, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    Theory predicts that male response to reduced paternity will depend on male state and interactions between the sexes. If there is little chance of reproducing again, then males should invest heavily in current offspring, regardless of their share in paternity. We tested this by manipulating male age and paternity assurance in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We found older males invested more in both mating effort and parental effort than younger males. Furthermore, male age, a component of male state, mediated male response to perceived paternity. Older males provided more prenatal care, whereas younger males provided less prenatal care, when perceived paternity was low. Adjustments in male care, however, did not influence selection acting indirectly on parents, through offspring performance. This is because females adjusted their care in response to the age of their partner, providing less care when paired with older males than younger males. As a result offspring, performance did not differ between treatments. Our study shows, for the first time, that a male state variable is an important modifier of paternity–parental care trade-offs and highlights the importance of social interactions between males and females during care in determining male response to perceived paternity. PMID:23782889

  11. Analysis of body fluids for forensic purposes: from laboratory testing to non-destructive rapid confirmatory identification at a crime scene.

    PubMed

    Virkler, Kelly; Lednev, Igor K

    2009-07-01

    Body fluid traces recovered at crime scenes are among the most important types of evidence to forensic investigators. They contain valuable DNA evidence which can identify a suspect or victim as well as exonerate an innocent individual. The first step of identifying a particular body fluid is highly important since the nature of the fluid is itself very informative to the investigation, and the destructive nature of a screening test must be considered when only a small amount of material is available. The ability to characterize an unknown stain at the scene of the crime without having to wait for results from a laboratory is another very critical step in the development of forensic body fluid analysis. Driven by the importance for forensic applications, body fluid identification methods have been extensively developed in recent years. The systematic analysis of these new developments is vital for forensic investigators to be continuously educated on possible superior techniques. Significant advances in laser technology and the development of novel light detectors have dramatically improved spectroscopic methods for molecular characterization over the last decade. The application of this novel biospectroscopy for forensic purposes opens new and exciting opportunities for the development of on-field, non-destructive, confirmatory methods for body fluid identification at a crime scene. In addition, the biospectroscopy methods are universally applicable to all body fluids unlike the majority of current techniques which are valid for individual fluids only. This article analyzes the current methods being used to identify body fluid stains including blood, semen, saliva, vaginal fluid, urine, and sweat, and also focuses on new techniques that have been developed in the last 5-6 years. In addition, the potential of new biospectroscopic techniques based on Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy is evaluated for rapid, confirmatory, non-destructive identification of a body

  12. Religion as a means to assure paternity

    PubMed Central

    Strassmann, Beverly I.; Kurapati, Nikhil T.; Hug, Brendan F.; Burke, Erin E.; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Karafet, Tatiana M.; Hammer, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    The sacred texts of five world religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism) use similar belief systems to set limits on sexual behavior. We propose that this similarity is a shared cultural solution to a biological problem: namely male uncertainty over the paternity of offspring. Furthermore, we propose the hypothesis that religious practices that more strongly regulate female sexuality should be more successful at promoting paternity certainty. Using genetic data on 1,706 father–son pairs, we tested this hypothesis in a traditional African population in which multiple religions (Islam, Christianity, and indigenous) coexist in the same families and villages. We show that the indigenous religion enables males to achieve a significantly (P = 0.019) lower probability of cuckoldry (1.3% versus 2.9%) by enforcing the honest signaling of menstruation, but that all three religions share tenets aimed at the avoidance of extrapair copulation. Our findings provide evidence for high paternity certainty in a traditional African population, and they shed light on the reproductive agendas that underlie religious patriarchy. PMID:22665788

  13. Religion as a means to assure paternity.

    PubMed

    Strassmann, Beverly I; Kurapati, Nikhil T; Hug, Brendan F; Burke, Erin E; Gillespie, Brenda W; Karafet, Tatiana M; Hammer, Michael F

    2012-06-19

    The sacred texts of five world religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism) use similar belief systems to set limits on sexual behavior. We propose that this similarity is a shared cultural solution to a biological problem: namely male uncertainty over the paternity of offspring. Furthermore, we propose the hypothesis that religious practices that more strongly regulate female sexuality should be more successful at promoting paternity certainty. Using genetic data on 1,706 father-son pairs, we tested this hypothesis in a traditional African population in which multiple religions (Islam, Christianity, and indigenous) coexist in the same families and villages. We show that the indigenous religion enables males to achieve a significantly (P = 0.019) lower probability of cuckoldry (1.3% versus 2.9%) by enforcing the honest signaling of menstruation, but that all three religions share tenets aimed at the avoidance of extrapair copulation. Our findings provide evidence for high paternity certainty in a traditional African population, and they shed light on the reproductive agendas that underlie religious patriarchy.

  14. Forensic DNA and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Lucia; Liò, Pietro

    2007-03-01

    The field of forensic science is increasingly based on biomolecular data and many European countries are establishing forensic databases to store DNA profiles of crime scenes of known offenders and apply DNA testing. The field is boosted by statistical and technological advances such as DNA microarray sequencing, TFT biosensors, machine learning algorithms, in particular Bayesian networks, which provide an effective way of evidence organization and inference. The aim of this article is to discuss the state of art potentialities of bioinformatics in forensic DNA science. We also discuss how bioinformatics will address issues related to privacy rights such as those raised from large scale integration of crime, public health and population genetic susceptibility-to-diseases databases.

  15. Microwave Digestion--Vacuum Filtration-Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy as a sensitive method for forensic diatom test.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Liu, Chao; Hu, Sunlin; He, Shuwen; Lu, Siya

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosis of drowning is one of the most difficult issues in forensic practice. A number of methods have been developed over the years to determine whether a person was drowned. Microwave Digestion-Vacuum Filtration-Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy (MD-VF-Auto SEM) method we developed is a new qualitative and quantitative method of diatom test for diagnosis of drowning. The new method is based on microwave digestion technique, vacuum filtration, and automated SEM, which would achieve a maximal recovery of diatoms and identify diatoms easily by SEM with high resolution. This study was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of this method, the recovery of diatom, and loss ratio of centrifugation, which were compared using the MD-VF-Auto SEM method and the conventional acid digestion method. Two groups of samples were designed in the study. Groups A (n = 20) and B (n = 20) were performed by MD-VF-Auto SEM method and the conventional acid digestion method, respectively. In addition, another eight water samples were centrifuged, and the diatoms in the supernatant and precipitate were counted and measured, respectively, in order to find out how many diatoms were lost after centrifugation. The difference between the two groups was statistically highly significant, and about 34 % of diatoms were lost after centrifugation at 4,000 rpm for 15 min. The results showed that the MD-VF-Auto SEM method was more sensitive and specific.

  16. Forensic pedology, forensic geology, forensic geoscience, geoforensics and soil forensics.

    PubMed

    Ruffell, Alastair

    2010-10-10

    We now have a confusing set of five commonly used terms for the application of Earth evidence in forensic science. This confusion is resulting in Earth scientists who use these methods mentioning different terms, sometimes for the same type of study. Likewise, forensic scientists, police/law enforcement officers and those employed by courts of law are becoming confused as to what each term means. A nomenclatural framework (based on the first use of each term) is proposed to encourage consistency in the use of terminology. Generally, the number of Earth science applications has grown through time, from soil and sediment analysis to remote sensing and GIS. The issue of where forensic biology and microbiology sits with these uses of Earth evidence is considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Increasing paternal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Cutright, P

    1985-01-01

    Increasing numbers of fathers of children born out of wedlock are not contributing to these children's economic support. In 1981, a tiny minority (14%) of the 1.7 million never-married mothers living with a child with an absent father had a child-support award, and of these, just 112,000 actually received some payment in 1981. The high rates of noncompliance, and the low level of legal efforts to enforce child support, are the result of attempts to collect payments through inefficient traditional methods, not the inability of fathers to pay, a Wisconsin study has shown. A basic problem with collecting child support under the present system is that it relies on fathers to control their expenditures and voluntarily to send the payment on a weekly, biweekly or monthly basis, year after year. As a Wisconsin study shows, full compliance with court-ordered payments dropped from 38% in the 1st year to below 20% by the 5th year among 163 ex-husbands tracked. A proposal by researchers at the University of Wisconsin's Institute for Research on Poverty calls for an "absent-parent tax." The Wisconsin Plan, as it is known, is simply a withholding tax based on the father's gross income and the number of his absent children. If his income falls below a certain level, payments will stop automatically, but will resume if and when it rises above the cutoff point. The Wisconsin plan removes all judicial discretion and lawyer's skill as factors in child-support awards, thus eliminating erratic awards. It also insures that support payments will be maintained during periods of conflict between the father and mother. However, before the Wisconsin Plan can effectively protect children both out of wedlock, a feature needs to be added that will establish paternity at birth. Imposing a real child-support obligation on fathers of children born outside of marriage will introduce a potentially powerful economic incentive for responsible male reproductive and parental behavior.

  18. [Forensic entomology].

    PubMed

    Açikgöz, Halide Nihal

    2010-01-01

    Odour of the animal or human corpses immediately after death is very attractive for insects and other invertebrates. Blue and green bottle flies from the Calliphoridae family are the first colonizers of cadaver and immediately later necrophagous Diptera from the Sarcophagidae family settle on the same corpse. It is essential to determine the time past after death for elucidating the event in case of the homicide or suspicious death, and it is directly proportional to the post mortem interval expected time, which is based upon the speed of the larval growth. In this article, we purposed to stress the special interest of forensic entomology for the scientists who will apply this science in their forensic researches and case studies, and also to provide information to our judges, prosecutors and law enforcement agents in order to consider the entomological samples to be reliable and applicable evidences as biological stains and hairs. We are of the opinion that if any forensic entomologist is called to the crime scene or if the evidences are collected and then delivered to an entomologist, the forensic cases will be elucidated faster and more accurately.

  19. Non-destructive testing techniques for the forensic engineering investigation of reinforced concrete buildings.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Brian; Tchoketch Kebir, Mohamed

    2007-04-11

    This study describes in detail the results of a laboratory investigation where the compressive strength of 150mm side-length cubes was evaluated. Non-destructive testing (NDT) was carried out using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and impact rebound hammer (IRH) techniques to establish a correlation with the compressive strengths of compression tests. To adapt the Schmidt hammer apparatus and the ultrasonic pulse velocity tester to the type of concrete used in Algeria, concrete mix proportions that are recommended by the Algerian code were chosen. The resulting correlation curve for each test is obtained by changing the level of compaction, water/cement ratio and concrete age of specimens. Unlike other works, the research highlights the significant effect of formwork material on surface hardness of concrete where two different mould materials for specimens were used (plastic and wood). A combined method for the above two tests, reveals an improvement in the strength estimation of concrete. The latter shows more improvement by including the concrete density. The resulting calibration curves for strength estimation were compared with others from previous published literature.

  20. Does the source of a forensic referral affect neuropsychological test performance on a standardized battery of tests?

    PubMed

    Meyers, John; Reinsch-Boothby, Lorrie; Miller, Ronald; Rohling, Martin; Axelrod, Bradley

    2011-04-01

    The current study examines the differences in neuropsychological test performance between individuals who were referred for evaluation by either plaintiff or defense attorneys. Comparisons were made using a standardized battery of tests, with the same tests being administered to both groups of individuals along with the MMPI-2. The results of the study showed no significant difference in domain-level performance, or on the psychological measures administered for plaintiff vs defense referrals who passed symptom validity tests (SVTs). Similarly, although those failing SVTs produced markedly lower test performance and reported more psychological symptoms in comparison to those passing SVTs, there were no differences between plaintiff or defense referrals on test performance for those failing SVTs.

  1. Elevated paternal glucocorticoid exposure modifies memory retention in female offspring.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Shlomo; Rogers, Jake; Short, Annabel K; Renoir, Thibault; Pang, Terence Y; Hannan, Anthony J

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that behavioral traits are subject to transgenerational modification by paternal environmental factors. We previously reported on the transgenerational influences of increased paternal stress hormone levels on offspring anxiety and depression-related behaviors. Here, we investigated whether offspring sociability and cognition are also influenced by paternal stress. Adult C57BL/6J male mice were treated with corticosterone (CORT; 25mg/L) for four weeks prior to paired-matings to generate F1 offspring. Paternal CORT treatment was associated with decreased body weights of female offspring and a marked reduction of the male offspring. There were no differences in social behavior of adult F1 offspring in the three-chamber social interaction test. Despite male offspring of CORT-treated fathers displaying hyperactivity in the Y-maze, there was no observable difference in short-term spatial working memory. Spatial learning and memory testing in the Morris water maze revealed that female, but not male, F1 offspring of CORT-treated fathers had impaired memory retention. We used our recently developed methodology to analyze the spatial search strategy of the mice during the learning trials and determined that the impairment could not be attributed to underlying differences in search strategy. These results provide evidence for the impact of paternal corticosterone administration on offspring cognition and complement the cumulative knowledge of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of acquired traits in rodents and humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic structure and forensic parameters of 38 Indels for human identification purposes in eight Mexican populations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cortés, G; Gusmão, L; Pereira, R; Salcido, V H; Favela-Mendoza, A F; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Inclán-Sánchez, A; López-Hernández, L B; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2015-07-01

    Insertion-deletions for human identification purposes (HID-Indels) offer advantages to solve particular forensic situations and complex paternity cases. In Mexico, admixed population known as Mestizos is the largest (∼90%), plus a number of Amerindian groups (∼10%), which have not been studied with HID-Indels. For this reason, allele frequencies and forensic parameters for 38 HID-Indels were estimated in 531 unrelated individuals from one Amerindian (Purépecha) and seven Mestizo populations from different regions of the country. Genotype distribution was in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg expectations in almost all loci/populations. The linkage disequilibrium (LD) test did not reveal possible associations between loci pairs in all eight Mexican populations. The combined power of discrimination was high in all populations (PD >99.99999999998%). However, the power of exclusion of the 38 HID-Indel system (PE >99.6863%) was reduced regarding most of autosomal STR kits. The assessment of genetic structure (AMOVA) and relationships between populations (FST) demonstrated significant differences among Mexican populations, mainly of the Purépecha Amerindian group. Among Mexican-Mestizos, three population clusters consistent with geography were defined: (i) North-West region: Chihuahua, Sinaloa, and Jalisco; (ii) Central-Southern region: Mexico City, Veracruz and Yucatan; (iii) South region: Chiapas. In brief, this report validates the inclusion of the 38 HID-Indel system in forensic casework and paternity cases in seven Mexican-Mestizo populations from different regions, and in one Mexican Amerindian group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospital Based Paternity Establishment in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jessica; Thoennes, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes the impact of the Colorado's Child Support Improvement Project on voluntary paternity acknowledgment rate, which increased almost 24% from 1991 to 1994. Program activities include simplifying voluntary acknowledgment procedures and training hospital personnel on paternity. Voluntary paternity acknowledgment is associated with the…

  4. Paternal Age and Sporadic Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Malaspina, Dolores; Corcoran, Cheryl; Fahim, Cherine; Berman, Ariela; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; Yale, Scott; Goetz, Deborah; Goetz, Raymond; Harlap, Susan; Gorman, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is an etiologically heterogeneous syndrome. It has a strong genetic component and exists in clinically indistinguishable familial and nonfamilial (sporadic) forms. A significant role for de novo genetic mutations in genetic schizophrenia vulnerability is suggested by a strong monotonic increase in schizophrenia risk with advancing paternal age. However, an alternative explanation for the paternal age effect in schizophrenia is that childbearing is delayed in fathers who themselves have genetic schizophrenia vulnerability. In this study, we compared paternal birth ages between patient groups with familial (n = 35) and sporadic (n = 68) patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia from an inpatient schizophrenia research unit. If later age of fathering children is related to having some genetic schizophrenia vulnerability, then paternal birth age should be later in familial schizophrenia cases than in sporadic cases, and any association of father’s age and schizophrenia risk in offspring would be a spurious finding, unrelated to etiology. However, if de novo mutations cause sporadic schizophrenia, then patients without a family history of schizophrenia would have older fathers than familial patients. We found that patients without a family history of schizophrenia had significantly older fathers (4.7 years) than familial patients; so later childbirth was not attributable to parental psychiatric illness. These findings support the hypothesis that de novo mutations contribute to the risk for sporadic schizophrenia. PMID:11920852

  5. Testing the effectiveness of an international conservation agreement: marketplace forensics and CITES caviar trade regulation.

    PubMed

    Doukakis, Phaedra; Pikitch, Ellen K; Rothschild, Anna; DeSalle, Rob; Amato, George; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis

    2012-01-01

    The international wildlife trade is a key threat to biodiversity. Temporal genetic marketplace monitoring can determine if wildlife trade regulation efforts such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) are succeeding. Protected under CITES effective 1997, sturgeons and paddlefishes, the producers of black caviar, are flagship CITES species. We test whether CITES has limited the amount of fraudulent black caviar reaching the marketplace. Using mitochondrial DNA-based methods, we compare mislabeling in caviar and meat purchased in the New York City area pre and post CITES listing. Our recent sampling of this market reveals a decrease in mislabeled caviar (2006-2008; 10%; n = 90) compared to pre-CITES implementation (1995-1996; 19%; n = 95). Mislabeled caviar was found only in online purchase (n = 49 online/41 retail). Stricter controls on importing and exporting as per CITES policies may be having a positive conservation effect by limiting the amount of fraudulent caviar reaching the marketplace. Sturgeons and paddlefishes remain a conservation priority, however, due to continued overfishing and habitat degradation. Other marine and aquatic species stand to benefit from the international trade regulation that can result from CITES listing.

  6. Testing the Effectiveness of an International Conservation Agreement: Marketplace Forensics and CITES Caviar Trade Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Doukakis, Phaedra; Pikitch, Ellen K.; Rothschild, Anna; DeSalle, Rob; Amato, George; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis

    2012-01-01

    Background The international wildlife trade is a key threat to biodiversity. Temporal genetic marketplace monitoring can determine if wildlife trade regulation efforts such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) are succeeding. Protected under CITES effective 1997, sturgeons and paddlefishes, the producers of black caviar, are flagship CITES species. Methodology/Principal Findings We test whether CITES has limited the amount of fraudulent black caviar reaching the marketplace. Using mitochondrial DNA-based methods, we compare mislabeling in caviar and meat purchased in the New York City area pre and post CITES listing. Our recent sampling of this market reveals a decrease in mislabeled caviar (2006–2008; 10%; n = 90) compared to pre-CITES implementation (1995–1996; 19%; n = 95). Mislabeled caviar was found only in online purchase (n = 49 online/41 retail). Conclusions/Significance Stricter controls on importing and exporting as per CITES policies may be having a positive conservation effect by limiting the amount of fraudulent caviar reaching the marketplace. Sturgeons and paddlefishes remain a conservation priority, however, due to continued overfishing and habitat degradation. Other marine and aquatic species stand to benefit from the international trade regulation that can result from CITES listing. PMID:22848410

  7. Testing inter-observer reliability of the Transition Analysis aging method on the William M. Bass forensic skeletal collection.

    PubMed

    Fojas, Christina L; Kim, Jieun; Minsky-Rowland, Jocelyn D; Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B

    2018-01-01

    Skeletal age estimation is an integral part of the biological profile. Recent work shows how multiple-trait approaches better capture senescence as it occurs at different rates among individuals. Furthermore, a Bayesian statistical framework of analysis provides more useful age estimates. The component-scoring method of Transition Analysis (TA) may resolve many of the functional and statistical limitations of traditional phase-aging methods and is applicable to both paleodemography and forensic casework. The present study contributes to TA-research by validating TA for multiple, differently experienced observers using a collection of modern forensic skeletal cases. Five researchers independently applied TA to a random sample of 58 documented individuals from the William M. Bass Forensic Skeletal Collection, for whom knowledge of chronological age was withheld. Resulting scores were input into the ADBOU software and maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were produced using the forensic prior. Krippendorff's alpha was used to evaluate interrater reliability and agreement. Inaccuracy and bias were measured to gauge the magnitude and direction of difference between estimated ages and chronological ages among the five observers. The majority of traits had moderate to excellent agreement among observers (≥0.6). The superior surface morphology had the least congruence (0.4), while the ventral symphyseal margin had the most (0.9) among scores. Inaccuracy was the lowest for individuals younger than 30 and the greatest for individuals over 60. Consistent over-estimation of individuals younger than 30 and under-estimation of individuals over 40 years old occurred. Individuals in their 30s showed a mixed pattern of under- and over-estimation among observers. These results support the use of the TA method by researchers of varying experience levels. Further, they validate its use on forensic cases, given the low error overall. © 2017 Wiley

  8. Paternal care and litter size coevolution in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Liane

    2016-01-01

    Biparental care of offspring occurs in diverse mammalian genera and is particularly common among species with socially monogamous mating systems. Despite numerous well-documented examples, however, the evolutionary causes and consequences of paternal care in mammals are not well understood. Here, we investigate the evolution of paternal care in relation to offspring production. Using comparative analyses to test for evidence of evolutionary associations between male care and life-history traits, we explore if biparental care is likely to have evolved because of the importance of male care to offspring survival, or if evolutionary increases in offspring production are likely to result from the evolution of biparental care. Overall, we find no evidence that paternal care has evolved in response to benefits of supporting females to rear particularly costly large offspring or litters. Rather, our findings suggest that increases in offspring production are more likely to follow the evolution of paternal care, specifically where males contribute depreciable investment such as provisioning young. Through coevolution with litter size, we conclude that paternal care in mammals is likely to play an important role in stabilizing monogamous mating systems and could ultimately promote the evolution of complex social behaviours. PMID:27097924

  9. Paternal care and litter size coevolution in mammals.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Paula; Hobson, Liane

    2016-04-27

    Biparental care of offspring occurs in diverse mammalian genera and is particularly common among species with socially monogamous mating systems. Despite numerous well-documented examples, however, the evolutionary causes and consequences of paternal care in mammals are not well understood. Here, we investigate the evolution of paternal care in relation to offspring production. Using comparative analyses to test for evidence of evolutionary associations between male care and life-history traits, we explore if biparental care is likely to have evolved because of the importance of male care to offspring survival, or if evolutionary increases in offspring production are likely to result from the evolution of biparental care. Overall, we find no evidence that paternal care has evolved in response to benefits of supporting females to rear particularly costly large offspring or litters. Rather, our findings suggest that increases in offspring production are more likely to follow the evolution of paternal care, specifically where males contribute depreciable investment such as provisioning young. Through coevolution with litter size, we conclude that paternal care in mammals is likely to play an important role in stabilizing monogamous mating systems and could ultimately promote the evolution of complex social behaviours. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Forensic efficiency and genetic variation of 30 InDels in Vietnamese and Nigerian populations

    PubMed Central

    Du, Weian; Peng, Zhiyong; Feng, Chunlei; Zhu, Bofeng; Wang, Bangchao; Wang, Yue; Liu, Chao; Chen, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Insertion/deletion polymorphisms (InDels) are ubiquitous diallelic genetic markers that have drawn increasing attention from forensic researchers. Here, we investigated 30 InDel loci in Vietnamese and Nigerian populations and evaluated their usefulness in forensic genetics. The polymorphic information content of these populations ranged, respectively, from 0.164 to 0.375 and from 0.090 to 0.375 across loci. After Bonferroni correction, no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was found, except for HLD97 in the Nigerian population. The cumulative power of exclusion for all 30 loci in the Vietnamese and Nigerian populations was 0.9870 and 0.9676, respectively, indicating that this InDel set is not suitable for paternity testing in these populations, but could be included as a supplement. For the Vietnamese and the Nigerian populations, the mean observed heterozygosity was 0.5917 and 0.6268, and the combined discrimination power of the 30 loci was 0.9999999999767 and 0.9999999999603, respectively. These findings indicated that these InDels may be suitable for personal forensic identification in the studied populations. The results of DA distance, phylogenetic tree, principal component, and cluster analyses were consistent and indicated a clear pattern of regional distribution. Moreover, the Vietnamese population was shown to have close genetic relationships with the Guangdong Han and Shanghai Han populations. PMID:29179488

  11. [Forensic Application of 16 X-STR Loci in Henan Han Population].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y J; Guo, L H; Yue, J T; Shi, M S

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the genetic data of 16 X-STR loci in Henan Han population and to assess the application value in forensic science. The DNA of 326 unrelated individuals in Henan Han population were amplified using Golden e ye™ DNA identification system 17X kit, and the PCR products were analyzed by electrophoresis through 3130xl genetic analyzer. The fragment sizes of alleles were analyzed subsequently by GeneMapper® ID-X. Allele frequencies and population genetics parameters of 16 X-STR loci were analyzed statistically and compared with the available data of other Han populations from different regions. Among the 16 X-STR loci, DXS6800 were found to be moderately polymorphic and the other 15 X-STR loci were highly polymorphic. The cumulative discrimination power in females and males were 0.999 999 999 999 992 and 0.999 999 996 577 712, respectively. The combined power of exclusion in trios and in duos were 0.999 999 971 and 0.999 992 574, respectively. The 16 X-STR loci meet the application requires of forensic genetics, especially for testing the special paternity cases. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  12. [Forensic anthropology].

    PubMed

    Lynnerup, Niels

    2009-09-07

    Forensic anthropology is the application of biological or physical anthropology in the service of justice. One main area is the analysis of human remains. Such analyses involve person identification by assessment of age and sex of the deceased, and comparison with ante-mortem data. Another major area is the analysis of surveillance pictures and videos. Such analyses may comprise facial and bodily morphological comparisons, multi-angle photogrammetry and gait analysis. We also perform studies of human remains for archaeologists.

  13. Transitioning from Forensic Genetics to Forensic Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Due to its support of law enforcement, forensics is a conservative field; nevertheless, driven by scientific and technological progress, forensic genetics is slowly transitioning into forensic genomics. With this Special Issue of Genes we acknowledge and appreciate this rather recent development by not only introducing the field of forensics to the wider community of geneticists, but we do so by emphasizing on different topics of forensic relevance where genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic principles, methods, and datasets of humans and beyond are beginning to be used to answer forensic questions. PMID:29271907

  14. Forensic geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffell, Alastair; McKinley, Jennifer

    2014-02-01

    Geomorphology plays a critical role in two areas of geoforensics: searching the land for surface or buried objects and sampling scenes of crime and control locations as evidence. Associated geoscience disciplines have substantial bodies of work dedicated to their relevance in forensic investigations, yet geomorphology (specifically landforms, their mapping and evolution, soils and relationship to geology and biogeography) have not had similar public exposure. This is strange considering how fundamental to legal enquiries the location of a crime and its evolution are, as this article will demonstrate. This work aims to redress the balance by showing how geomorphology featured in one of the earliest works on forensic science methods, and has continued to play a role in the sociology, archaeology, criminalistics and geoforensics of crime. Traditional landscape interpretation from aerial photography is used to demonstrate how a geomorphological approach saved police time in the search for a clandestine grave. The application geomorphology has in military/humanitarian geography and environmental/engineering forensics is briefly discussed as these are also regularly reviewed in courts of law.

  15. Multimedia Forensics Is Not Computer Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Rainer; Freiling, Felix C.; Gloe, Thomas; Kirchner, Matthias

    The recent popularity of research on topics of multimedia forensics justifies reflections on the definition of the field. This paper devises an ontology that structures forensic disciplines by their primary domain of evidence. In this sense, both multimedia forensics and computer forensics belong to the class of digital forensics, but they differ notably in the underlying observer model that defines the forensic investigator’s view on (parts of) reality, which itself is not fully cognizable. Important consequences on the reliability of probative facts emerge with regard to available counter-forensic techniques: while perfect concealment of traces is possible for computer forensics, this level of certainty cannot be expected for manipulations of sensor data. We cite concrete examples and refer to established techniques to support our arguments.

  16. Specifying digital forensics: A forensics policy approach

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Carol Louise; Popovsky, Barbara; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we present an approach to digital forensics specification based on forensic policy definition. Our methodology borrows from computer security policy specification, which has accumulated a significant body of research over the past 30 years. We first define the process of specifying forensics properties through a forensics policy and then present an example application of the process. This approach lends itself to formal policy specification and verification, which would allow for more clarity and less ambiguity in the specification process

  17. Maternal Depression, Paternal Psychopathology, and Toddlers' Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Laura J.; Jennings, Kay Donahue; Kelley, Sue A.; Marshal, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article examined the effects of maternal depression during the postpartum period (Time 1) on the later behavior problems of toddlers (Time 3) and tested if this relationship was moderated by paternal psychopathology during toddlers' lives and/or mediated by maternal parenting behavior observed during mother-child interaction (Time 2). Of the…

  18. Paternal contribution to birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Magnus, P; Gjessing, H; Skrondal, A; Skjarven, R

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—Understanding causes of variation in birth weight has been limited by lack of sufficient sets of data that include paternal birth weight. The objective was to estimate risks of low birth weight dependent on parental birth weights and to estimate father-mother-offspring correlations for birth weight to explain the variability in birth weight in terms of effects of genes and environmental factors.
DESIGN—A family design, using trios of father-mother-firstborn child.
SETTING—The complete birth population in Norway 1967-98.
PARTICIPANTS—67 795 families.
MAIN RESULTS—The birth weight correlations were 0.226 for mother-child and 0.126 for father-child. The spousal correlation was low, 0.020. The relative risk of low birth weight in the first born child was 8.2 if both parents were low birth weight themselves, with both parents being above 4 kg as the reference. The estimate of heritability is about 0.25 for birth weight, under the assumption that cultural transmission on the paternal side has no effect on offspring prenatal growth.
CONCLUSIONS—Paternal birth weight is a significant and independent predictor of low birth weight in offspring. The estimate of the heritability of birth weight in this study is lower than previously estimated from data within one generation in the Norwegian population.


Keywords: birth weight; genes; paternal effects PMID:11707480

  19. Forensic entomology: a template for forensic acarology?

    PubMed

    Turner, Bryan

    2009-10-01

    Insects are used in a variety of ways in forensic science and the developing area of forensic acarology may have a similar range of potential. This short account summarises the main ways in which entomology currently contributes to forensic science and discusses to what extent acarology might also contribute in these areas.

  20. Revision of the SNPforID 34-plex forensic ancestry test: Assay enhancements, standard reference sample genotypes and extended population studies.

    PubMed

    Fondevila, M; Phillips, C; Santos, C; Freire Aradas, A; Vallone, P M; Butler, J M; Lareu, M V; Carracedo, A

    2013-01-01

    A revision of an established 34 SNP forensic ancestry test has been made by swapping the under-performing rs727811 component SNP with the highly informative rs3827760 that shows a near-fixed East Asian specific allele. We collated SNP variability data for the revised SNP set in 66 reference populations from 1000 Genomes and HGDP-CEPH panels and used this as reference data to analyse four U.S. populations showing a range of admixture patterns. The U.S. Hispanics sample in particular displayed heterogeneous values of co-ancestry between European, Native American and African contributors, likely to reflect in part, the way this disparate group is defined using cultural as well as population genetic parameters. The genotyping of over 700 U.S. population samples also provided the opportunity to thoroughly gauge peak mobility variation and peak height ratios observed from routine use of the single base extension chemistry of the 34-plex test. Finally, the genotyping of the widely used DNA profiling Standard Reference Material samples plus other control DNAs completes the audit of the 34-plex assay to allow forensic practitioners to apply this test more readily in their own laboratories. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. USE OF DNA TECHNOLOGY IN FORENSIC DENTISTRY

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; de Oliveira, Rogério Nogueira; de Oliveira, Fernando Toledo; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2007-01-01

    The established importance of Forensic Dentistry for human identification, mainly when there is little remaining material to perform such identification (e.g., in fires, explosions, decomposing bodies or skeletonized bodies), has led dentists working with forensic investigation to become more familiar with the new molecular biology techniques. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article presents a literature review referring to the main studies on Forensic Dentistry that involve the use of DNA for human identification, and makes an overview of the evolution of this technology in the last years, highlighting the importance of molecular biology in forensic sciences. PMID:19089123

  2. Use of DNA technology in forensic dentistry.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; de Oliveira, Rogério Nogueira; de Oliveira, Fernando Toledo; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2007-06-01

    The established importance of Forensic Dentistry for human identification, mainly when there is little remaining material to perform such identification (e.g., in fires, explosions, decomposing bodies or skeletonized bodies), has led dentists working with forensic investigation to become more familiar with the new molecular biology techniques. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article presents a literature review referring to the main studies on Forensic Dentistry that involve the use of DNA for human identification, and makes an overview of the evolution of this technology in the last years, highlighting the importance of molecular biology in forensic sciences.

  3. Forensic entomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Jens; Krettek, Roman; Zehner, Richard

    Necrophagous insects are important in the decomposition of cadavers. The close association between insects and corpses and the use of insects in medicocriminal investigations is the subject of forensic entomology. The present paper reviews the historical background of this discipline, important postmortem processes, and discusses the scientific basis underlying attempts to determine the time interval since death. Using medical techniques, such as the measurement of body temperature or analysing livor and rigor mortis, time since death can only be accurately measured for the first two or three days after death. In contrast, by calculating the age of immature insect stages feeding on a corpse and analysing the necrophagous species present, postmortem intervals from the first day to several weeks can be estimated. These entomological methods may be hampered by difficulties associated with species identification, but modern DNA techniques are contributing to the rapid and authoritative identification of necrophagous insects. Other uses of entomological data include the toxicological examination of necrophagous larvae from a corpse to identify and estimate drugs and toxicants ingested by the person when alive and the proof of possible postmortem manipulations. Forensic entomology may even help in investigations dealing with people who are alive but in need of care, by revealing information about cases of neglect.

  4. Identification of visual paternity cues in humans.

    PubMed

    Alvergne, Alexandra; Perreau, Fanny; Mazur, Allan; Mueller, Ulrich; Raymond, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how individuals identify their relatives has implications for the evolution of social behaviour. Kinship cues might be based on familiarity, but in the face of paternity uncertainty and costly paternal investment, other mechanisms such as phenotypic matching may have evolved. In humans, paternal recognition of offspring and subsequent discriminative paternal investment have been linked to father-offspring facial phenotypic similarities. However, the extent to which paternity detection is impaired by environmentally induced facial information is unclear. We used 27 portraits of fathers and their adult sons to quantify the level of paternity detection according to experimental treatments that manipulate the location, type and quantity of visible facial information. We found that (i) the lower part of the face, that changes most with development, does not contain paternity cues, (ii) paternity can be detected even if relational information within the face is disrupted and (iii) the signal depends on the presence of specific information rather than their number. Taken together, the results support the view that environmental effects have little influence on the detection of paternity using facial similarities. This suggests that the cognitive dispositions enabling the facial detection of kinship relationships ignore genetic irrelevant facial information.

  5. Consequences of paternal cocaine exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the potential neuroteratological effects of paternal cocaine (COC) exposure using the novel mouse model of inhalational drug administration. In this model, mice were trained to self-administer COC in multi-hour daily inhalation sessions reminiscent of crack binges. The controls included males pair-fed with COC-inhaling animals as well as ad-lib-fed males. All males were bred with drug-naive females. The newborn pups sired by COC-inhaling males had a reduced biparietal head diameter, suggesting a decreased cerebral volume. When the pups reached adulthood, their sustained visuo-spatial attention and spatial working memory were tested using a 5-arm maze paradigm. During the attention tests, the percentage of correct trials at the shortest stimulus duration employed in the study (0.5 s) was significantly lower for the male offspring of COC-inhaling fathers as compared to the offspring of both pair-fed and ad-lib-fed controls. For the females sired by COC-inhaling fathers, the deficit was observed at light stimulus durations of 0.5 and 0.75 s. Also, during the working memory tests, the male offspring of COC-inhaling fathers required more sessions than the offspring of either pair-fed or ad-lib-fed fathers to reach the selected criterion at retention intervals of 16 min and longer. The impairment of working memory in female offspring of COC-inhaling fathers was even stronger, as the offspring needed more sessions to reach the criterion as compared to their control counterparts, even at retention intervals as short as 4 min. These findings suggest that paternal COC abuse prior to coitus may impact the development of the offspring, particularly if they are females. We further showed that chronic COC exposure in male mice does not result in substantial breakage of spermatozoal DNA, but significantly alters expression of DNA methyltransferases 1 and 3a in the germ cell-rich seminiferous tubules of the testis. Since these enzymes are essential for

  6. Neurotoxin Exposure and MMPI Forensic Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Heidi A.

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) has been widely used as an objective personality test, in addition to being used in forensic assessments, especially involving claims of physical or emotional damage. It now appears that questions must be raised concerning the MMPI's forensic implications given the advent of new disease…

  7. No fallacies in the formulation of the paternity index

    PubMed Central

    Baur, M. P.; Elston, R. C.; Gürtler, H.; Henningsen, K.; Hummel, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Mayr, W.; Moris, J. W.; Niejenhuis, L.; Polesky, H.; Salmon, D.; Valentin, J.; Walkers, R.

    1986-01-01

    In a recent publication, Li and Chakravarti claim to have shown that the paternity index is not a likelihood ratio. They present a method of estimating the prior probability of paternity from a sample of previous court cases on the basis of exclusions and nonexclusions. They propose calculating the posterior probability on the basis of this estimated prior and the test result expressed as exclusion/nonexclusion. Their claim is wrong—the paternity index is a likelihood-ratio, that is, the ratio of the likelihood of the observation conditional on the two mutually exclusive hypotheses. Their proposed method of estimating the prior has been long known, has been applied to several samples, and is inferior (in terms of variance of the estimate) to maximum likelihood estimation based on all the phenotypic information available. Their proposed “new method” of calculating a posterior probability is based on the use of a less informative likelihood ratio 1/(1 – PE) instead of Gürtler's fully informative paternity index X/Y (Acta Med Leg Soc Liege 9:83–93, 1956), but is otherwise indentical to the Bayesian approach originally introduced by Essen-Möller in 1938. PMID:3766545

  8. Shadows of doubt: the uneasy incorporation of identification science into legal determination of paternity in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Sueann; Stern, Alexandra Minna

    2017-05-08

    The arrival of DNA paternity testing in the 1980s was met with great enthusiasm in the Brazilian courts. Yet, over the past two decades, Brazilian legal doctrine and jurisprudence have increasingly rejected DNA proof as the sine qua non for paternity cases. Instead, DNA paternity testing has generated mountains of litigation, as biological proof has been challenged by the argument that paternity is primarily "socio-affective". Leading family law specialists describe this new conception of paternity as an outcome of the "revolutionary" provisions of the 1988 Constitution, which recognizes the "pluralism" of family forms in modern society and guarantees equal family rights for all children. Without denying the significance of the constitution's dignitary framework, we show that new legal understandings of paternity represent less a paradigm shift than a continuation of longstanding historical tensions between biological and socio-cultural understandings of family and identity. In this article, we explore the development of biological and eventually genetic typing in Brazil, both of which had ties to the fields of criminology and race science. Our review suggests that techniques of biological identification, no matter how sophisticated or precise, were ineffective means for establishing identity, whether of individual personhood, as in the case of paternity, or national make-up. Instead, they became incorporated as supplemental methods into complex legal, social, and cultural decision-making around families.

  9. Expanding forensic science through forensic intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ribaux, Olivier; Talbot Wright, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    Research and Development ('R&D') in forensic science currently focuses on innovative technologies improving the efficiency of existing forensic processes, from the detection of marks and traces at the scene, to their presentation in Court. R&D approached from this perspective provides no response to doubts raised by recent criminological studies, which question the effective contribution of forensic science to crime reduction, and to policing in general. Traces (i.e. forensic case data), as remnants of criminal activity are collected and used in various forms of crime monitoring and investigation. The aforementioned doubts therefore need to be addressed by expressing how information is conveyed by traces in these processes. Modelling from this standpoint expands the scope of forensic science and provides new R&D opportunities. Twelve propositions for R&D are stated in order to pave the way. Copyright © 2014 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Paternal inheritance in mealybugs (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kol-Maimon, Hofit; Mendel, Zvi; Franco, José Carlos; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-10-01

    Mealybugs have a haplodiploid reproduction system, with paternal genome elimination (PGE); the males are diploid soon after fertilization, but during embryogenesis, the male paternal set of chromosomes becomes heterochromatic (HC) and therefore inactive. Previous studies have suggested that paternal genes can be passed on from mealybug males to their sons, but not necessarily by any son, to the next generation. We employed crosses between two mealybug species— Planococcus ficus (Signoret) and Planococcus citri (Risso)—and between two populations of P. ficus, which differ in their mode of pheromone attraction, in order to demonstrate paternal inheritance from males to F2 through F1 male hybrids. Two traits were monitored through three generations: mode of male pheromone attraction (pherotype) and sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) gene segment (genotype). Our results demonstrate that paternal inheritance in mealybugs can occur from males to their F2 offspring, through F1 males (paternal line). F2 backcrossed hybrid males expressed paternal pherotypes and ITS2 genotypes although their mother originated through a maternal population. Further results revealed other, hitherto unknown, aspects of inheritance in mealybugs, such as that hybridization between the two species caused absence of paternal traits in F2 hybrid females produced by F1 hybrid females. Furthermore, hybridization between the two species raised the question of whether unattracted males have any role in the interactions between P. ficus and P. citri.

  11. Teenage Paternity, Child Support, and Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirog-Good, Maureen A.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the relationship between teenage premarital paternity, child support enforcement, and delinquency. The non-random data were gathered from the Marian County, Indiana District Attorney's Office and Juvenile Court. Suggests that the early establishment of paternity should be pursued and that child support enforcement strategies should…

  12. 32 CFR 584.3 - Paternity claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (iv) Advise the soldier that a court order against him on the paternity claim, followed by a refusal... taken on the claim of paternity in the absence of a court order. The court order must identify the soldier in question as the father of the child. Also, the court order must direct that the soldier provide...

  13. Risk Factors for Paternal Physical Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shawna J.; Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Yookyong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study uses the developmental-ecological framework to examine a comprehensive set of paternal factors hypothesized to be linked to risk for paternal child abuse (PCA) among a diverse sample of fathers. Attention was given to fathers' marital status and their race/ethnicity (White, African American, and Hispanic). Methods: Interviews…

  14. How well do mating frequency and duration predict paternity success in the polygynandrous water strider Aquarius remigis?

    PubMed

    Vermette, Richard; Fairbairn, Daphne J

    2002-09-01

    The relationship between mating success and paternity success is a key component of sexual selection but has seldom been estimated for species in which both sexes mate with many partners (polygynandry). We used a modification of Parker's sterile male technique to measure this relationship for the water strider Aquarius remigis in 47 laboratory populations simulating natural conditions of polygynandry. We also tested the hypothesis that prolonged copulation, a characteristic of this species, enhances paternity success. Mating behavior and paternity success were assayed for four days while males and females freely interacted. Paternity success was also assayed for an additional 7 days when females were isolated from males. Mating success significantly predicted paternity success and accounted for < or = 36% of the variance. Copulation duration was negatively related to both mating success and paternity success and did not explain any of the residual variance in paternity success. Thus, we found no evidence that prolonged copulation functions as a paternity assurance strategy in this species. Comparisons of sterile and fertile males suggested that paternity success is directly influenced by the quantity of sperm transferred. Our results support previous studies that have used mating success to estimate sexual selection, but also highlight the potential importance of sperm competition and other postinsemination processes.

  15. Object-oriented Bayesian networks for paternity cases with allelic dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Hepler, Amanda B.; Weir, Bruce S.

    2008-01-01

    This study extends the current use of Bayesian networks by incorporating the effects of allelic dependencies in paternity calculations. The use of object-oriented networks greatly simplify the process of building and interpreting forensic identification models, allowing researchers to solve new, more complex problems. We explore two paternity examples: the most common scenario where DNA evidence is available from the alleged father, the mother and the child; a more complex casewhere DNA is not available from the alleged father, but is available from the alleged father’s brother. Object-oriented networks are built, using HUGIN, for each example which incorporate the effects of allelic dependence caused by evolutionary relatedness. PMID:19079769

  16. Fatal Chromobacterium violaceum septicaemia in northern Laos, a modified oxidase test and post-mortem forensic family G6PD analysis

    PubMed Central

    Slesak, Günther; Douangdala, Phouvieng; Inthalad, Saythong; Silisouk, Joy; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Sengduangphachanh, Amphonesavanh; Moore, Catrin E; Mayxay, Mayfong; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Newton, Paul N

    2009-01-01

    Background Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram negative facultative anaerobic bacillus, found in soil and stagnant water, that usually has a violet pigmented appearance on agar culture. It is rarely described as a human pathogen, mostly from tropical and subtropical areas. Case presentation A 53 year-old farmer died with Chromobacterium violaceum septicemia in Laos. A modified oxidase method was used to demonstrate that this violacious organism was oxidase positive. Forensic analysis of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase genotypes of his family suggest that the deceased patient did not have this possible predisposing condition. Conclusion C. violaceum infection should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with community-acquired septicaemia in tropical and subtropical areas. The apparently neglected but simple modified oxidase test may be useful in the oxidase assessment of other violet-pigmented organisms or of those growing on violet coloured agar. PMID:19640274

  17. Integrating Forensic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funkhouser, John; Deslich, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the implementation of forensic science in an integrated curriculum and discusses the advantages of this approach. Lists the forensic science course syllabi studied in three high schools. Discusses the unit on polymers in detail. (YDS)

  18. Microbial forensics: the next forensic challenge.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Murch, Randall; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    2005-11-01

    Pathogens and toxins can be converted to bioweapons and used to commit bioterrorism and biocrime. Because of the potential and relative ease of an attack using a bioweapon, forensic science needs to be prepared to assist in the investigation to bring perpetrators to justice and to deter future attacks. A new subfield of forensics--microbial forensics--has been created, which is focused on characterization of evidence from a bioterrorism act, biocrime, hoax, or an inadvertent release. Forensic microbiological investigations are essentially the same as any other forensic investigation regarding processing. They involve crime scene(s) investigation, chain of custody practices, evidence collection, handling and preservation, evidence shipping, analysis of evidence, interpretation of results, and court presentation. In addition to collecting and analyzing traditional forensic evidence, the forensic investigation will attempt to determine the etiology and identity of the causal agent, often in a similar fashion as in an epidemiologic investigation. However, for attribution, higher-resolution characterization is needed. The tools for attribution include genetic- and nongenetic-based assays and informatics to attempt to determine the unique source of a sample or at least eliminate some sources. In addition, chemical and physical assays may help determine the process used to prepare, store, or disseminate the bioweapon. An effective microbial forensics program will require development and/or validation of all aspects of the forensic investigative process, from sample collection to interpretation of results. Quality assurance (QA) and QC practices, comparable to those used by the forensic DNA science community, are being implemented. Lastly, partnerships with other laboratories will be requisite, because many of the necessary capabilities for analysis will not reside in the traditional forensic laboratory.

  19. Counseling Sexual Assault Victims Who Become Pregnant after the Assault: Benefits and Limitations of First-Trimester Paternity Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Lee P.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a patient with a history of infertility who, after becoming pregnant following a sexual assault, used chorionic villus sampling and DNA studies for paternity identification. Discusses risks and potential problems that accompany prenatal paternity testing. Ethical, moral, emotional, and religious factors should be considered in the…

  20. Female mate choice predicts paternity success in the absence of additive genetic variance for other female paternity bias mechanisms in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Collet, J M; Blows, M W

    2014-11-01

    After choosing a first mate, polyandrous females have access to a range of opportunities to bias paternity, such as repeating matings with the preferred male, facilitating fertilization from the best sperm or differentially investing in offspring according to their sire. Female ability to bias paternity after a first mating has been demonstrated in a few species, but unambiguous evidence remains limited by the access to complex behaviours, sperm storage organs and fertilization processes within females. Even when found at the phenotypic level, the potential evolution of any mechanism allowing females to bias paternity other than mate choice remains little explored. Using a large population of pedigreed females, we developed a simple test to determine whether there is additive genetic variation in female ability to bias paternity after a first, chosen, mating. We applied this method in the highly polyandrous Drosophila serrata, giving females the opportunity to successively mate with two males ad libitum. We found that despite high levels of polyandry (females mated more than once per day), the first mate choice was a significant predictor of male total reproductive success. Importantly, there was no detectable genetic variance in female ability to bias paternity beyond mate choice. Therefore, whether or not females can bias paternity before or after copulation, their role on the evolution of sexual male traits is likely to be limited to their first mate choice in D. serrata. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. High Correlated Paternity Leads to Negative Effects on Progeny Performance in Two Mediterranean Shrub Species.

    PubMed

    Nora, Sofia; Aparicio, Abelardo; Albaladejo, Rafael G

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat deterioration can promote changes in plant mating systems that subsequently may affect progeny performance, thereby conditioning plant recruitment for the next generation. However, very few studies yet tested mating system parameters other than outcrossing rates; and the direct effects of the genetic diversity of the pollen received by maternal plants (i.e. correlated paternity) has often been overlooked. In this study, we investigated the relation between correlated paternity and progeny performance in two common Mediterranean shrubs, Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus. To do so, we collected open-pollinated progeny from selected maternal plants, calculated mating system parameters using microsatellite genotyping and conducted sowing experiments under greenhouse and field conditions. Our results showed that some progeny fitness components were negatively affected by the high correlated paternity of maternal plants. In Myrtus communis, high correlated paternity had a negative effect on the proportion and timing of seedling emergence in the natural field conditions and in the greenhouse sowing experiment, respectively. In Pistacia lentiscus, seedling emergence time under field conditions was also negatively influenced by high correlated paternity and a progeny survival analysis in the field experiment showed greater mortality of seedlings from maternal plants with high correlated paternity. Overall, we found effects of correlated paternity on the progeny performance of Myrtus communis, a self-compatible species. Further, we also detected effects of correlated paternity on the progeny emergence time and survival in Pistacia lentiscus, an obligate outcrossed species. This study represents one of the few existing empirical examples which highlight the influence that correlated paternity may exert on progeny performance in multiple stages during early seedling growth.

  2. High Correlated Paternity Leads to Negative Effects on Progeny Performance in Two Mediterranean Shrub Species

    PubMed Central

    Nora, Sofia; Aparicio, Abelardo; Albaladejo, Rafael G.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat deterioration can promote changes in plant mating systems that subsequently may affect progeny performance, thereby conditioning plant recruitment for the next generation. However, very few studies yet tested mating system parameters other than outcrossing rates; and the direct effects of the genetic diversity of the pollen received by maternal plants (i.e. correlated paternity) has often been overlooked. In this study, we investigated the relation between correlated paternity and progeny performance in two common Mediterranean shrubs, Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus. To do so, we collected open-pollinated progeny from selected maternal plants, calculated mating system parameters using microsatellite genotyping and conducted sowing experiments under greenhouse and field conditions. Our results showed that some progeny fitness components were negatively affected by the high correlated paternity of maternal plants. In Myrtus communis, high correlated paternity had a negative effect on the proportion and timing of seedling emergence in the natural field conditions and in the greenhouse sowing experiment, respectively. In Pistacia lentiscus, seedling emergence time under field conditions was also negatively influenced by high correlated paternity and a progeny survival analysis in the field experiment showed greater mortality of seedlings from maternal plants with high correlated paternity. Overall, we found effects of correlated paternity on the progeny performance of Myrtus communis, a self-compatible species. Further, we also detected effects of correlated paternity on the progeny emergence time and survival in Pistacia lentiscus, an obligate outcrossed species. This study represents one of the few existing empirical examples which highlight the influence that correlated paternity may exert on progeny performance in multiple stages during early seedling growth. PMID:27835658

  3. Forensic medicine in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Mghirbi, T; Aissaoui, A; Turki, E; Chadly, A

    2004-12-02

    Tunisia is an Arab northern African country which counts 10 millions citizens. In Tunisia, there is a small number of forensic practitioners (20) distributed over four University and two regional Hospitals. Forensic activity is under the supervision of Tunisian Ministry of Public Health. The first forensic medicine department was set up in the Faculty of Medicine of Tunis (the capital) in the sixties, after which three other departments were founded in medical faculties and in their respective university hospitals (Sfax, Sousse and Monastir). These departments provide forensic medical education and research beside their daily practice. Forensic medical practice is divided in forensic pathology and clinical forensic medicine. In forensic pathology, we have to deal with violent or suspected deaths beside natural deaths. The clinical forensic medicine activity covers mainly forensic traumatology. Other fields of forensic sciences are in progress and ought to be developed all over the country. A forensic medical curriculum is provided in the four Tunisian Faculties of Medicine and in their University Hospitals. Nevertheless, the number of trainees remains small and could not currently satisfy the country needs.

  4. Establishing Paternity: An Analysis of Cases from Two Arizona Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols-Casebolt, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Used data from sample of 877 child support paternity cases to determine what case characteristics influenced likelihood of successfully establishing paternity. Results indicated demographic differences between cases with and without paternity established but these differences were much less important to establishing paternity than obtaining…

  5. Genetic structure of Tibetan populations in Gansu revealed by forensic STR loci

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong-Bing; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Wang, Jiang; Tao, Xiaolan; Shang, Lei; Wen, Shao-Qing; Du, Qiajun; Deng, Qiongying; Xu, Bingying; Huang, Ying; Wang, Hong-Dan; Li, Shujin; Bin Cong; Ma, Liying; Jin, Li; Krause, Johannes; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The origin and diversification of Sino-Tibetan speaking populations have been long-standing hot debates. However, the limited genetic information of Tibetan populations keeps this topic far from clear. In the present study, we genotyped 15 forensic autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) from 803 unrelated Tibetan individuals from Gansu Province (635 from Gannan and 168 from Tianzhu) in northwest China. We combined these data with published dataset to infer a detailed population affinities and genetic substructure of Sino-Tibetan populations. Our results revealed Tibetan populations in Gannan and Tianzhu are genetically very similar with Tibetans from other regions. The Tibetans in Tianzhu have received more genetic influence from surrounding lowland populations. The genetic structure of Sino-Tibetan populations was strongly correlated with linguistic affiliations. Although the among-population variances are relatively small, the genetic components for Tibetan, Lolo-Burmese, and Han Chinese were quite distinctive, especially for the Deng, Nu, and Derung of Lolo-Burmese. Han Chinese but not Tibetans are suggested to share substantial genetic component with southern natives, such as Tai-Kadai and Hmong-Mien speaking populations, and with other lowland East Asian populations, which implies there might be extensive gene flow between those lowland groups and Han Chinese after Han Chinese were separated from Tibetans. The dataset generated in present study is also valuable for forensic identification and paternity tests in China. PMID:28112227

  6. Species detection using HyBeacon(®) probe technology: Working towards rapid onsite testing in non-human forensic and food authentication applications.

    PubMed

    Dawnay, Nick; Hughes, Rebecca; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Duxbury, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Identifying individual species or determining species' composition in an unknown sample is important for a variety of forensic applications. Food authentication, monitoring illegal trade in endangered species, forensic entomology, sexual assault case work and counter terrorism are just some of the fields that can require the detection of the biological species present. Traditional laboratory based approaches employ a wide variety of tools and technologies and exploit a number of different species specific traits including morphology, molecular differences and immuno-chemical analyses. A large number of these approaches require laboratory based apparatus and results can take a number of days to be returned to investigating authorities. Having a presumptive test for rapid identification could lead to savings in terms of cost and time and allow sample prioritisation if confirmatory testing in a laboratory is required later. This model study describes the development of an assay using a single HyBeacon(®) probe and melt curve analyses allowing rapid screening and authentication of food products labelled as Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Exploiting melt curve detection of species specific SNP sites on the COI gene the test allows detection of a target species (Atlantic cod) and closely related species which may be used as substitutes. The assay has been designed for use with the Field Portable ParaDNA system, a molecular detection platform for non-expert users. The entire process from sampling to result takes approximately 75min. Validation studies were performed on both single source genomic DNA, mixed genomic DNA and commercial samples. Data suggests the assay has a lower limit of detection of 31 pg DNA. The specificity of the assay to Atlantic cod was measured by testing highly processed food samples including frozen, defrosted and cooked fish fillets as well as fish fingers, battered fish fillet and fish pie. Ninety-six (92.7%) of all Atlantic cod food products

  7. A self-consistent approach to paternity and parental effort.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Alasdair I; McNamara, John M

    2002-01-01

    We review the relationship between optimal parental effort and paternity, and emphasize the need for a self-consistent approach. A fundamental consistency condition is what we refer to as the conservation of paternity. Every offspring has exactly one father. If a male has a paternity of less than unity, then another male or other males must have gained the lost paternity. Our approach also emphasizes that paternity emerges as the result of interactions between males and females. From this viewpoint, if paternity changes it is because some aspect of the interaction changes, and the correlation between effort and paternity depends on the aspect that has changed. This has implications for comparative analyses of paternity. The conclusions that are drawn about the correlation between effort and paternity within a population depend on, for example, the types of male in the population and how their abilities are correlated. It is easy to construct models that predict negative correlations between effort and paternity. PMID:11958703

  8. Forensic evaluations in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Chadda, R. K.

    2013-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is an important subspecialty of psychiatry. Forensic psychiatrists play an important role in the society in assisting the judiciary in many complicated cases. In India, forensic psychiatry work is undertaken mostly by the general psychiatrists. Forensic psychiatric assessments are often associated with an element of anxiety or fear for a young psychiatrist. The present paper aims at familiarizing the readers with forensic evaluation in various situations so that they are able to carry out the assessments in real-life situations comfortably. Various steps of forensic assessment in different situations are discussed in the background of real-life cases. Assessment areas include criminal responsibility, fitness to plead, issue of guardianship, assessment of mental status, testamentary capacity and others. The paper gives some general guidelines on forensic psychiatric assessment in practical situations in our country. The readers are advised to refer to the standard textbooks and the Indian law for further details. PMID:24459315

  9. Molecular analysis of paternity shows promiscuous mating in female humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, Borowski).

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, P J; Palsbøll, P J

    1997-01-01

    It is widely assumed that the mating system of the humpback whale. Magaptera novaeangliae, is similar to that of most mammals in that it represents some form of polygyny or promiscuity, but this cannot be tested without observations of copulation or data on paternity of offspring. Microsatellite DNA markers were used to examine the paternity of calves born to individually identified mature female humpback whales from the Gulf of Maine. Skin biopsies were obtained from three females, and several (range: three to five) of their known offspring. Multiple paternity of offspring, indicated by the presence of at least three different paternal alleles, was evident in all three females at either three or four of the six microsatellite loci surveyed. Such promiscuous mating is expected given current knowledge of the social ecology of this species. It is also consistent with resightings of individually identified female humpbacks with different male associates during two or more breeding seasons. PMID:9061965

  10. Avian paternal care had dinosaur origin.

    PubMed

    Varricchio, David J; Moore, Jason R; Erickson, Gregory M; Norell, Mark A; Jackson, Frankie D; Borkowski, John J

    2008-12-19

    The repeated discovery of adult dinosaurs in close association with egg clutches leads to speculation over the type and extent of care exhibited by these extinct animals for their eggs and young. To assess parental care in Cretaceous troodontid and oviraptorid dinosaurs, we examined clutch volume and the bone histology of brooding adults. In comparison to four archosaur care regressions, the relatively large clutch volumes of Troodon, Oviraptor, and Citipati scale most closely with a bird-paternal care model. Clutch-associated adults lack the maternal and reproductively associated histologic features common to extant archosaurs. Large clutch volumes and a suite of reproductive features shared only with birds favor paternal care, possibly within a polygamous mating system. Paternal care in both troodontids and oviraptorids indicates that this care system evolved before the emergence of birds and represents birds' ancestral condition. In extant birds and over most adult sizes, paternal and biparental care correspond to the largest and smallest relative clutch volumes, respectively.

  11. Thinking forensics: Cognitive science for forensic practitioners.

    PubMed

    Edmond, Gary; Towler, Alice; Growns, Bethany; Ribeiro, Gianni; Found, Bryan; White, David; Ballantyne, Kaye; Searston, Rachel A; Thompson, Matthew B; Tangen, Jason M; Kemp, Richard I; Martire, Kristy

    2017-03-01

    Human factors and their implications for forensic science have attracted increasing levels of interest across criminal justice communities in recent years. Initial interest centred on cognitive biases, but has since expanded such that knowledge from psychology and cognitive science is slowly infiltrating forensic practices more broadly. This article highlights a series of important findings and insights of relevance to forensic practitioners. These include research on human perception, memory, context information, expertise, decision-making, communication, experience, verification, confidence, and feedback. The aim of this article is to sensitise forensic practitioners (and lawyers and judges) to a range of potentially significant issues, and encourage them to engage with research in these domains so that they may adapt procedures to improve performance, mitigate risks and reduce errors. Doing so will reduce the divide between forensic practitioners and research scientists as well as improve the value and utility of forensic science evidence. Copyright © 2016 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple paternity analysis in the thornback ray Raja clavata L.

    PubMed

    Chevolot, Malia; Ellis, Jim R; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D; Stam, Wytze T; Olsen, Jeanine L

    2007-01-01

    Skates (Rajidae) are characterized by slow growth rate, low fecundity, and late maturity and are thus considered to be vulnerable to exploitation. Although understanding mating systems and behavior are important for long-term conservation and fisheries management, this aspect of life history is poorly understood in skates. Using 5 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci, we analyzed egg clutches collected from 4 female Raja clavata captured in the wild to test for multiple paternity. Using the reconstructed multilocus genotypes method to explain the progeny genotype array, we showed that all 4 clutches were sired by a minimum of 4-6 fathers and, thus, female thornback rays are polyandrous. Whether polyandry in R. clavata is natural or a consequence of overexploitation remains uncertain. This is the first report of multiple paternity in a rajiform species and any oviparous elasmobranch.

  13. Maternal Depression, Paternal Psychopathology, and Toddlers’ Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Laura J.; Jennings, Kay Donahue; Kelley, Sue A.; Marshal, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article examined the effects of maternal depression during the postpartum period (Time 1) on the later behavior problems of toddlers (Time 3) and tested if this relationship was moderated by paternal psychopathology during toddlers’ lives and/or or mediated by maternal parenting behavior observed during mother–child interaction (Time 2). Of the 101 mothers who participated in this longitudinal study with their toddlers, 51 had never experienced an episode of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and 50 had experienced an episode of MDD during the first 18 months of their toddlers’ lives. Maternal depression at Time 1 was significantly associated with toddlers’ externalizing and internalizing behavior problems only when paternal psychopathology was present. As predicted, maternal negativity at Time 2 was found to mediate the relationship between maternal depression at Time 1 and toddlers’ externalizing behavior problems at Time 3. PMID:19130357

  14. A set of autosomal multiple InDel markers for forensic application and population genetic analysis in the Chinese Xinjiang Hui group.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tong; Guo, Yuxin; Chen, Ling; Fang, Yating; Tai, Yunchun; Zhou, Yongsong; Qiu, Pingming; Zhu, Bofeng

    2018-03-13

    In recent years, insertion/deletion (InDel) markers have become a promising and useful supporting tool in forensic identification cases and biogeographic research field. In this study, 30 InDel loci were explored to reveal the genetic diversities and genetic relationships between Chinese Xinjiang Hui group and the 25 previously reported populations using various biostatistics methods such as forensic statistical parameter analysis, phylogenetic reconstruction, multi-dimensional scaling, principal component analysis, and STRUCTURE analysis. No deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium tests were found at all 30 loci in the Chinese Xinjiang Hui group. The observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.1971 (HLD118) to 0.5092 (HLD92), 0.2222 (HLD118) to 0.5000 (HLD6), respectively. The cumulative probability of exclusion and combined power of discrimination were 0.988849 and 0.99999999999378, respectively, which indicated that these 30 loci could be qualified for personal identification and used as complementary genetic markers for paternity tests in forensic cases. The results of present research based on the different methods of population genetic analysis revealed that the Chinese Xinjiang Hui group had close relationships with most Chinese groups, especially Han populations. In spite of this, for a better understanding of genetic background of the Chinese Xinjiang Hui group, more molecular genetic markers such as ancestry informative markers, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and copy number variations will be conducted in future studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spousal violence and paternal disinvestment among Tsimane' forager-horticulturalists.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael; Winking, Jeffrey; Tayo, Basilio Vie

    2011-01-01

    We develop and test a conceptual model of factors influencing the likelihood of physical wife abuse. The paternal disinvestment model emphasizes that spousal conflict over resource use results from men's attempts to increase individual fitness at a cost to the family (e.g., through pursuit of extramarital affairs). We propose that men use violence to control women's responses to the diversion of resources away from the family: to quell women's objections to male disinvestment, maintain women's parental investment, and to dissuade women from pursuing relationships with other men. Interviews were conducted among men and women to determine rates of violence and demographic and behavioral covariates. Structural equation modeling and generalized estimating equations analyses were used to test predictions derived from the model. We also collected data on frequent complaints in marriage and women's perceptions of arguments precipitating violence. Over 85% of women experienced physical wife abuse (n = 49). Indicators of paternal disinvestment positively covary with indicators of marital strife and with rates of wife abuse. The wife's age, matrilocal residence, and presence of joint dependent offspring decrease the likelihood of violence through direct and indirect routes. Wife abuse is linked to the importance of paternal investment in human families, and is a means by which men control women's responses to a dual reproductive strategy of familial investment and pursuit of extramarital sexual relationships. This framework is more general than traditional sociological and evolutionary perspectives emphasizing patriarchy and men's sexual jealousy, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Developmental Validation of the ParaDNA® Screening System - A presumptive test for the detection of DNA on forensic evidence items.

    PubMed

    Dawnay, Nick; Stafford-Allen, Beccy; Moore, Dave; Blackman, Stephen; Rendell, Paul; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack; Kallifatidis, Beatrice; Mendel, Julian; Mills, DeEtta K; Nagy, Randy; Wells, Simon

    2014-07-01

    Current assessment of whether a forensic evidence item should be submitted for STR profiling is largely based on the personal experience of the Crime Scene Investigator (CSI) and the submissions policy of the law enforcement authority involved. While there are chemical tests that can infer the presence of DNA through the detection of biological stains, the process remains mostly subjective and leads to many samples being submitted that give no profile or not being submitted although DNA is present. The ParaDNA(®) Screening System was developed to address this issue. It consists of a sampling device, pre-loaded reaction plates and detection instrument. The test uses direct PCR with fluorescent HyBeacon™ detection of PCR amplicons to identify the presence and relative amount of DNA on an evidence item and also provides a gender identification result in approximately 75 minutes. This simple-to-use design allows objective data to be acquired by both DNA analyst and non-specialist personnel, to enable a more informed submission decision to be made. The developmental validation study described here tested the sensitivity, reproducibility, accuracy, inhibitor tolerance, and performance of the ParaDNA Screening System on a range of mock evidence items. The data collected demonstrates that the ParaDNA Screening System identifies the presence of DNA on a variety of evidence items including blood, saliva and touch DNA items. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of the elastic modulus, tensile and flexural strength of five skull simulant materials for impact testing of a forensic skin/skull/brain model.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Chun Li, Kai; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Conducting in vitro research for forensic, impact and injury simulation modelling generally involves the use of a skull simulant with mechanical properties similar to those found in the human skull. For this study epoxy resin, fibre filled epoxy resin, 3D-printing filaments (PETG, PLA) and self-cure acrylic denture base resin were used to fabricate the specimens (n=20 per material group), according to ISO 527-2 IBB and ISO20795-1. Tensile and flexural testing in a universal testing machine was used to measure their tensile/flexural elastic modulus and strength. The results showed that the epoxy resin and fibre filled epoxy resin had similar tensile elastic moduli (no statistical significant difference) with lower values observed for the other materials. The fibre filled epoxy resin had a considerably higher flexural elastic modulus and strength, possibly attributed to the presence of fibres. Of the simulants tested, epoxy resin had an elastic modulus and flexural strength close to that of mean human skull values reported in the literature, and thus can be considered as a suitable skull simulant for a skin/skull/brain model for lower impact forces that do not exceed the fracture stress. For higher impact forces a 3D printing filament (PLA) may be a more suitable skull simulant material, due to its closer match to fracture stresses found in human skull bone. Influencing factors were also anisotropy, heterogeneity and viscoelasticity of human skull bone and simulant specimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Paternal Age Alters Social Development in Offspring.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Magdalena; Haworth, Claire M A; Ronald, Angelica; Krapohl, Eva; Happé, Francesca; Mill, Jonathan; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Fernandes, Cathy; Reichenberg, Abraham; Rijsdijk, Frühling

    2017-05-01

    Advanced paternal age (APA) at conception has been linked with autism and schizophrenia in offspring, neurodevelopmental disorders that affect social functioning. The current study explored the effects of paternal age on social development in the general population. We used multilevel growth modeling to investigate APA effects on socioemotional development from early childhood until adolescence, as measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) in the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS) sample. We also investigated genetic and environmental underpinnings of the paternal age effects on development, using the Additive genetics, Common environment, unique Environment (ACE) and gene-environment (GxE) models. In the general population, both very young and advanced paternal ages were associated with altered trajectory of social development (intercept: p = .01; slope: p = .03). No other behavioral domain was affected by either young or advanced age at fatherhood, suggesting specificity of paternal age effects. Increased importance of genetic factors in social development was recorded in the offspring of older but not very young fathers, suggesting distinct underpinnings of the paternal age effects at these two extremes. Our findings highlight that the APA-related deficits that lead to autism and schizophrenia are likely continuously distributed in the population. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Paternity and inheritance of wealth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, John

    1981-06-01

    One of the oldest conjectures in anthropology is that men transfer wealth to their sister's son when the biological paternity of their `own' children is in doubt1-12. Because maternity is certain, a man is necessarily related to his sister's son and his brother (see Fig. 1). It is argued here that relatedness to male heirs can be assured by passing wealth to sister's sons or down a line of brothers, whether the prevailing kinship system reckons those brothers matrilineally or patrilineally. It is also argued that when several transfers of wealth are considered, a man's likelihood of being cuckolded need not be unrealistically high13 for his successive matrilineal heirs to be more related to him than his successive patrilineal heirs (see Fig. 2). Cross-cultural data on sister's son/brother inheritance14 and frequency of extramarital sex for females15 support the hypothesis that men tend to transmit wealth to their sister's son and/or brother when the probability that their putative children are their genetic children is relatively low.

  20. Moderate financial incentive does not appear to influence the P300 Concealed Information Test (CIT) effect in the Complex Trial Protocol (CTP) version of the CIT in a forensic scenario, while affecting P300 peak latencies and behavior.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, J Peter; Sitar, Evan; Wasserman, Joshua; Ward, Anne

    2018-03-01

    Previous research indicated that the skin conductance response (SCR) of the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) in the Concealed Information Test (CIT) is typically increased in subjects who are financially and otherwise incentivized to defeat the CIT (the paradoxical "motivational impairment" effect). This is not the case for RT-based CITs, nor for P300 tests based on the 3-stimulus protocol or Complex Trial Protocol for detection of cognitive malingering (although these are not the same as forensic CITs). The present report extends earlier studies of malingerers by running five groups of subjects (15-16 per group yielding 78 total) in a mock crime (forensic) scenario: paid (to beat the test) and unpaid, instructed and uninstructed, and simply guilty. There was no evidence that the "CIT effect" (probe-minus-irrelevant P300 differences) differed among groups, although behavioral differences among groups were seen. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Verification of private paternity analysis at the Institutes of Legal Medicine in Greifswald, Jena, and Kiel].

    PubMed

    von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Simeoni, Eva; Poetsch, Micaela; Banaschak, Sibylle; Mályusz, Victoria; Schwark, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    This investigation presents the retrospective evaluation of paternity testing done as a "second opinion" in the last four years at the Institutes of Legal Medicine in Jena, Greifswald, and Kiel (Germany). All analyses were court-ordered and were preceded by paternity tests of "private" labs. The cases were selected in chronological order without any further exclusion criteria. A total of 59 cases, in which "private" laboratories from all regions of Germany had already performed paternity tests, were evaluated. In all cases, analyses were mainly done by PCR-based STR-typing (8 - 20 STRs). 18 % of the investigated "private" expert opinions showed a false determination of alleles. In two cases, paternity was wrongly confirmed or excluded. The reasons for the mistakes of private laboratories were hard to analyse, since most labs did not provide sufficient information (e.g. alleles, kits and chemicals used) in the written test results. In several cases, not even the typing results were revealed. Furthermore, in paternity testing of "private" labs the identity of the persons examined was usually not assured (e. g. by photo documentation or fingerprints) adding to the problem of insufficient test result reliability.

  2. The Effect of Paternal Age on Offspring Intelligence and Personality when Controlling for Parental Trait Levels

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Ruben C.; Penke, Lars; Johnson, Wendy; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Paternal age at conception has been found to predict the number of new genetic mutations. We examined the effect of father’s age at birth on offspring intelligence, head circumference and personality traits. Using the Minnesota Twin Family Study sample we tested paternal age effects while controlling for parents’ trait levels measured with the same precision as offspring’s. From evolutionary genetic considerations we predicted a negative effect of paternal age on offspring intelligence, but not on other traits. Controlling for parental intelligence (IQ) had the effect of turning an initially positive association non-significantly negative. We found paternal age effects on offspring IQ and Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire Absorption, but they were not robustly significant, nor replicable with additional covariates. No other noteworthy effects were found. Parents’ intelligence and personality correlated with their ages at twin birth, which may have obscured a small negative effect of advanced paternal age (<1% of variance explained) on intelligence. We discuss future avenues for studies of paternal age effects and suggest that stronger research designs are needed to rule out confounding factors involving birth order and the Flynn effect. PMID:24587224

  3. Higher levels of multiple paternities increase seedling survival in the long-lived tree Eucalyptus gracilis.

    PubMed

    Breed, Martin F; Christmas, Matthew J; Lowe, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees advances our understanding of how local environments affect seed quality, and thereby helps to predict when inbreeding or multiple paternities should impact on fitness. Indeed, for species that demonstrate inbreeding avoidance, multiple paternities (i.e. the number of male parents per half-sib family) should still vary and regulate fitness more than inbreeding--named here as the 'constrained inbreeding hypothesis'. We test this hypothesis in Eucalyptus gracilis, a predominantly insect-pollinated tree. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development.

  4. The unexpected but understandable dynamics of mating, paternity and paternal care in the ocellated wrasse.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, Suzanne H; Heckman, Kellie L

    2010-01-07

    Although theory generally predicts that males should reduce paternal care in response to cues that predict increased sperm competition and decreased paternity, empirical patterns are equivocal. Some studies have found the predicted decrease in male care with increased sperm competition, while even more studies report no effect of paternity or sperm competition on male care. Here, we report the first example, to our knowledge, of paternal care increasing with the risk and intensity of sperm competition, in the ocellated wrasse (Symphodus ocellatus). Theory also predicts that if paternal care varies and is important to female fitness, female choice among males and male indicators traits of expected paternal care should evolve. Despite a non-random distribution of mating success among nests, we found no evidence for female choice among parental males. Finally, we document the highest published levels of extra-pair paternity for a species with exclusive and obligate male care: genetic paternity analyses revealed cuckoldry at 100 per cent of nests and 28 per cent of all offspring were not sired by the male caring for them. While not predicted by any existing theory, these unexpected reproductive patterns become understandable if we consider how male and female mating and parental care interact simultaneously in this and probably many other species.

  5. The unexpected but understandable dynamics of mating, paternity and paternal care in the ocellated wrasse

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Suzanne H.; Heckman, Kellie L.

    2010-01-01

    Although theory generally predicts that males should reduce paternal care in response to cues that predict increased sperm competition and decreased paternity, empirical patterns are equivocal. Some studies have found the predicted decrease in male care with increased sperm competition, while even more studies report no effect of paternity or sperm competition on male care. Here, we report the first example, to our knowledge, of paternal care increasing with the risk and intensity of sperm competition, in the ocellated wrasse (Symphodus ocellatus). Theory also predicts that if paternal care varies and is important to female fitness, female choice among males and male indicators traits of expected paternal care should evolve. Despite a non-random distribution of mating success among nests, we found no evidence for female choice among parental males. Finally, we document the highest published levels of extra-pair paternity for a species with exclusive and obligate male care: genetic paternity analyses revealed cuckoldry at 100 per cent of nests and 28 per cent of all offspring were not sired by the male caring for them. While not predicted by any existing theory, these unexpected reproductive patterns become understandable if we consider how male and female mating and parental care interact simultaneously in this and probably many other species. PMID:19812085

  6. Accuracy Rates of Ancestry Estimation by Forensic Anthropologists Using Identified Forensic Cases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard M; Parks, Connie L; Richard, Adam H

    2017-07-01

    A common task in forensic anthropology involves the estimation of the ancestry of a decedent by comparing their skeletal morphology and measurements to skeletons of individuals from known geographic groups. However, the accuracy rates of ancestry estimation methods in actual forensic casework have rarely been studied. This article uses 99 forensic cases with identified skeletal remains to develop accuracy rates for ancestry estimations conducted by forensic anthropologists. The overall rate of correct ancestry estimation from these cases is 90.9%, which is comparable to most research-derived rates and those reported by individual practitioners. Statistical tests showed no significant difference in accuracy rates depending on examiner education level or on the estimated or identified ancestry. More recent cases showed a significantly higher accuracy rate. The incorporation of metric analyses into the ancestry estimate in these cases led to a higher accuracy rate. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. The relationship between cadaver, living and forensic stature: A review of current knowledge and a test using a sample of adult Portuguese males.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Marinho, Luísa; Albanese, John

    2016-01-01

    The use of cadaver length and forensic stature as a proxy for living standing height has not been scrutinized in detail. In this paper we present a brief review of the current knowledge on the relationship between cadaver, living and forensic stature; assess the magnitude and nature of the differences between these three measures of stature; and investigate the potential impact of these differences in forensic contexts. The study uses a sample of 84 males who were autopsied in 2008 at the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences (Porto, Portugal), where stature data were collected from three different sources: cadaver stature was obtained from the corpse prior to autopsy, living stature was obtained from military conscription records and forensic stature was obtained from national citizenship identification card records. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA and linear regression are used to analyze the data. The results show that cadaver stature is the highest measure, followed by forensic and by living stature, and the difference between cadaver and living stature is greater than expected (4.3cm). Results also show considerable individual variation in the differences between the three measures of stature and that differences decrease with stature, although only slightly. This study has shown that the difference between cadaver and living stature is greater than previously thought and suggests that previously reported correction factors are a minimum rather than a mean correction. Forensic stature is likely to be incorrectly estimated and can jeopardize identification if methods estimate living rather than forensic stature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Forensic odontology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Duane E

    2014-06-01

    This article is an overview of the field of forensic odontology, highlighting historical cases, with an emphasis on California cases, and briefly discussing some of the current techniques and issues in the field. As with all fields of dentistry, forensic odontology is adapting to new methodologies, changes in techniques, research findings and legal issues. Today's dentist who works in the forensic arena must face and understand these changes and advancements.

  9. A call for more science in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne; Sah, Sunita; Albright, Thomas D; Gates, S James; Denton, M Bonner; Casadevall, Arturo

    2018-05-01

    Forensic science is critical to the administration of justice. The discipline of forensic science is remarkably complex and includes methodologies ranging from DNA analysis to chemical composition to pattern recognition. Many forensic practices developed under the auspices of law enforcement and were vetted primarily by the legal system rather than being subjected to scientific scrutiny and empirical testing. Beginning in the 1990s, exonerations based on DNA-related methods revealed problems with some forensic disciplines, leading to calls for major reforms. This process generated a National Academy of Science report in 2009 that was highly critical of many forensic practices and eventually led to the establishment of the National Commission for Forensic Science (NCFS) in 2013. The NCFS was a deliberative body that catalyzed communication between nonforensic scientists, forensic scientists, and other stakeholders in the legal community. In 2017, despite continuing problems with forensic science, the Department of Justice terminated the NCFS. Just when forensic science needs the most support, it is getting the least. We urge the larger scientific community to come to the aid of our forensic colleagues by advocating for urgently needed research, testing, and financial support.

  10. Advantages of analyzing postmortem brain samples in routine forensic drug screening-Case series of three non-natural deaths tested positive for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

    PubMed

    Mardal, Marie; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Thomsen, Ragnar; Linnet, Kristian

    2017-09-01

    Three case reports are presented, including autopsy findings and toxicological screening results, which were tested positive for the potent hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). LSD and its main metabolites were quantified in brain tissue and femoral blood, and furthermore hematoma and urine when available. LSD, its main metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (oxo-HO-LSD), and iso-LSD were quantified in biological samples according to a previously published procedure involving liquid-liquid extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). LSD was measured in the brain tissue of all presented cases at a concentration level from 0.34-10.8μg/kg. The concentration level in the target organ was higher than in peripheral blood. Additional psychoactive compounds were quantified in blood and brain tissue, though all below toxic concentration levels. The cause of death in case 1 was collision-induced brain injury, while it was drowning in case 2 and 3 and thus not drug intoxication. However, the toxicological findings could help explain the decedent's inability to cope with brain injury or drowning incidents. The presented findings could help establish reference concentrations in brain samples and assist in interpretation of results from forensic drug screening in brain tissue. This is to the author's knowledge the first report of LSD, iso-LSD, and oxo-HO-LSD measured in brain tissue samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Forensic botany: usability of bryophyte material in forensic studies.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Viivi; Korpelainen, Helena; Kostamo, Kirsi

    2007-10-25

    Two experiments were performed to test the relevance of bryophyte (Plantae, Bryophyta) material for forensic studies. The first experiment was conducted to reveal if, and how well, plant fragments attach to footwear in general. In the test, 16 persons walked outdoors wearing rubber boots or hiking boots. After 24h of use outdoors the boots were carefully cleaned, and all plant fragments were collected. Afterwards, all plant material was examined to identify the species. In the second experiment, fresh material of nine bryophyte species was kept in a shed in adverse conditions for 18 months, after which DNA was extracted and subjected to genotyping to test the quality of the material. Both experiments give support for the usability of bryophyte material in forensic studies. The bryophyte fragments become attached to shoes, where they remain even after the wearer walks on a dry road for several hours. Bryophyte DNA stays intact, allowing DNA profiling after lengthy periods following detachment from the original plant source. Based on these experiments, and considering the fact that many bryophytes are clonal plants, we propose that bryophytes are among the most usable plants to provide botanical evidence for forensic investigations.

  12. [Forensic medicine and the overlap with pathology].

    PubMed

    Riepert, T

    2010-07-01

    Forensic medicine incorporates research, teaching and professional service. In the routine practice this encompasses interdisciplinary cooperation with physicians, natural scientists and the legal profession. Lectures in forensic medicine include the correct performance of an external examination of corpses, which every physician must be capable of, just as medical questions and the evidential documentation of injuries. Clinical forensic medicine encompasses the examination and documentation of living victims of physical and/or sexual violence. For further training to become a specialist for forensic medicine it is mandatory to undertake a 6-month training period in pathology. Fatalities with an unclear or unnatural manner of death must be registered with the police. On suspicion of third party involvement the public prosecutor will request a legal autopsy, which is carried out and documented by two physicians in accordance with the penal code. Imaging procedures are standard for an autopsy. Extensive samples are taken for additional testing, such as toxicological and molecular biological investigations.

  13. Forensic seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thirlaway, H. I. S.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty years ago, politicians, concerned a the slow progress of negotiations to stop nuclear weapons testing, described the state of seismology as being in the equivalent of the Stone Age. this assessment spurred the beginning of research and development at the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment near the village of Aldermaston, England. the object was to establish the limits of seismology for the detection and identification of underground explosions against a background of earthquakes. Thereby, verification that there was compliance with a treaty to ban further nuclear tests could be assessed before making political decisions. Negotiations now taking place in Geneva between the Soviet Union, the United States, and the United Kingdom are aimed at such a treaty.  

  14. Advancing paternal age and simplex autism.

    PubMed

    Puleo, Connor Morrow; Schmeidler, James; Reichenberg, Abraham; Kolevzon, Alexander; Soorya, Latha V; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Silverman, Jeremy M

    2012-07-01

    De novo events appear more common in female and simplex autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cases and may underlie greater ASD risk in older fathers' offspring. This study examined whether advancing paternal age predicts an increase in simplex (n = 90) versus multiplex ASD cases (n = 587) in 677 participants (340 families). Whether or not controlling for maternal age, results support a significant interaction of linear paternal age and sex of the child on simplex family type. Female ASD cases were significantly more likely to be simplex as paternal age increased, but the increase for males was not significant. Findings suggest that ASD arising from non-familial, de novo events may be far less prominent in males than in females, even if more prevalent in males, due to the substantially larger number of male cases attributable to other, more strongly male-biased risk factors.

  15. Single paternity of clutches in American Woodcock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ziel, H.; McAuley, D.G.; Rhymer, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Based on behavioral observations, the mating system of American Woodcock has been variously described as monogamous, a dispersed lek, or resource defense polygyny. Males perform elaborate mating displays that attract females to their display sites where copulations occur. We used microsatellite markers, developed for Ruffs (Philomachus pugnax), to assess paternity in American Woodcock. In 3 yr, we collected blood samples from 21 females and broods and 90 males. We found no evidence of multiple paternity within broods; paternity in all broods could be explained by 1 father. For 8 broods, we were able to infer probable fathers from males we sampled in the field. All 8 broods were found close to the singing site of the male or males that matched as possible fathers. Two males may have fathered 2 broods each, suggesting that polygyny may be a component of the woodcock mating system.

  16. Forensic Science Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Forensic science technicians, also called crime laboratory technicians or police science technicians, help solve crimes. They examine and identify physical evidence to reconstruct a crime scene. This article discusses everything students need to know about careers for forensic science technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career…

  17. Developing Ideas through Forensics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derryberry, Bob R.

    If forensic activity is to contribute to student growth and development, careful attention must be given to training and experience in developing ideas. Borrowing from the time-honored premise of invention, forensics educators should highlight argument construction as a foundation in speechwriting practices. Some of the essential premises or…

  18. Nuclear forensics: Soil content

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, Merilyn Amy

    2015-08-31

    Nuclear Forensics is a growing field that is concerned with all stages of the process of creating and detonating a nuclear weapon. The main goal is to prevent nuclear attack by locating and securing nuclear material before it can be used in an aggressive manner. This stage of the process is mostly paperwork; laws, regulations, treaties, and declarations made by individual countries or by the UN Security Council. There is some preliminary leg work done in the form of field testing detection equipment and tracking down orphan materials; however, none of these have yielded any spectacular or useful results. Inmore » the event of a nuclear attack, the first step is to analyze the post detonation debris to aid in the identification of the responsible party. This aspect of the nuclear forensics process, while reactive in nature, is more scientific. A rock sample taken from the detonation site can be dissolved into liquid form and analyzed to determine its chemical composition. The chemical analysis of spent nuclear material can provide valuable information if properly processed and analyzed. In order to accurately evaluate the results, scientists require information on the natural occurring elements in the detonation zone. From this information, scientists can determine what percentage of the element originated in the bomb itself rather than the environment. To this end, element concentrations in soils from sixty-nine different cities are given, along with activity concentrations for uranium, thorium, potassium, and radium in various building materials. These data are used in the analysis program Python.« less

  19. Soil Microbial Forensics.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Cano, Raúl J

    2016-08-01

    Soil microbial forensics can be defined as the study of how microorganisms can be applied to forensic investigations. The field of soil microbial forensics is of increasing interest and applies techniques commonly used in diverse disciplines in order to identify microbes and determine their abundances, complexities, and interactions with soil and surrounding objects. Emerging new techniques are also providing insights into the complexity of microbes in soil. Soil may harbor unique microbes that may reflect specific physical and chemical characteristics indicating site specificity. While applications of some of these techniques in the field of soil microbial forensics are still in early stages, we are still gaining insight into how microorganisms may be more robustly used in forensic investigations.

  20. FINEX: a Probabilistic Expert System for forensic identification.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Robert G

    2003-07-08

    A series of recent papers have shown how to formulate complex problems of forensic DNA identification inference, such as occur in disputed paternity or criminal identification cases, in terms of Probabilistic Expert Systems (PESs). However, at the present time, general purpose PES software is not particularly well suited to the repetitive tasks of: specifying an appropriate set of marker networks for a specific problem; for editing the many local conditional probability tables; and combining evidence from several genetic markers to evaluate likelihoods. Here, I describe a user-friendly prototype software tool called FINEX developed both to automate such tasks and also to evaluate likelihoods of interest. Ease of use is achieved by a graphical specification language that enables a user to quickly specify a range of forensic DNA problems. I describe the algorithms by which FINEX converts the user input in the graphical specification language and data on observed markers to the Bayesian networks used in PES.

  1. [The concept of "forensic medicine"].

    PubMed

    Popov, V L

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the definition of forensic medicine and its evolution during the past 300 years is presented. The special character of forensic medicine, its subject-matter, scope of research, procedures, goals and targeted application of forensic medical knowledge are discussed. The original definition of the notion of "forensic medicine" is proposed.

  2. Discovering misattributed paternity in genetic counselling: different ethical perspectives in two countries.

    PubMed

    Tozzo, Pamela; Caenazzo, Luciana; Parker, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Misattributed paternity or 'false' paternity is when a man is wrongly thought, by himself and possibly by others, to be the biological father of a child. Nowadays, because of the progression of genetics and genomics the possibility of finding misattributed paternity during familial genetic testing has increased. In contrast to other medical information, which pertains primarily to individuals, information obtained by genetic testing and/or pedigree analysis necessarily has implications for other biologically related members in the family. Disclosing or not a misattributed paternity has a number of different biological and social consequences for the people involved. Such an issue presents important ethical and deontological challenges. The debate centres on whether or not to inform the family and, particularly, whom in the family, about the possibility that misattributed paternity might be discovered incidentally, and whether or not it is the duty of the healthcare professional (HCP) to disclose the results and to whom. In this paper, we consider the different perspectives and reported problems, and analyse their cultural, ethical and legal dimensions. We compare the position of HCPs from an Italian and British point of view, particularly their role in genetic counselling. We discuss whether the Oviedo Convention of the Council of Europe (1997) can be seen as a basis for enriching the debate.

  3. 25 CFR 11.609 - Determination of paternity and support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of paternity and support. 11.609 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.609 Determination of paternity and support. The Court of Indian Offenses shall have jurisdiction of all suits brought to determine the paternity of a...

  4. 25 CFR 11.609 - Determination of paternity and support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Determination of paternity and support. 11.609 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.609 Determination of paternity and support. The Court of Indian Offenses shall have jurisdiction of all suits brought to determine the paternity of a...

  5. 25 CFR 11.609 - Determination of paternity and support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Determination of paternity and support. 11.609 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.609 Determination of paternity and support. The Court of Indian Offenses shall have jurisdiction of all suits brought to determine the paternity of a...

  6. 25 CFR 11.609 - Determination of paternity and support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Determination of paternity and support. 11.609 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.609 Determination of paternity and support. The Court of Indian Offenses shall have jurisdiction of all suits brought to determine the paternity of a...

  7. 25 CFR 11.609 - Determination of paternity and support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Determination of paternity and support. 11.609 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Domestic Relations § 11.609 Determination of paternity and support. The Court of Indian Offenses shall have jurisdiction of all suits brought to determine the paternity of a...

  8. What Exactly (If Anything) Is Wrong with Paternalism towards Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drerup, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical and practical issues concerning the justification of paternalism towards children are widely debated in a variety of philosophical contexts. The major focus of these debates lies either on questions concerning the general legitimacy of paternalism towards children or on justifications of paternalism in concrete situations involving…

  9. Paternal Antisocial Behavior (But Not Paternal ADHD) Is Associated With Negative Parenting and Child Conduct Problems.

    PubMed

    LeMoine, Kaitlyn A; Romirowsky, Abigail M; Woods, Kelsey E; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea

    2015-09-23

    Parental psychopathology and parenting quality robustly predict negative outcomes among children with ADHD. Little research has investigated associations between paternal ADHD symptoms and parenting, though there is clear evidence linking maternal ADHD symptoms with both suboptimal parenting and child conduct problems, and considerable research supporting fathers' significant contributions to their children's development. This cross-sectional study examined psychopathology and parenting in a sample of fathers (N = 102) and their 5- to 12-year-old children with previously diagnosed ADHD. Results suggested that paternal antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) symptoms (rather than ADHD symptoms) were robustly associated with child conduct problems, with an indirect effect through paternal negative parenting. This study suggests that negative parenting may be a potential mechanism by which paternal ASPD is associated with child conduct problems, and demonstrates the importance of considering co-occurring psychopathology in research examining adult ADHD, parenting, and child outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Forensic science, genetics and wildlife biology: getting the right mix for a wildlife DNA forensics lab.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Rob

    2010-09-01

    Wildlife DNA forensics is receiving increasing coverage in the popular press and has begun to appear in the scientific literature in relation to several different fields. Recognized as an applied subject, it rests on top of very diverse scientific pillars ranging from biochemistry through to evolutionary genetics, all embedded within the context of modern forensic science. This breadth of scope, combined with typically limited resources, has often left wildlife DNA forensics hanging precariously between human DNA forensics and academics keen to seek novel applications for biological research. How best to bridge this gap is a matter for regular debate among the relatively few full-time practitioners in the field. The decisions involved in establishing forensic genetic services to investigate wildlife crime can be complex, particularly where crimes involve a wide range of species and evidential questions. This paper examines some of the issues relevant to setting up a wildlife DNA forensics laboratory based on experiences of working in this area over the past 7 years. It includes a discussion of various models for operating individual laboratories as well as options for organizing forensic testing at higher national and international levels.

  11. Paternally expressed genes predominate in the placenta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Miller, Donald C.; Harman, Rebecca; Antczak, Douglas F.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of genomic imprinting through studies of manipulated mouse embryos indicated that the paternal genome has a major influence on placental development. However, previous research has not demonstrated paternal bias in imprinted genes. We applied RNA sequencing to trophoblast tissue from reciprocal hybrids of horse and donkey, where genotypic differences allowed parent-of-origin identification of most expressed genes. Using this approach, we identified a core group of 15 ancient imprinted genes, of which 10 were paternally expressed. An additional 78 candidate imprinted genes identified by RNA sequencing also showed paternal bias. Pyrosequencing was used to confirm the imprinting status of six of the genes, including the insulin receptor (INSR), which may play a role in growth regulation with its reciprocally imprinted ligand, histone acetyltransferase-1 (HAT1), a gene involved in chromatin modification, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus G6C, a newly identified imprinted gene in the major histocompatibility complex. The 78 candidate imprinted genes displayed parent-of-origin expression bias in placenta but not fetus, and most showed less than 100% silencing of the imprinted allele. Some displayed variability in imprinting status among individuals. This variability results in a unique epigenetic signature for each placenta that contributes to variation in the intrauterine environment and thus presents the opportunity for natural selection to operate on parent-of-origin differential regulation. Taken together, these features highlight the plasticity of imprinting in mammals and the central importance of the placenta as a target tissue for genomic imprinting. PMID:23754418

  12. Paternally expressed genes predominate in the placenta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Miller, Donald C; Harman, Rebecca; Antczak, Douglas F; Clark, Andrew G

    2013-06-25

    The discovery of genomic imprinting through studies of manipulated mouse embryos indicated that the paternal genome has a major influence on placental development. However, previous research has not demonstrated paternal bias in imprinted genes. We applied RNA sequencing to trophoblast tissue from reciprocal hybrids of horse and donkey, where genotypic differences allowed parent-of-origin identification of most expressed genes. Using this approach, we identified a core group of 15 ancient imprinted genes, of which 10 were paternally expressed. An additional 78 candidate imprinted genes identified by RNA sequencing also showed paternal bias. Pyrosequencing was used to confirm the imprinting status of six of the genes, including the insulin receptor (INSR), which may play a role in growth regulation with its reciprocally imprinted ligand, histone acetyltransferase-1 (HAT1), a gene involved in chromatin modification, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus G6C, a newly identified imprinted gene in the major histocompatibility complex. The 78 candidate imprinted genes displayed parent-of-origin expression bias in placenta but not fetus, and most showed less than 100% silencing of the imprinted allele. Some displayed variability in imprinting status among individuals. This variability results in a unique epigenetic signature for each placenta that contributes to variation in the intrauterine environment and thus presents the opportunity for natural selection to operate on parent-of-origin differential regulation. Taken together, these features highlight the plasticity of imprinting in mammals and the central importance of the placenta as a target tissue for genomic imprinting.

  13. Paternal Attachment, Parenting Beliefs and Children's Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between fathers' romantic attachment style, parenting beliefs and father-child attachment security and dependence were examined in a diverse sample of 72 fathers of young children. Paternal romantic attachment style was coded based on fathers' endorsement of a particular style represented in the Hazan and Shaver Three-Category…

  14. Adolescent Fathers: The Question of Paternity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozie-Battle, Judith L.

    1989-01-01

    Analyzes legislation and court decisions that affect unwed and/or adolescent African-American fathers. Addresses the following concerns: (1) paternity; (2) child support; and (3) legal rights and responsibilities. Recommends development of programs to help potential fathers understand their rights and responsibilities. (FMW)

  15. Advancing Paternal Age and Simplex Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puleo, Connor Morrow; Schmeidler, James; Reichenberg, Abraham; Kolevzon, Alexander; Soorya, Latha V.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Silverman, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    De novo events appear more common in female and simplex autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cases and may underlie greater ASD risk in older fathers' offspring. This study examined whether advancing paternal age predicts an increase in simplex (n = 90) versus multiplex ASD cases (n = 587) in 677 participants (340 families). Whether or not controlling…

  16. Paternal Engagement Activities with Minor Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsiglio, William

    1991-01-01

    Examined custodial fathers' engagement activities with minor children using data from heterosexual couples from National Survey of Families and Households. Strongest and most consistent predictors of paternal involvement with children 5-18 years of age were children's characteristics (age, number, biological status, gender composition). (Author/NB)

  17. Forensic seismology revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, A.

    2007-01-01

    The first technical discussions, held in 1958, on methods of verifying compliance with a treaty banning nuclear explosions, concluded that a monitoring system could be set up to detect and identify such explosions anywhere except underground: the difficulty with underground explosions was that there would be some earthquakes that could not be distinguished from an explosion. The development of adequate ways of discriminating between earthquakes and underground explosions proved to be difficult so that only in 1996 was a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) finally negotiated. Some of the important improvements in the detection and identification of underground tests—that is in forensic seismology—have been made by the UK through a research group at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE). The paper describes some of the advances made in identification since 1958, particularly by the AWE Group, and the main features of the International Monitoring System (IMS), being set up to verify the Test Ban. Once the Treaty enters into force, then should a suspicious disturbance be detected the State under suspicion of testing will have to demonstrate that the disturbance was not a test. If this cannot be done satisfactorily the Treaty has provisions for on-site inspections (OSIs): for a suspicious seismic disturbance for example, an international team of inspectors will search the area around the estimated epicentre of the disturbance for evidence that a nuclear test really took place. Early observations made at epicentral distances out to 2,000 km from the Nevada Test Site showed that there is little to distinguish explosion seismograms from those of nearby earthquakes: for both source types the short-period (SP: ˜1 Hz) seismograms are complex showing multiple arrivals. At long range, say 3,000 10,000 km, loosely called teleseismic distances, the AWE Group noted that SP P waves—the most widely and well-recorded waves from underground explosions—were in

  18. Microbial Forensics: A Scientific Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, Paul

    2003-02-17

    Microorganisms have been used as weapons in criminal acts, most recently highlighted by the terrorist attack using anthrax in the fall of 2001. Although such ''biocrimes'' are few compared with other crimes, these acts raise questions about the ability to provide forensic evidence for criminal prosecution that can be used to identify the source of the microorganisms used as a weapon and, more importantly, the perpetrator of the crime. Microbiologists traditionally investigate the sources of microorganisms in epidemiological investigations, but rarely have been asked to assist in criminal investigations. A colloquium was convened by the American Academy of Microbiology inmore » Burlington, Vermont, on June 7-9, 2002, in which 25 interdisciplinary, expert scientists representing evolutionary microbiology, ecology, genomics, genetics, bioinformatics, forensics, chemistry, and clinical microbiology, deliberated on issues in microbial forensics. The colloquium's purpose was to consider issues relating to microbial forensics, which included a detailed identification of a microorganism used in a bioattack and analysis of such a microorganism and related materials to identify its forensically meaningful source--the perpetrators of the bioattack. The colloquium examined the application of microbial forensics to assist in resolving biocrimes with a focus on what research and education are needed to facilitate the use of microbial forensics in criminal investigations and the subsequent prosecution of biocrimes, including acts of bioterrorism. First responders must consider forensic issues, such as proper collection of samples to allow for optimal laboratory testing, along with maintaining a chain of custody that will support eventual prosecution. Because a biocrime may not be immediately apparent, a linkage must be made between routine diagnosis, epidemiological investigation, and criminal investigation. There is a need for establishing standard operating procedures and

  19. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  20. The forensic psychiatric report.

    PubMed

    Norko, Michael A; Buchanan, Mar Alec

    2015-01-01

    The construction of a written forensic report is a core component of forensic practice, demonstrating the evaluator's skill in conducting the evaluation and in communicating relevant information to the legal audience in an effective manner. Although communication skills and quality of written documentation are important in clinical psychiatry generally, they form the sine qua non of successful forensic work, which consists in telling complex stories in a coherent and compelling fashion. High quality forensic reports require careful preparation from the earliest stages of work on a case. They generally follow an expected structure, which permits the evaluator to provide all the data necessary to form a carefully reasoned opinion that addresses the legal questions posed. Formats and content of reports vary according to the type of case and the circumstances of the evaluation and so require flexibility within customary frameworks. The style and quality of writing are critical to the crafting of forensic reports. The effects on legal decision-makers of various approaches to the presentation of information in reports has not been studied empirically, but guidance from experienced forensic psychiatrists is available. There is a small body of research on quality improvement in forensic writing, and further empiric study is warranted.

  1. Managing misaligned paternity findings in research including sickle cell disease screening in Kenya: ‘Consulting communities’ to inform policy☆

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Vicki; Kombe, Francis; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Molyneux, Sassy; Parker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The management of misaligned paternity findings raises important controversy worldwide. It has mainly, however, been discussed in the context of high-income countries. Genetic and genomics research, with the potential to show misaligned paternity, are becoming increasingly common in Africa. During a genomics study in Kenya, a dilemma arose over testing and sharing information on paternal sickle cell disease status. This dilemma may be paradigmatic of challenges in sharing misaligned paternity findings in many research and health care settings. Using a deliberative approach to community consultation to inform research practice, we explored residents' views on paternal testing and sharing misaligned paternity information. Between December 2009 and November 2010, 63 residents in Kilifi County were engaged in informed deliberative small group discussions, structured to support normative reflection within the groups, with purposive selection to explore diversity. Analysis was based on a modified framework analysis approach, drawing on relevant social science and bioethics literature. The methods generated in-depth individual and group reflection on morally important issues and uncovered wide diversity in views and values. Fundamental and conflicting values emerged around the importance of family interests and openness, underpinned by disagreement on the moral implications of marital infidelity and withholding truth. Wider consideration of ethical issues emerging in these debates supports locally-held reasoning that paternal sickle cell testing should not be undertaken in this context, in contrast to views that testing should be done with or without the disclosure of misaligned paternity information. The findings highlight the importance of facilitating wider testing of family members of affected children, contingent on the development and implementation of national policies for the management of this inherited disorder. Their richness also illustrates the potential for

  2. Managing misaligned paternity findings in research including sickle cell disease screening in Kenya: 'consulting communities' to inform policy.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Vicki; Kombe, Francis; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Molyneux, Sassy; Parker, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The management of misaligned paternity findings raises important controversy worldwide. It has mainly, however, been discussed in the context of high-income countries. Genetic and genomics research, with the potential to show misaligned paternity, are becoming increasingly common in Africa. During a genomics study in Kenya, a dilemma arose over testing and sharing information on paternal sickle cell disease status. This dilemma may be paradigmatic of challenges in sharing misaligned paternity findings in many research and health care settings. Using a deliberative approach to community consultation to inform research practice, we explored residents' views on paternal testing and sharing misaligned paternity information. Between December 2009 and November 2010, 63 residents in Kilifi County were engaged in informed deliberative small group discussions, structured to support normative reflection within the groups, with purposive selection to explore diversity. Analysis was based on a modified framework analysis approach, drawing on relevant social science and bioethics literature. The methods generated in-depth individual and group reflection on morally important issues and uncovered wide diversity in views and values. Fundamental and conflicting values emerged around the importance of family interests and openness, underpinned by disagreement on the moral implications of marital infidelity and withholding truth. Wider consideration of ethical issues emerging in these debates supports locally-held reasoning that paternal sickle cell testing should not be undertaken in this context, in contrast to views that testing should be done with or without the disclosure of misaligned paternity information. The findings highlight the importance of facilitating wider testing of family members of affected children, contingent on the development and implementation of national policies for the management of this inherited disorder. Their richness also illustrates the potential for

  3. Expansion of Microbial Forensics

    PubMed Central

    Schmedes, Sarah E.; Sajantila, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Microbial forensics has been defined as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of evidence related to bioterrorism, biocrimes, hoaxes, or the accidental release of a biological agent or toxin for attribution purposes. Over the past 15 years, technology, particularly massively parallel sequencing, and bioinformatics advances now allow the characterization of microorganisms for a variety of human forensic applications, such as human identification, body fluid characterization, postmortem interval estimation, and biocrimes involving tracking of infectious agents. Thus, microbial forensics should be more broadly described as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of microbial evidence in criminal and civil cases for investigative purposes. PMID:26912746

  4. The imported forensic expert

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, C.P.

    1980-09-01

    A review of the experiences of one of the pioneer forensic pathologists in the United States offers an interesting insight into the possibilities of private forensic pathology in America. The author's experience includes serving as President of the National Boxing Association and the International Boxing Association, during which time he made many improvements in ring safety. His research into several areas of cases of product liability offer an insight to the wide scope of the potential of the forensic expert. This presentation reviews his activities in realms widely afield from medicine.

  5. Molecular evidence for multiple paternity in a population of the Viviparous Tule Perch Hysterocarpus traski.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Xian; Tatarenkov, Andrey; O'Rear, Teejay A; Moyle, Peter B; Avise, John C

    2013-03-01

    Population density might be an important variable in determining the degree of multiple paternity. In a previous study, a high level of multiple paternity was detected in the shiner perch Cymatogaster aggregata, a species with high population density and a high mate encounter rate. The tule perch Hysterocarpus traski is phylogenetically closely related to C. aggregata, but it has relatively lower population density, which may result in distinct patterns of multiple paternity in these 2 species. To test the hypothesis that mate encounter rate may affect the rate of successful mating, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to identify multiple paternity in the progeny arrays of 12 pregnant females from a natural population of tule perch. Multiple paternity was detected in 11 (92%) of the 12 broods. The number of sires per brood ranged from 1 to 4 (mean 2.5) but with no correlation between sire number and brood size. Although the brood size of tule perch is considerably larger than that of shiner perch (40.7 vs. 12.9, respectively), the average number of sires per brood in tule perch is much lower than that in shiner perch (2.5 vs. 4.6, respectively). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that mate encounter rate is an important factor affecting multiple mating.

  6. Paternal investment and status-related child outcomes: timing of father's death affects offspring success.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Mary K; Scelza, Brooke A

    2012-09-01

    Recent work in human behavioural ecology has suggested that analyses focusing on early childhood may underestimate the importance of paternal investment to child outcomes since such investment may not become crucial until adolescence or beyond. This may be especially important in societies with a heritable component to status, as later investment by fathers may be more strongly related to a child's adult status than early forms of parental investment that affect child survival and child health. In such circumstances, the death or absence of a father may have profoundly negative effects on the adult outcomes of his children that cannot be easily compensated for by the investment of mothers or other relatives. This proposition is tested using a multigenerational dataset from Bangalore, India, containing information on paternal mortality as well as several child outcomes dependent on parental investment during adolescence and young adulthood. The paper examines the effects of paternal death, and the timing of paternal death, on a child's education, adult income, age at marriage and the amount spent on his or her marriage, along with similar characteristics of spouses. Results indicate that a father's death has a negative impact on child outcomes, and that, in contrast to some findings in the literature on father absence, the effects of paternal death are strongest for children who lose their father in late childhood or adolescence.

  7. U.S. initiatives to strengthen forensic science & international standards in forensic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Butler, John M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of initiatives are underway in the United States in response to the 2009 critique of forensic science by a National Academy of Sciences committee. This article provides a broad review of activities including efforts of the White House National Science and Technology Council Subcommittee on Forensic Science and a partnership between the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to create the National Commission on Forensic Science and the Organization of Scientific Area Committees. These initiatives are seeking to improve policies and practices of forensic science. Efforts to fund research activities and aid technology transition and training in forensic science are also covered. The second portion of the article reviews standards in place or in development around the world for forensic DNA. Documentary standards are used to help define written procedures to perform testing. Physical standards serve as reference materials for calibration and traceability purposes when testing is performed. Both documentary and physical standards enable reliable data comparison, and standard data formats and common markers or testing regions are crucial for effective data sharing. Core DNA markers provide a common framework and currency for constructing DNA databases with compatible data. Recent developments in expanding core DNA markers in Europe and the United States are discussed. PMID:26164236

  8. U.S. initiatives to strengthen forensic science & international standards in forensic DNA.

    PubMed

    Butler, John M

    2015-09-01

    A number of initiatives are underway in the United States in response to the 2009 critique of forensic science by a National Academy of Sciences committee. This article provides a broad review of activities including efforts of the White House National Science and Technology Council Subcommittee on Forensic Science and a partnership between the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to create the National Commission on Forensic Science and the Organization of Scientific Area Committees. These initiatives are seeking to improve policies and practices of forensic science. Efforts to fund research activities and aid technology transition and training in forensic science are also covered. The second portion of the article reviews standards in place or in development around the world for forensic DNA. Documentary standards are used to help define written procedures to perform testing. Physical standards serve as reference materials for calibration and traceability purposes when testing is performed. Both documentary and physical standards enable reliable data comparison, and standard data formats and common markers or testing regions are crucial for effective data sharing. Core DNA markers provide a common framework and currency for constructing DNA databases with compatible data. Recent developments in expanding core DNA markers in Europe and the United States are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Bayesian networks for evaluation of evidence from forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M Gunnar; Sundström, Anders; Lindström, Anders

    2013-09-01

    In the aftermath of a CBRN incident, there is an urgent need to reconstruct events in order to bring the perpetrators to court and to take preventive actions for the future. The challenge is to discriminate, based on available information, between alternative scenarios. Forensic interpretation is used to evaluate to what extent results from the forensic investigation favor the prosecutors' or the defendants' arguments, using the framework of Bayesian hypothesis testing. Recently, several new scientific disciplines have been used in a forensic context. In the AniBioThreat project, the framework was applied to veterinary forensic pathology, tracing of pathogenic microorganisms, and forensic entomology. Forensic entomology is an important tool for estimating the postmortem interval in, for example, homicide investigations as a complement to more traditional methods. In this article we demonstrate the applicability of the Bayesian framework for evaluating entomological evidence in a forensic investigation through the analysis of a hypothetical scenario involving suspect movement of carcasses from a clandestine laboratory. Probabilities of different findings under the alternative hypotheses were estimated using a combination of statistical analysis of data, expert knowledge, and simulation, and entomological findings are used to update the beliefs about the prosecutors' and defendants' hypotheses and to calculate the value of evidence. The Bayesian framework proved useful for evaluating complex hypotheses using findings from several insect species, accounting for uncertainty about development rate, temperature, and precolonization. The applicability of the forensic statistic approach to evaluating forensic results from a CBRN incident is discussed.

  10. Evolutionary history of partible paternity in lowland South America.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert S; Flinn, Mark V; Hill, Kim R

    2010-11-09

    Partible paternity, the conception belief that more than one man can contribute to the formation of a fetus, is common in lowland South America and characterized by nonexclusive mating relationships and various institutionalized forms of recognition and investment by multiple cofathers. Previous work has emphasized the fitness benefits for women where partible paternity beliefs facilitate paternal investment from multiple men and may reduce the risk of infanticide. In this comparative study of 128 lowland South American societies, the prevalence of partible paternity beliefs may be as much as two times as common as biologically correct beliefs in singular paternity. Partible paternity beliefs are nearly ubiquitous in four large language families--Carib, Pano, Tupi, and Macro-Je. Phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that partible paternity evolved deep in Amazonian prehistory at the root of a tentative Je-Carib-Tupi clade. Partible paternity often occurs with uxorilocal postmarital residence (males transfer), although there are exceptions. Partible paternity may have benefits for both sexes, especially in societies where essentially all offspring are said to have multiple fathers. Despite a decrease in paternity certainty, at least some men probably benefit (or mitigate costs) by increasing their number of extramarital partners, using sexual access to their wives to formalize male alliances, and/or sharing paternity with close kin.

  11. Evolutionary history of partible paternity in lowland South America

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert S.; Flinn, Mark V.; Hill, Kim R.

    2010-01-01

    Partible paternity, the conception belief that more than one man can contribute to the formation of a fetus, is common in lowland South America and characterized by nonexclusive mating relationships and various institutionalized forms of recognition and investment by multiple cofathers. Previous work has emphasized the fitness benefits for women where partible paternity beliefs facilitate paternal investment from multiple men and may reduce the risk of infanticide. In this comparative study of 128 lowland South American societies, the prevalence of partible paternity beliefs may be as much as two times as common as biologically correct beliefs in singular paternity. Partible paternity beliefs are nearly ubiquitous in four large language families—Carib, Pano, Tupi, and Macro-Je. Phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that partible paternity evolved deep in Amazonian prehistory at the root of a tentative Je-Carib-Tupi clade. Partible paternity often occurs with uxorilocal postmarital residence (males transfer), although there are exceptions. Partible paternity may have benefits for both sexes, especially in societies where essentially all offspring are said to have multiple fathers. Despite a decrease in paternity certainty, at least some men probably benefit (or mitigate costs) by increasing their number of extramarital partners, using sexual access to their wives to formalize male alliances, and/or sharing paternity with close kin. PMID:20974947

  12. Forensic Science: Hair Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Elhannan L.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students use a microscope to do a forensic hair comparative study and a medullary classification. Mounting methods, medulla types, hair photographs, and activities are described. (DS)

  13. Professionalism in Computer Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Alastair D.; Konstadopoulou, Anastasia

    The paper seeks to address the need to consider issues regarding professionalism in computer forensics in order to allow the discipline to develop and to ensure the credibility of the discipline from the differing perspectives of practitioners, the criminal justice system and in the eyes of the public. There is a need to examine and develop professionalism in computer forensics in order to promote the discipline and maintain the credibility of the discipline.

  14. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison.

  15. Mac OS X Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craiger, Philip; Burke, Paul

    This paper describes procedures for conducting forensic examinations of Apple Macs running Mac OS X. The target disk mode is used to create a forensic duplicate of a Mac hard drive and preview it. Procedures are discussed for recovering evidence from allocated space, unallocated space, slack space and virtual memory. Furthermore, procedures are described for recovering trace evidence from Mac OS X default email, web browser and instant messaging applications, as well as evidence pertaining to commands executed from a terminal.

  16. [Forensic medicine and criminalistics].

    PubMed

    Schwerd, W

    1989-01-01

    The supplementary designation "criminalistics" in the title of certain forensic medical institutes in the first half of this century is to be regarded as a reaction to faulty developments in our specialty, which almost led to the elimination of forensic medicine as an independent scientific discipline in the 1960s. The ability to think in terms of criminalistics and the corresponding working procedures has always been a crucial precondition for the forensic physician, since forensic medicine is the application of medical knowledge for juridical purposes. Forensic medicine originated with the appraisal of cases of violent death by doctors, i.e., reconstruction of the facts in the case. To use the term "criminalistics" in the form of a supplementary designation is thus not required. An attempt is nevertheless made to define "medical criminalistics" as a small but important component of criminalistics. They are subdivided into two phases: the first part begins at the scene of the crime or the place of discovery (local evidence). Here, the trained eye of the forensic physician is indispensable to the criminal investigation department and the prosecutor. Medical criminalistic thinking and working procedures continue at the autopsy. Here, forensic autopsy differs from that practiced by the pathologist. Without knowledge of the situation at the discovery location, the forensic physician runs the risk of not recognizing facts that are important for reconstruction and thus becoming a "destroyer of clues". The second part of medical criminalistics is the actual detection of medical clues, i.e., the investigation of medical clues with special methods, including histological and toxicological investigations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Internet and forensic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamakura, Reddy P.

    1997-02-01

    The Internet is a very powerful and inexpensive tool that was created for the free distribution of knowledge and information. The Internet is a learning tool, a research tool, a virtual library without borders and membership requirements, a journal with instant publication, a help desk, and a newspaper/journal with current information. Very soon, when live audio and video transmission is perfected, the Internet also will be a live classroom and everyday conference. Forensic scientists, laboratories and colleges should make use of information already available on the Internet. They also should actively participate and contribute. Very few forensic scientists and laboratories have made their presence felt by setting up their home pages/web pages. But, there is tremendous growth during the past year. Immense benefits from Internet to forensic community are discussed along with the author's personal experience. Creating on-line searchable data bases in all specialties of forensic science is an urgent need. Leading forensic journals should take a lead and create on-line searchable indexes with abstracts. On line electronic publishing, collaborative research/paper publishing or editing is easy, fast, economical and convenient through the use of the Internet. Creation of Internet repositories of unpublished papers is an idea worth looking into. Internet also can be used to give training, re-training or advanced training to students/forensic scientists.

  18. Paternal isodisomy for chromosome 7 is compatible with normal growth and development in a patient with congenital chloride diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Höglund, P.; Holmberg, C.; de la Chapelle, A.; Kere, J.

    1994-01-01

    Uniparental disomy for maternal chromosome 7 has been described in three patients with recessive disorders. Short stature in each of these patients has been explained by the effect of imprinting of growth-related genes on maternal chromosome 7. Alternatively, although less likely, all these patients may be homozygous for a rare recessive mutation. Here we report both paternal isodisomy for chromosome 7 and normal growth in a patient with a recessive disorder, congenital chloride diarrhea. She had inherited only paternal alleles at 10 loci and was homozygous for another 10 chromosome 7 loci studied. Her physical status and laboratory tests were normal except for a mild high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. As the patient has normal stature, it is likely that the paternal chromosome 7 lacks the suggested maternal imprinting effect on growth. Paternal isodisomy for human chromosome 7 may have no phenotypic effect on growth. Images Figure 1 PMID:7942853

  19. The future of forensic DNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Butler, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The author's thoughts and opinions on where the field of forensic DNA testing is headed for the next decade are provided in the context of where the field has come over the past 30 years. Similar to the Olympic motto of ‘faster, higher, stronger’, forensic DNA protocols can be expected to become more rapid and sensitive and provide stronger investigative potential. New short tandem repeat (STR) loci have expanded the core set of genetic markers used for human identification in Europe and the USA. Rapid DNA testing is on the verge of enabling new applications. Next-generation sequencing has the potential to provide greater depth of coverage for information on STR alleles. Familial DNA searching has expanded capabilities of DNA databases in parts of the world where it is allowed. Challenges and opportunities that will impact the future of forensic DNA are explored including the need for education and training to improve interpretation of complex DNA profiles. PMID:26101278

  20. Forensic anthropology and mortuary archaeology in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Jankauskas, Rimantas

    2009-12-01

    Forensic anthropology (in Lithuania, as everywhere in Eastern Europe, traditionally considered as a narrower field--forensic osteology) has a long history, experience being gained both during exhumations of mass killings during the Second World War and the subsequent totalitarian regime, investigations of historical mass graves, identification of historical personalities and routine forensic work. Experts of this field (usually a branch of forensic medicine) routinely are solving "technical" questions of crime investigation, particularly identification of (usually dead) individuals. Practical implementation of the mission of forensic anthropology is not an easy task due to interdisciplinary character of the field. On one hand, physical anthropology has in its disposition numerous scientifically tested methods, however, their practical value in particular legal processes is limited. Reasons for these discrepancies can be related both to insufficient understanding of possibilities and limitations of forensic anthropology and archaeology by officials representing legal institutions that perform investigations, and sometimes too "academic" research, that is conducted at anthropological laboratories, when methods developed are not completely relevant to practical needs. Besides of answering to direct questions (number of individuals, sex, age, stature, population affinity, individual traits, evidence of violence), important humanitarian aspects--the individual's right for identity, the right of the relatives to know the fate of their beloved ones--should not be neglected. Practical use of other identification methods faces difficulties of their own (e.g., odontology--lack of regular dental registration system and compatible database). Two examples of forensic anthropological work of mass graves, even when the results were much influenced by the questions raised by investigators, can serve as an illustration of the above-mentioned issues.

  1. World of Forensic Laboratory Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Microglobulin Kidney Disease Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker Bicarbonate (Total CO2) Bilirubin Blood Culture Blood Gases Blood ... Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) and F-actin Antibody Sodium Soluble Mesothelin-Related Peptides Soluble Transferrin Receptor Stool ...

  2. Negative effects of paternal age on children's neurocognitive outcomes can be explained by maternal education and number of siblings.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ryan D; Roff, Jennifer

    2010-09-14

    Recent findings suggest advanced paternal age may be associated with impaired child outcomes, in particular, neurocognitive skills. Such patterns are worrisome given relatively universal trends in advanced countries toward delayed nuptiality and fertility. But nature and nurture are both important for child outcomes, and it is important to control for both when drawing inferences about either pathway. We examined cross-sectional patterns in six developmental outcome measures among children in the U.S. Collaborative Perinatal Project (n = 31,346). Many of these outcomes at 8 mo, 4 y, and 7 y of age (Bayley scales, Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale, Graham-Ernhart Block Sort Test, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Wide Range Achievement Test) are negatively correlated with paternal age when important family characteristics such as maternal education and number of siblings are not included as covariates. But controlling for family characteristics in general and mother's education in particular renders the effect of paternal age statistically insignificant for most developmental measures. Assortative mating produces interesting relationships between maternal and paternal characteristics that can inject spurious correlation into observational studies via omitted variable bias. Controlling for both nature and nurture reveals little residual evidence of a link between child neurocognitive outcomes and paternal age in these data. Results suggest that benefits associated with the upward trend in maternal education may offset any negative effects of advancing paternal age.

  3. False paternity exclusion in the Rh system: use of cytofluorometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Rouger, P; Kornprobst, M; Séger, J; Salmon, D; Salmon, C

    1987-01-01

    In a two-men paternity testing analysis, the first putative father was definitely excluded by six blood group systems; the second one was apparently excluded in the Rh system. In fact, an analysis by flow-cytometry demonstrated that this false exclusion was due to the presence of a D--haplotype in the father and child.

  4. Evaluation of mRNA markers for estimating blood deposition time: Towards alibi testing from human forensic stains with rhythmic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lech, Karolina; Liu, Fan; Ackermann, Katrin; Revell, Victoria L; Lao, Oscar; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-03-01

    Determining the time a biological trace was left at a scene of crime reflects a crucial aspect of forensic investigations as - if possible - it would permit testing the sample donor's alibi directly from the trace evidence, helping to link (or not) the DNA-identified sample donor with the crime event. However, reliable and robust methodology is lacking thus far. In this study, we assessed the suitability of mRNA for the purpose of estimating blood deposition time, and its added value relative to melatonin and cortisol, two circadian hormones we previously introduced for this purpose. By analysing 21 candidate mRNA markers in blood samples from 12 individuals collected around the clock at 2h intervals for 36h under real-life, controlled conditions, we identified 11 mRNAs with statistically significant expression rhythms. We then used these 11 significantly rhythmic mRNA markers, with and without melatonin and cortisol also analysed in these samples, to establish statistical models for predicting day/night time categories. We found that although in general mRNA-based estimation of time categories was less accurate than hormone-based estimation, the use of three mRNA markers HSPA1B, MKNK2 and PER3 together with melatonin and cortisol generally enhanced the time prediction accuracy relative to the use of the two hormones alone. Our data best support a model that by using these five molecular biomarkers estimates three time categories, i.e. night/early morning, morning/noon, and afternoon/evening with prediction accuracies expressed as AUC values of 0.88, 0.88, and 0.95, respectively. For the first time, we demonstrate the value of mRNA for blood deposition timing and introduce a statistical model for estimating day/night time categories based on molecular biomarkers, which shall be further validated with additional samples in the future. Moreover, our work provides new leads for molecular approaches on time of death estimation using the significantly rhythmic m

  5. Certainty of paternity and paternal investment in eastern bluebirds and tree swallows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kempenaers, Bart; Lanctot, Richard B.; Robertson, Raleigh J.

    1998-01-01

    Extra-pair paternity is common in many socially monogamous passerine birds with biparental care. Thus, males often invest in offspring to which they are not related. Models of optimal parental investment predict that, under certain assumptions, males should lower their investment in response to reduced certainty of paternity. We attempted to reduce certainty of paternity experimentally in two species, the eastern bluebird, Sialia sialis, and the tree swallow, Tachycineta bicolor, by temporarily removing fertile females on two mornings during egg laying. In both species, experimental males usually attempted to copulate with the female immediately after her reappearance, suggesting that they experienced the absence of their mate as a threat to their paternity. Experimental males copulated at a significantly higher rate than control males. However, contrary to the prediction of the model, experimental males did not invest less than control males in their offspring. There was no difference between experimental and control nests in the proportion of male feeds, male and female feeding rates, nestling growth and nestling condition and size at age 14 days. We argue that females might have restored the males’ confidence in paternity after the experiment by soliciting or accepting copulations. Alternatively, males may not reduce their effort, because the fitness costs to their own offspring may outweigh the benefits for the males, at least in populations where females cannot fully compensate for reduced male investment.

  6. Paternal transmission of complex phenotypes in inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Alter, Mark D; Gilani, Ahmed I; Champagne, Frances A; Curley, James P; Turner, J Blake; Hen, Rene

    2009-12-01

    Inbred mice are genetically identical but nonetheless demonstrate substantial variability in complex behaviors such as activity levels in a novel environment. This variability has been associated with levels of parental care experienced early in development. Although maternal effects have been reported in biparental and uniparental strains, there have been no investigations of paternal effects in non-biparental strains in which offspring are reared exclusively by mothers. In the uniparental inbred Balb/cJ mouse strain, we examined the relationship of paternal open-field activity to the activity of both male and female offspring in the open-field. Potential mediators of paternal transmission of behavior were examined, including maternal care, growth parameters, litter characteristics, and time the father was present with the pregnant mother prenatally. An association of paternal open-field activity with the open-field activity of female but not male offspring was found. Variation in maternal postnatal care was associated with female but not male offspring activity in the open-field but did not mediate paternal effects on offspring behavior. Paternal effects on offspring growth parameters were present, but these effects also did not mediate paternal effects on behavior. Paternal transmission of complex traits in genetically identical mice reared only by mothers suggests a nongenetic mechanism of inheritance potentially mediated by epigenetic factors. The exclusion of multiple mediators of paternal effects on offspring suggests the possibility of germline paternal inheritance via sperm of complex phenotypes in inbred mice. Future studies are required to examine these interesting possibilities.

  7. Human mutagens: evidence from paternal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Douglas, G.R.; Nestmann, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    The importance of inherited mutations as a cause of human disease has been established clearly through examples of well-defined genetic anomalies, such as Down syndrome and retinoblastoma. Furthermore, it is suspected that environmental contaminants induce mutations resulting in increased risk for such defects in subsequent generations of persons exposed. The present lack of direct evidence for induced inherited genetic disorders in human beings hampers the development of risk estimation techniques for extrapolation from animal models. The most extensive prospective epidemiologic studies of inherited genetic effects have involved survivors of atomic bomb detonations and patients treated with cancer chemotherapy. In neithermore » case has a significant elevation in inherited genetic effects or cancer been detected in the offspring of exposed individuals. Epidemiologic studies of subjects receiving chronic exposure may be confounded by the effect of maternal exposure during pregnancy. Consideration of only paternal exposure can minimize the confounding influence of teratogenicity, enhancing the resolving power of studies for inherited effects. Using this approach, retrospective (case-control) studies of childhood cancer patients have provided limited but suggestive evidence for inheritance of induced effects. Endpoints, such as congenital malformations and spontaneous abortion following paternal exposure, can also be considered as indicators of heritable mutagenic effects. For example, there is limited evidence suggesting that paternal exposure to anaesthetic gases may cause miscarriage and congenital abnormalities as a result of induced male germ cell mutations. 104 references.« less

  8. Advantageous developmental outcomes of advancing paternal age.

    PubMed

    Janecka, M; Rijsdijk, F; Rai, D; Modabbernia, A; Reichenberg, A

    2017-06-20

    Advanced paternal age (APA) at conception has been associated with negative outcomes in offspring, raising concerns about increasing age at fatherhood. Evidence from evolutionary and psychological research, however, suggests possible link between APA and a phenotypic advantage. We defined such advantage as educational success, which is positively associated with future socioeconomic status. We hypothesised that high IQ, strong focus on the subject of interest and little concern about 'fitting in' will be associated with such success. Although these traits are continuously distributed in the population, they cluster together in so-called 'geeks'. We used these measures to compute a 'geek index' (GI), and showed it to be strongly predictive of future academic attainment, beyond the independent contribution of the individual traits. GI was associated with paternal age in male offspring only, and mediated the positive effects of APA on education outcomes, in a similar sexually dimorphic manner. The association between paternal age and GI was partly mediated by genetic factors not correlated with age at fatherhood, suggesting contribution of de novo factors to the 'geeky' phenotype. Our study sheds new light on the multifaceted nature of the APA effects and explores the intricate links between APA, autism and talent.

  9. Advantageous developmental outcomes of advancing paternal age

    PubMed Central

    Janecka, M; Rijsdijk, F; Rai, D; Modabbernia, A; Reichenberg, A

    2017-01-01

    Advanced paternal age (APA) at conception has been associated with negative outcomes in offspring, raising concerns about increasing age at fatherhood. Evidence from evolutionary and psychological research, however, suggests possible link between APA and a phenotypic advantage. We defined such advantage as educational success, which is positively associated with future socioeconomic status. We hypothesised that high IQ, strong focus on the subject of interest and little concern about ‘fitting in’ will be associated with such success. Although these traits are continuously distributed in the population, they cluster together in so-called ‘geeks’. We used these measures to compute a ‘geek index’ (GI), and showed it to be strongly predictive of future academic attainment, beyond the independent contribution of the individual traits. GI was associated with paternal age in male offspring only, and mediated the positive effects of APA on education outcomes, in a similar sexually dimorphic manner. The association between paternal age and GI was partly mediated by genetic factors not correlated with age at fatherhood, suggesting contribution of de novo factors to the ‘geeky’ phenotype. Our study sheds new light on the multifaceted nature of the APA effects and explores the intricate links between APA, autism and talent. PMID:28632201

  10. Density drives polyandry and relatedness influences paternal success in the Pacific gooseneck barnacle, Pollicipes elegans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyandry is a common mating strategy in animals, increasing female fitness through direct (material) and indirect (genetic) benefits. Most theories about the benefits of polyandry come from studies of terrestrial animals, which have relatively complex mating systems and behaviors; less is known about the potential benefits of polyandry in sessile marine animals, for which potential mates may be scarce and females have less control over pre-copulatory mate choice. Here, we used microsatellite markers to examine multiple paternity in natural aggregations of the Pacific gooseneck barnacle Pollicipes elegans, testing the effect of density on paternity and mate relatedness on male reproductive success. Results We found that multiple paternity was very common (79% of broods), with up to five fathers contributing to a brood, though power was relatively low to detect more than four fathers. Density had a significant and positive linear effect on the number of fathers siring a brood, though this relationship leveled off at high numbers of fathers, which may reflect a lack of power and/or an upper limit to polyandry in this species. Significant skew in male reproductive contribution in multiply-sired broods was observed and we found a positive and significant relationship between the proportion of offspring sired and the genetic similarity between mates, suggesting that genetic compatibility may influence reproductive success in this species. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to show high levels of multiple paternity in a barnacle, and overall, patterns of paternity in P. elegans appear to be driven primarily by mate availability. Evidence of paternity bias for males with higher relatedness suggests some form of post-copulatory sexual selection is taking place, but more work is needed to determine whether it operates during or post-fertilization. Overall, our results suggest that while polyandry in P. elegans is driven by mate availability, it

  11. Density drives polyandry and relatedness influences paternal success in the Pacific gooseneck barnacle, Pollicipes elegans.

    PubMed

    Plough, Louis V; Moran, Amy; Marko, Peter

    2014-04-16

    Polyandry is a common mating strategy in animals, increasing female fitness through direct (material) and indirect (genetic) benefits. Most theories about the benefits of polyandry come from studies of terrestrial animals, which have relatively complex mating systems and behaviors; less is known about the potential benefits of polyandry in sessile marine animals, for which potential mates may be scarce and females have less control over pre-copulatory mate choice. Here, we used microsatellite markers to examine multiple paternity in natural aggregations of the Pacific gooseneck barnacle Pollicipes elegans, testing the effect of density on paternity and mate relatedness on male reproductive success. We found that multiple paternity was very common (79% of broods), with up to five fathers contributing to a brood, though power was relatively low to detect more than four fathers. Density had a significant and positive linear effect on the number of fathers siring a brood, though this relationship leveled off at high numbers of fathers, which may reflect a lack of power and/or an upper limit to polyandry in this species. Significant skew in male reproductive contribution in multiply-sired broods was observed and we found a positive and significant relationship between the proportion of offspring sired and the genetic similarity between mates, suggesting that genetic compatibility may influence reproductive success in this species. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show high levels of multiple paternity in a barnacle, and overall, patterns of paternity in P. elegans appear to be driven primarily by mate availability. Evidence of paternity bias for males with higher relatedness suggests some form of post-copulatory sexual selection is taking place, but more work is needed to determine whether it operates during or post-fertilization. Overall, our results suggest that while polyandry in P. elegans is driven by mate availability, it may also provide a mechanism

  12. Saliva in forensic odontology: A comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Susmita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, saliva has attracted much interest among researchers especially in the field of forensic sciences. This complex body fluid is gaining popularity due to its ease of collection, safety in handling and its close relationship with plasma. Analysis of saliva for serological testing and cellular content has proved to be of wide use in crime detection, drug and alcohol abuse, hormone identification, cases of poisoning and animal bites. There is a need for forensic laboratories to automate the settings specific for saliva as routinely done for blood or urine in order to consider saliva as the primary investigating tool in the absence of other body fluids. This update is aimed at highlighting the many uses of saliva in the practice of forensic odontology.

  13. Forensic psychiatry in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lai Gwen; Tomita, Todd

    2013-12-01

    Singapore is a geographically small nation-state that has transformed itself from a third-world country to a developed nation after attaining political independence 46 years ago. The pace of change has been tremendous and mental health care is no exception. This paper provides an overview of mental health care and a review of key mental health legislation, including a National Mental Health Blueprint that was rolled out in 2007. On this background, the paper focuses on a description of forensic psychiatric services in Singapore. The role of the Department of Forensic Psychiatry at the Institute of Mental Health, which is the only forensic psychiatry department in the country, will be highlighted. Civil commitment and the treatment of unfit accused persons and insanity acquittees is reviewed. The role of forensic psychiatric assessments in the Singapore courts is examined. The application of the insanity and diminished responsibility defenses are reviewed. A trend is identified in the Singapore courts towards a more rehabilitation-focused sentencing approach and the role that forensic psychiatric assessments play in cases involving mentally disordered offenders is highlighted. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Paternity acknowledgment in 2 million birth records from Michigan.

    PubMed

    Almond, Douglas; Rossin-Slater, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-wedlock childbearing is more common in the U.S. than in other countries and becoming more so. A growing share of such non-marital births identify the father, which can create a legal entitlement to child support. Relatively little is known about individual determinants of the decision to establish paternity, in part because of data limitations. In this paper, we evaluate all birth records in Michigan from 1993 to 2006, which have been merged to the paternity registry. In 2006, 30,231 Michigan children, almost one quarter of all Michigan births, were born to unmarried mothers and had paternity acknowledged. We find that births with paternity acknowledged have worse outcomes along various health and socio-economic dimensions relative to births to married parents, but better outcomes relative to births to unmarried parents without paternity acknowledgement. Furthermore, unmarried men who father sons are significantly more likely to acknowledge paternity than fathers of daughters.

  15. Paternity Acknowledgment in 2 Million Birth Records from Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Almond, Douglas; Rossin-Slater, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-wedlock childbearing is more common in the U.S. than in other countries and becoming more so. A growing share of such non-marital births identify the father, which can create a legal entitlement to child support. Relatively little is known about individual determinants of the decision to establish paternity, in part because of data limitations. In this paper, we evaluate all birth records in Michigan from 1993 to 2006, which have been merged to the paternity registry. In 2006, 30,231 Michigan children, almost one quarter of all Michigan births, were born to unmarried mothers and had paternity acknowledged. We find that births with paternity acknowledged have worse outcomes along various health and socio-economic dimensions relative to births to married parents, but better outcomes relative to births to unmarried parents without paternity acknowledgement. Furthermore, unmarried men who father sons are significantly more likely to acknowledge paternity than fathers of daughters. PMID:23894583

  16. Addressing policy barriers to paternal involvement during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alio, Amina P; Bond, M Jermane; Padilla, Yolanda C; Heidelbaugh, Joel J; Lu, Michael; Parker, Willie J

    2011-05-01

    Efforts to reduce infant mortality in the United States have failed to incorporate paternal involvement. Research suggests that paternal involvement, which has been recognized as contributing to child development and health for many decades, is likely to affect infant mortality through the mother's well-being, primarily her access to resources and support. In spite of that, systemic barriers facing the father and the influence on his involvement in the pregnancy have received little attention. The Commission on Paternal Involvement in Pregnancy Outcomes (CPIPO) has identified the most important social barriers to paternal involvement during pregnancy and outlined a set of key policy priorities aimed at fostering paternal involvement. This article summarizes the key recommendations, including equitable paternity leave, elimination of marriage as a tax and public assistance penalty, integration of fatherhood initiatives in MCH programs, support of low-income fathers through employment training, father inclusion in family planning services, and expansion of birth data collection to include father information.

  17. Paternal Age in Relation to Offspring Intelligence in the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Elise; Deary, Ian J.; Der, Geoff; Batty, G. David; Benzeval, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    Background The adverse effects of advancing maternal age on offspring's health and development are well understood. Much less is known about the impact of paternal age. Methods We explored paternal age-offspring cognition associations in 772 participants from the West of Scotland Twenty-07 study. Offspring cognitive ability was assessed using Part 1 of the Alice Heim 4 (AH4) test of General Intelligence and by reaction time (RT). Results There was no evidence of a parental age association with offspring RT. However, we observed an inverse U-shaped association between paternal age and offspring AH4 score with the lowest scores observed for the youngest and oldest fathers. Adjustment for parental education and socioeconomic status somewhat attenuated this association. Adjustment for number of, particularly older, siblings further reduced the scores of children of younger fathers and appeared to account for the lower offspring scores in the oldest paternal age group. Conclusion We observed a paternal age association with AH4 but not RT, a measure of cognition largely independent of social and educational experiences. Factors such as parental education, socioeconomic status and number of, particularly older, siblings may play an important role in accounting for paternal age-AH4 associations. Future studies should include parental intelligence. PMID:23272219

  18. Forensics on a Shoestring Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greco, Joseph A.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, forensic science has gained popularity thanks in part to high-profile court cases and television programs. Although the cost of forensic equipment and supplies may initially seem too expensive for the typical high school classroom, the author developed an activity that incorporates forensics into her 10th-grade biology curriculum…

  19. Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In the past 50 years forensic psychological practice has expanded dramatically. Because the practice of forensic psychology differs in important ways from more traditional practice areas (Monahan, 1980) the "Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists" were developed and published in 1991 (Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic…

  20. From forensic epigenetics to forensic epigenomics: broadening DNA investigative intelligence.

    PubMed

    Vidaki, Athina; Kayser, Manfred

    2017-12-21

    Human genetic variation is a major resource in forensics, but does not allow all forensically relevant questions to be answered. Some questions may instead be addressable via epigenomics, as the epigenome acts as an interphase between the fixed genome and the dynamic environment. We envision future forensic applications of DNA methylation analysis that will broaden DNA-based forensic intelligence. Together with genetic prediction of appearance and biogeographic ancestry, epigenomic lifestyle prediction is expected to increase the ability of police to find unknown perpetrators of crime who are not identifiable using current forensic DNA profiling.

  1. Geoethics and Forensic Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Laurance

    2017-04-01

    The International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS), Initiative on Forensic Geology (IFG) was set up in 2011 to promote and develop the applications of geology to policing and law enforcement throughout the world. This includes the provision of crime scene examinations, searches to locate graves or items of interest that have been buried beneath the ground surface as part of a criminal act and geological trace analysis and evidence. Forensic geologists may assist the police and law enforcement in a range of ways including for example; homicide, sexual assaults, counter terrorism, kidnapping, humanitarian incidents, environmental crimes, precious minerals theft, fakes and fraudulent crimes. The objective of this paper is to consider the geoethical aspects of forensic geology. This includes both delivery to research and teaching, and contribution to the practical applications of forensic geology in case work. The case examples cited are based on the personal experiences of the authors. Often, the technical and scientific aspect of forensic geology investigation may be the most straightforward, after all, this is what the forensic geologist has been trained to do. The associated geoethical issues can be the most challenging and complex to manage. Generally, forensic geologists are driven to carry-out their research or case work with integrity, honesty and in a manner that is law abiding, professional, socially acceptable and highly responsible. This is necessary in advising law enforcement organisations, society and the scientific community that they represent. As the science of forensic geology begins to advance around the world it is desirable to establish a standard set of principles, values and to provide an agreed ethical a framework. But what are these core values? Who is responsible for producing these? How may these become enforced? What happens when geoethical standards are breached? This paper does not attempt to provide all of the answers, as further work

  2. Expansion of Microbial Forensics.

    PubMed

    Schmedes, Sarah E; Sajantila, Antti; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Microbial forensics has been defined as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of evidence related to bioterrorism, biocrimes, hoaxes, or the accidental release of a biological agent or toxin for attribution purposes. Over the past 15 years, technology, particularly massively parallel sequencing, and bioinformatics advances now allow the characterization of microorganisms for a variety of human forensic applications, such as human identification, body fluid characterization, postmortem interval estimation, and biocrimes involving tracking of infectious agents. Thus, microbial forensics should be more broadly described as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of microbial evidence in criminal and civil cases for investigative purposes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Forensic Psychiatry in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Seyed Mehdi; Mirsepassi, Gholam Reza

    2013-01-01

    In Iran, department of forensic psychiatry is one of the special units of Legal Medicine Organization concerned with individuals who demonstrate psychological and psychiatric problems. The duties of forensic psychiatrists in the department are, performing psychiatric examinations and determining mental competence of two major groups of referrals: Individuals who are involved in a legal problem related to civil law and individuals who are involved in criminal responsibility and/or forbearance of punishment such as offenders and prisoners. One of the worries of the Iran jurisdiction system is the absence of a secure mental hospital devoted to the irresponsible mentally ill criminals. In fact, there is no forensic inpatient unit available in the country. PMID:24644492

  4. Preconception paternal bisphenol A exposure induces sex-specific anxiety and depression behaviors in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Tian, Chong; Liu, Qilin; Zhen, Xianyue; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Liangneng; Li, Taibiao; Zhang, Yun; Ding, Shibin; He, Dongliang; Jin, Xin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Beibei; Wu, Nannan; Manyande, Anne; Zhu, Maoshu

    2018-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental endocrine-disrupting compound, has drawn a great attention for its adverse effect on behavioral development. Maternal exposure to this compound has been reported to induce anxiety and depression in offspring, but the effect of its paternal exposure is rarely discussed. This study investigated whether preconception paternal BPA exposure can affect the emotions of male rats and their offspring. Eighteen adult male rats (F0) received either a vehicle or 50 μg/kg/day BPA diet for 21 weeks and were then mated with non-exposed females to produce offspring (F1). The affective behaviors of F0 and F1 rats were evaluated in the open-field test, the elevated-plus maze and the forced swimming test, and their serum corticosterone were then examined. BPA exposure induced increased anxiety behaviors along with increased serum corticosterone in F0 rats. This paternal exposure also led to increased anxiety behaviors in F1 females and aggravated depression behaviors in both sexes of F1 rats. Furthermore, only F1 females exhibited increased serum corticosterone. Overall, these data indicate that preconception paternal exposure to a low dose of BPA may induce transgenerational sex-specific impairments in the affection of adult rats.

  5. [Influence of paternal age in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Hubert, A; Szöke, A; Leboyer, M; Schürhoff, F

    2011-06-01

    Schizophrenia is an aetiologically heterogeneous syndrome, with a strong genetic component. Despite a reduced fertility in this disorder, its prevalence is maintained and could be explained by de novo genetic mutations. Advanced paternal age (APA) is a major source of new mutations in human beings and could thus be associated with an increased risk of developing schizophrenia in offspring. New mutations related to APA have been implicated as a cause of sporadic cases in several autosomal dominant diseases and also in neurodevelopmental diseases, autism, intellectual disabilities, and social functioning. The aim of the present study was to summarize the results of studies investigating the role of APA, and to discuss some interpretations. All relevant studies were identified through the National Library of Medicine (PubMed(®) database). Keywords used for research were "age" and "schizophrenia" linked to "paternal or father". We have identified and analysed eight cohort studies, five case-control studies, two meta-analyses, and one review concerning different father's mutations potentially transmitted, two studies comparing paternal age at conception between sporadic versus familial cases of schizophrenia. All studies selected have been published between 2000 and 2009. After controlling for several confounding factors including maternal age, the relative risk of schizophrenia increased from 1.84 to 4.62 in offspring of fathers with an older age of fatherhood. Mother's age showed no significant effects after adjusting for paternal age. There was a significant association between paternal age and risk of developing schizophrenia, there was a weaker association with psychosis. The results of these different studies are confirmed by two recent meta-analyses which found an increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring of fathers older than 35 years. Two main hypotheses could explain these results. The first one is based on the presence of new mutations in the

  6. A low-cost, high-throughput, automated single nucleotide polymorphism assay for forensic human DNA applications.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Robert; Duncan, George; Sunar-Reeder, Bulbin; Ortenberg, Elen; Ketchum, Melba; Wasiluk, Hannah; Reeder, Dennis

    2009-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of human DNA for the purpose of identification has some promising attributes. The question of approach is critical to the eventual adoption of this technology. The use of a low-volume open array platform was tested with a small selected set of eight SNP primers that have a low F(ST) (the proportion of the total genetic variance contained in a subpopulation [S subscript] relative to the total genetic variance [T subscript]) in human populations. Because multiple SNPs must be interrogated, issues concerning DNA concentration, total DNA, and whole genome amplification were investigated. Excellent correlations were obtained for seven of the eight SNP assays on a set of DNA samples of known configuration over a broad concentration range spanning 25-150ng/microl in blind studies. These seven SNP assays were then applied to 39 DNA samples in a population from southern India. These SNPs were sufficient to individualize each member of this sample population. In a paternity study, these same SNPs showed clear parental relationships. For low amounts of genomic DNA, the use of a commercially available whole genome amplification kit showed promise for genotyping sub-nanogram samples. Discrimination against nonhuman DNA was also demonstrated successfully. Because of the very low quantities of reagents used in the assay, the cost per test becomes reasonably inexpensive. Overall, using commercially available SNP assays, the OpenArray platform showed excellent promise as a highly automated, low-volume, high-throughput system for SNP analysis with potential applications to relevant forensic analyses such as identification and paternity.

  7. Agarose gel electrophoresis of linear genomic DNA in the presence of ethidium bromide: band shifting and implications for forensic identity testing.

    PubMed

    Waye, J S; Fourney, R M

    1990-01-01

    We demonstrate that agarose gel electrophoresis of linear duplex DNA in the presence of ethidium bromide has a marked effect on the mobility of genomic DNA fragments detected by Southern hybridization. Mobility shifts of greater than 6% of the actual molecular weight were detected when different amounts of the same DNA sample were analyzed in 1.0% agarose gels containing 0.5 micrograms ml-1 ethidium bromide. For forensic applications, shifts of this magnitude could complicate the task of comparing restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles and introduce a degree of uncertainty to allele frequency population databases.

  8. 3D imaging in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sam; Jones, Carl; Plassmann, Peter

    2010-06-16

    This paper describes the investigation of a new 3D capture method for acquiring and subsequent forensic analysis of bite mark injuries on human skin. When documenting bite marks with standard 2D cameras errors in photographic technique can occur if best practice is not followed. Subsequent forensic analysis of the mark is problematic when a 3D structure is recorded into a 2D space. Although strict guidelines (BAFO) exist, these are time-consuming to follow and, due to their complexity, may produce errors. A 3D image capture and processing system might avoid the problems resulting from the 2D reduction process, simplifying the guidelines and reducing errors. Proposed Solution: a series of experiments are described in this paper to demonstrate that the potential of a 3D system might produce suitable results. The experiments tested precision and accuracy of the traditional 2D and 3D methods. A 3D image capture device minimises the amount of angular distortion, therefore such a system has the potential to create more robust forensic evidence for use in courts. A first set of experiments tested and demonstrated which method of forensic analysis creates the least amount of intra-operator error. A second set tested and demonstrated which method of image capture creates the least amount of inter-operator error and visual distortion. In a third set the effects of angular distortion on 2D and 3D methods of image capture were evaluated.

  9. Authentication of forensic DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Davidson, Ariane; Grafit, Arnon

    2010-02-01

    Over the past twenty years, DNA analysis has revolutionized forensic science, and has become a dominant tool in law enforcement. Today, DNA evidence is key to the conviction or exoneration of suspects of various types of crime, from theft to rape and murder. However, the disturbing possibility that DNA evidence can be faked has been overlooked. It turns out that standard molecular biology techniques such as PCR, molecular cloning, and recently developed whole genome amplification (WGA), enable anyone with basic equipment and know-how to produce practically unlimited amounts of in vitro synthesized (artificial) DNA with any desired genetic profile. This artificial DNA can then be applied to surfaces of objects or incorporated into genuine human tissues and planted in crime scenes. Here we show that the current forensic procedure fails to distinguish between such samples of blood, saliva, and touched surfaces with artificial DNA, and corresponding samples with in vivo generated (natural) DNA. Furthermore, genotyping of both artificial and natural samples with Profiler Plus((R)) yielded full profiles with no anomalies. In order to effectively deal with this problem, we developed an authentication assay, which distinguishes between natural and artificial DNA based on methylation analysis of a set of genomic loci: in natural DNA, some loci are methylated and others are unmethylated, while in artificial DNA all loci are unmethylated. The assay was tested on natural and artificial samples of blood, saliva, and touched surfaces, with complete success. Adopting an authentication assay for casework samples as part of the forensic procedure is necessary for maintaining the high credibility of DNA evidence in the judiciary system.

  10. Distribution of forensic marker allelic frequencies in Pernambuco, Northestern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, S M; Souza, C A; Rabelo, K C N; Souza, P R E; Moura, R R; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S

    2015-04-30

    Pernambuco is one of the 27 federal units of Brazil, ranking seventh in the number of inhabitants. We examined the allele frequencies of 13 short tandem repeat loci (CFS1PO, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D21S11, FGA, TH01, vWA, and TPOX), the minimum recommended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and commonly used in forensic genetics laboratories in Brazil, in a sample of 609 unrelated individuals from all geographic regions of Pernambuco. The allele frequencies ranged from 5 to 47.2%. No significant differences for any loci analyzed were observed compared with other publications in other various regions of Brazil. Most of the markers observed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The occurrence of the allele 47.2 (locus FGA) and alleles 35.1 and 39 (locus D21S11), also described in a single study of the Brazilian population, was observed. The other forensic parameters analyzed (matching probability, power of discrimination, polymorphic information content, paternity exclusion, complement factor I, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity) indicated that the studied markers are very informative for human forensic identification purposes in the Pernambuco population.

  11. Forensics and mitochondrial DNA: applications, debates, and foundations.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Allard, Marc W; Wilson, Mark R; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    2003-01-01

    Debate on the validity and reliability of scientific methods often arises in the courtroom. When the government (i.e., the prosecution) is the proponent of evidence, the defense is obliged to challenge its admissibility. Regardless, those who seek to use DNA typing methodologies to analyze forensic biological evidence have a responsibility to understand the technology and its applications so a proper foundation(s) for its use can be laid. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), an extranuclear genome, has certain features that make it desirable for forensics, namely, high copy number, lack of recombination, and matrilineal inheritance. mtDNA typing has become routine in forensic biology and is used to analyze old bones, teeth, hair shafts, and other biological samples where nuclear DNA content is low. To evaluate results obtained by sequencing the two hypervariable regions of the control region of the human mtDNA genome, one must consider the genetically related issues of nomenclature, reference population databases, heteroplasmy, paternal leakage, recombination, and, of course, interpretation of results. We describe the approaches, the impact some issues may have on interpretation of mtDNA analyses, and some issues raised in the courtroom.

  12. Moral Status and the Wrongness of Paternalism

    PubMed Central

    Birks, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I consider the view that paternalism is wrong when it demeans or diminishes the paternalizee’s moral status (the Moral Status Argument). I argue that we should reject the Moral Status Argument because it is both too narrow and too broad. It is too narrow because it cannot account for the wrongness of some of the most objectionable paternalistic interventions, namely strong paternalistic interventions. It is too broad because it is unable to distinguish between wrongful paternalistic acts that are plausibly considered more wrong than other wrongful paternalistic acts. PMID:25075133

  13. Exploring Trends in Forensic Odontology

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Ain, Tasneem S.; Sultan, Saima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Forensic odontology nowadays has become a developing science and is of great importance to society. It is important that dental practitioners should have a proper knowledge of forensics as the need has increased greatly over the last decades due to the unprecedented demand from the criminal justice including terrorism in Kashmir valley (J&K India). Materials and Methods: Data was collected based on questionnaire survey among qualified dental practitioners related to their awareness of forensic odontology. Results: A total number of 235 dental practitioners responded to the questionnaire. Results showed that there was a low confidence, in handling of forensic odontology related cases among dental practitioners and majority of dental practitioners were not having any formal training in forensic odontology. Conclusion: Each dental practitioner has a responsibility to understand the forensic implications associated with the practice of his profession and thus he should work sincerely enough so to ensure his contribution in the field of forensic odontology. PMID:25654026

  14. Exploring trends in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra Nath; Gowhar, Owais; Ain, Tasneem S; Sultan, Saima

    2014-12-01

    Forensic odontology nowadays has become a developing science and is of great importance to society. It is important that dental practitioners should have a proper knowledge of forensics as the need has increased greatly over the last decades due to the unprecedented demand from the criminal justice including terrorism in Kashmir valley (J&K India). Data was collected based on questionnaire survey among qualified dental practitioners related to their awareness of forensic odontology. A total number of 235 dental practitioners responded to the questionnaire. RESULTS showed that there was a low confidence, in handling of forensic odontology related cases among dental practitioners and majority of dental practitioners were not having any formal training in forensic odontology. Each dental practitioner has a responsibility to understand the forensic implications associated with the practice of his profession and thus he should work sincerely enough so to ensure his contribution in the field of forensic odontology.

  15. Forensic Applications of LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hark, Richard R.; East, Lucille J.

    Forensic science is broadly defined as the application of science to matters of the law. Practitioners typically use multidisciplinary scientific techniques for the analysis of physical evidence in an attempt to establish or exclude an association between a suspect and the scene of a crime.

  16. Application of Short Tandem Repeat markers in diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies and forensic DNA investigation in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chishti, Hafsah Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ajmal, Muhammad; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-09-15

    Short Tandem Repeat (STR) genetic markers hold great potential in forensic investigations, molecular diagnostics and molecular genetics research. AmpFlSTR® Identifiler™ PCR amplification kit is a multiplex system for co-amplification of 15 STR markers used worldwide in forensic investigations. This study attempts to assess forensic validity of these STRs in Pakistani population and to investigate its applicability in quick and simultaneous diagnosis and tracing parental source of common chromosomal aneuploidies. Samples from 554 healthy Pakistani individuals from 5 different ethnicities were analyzed for forensic parameters using Identifiler STRs and 74 patients' samples with different aneuploidies were evaluated for diagnostic strengths of these markers. All STRs hold sufficient forensic applicability in Pakistani population with paternity index between 1.5 and 3.5, polymorphic information content from 0.63 to 0.87 and discrimination power ≥0.9 (except TPOX locus). Variation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed at some loci reflecting selective breeding and intermarriages trend in Pakistan. Among aneuploidic samples, all trisomies were precisely detectable while aneuploidies involving sex chromosomes or missing chromosomes were not clearly detectable using Identifiler STRs. Parental origin of aneuploidy was traceable in 92.54% patients. The studied STR markers are valuable tools for forensic application in Pakistan and utilizable for quick and simultaneous identification of some common trisomic conditions. Adding more sex chromosome specific STR markers can immensely increase the diagnostic and forensic potential of this system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Location tracking forensics on mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Stefan; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    The spread of navigation devices has increased significantly over the last 10 years. With the help of the current development of even smaller navigation receiver units it is to navigate with almost any current smart phone. Modern navigation systems are no longer limited to satellite navigation, but use current techniques, e.g. WLAN localization. Due to the increased use of navigation devices their relevance to forensic investigations has risen rapidly. Because navigation, for example with navigation equipment and smartphones, have become common place these days, also the amount of saved navigation data has risen rapidly. All of these developments lead to a necessary forensic analysis of these devices. However, there are very few current procedures for investigating of navigation devices. Navigation data is forensically interesting because by the position of the devices in most cases the location and the traveled path of the owner can be reconstructed. In this work practices for forensic analysis of navigation devices are developed. Different devices will be analyzed and it is attempted, by means of forensic procedures to restore the traveled path of the mobile device. For analysis of the various devices different software and hardware is used. There will be presented common procedures for securing and testing of mobile devices. Further there will be represented the specials in the investigation of each device. The different classes considered are GPS handhelds, mobile navigation devices and smartphones. It will be attempted, wherever possible, to read all data of the device. The aim is to restore complete histories of the navigation data and to forensically study and analyze these data. This is realized by the usage of current forensic software e.g. TomTology or Oxygen Forensic Suite. It is also attempted to use free software whenever possible. Further alternative methods are used (e.g. rooting) to access locked data of the unit. To limit the practical work the

  18. Untreated perinatal paternal depression: Effects on offspring.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Salvatore; Fusco, Maria Luigia

    2017-06-01

    Transition to parenthood represents an important life event which increases vulnerability to psychological disorders. Aim of this article is to analyze all studies which investigated the effects of untreated perinatal paternal depression in offspring. We searched pertinent, peer-reviewed articles published in English (January 1980 to April 2016) on MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Science.gov. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of the reviewed studies suffer from methodological limitations, including the small sample, the lack of a structured psychiatric diagnosis, and inclusion bias. Despite such limitations, paternal depression seems to be associated with an increased risk of developmental and behavioural problems and even psychiatric disorders in offspring. In particular, in infants and toddlers such problems vary from increased crying to hyperactivity and conduct problems to psychological and developmental impairment, and poor social outcomes. School-age children of depressed fathers have a doubled risk for suffering from specific psychiatric disorders. Hence, facilitating access to vigorous and evidence based treatments is a public health opportunity for improving the quality of life of depressed parents and their children. Evidences emerging from this review actually suggest that the traditional gender-focused approach to perinatal mood disorders should be completed by a family-centred approach, in order to improve the effectiveness of perinatal mental health programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Developing forensic reference database by 18 autosomal STR for DNA identification in Republic of Belarus].

    PubMed

    Tsybovskii, I S; Veremeichik, V M; Kotova, S A; Kritskaya, S V; Evmenenko, S A; Udina, I G

    2017-02-01

    For the Republic of Belarus, development of a forensic reference database on the basis of 18 autosomal microsatellites (STR) using a population dataset (N = 1040), “familial” genotypic dataset (N = 2550) obtained from expertise performance of paternity testing, and a dataset of genotypes from a criminal registration database (N = 8756) is described. Population samples studied consist of 80% ethnic Belarusians and 20% individuals of other nationality or of mixed origin (by questionnaire data). Genotypes of 12346 inhabitants of the Republic of Belarus from 118 regional samples studied by 18 autosomal microsatellites are included in the sample: 16 tetranucleotide STR (D2S1338, TPOX, D3S1358, CSF1PO, D5S818, D8S1179, D7S820, THO1, vWA, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11, F13B, and FGA) and two pentanucleotide STR (Penta D and Penta E). The samples studied are in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium according to distribution of genotypes by 18 STR. Significant differences were not detected between discrete populations or between samples from various historical ethnographic regions of the Republic of Belarus (Western and Eastern Polesie, Podneprovye, Ponemanye, Poozerye, and Center), which indicates the absence of prominent genetic differentiation. Statistically significant differences between the studied genotypic datasets also were not detected, which made it possible to combine the datasets and consider the total sample as a unified forensic reference database for 18 “criminalistic” STR loci. Differences between reference database of the Republic of Belarus and Russians and Ukrainians by the distribution of the range of autosomal STR also were not detected, corresponding to a close genetic relationship of the three Eastern Slavic nations mediated by common origin and intense mutual migrations. Significant differences by separate STR loci between the reference database of Republic of Belarus and populations of Southern and Western Slavs were observed. The

  20. Forensic learning disability nursing skills and competencies: a study of forensic and non-forensic nurses.

    PubMed

    Mason, Tom; Phipps, Dianne

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the skills and competencies of forensic learning disability nurses in the United Kingdom. The two sample populations were forensic learning disability nurses from the high, medium, and low secure psychiatric services and non-forensic learning disability nurses from generic services. An information gathering schedule was used to collect the data; of 1200 schedules, 643 were returned for a response rate of 53.5%. The data identified the "top ten" problems that forensic learning disability nurses may encounter, the skills and competencies necessary to overcome them, and the areas that need to be developed in the future. The results indicated that the forensic learning disability nurses tended to focus on the physical aspects to the role whilst the non-forensic learning disability nurses tended to perceive the forensic role in relational terms. This has implications for practice, policy, and procedures.

  1. Intergenerational Comparisons of Paternal Korean Child Rearing Practices and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Kwanghee; Honig, Alice Sterling

    2000-01-01

    Explored possible antecedents of paternal child rearing in middle-class, two-parent, Korean families. Found that fathers reported disciplinary practices similar to those of their own fathers. Fathers reported more nurturance and acceptance/flexibility than grandfathers. Paternal job satisfaction, relationship with own mother, and educational…

  2. Factors Associated with Perceived Paternal Involvement in Childrearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Susan; Thompson, Vetta L. Sanders

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed African American and white fathers living with their young children and the children's mothers regarding variables associated with perceived paternal involvement in child care. Results indicated that ethnicity, gender role orientation, and perceived skill at child care related to higher levels of perceived paternal engagement in and…

  3. Fathers in Turkey: Paternity Characteristics, Gender Role, Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ünüvar, Perihan

    2017-01-01

    Objective of this study is to examine the correlation the quality of paternity, gender roles and communication skills of fathers. The scores in the scale of supporting developmental tasks were used in order to determine the quality of paternity. The other data collection tools were the BEM sex role inventory and the communication skills inventory.…

  4. First Things First: Paternity and Child Support for Nonmarital Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slayton, Ann

    1993-01-01

    Establishing a child's legal paternity is the first step to gaining specific rights and benefits which can be critical to a child's well-being, such as emotional and financial security. Discusses specific procedures that Washington, Virginia, and other states have enacted to more easily establish paternity. (MDM)

  5. Genotype Reconstruction of Paternity in European Lobsters (Homarus gammarus)

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Charlie D.; Hodgson, David J.; André, Carl; Sørdalen, Tonje K.; Knutsen, Halvor; Griffiths, Amber G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Decapod crustaceans exhibit considerable variation in fertilisation strategies, ranging from pervasive single paternity to the near-ubiquitous presence of multiple paternity, and such knowledge of mating systems and behaviour are required for the informed management of commercially-exploited marine fisheries. We used genetic markers to assess the paternity of individual broods in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, a species for which paternity structure is unknown. Using 13 multiplexed microsatellite loci, three of which are newly described in this study, we genotyped 10 eggs from each of 34 females collected from an Atlantic peninsula in the south-western United Kingdom. Single reconstructed paternal genotypes explained all observed progeny genotypes in each of the 34 egg clutches, and each clutch was fertilised by a different male. Simulations indicated that the probability of detecting multiple paternity was in excess of 95% if secondary sires account for at least a quarter of the brood, and in excess of 99% where additional sire success was approximately equal. Our results show that multiple paternal fertilisations are either absent, unusual, or highly skewed in favour of a single male among H. gammarus in this area. Potential mechanisms upholding single paternal fertilisation are discussed, along with the prospective utility of parentage assignments in evaluations of hatchery stocking and other fishery conservation approaches in light of this finding. PMID:26566271

  6. Fathers and Families: Paternal Factors in Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biller, Henry B.

    Examining the implications of research findings concerning the impact of paternal involvement in child development, this book elaborates on how variations in paternal involvement affect many different dimensions of child and parent development. The 12 chapters discuss the role of fathers in regard to: (1) the advantages of two-parent families; (2)…

  7. Genotype Reconstruction of Paternity in European Lobsters (Homarus gammarus).

    PubMed

    Ellis, Charlie D; Hodgson, David J; André, Carl; Sørdalen, Tonje K; Knutsen, Halvor; Griffiths, Amber G F

    2015-01-01

    Decapod crustaceans exhibit considerable variation in fertilisation strategies, ranging from pervasive single paternity to the near-ubiquitous presence of multiple paternity, and such knowledge of mating systems and behaviour are required for the informed management of commercially-exploited marine fisheries. We used genetic markers to assess the paternity of individual broods in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, a species for which paternity structure is unknown. Using 13 multiplexed microsatellite loci, three of which are newly described in this study, we genotyped 10 eggs from each of 34 females collected from an Atlantic peninsula in the south-western United Kingdom. Single reconstructed paternal genotypes explained all observed progeny genotypes in each of the 34 egg clutches, and each clutch was fertilised by a different male. Simulations indicated that the probability of detecting multiple paternity was in excess of 95% if secondary sires account for at least a quarter of the brood, and in excess of 99% where additional sire success was approximately equal. Our results show that multiple paternal fertilisations are either absent, unusual, or highly skewed in favour of a single male among H. gammarus in this area. Potential mechanisms upholding single paternal fertilisation are discussed, along with the prospective utility of parentage assignments in evaluations of hatchery stocking and other fishery conservation approaches in light of this finding.

  8. Parental Psychopathology and Paternal Child Neglect in Late Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Chris; Mezzich, Ada C.; Day, Bang-Shiuh

    2006-01-01

    We aimed at determining the association of both severity of paternal and maternal substance use disorder (SUD) and psychiatric disorders with paternal child neglect severity during late childhood. The sample comprised 146 intact SUD (n=71) and non SUD (n=75) families with a 10-12 year old female or male biological offspring. The average age of…

  9. Kinetics and specificity of paternal mitochondrial elimination in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lianwan; Liang, Qian; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Miao, Long; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-09-01

    In most eukaryotes, mitochondria are inherited maternally. The autophagy process is critical for paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how paternal mitochondria, but not maternal mitochondria, are selectively targeted for degradation is poorly understood. Here we report that mitochondrial dynamics have a profound effect on PME. A defect in fission of paternal mitochondria delays PME, whereas a defect in fusion of paternal mitochondria accelerates PME. Surprisingly, a defect in maternal mitochondrial fusion delays PME, which is reversed by a fission defect in maternal mitochondria or by increasing maternal mitochondrial membrane potential using oligomycin. Electron microscopy and tomography analyses reveal that a proportion of maternal mitochondria are compromised when they fail to fuse normally, leading to their competition for the autophagy machinery with damaged paternal mitochondria and delayed PME. Our study indicates that mitochondrial dynamics play a critical role in regulating both the kinetics and the specificity of PME.

  10. Maternal and paternal age and risk of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Croen, Lisa A; Najjar, Daniel V; Fireman, Bruce; Grether, Judith K

    2007-04-01

    To explore the association between maternal and paternal age and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in offspring. Historical birth cohort study. Kaiser Permanente (KP) in Northern California. All singleton children born at KP from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 1999, were included in the study. We identified 593 children who had ASD diagnoses (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, code 299.0 or 299.8) recorded 2 or more times in KP outpatient databases before May 2005. These children were compared with all 132,251 remaining singleton KP births. Main Exposures Maternal and paternal age at birth of offspring. Relative risks (RRs) estimated from proportional hazards regression models. Risk of ASDs evaluated in relation to maternal and paternal age, adjusted for each other and for the sex, birth date, and birth order of the child, maternal and paternal educational level, and maternal and paternal race/ethnicity. Risk of ASDs increased significantly with each 10-year increase in maternal age (adjusted RR, 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.62) and paternal age (RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.09-1.51). Adjusted RRs for both maternal and paternal age were elevated for children with autistic disorder (maternal age: RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.87-1.60; paternal age: RR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.06-1.69) and children with Asperger disorder or pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (maternal age: RR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.09-1.93; paternal age: RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.99-1.55). Associations with parental age were somewhat stronger for girls than for boys, although sex differences were not statistically significant. Advanced maternal and paternal ages are independently associated with ASD risk.

  11. Paternal age at childbirth and eating disorders in offspring.

    PubMed

    Javaras, K N; Rickert, M E; Thornton, L M; Peat, C M; Baker, J H; Birgegård, A; Norring, C; Landén, M; Almqvist, C; Larsson, H; Lichtenstein, P; Bulik, C M; D'Onofrio, B M

    2017-02-01

    Advanced paternal age at childbirth is associated with psychiatric disorders in offspring, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. However, few studies have investigated paternal age's relationship with eating disorders in offspring. In a large, population-based cohort, we examined the association between paternal age and offspring eating disorders, and whether that association remains after adjustment for potential confounders (e.g. parental education level) that may be related to late/early selection into fatherhood and to eating disorder incidence. Data for 2 276 809 individuals born in Sweden 1979-2001 were extracted from Swedish population and healthcare registers. The authors used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the effect of paternal age on the first incidence of healthcare-recorded anorexia nervosa (AN) and all eating disorders (AED) occurring 1987-2009. Models were adjusted for sex, birth order, maternal age at childbirth, and maternal and paternal covariates including country of birth, highest education level, and lifetime psychiatric and criminal history. Even after adjustment for covariates including maternal age, advanced paternal age was associated with increased risk, and younger paternal age with decreased risk, of AN and AED. For example, the fully adjusted hazard ratio for the 45+ years (v. the 25-29 years) paternal age category was 1.32 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-1.53] for AN and 1.26 (95% CI 1.13-1.40) for AED. In this large, population-based cohort, paternal age at childbirth was positively associated with eating disorders in offspring, even after adjustment for potential confounders. Future research should further explore potential explanations for the association, including de novo mutations in the paternal germline.

  12. Sexing of forensic samples using PCR.

    PubMed

    Pascal, O; Aubert, D; Gilbert, E; Moisan, J P

    1991-01-01

    A rapid protocol has been established for sexing forensic samples by the Polymerase Chain Reaction method. Three sets of primer were used, two specific for Y chromosome repetitive sequences and one specific for X chromosome repetitive sequences. Detailed procedures of experiments, the controls and the applications to testing bloodstains and a vaginal swab are presented. The sensitivity of the test and problems due to contamination are discussed.

  13. Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pomeroy, Emma; Wells, Jonathan CK; Cole, Tim J; O'Callaghan, Michael; Stock, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    The patterns of association between maternal or paternal and neonatal phenotype may offer insight into how neonatal characteristics are shaped by evolutionary processes, such as conflicting parental interests in fetal investment and obstetric constraints. Paternal interests are theoretically served by maximizing fetal growth, and maternal interests by managing investment in current and future offspring, but whether paternal and maternal influences act on different components of overall size is unknown. We tested whether parents' prepregnancy height and body mass index (BMI) were related to neonatal anthropometry (birthweight, head circumference, absolute and proportional limb segment and trunk lengths, subcutaneous fat) among 1,041 Australian neonates using stepwise linear regression. Maternal and paternal height and maternal BMI were associated with birthweight. Paternal height related to offspring forearm and lower leg lengths, maternal height and BMI to neonatal head circumference, and maternal BMI to offspring adiposity. Principal components analysis identified three components of variability reflecting neonatal “head and trunk skeletal size,” “adiposity,” and “limb lengths.” Regression analyses of the component scores supported the associations of head and trunk size or adiposity with maternal anthropometry, and limb lengths with paternal anthropometry. Our results suggest that while neonatal fatness reflects environmental conditions (maternal physiology), head circumference and limb and trunk lengths show differing associations with parental anthropometry. These patterns may reflect genetics, parental imprinting and environmental influences in a manner consistent with parental conflicts of interest. Paternal height may relate to neonatal limb length as a means of increasing fetal growth without exacerbating the risk of obstetric complications. Am J Phys Anthropol 156:625–636, 2015. PMID:25502164

  14. Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Emma; Wells, Jonathan C K; Cole, Tim J; O'Callaghan, Michael; Stock, Jay T

    2015-04-01

    The patterns of association between maternal or paternal and neonatal phenotype may offer insight into how neonatal characteristics are shaped by evolutionary processes, such as conflicting parental interests in fetal investment and obstetric constraints. Paternal interests are theoretically served by maximizing fetal growth, and maternal interests by managing investment in current and future offspring, but whether paternal and maternal influences act on different components of overall size is unknown. We tested whether parents' prepregnancy height and body mass index (BMI) were related to neonatal anthropometry (birthweight, head circumference, absolute and proportional limb segment and trunk lengths, subcutaneous fat) among 1,041 Australian neonates using stepwise linear regression. Maternal and paternal height and maternal BMI were associated with birthweight. Paternal height related to offspring forearm and lower leg lengths, maternal height and BMI to neonatal head circumference, and maternal BMI to offspring adiposity. Principal components analysis identified three components of variability reflecting neonatal "head and trunk skeletal size," "adiposity," and "limb lengths." Regression analyses of the component scores supported the associations of head and trunk size or adiposity with maternal anthropometry, and limb lengths with paternal anthropometry. Our results suggest that while neonatal fatness reflects environmental conditions (maternal physiology), head circumference and limb and trunk lengths show differing associations with parental anthropometry. These patterns may reflect genetics, parental imprinting and environmental influences in a manner consistent with parental conflicts of interest. Paternal height may relate to neonatal limb length as a means of increasing fetal growth without exacerbating the risk of obstetric complications. © 2014 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Forensic entomology: implementing quality assurance for expertise work.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Emmanuel; Dourel, Laurent

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Forensic Entomology (Institut de Recherche Criminelle de la Gendarmerie Nationale, France) was accredited by the French Committee of Accreditation (Cofrac's Healthcare section) in October 2007 on the basis of NF EN ISO/CEI 17025 standard. It was the first accreditation in this specific field of forensic sciences in France and in Europe. The present paper introduces the accreditation process in forensic entomology (FE) through the experience of the Department of Forensic Entomology. Based upon the identification of necrophagous insects and the study of their biology, FE must, as any other expertise work in forensic sciences, demonstrate integrity and good working practice to satisfy both the courts and the scientific community. FE does not, strictly speaking, follow an analytical method. This could explain why, to make up for a lack of appropriate quality reference, a specific documentation was drafted and written by the staff of the Department of Forensic Entomology in order to define working methods complying with quality standards (testing methods). A quality assurance system is laborious to set up and maintain and can be perceived as complex, time-consuming and never-ending. However, a survey performed in 2011 revealed that the accreditation process in the frame of expertise work has led to new well-defined working habits, based on an effort at transparency. It also requires constant questioning and a proactive approach, both profitable for customers (magistrates, investigators) and analysts (forensic entomologists).

  16. Theory and the scientific basis for forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Clifford; Boyd, Donna C

    2011-11-01

    Forensic anthropology has long been criticized for its lack of a strong theoretical and scientific foundation. This paper addresses this problem by examining the role of theory in forensic anthropology at different hierarchical levels (high-level, middle-range, and low-level) and the relevance of various theoretical concepts (taphonomic, agency, behavioral archaeology, nonlinear systems, and methodological theories) to the interpretation of forensic contexts. Application of these theories to a case study involving the search for the WWII Goettge Patrol illustrates the explanatory power these theories offer to the interpretation of forensic events as the end product of an often complex set of environmental constraints and behavioral interactions and choices. It also emphasizes the importance of case studies in theory building and hypothesis testing. A theoretical foundation does indeed currently exist in forensic anthropology; however, a recognition and broader implementation of anthropological (archaeological) theory is warranted and will further define forensic anthropology as a scientific endeavor. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid technology in forensic dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Pankaj; Datta, Sonia Sood

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) analysis methods have been applied to forensic cases. Forensic dental record comparison has been used for human identification in cases where destruction of bodily tissues or prolonged exposure to the environment has made other means of identification impractical, that is, after fire exposure or mass disaster. Teeth play an important role in identification and criminology, due to their unique characteristics and relatively high degree of physical and chemical resistance. The use of a DNA profile test in forensic dentistry offers a new perspective in human identification. The DNA is responsible for storing all the genetic material and is unique to each individual. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article gives an overview of the evolution of DNA technology in the last few years, highlighting its importance in cases of forensic investigation. PMID:23087582

  18. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid technology in forensic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Datta, Pankaj; Datta, Sonia Sood

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) analysis methods have been applied to forensic cases. Forensic dental record comparison has been used for human identification in cases where destruction of bodily tissues or prolonged exposure to the environment has made other means of identification impractical, that is, after fire exposure or mass disaster. Teeth play an important role in identification and criminology, due to their unique characteristics and relatively high degree of physical and chemical resistance. The use of a DNA profile test in forensic dentistry offers a new perspective in human identification. The DNA is responsible for storing all the genetic material and is unique to each individual. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article gives an overview of the evolution of DNA technology in the last few years, highlighting its importance in cases of forensic investigation.

  19. Perceptual expertise in forensic facial image comparison

    PubMed Central

    White, David; Phillips, P. Jonathon; Hahn, Carina A.; Hill, Matthew; O'Toole, Alice J.

    2015-01-01

    Forensic facial identification examiners are required to match the identity of faces in images that vary substantially, owing to changes in viewing conditions and in a person's appearance. These identifications affect the course and outcome of criminal investigations and convictions. Despite calls for research on sources of human error in forensic examination, existing scientific knowledge of face matching accuracy is based, almost exclusively, on people without formal training. Here, we administered three challenging face matching tests to a group of forensic examiners with many years' experience of comparing face images for law enforcement and government agencies. Examiners outperformed untrained participants and computer algorithms, thereby providing the first evidence that these examiners are experts at this task. Notably, computationally fusing responses of multiple experts produced near-perfect performance. Results also revealed qualitative differences between expert and non-expert performance. First, examiners' superiority was greatest at longer exposure durations, suggestive of more entailed comparison in forensic examiners. Second, experts were less impaired by image inversion than non-expert students, contrasting with face memory studies that show larger face inversion effects in high performers. We conclude that expertise in matching identity across unfamiliar face images is supported by processes that differ qualitatively from those supporting memory for individual faces. PMID:26336174

  20. Molecular Advancements in Forensic Odontology.

    PubMed

    Babu Rs, A; Rose, D

    2015-05-11

    Forensic odontology explores the field of human identification through dental tissues in cases where there is the destruction of body tissues in criminal investigations and mass disasters. Forensic odontology involves dentists participating in legal and criminal issues. Parameters such as age and gender identification are important in identifying the person or persons. Over the last two decades, the molecular aspect of forensic sciences has increased, and these molecular techniques now provide a novel approach to forensic odontology. Molecular advancements in science like DNA analysis have extended the range of forensic dentistry, as teeth possess the character of resistance toward physical or chemical aggressions. Teeth provide the abundant space for DNA, and hence teeth represent an excellent source of genomic DNA. The present paper focusses on molecular advancements in the field of forensic odontology.

  1. Analytical and Radiochemistry for Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert Ernest; Dry, Donald E.; Kinman, William Scott

    2015-05-26

    Information about nonproliferation nuclear forensics, activities in forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, radio analytical work at LANL, radiochemical characterization capabilities, bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities, and future interests in forensics interactions.

  2. Forensic evaluations of adolescents: psychosocial and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Halikias, W

    2000-01-01

    The forensic evaluation of an adolescent who has been arrested or is facing adjudication has important ramifications for the youth's present and future welfare. This paper reviews the knowledge base pertinent to forensic evaluations of adolescents, including the legal, social, developmental, and psychological factors underpinning such assessments. It then outlines an approach to assessment that employs a tripartite model of history, interviews and observations, and psychological tests. The manner in which information is reported to decisionmakers is also scrutinized.

  3. Forensic radiology in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Manigandan, T.; Sumathy, C.; Elumalai, M.; Sathasivasubramanian, S.; Kannan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiography can play an important part in forensic odontology, mainly to establish identification. This may take the precise form of comparison between antemortem and postmortem radiographs. Radiographs may also be taken to determine the age of a minor victim and even help in the assessment of the sex and ethnic group. Comparable radiographs are an essential factor to confirm identification in a mass disaster. PMID:26015728

  4. Microbes as forensic indicators.

    PubMed

    Alan, G; Sarah, J P

    2012-09-01

    The forensic potential of microorganisms is becoming increasingly apparent as a consequence of advances in molecular sciences and genomics. This review discusses instances in which microbes, and in particular bacteria, can impact upon forensic investigations. There is increasing evidence that humans have an extremely diverse 'microbiome' that may prove useful in determining ethnicity, country of origin, and even personal identity. The human microbiome differs between regions of the body and may prove useful for determining the nature of stains such as those caused by saliva and vaginal fluid: it may even be possible to link the stains to the person responsible for them. Similarly, the composition of the microbiome present in a soil sample may prove a useful indicator of geographic origin or as a means of linking people, animals, or objects together or to a specific location. Microorganisms are important in the decay process and also influence the presence and concentration of alcohol, drugs, and other chemicals of forensic relevance. There is also a possibility that the entry of microorganisms into the body during the agonal period may prove useful for the diagnosis of drowning. The transmission of infectious diseases, and in particular sexually-transmitted diseases, can provide evidence linking a victim and a suspect. Microorganisms that cause fatal infections are not always identified at the time of death and may lead to the death being considered 'suspicious'. If a fatal infection can be linked to a hospital or medical procedure it can lead to prosecutions and therefore it is important to determine when and where an infection was acquired. Similarly, naturally acquired infections need to be distinguished from those that result from malicious transmission. Microorganisms can therefore provide evidence in many different forensic scenarios but most of the work is still at the experimental stage and there are therefore many opportunities for further research.

  5. Forensic Data Carving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povar, Digambar; Bhadran, V. K.

    File or data carving is a term used in the field of Cyber forensics. Cyber forensics is the process of acquisition, authentication, analysis and documentation of evidence extracted from and/or contained in a computer system, computer network and digital media. Extracting data (file) out of undifferentiated blocks (raw data) is called as carving. Identifying and recovering files based on analysis of file formats is known as file carving. In Cyber Forensics, carving is a helpful technique in finding hidden or deleted files from digital media. A file can be hidden in areas like lost clusters, unallocated clusters and slack space of the disk or digital media. To use this method of extraction, a file should have a standard file signature called a file header (start of the file). A search is performed to locate the file header and continued until the file footer (end of the file) is reached. The data between these two points will be extracted and analyzed to validate the file. The extraction algorithm uses different methods of carving depending on the file formats.

  6. Forensic injury biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Wilson C; Erickson, Mark S; Power, Erik D

    2007-01-01

    Forensic injury biomechanics is the science that relates mechanical forces to disruption of anatomical regions of the human body. In this review, we introduce (a) how scaling techniques can be used to describe injury severity and probability of death; (b) how a simple ratio, the factor of risk, and more sophisticated injury risk functions can be used to determine the probability of injury; and (c) how injury criteria (also known as tolerance limits) are defined for the head and neck. Methods for establishing injury causation are then illustrated by real-world examples drawn from litigation involving motor vehicle collisions and slips, trips and falls. Those factors that distinguish litigation from basic and applied research are also discussed, including the criteria for admissibility of expert opinions and the level of certainty used as the basis for these opinions. The criteria that must be met to support opinions on causation at both epidemiological and individual levels are also noted. If the expert appreciates the difference between the demands of ligation and those of basic and applied research, expert opinion can play a crucial role in the decision-making process that characterizes litigation. Because forensic injury biomechanics is central to opinions on injury causation, and because causation is often the key to determinations of who is at fault, forensic injury biomechanics can be the deciding factor in many personal injury, products and premises liability, wrongful death, and criminal cases.

  7. Tattoos: forensic considerations.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W

    2013-12-01

    Tattooing refers to marking of the skin by puncturing and introducing pigmented material. Although it derives from a Polynesian word, tautau, decorative tattooing has been found in most societies over many centuries. The purpose of tattooing has varied from simple decoration, to a marker of social rank, criminal and noncriminal group membership, or a particular rite of passage in tribal communities. Tattooing may be used in medicine to mark areas for radiotherapy, and may occur inadvertently associated with certain occupations such as coal mining. Forensically, tattoos may be very useful in assisting with body identification if facial features or fingers have been damaged or removed. Aspects of a decedent's history may also be deduced from certain tattoos such as military tattoos in service personnel, rudimentary line tattoos with antisocial and anti-police messages in ex-prisoners, and syringes, marihuana leaves or mushrooms in illicit drug users. Tattoos have become more common in recent years in younger individuals in the West and so should be expected to be found with increasing incidence at the time of forensic autopsy examinations. Increasing population movements also mean that less common tattoos may be encountered during forensic evaluations.

  8. Telomere length, family history, and paternal age in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Malaspina, Dolores; Dracxler, Roberta; Walsh-Messinger, Julie; Harlap, Susan; Goetz, Raymond R; Keefe, David; Perrin, Mary C

    2014-07-01

    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is longer in association with advanced paternal age, but this association has not been examined along with family history (FH) in schizophrenia. LTL was measured by PCR and compared across cases and controls as part of a study to examine the characteristics of paternal age related schizophrenia. The 53 schizophrenia cases had similar mean LTL as 20 controls, although cases were significantly older than controls and overwhelmingly smoked cigarettes. Multivariate analyses showed that a FH of schizophrenia was associated with longer LTL in both male and female cases. Later paternal age was also related to longer LTL in male cases, but with shorter LTL in female cases. Male cases with older fathers and a FH had the longest LTL. The genetic architecture associated with a familial risk for schizophrenia may include pathways that lengthen LTL. Paternal aging conferred an additional increase in LTL lengthening in male cases, but reduced LTL in female cases. The gender difference in LTL for paternal aging is consistent with the severe illness features reported for female cases with older fathers and could implicate epigenetic alterations in the paternal X chromosomal region with advanced paternal age in association with the risk for schizophrenia.

  9. Telomere length, family history, and paternal age in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Malaspina, Dolores; Dracxler, Roberta; Walsh-Messinger, Julie; Harlap, Susan; Goetz, Raymond R; Keefe, David; Perrin, Mary C

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is longer in association with advanced paternal age, but this association has not been examined along with family history (FH) in schizophrenia. LTL was measured by PCR and compared across cases and controls as part of a study to examine the characteristics of paternal age related schizophrenia. The 53 schizophrenia cases had similar mean LTL as 20 controls, although cases were significantly older than controls and overwhelmingly smoked cigarettes. Multivariate analyses showed that a FH of schizophrenia was associated with longer LTL in both male and female cases. Later paternal age was also related to longer LTL in male cases, but with shorter LTL in female cases. Male cases with older fathers and a FH had the longest LTL. The genetic architecture associated with a familial risk for schizophrenia may include pathways that lengthen LTL. Paternal aging conferred an additional increase in LTL lengthening in male cases, but reduced LTL in female cases. The gender difference in LTL for paternal aging is consistent with the severe illness features reported for female cases with older fathers and could implicate epigenetic alterations in the paternal X chromosomal region with advanced paternal age in association with the risk for schizophrenia. PMID:25077175

  10. Forensic science: the truth is out there

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Lynne D.

    2002-06-01

    Criminalistics, one of the many sub-divisions of forensic science, is an applied science in which items of evidence are analyzed to provide investigative information and scientific evidence to be used in courts of law. Laboratories associated with governmental public agencies are typically involved in criminal cases as opposed to civil cases, and those types of cases that fall within the jurisdiction of the particular agency. Common analytical divisions within criminalistics laboratories include blood alcohol testing, toxicology, narcotics, questioned documents, biology, firearms, latent fingerprints, physical and trace evidence sections. Specialized field investigative services may be provided in the areas of clandestine drug laboratories and major crimes (firearms, biology, trace, arson/explosives). Forensic science best practice requires the use of non-destructive testing whenever reasonably possible. Several technically difficult situations (bodies and evidence encased in cement and metal) are presented as a challenge to audience.

  11. New perspectives in forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Dirkmaat, Dennis C; Cabo, Luis L; Ousley, Stephen D; Symes, Steven A

    2008-01-01

    A critical review of the conceptual and practical evolution of forensic anthropology during the last two decades serves to identify two key external factors and four tightly inter-related internal methodological advances that have significantly affected the discipline. These key developments have not only altered the current practice of forensic anthropology, but also its goals, objectives, scope, and definition. The development of DNA analysis techniques served to undermine the classic role of forensic anthropology as a field almost exclusively focused on victim identification. The introduction of the Daubert criteria in the courtroom presentation of scientific testimony accompanied the development of new human comparative samples and tools for data analysis and sharing, resulting in a vastly enhanced role for quantitative methods in human skeletal analysis. Additionally, new questions asked of forensic anthropologists, beyond identity, required sound scientific bases and expanded the scope of the field. This environment favored the incipient development of the interrelated fields of forensic taphonomy, forensic archaeology, and forensic trauma analysis, fields concerned with the reconstruction of events surrounding death. Far from representing the mere addition of new methodological techniques, these disciplines (especially, forensic taphonomy) provide forensic anthropology with a new conceptual framework, which is broader, deeper, and more solidly entrenched in the natural sciences. It is argued that this new framework represents a true paradigm shift, as it modifies not only the way in which classic forensic anthropological questions are answered, but also the goals and tasks of forensic anthropologists, and their perception of what can be considered a legitimate question or problem to be answered within the field.

  12. DNA fingerprinting: its application in forensic case work.

    PubMed

    Bär, W; Hummel, K

    1991-01-01

    Forensic serology deals with cases of disputed paternity and criminal stains. The spectacular improvement using DNA-profiling is best demonstrated with cases of criminal stains where with the same ease as a suspect can be identified, an innocent person can be excluded. In cases with band-shifting, a statistical definition of a match applying Bayes theorem as a decision making tool seems mandatory since matching or non-matching cannot be treated as a binary event. Good postmortem DNA stability is found in brain cortex, lymph nodes and psoas muscle. DNA fingerprinting is also a perfect tool to investigate disputed identity of blood alcohol samples. In paternity cases, we recommend both multi locus and single locus probes in kinship cases, e.g. in mother-child-putative father cases as well as father-daughter and brother-sister incest cases, grandparent cases and two-men cases. For the biostatistical evaluation of SLP patterns the formal genetics for a system of multiple allelism is used and for multi locus probes the model of multiple diallelism is applicable.

  13. Investigation of paternity with alleged father deceased or missing: analysis of success at the end of the report.

    PubMed

    Basgalupp, Suelen Porto; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Schumacher, Simone; Gastaldo, André Zoratto; Santos Silva, Deborah Soares Bispo; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-09-01

    In this work we present a retrospective study of 858 cases of paternity investigation performed in Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil, from 2007 to 2012, where the alleged father was deceased or missing. These cases represent 3.3% (858/26187) of paternity tests performed in that period. Considering the analysis of 17 DNA short tandem repeat loci, we present here the proportion of cases with conclusive results according to the number of relatives of the unavailable alleged father investigated and their kinship. The results show 81.0% (695/858) of cases with conclusive results and their characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Forensic archaeology and anthropology : An Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Kate

    2005-09-01

    Forensic archaeology is an extremely powerful investigative discipline and, in combination with forensic anthropology, can provide a wealth of evidentiary information to police investigators and the forensic community. The re-emergence of forensic archaeology and anthropology within Australia relies on its diversification and cooperation with established forensic medical organizations, law enforcement forensic service divisions, and national forensic boards. This presents a unique opportunity to develop a new multidisciplinary approach to forensic archaeology/anthropology within Australia as we hold a unique set of environmental, social, and cultural conditions that diverge from overseas models and require different methodological approaches. In the current world political climate, more forensic techniques are being applied at scenes of mass disasters, genocide, and terrorism. This provides Australian forensic archaeology/anthropology with a unique opportunity to develop multidisciplinary models with contributions from psychological profiling, ballistics, sociopolitics, cultural anthropology, mortuary technicians, post-blast analysis, fire analysis, and other disciplines from the world of forensic science.

  15. Animal experimentation in forensic sciences: How far have we come?

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, C; Maderna, E; Rendinelli, A; Gibelli, D

    2015-09-01

    In the third millennium where ethical, ethological and cultural evolution seem to be leading more and more towards an inter-species society, the issue of animal experimentation is a moral dilemma. Speaking from a self-interested human perspective, avoiding all animal testing where human disease and therapy are concerned may be very difficult or even impossible; such testing may not be so easily justifiable when suffering-or killing-of non human animals is inflicted for forensic research. In order to verify how forensic scientists are evolving in this ethical issue, we undertook a systematic review of the current literature. We investigated the frequency of animal experimentation in forensic studies in the past 15 years and trends in publication in the main forensic science journals. Types of species, lesions inflicted, manner of sedation or anesthesia and euthanasia were examined in a total of 404 articles reviewed, among which 279 (69.1%) concerned studies involving animals sacrificed exclusively for the sake of the experiment. Killing still frequently includes painful methods such as blunt trauma, electrocution, mechanical asphyxia, hypothermia, and even exsanguination; of all these animals, apparently only 60.8% were anesthetized. The most recent call for a severe reduction if not a total halt to the use of animals in forensic sciences was made by Bernard Knight in 1992. In fact the principle of reduction and replacement, frequently respected in clinical research, must be considered the basis for forensic science research needing animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Applications and limitations of Forensic Biomechanics: a Bayesian perspective.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael D; Kohles, Sean S

    2010-02-01

    Forensic Biomechanics is an analytic method intended for presentation in a court of law. The method consists of the reconstruction of an injury mechanism followed by a comparison between the injury risk of the mechanism and the injury tolerance of the individual. In recent years some courts have excluded such testimony based, in part, on the inability of experts to quantify the potential error of the methods they relied upon in reaching their conclusions. The application of Bayes' Law to a forensic test of truth in a disputed matter allows for quantification of the error inherent in the method through the conditioning of the pre-test probability of the test outcome with the true and false positive rate of the test. The result of the calculation is the Error Odds (O(E)) for the test, or the ratio of correct to incorrect tests. We present an Error Odds analysis of seven previously published case studies in Forensic Biomechanics as an illustration of the utility of the O(E) as a metric for admissibility of testimony in the courts, with a minimum Error Odds ratio of 10 proposed as a threshold. The results of our analysis yielded only 1 of 7 cases of applied Forensic Biomechanics that surpassed the threshold for admissible testimony of 10, with most the cases falling below an O(E) of 3. The results of the present study suggest that the forensic application of biomechanics is potentially fraught with error. We suggest that an Error Odds analysis be incorporated in Forensic Biomechanics as part of the analysis as a form of quality control and as demonstrable evidence of the accuracy of the methodology. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Benchmarking forensic rulers and photographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Barns, Janae; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Measuring various items (evidence) at the scene of an investigation, exposed to the elements, is an instrumental part of systematic forensic science. The key to these measurements often rest on rulers, and a knowledge of their limitations is vital to their appropriate application. The aim of this study was to test forensic ruler accuracy and photographic distortion under conditions that simulate common use to provide a foundational basis for baseline accuracy of their use. A series of ABFO rulers from 2 anonymous manufactures were tested against gold standards for accuracy at various temperatures (-14, 0, 25 and 40 °C). At the same time a series of rulers were photographed at different angulations to test reproducibility and angular distortion. At room temperature a variation of 0.28% in the dimensions of the rulers were found with larger distortions at colder temperatures. Photographs taken with the camera above the rulers suffered the least distortion (approximately 6-10°) and there was no difference over time, nor with ruler background colour. The results from this study show that further investigation is required into preventing angular distortion, and show the need for increased training to those who would be in a situation requiring them to document the scene of a crime. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. A defence of medical paternalism: maximising patients' autonomy.

    PubMed Central

    Komrad, M S

    1983-01-01

    All illness represents a state of diminished autonomy and therefore the doctor-patient relationship necessarily and justifiably involves a degree of medical paternalism argues the author, an American medical student. In a broad-ranging paper he discusses the concepts of autonomy and paternalism in the context of the doctor-patient relationship. Given the necessary diminution of autonomy which illness inflicts, a limited form of medical paternalism, aimed at restoring or maximising the patient's autonomy is entirely acceptable, and indeed fundamental to the relationship he argues. However, the exercise of this paternalism should be flexible and related to the current 'level of autonomy' of the patient himself. An editorial in this issue comments briefly on this paper. PMID:6834402

  19. Paternal programming of offspring cardiometabolic diseases in later life

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Tsuprykov, Oleg; Yang, Xiaoping; Hocher, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Early – intrauterine – environmental factors are linked to the development of cardiovascular disease in later life. Traditionally, these factors are considered to be maternal factors such as maternal under and overnutrition, exposure to toxins, lack of micronutrients, and stress during pregnancy. However, in the recent years, it became obvious that also paternal environmental factors before conception and during sperm development determine the health of the offspring in later life. We will first describe clinical observational studies providing evidence for paternal programming of adulthood diseases in progeny. Next, we describe key animal studies proving this relationship, followed by a detailed analysis of our current understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of paternal programming. Alterations of noncoding sperm micro-RNAs, histone acetylation, and targeted as well as global DNA methylation seem to be in particular involved in paternal programming of offspring's diseases in later life. PMID:27457668

  20. A pilot study of paternal drug exposure: the Motherisk experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Candace Y W; Jin, Cheng; Mata, Andrea M; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Einarson, Adrienne; Koren, Gideon

    2010-06-01

    There is a dearth of information on paternal drug exposure at the time of conception. The Motherisk Program, established in 1985, is a teratology information and clinical consultation service on drug safety during pregnancy and lactation, as well as paternal exposure (PEx). Here, we reviewed for the first time our experience with PEx. This was an observational retrospective cohort study using a prospectively collected database. Telephone counselling records from January 2002 to December 2007, inclusive, were screened to identify cases concerning PEx. Of a total of 188,188 counselling requests over these 6 years, 301 (0.16%) pertained to PEx. Counselling was most frequently sought on methotrexate, finasteride, prednisone and azathioprine. For many drugs, limited or no information was available on PEx. Paternal exposure represents a small fraction of counselling requests to Motherisk. Our findings suggest that there is an ongoing need for information on paternal drug exposure. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Paternal exposure and counselling: experience of a Teratology Information Service.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Marco; Cesari, Elena; Cavaliere, Annafranca; Ligato, Maria Serena; Nobili, Elena; Visconti, Daniela; Caruso, Alessandro

    2008-09-01

    We describe paternal exposure and counselling in a selected population calling to an Italian Teratology Information Service (TIS). The majority of callers asked for paternal drug exposure (76%, drugs except chemotherapy) and treatment for cancer (17%, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy). Others asked for exposure to diagnostic radiations (4%), recreational drugs (2%) and occupational chemicals (1%). Among paternal drugs neurological compounds, immunosuppressive drugs and antiviral agents were the main reasons for calling. In humans, there are no evidences of birth defects after paternal exposures, but to minimize any possible risk, counselling in men exposed to radio and chemotherapy should recommend delaying conception for at least 3 months after the end of the therapy. Male patients treated with drugs, whose teratogenic potential has been well assessed or suspected for maternal exposure, should be advised to practice effective birth control during therapy and up to one or two cycles of spermatogenesis and to avoid semen contact with vaginal walls during first trimester of pregnancy.

  2. The nucleic acid revolution continues - will forensic biology become forensic molecular biology?

    PubMed

    Gunn, Peter; Walsh, Simon; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology has evolved far beyond that which could have been predicted at the time DNA identity testing was established. Indeed we should now perhaps be referring to "forensic molecular biology." Aside from DNA's established role in identifying the "who" in crime investigations, other developments in medical and developmental molecular biology are now ripe for application to forensic challenges. The impact of DNA methylation and other post-fertilization DNA modifications, plus the emerging role of small RNAs in the control of gene expression, is re-writing our understanding of human biology. It is apparent that these emerging technologies will expand forensic molecular biology to allow for inferences about "when" a crime took place and "what" took place. However, just as the introduction of DNA identity testing engendered many challenges, so the expansion of molecular biology into these domains will raise again the issues of scientific validity, interpretation, probative value, and infringement of personal liberties. This Commentary ponders some of these emerging issues, and presents some ideas on how they will affect the conduct of forensic molecular biology in the foreseeable future.

  3. The nucleic acid revolution continues – will forensic biology become forensic molecular biology?

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Peter; Walsh, Simon; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Molecular biology has evolved far beyond that which could have been predicted at the time DNA identity testing was established. Indeed we should now perhaps be referring to “forensic molecular biology.” Aside from DNA’s established role in identifying the “who” in crime investigations, other developments in medical and developmental molecular biology are now ripe for application to forensic challenges. The impact of DNA methylation and other post-fertilization DNA modifications, plus the emerging role of small RNAs in the control of gene expression, is re-writing our understanding of human biology. It is apparent that these emerging technologies will expand forensic molecular biology to allow for inferences about “when” a crime took place and “what” took place. However, just as the introduction of DNA identity testing engendered many challenges, so the expansion of molecular biology into these domains will raise again the issues of scientific validity, interpretation, probative value, and infringement of personal liberties. This Commentary ponders some of these emerging issues, and presents some ideas on how they will affect the conduct of forensic molecular biology in the foreseeable future. PMID:24634675

  4. 'O father: where art thou?'--Paternity assessment in an open fission-fusion society of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Krützen, Michael; Barré, Lynne M; Connor, Richard C; Mann, Janet; Sherwin, William B

    2004-07-01

    Sexually mature male bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay cooperate by pursuing distinct alliance strategies to monopolize females in reproductive condition. We present the results of a comprehensive study in a wild cetacean population to test whether male alliance membership is a prerequisite for reproductive success. We compared two methods for inferring paternity: both calculate a likelihood ratio, called the paternity index, between two opposing hypotheses, but they differ in the way that significance is applied to the data. The first method, a Bayesian approach commonly used in human paternity testing, appeared to be overly conservative for our data set, but would be less susceptible to assumptions if a larger number of microsatellite loci had been used. Using the second approach, the computer program cervus 2.0, we successfully assigned 11 paternities to nine males, and 17 paternities to 14 out of 139 sexually mature males at 95% and 80% confidence levels, respectively. It appears that being a member of a bottlenose dolphin alliance is not a prerequisite for paternity: two paternities were obtained by juvenile males (one at the 95%, the other at the 80% confidence level), suggesting that young males without alliance partners pursue different mating tactics to adults. Likelihood analyses showed that these two juvenile males were significantly more likely to be the true father of the offspring than to be their half-sibling (P < 0.05). Using paternity data at an 80% confidence level, we could show that reproductive success was significantly skewed within at least some stable first-order alliances (P < 0.01). Interestingly, there is powerful evidence that one mating was incestuous, with one calf apparently fathered by its mother's father (P < 0.01). Our study suggests that the reproductive success of both allied males, and of nonallied juveniles, needs to be incorporated into an adaptive framework that seeks to explain alliance formation in male bottlenose dolphins.

  5. Bayesian Integrated Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kristin H.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Wunschel, David S.

    2008-06-01

    In the aftermath of the 2001 anthrax letters, researchers have been exploring ways to predict the production environment of unknown source microorganisms. Different mass spectral techniques are being developed to characterize components of a microbe’s culture medium including water, carbon and nitrogen sources, metal ions added, and the presence of agar. Individually, each technique has the potential to identify one or two ingredients in a culture medium recipe. However, by integrating data from multiple mass spectral techniques, a more complete characterization is possible. We present a Bayesian statistical approach to integrated microbial forensics and illustrate its application on spores grownmore » in different culture media.« less

  6. A Feasibility Study on Recruiting Fathers of Young Children to Examine the Impact of Paternal Depression on Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherr, Lorraine; Dave, Shreya; Lucas, Patricia; Senior, Rob; Nazareth, Irwin

    2006-01-01

    Fathers are underrepresented in research on mental health and child outcome. We tested a range of methods of recruitment of fathers to establish feasibility and recruitment rates to obtain a sample for a study on paternal depression and child development. The study took place in North London. Fathers of children aged 6 years and under were…

  7. The Link between Perceived Maternal and Paternal Autonomy Support and Adolescent Well-Being across Three Major Educational Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duineveld, Jasper J.; Parker, Philip D.; Ryan, Richard M.; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2017-01-01

    To what extent does maternal and paternal autonomy support enhance well-being across the major transitions of high school? We tested the degree to which perceived autonomy supportive parenting facilitated positive changes in self-esteem and life satisfaction and buffered against negative changes in depressive symptoms and school related burnout in…

  8. Guidelines for the identification of unknown samples for laboratories performing forensic analyses for chemical terrorism.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Matthew L; Satzger, R Duane; Alcaraz, Armando; Brewer, Jason; Fetterolf, Dean; Harper, Martin; Hrynchuk, Ronald; McNally, Mary F; Montgomery, Madeline; Nottingham, Eric; Peterson, James; Rickenbach, Michael; Seidel, Jimmy L; Wolnik, Karen

    2012-05-01

    Since the early 1990s, the FBI Laboratory has sponsored Scientific Working Groups to improve discipline practices and build consensus among the forensic community. The Scientific Working Group on the Forensic Analysis of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism developed guidance, contained in this document, on issues forensic laboratories encounter when accepting and analyzing unknown samples associated with chemical terrorism, including laboratory capabilities and analytical testing plans. In the context of forensic analysis of chemical terrorism, this guidance defines an unknown sample and addresses what constitutes definitive and tentative identification. Laboratory safety, reporting issues, and postreporting considerations are also discussed. Utilization of these guidelines, as part of planning for forensic analysis related to a chemical terrorism incident, may help avoid unfortunate consequences not only to the public but also to the laboratory personnel. 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  9. Paternal education and adverse birth outcomes in Canada.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Gabriel D; Bushnik, Tracey; Sheppard, Amanda J; Kramer, Michael S; Kaufman, Jay S; Yang, Seungmi

    2017-01-01

    Research on predictors of adverse birth outcomes has focused on maternal characteristics. Much less is known about the role of paternal factors. Paternal education is an important socioeconomic marker that may predict birth outcomes over and above maternal socioeconomic indicators. Using data from the 2006 Canadian Birth-Census Cohort, we estimated the associations between paternal education and preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth, stillbirth and infant mortality in Canada, controlling for maternal characteristics. Binomial regression was used to estimate risk ratios and risk differences for adverse birth outcomes associated with paternal education, after controlling for maternal education, age, marital status, parity, ethnicity and nativity. A total of 131 285 singleton births were included in the present study. Comparing the lowest to the highest paternal education category, adjusted risk ratios (95% CIs) were 1.22 (1.10 to 1.35) for preterm birth, 1.13 (1.03 to 1.23) for SGA birth, 1.92 (1.28 to 2.86) for stillbirth and 1.67 (1.01 to 2.75) for infant mortality. Consistent patterns of associations were observed for absolute risk differences. Our study suggests that low paternal education increases the risk of adverse birth outcomes, and especially of fetal and infant mortality, independently from maternal characteristics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Multiple paternity in the cultured yellow pond turtles (Mauremys mutica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Cheng; Zhao, Jian; Li, Wei; Wei, Cheng-Qing; Zhu, Xin-Ping

    2017-08-01

    As a result of hunting and habitat loss, wild populations of the yellow pond turtle, Mauremys mutica, are decreasing. The International Union for Conservation of Nature considers M. mutica to be an endangered species. All studied freshwater turtles have polyandrous mating with multiple paternity. To survey the mating strategies of M. mutica, 1year's genetic data of parents and all offspring in an artificially captive population were analyzed. Two groups of multiplex PCR containing 16 microsatellite loci were used to analyze the paternity of 302 hatchlings from 132 parents and from 159 clutches. The genetic data indicated that multiple paternity is rare in M. mutica, occurring in only seven of 138 clutches. Although the frequency of multiple paternity was only 5.07%, results of the present research indicate that M. mutica has a polyandrous mating system. In the breeding season, the successive clutches of 34 females each had the same paternity as the previous clutches. It was observed that four males (f85, f58, f87, and f76) had more than 20 offspring each, totaling 99 and representing 32.78% of all offspring. This finding implies that paternity is competitive in this artificially captive population and might bias the genetic diversity of the offspring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Paternal nicotine exposure alters hepatic xenobiotic metabolism in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Vallaster, Markus P; Kukreja, Shweta; Bing, Xin Y; Ngolab, Jennifer; Zhao-Shea, Rubing; Gardner, Paul D; Tapper, Andrew R; Rando, Oliver J

    2017-01-01

    Paternal environmental conditions can influence phenotypes in future generations, but it is unclear whether offspring phenotypes represent specific responses to particular aspects of the paternal exposure history, or a generic response to paternal ‘quality of life’. Here, we establish a paternal effect model based on nicotine exposure in mice, enabling pharmacological interrogation of the specificity of the offspring response. Paternal exposure to nicotine prior to reproduction induced a broad protective response to multiple xenobiotics in male offspring. This effect manifested as increased survival following injection of toxic levels of either nicotine or cocaine, accompanied by hepatic upregulation of xenobiotic processing genes, and enhanced drug clearance. Surprisingly, this protective effect could also be induced by a nicotinic receptor antagonist, suggesting that xenobiotic exposure, rather than nicotinic receptor signaling, is responsible for programming offspring drug resistance. Thus, paternal drug exposure induces a protective phenotype in offspring by enhancing metabolic tolerance to xenobiotics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24771.001 PMID:28196335

  12. Multiple Mating, Paternity and Complex Fertilisation Patterns in the Chokka Squid Loligo reynaudii.

    PubMed

    Naud, Marie-Jose; Sauer, Warwick H H; McKeown, Niall J; Shaw, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is widespread and influences patterns of sexual selection, with implications for sexual conflict over mating. Assessing sperm precedence patterns is a first step towards understanding sperm competition within a female and elucidating the roles of male- and female-controlled factors. In this study behavioural field data and genetic data were combined to investigate polyandry in the chokka squid Loligo reynaudii. Microsatellite DNA-based paternity analysis revealed multiple paternity to be the norm, with 79% of broods sired by at least two males. Genetic data also determined that the male who was guarding the female at the moment of sampling was a sire in 81% of the families tested, highlighting mate guarding as a successful male tactic with postcopulatory benefits linked to sperm deposition site giving privileged access to extruded egg strings. As females lay multiple eggs in capsules (egg strings) wherein their position is not altered during maturation it is possible to describe the spatial / temporal sequence of fertilisation / sperm precedence There were four different patterns of fertilisation found among the tested egg strings: 1) unique sire; 2) dominant sire, with one or more rare sires; 3) randomly mixed paternity (two or more sires); and 4) a distinct switch in paternity occurring along the egg string. The latter pattern cannot be explained by a random use of stored sperm, and suggests postcopulatory female sperm choice. Collectively the data indicate multiple levels of male- and female-controlled influences on sperm precedence, and highlights squid as interesting models to study the interplay between sexual and natural selection.

  13. Multiple Mating, Paternity and Complex Fertilisation Patterns in the Chokka Squid Loligo reynaudii

    PubMed Central

    Naud, Marie-Jose; Sauer, Warwick H. H.; McKeown, Niall J.; Shaw, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is widespread and influences patterns of sexual selection, with implications for sexual conflict over mating. Assessing sperm precedence patterns is a first step towards understanding sperm competition within a female and elucidating the roles of male- and female-controlled factors. In this study behavioural field data and genetic data were combined to investigate polyandry in the chokka squid Loligo reynaudii. Microsatellite DNA-based paternity analysis revealed multiple paternity to be the norm, with 79% of broods sired by at least two males. Genetic data also determined that the male who was guarding the female at the moment of sampling was a sire in 81% of the families tested, highlighting mate guarding as a successful male tactic with postcopulatory benefits linked to sperm deposition site giving privileged access to extruded egg strings. As females lay multiple eggs in capsules (egg strings) wherein their position is not altered during maturation it is possible to describe the spatial / temporal sequence of fertilisation / sperm precedence There were four different patterns of fertilisation found among the tested egg strings: 1) unique sire; 2) dominant sire, with one or more rare sires; 3) randomly mixed paternity (two or more sires); and 4) a distinct switch in paternity occurring along the egg string. The latter pattern cannot be explained by a random use of stored sperm, and suggests postcopulatory female sperm choice. Collectively the data indicate multiple levels of male- and female-controlled influences on sperm precedence, and highlights squid as interesting models to study the interplay between sexual and natural selection. PMID:26872354

  14. Forensic culture as epistemic culture: the sociology of forensic science.

    PubMed

    Cole, Simon A

    2013-03-01

    This paper explores whether we can interpret the notion of 'forensic culture' as something akin to what Knorr-Cetina called an 'epistemic culture'. Can we speak of a 'forensic culture', and, if so, how is it similar to, or different from, other epistemic cultures that exist in what is conventionally called 'science'? This question has important policy implications given the National Academy Science's (NAS) recent identification of 'culture' as one of the problems at the root of what it identified as 'serious deficiencies' in U.S. forensic science and 'scientific culture' as an antidote to those problems. Finding the NAS's characterisation of 'scientific culture' overly general and naïve, this paper offers a preliminary exploration of what might be called a 'forensic culture'. Specifically, the paper explores the way in which few of the empirical findings accumulated by sociologists of science about research science seem to apply to forensic science. Instead, forensic science seems to have developed a distinct culture for which a sociological analysis will require new explanatory tools. Faithful sociological analysis of 'forensic culture' will be a necessary prerequisite for the kind of culture change prescribed by external reformist bodies like the NAS. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Careers in Forensics: Analysis, Evidence, and Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2009-01-01

    In legal proceedings, a case is only as strong as its evidence. And whether that evidence is strong depends, in large part, on the work of forensic specialists. The field of forensics is broad and involves many kinds of workers. Some of them are involved in crimesolving. Others, such as forensic social workers or forensic economists, help to…

  16. Maternal and paternal alcohol consumption and miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Halmesmäki, E; Välimäki, M; Roine, R; Ylikahri, R; Ylikorkala, O

    1989-02-01

    To explore the role of parental alcohol consumption in miscarriage we interviewed 80 women who miscarried about their own and their partners' drinking habits. A control group of 81 gestational-age-matched women whose pregnancy ended in the delivery of a healthy infant at term were similarly questioned. The use of alcohol by women and men was equally frequent in both groups. Before pregnancy, the mean alcohol consumption per week had been about 1-2 drinks for the women and 4-5 drinks for the men. During the presumed day of conception, 13% of the women who miscarried and 11% of the women in the control group had drunk on average 3-4 drinks; the other women had been abstinent at this time. Of the partners, 13% and 15%, respectively, had taken a mean of 4-5 drinks. In both groups 58% of the subjects continued to consume alcohol during pregnancy. The mean consumption was about one drink a week by the women who miscarried and half a drink a week in the control group. Of women who miscarried, 36 had a blighted ovum and in this subgroup alcohol consumption in both women and men was similar to that in the other women who miscarried and their partners, suggesting that alcohol is not causally related to the development of a blighted ovum. These results suggest that moderate maternal or paternal alcohol consumption does not increase the risk of miscarriage.

  17. [New discoveries in forensic medicine. Hair analysis].

    PubMed

    Kaempe, B

    1999-03-29

    A review of forensic chemical drug testing in hair is given. Applications for analysis of hair are described. The special problems linked to the determination of drugs in hair such as contamination, differences in sex and ethnic groups and cosmetic pretreatment of the hair are outlined. It is concluded that greater knowledge of hair analysis is needed before the results can be used for toxicological evaluation at the same level as blood. On the other hand, a chemical hair analysis might expose a (mis)use of drugs and follow it step by step up to half a year back in time. In this way, it may supplement a systematic toxicological analysis (STA) for 'a general unknown' for use by police and forensic pathologists.

  18. Nails in Forensic Toxicology: An Update.

    PubMed

    Solimini, Renata; Minutillo, Adele; Kyriakou, Chrystalla; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta; Busardo, Francesco Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of nails as a keratinized matrix to detect drugs or illicit substances has been increasingly used in forensic and clinical toxicology as a complementary test, especially for the specific characteristics of stably accumulating substances for long periods of time. This allows a retrospective investigation of chronic drug abuse, monitoring continuous drug or pharmaceutical use, reveal in utero drug exposure or environmental exposures. We herein review the recent literature investigating drug incorporation mechanisms and drug detection in nails for forensic toxicological purposes. Mechanisms of drug incorporation have not yet been fully elucidated. However, some research has lately contributed to a better understanding of how substances are incorporated into nails, suggesting three potential mechanisms of drug incorporation: contamination from sweat, incorporation from nail bed and incorporation from germinal matrix. In addition, numerous methods dealing with the determination of drugs of abuse, medications and alcohol biomarkers in nails have been reported in studies over the years. The latter methods could find application in clinical and forensic toxicology. The studies herein reviewed point out how important it is to standardize and harmonize the methodologies (either pre-analytical or analytical) for nails analysis and the optimization of sampling as well as the development of proficiency testing programs and the determination of cut-off values. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. The future of forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Butler, John M

    2015-08-05

    The author's thoughts and opinions on where the field of forensic DNA testing is headed for the next decade are provided in the context of where the field has come over the past 30 years. Similar to the Olympic motto of 'faster, higher, stronger', forensic DNA protocols can be expected to become more rapid and sensitive and provide stronger investigative potential. New short tandem repeat (STR) loci have expanded the core set of genetic markers used for human identification in Europe and the USA. Rapid DNA testing is on the verge of enabling new applications. Next-generation sequencing has the potential to provide greater depth of coverage for information on STR alleles. Familial DNA searching has expanded capabilities of DNA databases in parts of the world where it is allowed. Challenges and opportunities that will impact the future of forensic DNA are explored including the need for education and training to improve interpretation of complex DNA profiles. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  1. Psychiatric/ psychological forensic report writing.

    PubMed

    Young, Gerald

    Approaches to forensic report writing in psychiatry, psychology, and related mental health disciplines have moved from an organization, content, and stylistic framework to considering ethical and other codes, evidentiary standards, and practice considerations. The first part of the article surveys different approaches to forensic report writing, including that of forensic mental health assessment and psychiatric ethics. The second part deals especially with psychological ethical approaches. The American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct (2002) provide one set of principles on which to base forensic report writing. The U.S. Federal Rules of Evidence (2014) and related state rules provide another basis. The American Psychological Association's Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology (2013) provide a third source. Some work has expanded the principles in ethics codes; and, in the third part of this article, these additions are applied to forensic report writing. Other work that could help with the question of forensic report writing concerns the 4 Ds in psychological injury assessments (e.g., conduct oneself with Dignity, avoid the adversary Divide, get the needed reliable Data, Determine interpretations and conclusions judiciously). One overarching ethical principle that is especially applicable in forensic report writing is to be comprehensive, scientific, and impartial. As applied to forensic report writing, the overall principle that applies is that the work process and product should reflect integrity in its ethics, law, and science. Four principles that derive from this meta-principle concern: Competency and Communication; Procedure and Protection; Dignity and Distance; and Data Collection and Determination. The standards or rules associated with each of these principles are reviewed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Advancing paternal age and offspring violent offending: a sibling-comparison study.

    PubMed

    Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Pawitan, Yudi; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Långström, Niklas; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2012-08-01

    Children born to older fathers are at higher risk to develop severe psychopathology (e.g., schizophrenia and bipolar disorder), possibly because of increased de novo mutations during spermatogenesis with older paternal age. Because severe psychopathology is correlated with antisocial behavior, we examined possible associations between advancing paternal age and offspring violent offending. Interlinked Swedish national registers provided information on fathers' age at childbirth and violent criminal convictions in all offspring born from 1958 to 1979 (N = 2,359,921). We used ever committing a violent crime and number of violent crimes as indices of violent offending. The data included information on multiple levels; we compared differentially exposed siblings in within-family analyses to rigorously test causal influences. In the entire population, advancing paternal age predicted offspring violent crime according to both indices. Congruent with a causal effect, this association remained for rates of violent crime in within-family analyses. However, in within-family analyses, we found no association with ever committing a violent crime, suggesting that factors shared by siblings (genes and environment) confounded this association. Life-course persistent criminality has been proposed to have a partly biological etiology; our results agree with a stronger biological effect (i.e., de novo mutations) on persistent violent offending.

  3. Advancing paternal age and offspring violent offending: A sibling-comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Pawitan, Yudi; D’Onofrio, Brian M; Långström, Niklas; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Children born to older fathers are at higher risk to develop severe psychopathology (e.g., schizophrenia and bipolar disorder), possibly due to increased de novo mutations during spermatogenesis with older paternal age. Since severe psychopathology is correlated with antisocial behavior, we examined possible associations between advancing paternal age and offspring violent offending. Interlinked Swedish national registers provided information on fathers’ age at childbirth and violent criminal convictions in all offspring born 1958–1979 (n=2,359,921). We used ever committing a violent crime and number of violent crimes as indices of violent offending. The data included information on multiple levels; we compared differentially exposed siblings in within-family analyses to rigorously test causal influences. In the entire population, advancing paternal age predicted offspring violent crime according to both indices. Congruent with a causal effect, this association remained for rates of violent crime in within-family analyses. However, in within-analyses, we found no association with ever committing a violent crime, suggesting that factors shared by siblings (genes and environment) confounded this association. Life-course-persistent criminality has been proposed to have a partly biological etiology; our results agree with a stronger biological effect (i.e., de novo mutations) on persistent violent offending. PMID:22781852

  4. Monkeys spontaneously discriminate their unfamiliar paternal kin under natural conditions using facial cues.

    PubMed

    Pfefferle, Dana; Kazem, Anahita J N; Brockhausen, Ralf R; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Widdig, Anja

    2014-08-04

    Kin recognition can enhance inclusive fitness via nepotism and optimal outbreeding. Mechanisms allowing recognition of patrilineal relatives are of particular interest in species in which females mate promiscuously, leading to paternity uncertainty. Humans are known to detect facial similarities between kin in the faces of third parties, and there is some evidence for continuity of this ability in nonhuman primates . However, no study has yet shown that this propensity translates into an ability to detect one's own relatives, one of the key prerequisites for gaining fitness benefits. Here we report a field experiment demonstrating that free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) spontaneously discriminate between facial images of their paternal half-siblings and unrelated individuals, when both animals are unfamiliar to the tested individual. Specifically, subjects systematically biased their inspection time toward nonkin when the animals pictured were of their own sex (potential threats), relative to when they were of the opposite sex (potential mates). Our results provide strong evidence for visual phenotype matching and the first demonstration in any primate that individuals can spontaneously detect their own paternal relatives on the basis of facial cues under natural conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Paternal smoking and maternal protective behaviors at home on infant's saliva cotinine levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-Ping; Suen, Yi-Nam; Wong, Bonny Yee-Man; Li, William Ho-Cheung; Koh, David Soo-Quee; Lam, Tai-Hing; Chan, Sophia Siu-Chee

    2017-12-13

    BackgroundWe investigated the association between paternal smoking, avoidance behaviors and maternal protective actions and smoke-free home rules with infant's saliva cotinine in Hong Kong.MethodsSix hundred and seventy-five non-smoking mothers (mean age 32.6 years) who attended the maternal-child health clinics with their newborns aged ≤18 months completed a questionnaire about paternal smoking and avoidance behaviors, maternal protective actions, smoke-free rules at home, and infant's second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure. Three hundred and eighty-nine infants provided saliva sample and its cotinine was tested.ResultsThe geometric mean of infant's saliva cotinine was 1.07 ng/ml (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98, 1.16). Infants living in smoking families with SHS exposure had significantly higher cotinine level than in non-smoking families (adjusted β=0.25, 95% CI: 0.16, 0.33). Paternal smoking near infants (within 1.5 m) was associated with higher cotinine level (adjusted β=0.60, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.98), which was not reduced by avoidance behaviors (e.g., smoking in kitchen or balcony). Even fathers smoking ≥3 m away from infants was associated with higher cotinine level than non-smoking families (adjusted β=0. 09, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.16). Maternal protective actions and smoke-free home rules were not significantly associated with reduced cotinine level.ConclusionPaternal smoking avoidance, maternal protective actions, and smoke-free policy at home did not reduce infant's saliva cotinine.Pediatric Research advance online publication, 13 December 2017; doi:10.1038/pr.2017.279.

  6. Cues of Paternal Uncertainty and Father to Child Physical Abuse as Reported by Mothers in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandre, Gisele Caldas; Nadanovsky, Paulo; Wilson, Margo; Daly, Martin; Moraes, Claudia Leite; Reichenheim, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Paternity is uncertain, so if paternal feelings evolved to promote fitness, we might expect them to vary in response to variables indicative of paternity probability. We therefore hypothesized that the risk of lapses of paternal affection, including abusive assaults on children, will be exacerbated by cues of non-paternity. Methods:…

  7. Current trends in forensic odontology

    PubMed Central

    Jeddy, Nadeem; Ravi, Shivani; Radhika, T.

    2017-01-01

    Forensic odontology is an evolving science and has a greater scope of development. It has established as an indispensable science in medico-legal matters and in the identification of the dead person. The dental tissues are often preserved even if the deceased person is skeletonized, decomposed, burnt, or dismembered. Various methods have been developed to determine age, sex, and ethnicity of the person, using dental tissues. Data collection methods and supplementary technologies used in forensic dental identification have undergone significant transformation. This article provides an overview of the evolving trends in conventional methods, and the recent concepts used in forensic odontology. PMID:29657486

  8. Current trends in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Jeddy, Nadeem; Ravi, Shivani; Radhika, T

    2017-01-01

    Forensic odontology is an evolving science and has a greater scope of development. It has established as an indispensable science in medico-legal matters and in the identification of the dead person. The dental tissues are often preserved even if the deceased person is skeletonized, decomposed, burnt, or dismembered. Various methods have been developed to determine age, sex, and ethnicity of the person, using dental tissues. Data collection methods and supplementary technologies used in forensic dental identification have undergone significant transformation. This article provides an overview of the evolving trends in conventional methods, and the recent concepts used in forensic odontology.

  9. Forensic Science Education and Educational Requirements for Forensic Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaensslen, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on criminalistics, which can be understood to mean the activities and specialty areas characteristic of most municipal, county, or state forensic science laboratories in the United States. (DDR)

  10. NUCLEAR FORENSICS ANALYSIS CENTER FORENSIC ANALYSIS TO DATA INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.

    2011-02-07

    The Nuclear Forensics Analysis Center (NFAC) is part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is one of only two USG National Laboratories accredited to perform nuclear forensic analyses to the requirements of ISO 17025. SRNL NFAC is capable of analyzing nuclear and radiological samples from bulk material to ultra-trace samples. NFAC provides analytical support to the FBI's Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF), which is located within SRNL. REEF gives the FBI the capability to perform traditional forensics on material that is radiological and/or is contaminated. SRNL is engaged in research and development efforts to improve the USG technical nuclearmore » forensics capabilities. Research includes improving predictive signatures and developing a database containing comparative samples.« less

  11. Advancing paternal age and schizophrenia: the impact of delayed fatherhood.

    PubMed

    Ek, Mats; Wicks, Susanne; Svensson, Anna C; Idring, Selma; Dalman, Christina

    2015-05-01

    It is well known that advancing paternal age is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring, but the mechanism behind this association remains unknown. This study investigates if delayed fatherhood rather than advancing paternal age per se might explain the increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring associated with advancing paternal age. This is a register-based study of the Swedish population looking at people born 1955-1985 who have 1 or 2 siblings (n = 2 589 502). The main analysis investigated whether the association between advancing paternal age and schizophrenia was explained by delayed fatherhood. Possible confounding factors were taken into account. Cox regression was used throughout. In the main analysis the association between advancing paternal age and increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring disappeared after controlling for delayed fatherhood (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.72-1.21 comparing 45+ years old fathers to those 25-29), whereas delayed fatherhood showed an association with increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring comparing 35-39 and 40-44 years old fathers to 25-29 year olds (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.18-1.58; HR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.44-2.28, respectively). The results remained when controlling for possible confounders. This study suggests that the association between paternal age and schizophrenia is not due to paternal age per se, but rather to an unknown factor associated with both delayed fatherhood and schizophrenia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Advancing Paternal Age and Schizophrenia: The Impact of Delayed Fatherhood

    PubMed Central

    Ek, Mats; Wicks, Susanne; Svensson, Anna C.; Idring, Selma; Dalman, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: It is well known that advancing paternal age is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring, but the mechanism behind this association remains unknown. This study investigates if delayed fatherhood rather than advancing paternal age per se might explain the increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring associated with advancing paternal age. Methods: This is a register-based study of the Swedish population looking at people born 1955–1985 who have 1 or 2 siblings (n = 2 589 502). The main analysis investigated whether the association between advancing paternal age and schizophrenia was explained by delayed fatherhood. Possible confounding factors were taken into account. Cox regression was used throughout. Results: In the main analysis the association between advancing paternal age and increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring disappeared after controlling for delayed fatherhood (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.72–1.21 comparing 45+ years old fathers to those 25–29), whereas delayed fatherhood showed an association with increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring comparing 35–39 and 40–44 years old fathers to 25–29 year olds (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.18–1.58; HR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.44–2.28, respectively). The results remained when controlling for possible confounders. Conclusions: This study suggests that the association between paternal age and schizophrenia is not due to paternal age per se, but rather to an unknown factor associated with both delayed fatherhood and schizophrenia. PMID:25378438

  13. Evaluation of a visualization assay for blood on forensic evidence.

    PubMed

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Lepez, Trees; Van Hoofstat, David; Deforce, Dieter

    2015-05-01

    In forensics, bloodstains on dark fabrics might be invisible for the naked eye. Although several visualization, presumptive, and confirmatory blood tests have been developed, all have one or more disadvantages, especially on DNA analysis. We report here the use of a visualization assay that can visually detect blood drops up to 1/20 dilution. In this assay, the fabric is placed between two wet filter papers and covered by glass surfaces on both sides. Pressure is applied on the glass surfaces in which bloodstains transfer onto the filter papers through capillary forces. Detected stains can be tested with other more sensitive presumptive blood tests performed on the filter paper. Even more, DNA analysis can be performed on the transferred bloodstains. The presented visualization assay is easy to perform, extremely cheap, requires little hands on time, and does not affect bloodstain pattern analysis. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Forensic Sciences published by American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. An Interdisciplinary Guided Inquiry Laboratory for First Year Undergraduate Forensic Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresswell, Sarah L.; Loughlin, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    An effective guided inquiry forensic case study (a pharmacy break-in) is described for first-year students. Four robust introductory forensic chemistry and biology experiments are used to analyze potential drug samples and determine the identity of a possible suspect. Students perform presumptive tests for blood on a "point of entry…

  15. Using Laboratory Chemicals to Imitate Illicit Drugs in a Forensic Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Shawn; Bromfield-Lee, Deborah; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    This forensic chemistry activity utilizes presumptive forensic testing procedures and laboratory chemicals that produce screening results similar to controlled substances. For obvious reasons, obtaining heavily regulated controlled substances to create an undergraduate student activity is not practical for most educational institutions. We were…

  16. Forensic pharmacovigilance: Newer dimension of pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Sewal, Rakesh K; Saini, Vikas K; Medhi, Bikash

    2015-08-01

    Drug safety for the patients is of paramount importance for a medical professional. Pharmacovigilance attempts to ensure the safety of patients by keeping a close vigil on the pattern of adverse events secondary to drug use. Number of medicolegal cases is at rise since last few years. Forensic sciences and pharmacovigilance need to work hand in hand to unlock the mystery of many criminal and civil proceedings. Pharmacovigilance offers its wide scope in forensic sciences by putting forward its expertise on adverse profile of drugs which may be instrumental in solving the cases and bringing the justice forth. It may range from as simple affairs as defining the adverse drug reaction on one hand to putting expert advice in critical criminal cases on the other one. Pharmacovigilance experts have to abide by the ethics of the practice while executing their duties as expert else it may tarnish the justice and loosen its dependability. As a budding discipline of science, it is confronted with several hurdles and challenges which include reluctance of medical professionals for being involved in court proceedings, extrapolations of facts and data and variations in law across the globe etc. These challenges and hurdles call the medical fraternity come forward to work towards the momentous application of pharmacovigilance in the forensic sciences. Evidence based practice e.g. testing the biological samples for the presence of drugs may prove to be pivotal in the success of this collaboration of sciences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. Forensic Age Estimation.

    PubMed

    Schmeling, Andreas; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Rudolf, Ernst; Vieth, Volker; Geserick, Gunther

    2016-01-29

    Forensic age estimation is requested by courts and other government authorities so that immigrants whose real age is unknown should not suffer unfair disadvantages because of their supposed age, and so that all legal procedures to which an individual's age is relevant can be properly followed. 157 age estimations were requested in Berlin in 2014, more than twice as many as in 2004. This review is based on pertinent articles retrieved by a selective search in the PubMed and MEDPILOT databases, supplemented by relevant recommendations and by the findings of the authors' own research. The essential components of age estimation are the history, physical examination, X-rays of the hands, panorama films of the jaws, and, if indicated, a thin-slice CT of the medial clavicular epiphyses, provided that there is a legal basis for X-ray examinations without a medical indication. Multiple methods are always used in combination, for optimal accuracy. Depending on the legal issues at hand, the examiner may be asked to estimate the individual's minimum age and/or his or her most probable age. The minimum-age concept can be used in determinations whether an individual has reached the age of legal majority. It is designed to ensure that practically all persons classified as adults have, in fact, attained legal majority, even though some other persons will be incorrectly classified as minors. Forensic age estimation lets courts and other government authorities determine the official age of persons whose actual age is unknown-in most cases, unaccompanied refugees who may be minors. The goal is to carry out age-dependent legal procedures appropriately in accordance with the rule of law. The minimum-age concept is designed to prevent the erroneous classification of minors as legal adults.

  18. Preface: Chemical Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Carlos G.

    2018-04-22

    This virtual special issue is devoted to chemical forensics, a developing scientific discipline that aims to provide information to support the attribution of a chemical (or mixture) of interest to its source. This process is carried out through the analysis of the chemical itself or associated material constituents to address investigative, legal or intelligence questions. “Source” refers to how, where and when a chemical was handled or produced. Source information is critical in investigations of incidents of chemicals used for illicit or nefarious purposes, especially when toxic chemicals are used as weapons. The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), an international disarmamentmore » treaty that entered into force in 1997, prohibits the use of chemicals as weapons. This treaty has 192 States Parties (the countries who have joined the treaty) encompassing more than 98% of the global population and landmass, yet chemical attacks have continued to increase since this treaty was opened for signature to the governments of the world in 1993. The first notorious use of a chemical weapon since 1993 was by the Aum Shinrikyo cult whose sarin attack on the Tokyo subway system in March 1995 killed 13 and drove another 6,000 to seek medical treatment. More recently, over 160 alleged chemical attacks have been reported in Syria and Iraq with both governments and terrorist groups being accused, and casualties numbering in the thousands. Additionally, recent high profile nerve agent poisoning of dissidents from North Korea and Russia illustrate a willingness to use chemical threat agents (CTAs) with impunity. Given the threat posed by those that choose to use CTAs as weapons, there is a dire need for advancements in chemical forensics that can be used in investigations and inquiries to help find and hold to account, the perpetrators of chemical attacks.« less

  19. American Academy of Forensic Sciences

    MedlinePlus

    ... Individual Section Requirements Application Documents Retired Status Information Disabled Status Information Applicants for Membership and Promotion Featured AAFS Members Young Forensic Scientists Forum Students Colleges & Universities College & University Listings FEPAC Accredited Programs ...

  20. Forensic historiography: narratives and science.

    PubMed

    Drukteinis, Albert M

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatrists function, in part, as historians who rely on patient narratives to help them understand presenting mental disorders and explain their causes. Forensic psychiatrists have been skeptical of using narratives, raising concerns about their lack of objectivity and potential for bias. They also have criticized narratives as being more performative than scientific. Recent authors, however, have pointed out that narratives may be helpful in forming forensic opinions and supporting oral testimony, while stressing that their use must be consistent with the ethics espoused by forensic psychiatry. This article reviews the role of narratives in understanding human events and the ubiquitous presence of narratives in the judicial process. It delves into the inescapability of using explicit or implicit narratives in the course of forensic practice, as well as how they may be meaningfully incorporated into evaluations and find expression alongside scientific principles. © 2014 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  1. Forensic Science--A Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geesaman, Donald P.; Abrahamson, Dean E.

    1973-01-01

    Forensic science is an approach to study desirability of specific technologies in the context of value objectives and biological imperatives of society. Such groups should be formed with people from various physical and social sciences. (PS)

  2. Professional convergence in forensic practice.

    PubMed

    Mercer, D; Mason, T; Richman, J

    2001-06-01

    This paper outlines the development and convergence of forensic science and secure psychiatric services in the UK, locating the professionalization of forensic nursing within a complex web of political, economic, and ideological structures. It is suggested that a stagnation of the therapeutic enterprise in high and medium security provision has witnessed an intrusion of medical power into the societal body. Expanding technologies of control and surveillance are discussed in relation to the move from modernity to postmodernity and the ongoing dynamic of medicalized offending. Four aspects of globalization are identified as impacting upon the organization and application of forensic practice: (i) organized capitalism and the exhaustion of the welfare state; (ii) security versus danger and trust versus risk; (iii) science as a meta-language; and (iv) foreclosure as a mechanism of censorship. Finally, as a challenge for the profession, some predictions are offered about the future directions or demise of forensic nursing.

  3. A history of forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H

    2018-04-01

    Forensic anthropology represents a dynamic and rapidly evolving complex discipline within anthropology and forensic science. Academic roots extend back to early European anatomists but development coalesced in the Americas through high-profile court testimony, assemblage of documented collections and focused research. Formation of the anthropology section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in 1972, the American Board of Forensic Anthropology in 1977/1978 and other organizational advances provided important stimuli for progress. While early pioneers concentrated on analysis of skeletonized human remains, applications today have expanded to include complex methods of search and recovery, the biomechanics of trauma interpretation, isotopic analysis related to diet and region of origin, age estimation of the living and issues related to humanitarian and human rights investigations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Integration initiatives for forensic services

    PubMed Central

    ARBOLEDA-FLÓREZ, JULIO

    2003-01-01

    Poorly implemented mental health reform policies are often given as reasons for the growth in demands for forensic psychiatric services and the steady increase of mental patients in prison systems. However, in this paper, additional reasons are advanced to explain the growth of forensic psychiatry, such as an expansion in the types of "psychiatric defences" in courts of law; public concerns about violent behaviour attributed to the mentally ill; the community management of paraphilias, especially pedophilia; the development of risk assessment methodologies and the halo of super-specialization. The net result of these developments is that patients who receive a label of "forensic" enter into a mental health ghetto with little connectivity or integration with the general mental health system. The forensic label increases the stigma and decreases opportunities for reintegration and full social recovery. The paper provides guidelines to reverse these trends. PMID:16946932

  5. Evidentiary standards for forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Angi M; Crowder, Christian M

    2009-11-01

    As issues of professional standards and error rates continue to be addressed in the courts, forensic anthropologists should be proactive by developing and adhering to professional standards of best practice. There has been recent increased awareness and interest in critically assessing some of the techniques used by forensic anthropologists, but issues such as validation, error rates, and professional standards have seldom been addressed. Here we explore the legal impetus for this trend and identify areas where we can improve regarding these issues. We also discuss the recent formation of a Scientific Working Group for Forensic Anthropology (SWGANTH), which was created with the purposes of encouraging discourse among anthropologists and developing and disseminating consensus guidelines for the practice of forensic anthropology. We believe it is possible and advisable for anthropologists to seek and espouse research and methodological techniques that meet higher standards to ensure quality and consistency in our field.

  6. [Effect of paternity leave on maternal postpartum depression].

    PubMed

    Séjourné, N; Beaumé, M; Vaslot, V; Chabrol, H

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of the paternity leave in the appearance of the maternal postpartum depression. Fifty-one couples took part in the whole study. Between the second and the fifth day after the childbirth, the mother completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), which measures the symptoms of depression and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) which measures the social support the mother has become. The father completed the EPDS. Two months and then the second time four months after the childbirth, the mother received the EPDS, the MSPSS, and questionnaires measuring the temperament of the baby, the maternal skills, the feeling of being a mother and the quality of life postpartum. In order to evaluate the paternal involvement, the father completed the EPDS and questions about paternal skills and involvement. The paternity leave seemed not to have any consequences on the results at the EPDS or other questionnaires. However, lack of paternal involvement was a significant predictor of the intensity of the depressive symptoms of the mothers. It is not the presence of the father wich seems important to take into account for detection and the traitement of postpatum depression but his participation in the care of the baby. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiple paternity and hybridization in two smooth-hound sharks

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Ilaria A. M.; Riginella, Emilio; Gristina, Michele; Rasotto, Maria B.; Zane, Lorenzo; Mazzoldi, Carlotta

    2015-01-01

    Multiple paternity appears to be a common trait of elasmobranch mating systems, with its occurrence likely driven by convenience, due to females seeking to minimize the stress of male harassment. Here we use molecular markers to analyse the frequency of multiple paternity in two related viviparous sharks, Mustelus mustelus and Mustelus punctulatus. We first applied molecular methods to assign pregnant females, embryos and additional reference adults (N = 792) to one of the two species. Paternity analysis was performed using a total of 9 polymorphic microsatellites on 19 females and 204 embryos of M. mustelus, and on 13 females and 303 embryos of M. punctulatus. Multiple paternity occurs in both species, with 47% of M. mustelus and 54% of M. punctulatus litters sired by at least two fathers. Female fecundity is not influenced by multiple mating and in 56% of polyandrous litters paternity is skewed, with one male siring most of the pups. Genetic analyses also revealed hybridization between the two species, with a M. punctulatus female bearing pups sired by a M. mustelus male. The frequency of polyandrous litters in these species is consistent with aspects of their reproductive biology, such as synchronous ovulation and possible occurrence of breeding aggregations. PMID:26257113

  8. Promiscuity, paternity and personality in the great tit.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Samantha C; Chapman, Joanne R; Dugdale, Hannah L; Quinn, John L; Sheldon, Ben C

    2012-05-07

    Understanding causes of variation in promiscuity within populations remain a major challenge. While most studies have focused on quantifying fitness costs and benefits of promiscuous behaviour, an alternative possibility--that variation in promiscuity within populations is maintained because of linkage with other traits-has received little attention. Here, we examine whether promiscuity in male and female great tits (Parus major)--quantified as extra-pair paternity (EPP) within and between nests--is associated with variation in a well-documented personality trait: exploration behaviour in a novel environment. Exploration behaviour has been shown to correlate with activity levels, risk-taking and boldness, and these are behaviours that may plausibly influence EPP. Exploration behaviour correlated positively with paternity gained outside the social pair among males in our population, but there was also a negative correlation with paternity in the social nest. Hence, while variation in male personality predicted the relative importance of paternity gain within and outside the pair bond, total paternity gained was unrelated to exploration behaviour. We found evidence that males paired with bold females were more likely to sire extra-pair young. Our data thus demonstrate a link between personality and promiscuity, with no net effects on reproductive success, suggesting personality-dependent mating tactics, in contrast with traditional adaptive explanations for promiscuity.

  9. Multiple paternity and hybridization in two smooth-hound sharks.

    PubMed

    Marino, Ilaria A M; Riginella, Emilio; Gristina, Michele; Rasotto, Maria B; Zane, Lorenzo; Mazzoldi, Carlotta

    2015-08-10

    Multiple paternity appears to be a common trait of elasmobranch mating systems, with its occurrence likely driven by convenience, due to females seeking to minimize the stress of male harassment. Here we use molecular markers to analyse the frequency of multiple paternity in two related viviparous sharks, Mustelus mustelus and Mustelus punctulatus. We first applied molecular methods to assign pregnant females, embryos and additional reference adults (N = 792) to one of the two species. Paternity analysis was performed using a total of 9 polymorphic microsatellites on 19 females and 204 embryos of M. mustelus, and on 13 females and 303 embryos of M. punctulatus. Multiple paternity occurs in both species, with 47% of M. mustelus and 54% of M. punctulatus litters sired by at least two fathers. Female fecundity is not influenced by multiple mating and in 56% of polyandrous litters paternity is skewed, with one male siring most of the pups. Genetic analyses also revealed hybridization between the two species, with a M. punctulatus female bearing pups sired by a M. mustelus male. The frequency of polyandrous litters in these species is consistent with aspects of their reproductive biology, such as synchronous ovulation and possible occurrence of breeding aggregations.

  10. Promiscuity, paternity and personality in the great tit

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Samantha C.; Chapman, Joanne R.; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Quinn, John L.; Sheldon, Ben C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding causes of variation in promiscuity within populations remain a major challenge. While most studies have focused on quantifying fitness costs and benefits of promiscuous behaviour, an alternative possibility—that variation in promiscuity within populations is maintained because of linkage with other traits—has received little attention. Here, we examine whether promiscuity in male and female great tits (Parus major)—quantified as extra-pair paternity (EPP) within and between nests—is associated with variation in a well-documented personality trait: exploration behaviour in a novel environment. Exploration behaviour has been shown to correlate with activity levels, risk-taking and boldness, and these are behaviours that may plausibly influence EPP. Exploration behaviour correlated positively with paternity gained outside the social pair among males in our population, but there was also a negative correlation with paternity in the social nest. Hence, while variation in male personality predicted the relative importance of paternity gain within and outside the pair bond, total paternity gained was unrelated to exploration behaviour. We found evidence that males paired with bold females were more likely to sire extra-pair young. Our data thus demonstrate a link between personality and promiscuity, with no net effects on reproductive success, suggesting personality-dependent mating tactics, in contrast with traditional adaptive explanations for promiscuity. PMID:22130602

  11. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population geneticsmore » by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations augmented by phylogenetic

  12. Parasites in Forensic Science: a historic perspective

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Rita; Alves, Helena; Richter, Joachim; Botelho, Monica C

    Parasites show a great potential to Forensic Science. Forensic Science is the application of any science and methodology to the legal system. The forensic scientist collects and analyses the physical evidence and produce a report of the results to the court. A parasite is an organism that lives at the expense of another and they exist in any ecosystem. Parasites are the cause of many important diseases. The forensic scientists can use the parasites to identify a crime scene, to determine the murder weapon or simply identify an individual. The applications for parasites in the Forensic Science can be many and more studies should be made in Forensic Parasitology. The most important parasites in Forensic Science are helminths specifically schistosomes. Through history there are many cases where schistosomes were described in autopsies and it was related to the cause of death. Here we review the applications of parasites in Forensic Science and its importance to the forensic scientist.

  13. Forensic science standards in fast-changing environments.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Regulatory trends in forensic science point strongly to the need for exhaustive testing of all findings and tools. At the same time a number ofjurisdictions suggest ajudicial test for the admissibility of novel scientific evidence. But in fields such as computers and cellphones, the rate of change is faster than the normal times required for peer-reviewed publication. One route to admitting less-than-perfect findings from forensic science is via a reevaluation of the role of expert evidence and in particular pre-trial meetings between experts.

  14. Testing the feasibility of DNA typing for human identification by PCR and an oligonucleotide ligation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Delahunty, C.; Ankener, W.; Deng, Qiang

    1996-06-01

    The use of DNA typing in human genome analysis is increasing and finding widespread application in the area of forensic and paternity testing. In this report, we explore the feasibility of typing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by using a semiautomated method for analyzing human DNA samples. In this approach, PCR is used to amplify segments of human DNA containing a common SNP. Allelic nucleotides in the amplified product are then typed by a calorimetric implementation of the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA). The results of the combined assay, PCR/OLA, are read directly by a spectrophotometer; the absorbances are compiled and themore » genotypes are automatically determined. A panel of 20 markers has been developed for DNA typing and has been tested using a sample panel from the CEPH pedigrees (CEPH parents). The results of this typing, as well as the potential to apply this method to larger populations, are discussed. 62 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.« less

  15. Forensic hash for multimedia information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenjun; Varna, Avinash L.; Wu, Min

    2010-01-01

    Digital multimedia such as images and videos are prevalent on today's internet and cause significant social impact, which can be evidenced by the proliferation of social networking sites with user generated contents. Due to the ease of generating and modifying images and videos, it is critical to establish trustworthiness for online multimedia information. In this paper, we propose novel approaches to perform multimedia forensics using compact side information to reconstruct the processing history of a document. We refer to this as FASHION, standing for Forensic hASH for informatION assurance. Based on the Radon transform and scale space theory, the proposed forensic hash is compact and can effectively estimate the parameters of geometric transforms and detect local tampering that an image may have undergone. Forensic hash is designed to answer a broader range of questions regarding the processing history of multimedia data than the simple binary decision from traditional robust image hashing, and also offers more efficient and accurate forensic analysis than multimedia forensic techniques that do not use any side information.

  16. Terminology and forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Birch, Ivan; Vernon, Wesley; Walker, Jeremy; Young, Maria

    2015-07-01

    The use of appropriate terminology is a fundamental aspect of forensic gait analysis. The language used in forensic gait analysis is an amalgam of that used in clinical practice, podiatric biomechanics and the wider field of biomechanics. The result can often be a lack of consistency in the language used, the definitions used and the clarity of the message given. Examples include the use of 'gait' and 'walking' as synonymous terms, confusion between 'step' and 'stride', the mixing of anatomical, positional and pathological descriptors, and inability to describe appropriately movements of major body segments such as the torso. The purpose of this paper is to share the well-established definitions of the fundamental parameters of gait, common to all professions, and advocate their use in forensic gait analysis to establish commonality. The paper provides guidance on the selection and use of appropriate terminology in the description of gait in the forensic context. This paper considers the established definitions of the terms commonly used, identifies those terms which have the potential to confuse readers, and suggests a framework of terminology which should be utilised in forensic gait analysis. Copyright © 2015 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Forensic laboratory evidence in sexually abused children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Young, Karen L; Jones, Jerry G; Worthington, Toss; Simpson, Pippa; Casey, Patrick H

    2006-06-01

    To determine if forensic laboratory evidence could be recovered from alleged sexual abuse victims more than 24 hours after the event and to determine if age or historical factors could be used to determine the need for forensic evidence collections. Retrospective study of hospital records matched with forensic evidence reports from the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory, Little Rock. The emergency department at Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock. Eighty children (aged <12 years) and adolescents (aged > or =12 years) who presented to the emergency department within 72 hours of an alleged event of sexual abuse or assault with genital contact. Cases positive for semen were correlated with age of the victim and post-event length of time to presentation to the emergency department. Of the 80 subjects, 16 had positive findings for semen. All 16 subjects who tested positive for semen presented to the emergency department less than 24 hours after the alleged abuse or assault event (P<.001). Of the 16 subjects who tested positive, 13 (81%) were adolescents. None of the prepubertal children had semen recovered from any body site; semen was recovered only from clothing or linen in those 3 children. Forensic evidence collections from body sites in child and adolescent rape patients are unlikely to yield positive results for semen (1) more than 24 hours after the event and (2) when taken from prepubertal patients. Consideration should be given to amending guidelines regarding forensic evidence collections in child and adolescent sexual abuse or assault victims.

  18. Forensic science and the right to access to justice: Testing the efficacy of self-examination intimate DNA swabs to enhance victim-centred responses to sexual violence in low-resource environments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa L; Wetton, Jon H; Lall, Gurdeep K M; Flowe, Heather D; Jobling, Mark A

    2017-09-01

    In developed countries, DNA profiling routinely forms part of the forensic strategy in the investigation of sexual violence. Medical examinations provide opportunities for recovering DNA evidence from intimate swabs, which can be particularly probative in cases where the identity of the perpetrator is unknown and proof of intercourse between two people is required. In low-resource environments, such as developing countries, remote geographic locations, conflict (and post-conflict) affected regions and displaced communities where access to medical examinations is lacking, DNA evidence is not available to support prosecutions and perpetrators are rarely identified and held accountable for crimes of sexual violence. This paper reports the results of a proof-of-concept study testing the efficacy of a novel self-examination intimate swab designed for recovering DNA following unprotected sexual intercourse. The results of this study corroborate previous research which has demonstrated that male DNA profiles can be successfully recovered by post-coital, self-examination methods, and discusses how this novel approach could enable the integration of DNA evidence into victim-centred approaches to investigating and prosecuting sexual violence in low-resource environments. The results and discussion challenge the prevailing assumption that intimate DNA swabs must be collected by trained medical professionals in order to be of evidential value. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Continuous challenges in Japanese forensic toxicology practice: strategy to address specific goals].

    PubMed

    Kageura, Mitsuyoshi

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, the status quo of forensic toxicology in Japan and the West is surveyed and a strategy to address future goals of Japanese forensic toxicology is proposed. Forensic toxicology in the West consists of three main areas--post-mortem forensic toxicology, human-performance forensic toxicology and forensic urine drug testing. In Japan, post-mortem forensic toxicology is practiced in university forensic medicine departments while most of the human-performance forensic toxicology is carried out in police laboratories. However, at least at present, strictly controlled workplace urine drug testing is not being performed, despite the abuse of drugs even by uniformed members of the National Defence Forces and police. For several years, the author has been introducing Western forensic toxicology guidelines and recommendations, translated into Japanese with the help of Western forensic toxicologists, to Japanese forensic toxicologists. Western forensic toxicology practice is at an advanced stage, whereas Japanese practice is in a critical condition and holds many problems awaiting solution, as exemplified by the urine drug testing in police laboratories. There is never any sample left for re-examination by the defence in all cases, though the initial volume of the urine sample available for examination is 30-50 ml. Only one organisation carries out everything from sampling to reporting and, in addition, the parent drug and its metabolites are not quantified. It is clear that the police laboratories do not work within good laboratory practice guidelines, nor do they have quality manuals or standard operating procedures manuals. A basic change in Japanese forensic toxicology practice is now essential. The author strongly recommends that, first of all, Japanese toxicologists should prepare forensic toxicology guidelines based on the Western models. The guidelines would progress the following objectives for forensic toxicology laboratories: 1) to have documented good

  20. Establishing paternity in Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) by DNA analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longmire, Jonathan L.; Gee, George F.; Hardekopf, C.L.; Mark, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting was used to study paternity and genetic variability within a captive flock of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana). Fingerprint patterns for 42 individuals were obtained by digesting genomic crane DNAs with HaeIII followed by electrophoresis, blotting, and hybridization to the M13 minisatellite probe. Despite finding reduced levels of genetic variation in the Whooping Crane due to a population "bottleneck," these polymorphisms were successfully used to determine paternity in six of seven cases of captive propagation where the maternal-offspring relationship was known, but where the sire was unknown. These determinations of paternity are required for effective genetic management of the crane flock. These results also revealed a number of heterozygous minisatellite loci that will be valuable in future assessments of genetic variability in this endangered species.

  1. Relationship between multiple paternity and reproductive parameters for Podocnemis sextuberculata (Testudines: Podocnemididae) in the Trombetas River, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Freda, F P; Bernardes, V C D; Eisemberg, C C; Fantin, C; Vogt, R C

    2016-01-29

    Genetic studies of multiple paternity are a valuable tool to gain information on the reproductive biology of turtles. We analyzed paternity type in Podocnemis sextuberculata and related number of fathers per nest to nesting period (beginning, middle, or end of nesting season); clutch size (number of eggs); female size; and hatchling success. Females were captured and maximum linear carapace lengths measured during the 60 days that encompass the nesting season at Rio Trombetas Biological Reserve (Pará, Brazil). Nests were marked and blood samples collected from hatchlings. Six heterologous loci were used: five from Podocnemis unifilis and one from Podocnemis expansa. Hatchlings were analyzed from 23 nests, and the rate of multiple paternity was 100%. The mean number of fathers per nest was six (± 0.9), and no significant difference between number of fathers in a nest and nesting period. Similarly there was no significant relationship between number of fathers in a nest and female size or hatchling success rate. Number of fathers was, however, positively correlated with clutch size (Spearman correlation rho = 0.47; P > 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first study to test the relationship between multiple paternity and ecological aspects of the reproductive ecology of turtles in the genus Podocnemis.

  2. [Two anniversaries in Czech forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Nečas, P; Hejna, P

    2012-10-01

    The authors commemorate the 100th anniversary of the publication of Slavíks textbook Forensic Pathology for Medical and Legal Students and the 125th anniversary of the 1st Czech forensic autopsy. They introduce professor V. Slavík and describe his personal qualities and expertise. The content of the textbook is described. The topicality of Slavíks explanations and the tradition of Czech forensic pathology are discussed. Key words: forensic pathology - history of Czech forensic pathology - textbooks of forensic pathology.

  3. Paternity testing and delivering trait-predictive genotypic data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the RosBREED project, the Genotyping Team (Team Leader: Nahla Bassil) leads the effort to obtain DNA data needed to enable marker-assisted breeding for critical fruit quality traits. These data are obtained from reference genotypes of apple, peach, cherry and strawberry carefully chosen to repres...

  4. Case-control analysis of paternal age and trisomic anomalies.

    PubMed

    De Souza, E; Morris, J K

    2010-11-01

    To determine whether older paternal age increases the risk of fathering a pregnancy with Patau (trisomy 13), Edwards (trisomy 18), Klinefelter (XXY) or XYY syndrome. Case-control: cases with each of these syndromes were matched to four controls with Down syndrome from within the same congenital anomaly register and with maternal age within 6 months. Data from 22 EUROCAT congenital anomaly registers in 12 European countries. Diagnoses with observed or (for terminations) predicted year of birth from 1980 to 2005, comprising live births, fetal deaths with gestational age ≥ 20 weeks and terminations after prenatal diagnosis of the anomaly. Data include 374 cases of Patau syndrome, 929 of Edwards syndrome, 295 of Klinefelter syndrome, 28 of XYY syndrome and 5627 controls with Down syndrome. Odds ratio (OR) associated with a 10-year increase in paternal age for each anomaly was estimated using conditional logistic regression. Results were adjusted to take account of the estimated association of paternal age with Down syndrome (1.11; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.23). The OR for Patau syndrome was 1.10 (95% CI 0.83 to 1.45); for Edwards syndrome, 1.15 (0.96 to 1.38); for Klinefelter syndrome, 1.35 (1.02 to 1.79); and for XYY syndrome, 1.99 (0.75 to 5.26). There was a statistically significant increase in the odds of Klinefelter syndrome with increasing paternal age. The larger positive associations of Klinefelter and XYY syndromes with paternal age compared with Patau and Edwards syndromes are consistent with the greater percentage of these sex chromosome anomalies being of paternal origin.

  5. Paternal age at childbearing and offspring psychiatric and academic morbidity.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Brian M; Rickert, Martin E; Frans, Emma; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Almqvist, Catarina; Sjölander, Arvid; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Advancing paternal age is associated with increased genetic mutations during spermatogenesis, which research suggests may cause psychiatric morbidity in the offspring. The effects of advancing paternal age at childbearing on offspring morbidity remain unclear, however, because of inconsistent epidemiologic findings and the inability of previous studies to rigorously rule out confounding factors. To examine the associations between advancing paternal age at childbearing and numerous indexes of offspring morbidity. We performed a population-based cohort study of all individuals born in Sweden in 1973-2001 (N = 2,615,081), with subsets of the data used to predict childhood or adolescent morbidity. We estimated the risk of psychiatric and academic morbidity associated with advancing paternal age using several quasi-experimental designs, including the comparison of differentially exposed siblings, cousins, and first-born cousins. Paternal age at childbearing. Psychiatric (autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, psychosis, bipolar disorder, suicide attempt, and substance use problem) and academic (failing grades and low educational attainment) morbidity. In the study population, advancing paternal age was associated with increased risk of some psychiatric disorders (eg, autism, psychosis, and bipolar disorders) but decreased risk of the other indexes of morbidity. In contrast, the sibling-comparison analyses indicated that advancing paternal age had a dose-response relationship with every index of morbidity, with the magnitude of the associations being as large or larger than the estimates in the entire population. Compared with offspring born to fathers 20 to 24 years old, offspring of fathers 45 years and older were at heightened risk of autism (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.45; 95% CI, 1.62-7.33), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (HR = 13.13; 95% CI, 6.85-25.16), psychosis (HR = 2.07; 95% CI, 1.35-3.20), bipolar disorder (HR = 24.70; 95% CI, 12

  6. Genetic variation and forensic efficiency of autosomal insertion/deletion polymorphisms in Chinese Bai ethnic group: phylogenetic analysis to other populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Hua; Yin, Cai-Yong; Shen, Chun-Mei; Guo, Yu-Xin; Dong, Qian; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Hong-Dan; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Meng, Hao-Tian; Jin, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Thirty insertion/deletion loci were utilized to study the genetic diversities of 125 bloodstain samples collected from Bai group in Yunnan Dali region, China. The observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity of the 30 loci ranged from 0.1520 to 0.5680, and 0.1927 to 0.4997, respectively. No deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium tests after Bonferroni correction were found at all 30 loci in Bai group. The cumulative probability of exclusion and combined discrimination power were 0.9859 and 0.9999999999887, respectively, which indicated the 30 loci could be used as complementary genetic markers for paternity testing and were qualified for personal identification in forensic cases. We found the studied Bai group had close relationships with Tibetan, Yi and Han groups from China by the population structure, principal component analysis, population differentiations, and phylogenetic reconstruction studies. Even so, for a better understanding of Bai ethnicity's genetic milieu, DNA genotyping at various genetic markers is necessary in future studies. PMID:28465476

  7. Psychiatric comorbidity in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Palijan, Tija Zarković; Muzinić, Lana; Radeljak, Sanja

    2009-09-01

    For the past several years a numerous studies in the field of forensic psychiatry confirmed a close relationship between violent offenders and comorbid substance abuse. The comorbid substance abuse in violent offenders was usually unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Furthermore, comorbidity in forensic psychiatry describes the co-occurrence of two or more conditions or psychiatric disorder known in the literature as dual diagnosis and defined by World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, many violent offenders have multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Recent studies have confirmed causal relationship between major psychiatric disorders and concomitant substance abuse (comorbidity) in 50-80% of forensic cases. In general, there is a high level of psychiatric comorbidity in forensic patients with prevalence of personality disorders (50-90%), mood disorders (20-60%) and psychotic disorders (15-20%) coupled with substance abuse disorders. Moreover, the high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities could be found in mentally retarded individuals, as well as, in epileptic patients. Drugs and alcohol abuse can produce serious psychotoxic effects that may lead to extreme violent behavior and consequently to serious criminal offence such as physical assault, rape, armed robbery, attempted murder and homicide, all due to an altered brain function and generating psychotic-like symptoms. Studies have confirmed a significant statistical relevance in causal relationship between substance abuse and violent offences. In terms of forensic psychiatry, the comorbidity strongly contributes in the process of establishing psychiatric diagnosis of diminished mental capacity or insanity at the time of the offence in the course of clinical assessment and evaluation of violent offenders. Today, the primary focus of forensic psychiatry treatment services (in-patient or community) is management of the violent offenders with psychiatric comorbidity which requires a multilevel, evidence based approach to

  8. Palynology: its position in the field of forensic science.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kevan A J; Horrocks, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Here we examine the current state of palynology in the field of forensic science. Forensic palynology is discussed with reference to other forensic disciplines to help understand what is required for its progress. Emerging developments are also discussed. Palynomorphs potentially deliver excellent trace evidence, fulfilling the requirements relating to the transfer, persistence, and detection of such evidence. Palynological evidence can provide very powerful investigative and associative evidence. Despite this, the application of palynology to forensic science has had mixed success. There are many anecdotal stories where pollen evidence has had spectacular successes. But it is extremely underutilized in most countries because it is labor-intensive and requires considerable expertise and experience, there is a lack of control over sample collection and inadequate resourcing and funding, and its crime-solving power is not well known. Palynology has been applied to forensic problems in an unstructured way, resulting in a lack of formalized discussion of the underlying principles. As there is renewed questioning of the acceptability of most evidence types in the current legal environment, there is a need for the establishment of palynological evidence through validation-type studies and experimentation, and the implementation of independent proficiency testing.

  9. Logical Framework of Forensic Identification: Ability to Resist Fabricated DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhou, Di; Zhang, Suhua; Bian, Yingnan; Hu, Zhen; Zhu, Ruxin; Lu, Daru; Li, Chengtao

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, DNA analysis has revolutionized forensic science and has become the most useful single tool in the multifaceted fight against crime. Today, DNA profiling with sets of highly polymorphic autosomal short tandem repeat markers is widely employed and accepted in the courts due to its high discriminating power and reliability. However, an artificial bloodstain purposefully created using molecular biology techniques succeeded in tricking a leading forensic DNA laboratory. The disturbing possibility that a forensic DNA profile can be faked shocked the general public and the mass media, and generated serious discussion about the credibility of DNA evidence. Herein, we present two exemplary assays based on tissue-specific methylation patterns and cell-specific mRNA expression, respectively. These two assays can be integrated into the DNA analysis pipelines without consumption of additional samples. We show that the two assays can not only distinguish between artificial and genuine samples, but also provide information on tissue origin. The two assays were tested on natural and artificial bloodstains (generated by polymerase chain reaction and whole genome amplification technique) and the results illustrated that the logical framework of forensic identification is still useful for forensic identification with the high credibility.

  10. Transgenerational effects of paternal heroin addiction on anxiety and aggression behavior in male offspring.

    PubMed

    Farah Naquiah, Mohd Zaki; James, Richard Johari; Suratman, Suraya; Lee, Lian Shien; Mohd Hafidz, Mohd Izhar; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Teh, Lay Kek

    2016-08-31

    Heroin addiction is a growing concern, affecting the socioeconomic development of many countries. Little is known about transgenerational effects on phenotype changes due to heroin addiction. This study aims to investigate changes in level of anxiety and aggression up to four different generations of adult male rats due to paternal exposure to heroin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed with heroin intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice-daily for 14 days with increasing dosage regimen (F0-heroin). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6-weeks-old) were divided into: (1) heroin exposed group (F0-heroin) and (2) control group treated with saline solution (F0-control). The dosage regime started with the lowest dose of 3 mg/kg per day of heroin followed by 1.5 mg/kg increments per day to a final dose of 13.5 mg/kg per day. Offspring were weaned on postnatal day 21. The adult male offspring from each generation were then mated with female-naïve rats after 2 weeks of heroin absence. Open field test and elevated plus maze test were used to study the anxiety level, whereas resident intruder test was used to evaluate aggression level in the addicted male rats and their offspring. Heroin exposure in male rats had resulted in smaller sizes of the litters compared to the control. We observed a higher anxiety level in the F1 and F2 progenies sired by the heroin exposed rats (F0) as compared to the control rats. Paternal heroin exposure also caused significantly more aggressive offspring in F1 compared to the control. The same pattern was also observed in the F2. Our results demonstrated that the progenies of F1 and F2 sustained higher levels of anxiety and aggression which are due to paternal heroin exposure.

  11. Forensic aspects of starvation.

    PubMed

    Madea, Burkhard; Ortmann, Jan; Doberentz, Elke

    2016-09-01

    Fatal starvation is a rare cause of death in industrialized countries. However, it may have major medicolegal importance if death results from the deliberate withholding of food, especially from infants. In such cases, the task of the forensic pathologist and the medical examiner, respectively, is to clarify the cause of death and give an expert opinion on the degree and duration of starvation. Several classification systems have been developed to estimate protein-energy malnutrition in developing countries. Simpler classifications, such as the Gomez classification, use the weight expected for the respective age group as the standard. However, smaller infants will be lighter, and therefore the classification may not be accurate in this case. Following the Waterlow classification, the extent of stunted growth (referring to growth retardation in cases of chronic malnutrition) is calculated using the ratio of the measured body height to that expected for the age. Using such classification systems, grading of stunting and wasting can be achieved and may greatly help in the assessment of a given child's nutritional status in legal cases. The application of the Waterlow classification to the authors' case material and previously published cases in the literature is herein demonstrated. The Waterlow classification is not only of importance for grading the final stage of fatal starvation, but also for the chronological development of the nutritional status if anthropometrical data have been repeatedly recorded from the affected individual in vivo.

  12. Drawbacks in the scientification of forensic science.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, A; Curran, J

    2014-12-01

    This letter to the Editor comments on the article On the limitations of probability in conceptualizing pattern matches in forensic science by P. T. Jayaprakash (Forensic Science International, [10]). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Active Traffic Capture for Network Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaviero, Marco; Granova, Anna; Olivier, Martin

    Network traffic capture is an integral part of network forensics, but current traffic capture techniques are typically passive in nature. Under heavy loads, it is possible for a sniffer to miss packets, which affects the quality of forensic evidence.

  14. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kinman, William Scott; Steiner, Robert Ernest; Lamont, Stephen Philip

    2016-09-30

    Nuclear forensics assists in responding to any event where nuclear material is found outside of regulatory control; a response plan is presented and a nuclear forensics program is undergoing further development so that smugglers are sufficiently deterred.

  15. The Association of Paternal Mood and Infant Temperament: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Shreya; Nazareth, Irwin; Sherr, Lorraine; Senior, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Maternal depression is associated with adverse child development, but little is known about the effects of paternal depression. This pilot study estimated the prevalence of paternal depression and mood state, and assessed the relationship between paternal mood and infant temperament. The participants in the study were 98 fathers of newborn babies.…

  16. 32 CFR 733.5 - Determination of paternity and support of illegitimate children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination of paternity and support of... NAVY PERSONNEL ASSISTANCE TO AND SUPPORT OF DEPENDENTS; PATERNITY COMPLAINTS § 733.5 Determination of paternity and support of illegitimate children. (a) Illegitimate children. If the service member desires...

  17. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-9 - Maternity and paternity absence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Maternity and paternity absence. 1.410(a)-9...(a)-9 Maternity and paternity absence. (a) Elapsed time—(1) Rule. For purposes of applying the rules... sections 410(a)(5)(E) and 411(a)(6)(E) (relating to maternity or paternity absence), the severance from...

  18. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-9 - Maternity and paternity absence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Maternity and paternity absence. 1.410(a)-9...(a)-9 Maternity and paternity absence. (a) Elapsed time—(1) Rule. For purposes of applying the rules... sections 410(a)(5)(E) and 411(a)(6)(E) (relating to maternity or paternity absence), the severance from...

  19. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-9 - Maternity and paternity absence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maternity and paternity absence. 1.410(a)-9...(a)-9 Maternity and paternity absence. (a) Elapsed time—(1) Rule. For purposes of applying the rules... sections 410(a)(5)(E) and 411(a)(6)(E) (relating to maternity or paternity absence), the severance from...

  20. For Your Child's Sake...Establish Paternity [and] Collect Child Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    These brochures explain briefly the importance of establishing paternity for unwed mothers. By establishing paternity and enforcing child support orders, fathers can be required to help raise their child legally and financially. The brochures consist of two separate sheets. "For Your Child's Sake...Establish Paternity" presents several…

  1. 32 CFR 733.5 - Determination of paternity and support of illegitimate children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of paternity and support of... NAVY PERSONNEL ASSISTANCE TO AND SUPPORT OF DEPENDENTS; PATERNITY COMPLAINTS § 733.5 Determination of paternity and support of illegitimate children. (a) Illegitimate children. If the service member desires...

  2. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-9 - Maternity and paternity absence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maternity and paternity absence. 1.410(a)-9...(a)-9 Maternity and paternity absence. (a) Elapsed time—(1) Rule. For purposes of applying the rules... sections 410(a)(5)(E) and 411(a)(6)(E) (relating to maternity or paternity absence), the severance from...

  3. 32 CFR 733.5 - Determination of paternity and support of illegitimate children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination of paternity and support of... NAVY PERSONNEL ASSISTANCE TO AND SUPPORT OF DEPENDENTS; PATERNITY COMPLAINTS § 733.5 Determination of paternity and support of illegitimate children. (a) Illegitimate children. If the service member desires...

  4. 32 CFR 733.5 - Determination of paternity and support of illegitimate children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of paternity and support of... NAVY PERSONNEL ASSISTANCE TO AND SUPPORT OF DEPENDENTS; PATERNITY COMPLAINTS § 733.5 Determination of paternity and support of illegitimate children. (a) Illegitimate children. If the service member desires...

  5. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-9 - Maternity and paternity absence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maternity and paternity absence. 1.410(a)-9... Maternity and paternity absence. (a) Elapsed time—(1) Rule. For purposes of applying the rules of § 1.410(a...)(5)(E) and 411(a)(6)(E) (relating to maternity or paternity absence), the severance from service date...

  6. Maternal age and paternal age are associated with distinct childhood behavioural outcomes in a general population birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sukanta; Barnett, Adrian G; Buka, Stephen L; McGrath, John J

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies show that advanced paternal age (APA) is associated with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A body of evidence also suggests that individuals who develop schizophrenia show subtle deviations in a range of behavioural domains during their childhood. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between paternal and maternal ages and selected behavioural measures in children using a large birth cohort. Participants were singleton children (n=21,753) drawn from the US Collaborative Perinatal Project. The outcome measures were assessed at 7 years. The main analyses examined the relationship between parental age and behavioural measures when adjusted for a range of potentially confounding variables, including age of the other parent, maternal race, socio-economic measures, sex, gestation length, maternal marital status, parental mental illness, and child's age-at-testing. Advanced paternal age was associated with a significantly increased risk of adverse 'externalizing' behaviours at age seven years. For every five year increase in paternal age, the odds of higher 'externalizing' behaviours was increased by 12% (OR=1.12; 95% CI=1.03, 1.21, p<0.0001). The relationship persisted after adjusting for potential confounding factors. 'Internalizing' behavioural outcome was not associated with advanced paternal age. In contrast, advanced maternal age was significantly protective against adverse 'externalizing' behavioural outcomes, but associated with an increased risk of adverse 'internalizing' behavioural outcomes. The offspring of older fathers show a distinctly different pattern of behaviours compared to the offspring of older mothers. The diverse socio-cultural and biologically-mediated factors that underpin these findings remain to be clarified. In light of secular trends related to delayed parenthood, the mechanisms underlying these findings warrant closer scrutiny.

  7. Infant Mortality Risk and Paternity Certainty Are Associated with Postnatal Maternal Behavior toward Adult Male Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei)

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Stacy; Hirwa, Jean Paul; Silk, Joan B.; Vigilant, Linda; Stoinski, Tara S.

    2016-01-01

    Sexually selected infanticide is an important source of infant mortality in many mammalian species. In species with long-term male-female associations, females may benefit from male protection against infanticidal outsiders. We tested whether mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) mothers in single and multi-male groups monitored by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund’s Karisoke Research Center actively facilitated interactions between their infants and a potentially protective male. We also evaluated the criteria mothers in multi-male groups used to choose a preferred male social partner. In single male groups, where infanticide risk and paternity certainty are high, females with infants <1 year old spent more time near and affiliated more with males than females without young infants. In multi-male groups, where infanticide rates and paternity certainty are lower, mothers with new infants exhibited few behavioral changes toward males. The sole notable change was that females with young infants proportionally increased their time near males they previously spent little time near when compared to males they had previously preferred, perhaps to encourage paternity uncertainty and deter aggression. Rank was a much better predictor of females’ social partner choice than paternity. Older infants (2–3 years) in multi-male groups mirrored their mothers’ preferences for individual male social partners; 89% spent the most time in close proximity to the male their mother had spent the most time near when they were <1 year old. Observed discrepancies between female behavior in single and multi-male groups likely reflect different levels of postpartum intersexual conflict; in groups where paternity certainty and infanticide risk are both high, male-female interests align and females behave accordingly. This highlights the importance of considering individual and group-level variation when evaluating intersexual conflict across the reproductive cycle. PMID:26863300

  8. Infant Mortality Risk and Paternity Certainty Are Associated with Postnatal Maternal Behavior toward Adult Male Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei).

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Stacy; Hirwa, Jean Paul; Silk, Joan B; Vigilant, Linda; Stoinski, Tara S

    2016-01-01

    Sexually selected infanticide is an important source of infant mortality in many mammalian species. In species with long-term male-female associations, females may benefit from male protection against infanticidal outsiders. We tested whether mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) mothers in single and multi-male groups monitored by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund's Karisoke Research Center actively facilitated interactions between their infants and a potentially protective male. We also evaluated the criteria mothers in multi-male groups used to choose a preferred male social partner. In single male groups, where infanticide risk and paternity certainty are high, females with infants <1 year old spent more time near and affiliated more with males than females without young infants. In multi-male groups, where infanticide rates and paternity certainty are lower, mothers with new infants exhibited few behavioral changes toward males. The sole notable change was that females with young infants proportionally increased their time near males they previously spent little time near when compared to males they had previously preferred, perhaps to encourage paternity uncertainty and deter aggression. Rank was a much better predictor of females' social partner choice than paternity. Older infants (2-3 years) in multi-male groups mirrored their mothers' preferences for individual male social partners; 89% spent the most time in close proximity to the male their mother had spent the most time near when they were <1 year old. Observed discrepancies between female behavior in single and multi-male groups likely reflect different levels of postpartum intersexual conflict; in groups where paternity certainty and infanticide risk are both high, male-female interests align and females behave accordingly. This highlights the importance of considering individual and group-level variation when evaluating intersexual conflict across the reproductive cycle.

  9. Nuclear forensic analysis of a non-traditional actinide sample

    DOE PAGES

    Doyle, Jamie L.; Kuhn, Kevin John; Byerly, Benjamin; ...

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear forensic publications, performance tests, and research and development efforts typically target the bulk global inventory of intentionally safeguarded materials, such as plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U). Other materials, such as neptunium (Np), pose a nuclear security risk as well. Trafficking leading to recovery of an interdicted Np sample is a realistic concern especially for materials originating in countries that reprocesses fuel. Using complementary forensic methods, potential signatures for an unknown Np oxide sample were investigated. Measurement results were assessed against published Np processes to present hypotheses as to the original intended use, method of production, and origin for thismore » Np oxide.« less

  10. Nuclear forensic analysis of a non-traditional actinide sample.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jamie L; Kuhn, Kevin; Byerly, Benjamin; Colletti, Lisa; Fulwyler, James; Garduno, Katherine; Keller, Russell; Lujan, Elmer; Martinez, Alexander; Myers, Steve; Porterfield, Donivan; Spencer, Khalil; Stanley, Floyd; Townsend, Lisa; Thomas, Mariam; Walker, Laurie; Xu, Ning; Tandon, Lav

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear forensic publications, performance tests, and research and development efforts typically target the bulk global inventory of intentionally safeguarded materials, such as plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U). Other materials, such as neptunium (Np), pose a nuclear security risk as well. Trafficking leading to recovery of an interdicted Np sample is a realistic concern especially for materials originating in countries that reprocesses fuel. Using complementary forensic methods, potential signatures for an unknown Np oxide sample were investigated. Measurement results were assessed against published Np processes to present hypotheses as to the original intended use, method of production, and origin for this Np oxide. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Web Content Management Systems: An Analysis of Forensic Investigatory Challenges.

    PubMed

    Horsman, Graeme

    2018-02-26

    With an increase in the creation and maintenance of personal websites, web content management systems are now frequently utilized. Such systems offer a low cost and simple solution for those seeking to develop an online presence, and subsequently, a platform from which reported defamatory content, abuse, and copyright infringement has been witnessed. This article provides an introductory forensic analysis of the three current most popular web content management systems available, WordPress, Drupal, and Joomla! Test platforms have been created, and their site structures have been examined to provide guidance for forensic practitioners facing investigations of this type. Result's document available metadata for establishing site ownership, user interactions, and stored content following analysis of artifacts including Wordpress's wp_users, and wp_comments tables, Drupal's "watchdog" records, and Joomla!'s _users, and _content tables. Finally, investigatory limitations documenting the difficulties of investigating WCMS usage are noted, and analysis recommendations are offered. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Shrunken head (tsantsa): a complete forensic analysis procedure.

    PubMed

    Charlier, P; Huynh-Charlier, I; Brun, L; Hervé, C; de la Grandmaison, G Lorin

    2012-10-10

    Based on the analysis of shrunken heads referred to our forensic laboratory for anthropological expertise, and data from both anthropological and medical literature, we propose a complete forensic procedure for the analysis of such pieces. A list of 14 original morphological criteria has been developed, based on the global aspect, color, physical deformation, anatomical details, and eventual associated material (wood, vegetal fibers, sand, charcoals, etc.). Such criteria have been tested on a control sample of 20 tsantsa (i.e. shrunken heads from the Jivaro or Shuar tribes of South America). Further complementary analyses are described such as CT-scan and microscopic examination. Such expertise is more and more asked to forensic anthropologists and practitioners in a context of global repatriation of human artifacts to native communities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Information Assurance and Forensic Readiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangalos, Georgios; Katos, Vasilios

    Egalitarianism and justice are amongst the core attributes of a democratic regime and should be also secured in an e-democratic setting. As such, the rise of computer related offenses pose a threat to the fundamental aspects of e-democracy and e-governance. Digital forensics are a key component for protecting and enabling the underlying (e-)democratic values and therefore forensic readiness should be considered in an e-democratic setting. This position paper commences from the observation that the density of compliance and potential litigation activities is monotonically increasing in modern organizations, as rules, legislative regulations and policies are being constantly added to the corporate environment. Forensic practices seem to be departing from the niche of law enforcement and are becoming a business function and infrastructural component, posing new challenges to the security professionals. Having no a priori knowledge on whether a security related event or corporate policy violation will lead to litigation, we advocate that computer forensics need to be applied to all investigatory, monitoring and auditing activities. This would result into an inflation of the responsibilities of the Information Security Officer. After exploring some commonalities and differences between IS audit and computer forensics, we present a list of strategic challenges the organization and, in effect, the IS security and audit practitioner will face.

  14. Towards a consensus Y-chromosomal phylogeny and Y-SNP set in forensics in the next-generation sequencing era.

    PubMed

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Kayser, Manfred; van Oven, Mannis; Decorte, Ronny

    2015-03-01

    Currently, several different Y-chromosomal phylogenies and haplogroup nomenclatures are presented in scientific literature and at conferences demonstrating the present diversity in Y-chromosomal phylogenetic trees and Y-SNP sets used within forensic and anthropological research. This situation can be ascribed to the exponential growth of the number of Y-SNPs discovered due to mostly next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies. As Y-SNPs and their respective phylogenetic positions are important in forensics, such as for male lineage characterization and paternal bio-geographic ancestry inference, there is a need for forensic geneticists to know how to deal with these newly identified Y-SNPs and phylogenies, especially since these phylogenies are often created with other aims than to carry out forensic genetic research. Therefore, we give here an overview of four categories of currently used Y-chromosomal phylogenies and the associated Y-SNP sets in scientific research in the current NGS era. We compare these categories based on the construction method, their advantages and disadvantages, the disciplines wherein the phylogenetic tree can be used, and their specific relevance for forensic geneticists. Based on this overview, it is clear that an up-to-date reduced tree with a consensus Y-SNP set and a stable nomenclature will be the most appropriate reference resource for forensic research. Initiatives to reach such an international consensus are therefore highly recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Colombian forensic genetics as a form of public science: The role of race, nation and common sense in the stabilization of DNA populations.

    PubMed

    Schwartz-Marín, Ernesto; Wade, Peter; Cruz-Santiago, Arely; Cárdenas, Roosbelinda

    2015-12-01

    Abstract This article examines the role that vernacular notions of racialized-regional difference play in the constitution and stabilization of DNA populations in Colombian forensic science, in what we frame as a process of public science. In public science, the imaginations of the scientific world and common-sense public knowledge are integral to the production and circulation of science itself. We explore the origins and circulation of a scientific object--'La Tabla', published in Paredes et al. and used in genetic forensic identification procedures--among genetic research institutes, forensic genetics laboratories and courtrooms in Bogotá. We unveil the double life of this central object of forensic genetics. On the one hand, La Tabla enjoys an indisputable public place in the processing of forensic genetic evidence in Colombia (paternity cases, identification of bodies, etc.). On the other hand, the relations it establishes between 'race', geography and genetics are questioned among population geneticists in Colombia. Although forensic technicians are aware of the disputes among population geneticists, they use and endorse the relations established between genetics, 'race' and geography because these fit with common-sense notions of visible bodily difference and the regionalization of race in the Colombian nation.

  16. Colombian forensic genetics as a form of public science: The role of race, nation and common sense in the stabilization of DNA populations

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz-Marín, Ernesto; Wade, Peter; Cruz-Santiago, Arely; Cárdenas, Roosbelinda

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role that vernacular notions of racialized-regional difference play in the constitution and stabilization of DNA populations in Colombian forensic science, in what we frame as a process of public science. In public science, the imaginations of the scientific world and common-sense public knowledge are integral to the production and circulation of science itself. We explore the origins and circulation of a scientific object – ‘La Tabla’, published in Paredes et al. and used in genetic forensic identification procedures – among genetic research institutes, forensic genetics laboratories and courtrooms in Bogotá. We unveil the double life of this central object of forensic genetics. On the one hand, La Tabla enjoys an indisputable public place in the processing of forensic genetic evidence in Colombia (paternity cases, identification of bodies, etc.). On the other hand, the relations it establishes between ‘race’, geography and genetics are questioned among population geneticists in Colombia. Although forensic technicians are aware of the disputes among population geneticists, they use and endorse the relations established between genetics, ‘race’ and geography because these fit with common-sense notions of visible bodily difference and the regionalization of race in the Colombian nation. PMID:27480000

  17. Validation of a multiplex PCR assay for the forensic identification of Indian crocodiles.

    PubMed

    Meganathan, Poorlin Ramakodi; Dubey, Bhawna; Jogayya, Kothakota Naga; Haque, Ikramul

    2011-09-01

    A dependable and efficient wildlife species identification system is essential for swift dispensation of the justice linking wildlife crimes. Development of molecular techniques is befitting the need of the time. The forensic laboratories often receive highly ill-treated samples for identification purposes, and thus, validation of any novel methodology is necessary for forensic usage. We validate a novel multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay, developed at this laboratory for the forensic identification of three Indian crocodiles, Crocodylus palustris, Crocodylus porosus, and Gavialis gangeticus, following the guidelines of Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods. The multiplex PCR was tested for its specificity, reproducibility, sensitivity, and stability. This study also includes the samples treated with various chemical substances and exposed to various environmental regimes. The result of this validation study promises this technique to be an efficient identification tool for Indian crocodiles and therefore is recommended for forensic purposes. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Paternal understanding of menstrual concerns in young women.

    PubMed

    Girling, Jane E; Hawthorne, Samuel Cj; Marino, Jennifer L; Nur Azurah, Abdul G; Grover, Sonia R; Jayasinghe, Yasmin L

    2018-04-12

    No studies have specifically considered paternal understanding of menstruation. This study aimed to establish the degree of understanding of fathers of adolescent girls with menstrual symptoms relative to mothers. This is a cross-sectional survey-based study. Adolescent patients attending an outpatient gynaecology clinic for dysmenorrhoea and/or heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and their parents were invited to complete surveys. 60 surveys were completed (24/40 daughters, 20/40 mothers, 16/40 fathers). Surveys aimed to test parents' understanding of menstrual symptoms and potential medications, as well as fathers' concerns with their daughters' health. The fathers' knowledge of menstrual symptoms was poorer than mothers, although most knew HMB (93%) and mood swings (87%). Many parents answered 'don't know' or did not answer questions about potential consequences of medications, although parents were clearly concerned about side effects. Most fathers (80%) were open to discussing menstrual concerns with daughters; however, only 52% of daughters were open to such discussions. Of fathers, 80% felt sympathetic/concerned, 53% helpless and 13% frustrated when daughters were in pain. When asked about impacts, 93% of fathers (79% of mothers) were worried about their daughter's welfare and 60% (21%) about schooling. We present the first insight into fathers' knowledge of their daughters' menstrual health. Overall, parents have an incomplete picture of menstrual symptoms. Even in this cohort, which could be expected to be well informed due to their daughters' attendance at a tertiary hospital, it is clear that further knowledge would assist them caring for their daughters. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Paternal Involvement and Child Sleep: A Look beyond Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernier, Annie; Tétreault, Émilie; Bélanger, Marie-Ève; Carrier, Julie

    2017-01-01

    While maternal influences on young children's sleep are increasingly documented, the study of paternal contributions to this important sphere of child functioning is only just beginning. In addition, much of this emerging research has focused on infancy only or has relied on parental reports of child sleep. The current study aimed to examine the…

  20. Change in paternity and recurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Fejzo, Marlena S; Ching, Chunyu; Schoenberg, Frederic P; Macgibbon, Kimber; Romero, Roberto; Goodwin, T Murphy; Mullin, Patrick M

    2012-08-01

    To determine whether change in paternity changes recurrence risk of hyperemesis gravidarum (HG). Survey data on recurrence of HG was compared between cases who had a paternity change between pregnancies and cases who did not. The percentage of HG pregnancies in women with the same partner for all pregnancies was not significantly different from the percentage of HG pregnancies in women who changed partners for at least one pregnancy (78% vs 71%, p > 0.05). Participants who did and did not change partners between their first and second pregnancies, were asked to rate their first and second pregnancy in regards to symptoms of HG. Neither the ratings nor the change in rating between pregnancies was significantly different between the two groups. Women reported HG in over 70% of their pregnancies regardless of a paternity change. Paternal genes expressed through the fetus do not have a significant effect on incidence or recurrence of HG. This study supports a strong maternal genetic factor involved in HG. However, because the recurrence risk is not 100%, other factors play a role. Identification of the predisposing gene(s) and other factors will determine the cause of this poorly understood complication of pregnancy.

  1. Change in paternity and recurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum

    PubMed Central

    Fejzo, Marlena S.; Ching, ChunYu; Schoenberg, Frederic P.; Macgibbon, Kimber; Romero, Roberto; Goodwin, T. Murphy; Mullin, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether change in paternity changes recurrence risk of hyperemesis gravidarum (HG). Study Design Survey data on recurrence of HG was compared between cases who had a paternity change between pregnancies and cases who did not. Results The percentage of HG pregnancies in women with the same partner for all pregnancies was not significantly different from the percentage of HG pregnancies in women who changed partners for at least one pregnancy (78% vs 71%, p > 0.05). Participants who did and did not change partners between their first and second pregnancies, were asked to rate their first and second pregnancy in regards to symptoms of HG. Neither the ratings nor the change in rating between pregnancies was significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion Women reported HG in over 70% of their pregnancies regardless of paternity change. Paternal genes expressed through the fetus do not have a significant effect on incidence or recurrence of HG. This study supports a strong maternal genetic factor involved in HG. However, because the recurrence risk is not 100%, other factors play a role. Identification of the predisposing gene(s) and other factors will determine the cause of this poorly understood complication of pregnancy. PMID:22010839

  2. Polypatex: an R package for paternity exclusion in autopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Alexander B; Elliott, Carole; Hopley, Tara; Lovell, David; Young, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Microsatellite markers have demonstrated their value for performing paternity exclusion and hence exploring mating patterns in plants and animals. Methodology is well established for diploid species, and several software packages exist for elucidating paternity in diploids; however, these issues are not so readily addressed in polyploids due to the increased complexity of the exclusion problem and a lack of available software. We introduce polypatex, an r package for paternity exclusion analysis using microsatellite data in autopolyploid, monoecious or dioecious/bisexual species with a ploidy of 4n, 6n or 8n. Given marker data for a set of offspring, their mothers and a set of candidate fathers, polypatex uses allele matching to exclude candidates whose marker alleles are incompatible with the alleles in each offspring-mother pair. polypatex can analyse marker data sets in which allele copy numbers are known (genotype data) or unknown (allelic phenotype data) - for data sets in which allele copy numbers are unknown, comparisons are made taking into account all possible genotypes that could arise from the compared allele sets. polypatex is a software tool that provides population geneticists with the ability to investigate the mating patterns of autopolyploids using paternity exclusion analysis on data from codominant markers having multiple alleles per locus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Change in paternity and select perinatal outcomes: causal or confounded?

    PubMed

    Bandoli, G; Lindsay, S; Johnson, D L; Kao, K; Luo, Y; Chambers, C D

    2012-10-01

    Select social, behavioural and maternal characteristics were evaluated to determine if they were confounding factors in the association between paternity change and pre-eclampsia, small for gestational age (SGA) and pre-term delivery, in a sample of 1,409 women. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine if any of these risk factors modified the association between changing paternity and the selected perinatal outcomes. Results of the analysis showed that women who changed partners were more likely to possess potentially confounding risk factors compared with those who had not. Paternity change was 2.75 times more likely to be associated with the development of pre-eclampsia (95% CI 1.33; 5.68) and 2.25 times more likely to be associated with an SGA infant on weight (95% CI 1.13; 4.47), after adjusting for selected risk factors. Paternity change remains a significant risk factor for pre-eclampsia and SGA in the presence of select risk factors.

  4. Mechanisms and consequences of paternally transmitted chromosomal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-04-05

    Paternally transmitted chromosomal damage has been associated with pregnancy loss, developmental and morphological defects, infant mortality, infertility, and genetic diseases in the offspring including cancer. There is epidemiological evidence linking paternal exposure to occupational or environmental agents with an increased risk of abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also a large body of literature on germ cell mutagenesis in rodents showing that treatment of male germ cells with mutagens has dramatic consequences on reproduction producing effects such as those observed in human epidemiological studies. However, we know very little about the etiology, transmission and early embryonic consequences of paternally-derived chromosomal abnormalities.more » The available evidence suggests that: (1) there are distinct patterns of germ cell-stage differences in the sensitivity of induction of transmissible genetic damage with male postmeiotic cells being the most sensitive; (2) cytogenetic abnormalities at first metaphase after fertilization are critical intermediates between paternal exposure and abnormal reproductive outcomes; and, (3) there are maternally susceptibility factors that may have profound effects on the amount of sperm DNA damage that is converted into chromosomal aberrations in the zygote and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes.« less

  5. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... determination of good cause for refusal to cooperate under section 454(29) of the Act. (2) A contested paternity... Maternal and Child Health (MCH) clinics), and private health care providers (including obstetricians... enforcement (IV-D) services; (C) Head Start and child care agencies (including child care information and...

  6. Modelling uncertain paternity to address differential pedigree accuracy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to implement uncertain parentage models to account for differences in daughter pedigree accuracy. Elite sires have nearly all daughters genotyped resulting in correct paternity assignment. Bulls of lesser genetic merit have fewer daughters genotyped creating the possibility for mor...

  7. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... paternity by legal process established under State law. (b) The IV-D agency need not attempt to establish...

  8. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... paternity by legal process established under State law. (b) The IV-D agency need not attempt to establish...

  9. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... paternity by legal process established under State law. (b) The IV-D agency need not attempt to establish...

  10. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... paternity by legal process established under State law. (b) The IV-D agency need not attempt to establish...

  11. Paternity: social responsibility of man's role as provider.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Waglânia de Mendonça Faustino e; Silva, Ana Tereza Medeiros Cavalcante da; Coelho, Edméia de Almeida Cardoso; Guedes, Rebeca Nunes; Lucena, Kerle Dayana Tavares de; Costa, Ana Paula Teixeira

    2009-02-01

    To analyze meanings attributed to paternity by men who are fathers. Study with a qualitative approach and gender-theory focus, performed in the city of João Pessoa, Northeastern Brazil, in 2003. A total of ten men, whose children had been cared for in the pediatric outpatient clinic of a university hospital, participated in the study. Information analyzed was obtained with semi-structured interviews. Critical discourse analysis technique was employed to analyze participants' speech. DISCOURSE ANALYSIS: Participants in the study viewed paternity as a new social role, more closely associated with material support for the family than the dimension of affective involvement with the child. However, participants experienced a transition process where the traditional father lived with those whose affective dimension of paternity was found to be the main concern of being a father. The meaning and concrete exercise of paternity were found in an area of responsibilities that predominantly reproduces the traditional father, but also recreates the father's role, including the affective dimension.

  12. Paternal Psychopathology: Relationship to Adolescent Substance Abuse and Deviant Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sandra A.; And Others

    Research has documented the genetic contribution of paternal alcoholism and Antisocial Personality Disorder as risk factors for adolescent deviant behavior, including substance abuse. Teens (n=147) between the ages of 12 and 19 years and their parents participated in the study. The sample consisted of 74 substance abusing teens/families drawn from…

  13. Forensic Chemistry--A Symposium Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a collection of articles to provide chemistry teachers with resource materials to add forensic chemistry units to their chemistry courses. Topics range from development of forensic science laboratory courses and mock-crime scenes to forensic serology and analytical techniques. (JN)

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency in an Inpatient Forensic Intellectual Disability Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Verity; Simmons, Hayley; Henriksen, Marie; Alexander, Regi T.

    2017-01-01

    No research has examined vitamin D deficiency among inpatients within forensic intellectual disability services, despite their potentially increased risk. Tests of serum 25(OHD) concentration in blood are routinely offered to patients within the service as part of the admission and annual physical health check. Results were classified as deficient…

  15. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  16. Autism and Increased Paternal Age Related Changes in Global Levels of Gene Expression Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Mark D.; Kharkar, Rutwik; Ramsey, Keri E.; Craig, David W.; Melmed, Raun D.; Grebe, Theresa A.; Bay, R. Curtis; Ober-Reynolds, Sharman; Kirwan, Janet; Jones, Josh J.; Turner, J. Blake; Hen, Rene; Stephan, Dietrich A.

    2011-01-01

    A causal role of mutations in multiple general transcription factors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism suggested that alterations in global levels of gene expression regulation might also relate to disease risk in sporadic cases of autism. This premise can be tested by evaluating for changes in the overall distribution of gene expression levels. For instance, in mice, variability in hippocampal-dependent behaviors was associated with variability in the pattern of the overall distribution of gene expression levels, as assessed by variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in the hippocampus. We hypothesized that a similar change in variance might be found in children with autism. Gene expression microarrays covering greater than 47,000 unique RNA transcripts were done on RNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of children with autism (n = 82) and controls (n = 64). Variance in the distribution of gene expression levels from each microarray was compared between groups of children. Also tested was whether a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age, was associated with variance. A decrease in the variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in PBL was associated with the diagnosis of autism and a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age. Traditional approaches to microarray analysis of gene expression suggested a possible mechanism for decreased variance in gene expression. Gene expression pathways involved in transcriptional regulation were down-regulated in the blood of children with autism and children of older fathers. Thus, results from global and gene specific approaches to studying microarray data were complimentary and supported the hypothesis that alterations at the global level of gene expression regulation are related to autism and increased paternal age. Global regulation of transcription, thus, represents a possible point of convergence for multiple etiologies of autism and other

  17. System Support for Forensic Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehani, Ashish; Kirchner, Florent; Shankar, Natarajan

    Digital evidence is playing an increasingly important role in prosecuting crimes. The reasons are manifold: financially lucrative targets are now connected online, systems are so complex that vulnerabilities abound and strong digital identities are being adopted, making audit trails more useful. If the discoveries of forensic analysts are to hold up to scrutiny in court, they must meet the standard for scientific evidence. Software systems are currently developed without consideration of this fact. This paper argues for the development of a formal framework for constructing “digital artifacts” that can serve as proxies for physical evidence; a system so imbued would facilitate sound digital forensic inference. A case study involving a filesystem augmentation that provides transparent support for forensic inference is described.

  18. Ethics in forensic psychiatry publishing.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reena; Young, John L; Coleman, Jacquelyn T; Norko, Michael A; Griffith, Ezra E H

    2011-01-01

    Several organizations have developed guidelines to help authors and editors of medical journals negotiate ethics dilemmas in publishing, but very little is known about how these guidelines translate to the context of forensic psychiatry. In this article, we explore the important topic of ethics in forensic psychiatry publishing. First, we review the historical development of ethics principles in medical and psychiatric publishing. We then analyze eight ethics dilemmas that have arisen in the publication of The Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (The Journal) from 2000 to 2009, including disputes about authorship, conflict of interest, redundant publication, bias in peer reviewers, confidentiality in case reports, and others. We identify ethics principles that were relevant to the dilemmas and discuss how they were resolved by the editors of The Journal. We conclude by using the principles identified in the practical resolution of ethics dilemmas to derive a conceptual foundation for ethics in forensic psychiatry publishing.

  19. High Performance Proactive Digital Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Soltan; Moa, Belaid; Weber-Jahnke, Jens; Traore, Issa

    2012-10-01

    With the increase in the number of digital crimes and in their sophistication, High Performance Computing (HPC) is becoming a must in Digital Forensics (DF). According to the FBI annual report, the size of data processed during the 2010 fiscal year reached 3,086 TB (compared to 2,334 TB in 2009) and the number of agencies that requested Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory assistance increasing from 689 in 2009 to 722 in 2010. Since most investigation tools are both I/O and CPU bound, the next-generation DF tools are required to be distributed and offer HPC capabilities. The need for HPC is even more evident in investigating crimes on clouds or when proactive DF analysis and on-site investigation, requiring semi-real time processing, are performed. Although overcoming the performance challenge is a major goal in DF, as far as we know, there is almost no research on HPC-DF except for few papers. As such, in this work, we extend our work on the need of a proactive system and present a high performance automated proactive digital forensic system. The most expensive phase of the system, namely proactive analysis and detection, uses a parallel extension of the iterative z algorithm. It also implements new parallel information-based outlier detection algorithms to proactively and forensically handle suspicious activities. To analyse a large number of targets and events and continuously do so (to capture the dynamics of the system), we rely on a multi-resolution approach to explore the digital forensic space. Data set from the Honeynet Forensic Challenge in 2001 is used to evaluate the system from DF and HPC perspectives.

  20. The relationship of forensic odontology with various dental specialties in the articles published in a National and an International Forensic Odontology Journal: A 5-year content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thetakala, Ravi Kumar; Chandrashekar, B. R.; Sunitha, Siddanna; Sharma, Priyanka

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the quantum of articles published by various dental specialties in a National and an International Forensic Odontology Journal from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014. Settings and Design: The present study is a 5-year retrospective content analysis study. Subjects and Methods: Data were collected from two forensic odontology journals (Journal of Forensic Odonto Stomatology [JOFS] and Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences [JFDS]) which are subscribed by institutional library. The article contents were scrutinized by one investigator and categorized into nine individual dental specialties based on the new working classification proposed for forensic odontology. Statistical Analysis Used: The quantum of articles published by various dental specialties and the various focus areas in each specialty were assessed using Chi-square test. Results: Among all the published articles, a maximum number of articles were related to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology (32.6%) in JFDS with Cheiloscopy (46.7%) being more focused area and to the Department of Prosthodontics (25.7%) in JFOS with Bite mark analysis (66.7%) being more focused area. Conclusions: There was a scarcity of information about the relationship of forensic odontology with various dental specialties in the articles published in JFDS and JFOS. The editorial board of journals should expand and elaborate their scope of journals to various focus areas of forensic odontology. This will encourage the researchers to explore in the different focus areas which are most neglected as of now. PMID:29263610

  1. The relationship of forensic odontology with various dental specialties in the articles published in a National and an International Forensic Odontology Journal: A 5-year content analysis.

    PubMed

    Thetakala, Ravi Kumar; Chandrashekar, B R; Sunitha, Siddanna; Sharma, Priyanka

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the quantum of articles published by various dental specialties in a National and an International Forensic Odontology Journal from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014. The present study is a 5-year retrospective content analysis study. Data were collected from two forensic odontology journals (Journal of Forensic Odonto Stomatology [JOFS] and Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences [JFDS]) which are subscribed by institutional library. The article contents were scrutinized by one investigator and categorized into nine individual dental specialties based on the new working classification proposed for forensic odontology. The quantum of articles published by various dental specialties and the various focus areas in each specialty were assessed using Chi-square test. Among all the published articles, a maximum number of articles were related to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology (32.6%) in JFDS with Cheiloscopy (46.7%) being more focused area and to the Department of Prosthodontics (25.7%) in JFOS with Bite mark analysis (66.7%) being more focused area. There was a scarcity of information about the relationship of forensic odontology with various dental specialties in the articles published in JFDS and JFOS. The editorial board of journals should expand and elaborate their scope of journals to various focus areas of forensic odontology. This will encourage the researchers to explore in the different focus areas which are most neglected as of now.

  2. DNA methylation-based forensic tissue identification.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Budowle, Bruce; Davidson, Ariane

    2011-11-01

    Identifying the source tissue of biological material found at crime scenes can be very informative in a number of cases. Despite their usefulness, current visual, catalytic, enzymatic, and immunologic tests for presumptive and confirmatory tissue identification are applicable only to a subset of samples, might suffer limitations such as low specificity, lack of sensitivity, and are substantially impacted by environmental insults. Moreover these assays are incompatible and thus cannot be multiplexed. Thus they are less amenable to automation. In addition their results are operator-dependent. A better alternative approach is tissue identification based on messenger RNA (mRNA) or microRNA (miRNA); however, RNA is not as stable as DNA, and requires the use of non-standard procedures by forensic laboratories. Herein a DNA-based assay is described that enables tissue identification based on detection of tissue-specific methylation patterns. DNA samples are subjected to digestion by a methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease followed by multiplex amplification of specific genomic targets with fluorescent-labeled primers, capillary electrophoresis of amplification products, and automatic signal analysis by dedicated software, yielding the source tissue of the sample. The single tube assay was designed for easy integration by forensic laboratories (as the assay utilizes the same platforms as current forensic STR profiling). The system is fully automatable, provides operator-independent results, and allows combining tissue identification with profiling in a single procedure. The assay was tested on 50 DNA samples from blood, saliva, semen, and skin epidermis, and the source tissue was successfully identified in all cases. Detection of semen and DNA profiling were combined into one assay and the ability to detect mixtures of semen and saliva in various ratios was demonstrated. The assay correctly detected semen in all samples where it was present, and the calculated

  3. The nasty neighbour in the striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio) steals paternity and elicits aggression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Territoriality functions to monopolize access to resources including mates, but is costly in terms of energy and time investment. Some species reduce these costs by being less aggressive towards their neighbours than towards unfamiliar strangers, the so called dear enemy phenomenon. However, in other species individuals are more, not less aggressive towards their neighbours. It has been hypothesised that this is due to the fact that neighbours can impose a greater threat than strangers, but this has not been tested previously. Results We tested aggression in wild group-living male striped mice in a neutral test arena and demonstrate that breeders are more aggressive than non-breeding philopatrics, and that more aggression occurs during the breeding than during the non-breeding season. Male breeders were significantly more aggressive towards their neighbours than towards strangers, leading to the prediction that neighbours are the most important competitors for paternity. Using a molecular parentage analysis we show that 28% of offspring are sired by neighbouring males and only 7% by strangers. Conclusions We conclude that in male striped mice the main function of male aggression is defending paternity against their territorial neighbours. PMID:20573184

  4. Two brothers' alleged paternity for a child: who is the father?

    PubMed

    Dogan, Muhammed; Kara, Umut; Emre, Ramazan; Fung, Wing Kam; Canturk, Kemal Murat

    2015-06-01

    In paternity cases where individuals are close relatives, it may be necessary to evaluate mother's DNA profile (trio test) and to increase the number of polymorphic STR loci that are analyzed. In our case, two alleged fathers who are brothers and the child (duo case) were analyzed based on 20 STR loci; however, no exclusions could be achieved. Then trio test (with mother) was performed using the Identifiler Plus kit (Applied Biosystems) and no exclusions could be achieved again. Analysis performed with the ESS Plex Plus kit (Qiagen), the paternity of one of the two alleged fathers was rejected only on 2 STR loci. We made the calculations of power of exclusion values to interpret our results more properly. The probability of exclusion (PE) is calculated as 0.9776546 in 15 loci of Identifiler Plus kit without mother. The PE is calculated as 0.9942803, if 5 additional loci from ESS Plex Plus kit are typed. The PE becomes 0.9961048 for the Identifiler Plus kit in trio analysis. If both Identifiler Plus and ESS Plex Plus kits are used for testing, the PE is calculated as 0.999431654, which indicates that the combined kits are highly discriminating.

  5. Strengthening forensic DNA decision making through a better understanding of the influence of cognitive bias.

    PubMed

    Jeanguenat, Amy M; Budowle, Bruce; Dror, Itiel E

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive bias may influence process flows and decision making steps in forensic DNA analyses and interpretation. Currently, seven sources of bias have been identified that may affect forensic decision making with roots in human nature; environment, culture, and experience; and case specific information. Most of the literature and research on cognitive bias in forensic science has focused on patterned evidence; however, forensic DNA testing is not immune to bias, especially when subjective interpretation is involved. DNA testing can be strengthened by recognizing the existence of bias, evaluating where it influences decision making, and, when applicable, implementing practices to reduce or control its effects. Elements that may improve forensic decision making regarding bias include cognitively informed education and training, quality assurance procedures, review processes, analysis and interpretation, and context management of irrelevant information. Although bias exists, reliable results often can be (and have been) produced. However, at times bias can (and has) impacted the interpretation of DNA results negatively. Therefore, being aware of the dangers of bias and implementing measures to control its potential impact should be considered. Measures and procedures that handicap the workings of the crime laboratory or add little value to improving the operation are not advocated, but simple yet effective measures are suggested. This article is meant to raise awareness of cognitive bias contamination in forensic DNA testing and to give laboratories possible pathways to make sound decisions to address its influences. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Printing artificial sweat using ink jet printers for the test set generation in forensics: an image quality assessment of the reproducibility of the printing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Mario; Sturm, Jennifer; Dittmann, Jana

    2013-01-01

    In order to use scientific expert evidence in court hearings, several criteria must be met. In the US jurisdiction the Daubert decision2 has defined several criteria that might be assessed if a testimony is challenged. In particular the potential for testing or actual testing, as well as known or potential error rate are two very important criteria. In order to be able to compare the results with each other, the reproducible creation of evaluation samples is necessary. However, each latent fingerprint is unique due to external inuence factors such as sweat composition or pressure during the application of a trace. Hence, Schwarz1 introduces a method to print latent fingerprints using ink jet printers equipped with artificial sweat. In this paper we assess the image quality in terms of reproducibility and clarity of the printed artificial sweat patterns. For that, we determine the intra class variance from one printer on the same and on different substrates based on a subjective assessment, as well as the inter class variance between different printers of the same model using pattern recognition techniques. Our results indicate that the intra class variance is primarily inuenced by the drying behavior of the amino acid. The inter class is surprisingly large between identical models of one printer. Our evaluation is performed using 100 samples on an overhead foil and 50 samples on a compact disk surface with 5 different patterns (two line structures, a fingerprint image and two di_erent arrows with a larger area with amino acid) acquired with a Keyence VK-X110 laser scanning confocal microscope.11 The results show a significant difference between the two identical printers allowing for differentiating between them with an accuracy of up to 99%.

  7. A Review of Forensic Science Management Literature.

    PubMed

    Houck, M M; McAndrew, W P; Porter, M; Davies, B

    2015-01-01

    The science in forensic science has received increased scrutiny in recent years, but interest in how forensic science is managed is a relatively new line of research. This paper summarizes the literature in forensic science management generally from 2009 to 2013, with some recent additions, to provide an overview of the growth of topics, results, and improvements in the management of forensic services in the public and private sectors. This review covers only the last three years or so and a version of this paper was originally produced for the 2013 Interpol Forensic Science Managers Symposium and is available at interpol.int. Copyright © 2015 Central Police University.

  8. Towards a Formalization of Digital Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slay, Jill; Lin, Yi-Chi; Turnbull, Benjamin; Beckett, Jason; Lin, Paul

    While some individuals have referred to digital forensics as an art, the literature of the discipline suggests a trend toward the formalization of digital forensics as a forensic science. Questions about the quality of digital evidence and forensic soundness continue to be raised by researchers and practitioners in order to ensure the trustworthiness of digital evidence and its value to the courts. This paper reviews the development of digital forensic models, procedures and standards to lay a foundation for the discipline. It also points to new work that provides validation models through a complete mapping of the discipline.

  9. [National organization of forensic medicine in France].

    PubMed

    Chariot, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Forensic medicine has long been characterized, in France, by diverse medical practices, which affected its recognition and development. A change was needed, Harmonization procedure includes the development of professional guidelines and allows forensic medicine to look at itself. However, the implementation of the recommendations is still far from complete. A national reform came into effect on 15 January 2011 and has defined a national reform of forensic medicine which includes funding by global budgets instead of fee-for-service. This reform allows easier organization and identification of forensic medicine units. One year later, tangible results are mixed. Forensic medicine is now more clearly identified but properly defined funding criteria are still lacking.

  10. [Advances of forensic entomology in China].

    PubMed

    Lan, Ling-mei; Liao, Zhi-gang; Chen, Yao-qing; Yao, Yue; Li, Jian-bo; Li, Mao-yang; Cai, Ji-feng

    2006-12-01

    Forensic entomology is a branch of forensic medicine, which applies studies of insects and arthropods to getting evidence for court and has an analogous advantage in the estimation of the postmortem interval (PMI) and other questions of forensic relevance. The paper expounds its definition and contents and reviews some progress of the studies in some aspects in China such as the constitution and succession of insect community on the different cadavers, the applications of morphological features of insects and the technology of analysis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in forensic entomology, and forensic entomological toxicology etc.

  11. Nuclear Forensic Inferences Using Iterative Multidimensional Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Heller, M A

    2009-06-09

    Nuclear forensics involves the analysis of interdicted nuclear material for specific material characteristics (referred to as 'signatures') that imply specific geographical locations, production processes, culprit intentions, etc. Predictive signatures rely on expert knowledge of physics, chemistry, and engineering to develop inferences from these material characteristics. Comparative signatures, on the other hand, rely on comparison of the material characteristics of the interdicted sample (the 'questioned sample' in FBI parlance) with those of a set of known samples. In the ideal case, the set of known samples would be a comprehensive nuclear forensics database, a database which does not currently exist. Inmore » fact, our ability to analyze interdicted samples and produce an extensive list of precise materials characteristics far exceeds our ability to interpret the results. Therefore, as we seek to develop the extensive databases necessary for nuclear forensics, we must also develop the methods necessary to produce the necessary inferences from comparison of our analytical results with these large, multidimensional sets of data. In the work reported here, we used a large, multidimensional dataset of results from quality control analyses of uranium ore concentrate (UOC, sometimes called 'yellowcake'). We have found that traditional multidimensional techniques, such as principal components analysis (PCA), are especially useful for understanding such datasets and drawing relevant conclusions. In particular, we have developed an iterative partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) procedure that has proven especially adept at identifying the production location of unknown UOC samples. By removing classes which fell far outside the initial decision boundary, and then rebuilding the PLS-DA model, we have consistently produced better and more definitive attributions than with a single pass classification approach. Performance of the iterative PLS-DA method

  12. Multivariate Analysis of the Factors Associated With Sexual Intercourse, Marriage, and Paternity of Hypospadias Patients.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Akihiro; Higuchi, Yoshihide; Tanaka, Shiro; Hashimoto, Takahiko; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2016-10-01

    Patients with hypospadias are treated surgically during childhood, which has the intention of enabling a satisfactory sexual life in adulthood. However, it is unclear whether patients with corrected hypospadias can lead a satisfactory sexual life and sustain a marital relationship and produce offspring. To evaluate factors associated with achievement of sexual intercourse, marriage, and paternity in patients with hypospadias who have reached adulthood. Self-completion questionnaires were mailed in April 2012 to patients with hypospadias at least 18 years old who had been treated at our institution during childhood from 1973 through 1998 by a single surgeon and the same surgical policy. Assessments included the International Prostate Symptom Score, the International Index for Erectile Function-5, and non-validated questions related to current social and physical status and sexual, marital, and paternity experiences. Candidate factors were extracted from patients' neonatal data, surgical findings and results, and current physical and social status obtained by the questionnaires. Candidate factors associated with heterosexual intercourse, marriage, and paternity experiences were analyzed using univariate and multivariate proportional hazard models and log-rank test of Kaplan-Meier curves. Of the 518 patients contacted, 108 (age = 18-50 years, median = 28 years) met the inclusion criteria. Two- and one-stage repairs were performed as the initial treatment in 79 and 12, respectively, and 17 of the analyzed cases were reoperations for patients initially treated elsewhere. Fifty-seven patients had the milder type (31 glandular, 26 penile), 36 had the proximal type (13 penoscrotal, 23 scrotal-perineal), and 15 had an unknown type. Multivariate analyses by Cox proportional hazard model and log-rank tests confirmed that experience of sexual intercourse was associated with the milder type of hypospadias (P = .025 and .0076 respectively), marriage was associated with stable

  13. An integratable microfluidic cartridge for forensic swab samples lysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianing; Brooks, Carla; Estes, Matthew D; Hurth, Cedric M; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Fully automated rapid forensic DNA analysis requires integrating several multistep processes onto a single microfluidic platform, including substrate lysis, extraction of DNA from the released lysate solution, multiplexed PCR amplification of STR loci, separation of PCR products by capillary electrophoresis, and analysis for allelic peak calling. Over the past several years, most of the rapid DNA analysis systems developed started with the reference swab sample lysate and involved an off-chip lysis of collected substrates. As a result of advancement in technology and chemistry, addition of a microfluidic module for swab sample lysis has been achieved in a few of the rapid DNA analysis systems. However, recent reports on integrated rapid DNA analysis systems with swab-in and answer-out capability lack any quantitative and qualitative characterization of the swab-in sample lysis module, which is important for downstream forensic sample processing. Maximal collection and subsequent recovery of the biological material from the crime scene is one of the first and critical steps in forensic DNA technology. Herein we present the design, fabrication and characterization of an integratable swab lysis cartridge module and the test results obtained from different types of commonly used forensic swab samples, including buccal, saliva, and blood swab samples, demonstrating the compatibility with different downstream DNA extraction chemistries. This swab lysis cartridge module is easy to operate, compatible with both forensic and microfluidic requirements, and ready to be integrated with our existing automated rapid forensic DNA analysis system. Following the characterization of the swab lysis module, an integrated run from buccal swab sample-in to the microchip CE electropherogram-out was demonstrated on the integrated prototype instrument. Therefore, in this study, we demonstrate that this swab lysis cartridge module is: (1) functionally, comparable with routine benchtop lysis

  14. Design and Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of a Paternal Adaptation Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Narges; Simbar, Masoumeh; Vadadhir, AbouAli; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza

    2016-07-25

    The present study aimed to design and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Paternal Adaptation Questionnaire (PAQ). The study was a mixed (qualitative and quantitative) sequential exploratory study. In the qualitative phase, a preliminary questionnaire with 210 items emerged from in-depth interviews with 17 fathers and 15 key informants. In the quantitative phase, psychometric properties of the PAQ were assessed. Considering cutoff points as 1.5 for item impact, 0.49 for content validity ratio (CVR), and 0.7 for content validity index (CVI), items of the questionnaire were reduced from 210 to 132. Assessment of the content validity of the questionnaire demonstrated S-CVR = 0.68 and S-CVI = 0.92. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in the development of a PAQ with 38 items classified under five factors (ability in performing the roles and responsibilities; perceiving the parental development; stabilization in paternal position; spiritual stability and internal satisfaction; and challenges and concerns), which explained 52.19% of cumulative variance. Measurement of internal consistency reported a Cronbach's α of .89 for PAQ (.61-.86 for subscales), and stability assessment of the PAQ through the test-retest demonstrated Spearman's correlation coefficients and intraclass correlation coefficient of .96 (.81-.97 for subscales). It was identified that the PAQ is a valid and reliable instrument that could be used to assess fatherhood adaptation with the paternal roles and fathers' needs, as well as to design appropriate interventions and to evaluate their effectiveness. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. The Paternal Provisioning Hypothesis: effects of workload and testosterone production on men's musculature.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Louis Calistro; Muller, Martin N; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Klimek, Magdalena; Nenko, Ilona; Jasienska, Grazyna

    2015-09-01

    Testosterone supports male reproduction through a broad range of behavioral and physiological effects, including the maintenance of sexually dimorphic muscle used in male-male competition. Although it is often assumed that a persistent relationship exists between men's testosterone production and musculature, most studies either fail to find evidence for such a relationship, or document very weak associations. In nonhuman primates, by contrast, correlations between testosterone and muscle mass are higher. Here, we propose the "Paternal Provisioning Hypothesis," which predicts that men's skeletal muscle is less dependent on the effects of androgens than that of other primates, and more sensitive to the physical demands of men's work. This permits human fathers to downregulate testosterone, which has negative impacts on pair-bonding and parenting effort, but without sacrificing the strength and musculature necessary to provision mates and offspring. We tested predictions of the Paternal Provisioning Hypothesis by assessing parental status, salivary testosterone levels, anthropometry, and strength among 122 men (ages 18-78) at the Mogielica Human Ecology Study Site in rural Poland. We chose this population because men practice subsistence agriculture, regularly engaging in physically demanding labor. Grip and chest strength were assessed using a dynamometer, and upper-body musculature was estimated from arm muscle circumference. In this population, testosterone showed no association with measures of strength or musculature, and was lower in older men and pair-bonded fathers. Marital and parental status and workload, by contrast, were positive predictors of muscle mass and strength measures. These findings offer support for the Paternal Provisioning Hypothesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Admixture and population structure in Mexican-Mestizos based on paternal lineages.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cortés, Gabriela; Salazar-Flores, Joel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Laura Gabriela; Rubi-Castellanos, Rodrigo; Rodríguez-Loya, Carmen; Velarde-Félix, Jesús Salvador; Muñoz-Valle, José Franciso; Parra-Rojas, Isela; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor

    2012-09-01

    In the nonrecombining region of the Y-chromosome, there are single-nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) that establish haplogroups with particular geographical origins (European, African, Native American, etc.). The complex process of admixture that gave rise to the majority of the current Mexican population (~93%), known as Mestizos, can be examined with Y-SNPs to establish their paternal ancestry and population structure. We analyzed 18 Y-SNPs in 659 individuals from 10 Mexican-Mestizo populations from different regions of the country. In the total population sample, paternal ancestry was predominately European (64.9%), followed by Native American (30.8%) and African (4.2%). However, the European ancestry was prevalent in the north and west (66.7-95%) and, conversely, Native American ancestry increased in the center and southeast (37-50%), whereas the African ancestry was low and relatively homogeneous (0-8.8%). Although this paternal landscape concurs with previous studies based on genome-wide SNPs and autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), this pattern contrasts with the maternal ancestry, mainly of Native American origin, based on maternal lineages haplogroups. In agreement with historical records, these results confirm a strong gender-biased admixture history between European males and Native American females that gave rise to Mexican-Mestizos. Finally, pairwise comparisons and analysis of molecular variance tests demonstrated significant population structure (F(ST)=4.68%; P<0.00005), delimiting clusters that were geographically defined as the following: north-west, center-south and southeast.

  17. Development of the Korean Paternal-Fetal Attachment Scale (K-PAFAS).

    PubMed

    Noh, Nan Iee; Yeom, Hye-Ah

    2017-06-01

    This study is a methodological study aimed to develop the Korean Paternal-Fetal Attachment Scale (K-PAFAS) to measure the level of attachment between the father and the expected baby, and to examine its validity and reliability. The K-PAFAS was developed in four steps. The first step involved derivation of the initial items through review of the literature and in-depth interviews with 10 expectant fathers. The second step was the process of expert panel review, examining content validity for the initial items. In the third step, items were examined for their usability through a preliminary survey with 30 expectant fathers. As the last step, the final K-PAFAS was applied to 200 participants and examined for its psychometric profile. K-PAFAS consisted of 20 items, and used a 5-point Likert scale with the total score ranging from 20 points to 100 points. A higher score indicated a higher level of attachment between the father and his unborn child. The K-PAFAS was composed of four factors. The K-PAFAS demonstrated satisfactory criterion validity, which was supported by its significant correlations with the Paternal Antenatal Attachment Scale, the Korean Dyadic Adjustment Scale, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. The Cronbach α of the K-PAFAS was .89. In test-retest reliability, the K-PAFAS showed a correlation coefficient of .91. The K-PAFAS demonstrated initial validity and reliability. It was short, and relatively easy for use in evaluating the degree of paternal-fetal attachment in the antenatal management stage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Detection of new paternal dystrophin gene mutations in isolated cases of dystrophinopathy in females

    SciTech Connect

    Pegoraro, E.; Wessel, H.B.; Schwartz, L.

    1994-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders and is caused by dystrophin deficiency. The disease is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait; however, recent biochemical and clinical studies have shown that many girls and women with a primary myopathy have an underlying dystrophinopathy, despite a negative family history for Duchenne dystrophy. These isolated female dystrophinopathy patients carried ambiguous diagnoses with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy) prior to biochemical detection of dystrophin abnormalities in their muscle biopsy. It has been assumed that these female dystrophinopathy patients are heterozygous carries who show preferential inactivation ofmore » the X chromosome harboring the normal dystrophin gene, although this has been shown for only a few X:autosome translocations and for two cases of discordant monozygotic twin female carriers. Here the authors study X-inactivation patterns of 13 female dystrophinopathy patients - 10 isolated cases and 3 cases with a positive family history for Duchenne dystrophy in males. They show that all cases have skewed X-inactivation patterns in peripheral blood DNA. Of the nine isolated cases informative in the assay, eight showed inheritance of the dystrophin gene mutation from the paternal germ line. Only a single case showed maternal inheritance. The 10-fold higher incidence of paternal transmission of dystrophin gene mutations in these cases is at 30-fold variance with Bayesian predictions and gene mutation rates. Thus, the results suggest some mechanistic interaction between new dystrophin gene mutations, paternal inheritance, and skewed X inactivation. The results provide both empirical risk data and a molecular diagnostic test method, which permit genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of this new category of patients. 58 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  19. Acceptance of forensic imaging in Israel.

    PubMed

    Tal, Sigal; Berkovitz, Nadav; Gottlieb, Paul; Zaitsev, Konstantin

    2015-03-01

    Forensic imaging was officially introduced in Israel in 2011. Religious and cultural opposition to autopsies prevails in most of the population of Israel. To examine the extent to which forensic imaging has been accepted as an adjuvant or partial replacement of forensic autopsy, particularly among those opposed to forensic autopsy. The study was conducted in the pediatric population. Data were collected from the National Center of Forensic Medicine and Assaf Harofeh Medical Center during the 18 month period following the introduction of forensic imaging (group A). The data were compared to those of the previous 18 months (group B). The examined parameters were cases submitted, examined, autopsied or imaged depending on family consent. Consent to autopsy was similar in both groups (A = 56% vs. B = 54%). In group A, consent for imaging was 24% of all cases, and of those imaged 77% underwent autopsy. Of those examined externally only, 16% consented to imaging. For 7% of the total cases in group A, estimation of cause of death was based on virtopsy alone. In a country with a high level of religious and cultural opposition to autopsy, it is a challenge to add forensic imaging to the pediatric forensic investigation. Those consenting to forensic imaging are more likely to be those consenting to autopsy. Consent for forensic imaging only was given in 7% of cases. Greater efforts should be invested to educate and inform the public regarding the benefits of virtual autopsy and the importance of data acquired from forensic images.

  20. Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD): Automatically generated, permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles.

    PubMed

    Van Neste, Christophe; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to predict if and when massively parallel sequencing of forensic STR loci will replace capillary electrophoresis as the new standard technology in forensic genetics. The main benefits of sequencing are increased multiplexing scales and SNP detection. There is not yet a consensus on how sequenced profiles should be reported. We present the Forensic Loci Allele Database (FLAD) service, made freely available on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/. It offers permanent identifiers for sequenced forensic alleles (STR or SNP) and their microvariants for use in forensic allele nomenclature. Analogous to Genbank, its aim is to provide permanent identifiers for forensically relevant allele sequences. Researchers that are developing forensic sequencing kits or are performing population studies, can register on http://forensic.ugent.be/FLAD/ and add loci and allele sequences with a short and simple application interface (API). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.